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Sample records for germination test applied

  1. Germination tests for assessing biochar quality.

    PubMed

    Rogovska, N; Laird, D; Cruse, R M; Trabue, S; Heaton, E

    2012-01-01

    Definition, analysis, and certification of biochar quality are crucial to the agronomic acceptance of biochar. While most biochars have a positive impact on plant growth, some may have adverse effects due to the presence of phytotoxic compounds. Conversely, some biochars may have the ability to adsorb and neutralize natural phytotoxic compounds found in soil. We evaluated the effects of biochars on seedling growth and absorption of allelochemicals present in corn ( L.) residues. Corn seeds were germinated in aqueous extracts of six biochars produced from varied feedstocks, thermochemical processes, and temperatures. Percent germination and shoot and radicle lengths were evaluated at the end of the germination period. Extracts from the six biochars had no effect on percent germination; however, extracts from three biochars produced at high conversion temperatures significantly inhibited shoot growth by an average of 16% relative to deionized (DI) water. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons detected in the aqueous extracts are believed to be at least partly responsible for the reduction in seedling growth. Repeated leaching of biochars before extract preparation eliminated the negative effects on seedling growth. Biochars differ significantly in their capacity to adsorb allelochemicals present in corn residues. Germination of corn seeds in extracts of corn residue showed 94% suppression of radicle growth compared to those exposed to DI water; however, incubation of corn residue extracts with leached biochar for 24 h before initiating the germination test increased radicle length 6 to 12 times compared to the corn residue extract treatments. Germination tests appear to be a reliable procedure to differentiate between effects of different types of biochar on corn seedling growth.

  2. Comparison of Germination and Viability Tests for Southern Hardwood Seed

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner; J. L. Gammage

    1967-01-01

    This paper summarizes a 3-year evaluation of 10 methods for testing germinability and viability of the seed of six species of southern hardwood. In five of the methods, the seeds were germinated. In the others, visual, biochemical, or physical properties were the criteria. Cutting tests were best for sweetgum and Nuttall oak seed, while cutting or water germination...

  3. Germination and root elongation bioassays in six different plant species for testing Ni contamination in soil.

    PubMed

    Visioli, Giovanna; Conti, Federica D; Gardi, Ciro; Menta, Cristina

    2014-04-01

    In vitro short-term chronic phytotoxicity germination and root elongation test were applied to test the effects of nickel (Ni) in seed germination and root elongation in six plants species: Cucumis sativus (Cucurbitaceae), Lepidium sativum and Brassica nigra (Brassicaceae), Trifolium alexandrinum and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae), Phacelia tanacetifolia (Boraginaceae). A naturally Ni rich soil was used to compare the results obtained. Unlike root elongation, germination was not affected by Ni in any of the six species tested. EC50 values, calculated on the root elongation, showed that Ni toxicity decreases in the following order: P. tanacetifolia > B. nigra > C. sativus > L. sativum > M. sativa > T. alexandrinum. The test conducted using soil elutriate revealed a significantly lower effect in both seed germination and root elongation when compared to the results obtained using untreated soil. Conversely, the test performed on soil confirmed the high sensitivity of C. sativus, P. tanacetifolia and L. sativum to Ni.

  4. A Quick-Test for Biochar Effects on Seed Germination ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biochar is being globally evaluated as a soil amendment to improve soil characteristics (e.g. soil water holding, nutrient exchange, microbiology, pesticides and chemical availability) to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, there are no quick tests to determine what biochar types are most effective at improving soil characteristics amenable for higher crop yields. Seed germination is a critical parameter for plant establishment and may be a quick indicator of biochar quality. We adapted Oregon State University Seed Laboratory procedures to develop a “quick-test” for screening the effects of biochar on seed germination. We used 11.0 cm rectangular x 3.5 cm deep containers fitted with blotter paper. The paper was premoistened with reverse-osmosis water, followed by placement of seeds (25 in a uniform 5 x 5 vacuum-assisted pattern, and biochar mixtures). A Norfolk and Coxville soil series from South Carolina were used. A total of 18 biochars were evaluated that were produced from 6 feedstocks (pine chips, poultry litter, swine solids, switchgrass, and two blends of pine chips and poultry litter); with biochar from each feedstock made by pyrolysis at 350, 500 and 700 ̊ C. Crops were cabbage, cucumber, onion, ryegrass and tomato. Preliminary results from the test indicated differences in seed germination due to soil type and possibly soil x biochar feedstock interactions. Other measurements including shoot dry weight per plate and pH of the soil+ biochar mixtur

  5. A Quick-Test for Biochar Effects on Seed Germination ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biochar is being globally evaluated as a soil amendment to improve soil characteristics (e.g. soil water holding, nutrient exchange, microbiology, pesticides and chemical availability) to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, there are no quick tests to determine what biochar types are most effective at improving soil characteristics amenable for higher crop yields. Seed germination is a critical parameter for plant establishment and may be a quick indicator of biochar quality. We adapted Oregon State University Seed Laboratory procedures to develop a “quick-test” for screening the effects of biochar on seed germination. We used 11.0 cm rectangular x 3.5 cm deep containers fitted with blotter paper. The paper was premoistened with reverse-osmosis water, followed by placement of seeds (25 in a uniform 5 x 5 vacuum-assisted pattern, and biochar mixtures). A Norfolk and Coxville soil series from South Carolina were used. A total of 18 biochars were evaluated that were produced from 6 feedstocks (pine chips, poultry litter, swine solids, switchgrass, and two blends of pine chips and poultry litter); with biochar from each feedstock made by pyrolysis at 350, 500 and 700 ̊ C. Crops were cabbage, cucumber, onion, ryegrass and tomato. Preliminary results from the test indicated differences in seed germination due to soil type and possibly soil x biochar feedstock interactions. Other measurements including shoot dry weight per plate and pH of the soil+ biochar mixtur

  6. Does germination success differ with respect to seed mass and germination season? Experimental testing of plant functional trait responses to grassland management.

    PubMed

    Kahmen, S; Poschlod, P

    2008-03-01

    Plant functional trait responses to processes such as grassland management have been analysed frequently; however, the scaling-up from individual traits to the outcomes of vegetation dynamics has seldom been tested. In this experiment, germination success was studied with respect to the relationships between grassland management (mowing and grazing), as well as abandonment, and two traits that are relevant for seedling recruitment: seed mass and germination season. On the basis of discussions in the literature and indirect trait analyses in our previous studies, the following hypotheses are proposed: (1) with respect to seed mass, mowing and grazing favour the germination of small seeds, whereas after abandonment the germination success of larger seeds is higher; and (2) with respect to germination season, mowing and grazing favour autumn-germinating seeds, whereas succession promotes spring-germinating seeds. The germination experiment took place in a semi-natural, dry grassland in north-east Germany. Seeds of eight herbaceous species that differ with respect to seed mass and germination season were sown in mown, grazed and abandoned plots. Germination success was documented during the following year. Contrary to the hypothesis, germination of small seeds was not promoted by mowing or grazing and they germinated relatively more often than expected in the abandoned plots. A relationship between abandonment and gaps of bare soil below the vegetation cover that favour germination of small seeds was likely, but could not be proved statistically. It is possible that the small seeds suffered less from predation. Mowing favoured autumn germination, which could be explained by the removal of biomass in late summer. Contrary to our expectation, there was relatively more spring germination after grazing than after mowing, yet vegetation height was smallest in spring. Generally, germination season was found to be related to the temporal occurrence of favourable light

  7. Are cactus growth forms related to germination responses to light? A test using Echinopsis species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Baes, Pablo; Aparicio-González, Mónica; Galíndez, Guadalupe; del Fueyo, Patricia; Sühring, Silvia; Rojas-Aréchiga, Mariana

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of light regimen (white light vs. darkness) on the germination of 12 species of the Echinopsis genus (tribe Trichocereeae, Cactaceae). This genus presents a variety of growth forms and relatively small and uniform seed size. These traits allowed us to test, within the same linage and removing seed mass effect, the hypothesis that the germination response to light (indifferent to light or positive photoblastic) is related to growth form. Our results reject this hypothesis since no seeds germinated in darkness, so all of the species can be classified as being positively photoblastic. The proportion of seed germination with white light was significantly different among cactus growth forms. Columnar cacti (arborescent, creeping and short) showed a greater proportion of seed germination than barrel and globose cacti. The germination rate differed among growth forms and species. At constant temperatures, creeping columnar cacti presented a significantly higher germination rate than the other growth forms. With alternating temperatures, columnar cacti showed higher germination rates than the other growth forms. The low proportion of seeds that germinated for some species indicates that they show seed dormancy. Our results suggest that germination responses to light in the cactus family could be related to seed mass and phylogenetic constraints.

  8. Inference of sigma factor controlled networks by using numerical modeling applied to microarray time series data of the germinating prokaryote

    PubMed Central

    Strakova, Eva; Zikova, Alice; Vohradsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    A computational model of gene expression was applied to a novel test set of microarray time series measurements to reveal regulatory interactions between transcriptional regulators represented by 45 sigma factors and the genes expressed during germination of a prokaryote Streptomyces coelicolor. Using microarrays, the first 5.5 h of the process was recorded in 13 time points, which provided a database of gene expression time series on genome-wide scale. The computational modeling of the kinetic relations between the sigma factors, individual genes and genes clustered according to the similarity of their expression kinetics identified kinetically plausible sigma factor-controlled networks. Using genome sequence annotations, functional groups of genes that were predominantly controlled by specific sigma factors were identified. Using external binding data complementing the modeling approach, specific genes involved in the control of the studied process were identified and their function suggested. PMID:24157841

  9. Effect of fungicides on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Cox; Lance H. Kosberg; Nancy L. Shaw; Stuart P. Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different...

  10. Seed viability of five wild Saudi Arabian species by germination and X-ray tests.

    PubMed

    Al-Hammad, B A; Al-Ammari, B S

    2017-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of the germination vs. the X-ray test in determining the initial viability of seeds of five wild species (Moringa peregrina, Abrus precatorius, Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis) from Saudi Arabia. Usually several days were required to determine the viability of all five species via germination tests. However, X-ray test will give immediate results on filled/viable seeds. Seeds of all species, except Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis showed high viability in both germination (96-72% at 25/15 °C, 94-70% at 35/25 °C) and X-ray (100-80%) test. Furthermore, there was a general agreement between the germination (19%, 14% at 25/15 °C and 17% and 12% at 35/25 °C) and X-ray (8%, 4%) tests in which seed viability of Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis was very low due to insect damaged embryo as shown in X-ray analysis. Seeds of Abruspreca torius have physical dormancy, which was broken by scarification in concentrated sulfuric acid (10 min), and they exhibited high viability in both the germination (83% at 25/15 °C and 81% at 35/25 °C) and X-ray (96%) tests. Most of the nongerminated seeds of the five species except those of Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis, were alive as judged by the tetrazolium test (TZ). Thus, for the five species examined, the X-ray test was proved to be a good and rapid predictor of seed viability.

  11. Variation in Seed Dormancy in Echinochloa and the Development of a Standard Protocol for Germination Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station maintains more than 300 accessions of Echinochloa representing 15 species from a diverse cross-section of nations and growing conditions from around the world. With such a diverse collection, no single germination-testing protocol was adequate f...

  12. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  13. A Quick-Test for Biochar Effects on Seed Germination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biochar is being globally evaluated as a soil amendment to improve soil characteristics (e.g. soil water holding, nutrient exchange, microbiology, pesticides and chemical availability) to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, there are no quick tests to determine what biochar type...

  14. A Quick-Test for Biochar Effects on Seed Germination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biochar is being globally evaluated as a soil amendment to improve soil characteristics (e.g. soil water holding, nutrient exchange, microbiology, pesticides and chemical availability) to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, there are no quick tests to determine what biochar type...

  15. [Testing of germination rate of hybrid rice seeds based on near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-nian; Jiang, Dan; Liu, Ying-ying; Ding, Wei-min; Ding, Qi-shuo; Zha, Liang-yu

    2014-06-01

    Germination rate of rice seeds was measured according to technical stipulation of germination testing for agricultural crop seeds at present. There existed many faults for this technical stipulation such as long experimental period, more costing and higher professional requirement. A rapid and non-invasive method was put forward to measure the germination rate of hybrid rice seeds based on near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Two varieties of hybrid rice seeds were aged artificially at temperature 45 degrees C and humidity 100% condition for 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 and 144 h. Spectral data of 280 samples for 2 varieties of hybrid rice seeds with different aging time were acquired individually by near-infrared spectra analyzer. Spectral data of 280 samples for 2 varieties of hybrid rice seeds were randomly divided into calibration set (168 samples) and prediction set (112 samples). Gormination rate of rice seed with different aging time was tested. Regression model was established by using partial least squares (PLS). The effect of the different spectral bands on the accuracy of models was analyzed and the effect of the different spectral preprocessing methods on the accuracy of models was also compared. Optimal model was achieved under the whole bands and by using standardization and orthogonal signal correction (OSC) preprocessing algorithms with CM2000 software for spectral data of 2 varieties of hybrid rice seeds, the coefficient of determination of the calibration set (Rc) and that of the prediction set (Rp) were 0.965 and 0.931 individually, standard error of calibration set (SEC) and that of prediction set (SEP) were 1.929 and 2.899 respectively. Relative error between tested value and predicted value for prediction set of rice seeds is below 4.2%. The experimental results show that it is feasible that rice germination rate is detected rapidly and nondestructively by using the near-infrared spectroscopy analysis technology.

  16. Lunisolar tidal synchronism with biophoton emission during intercontinental wheat-seedling germination tests

    PubMed Central

    Gallep, Cristiano M; Moraes, Thiago A; Červinková, Kateřina; Cifra, Michal; Katsumata, Masakazu; Barlow, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Synchronic measurements of spontaneous ultra-weak light emission from germinating wheat seedlings both in Brazil and after transportation to Japan, and with a simultaneous series of germinations with local seedlings in the Czech Republic, are presented. A series of tests was also performed with samples returned from Japan to Brazil and results compared with those from undisturbed Brazilian seedlings. Native seedlings presented semi-circadian rhythms of emission which correlated with the gravimetric tidal acceleration at their locality, as did seeds which had been transported from Brazil to Japan, and then returned to Brazil. Here, however, there were very small disturbances within the periodicity of emissions, perhaps as a result of similar tidal profiles at locations whose longitudes are 180° apart, as in this case, different from previous results obtained in Brazil–Germany tests with other longitude shift. This feature of the Brazil and Japan locations may have minimized the requirement for the acclimatization of the transported seed to their new location. PMID:24714075

  17. Lunisolar tidal synchronism with biophoton emission during intercontinental wheat-seedling germination tests.

    PubMed

    Gallep, Cristiano M; Moraes, Thiago A; Cervinková, Kateřina; Cifra, Michal; Katsumata, Masakazu; Barlow, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Synchronic measurements of spontaneous ultra-weak light emission from germinating wheat seedlings both in Brazil and after transportation to Japan, and with a simultaneous series of germinations with local seedlings in the Czech Republic, are presented. A series of tests was also performed with samples returned from Japan to Brazil and results compared with those from undisturbed Brazilian seedlings. Native seedlings presented semi-circadian rhythms of emission which correlated with the gravimetric tidal acceleration at their locality, as did seeds which had been transported from Brazil to Japan, and then returned to Brazil. Here, however, there were very small disturbances within the periodicity of emissions, perhaps as a result of similar tidal profiles at locations whose longitudes are 180° apart, as in this case, different from previous results obtained in Brazil-Germany tests with other longitude shift. This feature of the Brazil and Japan locations may have minimized the requirement for the acclimatization of the transported seed to their new location.

  18. Coincidence of biophoton emission by wheat seedlings during simultaneous, transcontinental germination tests.

    PubMed

    Gallep, Cristiano M; Moraes, Thiago A; Dos Santos, Samuel R; Barlow, Peter W

    2013-06-01

    Measurements of spontaneous ultra-weak light (biophoton) emission from native Brazilian and German wheat seedlings in three simultaneous series of germination tests are presented, two run in Germany and one in Brazil. Seedlings in both countries presented semi-circadian rhythms of emission that were in accordance with the local lunisolar gravimetric tidal acceleration, as did seeds which had been transported from Brazil to Germany. The simultaneity of the photon emission patterns in all tests argues for the lunisolar tide and its rhythmic variations as regulators of the natural rhythm of photon emission. However, seedlings from seed samples transported from Brazil to Germany showed, in addition, a temporary disturbance within the emission periodicity which may indicate a possible short-term acclimatization to the new location.

  19. Lloyd interferometer applied to flatness testing.

    PubMed

    Langenbeck, P H

    1967-10-01

    Lloyd's mirror experiment is applied to testing flatness of large surfaces. Because of the grazing incidence, even rough surfaces provide the characteristic interference pattern. In the case of a perfectly flat surface, that pattern consists of narrowly and equally spaced two beam interference fringes. Departures from flatness are reflected in changes of the fringe spacing. Moiré techniques are used for visualizing and measuring these changes in the deviation from straightness of the Moiré fringes. Qualitative examples are given.

  20. Determination of seed viability of eight wild Saudi Arabian species by germination and X-ray tests.

    PubMed

    Al-Turki, Turki A; Baskin, Carol C

    2017-05-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the usefulness of the germination vs. the X-ray test in determining the initial viability of seeds of eight wild species (Salvia spinosa, Salvia aegyptiaca, Ochradenus baccatus, Ochradenus arabicus, Suaeda aegyptiaca, Suaeda vermiculata, Prosopisfarcta and Panicumturgidum) from Saudi Arabia. Several days were required to determine viability of all eight species via germination tests, while immediate results on filled/viable seeds were obtained with the X-ray test. Seeds of all the species, except Sa.aegyptiaca, showed high viability in both the germination (98-70% at 25/15 °C, 93-66% at 35/25 °C) and X-ray (100-75%) test. Furthermore, there was general agreement between the germination (10% at 25/15 °C and 8% at 35/25 °C) and X-ray (5%) tests that seed viability of Sa.aegyptiaca was very low, and X-ray analysis revealed that this was due to poor embryo development. Seeds of P.farcta have physical dormancy, which was broken by scarification in concentrated sulfuric acid (10 min), and they exhibited high viability in both the germination (98% at 25/15 °C and 93% at 35/25 °C) and X-ray (98%) test. Most of the nongerminated seeds of the eight species except those of Sa.aegyptiaca were alive as judged by the tetrazolium test (TZ). Thus, for the eight species examined, the X-ray test was a good and rapid predictor of seed viability.

  1. Applying Motion Constraints Based on Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    MSC ADAMS is a simulation software that is used to analyze multibody dynamics. Using user subroutines, it is possible to apply motion constraints to the rigid bodies so that they match the motion profile collected from test data. This presentation describes the process of taking test data and passing it to ADAMS using user subroutines, and uses the Morpheus free-flight 4 test as an example of motion data used for this purpose. Morpheus is the name of a prototype lander vehicle built by NASA that serves as a test bed for various experimental technologies (see backup slides for details) MSC.ADAMS"TM" is used to play back telemetry data (vehicle orientation and position) from each test as the inputs to a 6-DoF general motion constraint (details in backup slides) The MSC.ADAMS"TM" playback simulations allow engineers to examine and analyze flight trajectory as well as observe vehicle motion from any angle and at any playback speed. This facilitates the development of robust and stable control algorithms, increasing reliability and reducing development costs of this developmental engine The simulation also incorporates a 3D model of the artificial hazard field, allowing engineers to visualize and measure performance of the developmental autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology ADAMS is a multibody dynamics solver. It uses forces, constraints, and mass properties to numerically integrate equations of motion. The ADAMS solver will ask the motion subroutine for position, velocity, and acceleration values at various time steps. Those values must be continuous over the whole time domain. Each degree of freedom in the telemetry data can be examined separately; however, linear interpolation of the telemetry data is invalid, since there will be discontinuities in velocity and acceleration.

  2. Applying Motion Constraints Based on Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    MSC ADAMS is a simulation software that is used to analyze multibody dynamics. Using user subroutines, it is possible to apply motion constraints to the rigid bodies so that they match the motion profile collected from test data. This presentation describes the process of taking test data and passing it to ADAMS using user subroutines, and uses the Morpheus free-flight 4 test as an example of motion data used for this purpose. Morpheus is the name of a prototype lander vehicle built by NASA that serves as a test bed for various experimental technologies (see backup slides for details) MSC.ADAMS"TM" is used to play back telemetry data (vehicle orientation and position) from each test as the inputs to a 6-DoF general motion constraint (details in backup slides) The MSC.ADAMS"TM" playback simulations allow engineers to examine and analyze flight trajectory as well as observe vehicle motion from any angle and at any playback speed. This facilitates the development of robust and stable control algorithms, increasing reliability and reducing development costs of this developmental engine The simulation also incorporates a 3D model of the artificial hazard field, allowing engineers to visualize and measure performance of the developmental autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology ADAMS is a multibody dynamics solver. It uses forces, constraints, and mass properties to numerically integrate equations of motion. The ADAMS solver will ask the motion subroutine for position, velocity, and acceleration values at various time steps. Those values must be continuous over the whole time domain. Each degree of freedom in the telemetry data can be examined separately; however, linear interpolation of the telemetry data is invalid, since there will be discontinuities in velocity and acceleration.

  3. Treated wastewater phytotoxicity assessment using Lactuca sativa: Focus on germination and root elongation test parameters.

    PubMed

    Priac, Anne; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Crini, Grégorio

    2017-03-01

    Sensitive and simple ecotoxicological bioassays like seed germination and root elongation tests are commonly used to evaluate the phytotoxicity of waste and industrial discharge waters. Although the tests are performed following national and international standards, various parameters such as the number of seeds per dish, the test duration or the type of support used remain variable. To be able to make a correct comparison of results from different studies, it is crucial to know which parameter(s) could affect ecotoxicological diagnosis. We tested four different control waters and three seed densities. No significant differences on either germination rate or root elongation endpoints were shown. Nevertheless, we found that the four lettuce cultivars (Appia, batavia dorée de printemps, grosse blonde paresseuse, and Kinemontepas) showed significantly different responses when watered with the same and different metal-loaded industrial discharge water. From the comparison, it is clear that a differential sensitivity scale occurs among not just species but cultivars.

  4. Reliability analysis applied to structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, P.; Payne, A. O.

    1972-01-01

    The application of reliability theory to predict, from structural fatigue test data, the risk of failure of a structure under service conditions because its load-carrying capability is progressively reduced by the extension of a fatigue crack, is considered. The procedure is applicable to both safe-life and fail-safe structures and, for a prescribed safety level, it will enable an inspection procedure to be planned or, if inspection is not feasible, it will evaluate the life to replacement. The theory has been further developed to cope with the case of structures with initial cracks, such as can occur in modern high-strength materials which are susceptible to the formation of small flaws during the production process. The method has been applied to a structure of high-strength steel and the results are compared with those obtained by the current life estimation procedures. This has shown that the conventional methods can be unconservative in certain cases, depending on the characteristics of the structure and the design operating conditions. The suitability of the probabilistic approach to the interpretation of the results from full-scale fatigue testing of aircraft structures is discussed and the assumptions involved are examined.

  5. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  6. Projection Registration Applied to Nondestructive Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Arrowood, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    Registration of radiographic and computed tomography (CT) data has the potential to allow automated metrology and defect detection. While registration of the three-dimensional reconstructed data is a common task in the medical industry for registration of data sets from multiple detection systems, registration of projection sets has only seen development in the area of tomotherapy. Efforts in projection registration have employed a method named Fourier phase matching (FPM). This work discusses implementation and results for the application of the FPM method to industrial applications for the nondestructive testing (NDT) community. The FPM method has been implemented and modified for industrial application. Testing with simulated and experimental x-ray CT data shows excellent performance with respect to the resolution of the imaging system.

  7. Rapid bioassessment methods for assessing vegetation toxicity at the Savannah River Site - germination tests and root elongation trials

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.; Klaine, S.J.; Hook, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Plants form the basis of all ecosystems including wetlands. Although they are the most abundant life form and are the primary producers for all other organisms, they have received the least attention when it comes to environmental matters. Higher plants have rarely been used in ecotoxicity testing and may not respond in the same manner as algae, which have been used more frequently. The introduction of hazardous waste materials into wetland areas has the potential to alter and damage the ecological processes in these ecosystems. Measuring the impact of these contaminants on higher plants is therefore important and needs further research. Higher plants are useful for detecting both herbicidal toxicity and heavy metal toxicity. For phytotoxicity tests to be practical they must be simple, inexpensive, yet sensitive to a variety of contaminants. A difference between seed germination and root elongation tests is that seed germination tests measure toxicity associated with soils directly, while root elongation tests consider the indirect effects of water-soluble constituents that may be present in site samples.

  8. 7 CFR 201.63 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Germination. 201.63 Section 201.63 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.63 Germination. The following tolerances are applicable to the percentage of germination and also to the sum of the germination plus the hard seed when 400 or more seeds are tested....

  9. 7 CFR 201.63 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Germination. 201.63 Section 201.63 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.63 Germination. The following tolerances are applicable to the percentage of germination and also to the sum of the germination plus the hard seed when 400 or more seeds are tested....

  10. 7 CFR 201.63 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Germination. 201.63 Section 201.63 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.63 Germination. The following tolerances are applicable to the percentage of germination and also to the sum of the germination plus the hard seed when 400 or more seeds are tested....

  11. 7 CFR 201.63 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Germination. 201.63 Section 201.63 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.63 Germination. The following tolerances are applicable to the percentage of germination and also to the sum of the germination plus the hard seed when 400 or more seeds are tested....

  12. 7 CFR 201.63 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Germination. 201.63 Section 201.63 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.63 Germination. The following tolerances are applicable to the percentage of germination and also to the sum of the germination plus the hard seed when 400 or more seeds are tested....

  13. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  14. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H.; Anderson, K.; Boody, A.; Cox, D.; Kuznetsov, O.; Hasenstein, K.

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation BIOTUBE Precursor hardware demonstration payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to provide a demonstration and test of the newly developed BIOTUBE water delivery subsystem, and to determine the optimal water volume and germination paper combination for the automated imbibition and germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different substrate treatments of standard laboratory germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. The first consisted of one layer of thick germination paper (designated "heavy"), and the second consisted of one layer of standard germination paper (designated "normal") under one layer of heavy germination paper. The germination paper strips were cut (4 X 1.6 cm) to fit snugly into seed cassettes. The seeds were attached to them by applying guar glue (1.25% w/v) drops to 8 premarked spots and the seeds orientated with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in 50 μL boluses which slowly traveled down the paper via capillary action (eliminating the complications caused by excess water pooling around the seed's surface). The data indicated that the 480 μL water delivery volume provided the best wetness level treatment for both percent germination (90.6%) and overall root growth (mean = 4.1 mm) during the 34 hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment experienced similar results, but with slightly lower rates of germination (84.4%) and significantly shorter root lengths (2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of "Heavy" germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. This in conjunction with the simplicity of using a single strip per seed cassette argues in favor of its selection. Significant seed position

  15. 7 CFR 201.53 - Source of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Source of seeds for germination. 201.53 Section 201.53... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.53 Source of seeds for germination. (a) When both purity and germination tests are required, seeds for germination shall be taken from...

  16. 7 CFR 201.53 - Source of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Source of seeds for germination. 201.53 Section 201.53... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.53 Source of seeds for germination. (a) When both purity and germination tests are required, seeds for germination shall be taken from...

  17. 7 CFR 201.53 - Source of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Source of seeds for germination. 201.53 Section 201.53... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.53 Source of seeds for germination. (a) When both purity and germination tests are required, seeds for germination shall be taken from...

  18. 7 CFR 201.53 - Source of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Source of seeds for germination. 201.53 Section 201.53... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.53 Source of seeds for germination. (a) When both purity and germination tests are required, seeds for germination shall be taken from...

  19. 7 CFR 201.53 - Source of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Source of seeds for germination. 201.53 Section 201.53... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.53 Source of seeds for germination. (a) When both purity and germination tests are required, seeds for germination shall be taken from...

  20. [The research of Valeriana amurensis seed germination characteristics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Yang, Chun-Rong; Jiang, Bo; Fang, Min; Du, Juan

    2011-10-01

    To study the effect of different treatments on the Valeriana amurensis seed germination rate. Used different chemical reagents and seed soakings on the routine germination test and the orthogonal test of the Valeriana amurensis seed, calculated the germination rate under different germination condition. Valeriana amurensis treated with different chemical reagends had different germination rate. The suitable immersion time could enhance Valeriana amurensis seed germination rate. Different treatment time, different disposal temperature, different germination temperature would have an impact on the Valeriana amurensis seed germination rate. In order to raise the Valeriana amurensis seed germination rate, use appropriate treatment on the seed before plant seeds; The seed growing must under suitable time and temperature.

  1. Seed Germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Initiation of seed germination is a critical decision for plants. It is important for seed populations under natural conditions to spread the timing of germination of individual seeds to maximize the probability of species survival. Therefore, seeds have evolved the multiple layers of mechanisms tha...

  2. Viral load: Roche applies for marketing approval for ultrasensitive test.

    PubMed

    1998-08-07

    Roche Molecular Systems has applied for FDA permission to market a more sensitive viral load test. The Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor UltraSensitive Method tests viral load as low as 50 copies; current tests are only accurate to 400 copies. There is a widespread consensus among physicians that testing below 400 copies would be a valuable treatment tool.

  3. Does Cold Plasma Affect Breaking Dormancy and Seed Germination? A Study on Seeds of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božena, Šerá; Michal, Šerý; Vitězslav, Štrañák; Petr, Špatenka; Milan, tichý

    2009-12-01

    Low-pressure discharge is applied for stimulation of germination of two seed lots of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.) with different starting germinations (17%, 8%) and in different stages of dormancy. Different exposition durations with cold plasma treatment were applied. The variable of the ratio cumulative germination was calculated. The Richards' equation was used for curve-fitting and simulation of the growth curves. Population parameters, namely Vi - viability, Me - time, Qu - dispersion, and Sk - skewness, counted from the curves described the germination rate well. Significant differences among Qu confirmed the erratic dormancy and gradual germination of Lamb's Quarters. No difference in the Me parameter was found between two tested seed lots, and no interspecies characteristics were changed using low-pressure discharge. The results suggested that plasma treatment changed seed germination in Lamb's Quarters seeds.

  4. Germination Conditions For Poison Ivy

    Treesearch

    Nathan M. Schiff; Kristina F. Connor; Margaret S. Devall

    2004-01-01

    Several scarification and stratification treatments were tested to optimize germination conditions for poison ivy [Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kunst]. Fall-collected seeds soaked for 1 hour in water showed increasing germination with increasing stratification. Scarification with concentrated sulphuric acid for 30 minutes resulted in approximately 65...

  5. 7 CFR 201.6 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Germination. 201.6 Section 201.6 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.6 Germination. The complete record shall include the records of all laboratory tests for germination and hard seed for each lot of seed offered...

  6. 7 CFR 201.6 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Germination. 201.6 Section 201.6 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.6 Germination. The complete record shall include the records of all laboratory tests for germination and hard seed for each lot of seed offered...

  7. 7 CFR 201.6 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Germination. 201.6 Section 201.6 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.6 Germination. The complete record shall include the records of all laboratory tests for germination and hard seed for each lot of seed offered...

  8. 7 CFR 201.6 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Germination. 201.6 Section 201.6 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.6 Germination. The complete record shall include the records of all laboratory tests for germination and hard seed for each lot of seed offered...

  9. 7 CFR 201.6 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Germination. 201.6 Section 201.6 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.6 Germination. The complete record shall include the records of all laboratory tests for germination and hard seed for each lot of seed offered...

  10. Flight control system design factors for applying automated testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitz, Joel R.; Vernon, Todd H.

    1990-01-01

    Automated validation of flight-critical embedded systems is being done at ARC Dryden Flight Research Facility. The automated testing techniques are being used to perform closed-loop validation of man-rated flight control systems. The principal design features and operational experiences of the X-29 forward-swept-wing aircraft and F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) automated test systems are discussed. Operationally applying automated testing techniques has accentuated flight control system features that either help or hinder the application of these techniques. The paper also discusses flight control system features which foster the use of automated testing techniques.

  11. 7 CFR 201.54 - Number of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Number of seeds for germination. 201.54 Section 201.54... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.54 Number of seeds for germination. At least 400 seeds shall be tested for germination; except that in mixtures, 200 seeds of each of...

  12. 7 CFR 201.54 - Number of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Number of seeds for germination. 201.54 Section 201.54... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.54 Number of seeds for germination. At least 400 seeds shall be tested for germination; except that in mixtures, 200 seeds of each of...

  13. 7 CFR 201.54 - Number of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Number of seeds for germination. 201.54 Section 201.54... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.54 Number of seeds for germination. At least 400 seeds shall be tested for germination; except that in mixtures, 200 seeds of each of...

  14. 7 CFR 201.54 - Number of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Number of seeds for germination. 201.54 Section 201.54... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.54 Number of seeds for germination. At least 400 seeds shall be tested for germination; except that in mixtures, 200 seeds of each of...

  15. 7 CFR 201.54 - Number of seeds for germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Number of seeds for germination. 201.54 Section 201.54... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.54 Number of seeds for germination. At least 400 seeds shall be tested for germination; except that in mixtures, 200 seeds of each of...

  16. Toxicity test of the F-Area seep soils by laboratory lettuce seed germination and seedling growth

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.; Murphy, C.E.

    1993-09-01

    This study is a follow-up of a similar study done by Loehle (1990). The objectives of the original study were to: (1) measure the toxicity of groundwater contaminated by the F-Area seepage basins where this water surfaces in a seepline along Fourmile Branch and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of rainwater for washing contaminants from the soil. Results of seed germination tests show no significant difference between water extracted from one extraction of F-Area seepline soil, soil from a control area, the sixth consecutive extraction from F-Area soil, and a deionized water control. A root-growth assay on the same seeds shows a significant effect with the order of growth, first extraction of F-Area soil

  17. Variability of germination in digger pine in California

    Treesearch

    James R. Griffin

    1971-01-01

    Seeds collected from 17 Pinus sabiniana Dougl. populations in California were tested for germination. Unstratified seeds germinated slower than stratified seeds. Germination of stratified seeds showed distinct population differences. Some populations started germination at 5°C. and reached a level of 60 to 70 percent after 30 days at 25°. Less than...

  18. Portable Diagnostics and Rapid Germination

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Zachary Spencer

    2016-12-01

    In the Bioenergy and Defense Department of Sandia National Laboratories, characterization of the BaDx (Bacillus anthracis diagnostic cartridge) was performed and rapid germination chemistry was investigated. BaDx was tested with complex sample matrixes inoculated with Bacillus anthracis, and the trials proved that BaDx will detect Bacillus anthracis in a variety of the medium, such as dirt, serum, blood, milk, and horse fluids. The dimensions of the device were altered to accommodate an E. coli or Listeria lateral flow immunoassay, and using a laser printer, BaDx devices were manufactured to identify E. coli and Listeria. Initial testing with E. coli versions of BaDx indicate that the device will be viable as a portable diagnostic cartridge. The device would be more effective with faster bacteria germination; hence studies were performed the use of rapid germination chemistry. Trials with calcium dipicolinic acid displayed increased cell germination, as shown by control studies using a microplate reader. Upon lyophilization the rapid germination chemistry failed to change growth patterns, indicating that the calcium dipicolinic acid was not solubilized under the conditions tested. Although incompatible with the portable diagnostic device, the experiments proved that the rapid germination chemistry was effective in increasing cell germination.

  19. Applying Independent Verification and Validation to Automatic Test Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Cynthia C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a general overview of applying Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) to Automatic Test Equipment (ATE). The overview is not inclusive of all IV&V activities that can occur or of all development and maintenance items that can be validated and verified, during the IV&V process. A sampling of possible IV&V activities that can occur within each phase of the ATE life cycle are described.

  20. Testing safety of germinated rye sourdough in a celiac disease model based on the adoptive transfer of prolamin-primed memory T cells into lymphopenic mice.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Tobias L; Loponen, Jussi; Messing, Marcel; Zevallos, Victor; Andersson, Leif C; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula; Saavalainen, Päivi; Schuppan, Detlef; Salovaara, Hannu; Meri, Seppo

    2014-03-01

    The current treatment for celiac disease is strict gluten-free diet. Technical processing may render gluten-containing foods safe for consumption by celiac patients, but so far in vivo safety testing can only be performed on patients. We modified a celiac disease mouse model to test antigenicity and inflammatory effects of germinated rye sourdough, a food product characterized by extensive prolamin hydrolysis. Lymphopenic Rag1-/- or nude mice were injected with splenic CD4+CD62L-CD44high-memory T cells from gliadin- or secalin-immunized wild-type donor mice. We found that: 1) Rag1-/- recipients challenged with wheat or rye gluten lost more body weight and developed more severe histological duodenitis than mice on gluten-free diet. This correlated with increased secretion of IFNγ, IL-2, and IL-17 by secalin-restimulated splenocytes. 2) In vitro gluten testing using competitive R5 ELISA demonstrated extensive degradation of the gluten R5 epitope in germinated rye sourdough. 3) However, in nude recipients challenged with germinated rye sourdough (vs. native rye sourdough), serum anti-secalin IgG/CD4+ T helper 1-associated IgG2c titers were only reduced, but not eliminated. In addition, there were no reductions in body weight loss, histological duodenitis, or T cell cytokine secretion in Rag1-/- recipients challenged accordingly. 1) prolamin-primed CD4+CD62L-CD44high-memory T cells induce gluten-sensitive enteropathy in Rag1-/- mice. 2) Hydrolysis of secalins in germinated rye sourdough remains incomplete. Secalin peptides retain B and T cell stimulatory capacity and remain harmful to the intestinal mucosa in this celiac disease model. 3) Current antibody-based prolamin detection methods may fail to detect antigenic gluten fragments in processed cereal food products.

  1. Data Mining Techniques Applied to Hydrogen Lactose Breath Test

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno-Chamorro, Isabel; Pontes-Balanza, Beatriz; Hernández-Mendoza, Yoedusvany; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the results of applying data mining techniques to hydrogen breath test data. Disposal of H2 gas is of utmost relevance to maintain efficient microbial fermentation processes. Objectives Analyze a set of data of hydrogen breath tests by use of data mining tools. Identify new patterns of H2 production. Methods Hydrogen breath tests data sets as well as k-means clustering as the data mining technique to a dataset of 2571 patients. Results Six different patterns have been extracted upon analysis of the hydrogen breath test data. We have also shown the relevance of each of the samples taken throughout the test. Conclusions Analysis of the hydrogen breath test data sets using data mining techniques has identified new patterns of hydrogen generation upon lactose absorption. We can see the potential of application of data mining techniques to clinical data sets. These results offer promising data for future research on the relations between gut microbiota produced hydrogen and its link to clinical symptoms. PMID:28125620

  2. Magnetic-time model at off-season germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Tarlochan Singh; Pandey, Om Prakash

    2014-03-01

    Effect of static magnetic field on germination of mung beans is described. Seeds of mung beans, were exposed in batches to static magnetic fields of 87 to 226 mT intensity for 100 min. Magnetic time constant - 60.743 Th (Tesla hour) was determined experimentally. High value of magnetic time constant signifies lower effect of magnetic field on germination rate as this germination was carried out at off-season (13°C). Using decay function, germination magnetic constant was calculated. There was a linear increase in germination magnetic constant with increasing intensity of magnetic field. Calculated values of mean germination time, mean germination rate, germination rate coefficient, germination magnetic constant, transition time, water uptake, indicate that the impact of applied static magnetic field improves the germination of mung beans seeds even in off-season

  3. Testing the test: an analysis of the MRCGP Applied Knowledge Test as an assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Neil H

    2012-01-01

    The new membership examination of the Royal College of General Practitioners (MRCGP) has been in existence since autumn 2007. The MRCGP assessments aim to assure the RCGP of the competence of a general practitioner specialty trainee (GPST). Once the MRCGP is obtained, the GPST is then able to apply for a certificate of completion of training (CCT) from the General Medical Council (GMC). The MRCGP demonstrates the commonly described educational theory model of Miller's pyramid (see Figure 1). The Applied Knowledge Test (AKT), as the name suggests, aims for more than mere recall and arguably is at the 'knows how' level. Current literature suggests that the 'shows how' level constitutes competency-based assessment rather than performance. In the MRCGP, this takes the form of Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA). The level of 'does' is assessed via workplace-based assessments. These are performed throughout the three years of GPST training. They also take into account that the skill of performance incorporates not only competence, but also a combination of other influences mentioned in the Cambridge model for delineating performance and competence. This article will focus on the AKT. It is a three-hour 200-item multi-choice question (MCQ) examination that covers the three broad domains described in Box 1. The questions are in one of three formats: single best answer, extended matching questions and completion of algorithms. Literature exists that looks at the characteristics of a good assessment system. However, it is the work of van der Vleuten that is widely cited. He suggested that validity, reliability, educational impact, cost-effectiveness and acceptability must all be considered when constructing an assessment. I will now focus on the AKT in relation to each of the factors.

  4. Phytochrome and Seed Germination. I. Temperature Dependence and Relative P(FR) Levels in the Germination of Dark-germinating Tomato Seeds.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, A L; Yaniv, Z; Smith, P

    1967-03-01

    Germination of the dark-germinating seeds of 3 varieties of tomato is controlled by the phytochrome system. Germination is inhibited by far red radiation and repromoted by red applied after far red. At low temperatures, 17 to 20 degrees , a single, low energy far red irradiation is sufficient to inhibit germination in all 3 varieties. At higher temperatures far red is less effective in the inhibition of the germination of the tomato seeds. The phytochrome fraction present as P(FR) in the dark-germinating seeds of the Ace variety is about 40% of the total phytochrome present.

  5. The virtual fields method applied to spalling tests on concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron, F.; Forquin, P.

    2012-08-01

    For one decade spalling techniques based on the use of a metallic Hopkinson bar put in contact with a concrete sample have been widely employed to characterize the dynamic tensile strength of concrete at strain-rates ranging from a few tens to two hundreds of s-1. However, the processing method mainly based on the use of the velocity profile measured on the rear free surface of the sample (Novikov formula) remains quite basic and an identification of the whole softening behaviour of the concrete is out of reach. In the present paper a new processing method is proposed based on the use of the Virtual Fields Method (VFM). First, a digital high speed camera is used to record the pictures of a grid glued on the specimen. Next, full-field measurements are used to obtain the axial displacement field at the surface of the specimen. Finally, a specific virtual field has been defined in the VFM equation to use the acceleration map as an alternative `load cell'. This method applied to three spalling tests allowed to identify Young's modulus during the test. It was shown that this modulus is constant during the initial compressive part of the test and decreases in the tensile part when micro-damage exists. It was also shown that in such a simple inertial test, it was possible to reconstruct average axial stress profiles using only the acceleration data. Then, it was possible to construct local stress-strain curves and derive a tensile strength value.

  6. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    PubMed

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  7. Bridging meta-analysis and the comparative method: a test of seed size effect on germination after frugivores' gut passage.

    PubMed

    Verdú, Miguel; Traveset, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Most studies using meta-analysis try to establish relationships between traits across taxa from interspecific databases and, thus, the phylogenetic relatedness among these taxa should be taken into account to avoid pseudoreplication derived from common ancestry. This paper illustrates, with a representative example of the relationship between seed size and the effect of frugivore's gut on seed germination, that meta-analytic procedures can also be phylogenetically corrected by means of the comparative method. The conclusions obtained in the meta-analytical and phylogenetical approaches are very different. The meta-analysis revealed that the positive effects that gut passage had on seed germination increased with seed size in the case of gut passage through birds whereas decreased in the case of gut passage through non-flying mammals. However, once the phylogenetic relatedness among plant species was taken into account, the effects of gut passage on seed germination did not depend on seed size and were similar between birds and non-flying mammals. Some methodological considerations are given to improve the bridge between the meta-analysis and the comparative method.

  8. Reliability Testing Procedure for MEMS IMUs Applied to Vibrating Environments

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Giorgio; Somà, Aurelio

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology applied to navigation systems is rapidly increasing, but currently, there is a lack of knowledge about the reliability of this typology of devices, representing a serious limitation to their use in aerospace vehicles and other fields with medium and high requirements. In this paper, a reliability testing procedure for inertial sensors and inertial measurement units (IMU) based on MEMS for applications in vibrating environments is presented. The sensing performances were evaluated in terms of signal accuracy, systematic errors, and accidental errors; the actual working conditions were simulated by means of an accelerated dynamic excitation. A commercial MEMS-based IMU was analyzed to validate the proposed procedure. The main weaknesses of the system have been localized by providing important information about the relationship between the reliability levels of the system and individual components. PMID:22315550

  9. Zinnia Germination and Lunar Soil Amendment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Germination testing was performed to determine the best method for germinating zinnias. This method will be used to attempt to germinate the zinnia seeds produced in space. It was found that seed shape may be critically important in determining whether a seed will germinate or not. The ability of compost and worm castings to remediate lunar regolith simulant for plant growth was tested. It was found that neither treatment effectively improves plant growth in lunar regolith simulant. A potential method of improving lunar regolith simulant by mixing it with arcillite was discovered.

  10. Can standard genotoxicity tests be applied to nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Magdolenova, Zuzana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Collins, Andrew; Dusinska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the validity of two common genotoxicity testing procedures, the comet assay and the micronucleus (MN) test, when applied to nanoparticles (NP). The comet assay is used to detect strand breaks (SB) induced in cellular DNA. There is a possibility of obtaining false positive results, if residual NP remain in proximity to the virtually naked DNA that results from lysis of agarose-embedded cells, and react with this DNA in ways that do not occur with chromatin in intact cells. However, data showed that if NP are deliberately present at high concentration with lysed cells, there is no change in SB with a range of NP. Only oleic acid-coated Fe₃O₄ NP induced damage, as these particles also produced equivalent alterations in whole cells. A modification of the comet assay incorporates digestion of DNA with lesion-specific endonucleases, notably formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG), which detects oxidized purines. Again there is a concern regarding the presence of residual NP with DNA of lysed cells, but this time because of the risk of false negative results if NP interfere with the FPG reaction. However, it was found that incubation of cells with NP before treatment with a known 8-oxoguanine-inducing agent does not lead to any decrease in the yield of FPG-sensitive sites. Chromosomal damage is detected with the MN assay, which depends on the use of cytochalasin B (CB) to prevent cell division and accumulates binucleate cells. It is known that CB also inhibits endocytosis, and thus might prevent NP uptake. Data demonstrated that if NP are added to cells together with CB, fewer MN are induced. It is therefore necessary to treat cells with NP prior to CB in order to avoid interference and possible false negative results.

  11. Effect of chemical and physical factors to improve the germination rate of Echinacea angustifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Chuanren, Duan; Bochu, Wang; Wanqian, Liu; Jing, Chen; Jie, Lian; Huan, Zhao

    2004-09-01

    Seeds of Echinacea angustifolia are known for their deep dormancy. In this paper, we studied the responses of E. angustifolia seeds to some chemical and physical factors, such as scarification, chilling (5 degrees C) period, light and applied BA (6-benzylaminopurine), GA3 (gibberellic acid) and sound stimulation. When the seed coat layers were removed, the germination rate grew up from 6 to 20% (incubated in light) and the mean time germination (MTG) was reduced from 18 to 6.6 days. On the basis of layers-removed, chilling and continuous light gave significantly higher germination rate (up to 70%). Compare the data of seeds chilled by 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 days, the maximum germination rate (up to 70%) achieved at 18-days chilling treatment. Further increases in the chilling period could slightly improve germination. Exogenous application of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mg/L GA3 or BA in the previous pretreatment increased germination to 78, 90 and 84% or 76, 86 and 84%, respectively. Obviously, the best concentration of GA or BA is 0.3 mg/L. And the GA3 or BA treatment shortened the MTG to about 4 days. The influence of sound stimulation was also tested in the experiment. The result showed that one 100 dB and 1000 Hz sound wave (sine-wave) was beneficial to the germination of E. angustifolia seeds.

  12. Applying the Implicit Association Test to Measure Intolerance of Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Oriana; Dentale, Francesco; Lauriola, Marco; Leone, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is a key trans-diagnostic personality construct strongly associated with anxiety symptoms. Traditionally, IU is measured through self-report measures that are prone to bias effects due to impression management concerns and introspective difficulties. Moreover, self-report scales are not able to intercept the automatic associations that are assumed to be main determinants of several spontaneous responses (e.g., emotional reactions). In order to overcome these limitations, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) was applied to measure IU, with a particular focus on reliability and criterion validity issues. The IU-IAT and the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory (IUI) were administered to an undergraduate student sample (54 females and 10 males) with a mean age of 23 years (SD = 1.7). Successively, participants were asked to provide an individually chosen uncertain event from their own lives that may occur in the future and were requested to identify a number of potential negative consequences of it. Participants' responses in terms of cognitive thoughts (i.e., cognitive appraisal) and worry reactions toward these events were assessed using the two subscales of the Worry and Intolerance of Uncertainty Beliefs Questionnaire. The IU-IAT showed an adequate level of internal consistency and a not significant correlation with the IUI. A path analysis model, accounting for 35% of event-related worry, revealed that IUI had a significant indirect effect on the dependent variable through event-related IU thoughts. By contrast, as expected, IU-IAT predicted event-related worry independently from IU thoughts. In accordance with dual models of social cognition, these findings suggest that IU can influence event-related worry through two different processing pathways (automatic vs. deliberative), supporting the criterion and construct validity of the IU-IAT. The potential role of the IU-IAT for clinical applications was discussed.

  13. Similitude requirements and scaling relationships as applied to model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Brown, J. S., Jr.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The similitude requirements for the most general test conditions are presented. These similitude requirements are considered in relation to the scaling relationships, test technique, test conditions (including supersonic flow), and test objectives. Particular emphasis is placed on satisfying the various similitude requirements for incompressible and compressible flow conditions. For free flying models tests, the test velocities for incompressible flow are scaled from Froude number similitude requirements and those for compressible flow are scaled from Mach number similitude requirements. The limitations of various test techniques are indicated, with emphasis on the free flying model.

  14. Effects of disturbance on germination and seedling establishment in a coastal prairie grassland: A test of the competitive release hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jutila, H.M.; Grace, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    1. We evaluated the responses of native grassland sods to a variety of types of disturbance in order to assess hypotheses about the competitive effects of established vegetation on seed germination and seedling establishment. In particular, we consider whether germination is more responsive to the magnitude and duration of vegetation removal (competitive release) or to individual disturbance types (specific effects). 2. Field-collected sods of coastal tallgrass prairie were subjected to no manipulation, cutting with clippings left, cutting with clippings removed (hayed), burning, and complete destruction of established vegetation under greenhouse conditions. The emergence and fate of seedlings, as well as light penetration through the canopy, were followed for a period of 4.5 months. 3. Total seedling emergence increased from cut to control, hayed, burned and plants-removed treatments. Several periods of increased seedling emergence suggested responses to both light penetration and seasonal change. 4. Species richness was lowest in cut sods and highest in sods that had plants removed or were burned. Rarefaction analysis showed that these differences were largely those expected from differences in seedling number, except for the cut treatment, which produced fewer species per seedling than other treatments. 5. Indicator species analysis and ordination methods revealed that seedling community composition overlapped strongly across all treatments, although the area of ordination space did increase with increasing numbers of seedlings. 6. Overall, most of the effects of disturbance could be explained by cumulative light penetration to the soil surface, an indicator of total competitive release, although a few specific effects could be found (particularly for the cutting treatment). Thus, these results generally support the competitive release hypothesis.

  15. A Germination Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves using sponge seedlings to demonstrate the germination process without the usual waiting period. Discusses epigeous versus hypogeous germination, and cotyledon number and biodiversity. (JRH)

  16. A Germination Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves using sponge seedlings to demonstrate the germination process without the usual waiting period. Discusses epigeous versus hypogeous germination, and cotyledon number and biodiversity. (JRH)

  17. Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because fungal infection may complicate both the logistics and the interpretation of germination tests, seeds are sometimes treated with chemical fungicides. Fungicides may reduce the germination rate and/or germination percentage, and should be avoided unless fungal contamination is severe enough ...

  18. Data Mining Techniques Applied to Hydrogen Lactose Breath Test.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Escudero, Cristina; Valverde-Fernández, Justo; Nepomuceno-Chamorro, Isabel; Pontes-Balanza, Beatriz; Hernández-Mendoza, Yoedusvany; Rodríguez-Herrera, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Analyze a set of data of hydrogen breath tests by use of data mining tools. Identify new patterns of H2 production. Hydrogen breath tests data sets as well as k-means clustering as the data mining technique to a dataset of 2571 patients. Six different patterns have been extracted upon analysis of the hydrogen breath test data. We have also shown the relevance of each of the samples taken throughout the test. Analysis of the hydrogen breath test data sets using data mining techniques has identified new patterns of hydrogen generation upon lactose absorption. We can see the potential of application of data mining techniques to clinical data sets. These results offer promising data for future research on the relations between gut microbiota produced hydrogen and its link to clinical symptoms.

  19. Inhibitory effects of monoterpenes on seed germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet; Sutay, Sunay

    2007-01-01

    Monoterpenes, the chemical constituents of essential oils found in plants, are known biologically active compounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of 30 monoterpenes including monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes on seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album and Rumex crispus under laboratory conditions. The monoterpenes were applied at contents of 10 and 20 microl for liquid compounds and 10 and 20 microg for solid compounds. The results show that most of the monoterpenes significantly inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of the tested plants. Oxygenated monoterpenes including beta-citronellol, nerol and terpinen-4-ol completely inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of all tested plants. Their inhibitory effects were also stronger than that of the herbicide 2,4-D. In general, monoterpenes were less effective against seed germination and seedling growth of C. album as compared with R. crispus and A. retroflexus. Phytotoxic effects of monoterpene hydrocarbons were found to be lower than those of oxygenated monoterpenes. The alcohol derivatives of oxygenated monoterpenes were also found to be more phytotoxic as compared with their acetate derivatives. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that the oxygenated monoterpenes can be used as potential bio-herbicides.

  20. A simple and reliable method to detect gamma irradiated lentil ( Lens culinaris Medik.) seeds by germination efficiency and seedling growth test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sadhan K.

    2002-05-01

    Germination efficiency and root/shoot length of germinated seedling is proposed to identify irradiated lentil seeds. Germination percentage was reduced above 0.2 kGy and lentil seeds were unable to germinate above 1.0 kGy dose. The critical dose that prevented the root elongation varied from 0.1 to 0.5 kGy. The sensitivity of lentil seeds to gamma irradiation was inversely proportional to moisture content of the seeds. Radiation effects could be detected in seeds even 12 months storage after gamma irradiation.

  1. Multi-matrix, dual polarity, tandem mass spectrometry imaging strategy applied to a germinated maize seed: toward mass spectrometry imaging of an untargeted metabolome

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-08-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides high spatial resolution information that is unprecedented in traditional metabolomics analyses; however, the molecular coverage is often limited to a handful of compounds and is insufficient to understand overall metabolomic changes of a biological system. Here, we propose an MSI methodology to increase the diversity of chemical compounds that can be imaged and identified, in order to eventually perform untargeted metabolomic analysis using MSI. We use the desorption/ionization bias of various matrixes for different metabolite classes along with dual polarities and a tandem MSI strategy. The use of multiple matrixes and dual polarities allows us to visualize various classes of compounds, while data-dependent MS/MS spectra acquired in the same MSI scans allow us to identify the compounds directly on the tissue. In a proof of concept application to a germinated corn seed, a total of 166 unique ions were determined to have high-quality MS/MS spectra, without counting structural isomers, of which 52 were identified as unique compounds. According to an estimation based on precursor MSI datasets, we expect over five hundred metabolites could be potentially identified and visualized once all experimental conditions are optimized and an MS/MS library is available. Finally, metabolites involved in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were imaged to demonstrate the potential of this technology to better understand metabolic biology.

  2. Multi-matrix, dual polarity, tandem mass spectrometry imaging strategy applied to a germinated maize seed: toward mass spectrometry imaging of an untargeted metabolome

    DOE PAGES

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Lee, Young Jin

    2015-08-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides high spatial resolution information that is unprecedented in traditional metabolomics analyses; however, the molecular coverage is often limited to a handful of compounds and is insufficient to understand overall metabolomic changes of a biological system. Here, we propose an MSI methodology to increase the diversity of chemical compounds that can be imaged and identified, in order to eventually perform untargeted metabolomic analysis using MSI. We use the desorption/ionization bias of various matrixes for different metabolite classes along with dual polarities and a tandem MSI strategy. The use of multiple matrixes and dual polarities allows usmore » to visualize various classes of compounds, while data-dependent MS/MS spectra acquired in the same MSI scans allow us to identify the compounds directly on the tissue. In a proof of concept application to a germinated corn seed, a total of 166 unique ions were determined to have high-quality MS/MS spectra, without counting structural isomers, of which 52 were identified as unique compounds. According to an estimation based on precursor MSI datasets, we expect over five hundred metabolites could be potentially identified and visualized once all experimental conditions are optimized and an MS/MS library is available. Finally, metabolites involved in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were imaged to demonstrate the potential of this technology to better understand metabolic biology.« less

  3. Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2003-05-01

    Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax ( Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume = 14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 μl O 2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O 2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O 2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination.

  4. Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Oleg A; Hasenstein, K H

    2003-01-01

    Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume=14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 microliters O2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination. c2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  5. Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Hasentein, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume=14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 microliters O2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination. c2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  6. Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Hasentein, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume=14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 microliters O2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination. c2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  7. The Anthelmintic Ingredient Moxidectin Negatively Affects Seed Germination of Three Temperate Grassland Species.

    PubMed

    Eichberg, Carsten; Wohde, Manuel; Müller, Kerstin; Rausch, Anja; Scherrmann, Christina; Scheuren, Theresa; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Donath, Tobias W

    2016-01-01

    In animal farming, anthelmintics are regularly applied to control gastrointestinal nematodes. There is plenty of evidence that also non-target organisms, such as dung beetles, are negatively affected by residues of anthelmintics in faeces of domestic ungulates. By contrast, knowledge about possible effects on wild plants is scarce. To bridge this gap of knowledge, we tested for effects of the common anthelmintic formulation Cydectin and its active ingredient moxidectin on seed germination. We conducted a feeding experiment with sheep and germination experiments in a climate chamber. Three wide-spread plant species of temperate grasslands (Centaurea jacea, Galium verum, Plantago lanceolata) were studied. We found significant influences of both, Cydectin and moxidectin, on germination of the tested species. Across species, both formulation and active ingredient solely led to a decrease in germination percentage and synchrony of germination and an increase in mean germination time with the formulation showing a more pronounced response pattern. Our study shows for the first time that anthelmintics have the potential to negatively affect plant regeneration. This has practical implications for nature conservation since our results suggest that treatments of livestock with anthelmintics should be carefully timed to not impede endozoochorous seed exchange between plant populations.

  8. The Anthelmintic Ingredient Moxidectin Negatively Affects Seed Germination of Three Temperate Grassland Species

    PubMed Central

    Eichberg, Carsten; Wohde, Manuel; Müller, Kerstin; Rausch, Anja; Scherrmann, Christina; Scheuren, Theresa; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Donath, Tobias W.

    2016-01-01

    In animal farming, anthelmintics are regularly applied to control gastrointestinal nematodes. There is plenty of evidence that also non-target organisms, such as dung beetles, are negatively affected by residues of anthelmintics in faeces of domestic ungulates. By contrast, knowledge about possible effects on wild plants is scarce. To bridge this gap of knowledge, we tested for effects of the common anthelmintic formulation Cydectin and its active ingredient moxidectin on seed germination. We conducted a feeding experiment with sheep and germination experiments in a climate chamber. Three wide-spread plant species of temperate grasslands (Centaurea jacea, Galium verum, Plantago lanceolata) were studied. We found significant influences of both, Cydectin and moxidectin, on germination of the tested species. Across species, both formulation and active ingredient solely led to a decrease in germination percentage and synchrony of germination and an increase in mean germination time with the formulation showing a more pronounced response pattern. Our study shows for the first time that anthelmintics have the potential to negatively affect plant regeneration. This has practical implications for nature conservation since our results suggest that treatments of livestock with anthelmintics should be carefully timed to not impede endozoochorous seed exchange between plant populations. PMID:27846249

  9. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  10. TESTING THE IDEAS GUIDELINES AS APPLIED TO PLUTONIUM INTAKES.

    PubMed

    Bull, Richard; Roberts, Gareth

    2016-09-01

    The IDEAS Guidelines [Doerfel, H., et al General Guidelines for the Estimation of Committed Effective Dose from Incorporation Monitoring Data. Report FZKA 7243, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, GmbH (2006); Castellani, C. M., Marsh, J. W., Hurtgen, C., Blanchardon, E., Berard, P., Giusani, A. and Lopez, M. A. IDEAS Guidelines (Version 2) for the Estimation of Committed Doses from Incorporation Monitoring Data. EURADOS Report 2013-01, Braunschweig (2013)] provide a structured approach to the assessment of intakes of radionuclides. In order to check that the guidelines, when applied to typical monitoring programmes, lead to reliable assessments, a number of numerically-generated datasets have been constructed and assessed using the guidelines. The dose and intake obtained by the assessment can be compared with the 'true' dose and intake. In this way, the accuracy of the IDEAS assessment process can be examined when applied to monitoring programmes that are typically used in the nuclear industry. The simulations focus on assessments carried out as a result of elevated (239)Pu activities in routine urine samples, which lead to follow-up urine and faecal samples being provided. Cases where the assessor makes the correct initial assumption about lung solubility can be compared with cases where this initial choice is wrong. The results of these simulations and the implication for the use of monitoring programmes are discussed.

  11. Applying fiber optical methods for toxicological testing in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Buchholz, Rainer; Emmrich, Frank; Fink, Frank; Geddes, Clive L.; Pfeifer, Lutz; Raabe, Ferdinand; Scheper, Thomas-Helmut; Ulrich, Elizabeth; Marx, Uwe

    1999-04-01

    The new medical developments, e.g. immune therapy, patient oriented chemotherapy or even gene therapy, create a questionable doubt to the further requirement of animal test. Instead the call for humanitarian reproductive in vitro models becomes increasingly louder. Pharmaceutical usage of in vitro has a long proven history. In cancer research and therapy, the effect of chemostatica in vitro in the so-called oncobiogram is being tested; but the assays do not always correlate with in vivo-like drug resistance and sensitivity. We developed a drug test system in vitro, feasible for therapeutic drug monitoring by the combination of tissue cultivation in hollow fiber bioreactors and fiber optic sensors for monitoring the pharmaceutical effect. Using two fiber optic sensors - an optical oxygen sensor and a metabolism detecting Laserfluoroscope, we were able to successfully monitor the biological status of tissue culture and the drug or toxic effects of in vitro pharmaceutical testing. Furthermore, we developed and patented a system for monitoring the effect of minor toxic compounds which can induce Sick Building Syndrome.

  12. [Effects of seed priming on physiology of seed germination and seeding growth of Marsdenia tenacissima under NaCl stress].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xue-feng; Liu, Li; Guo, Qiao-sheng; Li, Chao; Wang, Ping-li; Yang, Sheng-chao; Hang, Yue-yu

    2015-01-01

    To offer the reference and method for salt damage in the cultivation of Marsdenia tenacissima, the seeds of M. tenacissima collected from Maguan city ( Yunnan province) were taken as the test materials to study the effects of different priming materials on improving germination and growth under high-level salt stress condition. Four different treatments, which were GA3, KNO3-KH2PO4, PEG-6000, NaCl, combined with ANOVA were applied to test the performance of germination energy, germination percentage, germination index, MDA, SOD, and CAT. The results showed that the seed germination was obviously inhibited under salt stress and the soaked seeds with different priming materials could alleviate the damage of salt stress. Under these treatments, the activities of SOD, CAT the content of soluble protein significantly increased. While the content of MDA significantly decreased. The maximum index was obtained when treated with 1.20% KNO3-KH2PO4, the germination percentage increased from 52.67% to 87.33% and the activity of SOD increased from 138.01 to 219.44 respectively. Comparing with the treatment of 1.20% KNO3-KH2PO4, the germination percentage of treating with 300 mg x L(-1) GA3 increased from 52.67% to 80.67%, while the activity of SOD increased from 138.01 to 444.61.

  13. Spore germination and germinant receptor genes in wild strains of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, O M; Moir, A

    2014-09-01

    To compare the germination of laboratory and wild strains of Bacillus subtilis. The spore germination of B. subtilis 168 (subsp. subtilis) was compared with that of the laboratory strain W23 (subsp. spizizenii) and desert-sourced isolates, including one member of subsp. subtilis (RO-NN-1), strains TU-B-10, RO-E-2, N10 and DV1-B-1, (all subsp. spizizenii), the B. mojavensis strain RO-H-1 and a B. subtilis natto strain. All germinated in L-alanine, although some were slower, and some 10-fold less sensitive to germinant. All germinated in calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA). Germination in asparagine, glucose, fructose + KCl was slow and incomplete in many of the strains, and decoating RO-NN-1 and W23 spores did not restore germination rates. Comparing the sequences of B. subtilis strains 168, RO-NN-1, W23, TU-B-10 and DV1-B-1, the operons encoding GerA, B and K germinant receptors were intact, although the two additional operons yndDEF and yfkQRST had suffered deletions or were absent in several spizizenii strains. Wild strains possess an efficient germination machinery for L-alanine germination. AGFK germination is often less efficient, the gerB genes more diverged, and the two germinant receptor operons of unknown function have been lost from the genome in many subsp. spizizenii strains. The two major subspecies of B. subtilis have conserved GerA receptor function, confirming its importance, at least in the natural environments of these strains. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Testing aerially applied Orthene for control of larch casebearer.

    Treesearch

    John S. Hard; Stanley Meso; Michael Haskett

    1979-01-01

    Orthene was tested in a randomized block experiment to determine efficacy against larch casebearer. Needlemining larval populations were sprayed in September 1976 by helicopter with 0.5 lb Orthene/gal water/acre (560 g a.i/9.3 l/ha). Spray deposit was sampled with Kromekote cards. Plot mean larval populations, spray deposit, and defoliation index were analyzed to...

  15. Test Structures Applied to the Rapid Prototyping of Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Chang, L-J.; Martin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, test structures were used to aid in the rapid development of a gas sensor and pressure sensor. These sensors were fabricated using co-fired ceramic technology and a multiproject approach. This talk will describe results obtained from a ceramic substrate which contained 36 chips with six variants including the sensors, process control monitors, and an interconnect chip. As far as the authors know, this is the first implementation of multi-projects in co-fired ceramic substrate. The gas sensor is being developed for the Space Shuttle and the pressure gage is being developed as a Martian barometer.

  16. Munsell's 100-hue test applied to color films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    1999-12-01

    The experiments described in this paper use the Munsell 100 Hue test to measure color film's ability to order chips the same as humans. The procedure is to photograph the chips in daylight and to scan the dye densities in the processed prints. If the film confuses colors, as colorblind and color anomalous humans do, then the dye density sequence will not be monotonic. Local reversals in dye density imply spectral responses different than humans. A triplet of monotonic dye curves would mimic the color response of people with much better than average color discrimination.

  17. Test Structures Applied to the Rapid Prototyping of Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Chang, L-J.; Martin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, test structures were used to aid in the rapid development of a gas sensor and pressure sensor. These sensors were fabricated using co-fired ceramic technology and a multiproject approach. This talk will describe results obtained from a ceramic substrate which contained 36 chips with six variants including the sensors, process control monitors, and an interconnect chip. As far as the authors know, this is the first implementation of multi-projects in co-fired ceramic substrate. The gas sensor is being developed for the Space Shuttle and the pressure gage is being developed as a Martian barometer.

  18. Advanced Background Subtraction Applied to Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Horne, William C.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced form of background subtraction is presented and applied to aeroacoustic wind tunnel data. A variant of this method has seen use in other fields such as climatology and medical imaging. The technique, based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the background noise cross-spectral matrix, is robust against situations where isolated background auto-spectral levels are measured to be higher than levels of combined source and background signals. It also provides an alternate estimate of the cross-spectrum, which previously might have poor definition for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Simulated results indicate similar performance to conventional background subtraction when the subtracted spectra are weaker than the true contaminating background levels. Superior performance is observed when the subtracted spectra are stronger than the true contaminating background levels. Experimental results show limited success in recovering signal behavior for data where conventional background subtraction fails. They also demonstrate the new subtraction technique's ability to maintain a proper coherence relationship in the modified cross-spectral matrix. Beam-forming and de-convolution results indicate the method can successfully separate sources. Results also show a reduced need for the use of diagonal removal in phased array processing, at least for the limited data sets considered.

  19. Statistical comparison of similarity tests applied to speech production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollia, H.; Jorgenson, Jay; Saint Fleur, Rose; Foster, Kevin

    2004-05-01

    Statistical analysis of data variability in speech production research has traditionally been addressed with the assumption of normally distributed error terms. The correct and valid application of statistical procedure requires a thorough investigation of the assumptions that underlie the methodology. In previous work [Kollia and Jorgenson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102 (1997); 109 (2002)], it was shown that the error terms of speech production data in a linear regression can be modeled accurately using a quadratic probability distribution, rather than a normal distribution as is frequently assumed. The measurement used in the earlier Kollia-Jorgenson work involved the classical Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. In the present work, the authors further explore the problem of analyzing the error terms coming from linear regression using a variety of known statistical tests, including, but not limited to chi-square, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Anderson-Darling, Cramer-von Mises, skewness and kurtosis, and Durbin. Our study complements a similar study by Shapiro, Wilk, and Chen [J. Am. Stat. Assoc. (1968)]. [Partial support provided by PSC-CUNY and NSF to Jay Jorgenson.

  20. On von Neumann and Bell Theorems Applied to Quantumness Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert

    2009-04-01

    The issues, raised in Żukowski ( arXiv:0809.0115v1 , 2008), concerning the relevance of the von Neumann theorem for the single-system’s quantumness test proposed in Alicki and Van Ryn (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41:062001, 2008) and performed for the case of single photon polarization in Brida et al. (Opt. Express 16:11750, 2008; arXiv:0811.3376 , 2008) and the usefulness of Bell’s inequality for testing the idea of macroscopic quantum systems are discussed in some details. Finally, the proper quantum mechanical description of the experiment with polarized photon beams is presented.

  1. Asymbiotic Germination Response to Photoperiod and Nutritional Media in Six Populations of Calopogon tuberosus var. tuberosus (Orchidaceae): Evidence for Ecotypic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kauth, Philip J.; Kane, Michael E.; Vendrame, Wagner A.; Reinhardt-Adams, Carrie

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Ecotypic differentiation has been explored in numerous plant species, but has been largely ignored in the Orchidaceae. Applying a specific germination protocol for widespread seed sources may be unreliable due to inherent physiological or genetic differences in localized populations. It is crucial to determine whether ecotypic differentiation exists for restoration and conservation programmes. Calopogon tuberosus var. tuberosus, a widespread terrestrial orchid of eastern North America, is a model species to explore ecotypic differences in germination requirements, as this species occupies diverse habitats spanning a wide geographical range. Methods Mature seeds were collected from south Florida, north central Florida, three locations in South Carolina, and the upper Michigan peninsula. Effects of three photoperiods (8/16, 12/12, 16/8 h L/D) were examined on asymbiotic in vitro seed germination and seedling development of C. tuberosus. Germination and early development was monitored for 8 weeks, while advanced development was monitored for an additional 8 weeks. In an additional experiment, asymbiotic seed germination and development was monitored for 8 weeks on six culture media (BM-1 terrestrial orchid medium, Knudson C, Malmgrem, half-strength MS, P723, and Vacin and Went). A tetrazolium test for embryo viability was performed. Key Results Short days promoted the highest germination among Florida populations, but few differences among photoperiods in other seed sources existed. Different media had little effect on the germination of Michigan and Florida populations, but germination of South Carolina seeds was higher on media with higher calcium and magnesium. Tetrazolium testing confirmed that South Carolina seeds exhibited low viability while viability was higher in Florida seeds. Seed germination and corm formation was rapid in Michigan seeds across all treatments. Michigan seedlings allocated more biomass to corms compared with other seed

  2. Bioaccumulation tests applied in whole effluent assessment: A review

    SciTech Connect

    De Maagd, P.G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Until recently, the emphasis within whole effluent assessment has been on the application of bioassays for acute and chronic toxicity. Although the need for additional parameters to assess the ecotoxicological hazard and risk of effluents for receiving water systems has been repeatedly advocated, other parameters such as bioaccumulation, genotoxicity, sediment toxicity, and nutrient impacts are seldom addressed. This paper discusses the potential additional value of including bioaccumulation parameters in whole effluent assessment and methods that can be used for routine assessment. It is concluded that screening on the presence of potentially bioaccumulating compounds leads to a more comprehensive hazard assessment and should therefore be included in whole effluent assessment. A chemical method to assess potentially bioaccumulating substances (PBSs) is preferred above methods using organisms or classical group parameters such as extractable organic halogens (EOX). In situ studies with organisms are not feasible for routine assessment for a number of reasons, including cost efficiency and matrix problems. Classical group parameters such as EOX do not relate to bioaccumulation or toxicity. Chemical methods for assessing bioaccumulation are usually presented as integrated methods composed of different procedure steps such as pretreatment, extraction, separation, and detection. However, an optimal method may be constructed by combining procedure steps from different reported methods. Solid phase microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry is regarded as the preferable method for the assessment of PBSs. Before implementation in whole effluent assessment, however, the method must be carefully validated. Hazard assessment based on bioaccumulation seems feasible. For risk assessment, however, additional information is a prerequisite. Quantitative causal relationships between test assay results

  3. Phytotoxic effects of sewage sludge extracts on the germination of three plant species.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Wilson A; Domene, Xavier; Andrés, Pilar; Alcañiz, Josep M

    2008-11-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of three types of extracts to explain the ecotoxicological risk of treated municipal sewage sludges, the OECD 208A germination test was applied using three plants (Lolium perenne L., Brassica rapa L., and Trifolium pratense L.). Three equivalent batches of sludge, remained as dewatered sludge, composted with plant remains and thermally dried, from an anaerobic waste water treatment plant were separated. Samples from these three batches were extracted in water, methanol, and dichloromethane. Plant bioassays were performed and the Germination Index (GI) for the three plants was evaluated once after a period of 10 days. Germination in extracts was always lower than the respective controls. The germination in composted sludge (GI 40.9-86.2) was higher than the dewatered (GI 2.9-45.8), or thermally dried sludges (GI 24.6-64.4). A comparison of the germination between types of extracts showed differences for dewatered sludge with the three plants, where the water and methanol extracts had significantly lower germination than the dichloromethane extract. A higher half maximal effective concentration (EC50) in composted extracts was established, mainly in the water extract (EC50 431-490 g kg(-1)). On the contrary, the germination was strongly inhibited in the water extract of the dewatered sludge (EC50 14 g kg(-1)). The germination was positively correlated with the degree of organic matter stability of the parent sludge, and an inverse correlation was detected for total nitrogen, hydrolysable nitrogen and ammonium content. It is concluded that the phytotoxic effect of the water extract is more closely related to hydrophilic substances rather than lipophilic ones, and care must be taken with dewatered sludge application, especially with their aqueous eluates. Results obtained in this work show the suitability of the use of sludge extracts in ecotoxic assays and emphasize the relevance of sewage sludge stabilization by post

  4. Seed germination and vigor.

    PubMed

    Rajjou, Loïc; Duval, Manuel; Gallardo, Karine; Catusse, Julie; Bally, Julia; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Germination vigor is driven by the ability of the plant embryo, embedded within the seed, to resume its metabolic activity in a coordinated and sequential manner. Studies using "-omics" approaches support the finding that a main contributor of seed germination success is the quality of the messenger RNAs stored during embryo maturation on the mother plant. In addition, proteostasis and DNA integrity play a major role in the germination phenotype. Because of its pivotal role in cell metabolism and its close relationships with hormone signaling pathways regulating seed germination, the sulfur amino acid metabolism pathway represents a key biochemical determinant of the commitment of the seed to initiate its development toward germination. This review highlights that germination vigor depends on multiple biochemical and molecular variables. Their characterization is expected to deliver new markers of seed quality that can be used in breeding programs and/or in biotechnological approaches to improve crop yields.

  5. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Cox, Dave; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2003-05-01

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to test a newly developed water delivery system, and to determine the optimal combination of water volume and substrate for the imbibition and germination of flax ( Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different combinations of germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. A single layer of thick germination paper was compared with one layer of thin germination paper under a layer of thick paper. Paper strips were cut to fit snugly into seed cassettes, and seeds were glued to them with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in small increments that traveled through the paper via capillary action. Three water delivery volumes were tested, with the largest (480 μL) outperforming the 400 μL, and 320 μL volumes for percent germination (90.6%) and root growth (mean = 4.1 mm) during the 34-hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment yielded similar results, but with lower rates of germination (84.4%) and shorter root lengths (mean = 2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of thick germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. Significant seed position effects were observed in both the flight and ground control experiments. Overall, the design of the water delivery system, seed cassettes and the germination paper strip concept was validated as an effective method for promoting seed germination and root growth under microgravity conditions.

  6. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Levine, Howard G; Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Cox, Dave; Kuznetsov, Oleg A; Hasenstein, Karl H

    2003-01-01

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to test a newly developed water delivery system, and to determine the optimal combination of water volume and substrate for the imbibition and germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different combinations of germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. A single layer of thick germination paper was compared with one layer of thin germination paper under a layer of thick paper. Paper strips were cut to fit snugly into seed cassettes, and seeds were glued to them with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in small increments that traveled through the paper via capillary action. Three water delivery volumes were tested, with the largest (480 microliters) outperforming the 400 microliters and 320 microliters volumes for percent germination (90.6%) and root growth (mean=4.1 mm) during the 34-hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment yielded similar results, but with lower rates of germination (84.4%) and shorter root lengths (mean=2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of thick germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. Significant seed position effects were observed in both the flight and ground control experiments. Overall, the design of the water delivery system, seed cassettes and the germination paper strip concept was validated as an effective method for promoting seed germination and root growth under microgravity conditions. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Cox, Dave; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2003-01-01

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to test a newly developed water delivery system, and to determine the optimal combination of water volume and substrate for the imbibition and germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different combinations of germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. A single layer of thick germination paper was compared with one layer of thin germination paper under a layer of thick paper. Paper strips were cut to fit snugly into seed cassettes, and seeds were glued to them with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in small increments that traveled through the paper via capillary action. Three water delivery volumes were tested, with the largest (480 microliters) outperforming the 400 microliters and 320 microliters volumes for percent germination (90.6%) and root growth (mean=4.1 mm) during the 34-hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment yielded similar results, but with lower rates of germination (84.4%) and shorter root lengths (mean=2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of thick germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. Significant seed position effects were observed in both the flight and ground control experiments. Overall, the design of the water delivery system, seed cassettes and the germination paper strip concept was validated as an effective method for promoting seed germination and root growth under microgravity conditions. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Germination and elongation of flax in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Cox, Dave; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2003-01-01

    This experiment was conducted as part of a risk mitigation payload aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-101. The objectives were to test a newly developed water delivery system, and to determine the optimal combination of water volume and substrate for the imbibition and germination of flax (Linum usitatissimum) seeds in space. Two different combinations of germination paper were tested for their ability to absorb, distribute, and retain water in microgravity. A single layer of thick germination paper was compared with one layer of thin germination paper under a layer of thick paper. Paper strips were cut to fit snugly into seed cassettes, and seeds were glued to them with the micropyle ends pointing outward. Water was delivered in small increments that traveled through the paper via capillary action. Three water delivery volumes were tested, with the largest (480 microliters) outperforming the 400 microliters and 320 microliters volumes for percent germination (90.6%) and root growth (mean=4.1 mm) during the 34-hour spaceflight experiment. The ground control experiment yielded similar results, but with lower rates of germination (84.4%) and shorter root lengths (mean=2.8 mm). It is not clear if the roots emerged more quickly in microgravity and/or grew faster than the ground controls. The single layer of thick germination paper generally exhibited better overall growth than the two layered option. Significant seed position effects were observed in both the flight and ground control experiments. Overall, the design of the water delivery system, seed cassettes and the germination paper strip concept was validated as an effective method for promoting seed germination and root growth under microgravity conditions. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bryophyte spore germinability is inhibited by peatland substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhao-Jun; Li, Zhi; Liu, Li-Jie; Sundberg, Sebastian; Feng, Ya-Min; Yang, Yun-He; Liu, Shuang; Song, Xue; Zhang, Xing-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Bryophyte substrates and species may affect spore germination through allelopathy. Polytrichum strictum is currently expanding in peatlands in north-eastern China - is this an effect of its superior spore germinability or do its gametophytes have a stronger allelopathic effect than do Sphagnum? We conducted a spore burial experiment to test the effect of species identity, substrate and water table depth (WTD) on spore germinability and bryophyte allelopathic effect with P. strictum and two Sphagnum species (S. palustre and S. magellanicum). After 5 months of burial during a growing season, the spores were tested for germinability. Allelopathic effect of bryophyte substrates was assessed by the difference between spore germinability after being stored inside or outside the substrates. After burial, more than 90% of the spores lost their germinability across all three species due to ageing and allelopathy. Spore germinability differed among species, where the spores in S. palustre had a higher germination frequency than those in P. strictum. The three bryophytes maintained a higher germinability in Sphagnum than in Polytrichum hummocks, probably due to a stronger allelopathic effect of P. strictum. Water table drawdown by 10 cm increased germinability by more than 60% across the three species. The study indicates that P. strictum does not possess an advantage regarding spore germination but rather its gametophytes have a stronger allelopathic effect. Due to the weaker inhibitive effect of Sphagnum gametophytes, P. strictum may have a potential establishment superiority over Sphagnum in peatlands, in addition to a better drought tolerance, which may explain its current expansion.

  10. Chapter 26. Seed germination

    Treesearch

    Kent R. Jorgensen; G. Richard Wilson

    2004-01-01

    Seed germination represents the means for survival and spread of many plants (McDonough 1977). Germination consists of three overlapping processes: (1) absorption of water, mainly by imbibition, causing swelling of the seed; (2) concurrent enzymatic activity and increased respiration and assimilation rates; and (3) cell enlargement and divisions resulting in emergence...

  11. Priming effects on seed germination in Tecoma stans (Bignoniaceae) and Cordia megalantha (Boraginaceae), two tropical deciduous tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-López, Sandra; Soriano, Diana; Velázquez, Noé; Orozco-Segovia, Alma; Gamboa-deBuen, Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Successful revegetation necessarily requires the establishment of a vegetation cover and one of the challenges for this is the scarce knowledge about germination and seedling establishment of wild tree species. Priming treatments (seed hydration during a specific time followed by seed dehydration) could be an alternative germination pre-treatment to improve plant establishment. Natural priming (via seed burial) promotes rapid and synchronous germination as well as the mobilisation of storage reserves; consequently, it increases seedling vigour. These metabolic and physiological responses are similar to those occurring as a result of the laboratory seed priming treatments (osmopriming and matrix priming) applied successfully to agricultural species. In order to know if natural priming had a positive effect on germination of tropical species we tested the effects of natural priming on imbibition kinetics, germination parameters (mean germination time, lag time and germination rate and percentage) and reserve mobilisation in the seeds of two tree species from a tropical deciduous forest in south-eastern México: Tecoma stans (L Juss. Ex Kunth) and Cordia megalantha (S.F Blake). The wood of both trees are useful for furniture and T. stans is a pioneer tree that promotes soil retention in disturbed areas. We also compared the effect of natural priming with that of laboratory matrix priming (both in soil). Matrix priming improved germination of both studied species. Natural priming promoted the mobilisation of proteins and increased the amount of free amino acids and of lipid degradation in T. stans but not in C. megalantha. Our results suggest that the application of priming via the burial of seeds is an easy and inexpensive technique that can improve seed germination and seedling establishment of tropical trees with potential use in reforestation and restoration practices.

  12. The oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.; Hasenstein, K.

    Experiments for earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and often germinated in orbit in order to study gravity effects on developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds and respiration. In orbit the formation of a water layer around the seed may further limit oxygen availability. Therefore, the oxygen content of the available gas volume is one of the limiting factors for seed germination. In preparation for an upcoming shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware. We tested per seed chamber (gas volume = 14 mL, O2 = 2.9 mL) between 4 to 32 seeds glued to germination paper by 1% (w/v) gum guar. A lexan cover and a gasket hermetically sealed each of the eight chambers. For imbibition of the seeds a previously optimized amount of distilled water was dispensed through sealed inlets. The seedlings were allowed to grow for either 32 to 48 h on a clinostat or without microgravity simulation. Then their root length was measured. With 32 seeds per chamber, four times the intended number of seeds for the flight, the germination rate decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%. Experiments on the germination and root length in controlled atmospheres (5, 10, 15 and 21% O2 ) suggest that germination and growth for two days requires about 200 :l of O (1 mL air) per seed. Our2 experiments correlate oxygen dependency from seed mass and germination temperature, and analyze accumulation of gaseous metabolites (supported by NASA grant NAG10-0190).

  13. Functional Characterisation of Germinant Receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes Presents Novel Insights into Spore Germination Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Jason; Plowman, June; Gaskin, Duncan J. H.; Itchner, Manoa; Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a dangerous pathogen that forms the highly potent botulinum toxin, which when ingested causes a deadly neuroparalytic disease. The closely related Clostridium sporogenes is occasionally pathogenic, frequently associated with food spoilage and regarded as the non-toxigenic equivalent of Group I C. botulinum. Both species form highly resistant spores that are ubiquitous in the environment and which, under favourable growth conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is imperative to comprehend the mechanisms by which spores germinate. Germination is initiated following the recognition of small molecules (germinants) by a specific germinant receptor (GR) located in the spore inner membrane. The present study precisely defines clostridial GRs, germinants and co-germinants. Group I C. botulinum ATCC3502 contains two tricistronic and one pentacistronic GR operons, while C. sporogenes ATCC15579 has three tricistronic and one tetracistronic GR operons. Insertional knockout mutants, allied with characterisation of recombinant GRs shows for the first time that amino acid stimulated germination in C. botulinum requires two tri-cistronic encoded GRs which act in synergy and cannot function individually. Spore germination in C. sporogenes requires one tri-cistronic GR. Two other GRs form part of a complex involved in controlling the rate of amino-acid stimulated germination. The suitability of using C. sporogenes as a substitute for C. botulinum in germination studies and food challenge tests is discussed. PMID:25210747

  14. Functional characterisation of germinant receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes presents novel insights into spore germination systems.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Jason; Plowman, June; Gaskin, Duncan J H; Itchner, Manoa; Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a dangerous pathogen that forms the highly potent botulinum toxin, which when ingested causes a deadly neuroparalytic disease. The closely related Clostridium sporogenes is occasionally pathogenic, frequently associated with food spoilage and regarded as the non-toxigenic equivalent of Group I C. botulinum. Both species form highly resistant spores that are ubiquitous in the environment and which, under favourable growth conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is imperative to comprehend the mechanisms by which spores germinate. Germination is initiated following the recognition of small molecules (germinants) by a specific germinant receptor (GR) located in the spore inner membrane. The present study precisely defines clostridial GRs, germinants and co-germinants. Group I C. botulinum ATCC3502 contains two tricistronic and one pentacistronic GR operons, while C. sporogenes ATCC15579 has three tricistronic and one tetracistronic GR operons. Insertional knockout mutants, allied with characterisation of recombinant GRs shows for the first time that amino acid stimulated germination in C. botulinum requires two tri-cistronic encoded GRs which act in synergy and cannot function individually. Spore germination in C. sporogenes requires one tri-cistronic GR. Two other GRs form part of a complex involved in controlling the rate of amino-acid stimulated germination. The suitability of using C. sporogenes as a substitute for C. botulinum in germination studies and food challenge tests is discussed.

  15. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for... Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? (a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described...

  16. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for... Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? (a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described...

  17. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What transient duty cycles apply for... Procedures § 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing? (a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described...

  18. 77 FR 73401 - Not Applying the Mark of Inspection Pending Certain Test Results

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and Inspection Service Not Applying the Mark of Inspection Pending..., ``Not Applying the Mark of Inspection Pending Certain Test Results'' (76 FR 19952). The notice explained that the Agency's practice has been to allow products tested for adulterants to bear the mark of...

  19. Variation in the amount of petrolatum preparation applied at patch testing.

    PubMed

    Bruze, Magnus; Frick-Engfeldt, Malin; Gruvberger, Birgitta; Isaksson, Marléne

    2007-01-01

    The elicitation of a positive patch test reaction in a given individual depends upon the dose of the sensitizer applied, the patch test technique and the occlusion time. The dose is determined by the concentration and volume/amount of test preparation applied. If the same amount/volume of a test preparation is applied all the time with the same test technique (same area of skin) and occlusion time, it is appropriate to use concentration as a dose parameter. Most contact sensitizers are incorporated in petrolatum (pet.). With pet. as vehicle, it is impossible to repeatedly apply an exact volume/amount. This study was performed to investigate the inter- and intra-individual variation of pet. preparation applied at patch testing by 3 technicians. Weighing demonstrated that the 3 technicians had about the same precision in their pet. application. The investigation demonstrates that there is both an inter-individual (statistically significant) and intra-individual variation in the amounts of pet. applied at patch testing for the 3 technicians. Presently, there is no recommendation on what amount of pet. preparation to apply, which merits a decision to be taken based on thorough investigations on the appropriate volumes of pet. preparation to be applied in various patch test systems.

  20. Applied Performance Testing. What Is It? Why Use It? (Paper I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeegan, Hugh F.

    Applied performance tests (APTs) are defined as tests designed to measure performance, in an actual or simulated setting, of tasks significant to a student's life outside the school or significant to adult life. A number of examples are presented to illustrate which skills may be classified as applied performance (such as file a tax return or…

  1. Effects of soil quality and depth on seed germination and seedling survival at the Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, K.W.; Lyon, G.E.

    1993-12-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended in 1987, directs the US Department of Energy (DOE) to study Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a potential site for long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. DOE policy mandates the restoration of all lands disturbed by site characterization activities and DOE has developed an environmental program that is to be implemented during site characterization activities at Yucca.Mountain. DOE is currently conducting reclamation feasibility trials as part of this environmental program. No topsoil was saved on disturbances during early site investigation and minimal soil remains at existing disturbances on Yucca Mountain. A study was developed to test the effects of soil quality and depth on seedling emergence and survival. A series of plots was established and two treatments were tested. The first treatment compared native topsoil to subsoil imported from a borrow pit. The second treatment compared four different depth ranges of both soil types. All plots received identical seeding treatments. Seedling density was measured after emergence. Overall seedling densities were low, averaging 10.3 {plus_minus} 8.8 (SD) plants/m{sup 2}. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the two treatment factors. The subsoil had increasing densities from the deep soil depths to the shallow depths while the topsoil had increasing densities from the shallow soil depths to the deep depths. The cause of this interaction may have resulted from the bedrock being close to the soil surface of the shallow plots.

  2. Seed dormancy and germination.

    PubMed

    Penfield, Steven

    2017-09-11

    Reproduction is a critical time in plant life history. Therefore, genes affecting seed dormancy and germination are among those under strongest selection in natural plant populations. Germination terminates seed dispersal and thus influences the location and timing of plant growth. After seed shedding, germination can be prevented by a property known as seed dormancy. In practise, seeds are rarely either dormant or non-dormant, but seeds whose dormancy-inducing pathways are activated to higher levels will germinate in an ever-narrower range of environments. Thus, measurements of dormancy must always be accompanied by analysis of environmental contexts in which phenotypes or behaviours are described. At its simplest, dormancy can be imposed by the formation of a simple physical barrier around the seed through which gas exchange and the passage of water are prevented. Seeds featuring this so-called 'physical dormancy' often require either scarification or passage through an animal gut (replete with its associated digestive enzymes) to disrupt the barrier and permit germination. In other types of seeds with 'morphological dormancy' the embryo remains under-developed at maturity and a dormant phase exists as the embryo continues its growth post-shedding, eventually breaking through the surrounding tissues. By far, the majority of seeds exhibit 'physiological dormancy' - a quiescence program initiated by either the embryo or the surrounding endosperm tissues. Physiological dormancy uses germination-inhibiting hormones to prevent germination in the absence of the specific environmental triggers that promote germination. During and after germination, early seedling growth is supported by catabolism of stored reserves of protein, oil or starch accumulated during seed maturation. These reserves support cell expansion, chloroplast development and root growth until photoauxotrophic growth can be resumed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrogen fertilization stimulates germination of dormant pin cherry seed

    Treesearch

    L.R. Auchmoody

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilizers triggered germination of dormant Prunus pensylvanica L. seed naturally buried in the forest floor of 60-year-old Allegheny hardwood stands. Neither triple superphosphate nor muriate of potash applied with urea increased germination over that which occurred with urea alone. Rates as low as 56 kg/ha N from urea and calcium...

  4. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: field evaluation of prototype test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    The report describes results of the third and final phase of a study conducted for the General Services Administration (GSA) to develop a field-test method to measure the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulation materials. Field tests were conducted on 17 fibrous and 2 cementitious spray-applied materials to assess surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact properties. The tests were performed using prototype devices developed in an earlier phase of the study. As expected, the field specimens displayed varying response to dislodgment or indentation in the tests. The field tests confirmed that the goal of the study had been achieved.

  5. Effect of day length on germination of seeds collected in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Day length control can effectively limit seed germination to favorable seasons, but this phenomenon has been studied in relatively few wild plants. I tested species from interior Alaska for day length control of germination under controlled conditions, and I also monitored germination phenology in natural habitats. Unstratified and cold-stratified seeds were germinated on short (13 h) and long (22 h) day length and in the dark at constant and alternating temperatures. On long day length, unstratified Ledum decumbens and Saxifraga tricuspidata seeds germinated from 5??C to 20??C, but on short day length few or no seeds germinated at 5??C and 10??C and germination was reduced at higher temperatures. Unstratified seeds of Diapensia lapponica and Chamaedaphne calyculata germinated only at 15??C and 20??C on long day length, and short day length completely inhibited germination. Cold stratification widened the temperature range for germination on both long and short day lengths, but germination was still lower on short than long day length. Germination phenology in natural habitats was consistent with germination in controlled conditions. In these species, short day length and low temperatures interact to inhibit germination in the fall. After overwintering, seeds germinate in the spring at low temperatures and on long day lengths. The inhibitory effect of short day length is not important in the spring because day length is already long at snowmelt.

  6. Seed germination of Sierra Nevada postfire chaparral species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; McGinnis, Thomas W.; Bollens, Kim A.

    2005-01-01

    The California chaparral community has a rich flora of species with different mechanisms for cuing germination to postfire conditions. Here we report further germination experiments that elucidate the response of several widespread shrub species whose germination response was not clear and include other species from the Sierra Nevada, which have not previously been included in germination studies. The shrubs Adenostoma fasciculatum and Eriodictyon crassifolium and the postfire annualMentzelia dispersa exhibited highly significant germination in response to smoke treatments, with some enhanced germination in response to heating as well. The shrubs Fremontodendron californicum and Malacothamnus fremontii were stimulated only by heat-shock treatments. Seeds buried in the soil for one year exhibited substantially higher germination for controls and most treatments. In the case of two postfire annuals, Mimulus bolanderi and M. gracilipes, germination of fresh seed was significantly greater with smoke or heating but after soil storage, over two-thirds of the control seeds germinated and treatment effects were not significant. These two annuals are generally restricted to postfire conditions and it is suggested that control germination of soil-stored seed may be a light-response (which was not tested here) as previously reported for another chaparral species in that genus.

  7. Photoinduced Seed Germination of Oenothera biennis L

    PubMed Central

    Ensminger, Peter A.; Ikuma, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    General characteristics of light-induced germination of Oenothera biennis L. seeds were investigated at 24°C. During dark imbibition, seeds reached maximal respiration in 7 hours and maximal water content and photosensitivity in 24 hours. After dark imbibition of 24 hours, seeds required a long exposure (>36 hours) to red or white light for maximal germination. Two photoperiods (12 and 2 hours) separated by a period of darkness of 10 to 16 hours gave near maximal germination. For the two photoperiod regime, the first light potentiates a reversible phytochrome response by the second light. A 35°C treatment for 2 to 3 hours in the dark immediately prior or subsequent to 8 hours of light caused a higher percentage of germination. A 2 hour treatment at 35°C also potentiates a reversible phytochrome response. Halved seeds germinated at 100% in light or darkness indicating that the light requirement of the seeds is lost in the halving procedure. After-ripened seeds required less light and germinated more rapidly and at higher percentages than seeds tested shortly after maturation. PMID:16665824

  8. Sycamore Seed Germination: The Effects of Provenance, Stratification, Temperature, and Parent Tree

    Treesearch

    Charles D. Webb; Robert E. Farmer

    1968-01-01

    Various stratification periods and germination temperatures were applied to sycamore seed collected along the Chattahoochee River from north Georgia to west Florida. Results showed that percent and speed of germination were greater for seed from southern than from northern provenances. Percent and speed of germination increased as temperature increased. The...

  9. Applied Physics Modules: Notes, Instructions, Data Sheets, Tests, and Test Answer Keys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    These user instructions and related materials are designed to accompany a series of twenty-three applied physics modules which have been developed for postsecondary students in electrical, electronics, machine tool, metals, manufacturing, automotive, diesel, architecture, and civil drafting occupational programs. The instructions include an…

  10. Applied Physics Modules: Notes, Instructions, Data Sheets, Tests, and Test Answer Keys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    These user instructions and related materials are designed to accompany a series of twenty-three applied physics modules which have been developed for postsecondary students in electrical, electronics, machine tool, metals, manufacturing, automotive, diesel, architecture, and civil drafting occupational programs. The instructions include an…

  11. Stratification period and germination of Douglas-fir seed from Oregon seed orchards: two case studies.

    Treesearch

    Frank C. Sorenson

    1991-01-01

    Effect of stratification period (S) and incubation temperature (T) on germination be- havior were tested by using two groups of Douglas-fir orchard seedlots that had given low germination percentages in standard tests. One group of seedlots that had experienced different cone-drying regimes, but otherwise were treated comparably, were germinated at T = 15 and 25 °C...

  12. Engineering in software testing: statistical testing based on a usage model applied to medical device development.

    PubMed

    Jones, P L; Swain, W T; Trammell, C J

    1999-01-01

    When a population is too large for exhaustive study, as is the case for all possible uses of a software system, a statistically correct sample must be drawn as a basis for inferences about the population. A Markov chain usage model is an engineering formalism that represents the population of possible uses for which a product is to be tested. In statistical testing of software based on a Markov chain usage model, the rich body of analytical results available for Markov chains provides numerous insights that can be used in both product development and test planing. A usage model is based on specifications rather than code, so insights that result from model building can inform product decisions in the early stages of a project when the opportunity to prevent problems is the greatest. Statistical testing based on a usage model provides a sound scientific basis for quantifying the reliability of software.

  13. The mechanism underlying fast germination of tomato cultivar LA2711.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchao; Chu, Zhuannan; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Ying; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Dianbo; Weeda, Sarah; Ren, Shuxin; Ouyang, Bo; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Seed germination is important for early plant morphogenesis as well as abiotic stress tolerance, and is mainly controlled by the phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA). Our previous studies identified a salt-tolerant tomato cultivar, LA2711, which is also a fast-germinating genotype, compared to its salt-sensitive counterpart, ZS-5. In an effort to further clarify the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we compared the dynamic levels of ABA and GA4, the transcript abundance of genes involved in their biosynthesis and catabolism as well as signal transduction between the two cultivars. In addition, we tested seed germination sensitivity to ABA and GAs. Our results revealed that insensitivity of seed germination to exogenous ABA and low ABA content in seeds are the physiological mechanisms conferring faster germination rates of LA2711 seeds. SlCYP707A2, which encodes an ABA catabolic enzyme, may play a decisive role in the fast germination rate of LA2711, as it showed a significantly higher level of expression in LA2711 than ZS-5 at most time points tested during germination. The current results will enable us to gain insight into the mechanism(s) regarding seed germination of tomato and the role of fast germination in stress tolerance.

  14. Environmental filtering drives the shape and breadth of the seed germination niche in coastal plant communities.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pascual, Eduardo; Pérez-Arcoiza, Adrián; Prieto, José Alberto; Díaz, Tomás E

    2017-05-01

    A phylogenetic comparative analysis of the seed germination niche was conducted in coastal plant communities of western Europe. Two hypotheses were tested, that (1) the germination niche shape (i.e. the preference for a set of germination cues as opposed to another) would differ between beaches and cliffs to prevent seedling emergence in the less favourable season (winter and summer, respectively); and (2) the germination niche breadth (i.e. the amplitude of germination cues) would be narrower in the seawards communities, where environmental filtering is stronger. Seeds of 30 specialist species of coastal plant communities were collected in natural populations of northern Spain. Their germination was measured in six laboratory treatments based on field temperatures. Germination niche shape was estimated as the best germination temperature. Germination niche breadth was calculated using Pielou's evenness index. Differences between plant communities in their germination niche shape and breadth were tested using phylogenetic generalized least squares regression (PGLS). Germination niche shape differed between communities, being warm-cued in beaches (best germination temperature = 20 °C) and cold-cued in cliffs (14 °C). Germination niche was narrowest in seawards beaches (Pielou's index = 0·89) and broadest in landwards beaches (0·99). Cliffs had an intermediate germination niche breadth (0·95). The relationship between niche and plant community had a positive phylogenetic signal for shape (Pagel's λ = 0·64) and a negative one for breadth (Pagel's λ = -1·71). Environmental filters shape the germination niche to prevent emergence in the season of highest threat for seedling establishment. The germination niche breadth is narrower in the communities with stronger environmental filters, but only in beaches. This study provides empirical support to a community-level generalization of the hypotheses about the environmental drivers of the germination

  15. 40 CFR 1039.235 - What testing requirements apply for certification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certification? 1039.235 Section 1039.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Certifying Engine Families § 1039.235 What testing requirements apply for certification? This section describes the emission testing you must perform to show compliance with the emission standards in §...

  16. A Multivariate Randomization Text of Association Applied to Cognitive Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert; Beard, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    Randomization tests provide a conceptually simple, distribution-free way to implement significance testing. We have applied this method to the problem of evaluating the significance of the association among a number (k) of variables. The randomization method was the random re-ordering of k-1 of the variables. The criterion variable was the value of the largest eigenvalue of the correlation matrix.

  17. Applied Reading Test--Forms A and B, Interim Manual, and Answer Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    Designed for use in the selection of apprentices, trainees, technical and trade personnel, and any other persons who need to read and understand text of a technical nature, this Applied Reading Test specimen set contains six passages and 32 items, has a 30-minute time limit, and is presented in a reusable multiple choice test booklet. The specimen…

  18. Applying Bayesian Item Selection Approaches to Adaptive Tests Using Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.

    2006-01-01

    This study applied the maximum expected information (MEI) and the maximum posterior-weighted information (MPI) approaches of computer adaptive testing item selection to the case of a test using polytomous items following the partial credit model. The MEI and MPI approaches are described. A simulation study compared the efficiency of ability…

  19. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN646) interior. Construction worker applies caulking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-646) interior. Construction worker applies caulking compound to joint between stainless steel weir and concrete. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: March 6, 1959. INEEL negative no. 59-1099 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Applied Studies in Computerized Diagnostic Testing: Implications for Practice. Diagnostic Testing Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David L.

    The use of computers to build diagnostic inferences is presented in two contexts: (1) closed world, exemplified by the space shuttle launch monitoring system; and (2) open world, represented by computerized diagnostic testing of reading comprehension. The analysis shows that the closed world provides a substantially cleaner environment within…

  1. An experimental test of two mathematical models applied to the size-weight illusion.

    PubMed

    Sarris, V; Heineken, E

    1976-05-01

    Two quantitative models, which make different quantitative predictions for the amount of the size-weight illusion, were tested according to the psychophysical methods employed by the respective authors (magnitude estimation versus category ratings). Both models with their corresponding method were supported. This causes uncertainty over Anderson's chaim that the validity of both a model and the applied scale used is sufficiently test by the socalled joint testing procedure.

  2. Applying EVM to Satellite on Ground and In-Orbit Testing - Better Data in Less Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert; Lebbink, Elizabeth-Klein; Lee, Victor; Model, Josh; Wezalis, Robert; Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    Using Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) in satellite integration and test allows rapid verification of the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of a satellite link and is particularly well suited to measurement of low bit rate satellite links where it can result in a major reduction in test time (about 3 weeks per satellite for the Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite [GOES] satellites during ground test) and can provide diagnostic information. Empirical techniques developed to predict BER performance from EVM measurements and lessons learned about applying these techniques during GOES N, O, and P integration test and post launch testing, are discussed.

  3. GERMINAL — A computer code for predicting fuel pin behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, J. C.; Roche, L.; Piron, J. P.; Truffert, J.

    1992-06-01

    In the frame of the R and D on FBR fuels, CEA/DEC is developing the computer code GERMINAL to study the fuel pin thermal-mechanical behaviour during steady-state and incidental conditions. The development of GERMINAL is foreseen in two steps: (1) The GERMINAL 1 code designed as a "working horse" for immediate applications. The version 1 of GERMINAL 1 is presently delivered fully documented with a physical qualification guaranteed up to 8 at%. (2) The version 2 of GERMINAL 1, in addition to what is presently treated in GERMINAL 1 includes the treatment of high burnup effects on the fission gas release and the fuel-clad joint. This version, GERMINAL 1.2, is presently under testing and will be completed up to the end of 1991. The GERMINAL 2 code designed as a reference code for future applications will cover all the aspects of GERMINAL 1 (including high burnup effects) with a more general mechanical treatment, and a completely revised and advanced informatical structure.

  4. Germination phenology determines the propensity for facilitation and competition.

    PubMed

    Leverett, Lindsay D

    2017-09-01

    A single plant can interact both positively and negatively with its neighbors through the processes of facilitation and competition, respectively. Much of the variation in the balance of facilitation and competition that individuals experience can be explained by the degree of physical stress and the sizes or ages of plants during the interaction. Germination phenology partly controls both of these factors, but its role in defining the facilitation-competition balance has not been explicitly considered. I performed an experiment in a population of the winter annual Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) to test whether germinating during physically stressful periods leads to facilitation while germinating during periods that promote growth and reproduction leads to competition. I manipulated germination and neighbor presence across two years in order to quantify the effects of the local plant community on survival, fecundity, and total fitness as a function of germination phenology. Neighbors increased survival when germination occurred under conditions that were unsuitable for survival, but they reduced fecundity in germinants that were otherwise the most fecund. Later germination was associated with facilitation in the first year but competition in the second year. These episodes of facilitation and competition opposed each other, leading to no net effect of neighbors when averaged over all cohorts. These results indicate that variation in germination timing can explain some of the variation in the facilitation-competition balance in plant communities. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Involvement of Coat Proteins in Bacillus subtilis Spore Germination in High-Salinity Environments.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Katja; Setlow, Peter; Reineke, Kai; Driks, Adam; Moeller, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    The germination of spore-forming bacteria in high-salinity environments is of applied interest for food microbiology and soil ecology. It has previously been shown that high salt concentrations detrimentally affect Bacillus subtilis spore germination, rendering this process slower and less efficient. The mechanistic details of these salt effects, however, remained obscure. Since initiation of nutrient germination first requires germinant passage through the spores' protective integuments, the aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the proteinaceous spore coat in germination in high-salinity environments. Spores lacking major layers of the coat due to chemical decoating or mutation germinated much worse in the presence of NaCl than untreated wild-type spores at comparable salinities. However, the absence of the crust, the absence of some individual nonmorphogenetic proteins, and the absence of either CwlJ or SleB had no or little effect on germination in high-salinity environments. Although the germination of spores lacking GerP (which is assumed to facilitate germinant flow through the coat) was generally less efficient than the germination of wild-type spores, the presence of up to 2.4 M NaCl enhanced the germination of these mutant spores. Interestingly, nutrient-independent germination by high pressure was also inhibited by NaCl. Taken together, these results suggest that (i) the coat has a protective function during germination in high-salinity environments; (ii) germination inhibition by NaCl is probably not exerted at the level of cortex hydrolysis, germinant accessibility, or germinant-receptor binding; and (iii) the most likely germination processes to be inhibited by NaCl are ion, Ca(2+)-dipicolinic acid, and water fluxes.

  6. Cost effectiveness as applied to the Viking Lander systems-level thermal development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buna, T.; Shupert, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The economic aspects of thermal testing at the systems-level as applied to the Viking Lander Capsule thermal development program are reviewed. The unique mission profile and pioneering scientific goals of Viking imposed novel requirements on testing, including the development of a simulation technique for the Martian thermal environment. The selected approach included modifications of an existing conventional thermal vacuum facility, and improved test-operational techniques that are applicable to the simulation of the other mission phases as well, thereby contributing significantly to the cost effectiveness of the overall thermal test program.

  7. Sporulation environment of emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus strains determines spore size, heat resistance and germination capacity.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Abee, T

    2013-04-01

    Heat resistance, germination and outgrowth capacity of Bacillus cereus spores in processed foods are major factors in causing the emetic type of gastrointestinal disease. In this study, we aim to identify the impact of different sporulation conditions on spore properties of emetic toxin-producing B. cereus strains. Spore properties of eight different emetic toxin-producing strains were tested, with spores produced in five different sporulation conditions: aerated liquid cultures, air-liquid biofilms, 1.5% agar plates, 0.75% agar plates and swarming colonies. Model food studies revealed spores from emetic toxin-producing strains to germinate efficiently on meat broth- and milk-based agar plates, whereas germination on rice-based agar plates was far less efficient. Notably, spores of all strains germinated efficiently when 0.1% meat broth was added to the rice plates. Analysis of spores derived from different environments revealed large diversity and showed biofilm spores for the strains tested to be the largest in size, the most heat resistant and with the lowest germination capacity. Sporulation in complex conditions such as biofilms and surface swarming colonies increases heat resistance and dormancy of spores. The results obtained imply the importance of sporulation conditions on spore properties of emetic toxin-producing B. cereus strains, as occur for instance in food processing. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. 75 FR 47592 - Final Test Guideline; Product Performance of Skin-applied Insect Repellents of Insect and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Health Organization (WHO) has also published guidelines for testing efficacy of skin-applied mosquito... mosquito repellents applied to human skin. EPA's harmonized test guidelines coincide with the WHO...

  9. 40 CFR 1039.235 - What testing requirements apply for certification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What testing requirements apply for certification? 1039.235 Section 1039.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION...

  10. Applied Performance Tests: How to Judge Them; How to Develop Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeegan, Hugh; Dennis, Cathy C.

    A good applied performance test (APT) concentrates on measurable objectives which are relevant for today's society in general, for the local community, and for the students. APTs should be valid, objective/reliable, straightforward in format, simple to understand, and able to maintain student interest. Scoring procedures should be standardized and…

  11. 21 CFR 111.320 - What requirements apply to laboratory methods for testing and examination?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to laboratory methods for testing and examination? 111.320 Section 111.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING...

  12. Model-based testing with UML applied to a roaming algorithm for bluetooth devices.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhen Ru; Grabowski, Jens; Neukirchen, Helmut; Pals, Holger

    2004-11-01

    In late 2001, the Object Management Group issued a Request for Proposal to develop a testing profile for UML 2.0. In June 2003, the work on the UML 2.0 Testing Profile was finally adopted by the OMG. Since March 2004, it has become an official standard of the OMG. The UML 2.0 Testing Profile provides support for UML based model-driven testing. This paper introduces a methodology on how to use the testing profile in order to modify and extend an existing UML design model for test issues. The application of the methodology will be explained by applying it to an existing UML Model for a Bluetooth device.

  13. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: laboratory evaluation of prototype test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of a study to develop a field test method for assessing the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulating materials. Phase 2 is the laboratory evaluation of the prototype devices for conducting surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact tests. The results indicated that the surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, and impact devices provided some measure of discrimination between samples subjectively judged as having high and moderate friability. In contrast, the abrasion device was non-discriminating in that, for all tests, a residue was produced. It was concluded that all devices be included in the field phase of the study using in-place spray-applied fireproofings having different levels of friability.

  14. Recommendation of appropriate amounts of petrolatum preparation to be applied at patch testing.

    PubMed

    Bruze, Magnus; Isaksson, Marléne; Gruvberger, Birgitta; Frick-Engfeldt, Malin

    2007-05-01

    No recommendation exists on the amount of petrolatum (pet.) preparation to be applied in a Finn Chamber or van der Bend Chamber. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate amount of pet. preparation to apply in the Finn and van der Bend chambers. 12 volunteers were patch tested with green-coloured pet. in Finn and van der Bend chambers on the back on 3 occasions. Doses were 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 mg initially and on second and third occasion, 10 mg was removed in van der Bend Chambers and 35 mg was added. On day 2, the test sites were scored. A negative test equalled a test area not covered to 100%. A positive test meant a completely green-coloured test area. Minor and major spreading was noted. The amount of pet. preparation yielding at most 5% negative reactions and having the least number of reactions with major spreading equalled the appropriate amount. For van der Bend Chambers, all doses yielded more than 5% negative reactions. For the Finn Chamber, 30, 25, and 20 mg pet. yielded less than 5% negative reactions and with major spreading in 60%, 40%, and 25% of test sites. 20 mg pet. preparation was the optimal dose for the Finn Chambers.

  15. Physical characterization of Rhipsalis (Cactaceae) fruits and seeds germination in different temperatures and light regimes.

    PubMed

    Lone, A B; Colombo, R C; Andrade, B L G; Takahashi, L S A; Faria, R T

    2016-06-01

    The germination characteristics of the native cactus species are poorly known, being the temperature and the light the factors that the most interferes in that process. Thus, the objective of the present work was to characterize the fruits and evaluate the influence of the temperature and the light in the seed germination of Rhipsalis floccosa, Rhipsalis pilocarpa and Rhipsalis teres. The tested constant temperatures were 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C and the alternate of 20-30 °C and 25-35 °C in a photoperiod of 10 hours, and with determination of the most appropriate temperature, the germination was tested in light absence. The germination percentage, the index of germination speed and medium time of germination were evaluated. For R. floccosa, the highest germination percentage was at 20 °C. For R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the highest germination percentages occurred in 15 °C and 20 °C. There was correlation to germination percentage between the three species, indicating that they had similar germination behavior. Total absence of germination was verified for the three species in condition of light absence. In conclusion, the temperature of 20 °C is the most suitable for the seed germination of R. floccosa. For the species R. pilocarpa and R. teres, the temperatures of 15 and 20 °C are the most suitable.

  16. Case Studies for the Statistical Design of Experiments Applied to Powered Rotor Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Martin, Preston B.; Commo, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of statistical Design of Experiments (DOE) to helicopter wind tunnel testing was explored during two powered rotor wind tunnel entries during the summers of 2012 and 2013. These tests were performed jointly by the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate Joint Research Program Office and NASA Rotary Wing Project Office, currently the Revolutionary Vertical Lift Project, at NASA Langley Research Center located in Hampton, Virginia. Both entries were conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with a small portion of the overall tests devoted to developing case studies of the DOE approach as it applies to powered rotor testing. A 16-47 times reduction in the number of data points required was estimated by comparing the DOE approach to conventional testing methods. The average error for the DOE surface response model for the OH-58F test was 0.95 percent and 4.06 percent for drag and download, respectively. The DOE surface response model of the Active Flow Control test captured the drag within 4.1 percent of measured data. The operational differences between the two testing approaches are identified, but did not prevent the safe operation of the powered rotor model throughout the DOE test matrices.

  17. Development of a threshold model to predict germination of Populus tomentosa seeds after harvest and storage under ambient condition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Song, Song-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Effects of temperature, storage time and their combination on germination of aspen (Populus tomentosa) seeds were investigated. Aspen seeds were germinated at 5 to 30°C at 5°C intervals after storage for a period of time under 28°C and 75% relative humidity. The effect of temperature on aspen seed germination could not be effectively described by the thermal time (TT) model, which underestimated the germination rate at 5°C and poorly predicted the time courses of germination at 10, 20, 25 and 30°C. A modified TT model (MTT) which assumed a two-phased linear relationship between germination rate and temperature was more accurate in predicting the germination rate and percentage and had a higher likelihood of being correct than the TT model. The maximum lifetime threshold (MLT) model accurately described the effect of storage time on seed germination across all the germination temperatures. An aging thermal time (ATT) model combining both the TT and MLT models was developed to describe the effect of both temperature and storage time on seed germination. When the ATT model was applied to germination data across all the temperatures and storage times, it produced a relatively poor fit. Adjusting the ATT model to separately fit germination data at low and high temperatures in the suboptimal range increased the models accuracy for predicting seed germination. Both the MLT and ATT models indicate that germination of aspen seeds have distinct physiological responses to temperature within a suboptimal range.

  18. Critique of FY 1984 Advertising Mix Test of Wharton Center for Applied Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    experiment and the selection of ADIs for the Reduced advertising Cells in the 1979 Navy Enlistment Marketing Experiment (reported in Marketing Science...AD-Ai?3 653 CRITIQUE OF FY 1984 ADVERTISING NIX TEST OF MHARTON i/1 CENTER FOR APPLIED RE..(U) TEXAS UNIV AT AUSTIN CENTER FOR CYBERNETIC STUDIES A...L4 11.6 M)CROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NA1I0NAL BUREAU Of SOANDARDS, I%3-A .A ’~A~ J ~. Research Report CCS 546 CRITIQUE OF FY 1984 ADVERTISING MIX

  19. Acquisition, simulation, and test replication of weapon firing shock applied to optical sights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Kenneth D.; Gardner, Dave

    2011-09-01

    With the ever increasing desire for range and delivery capabilities of ballistic defence equipment, weapons and sight systems are constantly evolving in complexity. As a result current systems now incorporate more sophisticated technology than ever before. This paper describes the non-intrusive mechanical field data acquisition and subsequent analysis and test integration techniques performed on complex opto-mechanical weapon mounted systems. As a result of physical acquisition, innovative techniques have been developed to enable the synthesis of the transient recordings for the purpose of finite element analysis. Further investigations have revealed new possibilities in applying more accurately controlled 'in house' loads, for low cost representative test purposes.

  20. The clinical utility of force/displacement analysis of muscle testing in applied kinesiology.

    PubMed

    Caruso, W; Leisman, G

    2001-01-01

    Manual muscle testing procedures are the subject of a force and displacement analysis. Equipment was fabricated, tested, and employed to gather force, displacement, and time data for examining muscle test parameters as practiced by applied kinesiology (A.K.) clinicians. Simple mathematical procedures are used to process the data in an effort to find potential patterns of force and displacement which would correspond to the testing of strong and weak muscles on healthy subjects. Particular attention is paid to the leading edge of the force pulses, as most clinicians report that they derive most of their assessment from the initial thrust imparted on the patient's limb. An analysis of the simple linear regression of the slope of the leading edge of a force pulse reveals that a high dx/dF is indicative of a weak muscle test result (as perceived by the tester), and a low dx/dF is indicative of a strong muscle test. Thresholds for dx/dF are determined to discriminate between inhibited and facilitated muscle test results. The data lay the groundwork for future studies that examine the objectivity of A.K. muscle testing.

  1. Environmental and genetic effects on tomato seed metabolic balance and its association with germination vigor.

    PubMed

    Rosental, Leah; Perelman, Adi; Nevo, Noa; Toubiana, David; Samani, Talya; Batushansky, Albert; Sikron, Noga; Saranga, Yehoshua; Fait, Aaron

    2016-12-19

    The metabolite content of a seed and its ability to germinate are determined by genetic makeup and environmental effects during development. The interaction between genetics, environment and seed metabolism and germination was studied in 72 tomato homozygous introgression lines (IL) derived from Solanum pennelli and S. esculentum M82 cultivar. Plants were grown in the field under saline and fresh water irrigation during two consecutive seasons, and collected seeds were subjected to morphological analysis, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolic profiling and germination tests. Seed weight was under tight genetic regulation, but it was not related to germination vigor. Salinity significantly reduced seed number but had little influence on seed metabolites, affecting only 1% of the statistical comparisons. The metabolites negatively correlated to germination were simple sugars and most amino acids, while positive correlations were found for several organic acids and the N metabolites urea and dopamine. Germination tests identified putative loci for improved germination as compared to M82 and in response to salinity, which were also characterized by defined metabolic changes in the seed. An integrative analysis of the metabolite and germination data revealed metabolite levels unambiguously associated with germination percentage and rate, mostly conserved in the different tested seed development environments. Such consistent relations suggest the potential for developing a method of germination vigor prediction by metabolic profiling, as well as add to our understanding of the importance of primary metabolic processes in germination.

  2. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  3. Microstrain-level measurement of third-order elastic constants applying dynamic acousto-elastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Guillaume; Talmant, Maryline; Marrelec, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear elasticity of solids at the microstrain level has been recently studied by applying dynamic acousto-elastic testing. It is the analog of conventional quasi-static acousto-elastic experiments but the strain-dependence (or stress-dependence) of ultrasonic wave-speed is measured with an applied strain ranging from 10-7 to 10-5 and produced by a stationary elastic wave. In conventional quasi-static acousto-elastic experiments, the strain is applied in a quasi-static manner; it exceeds 10-4 and can reach 10-2. In this work, we apply dynamic acousto-elastic testing to measure the third-order elastic constants of two isotropic materials: polymethyl methacrylate and dry Berea sandstone. The peak amplitude of the dynamic applied strain is 8 × 10-6. The method is shown to be particularly suitable for materials exhibiting large elastic nonlinearity like sandstones, since the measurement is performed in the domain of validity of the third-order hyperelastic model. In contrast, conventional quasi-static acousto-elastic experiments in such materials are often performed outside the domain of validity of the third-order hyperelastic model and the stress-dependence of the ultrasonic wave-speed must be extrapolated at zero stress, leading to approximate values of the third-order elastic constants. The uncertainty of the evaluation of the third-order elastic constants is assessed by repeating multiple times the measurements and with Monte-Carlo simulations. The obtained values of the Murnaghan third-order elastic constants are l = -73 GPa ± 9%, m = -34 GPa ± 9%, and n = -61 GPa ± 10% for polymethyl methacrylate, and l = -17 000 GPa ± 20%, m = -11 000 GPa ± 10%, and n = -30 000 GPa ± 20% for dry Berea sandstone.

  4. Applying item response theory and computer adaptive testing: the challenges for health outcomes assessment.

    PubMed

    Fayers, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    We review the papers presented at the NCI/DIA conference, to identify areas of controversy and uncertainty, and to highlight those aspects of item response theory (IRT) and computer adaptive testing (CAT) that require theoretical or empirical research in order to justify their application to patient reported outcomes (PROs). IRT and CAT offer exciting potential for the development of a new generation of PRO instruments. However, most of the research into these techniques has been in non-healthcare settings, notably in education. Educational tests are very different from PRO instruments, and consequently problematic issues arise when adapting IRT and CAT to healthcare research. Clinical scales differ appreciably from educational tests, and symptoms have characteristics distinctly different from examination questions. This affects the transferring of IRT technology. Particular areas of concern when applying IRT to PROs include inadequate software, difficulties in selecting models and communicating results, insufficient testing of local independence and other assumptions, and a need of guidelines for estimating sample size requirements. Similar concerns apply to differential item functioning (DIF), which is an important application of IRT. Multidimensional IRT is likely to be advantageous only for closely related PRO dimensions. Although IRT and CAT provide appreciable potential benefits, there is a need for circumspection. Not all PRO scales are necessarily appropriate targets for this methodology. Traditional psychometric methods, and especially qualitative methods, continue to have an important role alongside IRT. Research should be funded to address the specific concerns that have been identified.

  5. Proteomic analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) seeds during germination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pingfang; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Hui; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shihua

    2007-09-01

    Although seed germination is a major subject in plant physiological research, there is still a long way to go to elucidate the mechanism of seed germination. Recently, functional genomic strategies have been applied to study the germination of plant seeds. Here, we conducted a proteomic analysis of seed germination in rice (Oryza sativa indica cv. 9311) - a model monocot. Comparison of 2-DE maps showed that there were 148 proteins displayed differently in the germination process of rice seeds. Among the changed proteins, 63 were down-regulated, 69 were up-regulated (including 20 induced proteins). The down-regulated proteins were mainly storage proteins, such as globulin and glutelin, and proteins associated with seed maturation, such as "early embryogenesis protein" and "late embryogenesis abundant protein", and proteins related to desiccation, such as "abscisic acid-induced protein" and "cold-regulated protein". The degradation of storage proteins mainly happened at the late stage of germination phase II (48 h imbibition), while that of seed maturation and desiccation associated proteins occurred at the early stage of phase II (24 h imbibition). In addition to alpha-amylase, the up-regulated proteins were mainly those involved in glycolysis such as UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and pyruvate decarboxylase. The results reflected the possible biochemical and physiological processes of germination of rice seeds.

  6. [Study on physiological and germination characteristics of Tulipa edulis seed].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengjun; Zhu, Zaibiao; Guo, Qiaosheng; Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Hongjian; Miao, Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Current study was conducted to investigate the seed physiological characteristics of Tulipa edulis and improve germination rate. Anatomical characteristics was observed. Seed water absorption curve was tested by soaking method. Dynamic of embryo development and germination rate as well as germination index under different conditions were recorded. And the biological test of cabbage seed was used for detecting the germination inhibitors. The embryo rate of newly matured seeds was about 10%, and there was no obstacle of water absorption on testa of T. edulis. The optimum method for embryo development was exposure to 300 mg x L(-1) gibberellin solution for 24 hours, and stratification at 25 degrees C for 70 days followed by stratification at 5 degrees C for 40 days. The germintion rate and germination index of dormancy-broken seeds under the dark environment at 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C were significantly higher than those under other conditions. Additionally, there were some germination inhibitory substances in dry seeds. The seed of T. edulis can be classified as having complex morphophysiological dormancy, and the morphological embryo dormancy played a leading role. Warm and cold stratification resulted in a fast dormancy breaking effect, and a high germination rate more than 90% could be obtained under the optimum conditions.

  7. Impact of gene patents on diagnostic testing: a new patent landscaping method applied to spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Berthels, Nele; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2011-11-01

    Recent reports in Europe and the United States raise concern about the potential negative impact of gene patents on the freedom to operate of diagnosticians and on the access of patients to genetic diagnostic services. Patents, historically seen as legal instruments to trigger innovation, could cause undesired side effects in the public health domain. Clear empirical evidence on the alleged hindering effect of gene patents is still scarce. We therefore developed a patent categorization method to determine which gene patents could indeed be problematic. The method is applied to patents relevant for genetic testing of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The SCA test is probably the most widely used DNA test in (adult) neurology, as well as one of the most challenging due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Typically tested as a gene panel covering the five common SCA subtypes, we show that the patenting of SCA genes and testing methods and the associated licensing conditions could have far-reaching consequences on legitimate access to this gene panel. Moreover, with genetic testing being increasingly standardized, simply ignoring patents is unlikely to hold out indefinitely. This paper aims to differentiate among so-called 'gene patents' by lifting out the truly problematic ones. In doing so, awareness is raised among all stakeholders in the genetic diagnostics field who are not necessarily familiar with the ins and outs of patenting and licensing.

  8. Impact of gene patents on diagnostic testing: a new patent landscaping method applied to spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Berthels, Nele; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports in Europe and the United States raise concern about the potential negative impact of gene patents on the freedom to operate of diagnosticians and on the access of patients to genetic diagnostic services. Patents, historically seen as legal instruments to trigger innovation, could cause undesired side effects in the public health domain. Clear empirical evidence on the alleged hindering effect of gene patents is still scarce. We therefore developed a patent categorization method to determine which gene patents could indeed be problematic. The method is applied to patents relevant for genetic testing of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The SCA test is probably the most widely used DNA test in (adult) neurology, as well as one of the most challenging due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Typically tested as a gene panel covering the five common SCA subtypes, we show that the patenting of SCA genes and testing methods and the associated licensing conditions could have far-reaching consequences on legitimate access to this gene panel. Moreover, with genetic testing being increasingly standardized, simply ignoring patents is unlikely to hold out indefinitely. This paper aims to differentiate among so-called ‘gene patents' by lifting out the truly problematic ones. In doing so, awareness is raised among all stakeholders in the genetic diagnostics field who are not necessarily familiar with the ins and outs of patenting and licensing. PMID:21811306

  9. CR-Calculus and adaptive array theory applied to MIMO random vibration control tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musella, U.; Manzato, S.; Peeters, B.; Guillaume, P.

    2016-09-01

    Performing Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) tests to reproduce the vibration environment in a user-defined number of control points of a unit under test is necessary in applications where a realistic environment replication has to be achieved. MIMO tests require vibration control strategies to calculate the required drive signal vector that gives an acceptable replication of the target. This target is a (complex) vector with magnitude and phase information at the control points for MIMO Sine Control tests while in MIMO Random Control tests, in the most general case, the target is a complete spectral density matrix. The idea behind this work is to tailor a MIMO random vibration control approach that can be generalized to other MIMO tests, e.g. MIMO Sine and MIMO Time Waveform Replication. In this work the approach is to use gradient-based procedures over the complex space, applying the so called CR-Calculus and the adaptive array theory. With this approach it is possible to better control the process performances allowing the step-by-step Jacobian Matrix update. The theoretical bases behind the work are followed by an application of the developed method to a two-exciter two-axis system and by performance comparisons with standard methods.

  10. Promotion of seed germination by cyanide.

    PubMed

    Taylorson, R B; Hendricks, S B

    1973-07-01

    Potassium cyanide at 3 mum to 10 mm promotes germination of Amaranthus albus, Lactuca sativa, and Lepidium virginicum seeds. l-Cysteine hydrogen sulfide lyase, which catalyzes the reaction of HCN with l-cysteine to form beta-l cyanoalanine, is active in the seeds. beta-l-Cyanoalanine is the most effective of the 23 alpha-amino acids tested for promoting germination of A. albus seeds. Aspartate, which is produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of asparagine formed by hydrolysis from beta-cyanoalanine, is the second most effective of the 23 amino acids. Uptake of aspartate-4-(14)C is much lower than of cyanide.Radioactive tracer in K(14)CN shows uptake of about 1.5 mumoles of HCN per gram of A. albus and L. sativa seeds after 20 hours of imbibition. Extracts of the seeds gave high (14)C activity in beta-cyanoalanine, asparagine, and aspartate. The acid-hydrolyzed protein extract gave high activity only in aspartate. Tests were negative for free cyanide in the seed. Respiration of the seed is inhibited more than 75% by KCN and by KN(3) at 10 mm. Azide at greater than 1.0 mm inhibits the promotion of germination by cyanides. Neither 0.1 mm KCN nor KN(3) inhibit O(2) consumption, whereas lower concentrations promote germination. It is concluded that the high rate of utilization of cyanide in the reaction to form beta-l-cyanoalanine and the subsequent incorporation into protein limit any inhibition of oxygen consumption. The promotion of seed germination is substrate-limited by asparagine-aspartate, which is required for protein synthesis.

  11. Effects of germination season on life history traits and on transgenerational plasticity in seed dormancy in a cold desert annual

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Juan J.; Tan, Dun Y.; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.

    2016-01-01

    The maternal environment can influence the intensity of seed dormancy and thus seasonal germination timing and post-germination life history traits. We tested the hypotheses that germination season influences phenotypic expression of post-germination life history traits in the cold desert annual Isatis violascens and that plants from autumn- and spring-germinating seeds produce different proportions of seeds with nondeep and intermediate physiological dormancy (PD). Seeds were sown in summer and flexibility in various life history traits determined for plants that germinated in autumn and in spring. A higher percentage of spring- than of autumn-germinating plants survived the seedling stage, and all surviving plants reproduced. Number of silicles increased with plant size (autumn- > spring-germinating plants), whereas percent dry mass allocated to reproduction was higher in spring- than in autumn-germinating plants. Autumn-germinating plants produced proportionally more seeds with intermediate PD than spring-germinating plants, while spring-germinating plants produced proportionally more seeds with nondeep PD than autumn-germinating plants. Flexibility throughout the life history and transgenerational plasticity in seed dormancy are adaptations of I. violascens to its desert habitat. Our study is the first to demonstrate that autumn- and spring-germinating plants in a species population differ in proportion of seeds produced with different levels of PD. PMID:27117090

  12. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jerr; Plachta, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing both thermally and structurally were performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  13. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Plachta, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing, both thermal and structural was performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  14. Applying massively parallel sequencing to paternity testing on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Xueying; Ma, Ke; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan; Shao, Chengchen; Xie, Jianhui; Liu, Wenbin

    2017-09-12

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is a promising supplementary method for forensic genetics and has gradually been applied to forensic casework. In this study, we applied MPS to forensic casework on an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine to evaluate its performance in paternity testing with mismatched STR loci. A total of 15 samples from seven cases containing one mismatched locus by capillary electrophoresis typing were analyzed. Combined paternity index (CPI) and relative chance of paternity were calculated according to the International Society for Forensic Genetics guidelines and the Chinese national standards recommended for paternity testing. With simultaneous analysis of enough STR loci, the results support the certainty of paternity, and the mismatched alleles were considered to be mutations (CPI>10,000). With the detection of allele sequence structures, the origins of the mutations were inferred in some cases. Meanwhile, nine STRs (CSF1PO, D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D12S391, D21S11 and D4S2408) were found in an increased number of unique alleles and three new alleles in three STRs (D2S441, D21S11, and FGA) that have not been reported before were detected. Therefore, MPS can provide valuable information for forensic genetics research and play a promising role in paternity testing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Applying computerized adaptive testing to the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised: Rasch analysis of workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shu-Ching; Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Li, Yu-Chi; Yui, Mei-Shu

    2014-02-17

    Workplace bullying is a prevalent problem in contemporary work places that has adverse effects on both the victims of bullying and organizations. With the rapid development of computer technology in recent years, there is an urgent need to prove whether item response theory-based computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency and measurement precision of a CAT-based test for hospital nurses compared to traditional nonadaptive testing (NAT). Under the preliminary conditions of a single domain derived from the scale, a CAT module bullying scale model with polytomously scored items is provided as an example for evaluation purposes. A total of 300 nurses were recruited and responded to the 22-item Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R). All NAT (or CAT-selected) items were calibrated with the Rasch rating scale model and all respondents were randomly selected for a comparison of the advantages of CAT and NAT in efficiency and precision by paired t tests and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The NAQ-R is a unidimensional construct that can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying through CAT-based administration. Nursing measures derived from both tests (CAT and NAT) were highly correlated (r=.97) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P=.49) as expected. CAT required fewer items than NAT (an efficiency gain of 32%), suggesting a reduced burden for respondents. There were significant differences in work tenure between the 2 groups (bullied and nonbullied) at a cutoff point of 6 years at 1 worksite. An AUROC of 0.75 (95% CI 0.68-0.79) with logits greater than -4.2 (or >30 in summation) was defined as being highly likely bullied in a workplace. With CAT-based administration of the NAQ-R for nurses, their burden was substantially reduced without compromising measurement precision.

  16. Disentangling manual muscle testing and Applied Kinesiology: critique and reinterpretation of a literature review.

    PubMed

    Haas, Mitchell; Cooperstein, Robert; Peterson, David

    2007-08-23

    Cuthbert and Goodheart recently published a narrative review on the reliability and validity of manual muscle testing (MMT) in the Journal. The authors should be recognized for their effort to synthesize this vast body of literature. However, the review contains critical errors in the search methods, inclusion criteria, quality assessment, validity definitions, study interpretation, literature synthesis, generalizability of study findings, and conclusion formulation that merit a reconsideration of the authors' findings. Most importantly, a misunderstanding of the review could easily arise because the authors did not distinguish the general use of muscle strength testing from the specific applications that distinguish the Applied Kinesiology (AK) chiropractic technique. The article makes the fundamental error of implying that the reliability and validity of manual muscle testing lends some degree of credibility to the unique diagnostic procedures of AK. The purpose of this commentary is to provide a critical appraisal of the review, suggest conclusions consistent with the literature both reviewed and omitted, and extricate conclusions that can be made about AK in particular from those that can be made about MMT. When AK is disentangled from standard orthopedic muscle testing, the few studies evaluating unique AK procedures either refute or cannot support the validity of AK procedures as diagnostic tests. The evidence to date does not support the use of MMT for the diagnosis of organic disease or pre/subclinical conditions.

  17. Clinical usefulness of the clock drawing test applying rasch analysis in predicting of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Doo Han; Lee, Jae Shin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the clinical usefulness of the clock drawing test applying Rasch analysis for predicting the level of cognitive impairment. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 187 stroke patients with cognitive impairment were enrolled in this study. The 187 patients were evaluated by the clock drawing test developed through Rasch analysis along with the mini-mental state examination of cognitive evaluation tool. An analysis of the variance was performed to examine the significance of the mini-mental state examination and the clock drawing test according to the general characteristics of the subjects. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine the cutoff point for cognitive impairment and to calculate the sensitivity and specificity values. [Results] The results of comparison of the clock drawing test with the mini-mental state showed significant differences in according to gender, age, education, and affected side. A total CDT of 10.5, which was selected as the cutoff point to identify cognitive impairement, showed a sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, positive predictive, and negative predicive values of 86.4%, 91.5%, 0.8, 95%, and 88.2%. [Conclusion] The clock drawing test is believed to be useful in assessments and interventions based on its excellent ability to identify cognitive disorders.

  18. MicroRNA transcriptomic analysis of heterosis during maize seed germination.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dong; Wang, Yinju; Han, Mingshui; Fu, Zhiyuan; Li, Weihua; Liu, Zonghua; Hu, Yanmin; Tang, Jihua

    2012-01-01

    Heterosis has been utilized widely in the breeding of maize and other crops, and plays an important role in increasing yield, improving quality and enhancing stresses resistance, but the molecular mechanism responsible for heterosis is far from clear. To illustrate whether miRNA-dependent gene regulation is responsible for heterosis during maize germination, a deep-sequencing technique was applied to germinating embryos of a maize hybrid, Yuyu22, which is cultivated widely in China and its parental inbred lines, Yu87-1 and Zong3. The target genes of several miRNAs showing significant expression in the hybrid and parental lines were predicted and tested using real-time PCR. A total of 107 conserved maize miRNAs were co-detected in the hybrid and parental lines. Most of these miRNAs were expressed non-additively in the hybrid compared to its parental lines. These results indicated that miRNAs might participate in heterosis during maize germination and exert an influence via the decay of their target genes. Novel miRNAs were predicted follow a rigorous criterion and only the miRNAs detected in all three samples were treated as a novel maize miRNA. In total, 34 miRNAs belonged to 20 miRNA families were predicted in germinating maize seeds. Global repression of miRNAs in the hybrid, which might result in enhanced gene expression, might be one reason why the hybrid showed higher embryo germination vigor compared to its parental lines.

  19. Measuring effects of music, noise, and healing energy using a seed germination bioassay.

    PubMed

    Creath, Katherine; Schwartz, Gary E

    2004-02-01

    To measure biologic effects of music, noise, and healing energy without human preferences or placebo effects using seed germination as an objective biomarker. A series of five experiments were performed utilizing okra and zucchini seeds germinated in acoustically shielded, thermally insulated, dark, humid growth chambers. Conditions compared were an untreated control, musical sound, pink noise, and healing energy. Healing energy was administered for 15-20 minutes every 12 hours with the intention that the treated seeds would germinate faster than the untreated seeds. The objective marker was the number of seeds sprouted out of groups of 25 seeds counted at 12-hour intervals over a 72-hour growing period. Temperature and relative humidity were monitored every 15 minutes inside the seed germination containers. A total of 14 trials were run testing a total of 4600 seeds. Musical sound had a highly statistically significant effect on the number of seeds sprouted compared to the untreated control over all five experiments for the main condition (p < 0.002) and over time (p < 0.000002). This effect was independent of temperature, seed type, position in room, specific petri dish, and person doing the scoring. Musical sound had a significant effect compared to noise and an untreated control as a function of time (p < 0.03) while there was no significant difference between seeds exposed to noise and an untreated control. Healing energy also had a significant effect compared to an untreated control (main condition, p < 0.0006) and over time (p < 0.0001) with a magnitude of effect comparable to that of musical sound. This study suggests that sound vibrations (music and noise) as well as biofields (bioelectromagnetic and healing intention) both directly affect living biologic systems, and that a seed germination bioassay has the sensitivity to enable detection of effects caused by various applied energetic conditions.

  20. Germination of Chenopodium Album in Response to Microwave Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Será, Bozena; Stranák, Vitezslav; Serý, Michal; Tichý, Milan; Spatenka, Petr

    2008-08-01

    The seeds of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.) were stimulated by low-pressure discharge. The tested seeds were exposed to plasma discharge for different time durations (from 6 minutes to 48 minutes). Germination tests were performed under specified laboratory conditions during seven days in five identical and completely independent experiments. Significant differences between the control and plasma-treated seeds were observed. The treated seeds showed structural changes on the surface of the seat coat. They germinated faster and their sprout accretion on the first day of seed germination was longer. Germination rate for the untreated seeds was 15% while it increased approximately three times (max 55%) for seeds treated by plasma from 12 minutes to 48 minutes.

  1. The concealed information test as an instrument of applied differential psychophysiology: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Furedy, John J

    2009-09-01

    In this interpretative paper, I consider four sets of methodological issues that may be relevant to improving the concealed information test (CIT) as an instrument of applied differential psychophysiology. The first set has to do with psychophysiological measurement in the CIT (e.g., specific sensitivity testing in lab vs. field). Secondly, I consider the relationships between the psychological process of deception and the CIT. Thirdly, I consider the problem of laboratory-to-field generalization of the CIT, a consideration that includes a discussion of whether the lab/field differences are merely quantitative or actually qualitative. Finally, I discuss theories concerning the hypothetical mechanisms underlying the CIT, and argue that while the purely cognitive, Sokolovian, orienting response (OR) account is widely accepted as the sole mechanism, there is evidence to suggest that not just motivational, but even emotional mechanisms are also relevant.

  2. Improvement of Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel Flow Quality as Applied to Wall Mounted Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    A survey to determine the characteristics of a boundary layer that forms on the wall of the Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel has been performed. Early results showed significant differences in the velocity profiles as measured spanwise across the wall. An investigation of the flow in the upstream contraction revealed the presence of a separation bubble at the beginning of the contraction which caused much of the observed unsteadiness. Vortex generators were successfully applied to the contraction inlet to alleviate the separation. A final survey of the wall boundary layer revealed variations in the displacement and momentum thicknesses to be less than +/- 5% for all but the most upper portion of the wall. The flow quality was deemed adequate to continue the planned follow-on tests to help develop the semi-span test technique.

  3. A Study of Applying Pulsed Remote Field Eddy Current in Ferromagnetic Pipes Testing.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingwang; Shi, Yibing; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yanjun

    2017-05-05

    Pulsed Remote Field Eddy Current Testing (PRFECT) attracts the attention in the testing of ferromagnetic pipes because of its continuous spectrum. This paper simulated the practical PRFECT of pipes by using ANSYS software and employed Least Squares Support Vector Regression (LSSVR) to extract the zero-crossing time to analyze the pipe thickness. As a result, a secondary peak is found in zero-crossing time when transmitter passed by a defect. The secondary peak will lead to wrong quantification and the localization of defects, especially when defects are found only at the transmitter location. Aiming to eliminate the secondary peaks, double sensing coils are set in the transition zone and Wiener deconvolution filter is applied. In the proposed method, position dependent response of the differential signals from the double sensing coils is calibrated by employing zero-mean normalization. The methods proposed in this paper are validated by analyzing the simulation signals and can improve the practicality of PRFECT of ferromagnetic pipes.

  4. Suicidal germination for parasitic weed control.

    PubMed

    Zwanenburg, Binne; Mwakaboko, Alinanuswe S; Kannan, Chinnaswamy

    2016-11-01

    Parasitic weeds of the genera Striga and Orobanche spp. cause severe yield losses in agriculture, especially in developing countries and the Mediterranean. Seeds of these weeds germinate by a chemical signal exuded by the roots of host plants. The radicle thus produced attaches to the root of the host plant, which can then supply nutrients to the parasite. There is an urgent need to control these weeds to ensure better agricultural production. The naturally occurring chemical signals are strigolactones (SLs), e.g. strigol and orobanchol. One option to control these weeds involves the use of SLs as suicidal germination agents, where germination takes place in the absence of a host. Owing to the lack of nutrients, the germinated seeds will die. The structure of natural SLs is too complex to allow multigram synthesis. Therefore, SL analogues are developed for this purpose. Examples are GR24 and Nijmegen-1. In this paper, the SL analogues Nijmegen-1 and Nijmegen-1 Me were applied in the field as suicidal germination agents. Both SL analogues were formulated using an appropriate EC-approved emulsifier (polyoxyethylene sorbitol hexaoleate) and applied to tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) fields infested by Orobanche ramosa L. (hemp broomrape), following a strict protocol. Four out of 12 trials showed a reduction in broomrape of ≥95%, two trials were negative, two showed a moderate result, one was unclear and in three cases there was no Orobanche problem in the year of the trials. The trial plots were ca 2000 m(2) ; half of that area was treated with stimulant emulsion, the other half was not treated. The optimal amount of stimulant was 6.25 g ha(-1) . A preconditioning prior to the treatment was a prerequisite for a successful trial. In conclusion, the suicidal germination approach to reducing O. ramosa in tobacco fields using formulated SL analogues was successful. Two other options for weed control are discussed: deactivation of stimulants prior to action and

  5. Seed after-ripening and dormancy determine adult life history independently of germination timing.

    PubMed

    de Casas, Rafael Rubio; Kovach, Katherine; Dittmar, Emily; Barua, Deepak; Barco, Brenden; Donohue, Kathleen

    2012-05-01

    • Seed dormancy can affect life history through its effects on germination time. Here, we investigate its influence on life history beyond the timing of germination. • We used the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to chilling at the germination and flowering stages to test the following: how seed dormancy affects germination responses to the environment; whether variation in dormancy affects adult phenology independently of germination time; and whether environmental cues experienced by dormant seeds have an effect on adult life history. • Dormancy conditioned the germination response to low temperatures, such that prolonged periods of chilling induced dormancy in nondormant seeds, but stimulated germination in dormant seeds. The alleviation of dormancy through after-ripening was associated with earlier flowering, independent of germination date. Experimental dormancy manipulations showed that prolonged chilling at the seed stage always induced earlier flowering, regardless of seed dormancy. Surprisingly, this effect of seed chilling on flowering time was observed even when low temperatures did not induce germination. • In summary, seed dormancy influences flowering time and hence life history independent of its effects on germination timing. We conclude that the seed stage has a pronounced effect on life history, the influence of which goes well beyond the timing of germination.

  6. Natural variation in germination responses of Arabidopsis to seasonal cues and their associated physiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Deepak; Butler, Colleen; Tisdale, Tracy E.; Donohue, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite the intense interest in phenological adaptation to environmental change, the fundamental character of natural variation in germination is almost entirely unknown. Specifically, it is not known whether different genotypes within a species are germination specialists to particular conditions, nor is it known what physiological mechanisms of germination regulation vary in natural populations and how they are associated with responses to particular environmental factors. Methods We used a set of recombinant inbred genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which linkage disequilibrium has been disrupted over seven generations, to test for genetic variation and covariation in germination responses to distinct environmental factors. We then examined physiological mechanisms associated with those responses, including seed-coat permeability and sensitivity to the phytohormones gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Key Results Genetic variation for germination was environment-dependent, but no evidence for specialization of germination to different conditions was found. Hormonal sensitivities also exhibited significant genetic variation, but seed-coat properties did not. GA sensitivity was associated with germination responses to multiple environmental factors, but seed-coat permeability and ABA sensitivity were associated with specific germination responses, suggesting that an evolutionary change in GA sensitivity could affect germination in multiple environments, but that of ABA sensitivity may affect germination under more restricted conditions. Conclusions The physiological mechanisms of germination responses to specific environmental factors therefore can influence the ability to adapt to diverse seasonal environments encountered during colonization of new habitats or with future predicted climate change. PMID:22012958

  7. Germination of red alder seed.

    Treesearch

    M.A. Radwan; D.S. DeBell

    1981-01-01

    Red alder seeds were collected from six locations throughout the natural range of the species. Each seed lot was obtained from a single tree, and the seeds were used to determine germination with and without stratification treatment. Irrespective of treatment, germination varied significantly (P

  8. Role of fire in the germination ecology of fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum), an invasive African bunchgrass in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Edith N. Adkins; Susan Cordell; Donald R. Drake

    2011-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were carried out to test factors expected to be relevant for the germination of fountain grass: (1) light; (2) emergence of fountain grass seedlings from depths of 0, 2.5, and 5 cm; (3) fire passing over exposed and buried seeds; (4) laboratory heat treatment mimicking exposure to grass fire. Both fire in the field and heat applied in the...

  9. Evaluation of feasibility of static tests applied to Küre VMS ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Çelik Balci, Nurgül; Şeref Sönmez, M.

    2015-04-01

    Küre volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) ore deposits have been mined for its copper content for over centuries. However, there is no published data on AMD around Küre VMS ore deposits. This study investigates the sources of acid producing mechanisms in Küre, using field and laboratorial approaches. Geochemical static tests to predict AMD generation are widely applied to mining sites for assessing potential environmental consequences. However, there are well known limitations of these methods particularly resulting from assumptions used for calculations. To test the feasibility of the methods to predict potential of AMD generation of Küre (VMS) copper deposits, for the first time, acid production and neutralization potential of various mine wastes of Küre (VMS) copper deposits were determined. To test our static test results, in situ and laboratory geochemical data were also obtained from the groundwater discharges from Bakibaba underground mining tunnels. Feasibility study showed that, despite a few inconsistencies, static tests were suitable for predicting generation of AMD around Küre copper mining site and reflected well the site conditions. The current study revealed that pulp density, defined as solid/liquid ratio and used for static tests, is an important limiting factor to predict reliable data for AMD generation. In this study, we also determined surface waters affected by AMD are predicted to have a pH value between 3 and 5, with an average of pH 4. Excessive concentrations of manganese, copper, cobalt and sulfate are also noted with considerable amounts of iron and zinc, which can reach to toxic levels. Moreover, iron and zinc were found to be the controlling the fate of metals by precipitation and co-precipitation, due to their relatively depleted concentrations at redox shifting zones. Key words: Küre pyritic copper ore, Bakibaba mining tunnels, volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposits, acid production potential, neutralization potential

  10. Underdeveloped embryos and germination in Aristolochia galeata seeds.

    PubMed

    Alves-Da-Silva, D; Borghetti, F; Thompson, K; Pritchard, H; Grime, J P

    2011-01-01

    Aristolochiaceae have been described as having seeds with underdeveloped embryos and morphological or morphophysiological dormancy. Aristolochia galeata is a native climber found in the Cerrado biome, associated with road and gallery forest edges. The aims of this study were to investigate: embryo growth rate, morphology and seed germination parameters under different treatments. Embryos were excised to obtain embryo length at four stages: initial, seeds after coat rupture, radicle tip protrusion and cotyledon emergence from the seed coat. Germination tests were conducted at 30 °C under three nitrate concentrations (1, 10 and 20 mM), fluctuating temperature (27/20 °C) and light and dark conditions. We found that seeds have underdeveloped embryos, which take about 301 ± 178 h (±SD) to achieve seed coat rupture, another 205 ± 126 h to reach radicle protrusion and 176 ± 76 h more to the final stage of cotyledon emergence. Germinability was above 52% in all treatments, except in the dark (15%). For all treatments, average germination time was above 290 ± 123 h. Potassium nitrate increased germinability to >87%. No particular treatment was required for embryo development, but seeds in the population that continued to germinate after 1 month were probably in various states of non-deep, simple morphophysiological dormancy. Increased germinability in nitrate treatments and light requirement for germination could prevent germination under unsuitable environmental conditions and be a strategy to increase seedling establishment in the cerrado. © 2010 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Intersection of two signalling pathways: extracellular nucleotides regulate pollen germination and pollen tube growth via nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Stuart A; Torres, Jonathan; Rivera, Amy L; Cintolesi, Viviana A; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2009-01-01

    Plant and animal cells release or secrete ATP by various mechanisms, and this activity allows extracellular ATP to serve as a signalling molecule. Recent reports suggest that extracellular ATP induces plant responses ranging from increased cytosolic calcium to changes in auxin transport, xenobiotic resistance, pollen germination, and growth. Although calcium has been identified as a secondary messenger for the extracellular ATP signal, other parts of this signal transduction chain remain unknown. Increasing the extracellular concentration of ATPgammaS, a poorly-hydrolysable ATP analogue, inhibited both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, while the addition of AMPS had no effect. Because pollen tube elongation is also sensitive to nitric oxide, this raised the possibility that a connection exists between the two pathways. Four approaches were used to test whether the germination and growth effects of extracellular ATPgammaS were transduced via nitric oxide. The results showed that increases in extracellular ATPgammaS induced increases in cellular nitric oxide, chemical agonists of the nitric oxide signalling pathway lowered the threshold of extracellular ATPgammaS that inhibits pollen germination, an antagonist of guanylate cyclase, which can inhibit some nitric oxide signalling pathways, blocked the ATPgammaS-induced inhibition of both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, and the effects of applied ATPgammaS were blocked in nia1nia2 mutants, which have diminished NO production. The concurrence of these four data sets support the conclusion that the suppression of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation by extracellular nucleotides is mediated in part via the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

  12. Spore swelling and germination as a bioassay for the rapid screening of crude biological extracts for antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Uldahl, Svein Atle; Knutsen, Gjert

    2009-10-01

    Screening for bioactivity is commonly performed in vivo in a bioassay purposefully designed for revealing a defined bioactivity (e.g. fungicide or antibacterial activity). This allows the testing of many crude extracts. In the present work a new method (bioassay) targeting spore swelling and germination to assess antifungal susceptibility is developed and evaluated. Traditionally, antifungal activity has been investigated using disk diffusion assays or micro-well plates. Inhibition is measured as a function of radial growth, inhibition zone or turbidity. The construction of a bioassay composed of germinating fungal spores bears the prospect of being a more rapid method, allowing more extracts to be screened within a shorter time frame. It can also be used to reveal antifungal action at an early state in the prospecting process. Suppression of spore swelling provides early indication of inhibitory potential and the type of swelling curve produced might indicate the mechanism of fungistasis. A strain of Absidia glauca Hagem served as model organism. A Beckman Coulter Multiziser 3 particle analyser was applied for the determination of bioactivity and investigation of the sporangiospores. Inhibition was standardized against two known fungicides (sorbic and benzoic acid). Four biological extract solvents were also tested; where DMSO was found to be the best candidate as extract solvent in the assay. Inhibition was investigated as changes in volumes of the germinating spores using germination as endpoint target. The new bioassay was found to be a simple and rapid method for detection of antifungal activity of extracts.

  13. Applying Computerized Adaptive Testing to the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised: Rasch Analysis of Workplace Bullying

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shu-Ching; Li, Yu-Chi; Yui, Mei-Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Workplace bullying is a prevalent problem in contemporary work places that has adverse effects on both the victims of bullying and organizations. With the rapid development of computer technology in recent years, there is an urgent need to prove whether item response theory–based computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency and measurement precision of a CAT-based test for hospital nurses compared to traditional nonadaptive testing (NAT). Under the preliminary conditions of a single domain derived from the scale, a CAT module bullying scale model with polytomously scored items is provided as an example for evaluation purposes. Methods A total of 300 nurses were recruited and responded to the 22-item Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R). All NAT (or CAT-selected) items were calibrated with the Rasch rating scale model and all respondents were randomly selected for a comparison of the advantages of CAT and NAT in efficiency and precision by paired t tests and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Results The NAQ-R is a unidimensional construct that can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying through CAT-based administration. Nursing measures derived from both tests (CAT and NAT) were highly correlated (r=.97) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P=.49) as expected. CAT required fewer items than NAT (an efficiency gain of 32%), suggesting a reduced burden for respondents. There were significant differences in work tenure between the 2 groups (bullied and nonbullied) at a cutoff point of 6 years at 1 worksite. An AUROC of 0.75 (95% CI 0.68-0.79) with logits greater than –4.2 (or >30 in summation) was defined as being highly likely bullied in a workplace. Conclusions With CAT-based administration of the NAQ-R for nurses, their burden was substantially

  14. Design, fabrication, and test of a graphite/epoxy metering truss. [as applied to the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite/epoxy metering truss as applied to the large space telescope was investigated. A full-scale truss was designed, fabricated and tested. Tests included static limit loadings, a modal survey and thermal-vacuum distortion evaluation. The most critical requirement was the demonstration of the dimensional stability provided by the graphite/epoxy truss concept. Crucial to the attainment of this objective was the ability to make very sophisticated thermal growth measurements which was provided by a seven beam laser interferometer. The design of the basic truss elements were tuned to provide the high degree of dimensional stability and stiffness required by the truss. The struts and spider assembly were fabricated with Fiberite's AS/934 and HMS/934 broadgoods. The rings utilized T300 graphite fabricate with the same materials. The predicted performance of the truss was developed using the NASTRAN program. These results showed conformance with the critical stiffness and thermal distortion requirements and correlated well with the test results.

  15. Testing of evaluation methods applied to raw infiltration data measured at very heterogeneous mountain forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacka, Lukas; Pavlasek, Jirka; Pech, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    In order to obtain infiltration parameters and analytical expressions of the cumulative infiltration and infiltration rate, raw infiltration data are often evaluated using various infiltration equations. Knowledge about the evaluation variability of these equations in the specific case of extremely heterogeneous soils provides important information for many hydrological and engineering applications. This contribution presents an evaluation of measured data using five well-established physically-based equations and empirical equations, and makes a comparison of these procedures. Evaluation procedures were applied to datasets measured on three different sites of hydrologically important mountain podzols. A total of 47 single ring infiltration experiments were evaluated using these procedures. From the quality-of-fit perspective, all of the tested equations characterized most of the raw datasets properly. In a few cases, some of the physically-based equations led to poor fits of the datasets measured on the most heterogeneous site (characterized by the lowest depth of the organic horizon, and more bleached eluvial horizon than on the other tested sites). For the parameters evaluated on this site, the sorptivity estimates and the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) estimates were distinctly different between the tested procedures.

  16. Procedural uncertainties of Proctor compaction tests applied on MSWI bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Maria; Querol, Xavier; Vazquez, Enric

    2011-02-28

    MSWI bottom ash is a well-graded highly compactable material that can be used as a road material in unbound pavements. Achieving the compactness assumed in the design of the pavement is of primary concern to ensure long term structural stability. Regulations on road construction in a number of EU countries rely on standard tests originally developed for natural aggregates, which may not be appropriate to accurately assess MSWI bottom ash. This study is intended to assist in consistently assessing MSWI bottom ash compaction by means of the Proctor method. This test is routinely applied to address unbound road materials and suggests two methods. Compaction parameters show a marked procedural dependency due to the particle morphology and weak particle strength of ash. Re-compacting a single batch sample to determine Proctor curves is a common practise that turns out to overvalue optimum moisture contents and maximum dry densities. This could result in wet-side compactions not meeting stiffness requirements. Inaccurate moisture content measurements during testing may also induce erroneous determinations of compaction parameters. The role of a number of physical properties of MSWI bottom ash in compaction is also investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing and Analysis Validation of a Metallic Repair Applied to a PRSEUS Tension Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.

    2013-01-01

    A design and analysis of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure was recently completed. The damage scenario considered was a midbay-to-midbay saw-cut with a severed stiffener, flange and skin. Advanced modeling techniques such as mesh-independent definition of compliant fasteners and elastic-plastic material properties for metal parts were utilized in the finite element analysis supporting the design effort. A bolted metallic repair was selected so that it could be easily applied in the operational environment. The present work describes results obtained from a tension panel test conducted to validate both the repair concept and finite element analysis techniques used in the design effort. The test proved that the proposed repair concept is capable of sustaining load levels that are higher than those resulting from the current working stress allowables. This conclusion enables upward revision of the stress allowables that had been kept at an overly-conservative level due to concerns associated with repairability of the panels. Correlation of test data with finite element analysis results is also presented and assessed.

  18. Lipids characterization of ultrasound and microwave processed germinated sorghum.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sadia; Imran, Muhammad; Ahmad, Nazir; Khan, Muhammad Kamran

    2017-06-27

    -SFA)/saturated fatty acids (SFA) ratio by gas chromatography. The results revealed that oil yield in sorghum before and after germination ranged from 6.55 to 7.84% and 6.28 to 7.57%, respectively. All the microwave and ultrasound processed samples showed significant difference in oil yield than the raw sorghum grains. The highest tested yield was 7.84 ± 0.31% when combination of microwave power (700 W) and ultrasound intensity (60%) was applied for 30s and 10 min, respectively. The results further demonstrate that the raw sorghum contained palmitic (13.73 ± 0.10%), palmitoleic (0.43 ± 0.02%), stearic (1.07 ± 0.04%), oleic (37.15 ± 0.10%), linoleic (43.33 ± 0.21%), linolenic (1.55 ± 0.04%), arachidic acid (0.13 ± 0.01%) and eicosenoic acid (0.37 ± 0.02%), respectively. The highest fatty acid percentage for palmitic, stearic and arachidic acid was 13.75 ± 0.07%, 1.11 ± 0.09% and 0.15 ± 0.03% at 60% US intensity for 10 min (T4), respectively. Maximum amount observed was 1.60 ± 0.09% of linolenic acid while amount of eicosenoic acid decreased from 0.37 ± 0.02% to 0.31 ± 0.01% after processing. In case of applying combination of microwave and sonication treatments, the change in eicosenoic acid increased from 0.35 ± 0.02% to 0.40 ± 0.04% while there was no significant change in other fatty acids. The ungerminated sorghum oil possessed 14.93-15.05% and 82.83-83.12% of SFA and Un-SFA, respectively. After germination, percentage of saturated fatty acids increased (16.4-16.55%) while decreased for unsaturated fatty acids (80.13-80.56%) were noted. The results of the present study conclude that the yield of oil from sorghum grains increased by emerging processing. Fatty acid analysis of sorghum oil suggested that pre-treatment strategies will not affect the quality of the oil with respect to essential fatty acids content. Overall, the composition of saturated fatty acid in germinated grain is improved than ungerminated grains after

  19. Germination requirements and dispersal timing in two heterocarpic weedy asteraceae.

    PubMed

    Bastida, F; Menéndez, J

    2004-01-01

    In SW Spain the winter annuals Anacyclus radiatus and Chrysanthemum coronarium (Asteraceae) are found as weeds in diverse crops. Both plant species are heterocarpic, i.e. the peripheral and central achenes of the capitulum are morphologically distinctive. In heterocarpic and heterospermic species the different fruit or seed morphs usually have differential ecological behaviour. In this work we have studied the morphometry, germination and dispersal timing of t he different achene morphs in A. radiatus and C. coronarium. Laboratory germination tests were carried out to evaluate the influence of incubation temperature (light/dark, 27/27, 24/18, 20/10, 15/5, 10/4 degrees C), chilling period (0, 1, 7, 21 and 60 days at 2 degrees C), GA3, nitrate and the dark on the germination percentage and rate (t50). The peripheral achenes of A. radiatus have a significantly broader wing than the central achenes. In this species, germination was inhibited in the dark but viable achenes of both types germinated completely under light exposure irrespective of test conditions. Nevertheless, the peripheral achenes germinated significantly faster compared to the central achenes (t5o 1.04 vs. 1.55 days at 24/18 degrees C). In C. coronarium peripheral achenes have three-winged ribs and are significantly longer, wider and thicker than the central achenes, which have only one- or two-winged ribs. In this species the peripheral achenes showed a much lower germination compared to the central achenes under all conditions tested (0.3-3.5% vs. 41.5-58.0%). Embryos isolated from the pericarp of peripheral achenes germinated quickly in a great extent, and when placed in close contact with a pericarp fragment they did not show any inhibition of germination, suggesting physical dormancy. To determine differences in dispersal timing between achene morphs, we monitored dispersal in a stand of both plant species. In A. radiatus the peripheral achenes were shed first, at the onset of the rainy season in

  20. Cupule Removal and Caryopsis Scarification Improves Germination of Eastern Gamagrass Seed.

    PubMed

    Tian, X.; Knapp, A. D.; Moore, K. J.; Brummer, E. C.; Bailey, T. B.

    2002-01-01

    Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides L.) is a warm-season, perennial grass with high palatability and productivity. However, poor stand establishment, often due to seed dormancy, limits its widespread use. Seed dormancy is often caused by structures surrounding the embryo, the physiological state of the embryo itself, or a combination of these factors. The eastern gamagrass dispersal unit is a floret within a thick, hard cupule. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of cupule (including lemma and palea) removal and caryopsis scarification on germination of eastern gamagrass by means of different commercial seed lots produced in different locations and years. Germination tests were conducted at 20/30 degrees C alternating temperature with light during 30 degrees C for 8 h daily. Germination counts were made every 7 d. After 28 d, the germination of decupulated caryopses from different seed lots germinated from 16 to 49% across seed lots, compared with 5 to 18% germination for caryopses with cupule intact. Scarifying the pericarp over the embryo, however, resulted in germination of all dormant seeds. We conclude that while the cupule (including the lemma and palea) contributes to the dormancy of eastern gamagrass, the pericarp and/or testa are the main factors restricting germination of this species. In addition, caryopsis scarification increased the germination rate and the germination test could be shortened to 21 or even 14 d depending on the seed lot.

  1. Photoinhibition of germination in grass seed--implications for prairie revegetation.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Federico P O; Naeth, M Anne

    2014-09-01

    Germination photoinhibition is not a recognized cause of revegetation failure; yet prolonged sunlight exposure can inhibit germination of several grass species. This research addressed susceptibility to photoinhibition of selected native grass species used to restore Canadian prairies, and reclamation treatments to alter environmental conditions in order to release seeds from photoinhibition. Under laboratory conditions effects of photoinhibition were tested on the ability of seeds to germinate at low water potential and effects of daily alternating temperatures and nitrates to break photoinhibition. Whether surficial mulch can release seeds from photoinhibition was assessed in a field experiment. Germination photoinhibition was evident in Festuca hallii and Koeleria macrantha seeds even under very low irradiances. The prolonged exposure to light decreased germination rates and ability of seeds to germinate at low water potentials. Daily fluctuating temperatures released a fraction of Bromus carinatus and Elymus trachycaulus seeds from photoinhibition yet did not improve F. hallii or K. macrantha germinability. Nitrates failed to break seed photoinhibition in all species tested. In the field experiment, mulched F. hallii seeds (covered with an erosion control blanket) showed a tenfold increase in germination percentages relative to seeds exposed to direct sunlight, indicating the facilitative effects of mulching on attenuation of the light environment. We conclude that germination photoinhibition as a cause of emergence failures in land reclamation where seed is broadcast or shallow seeded should be recognized and germination photoinhibition included in the decision making process to select revegetation seeding techniques.

  2. Standard-Model Tests with Superallowed {beta} Decay: Nuclear Data Applied to Fundamental Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.C.

    2005-05-24

    The study of superallowed nuclear {beta} decay currently provides the most precise and convincing confirmation of the conservation of the vector current (CVC) and is a key component of the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, a basic pillar of the Electroweak Standard Model. Experimentally, the Q-value, half-life, and branching ratio for superallowed transitions must be determined with a precision better than 0.1%. This demands metrological techniques be applied to short-lived ({approx}1 s) activities and that strict standards be employed in surveying the body of world data. The status of these fundamental studies is summarized and recent work described.

  3. V/V(max) test applied to SMM gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matz, S. M.; Higdon, J. C.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Iadicicco, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have applied the V/V(max) test to candidate gamma-ray bursts detected by the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) aboard the SMM satellite to examine quantitatively the uniformity of the burst source population. For a sample of 132 candidate bursts identified in the GRS data by an automated search using a single uniform trigger criterion we find average V/V(max) = 0.40 +/- 0.025. This value is significantly different from 0.5, the average for a uniform distribution in space of the parent population of burst sources; however, the shape of the observed distribution of V/V(max) is unusual and our result conflicts with previous measurements. For these reasons we can currently draw no firm conclusion about the distribution of burst sources.

  4. ISO 10360 verification tests applied to CMMs equipped with a laser line scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeckmans, B.; Probst, G.; Zhang, M.; Dewulf, W.; Kruth, J.-P.

    2016-05-01

    Within the field of quality control and dimensional metrology, the evolutions in the domain of production processes are triggering more use of non-contact measurement equipment to assure faster feature assessment where possible. This led to the development of for instance laser line scanners. The standardization of these new tools follows these novel evolutions. As the coordinate measuring systems (CMSs) which include coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) with its diversity in measurement probes widens its spectrum, the ISO 10360 standard series is rearranged and split up in more parts, covering specific probe groups. The previously mentioned laser line scanners, that can be equipped on a CMM, are integrated within ISO 10360-8 which applies for CMMs equipped with optical distance sensors. This paper is an example of how to interpret and apply this standard to a specific optical distance sensor. This has to be done by taking into account the sensor's characteristics. The intrinsic properties in the technique require an in-depth look at the recommended guidelines within the standard. Furthermore, the guidelines are adapted to use the same capabilities of the laser line scanner, which are used for measuring, without eliminating the uncertainties present in practical use of the sensor. The verification tests and their implementation are discussed, adapted to the sensors needs and performed on a state-of-the-art CMM. The verification parameter results are determined, presented and critically evaluated.

  5. Steroid hormone runoff from agricultural test plots applied with municipal biosolids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Gray, James L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Davis, Jessica G.; ReVollo, Rhiannon C.; Borch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The potential presence of steroid hormones in runoff from sites where biosolids have been used as agricultural fertilizers is an environmental concern. A study was conducted to assess the potential for runoff of seventeen different hormones and two sterols, including androgens, estrogens, and progestogens from agricultural test plots. The field containing the test plots had been applied with biosolids for the first time immediately prior to this study. Target compounds were isolated by solid-phase extraction (water samples) and pressurized solvent extraction (solid samples), derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Runoff samples collected prior to biosolids application had low concentrations of two hormones (estrone -1 and androstenedione -1) and cholesterol (22.5 ± 3.8 μg L-1). In contrast, significantly higher concentrations of multiple estrogens (-1), androgens (-1), and progesterone (-1) were observed in runoff samples taken 1, 8, and 35 days after biosolids application. A significant positive correlation was observed between antecedent rainfall amount and hormone mass loads (runoff). Hormones in runoff were primarily present in the dissolved phase (<0.7-μm GF filter), and, to a lesser extent bound to the suspended-particle phase. Overall, these results indicate that rainfall can mobilize hormones from biosolids-amended agricultural fields, directly to surface waters or redistributed to terrestrial sites away from the point of application via runoff. Although concentrations decrease over time, 35 days is insufficient for complete degradation of hormones in soil at this site.

  6. An empirical test of signal detection theory as it applies to Batesian mimicry.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Liam; Van Gossum, Hans; Beirinckx, Kirsten; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2006-11-01

    Signal detection theory (SDT) has been repeatedly invoked to understand how palatable prey might gain an advantage by resembling unpalatable prey. Here we developed an experimental test of the theory in which we sequentially presented computer-generated Mimics (profitable to attack) and Models (unprofitable to attack) to human volunteers, and asked them to forage in a way that maximized their personal scores. Both the Mimics and Models exhibited normally distributed variation in a single stimulus dimension. When we varied the mean similarity of Mimics to Models, and the proportion of all prey items that were Mimics, our human predators made foraging decisions that were close to those predicted by SDT, including the adoption of a threshold in appearance beyond which prey items were unlikely to be attacked. The fit of predictions to observations was marginally closer when including the time taken to handle the two types of prey. When Mimics and Models were allowed to evolve in appearance subject to selection, the evolutionary trajectory fitted the predictions of SDT closely. While our system was not appropriate to test all predictions of recent SDT theory, it provides strong support for the SDT framework as it applies to Batesian mimicry.

  7. EUCAST recommendations for antimicrobial susceptibility testing applied to the three main Campylobacter species isolated in humans.

    PubMed

    Sifré, Elodie; Salha, Ben Amor; Ducournau, Astrid; Floch, Pauline; Chardon, Hubert; Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter isolates is of great importance for treatment options especially in systemic diseases. The European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recently proposed epidemiological cut-offs (ECOFFs) for a limited number of antimicrobial compounds and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli only. In the present study, the EUCAST method was used after minor modifications to define antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for, 1997 C. jejuni, 419 C. coli and 100 Campylobacter fetus strains received at the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters. Our results show that the ECOFFs defined by EUCAST for tetracycline and ciprofloxacin can be used for C. jejuni and C. coli. The same ECOFF can be used for erythromycin for the three species. The C. jejuni and C. coli ECOFFs for ciprofloxacin however cannot be applied to C. fetus. We also provide data to categorise two 2 β-lactams of interest for systemic diseases, ampicillin and amoxicillin+clavulanate, for the three species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of pesticides on morphology, viability, and germination of Blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth.) and Tree tomato (Solanum betaceum Cav.) pollen grains.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Flavio; Soria, Norman; Oleas, Abrahan; Rueda, Darwin; Manjunatha, Bangeppagari; Kundapur, Rajesh R; Maddela, Naga Raju; Rajeswari, Bugude

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of application of pesticides on morphology, viability, and germination of pollen grains of Blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth.) and Tree tomato (Solanum betaceum Cav.). The study was performed at Patate, Tungurahua province, Ecuador and was divided into two phases. Phase one dedicated to the study of morphology, viability, and identification of nutrient solution for better germination of pollen grains and phase two for the analysis of the effect of conventional, organic, and biological pesticides on pollen grain germination and pollen tube length. To study pollen morphology, pollens were extracted by hand pressure and was analyzed by optical and electron microscopy. The viable pollen grains were identified by staining with 1% acetocarmine. Even though Tree tomato and Blackberry pollen grains are morphologically similar, their exine shapes differ. We observed four times increase in pollen germination rate when suspended in nutrient solution (Sucrose with Boric acid) than control (water). Pollen grains under nutrient solution were subjected to different groups of pesticides for the period of 2, 4, and 6 h. With respect to pesticide affect, the Blackberry pollen grain germination followed the following order: Lecaniceb > Beauveb > Metazeb => Myceb > Control. However, the effect on Tree tomato pollen grains was as follows: Lecaniceb > Myceb > Cantus > Bacillus thuringiensis > Kripton > Control. As per as pollen grain germination is concerned, we observed that the chemical pesticides are more harmful than other pesticides. So, it is necessary to perform screening test for different pesticides and their effect on pollen grain germination before applying to the fields.

  9. Germination characteristics of six plant species growing on the Hanford Site. [Disturbed land revegetation feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.R.; Kirkham, R.R.; Cline, J.F.

    1980-03-01

    Six plant species (Siberian and thickspike wheatgrass, cheatgrass, sand dropseed, Indian ricegrass, and Russian thistle) found on the Hanford Site were studied as part of an investigation into the revegetation of disturbed areas. Germination response to three environmental parameters (soil moisture, soil temperature, and planting depth) were measured. Results indicated that when a polyethylene glycol solution was used to control the osmotic potential of the imbibition media, no significant decrease in germination rate occurred down to -3.0 bars. However, below -7.0 bars all species experienced a decrease in germination. When germinated in soil, all species except Russian thistle exhibited a significant decrease in germination rate at -0.3 bars. Russian thistle was the only species tested that exhibited germination at a soil temperature of 1/sup 0/C. All species gave optimum germination at temperatures between 10 and 15/sup 0/C. Thickspike wheatgrass was the only species tested which was able to germinate and emerge from a planting depth of greater than 2 inches. If supplemental moisture is provided, a shallow planting would be advisable for those species tested. If not overcome by pretreatment prior to planting, seed dormancy may be a significant factor which will reduce the germination potential of some species tested.

  10. A Monte Carlo approach applied to ultrasonic non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, I.; Bilgili, F.; Meier, T.; Sigloch, K.

    2012-04-01

    Non-destructive testing based on ultrasound allows us to detect, characterize and size discrete flaws in geotechnical and architectural structures and materials. This information is needed to determine whether such flaws can be tolerated in future service. In typical ultrasonic experiments, only the first-arriving P-wave is interpreted, and the remainder of the recorded waveform is neglected. Our work aims at understanding surface waves, which are strong signals in the later wave train, with the ultimate goal of full waveform tomography. At present, even the structural estimation of layered media is still challenging because material properties of the samples can vary widely, and good initial models for inversion do not often exist. The aim of the present study is to combine non-destructive testing with a theoretical data analysis and hence to contribute to conservation strategies of archaeological and architectural structures. We analyze ultrasonic waveforms measured at the surface of a variety of samples, and define the behaviour of surface waves in structures of increasing complexity. The tremendous potential of ultrasonic surface waves becomes an advantage only if numerical forward modelling tools are available to describe the waveforms accurately. We compute synthetic full seismograms as well as group and phase velocities for the data. We invert them for the elastic properties of the sample via a global search of the parameter space, using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. Such a Monte Carlo approach allows us to perform a complete uncertainty and resolution analysis, but the computational cost is high and increases quickly with the number of model parameters. Therefore it is practical only for defining the seismic properties of media with a limited number of degrees of freedom, such as layered structures. We have applied this approach to both synthetic layered structures and real samples. The former contributed to benchmark the propagation of ultrasonic surface

  11. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: the basis for a field-test method

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1987-12-01

    The investigation was Phase 1 of a two-part study to develop a test method that can be used in the field to measure the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and insulating materials containing asbestos fibers. Four test methods were selected; compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact. For each of the four tests, mechanical devices were devised by modification of existing material test apparatus. A description of the test devices is given in the report.

  12. [Studies on biological characteristics and germination conditions of Thladiantha dubia seeds].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Ying; Su, Zhan-Hui; Mao, Xiao-Xia; Tong, Ji-Ming

    2013-07-01

    To study the biological characteristics and find out the optimum condition for germination of seed of Thladiantha dubia Bunge for its standardized culturing. The weight per 1 000 seeds, seed moisture content and seed viability were determined. The biological characteristics were studied and germination conditions of seed of T. dubia were tested under following conditions: different seed soaking time, different temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 degrees C) and different irradiation time (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 min). The average length, width and thickness of T. Dubia seed were 4.96, 3.25 and 1.08 mm, respectively. The weight per 1 000 seeds was 14.03 g; the seed moisture content was 10.10%; the seed viability was 90.33%. Under the same condition of light, temperature and other factors, the seed germination percentage and germination energy were the highest after seed soaking 24 h. The suitable temperature range of seeds was form 25 degrees C to 35 degrees C. Under different irradiation time, the seed germination percentage and germination energy were the highest after irradiation 10 min. In different germinating beds, the seeds germination percentage and germination energy were the highest on paper (TP), which was 89.33%. The optimum condition for the germination of the seed of T. dubia is seed soaking 12 h, irradiation 10 min, 25-30 degrees C on filter paper.

  13. Factors influencing seed germination of medicinal plant Salvia aegyptiaca L. (Lamiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gorai, Mustapha; Gasmi, Hayet; Neffati, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Salvia aegyptiaca is a xerophytic perennial herb belongs to the Lamiaceae family commonly used for medicinal purposes. Laboratory experiments were carried out to assess the effects of temperature and salinity on seed germination and recovery responses after transferring to distilled water. Temperatures between 10 and 40 °C seem to be favourable for the germination of this species. Germination was inhibited by either an increase or decrease in temperature from the optimum (30 °C). The highest germination percentages were obtained at 0 mM NaCl; however, the increase of solution osmolalities progressively inhibited seed germination. The germination rate decreased with an increase in salinity for most of tested temperatures, but comparatively higher rates were obtained at 30 °C. Salt stress decreased both the percentage and the rate of germination. An interaction between salinity and temperature yielded no germination at 300 mM NaCl. By experimental transfer to distilled water, S. aegyptiaca seeds that were exposed to moderately saline conditions recovered and keep their ability to germinate mostly at low temperatures. At 300 mM NaCl, germination recovery decreased with increasing temperature and it was completely inhibited at 40 °C. PMID:23961132

  14. Protein mobilization in germinating mung bean seeds involves vacuolar sorting receptors and multivesicular bodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqi; Li, Yubing; Lo, Sze Wan; Hillmer, Stefan; Sun, Samuel S M; Robinson, David G; Jiang, Liwen

    2007-04-01

    Plants accumulate and store proteins in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) during seed development and maturation. Upon seed germination, these storage proteins are mobilized to provide nutrients for seedling growth. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of protein degradation during seed germination. Here we test the hypothesis that vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) proteins play a role in mediating protein degradation in germinating seeds. We demonstrate that both VSR proteins and hydrolytic enzymes are synthesized de novo during mung bean (Vigna radiata) seed germination. Immunogold electron microscopy with VSR antibodies demonstrate that VSRs mainly locate to the peripheral membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), presumably as recycling receptors in day 1 germinating seeds, but become internalized to the MVB lumen, presumably for degradation at day 3 germination. Chemical cross-linking and immunoprecipitation with VSR antibodies have identified the cysteine protease aleurain as a specific VSR-interacting protein in germinating seeds. Further confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy studies demonstrate that VSR and aleurain colocalize to MVBs as well as PSVs in germinating seeds. Thus, MVBs in germinating seeds exercise dual functions: as a storage compartment for proteases that are physically separated from PSVs in the mature seed and as an intermediate compartment for VSR-mediated delivery of proteases from the Golgi apparatus to the PSV for protein degradation during seed germination.

  15. Microbe associated molecular patterns from rhizosphere bacteria trigger germination and Papaver somniferum metabolism under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, A; Sarria, A L F; Algar, E; Muñoz Ledesma, F J; Ramos Solano, B; Fernandes, J B; Gutierrez Mañero, F J

    2014-01-01

    Ten PGPR from different backgrounds were assayed on Papaver somniferum var. Madrigal to evaluate their potential as biotic elicitors to increase alkaloid content under the rationale that some microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are able to trigger plant metabolism. First, the 10 strains and their culture media at two different concentrations were tested for their ability to trigger seed germination. Then, the best three strains were tested for their ability to increase seedling growth and alkaloid levels under greenhouse conditions. Only three strains and their culture media enhanced germination. Then, germination enhancing capacity of these best three strains, N5.18 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aur9 Chryseobacterium balustinum and N21.4 Pseudomonas fluorescens was evaluated in soil. Finally, the three strains were applied on seedlings at two time points, by soil drench or by foliar spray. Photosynthesis was measured, plant height was recorded, capsules were weighted and alkaloids analyzed by HPLC. Only N5.18 delivered by foliar spray significantly increased plant height coupled to an increase in total alkaloids and a significant increase in opium poppy straw dry weight; these increases were supported by a better photosynthetic efficiency. The relative contents of morphine, thebaine, codeine and oripavine were affected by this treatment causing a significant increase in morphine coupled to a decrease in thebaine, demonstrating the effectivity of MAMPs from N5.18 in this plant species. Considering the increase in capsule biomass and alkaloids together with the acceleration of germination, strain N5.18 appears as a good candidate to elicit plant metabolism and consequently, to increase productivity of Papaver somniferum.

  16. Applying Computerized Adaptive Testing to the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ): A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    de Beurs, Derek P; Terluin, Berend; Verhaak, Peter F

    2017-01-01

    Background Efficient screening questionnaires are useful in general practice. Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a method to improve the efficiency of questionnaires, as only the items that are particularly informative for a certain responder are dynamically selected. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether CAT could improve the efficiency of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ), a frequently used self-report questionnaire designed to assess common psychosocial problems in general practice. Methods A simulation study was conducted using a sample of Dutch patients visiting a general practitioner (GP) with psychological problems (n=379). Responders completed a paper-and-pencil version of the 50-item 4DSQ and a psychometric evaluation was performed to check if the data agreed with item response theory (IRT) assumptions. Next, a CAT simulation was performed for each of the four 4DSQ scales (distress, depression, anxiety, and somatization), based on the given responses as if they had been collected through CAT. The following two stopping rules were applied for the administration of items: (1) stop if measurement precision is below a predefined level, or (2) stop if more than half of the items of the subscale are administered. Results In general, the items of each of the four scales agreed with IRT assumptions. Application of the first stopping rule reduced the length of the questionnaire by 38% (from 50 to 31 items on average). When the second stopping rule was also applied, the total number of items could be reduced by 56% (from 50 to 22 items on average). Conclusions CAT seems useful for improving the efficiency of the 4DSQ by 56% without losing a considerable amount of measurement precision. The CAT version of the 4DSQ may be useful as part of an online assessment to investigate the severity of mental health problems of patients visiting a GP. This simulation study is the first step needed for the development a CAT version of the 4

  17. Phosphorus recycling potential assessment by a biological test applied to wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Braak, Etienne; Auby, Sarah; Piveteau, Simon; Guilayn, Felipe; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling as mineral fertilizer from wastewater activated sludge (WAS) depends on the amount that can be dissolved and separated from the organic matter before the final crystallization step. The aim of the biological phosphorus dissolution potential (BPDP) test developed here was to assess the maximum amount of P that could be biologically released from WAS prior that the liquid phase enters the recovery process. It was first developed for sludge combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride. Because carbohydrates are known to induce acidification during the first stage of anaerobic digestion, sucrose was used as a co-substrate. Best results were obtained after 24-48 h, without inoculum, with a sugar/sludge ratio of 0.5 gCOD/gVS and under strict anaerobic conditions. Up to 75% of the total phosphorus in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride phosphorus removal could be dissolved. Finally, the test was applied to assess BPDP from different sludge using alum compounds for P removal. No dissolution was observed when alum polychloride was used and less than 20% when alum sulphate was used. In all the cases, comparison to chemical acidification showed that the biological process was a major contributor to P dissolution. The possibility to crystallize struvite was discussed from the composition of the liquids obtained. The BPDP will be used not only to assess the potential for phosphorus recycling from sludge, but also to study the influence of the co-substrates available for anaerobic digestion of sludge.

  18. Variability in source sediment contributions by applying different statistic test for a Pyrenean catchment.

    PubMed

    Palazón, L; Navas, A

    2017-06-01

    Information on sediment contribution and transport dynamics from the contributing catchments is needed to develop management plans to tackle environmental problems related with effects of fine sediment as reservoir siltation. In this respect, the fingerprinting technique is an indirect technique known to be valuable and effective for sediment source identification in river catchments. Large variability in sediment delivery was found in previous studies in the Barasona catchment (1509 km(2), Central Spanish Pyrenees). Simulation results with SWAT and fingerprinting approaches identified badlands and agricultural uses as the main contributors to sediment supply in the reservoir. In this study the <63 μm sediment fraction from the surface reservoir sediments (2 cm) are investigated following the fingerprinting procedure to assess how the use of different statistical procedures affects the amounts of source contributions. Three optimum composite fingerprints were selected to discriminate between source contributions based in land uses/land covers from the same dataset by the application of (1) discriminant function analysis; and its combination (as second step) with (2) Kruskal-Wallis H-test and (3) principal components analysis. Source contribution results were different between assessed options with the greatest differences observed for option using #3, including the two step process: principal components analysis and discriminant function analysis. The characteristics of the solutions by the applied mixing model and the conceptual understanding of the catchment showed that the most reliable solution was achieved using #2, the two step process of Kruskal-Wallis H-test and discriminant function analysis. The assessment showed the importance of the statistical procedure used to define the optimum composite fingerprint for sediment fingerprinting applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optical coherence tomography applied to tests of skin care products in humans--a case study.

    PubMed

    Vasquez-Pinto, L M C; Maldonado, E P; Raele, M P; Amaral, M M; de Freitas, A Z

    2015-02-01

    When evaluating skin care products for human skin, quantitative test methods need to be simple, precise and reliable. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), provides high-resolution sectional images of translucent materials to a depth of a few millimeters, a technique usually applied to medical measurements in ophthalmology and dermatology. This study aimed to demonstrate the application of OCT as the main technique for monitoring changes in skin topography during tests of a wrinkle-reduction product in humans. We used a commercial OCT apparatus to perform clinical examinations of skin roughness in treated and non-treated sites in the periorbital region of thirty human voluntaries who were using an anti-aging product commercially available: Natura Chronos® Flavonóides de Passiflora 45+ FPS15, from Natura Cosméticos, Brazil. Measurements were performed days 0, 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. Equipment and software allowed real-time recording of skin roughness parameters and wrinkle depths. The OCT measurements have allowed the monitoring of changes in skin roughness, which have shown reduction in treated sites around 10%. The obtained depth distributions also indicate reduction in the occurrence of wrinkles deeper than 170 μm. The verified results are consistent with those typically obtained after successful treatment with modern anti-aging products. By using the OCT technique, it was possible to quantify changes in skin roughness and in the distribution of depths of skin wrinkles, with adequate sensitivity. OCT imaging allows the direct visualization of the skin topography with resolution of micrometers, a reliable and interactive tool for clinical use. Therefore, for the first time, we demonstrated the use of OCT technique to verify the efficacy of cosmetic products in real time. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Monte Carlo approach applied to ultrasonic non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, I.; Bilgili, F.; Meier, T. M.; Sigloch, K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-destructive testing based on ultrasound allows us to detect, characterize and size discrete flaws in geotechnical and engineering structures and materials. This information is needed to determine whether such flaws can be tolerated in future service. In typical ultrasonic experiments, only the first-arriving P-wave is interpreted, and the remainder of the recorded waveform is neglected. Our work aims at understanding surface waves, which are strong signals in the later wave train, with the ultimate goal of full waveform tomography. At present, even the structural estimation of layered media is still challenging because material properties of the samples can vary widely, and good initial models for inversion do not often exist. The aim of the present study is to analyze ultrasonic waveforms measured at the surface of Plexiglas and rock samples, and to define the behaviour of surface waves in structures of increasing complexity. The tremendous potential of ultrasonic surface waves becomes an advantage only if numerical forward modelling tools are available to describe the waveforms accurately. We compute synthetic full seismograms as well as group and phase velocities for the data. We invert them for the elastic properties of the sample via a global search of the parameter space, using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. Such a Monte Carlo approach allows us to perform a complete uncertainty and resolution analysis, but the computational cost is high and increases quickly with the number of model parameters. Therefore it is practical only for defining the seismic properties of media with a limited number of degrees of freedom, such as layered structures. We have applied this approach to both synthetic layered structures and real samples. The former contributed to benchmark the propagation of ultrasonic surface waves in typical materials tested with a non-destructive technique (e.g., marble, unweathered and weathered concrete and natural stone).

  1. Cold-Applied Roofing Systems and Waterproofing and Dampproofing. Roofing Workbook and Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Arthur

    This workbook for students in California roofing apprenticeship programs provides information for classroom work in the area of cold-applied roofing systems and waterproofing and dampproofing. Eight topics are covered: introduction to cold-applied roofing systems and waterproofing and dampproofing, tools and equipment used in cold-applied roofing,…

  2. Subpopulations of B lymphocytes in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, G; Cebra-Thomas, J A; Mustain, E; Davie, J M; Alley, C D; Nahm, M H

    1987-10-01

    With two new monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry, we defined three subpopulations among B cells expressing binding sites for peanut agglutinin (i.e., B cells of the germinal center). On monoclonal antibody (5B5) binds globotriaosyl ceramide. The B lymphocytes binding 5B5 have binding sites for peanut agglutinin on the surface and express only small amounts of sIgD and sIgM. When tested against a panel of B cell lines, only Burkitt's lymphoma cells were 5B5+. Moreover, the 5B5+ cells have larger average sizes and a large fraction of proliferating cells. The other monoclonal antibody (HK23) binds a 90,000 protein. Lymphocytes binding HK23 are 5B5- and include T cells and a subpopulation of B cells. In contrast to 5B5+ cells, the HK23+ and peanut agglutinin positive B cells express a large amount of sIgM. These two subpopulations of germinal centers are distinct from the germinal center B cell subpopulation expressing the CD23 (Blast-2) antigen. The CD23+ B cells are 5B5- and express an intermediate level of HK23 antigen. In addition, CD23+ B cells are highly variable in number, whereas the proportions of HK23+ and 5B5+ cells are relatively stable.

  3. Germination Ecophysiology of Annona crassiflora Seeds

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Edvaldo A. A.; de Melo, Daniel L. B.; Davide, Antonio C.; de Bode, Nienke; Abreu, Guilherme B.; Faria, José M. R.; Hilhorst, Henk W. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Little is known about environmental factors that break morphophysiological dormancy in seeds of the Annonaceae and the mechanisms involved. The aim of this study was to characterize the morphological and physiological components of dormancy of Annona crassiflora, a tree species native to the Cerrado of Brazil, in an ecophysiological context. Methods Morphological and biochemical characteristics of both embryo and endosperm were monitored during dormancy break and germination at field conditions. Seeds were buried in the field and exhumed monthly for 2 years. Germination, embryo length and endosperm digestion, with endo-β-mannanase activity as a marker, were measured in exhumed seeds, and scanning electron microscopy was used to detect cell division. The effect of constant low and high temperatures and exogenous gibberellins on dormancy break and germination was also tested under laboratory conditions. Key Results After burial in April, A. crassiflora seeds lost their physiological dormancy in the winter months with lowest monthly average minimum temperatures (May–August) prior to the first rainfall of the wet season. The loss of physiological dormancy enabled initiation of embryo growth within the seed during the first 2 months of the rainy season (September–October), resulting in a germination peak in November. Embryo growth occurred mainly through cell expansion but some dividing cells were also observed. Endosperm digestion started at the micropylar side around the embryo and diffused to the rest of the endosperm. Exogenous gibberellins induced both embryo growth and endo-β-mannanase activity in dormant seeds. Conclusions The physiological dormancy component is broken by low temperature and/or temperature fluctuations preceding the rainy season. Subsequent embryo growth and digestion of the endosperm are both likely to be controlled by gibberellins synthesized during the breaking of physiological dormancy. Radicle protrusion thus

  4. Fuel modeling at high burn-up: recent development of the GERMINAL code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, J.-C.; Piron, J.-P.; Roche, L.

    1993-09-01

    In the frame of research and development on fast breeder reactors fuels, CEA/DEC is developing the computer code GERMINAL to study fuel pin thermal and mechanical behaviour during steady-state and accidental conditions. The development of the GERMINAL 1 code is foreseen in two steps: (1) The GERMINAL 1-1 version which is presently delivered fully documented with a physical qualification guaranteed up to 8 at%. (2) The GERMINAL 1-2 version which, in addition to what is presently treated in GERMINAL 1-1, includes the treatment of high burn-up effects on the the fission gas release and the fuel-clad interface (called JOG). The validation of GERMINAL 1-2 is presently in progress and will include specific experiments (JOG tests) performed in the CABRI reactor.

  5. Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Agricultural Resources Component. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

    An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the agricultural resources component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist of three…

  6. Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Agricultural Production Component. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

    An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the agricultural production component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist…

  7. Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Forestry Component. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

    An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the forestry component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist of three components, with…

  8. Competency Test Items for Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Agricultural Production Component. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; McGhee, Max B.

    An activity was undertaken to develop written criterion-referenced tests for the agricultural production component of Applied Principles of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations. Intended for tenth grade students who have completed Fundamentals of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Occupations, applied principles were designed to consist…

  9. In Vitro Pollen Viability and Pollen Germination in Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sulusoglu, Melekber; Cavusoglu, Aysun

    2014-01-01

    Pollen quality is important for growers and breeders. This study was carried out to determine in vitro pollen viability and pollen germination in seven genotypes of cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.). Two pollen viability tests, TTC (2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) and IKI (iodine potassium iodide), were used. Pollen traits of genotypes were studied using an in vitro medium containing 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% sucrose to determine the best sucrose concentrations for germination. In the second step, the germinated pollen was counted 1, 4, 6, 10, 12, 24, and 48 hours later until there was no further germination. The viability rates were different according to genotypes and tests used. The IKI and TTC staining tests and pollen germination had low correlation (r2 = 0.0614 and r2 = 0.0015, resp.). Painted pollen rate was higher and pollen was well-stained with IKI test and pollen viability estimated with TTC staining test was better than that estimated with the IKI staining test. 15% sucrose gave the best germination rates in most of the genotypes. Pollen germination rates were recorded periodically from one hour to 48 hours in 15% sucrose and the results showed that pollen germination rates increased after 6 hours of being placed in culture media. PMID:25405230

  10. In vitro pollen viability and pollen germination in cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.).

    PubMed

    Sulusoglu, Melekber; Cavusoglu, Aysun

    2014-01-01

    Pollen quality is important for growers and breeders. This study was carried out to determine in vitro pollen viability and pollen germination in seven genotypes of cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.). Two pollen viability tests, TTC (2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) and IKI (iodine potassium iodide), were used. Pollen traits of genotypes were studied using an in vitro medium containing 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% sucrose to determine the best sucrose concentrations for germination. In the second step, the germinated pollen was counted 1, 4, 6, 10, 12, 24, and 48 hours later until there was no further germination. The viability rates were different according to genotypes and tests used. The IKI and TTC staining tests and pollen germination had low correlation (r(2) = 0.0614 and r(2) = 0.0015, resp.). Painted pollen rate was higher and pollen was well-stained with IKI test and pollen viability estimated with TTC staining test was better than that estimated with the IKI staining test. 15% sucrose gave the best germination rates in most of the genotypes. Pollen germination rates were recorded periodically from one hour to 48 hours in 15% sucrose and the results showed that pollen germination rates increased after 6 hours of being placed in culture media.

  11. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  12. Tomato Seed Coat Permeability to Selected Carbon Nanomaterials and Enhancement of Germination and Seedling Growth.

    PubMed

    Ratnikova, Tatsiana A; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao M; Taylor, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Seed coat permeability was examined using a model that tested the effects of soaking tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seeds in combination with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNMs) and ultrasonic irradiation (US). Penetration of seed coats to the embryo by CBNMs, as well as CBNMs effects on seed germination and seedling growth, was examined. Two CBNMs, C60(OH)20 (fullerol) and multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), were applied at 50 mg/L, and treatment exposure ranged from 0 to 60 minutes. Bright field, fluorescence, and electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy provided corroborating evidence that neither CBNM was able to penetrate the seed coat. The restriction of nanomaterial (NM) uptake was attributed to the semipermeable layer located at the innermost layer of the seed coat adjacent to the endosperm. Seed treatments using US at 30 or 60 minutes in the presence of MWNTs physically disrupted the seed coat; however, the integrity of the semipermeable layer was not impaired. The germination percentage and seedling length and weight were enhanced in the presence of MWNTs but were not altered by C60(OH)20. The combined exposure of seeds to NMs and US provided insight into the nanoparticle-seed interaction and may serve as a delivery system for enhancing seed germination and early seedling growth.

  13. Tomato Seed Coat Permeability to Selected Carbon Nanomaterials and Enhancement of Germination and Seedling Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikova, Tatsiana A.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao M.; Taylor, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    Seed coat permeability was examined using a model that tested the effects of soaking tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seeds in combination with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNMs) and ultrasonic irradiation (US). Penetration of seed coats to the embryo by CBNMs, as well as CBNMs effects on seed germination and seedling growth, was examined. Two CBNMs, C60(OH)20 (fullerol) and multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), were applied at 50 mg/L, and treatment exposure ranged from 0 to 60 minutes. Bright field, fluorescence, and electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy provided corroborating evidence that neither CBNM was able to penetrate the seed coat. The restriction of nanomaterial (NM) uptake was attributed to the semipermeable layer located at the innermost layer of the seed coat adjacent to the endosperm. Seed treatments using US at 30 or 60 minutes in the presence of MWNTs physically disrupted the seed coat; however, the integrity of the semipermeable layer was not impaired. The germination percentage and seedling length and weight were enhanced in the presence of MWNTs but were not altered by C60(OH)20. The combined exposure of seeds to NMs and US provided insight into the nanoparticle-seed interaction and may serve as a delivery system for enhancing seed germination and early seedling growth. PMID:26495423

  14. Underwater germination potential of common ash seed (Fraxinus excelsior L.) originating from flooded and non-flooded sites.

    PubMed

    Dacasa Rüdinger, M C; Dounavi, A

    2008-05-01

    Oxygen availability is one of the main factors affecting seed germination capacity. On floodplains, oxygen supply is seasonally restricted because of flooding events. Seed ecotypes are able to cope with total submergence to different extents, depending on the species and its position in a given environmental gradient. This investigation tested three provenances of common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), one from a lowland site and two from upland sites, for germination capacity and germination velocity under water. The final germination capacity of all provenances was unaffected, but the germination velocity was decreased for all provenances. The adaptational significance of these results is discussed.

  15. [Study on geographical variation of morphologic and germination characteristic of different Glycyrrhiza uralensis provenance seeds].

    PubMed

    Wei, Sheng-Li; Wang, Wen-Quan; Qin, Shu-Ying; Liu, Chang-Li; Zhang, Zhao-Ying; Di, Ming

    2008-04-01

    To study the geographical variation of morphologic and germination characteristic of different Glycyrrhiza uralensis provenance seeds, approach the geographical variation mode and ecology mechanism, and laid theoretical foundation for districting and allocating of G. uralensis seeds. Field investigation and laboratory analysis were applied. Seed shape and kilosseed weight were sampled randomly, germination rate germination force by general methods. The morphologic characteristic of G. uralensis seeds showed roughly longitude variation tendency that the seeds increased gradually from west to east. While the germination characteristic showed roughly altitude variation tendency that the seeds germination rate and germination force increased with the increase of the altitude, and the average germination rate was the same with the seeds morphologic characteristic. The results of analysis correlated with the climatic factors show that the morphologic characteristic of G. uralensis was positive correlated with annual rain-fall of the habitat, and the germination rate was quickened by drought, high temperature and strong sunshine. The morphologic and germination characteristic and of G. uralensis seeds present distinguished geographical variation, and the formation of the variation was related to the ecological environment in which the seed provenance adapted.

  16. Analysis of the germination proteins in Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores subjected to external factors.

    PubMed

    Porębska, Izabela; Sokołowska, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The presence of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, a thermoacidophilic and spore-forming bacterium, in pasteurized acidic juices poses a serious problem for the processing industry. Therefore, the use of other more effective techniques, such as high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCD), is considered for preserving juices in order to inactivate these bacteria, while reducing the loss of nutrients and sensory quality of juices. On the other hand, HHP and SCCD when combined with a moderately elevated temperature can induce germination of bacterial spores, making them more vulnerable to inactivation. The spore germination can be also induced by nutrients, such as L-alanine or a mixture of asparagine, glucose, fructose and potassium ions (AGFK). The aim of this work was to determine whether applying activating agents: HHP, SCCD and nutrient germinants (L-alanine and the AGFK mixture), could influence the number of spores which start to germinate and how this affects the proteins involved in the spore germination. SDS-PAGE was used to resolve proteins isolated from the A. acidoterrestris spores. The results that were obtained indicate that the germination of A. acidoterrestris spores treated with HHP, SCCD and nutrient germinants reflect the number of spores which start to germinate. The SDS-PAGE data indicated changes in the level of selected proteins occurring when subjected to the germination activating factors as well as noticeable differences in those proteins' molecular weights.

  17. Germination and Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Spores Induced by Moderate Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Skapska, Sylwia; Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Niezgoda, Jolanta; Porebska, Izabela; Dekowska, Agnieszka; Rzoska, Sylwester J

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of spoilage caused by Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris for the fruit juice industry, the objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores induced by moderate hydrostatic pressure. Hydrostatic pressure treatment can induce the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores. At low pH, spore germination of up to 3.59-3.75 log and inactivation of 1.85-2.04 log was observed in a low pressure window (200-300 MPa) applied at 50 degrees C for 20 min. Neutral pH suppressed inactivation, the number of spores inactivated at pH 7.0 was only 0.24-1.06 log. The pressurization temperature significantly affected spore germination and inactivation. The degree of germination in apple juice after pressurization for 30 min with 200 MPa at 20 degrees C was 2.04 log, with only 0.61 log of spores being inactivated, while at 70 degrees C spore germination was 5.94 log and inactivation 4.72 log. This temperature strongly stimulated germination and inactivation under higher (500 MPa) than lower (200 MPa) pressure. When the oscillatory mode was used, the degree of germination and inactivation was slightly higher than at continuous mode. The degree of germination and inactivation was inversely proportional to the soluble solids content and was lowest in concentrated apple juice.

  18. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60 Food... § 212.60 What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and..., in-process materials, and finished PET drug products must have and follow written procedures for...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1901 - What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES Manufacturer-Run In-Use Testing Program for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines § 86.1901 What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service? (a) If you manufacture diesel heavy... engines that have gone into service? 86.1901 Section 86.1901 Protection of Environment...

  20. 10 CFR 26.67 - Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization. 26.67 Section 26.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.67 Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who...

  1. 10 CFR 26.67 - Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization. 26.67 Section 26.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.67 Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who...

  2. 10 CFR 26.67 - Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization. 26.67 Section 26.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.67 Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who...

  3. 10 CFR 26.67 - Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization. 26.67 Section 26.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.67 Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who...

  4. 10 CFR 26.67 - Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who have applied for authorization. 26.67 Section 26.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.67 Random drug and alcohol testing of individuals who...

  5. Characterization of the Dynamic Germination of Individual Clostridium difficile Spores Using Raman Spectroscopy and Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Shen, Aimee; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2015-07-01

    The Gram-positive spore-forming anaerobe Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Spores of C. difficile initiate infection when triggered to germinate by bile salts in the gastrointestinal tract. We analyzed germination kinetics of individual C. difficile spores using Raman spectroscopy and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Similar to Bacillus spores, individual C. difficile spores germinating with taurocholate plus glycine began slow leakage of a ∼15% concentration of a chelate of Ca(2+) and dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) at a heterogeneous time T1, rapidly released CaDPA at Tlag, completed CaDPA release at Trelease, and finished peptidoglycan cortex hydrolysis at Tlysis. T1 and Tlag values for individual spores were heterogeneous, but ΔTrelease periods (Trelease - Tlag) were relatively constant. In contrast to Bacillus spores, heat treatment did not stimulate spore germination in the two C. difficile strains tested. C. difficile spores did not germinate with taurocholate or glycine alone, and different bile salts differentially promoted spore germination, with taurocholate and taurodeoxycholate being best. Transient exposure of spores to taurocholate plus glycine was sufficient to commit individual spores to germinate. C. difficile spores did not germinate with CaDPA, in contrast to B. subtilis and C. perfringens spores. However, the detergent dodecylamine induced C. difficile spore germination, and rates were increased by spore coat removal although cortex hydrolysis did not follow Trelease, in contrast with B. subtilis. C. difficile spores lacking the cortex-lytic enzyme, SleC, germinated extremely poorly, and cortex hydrolysis was not observed in the few sleC spores that partially germinated. Overall, these findings indicate that C. difficile and B. subtilis spore germination exhibit key differences. Spores of the Gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium difficile are responsible for initiating infection by this important

  6. The Rasch Model as a Criterion: Applying the Rasch Model to the Analysis of Test Heterogeneity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Berner

    The aim of this paper is to explore the Rasch model as a criterion of test homogeneity. Two empirical studies are presented to demonstrate this usage. From these studies it is argued that statistical tests of item characteristic curve (ICC) slopes are not sufficient in testing for heterogeneity. Tests of equality of ICC's over groups of subject…

  7. Understanding and Applying the Dynamics of Test Practice and Study Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Two different methods of practice are available in the learning of simple information, test practice or study practice. Of these two methods of learning, research has generally shown that test practice is superior to study practice. However, this research has not considered the testing advantage with respect to the fact that test learning is…

  8. Applicability of Aerospace Materials Ground Flammability Test Data to Spacecraft Environments Theory and Applied Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Williams, Jim; Beeson, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ground test data in reference to flammability to spacecraft environments. It reviews the current approach to spacecraft fire safety, the challenges to fire safety that the Constellation program poses, the current trends in the evaluation of the Constellation materials flammability, and the correlation of test data from ground flammability tests with the spacecraft environment. Included is a proposal for testing and the design of experiments to test the flammability of materials under similar spacecraft conditions.

  9. Analysis of Full-Test tools and their limitations as applied to terminal junction blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Discovery of unlocked contacts in Deutsch Block terminal junctions in Solid Rocket Booster flight hardware prompted an investigation into pull test techniques to help insure against possible failures. Internal frictional forces between socket and pin and between wire and grommet were examined. Pull test force must be greater than internal friction yet less than the crimp strength of the pin or socket. For this reason, a 100 percent accurate test is impossible. Test tools were evaluated. Available tools are adequate for pull testing.

  10. Douglas-fir in northern California: effects of shade on germination, survival, and growth

    Treesearch

    Rudolph O. Strothmann

    1972-01-01

    Effects of four light intensities on germination, survival, and early growth of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were studied on south-facing cutblocks in northwestern California. Tested were four shade intensities: 0, 25, 50, and 75 percent. On seeded spots, 50 percent shade resulted in greatest germination and survival, being significantly...

  11. Birch seeds will germinate under a water-light treatment without pre-chilling

    Treesearch

    George Yelenosky

    1961-01-01

    The seed of yellow and paper birches, like that of many other species, often exhibits delayed germination, which apparently is due to embryo dormancy. Stratification is usually recommended for overcoming this dormancy before the seed is sown or before it is tested for germination. This involves a chilling treatment for 1 to 2 1/2 months, which is best done under...

  12. Germination and seedling morphology of four South American Smilax (Smilacaceae).

    PubMed

    Martins, Aline Redondo; Soares, Anielca Nascimento; Bombo, Aline Bertolosi; Fidelis, Alessandra; Novembre, Ana Dionisia da Luz Coelho; da Glória, Beatriz Appezzato

    2012-03-01

    Species of Smilax, also known as greenbrier, are widely distributed in Brazil and their commercial trades are carried out by the extractivism of native species. We the aim to provide information about the germination and development of seedlings in four Smilax species, different experiments were developed under controlled conditions. We evaluated two germination treatments: temperature (30 degrees C and 20-30 degrees C) and light (presence/ absence), and for few cases the tetrazolium treatment was applied. A different treatment response was observed among the studied species. Light had a significant influence in S. brasiliensis, with the highest germination rates at 20-30 degrees C in dark conditions. S. campestris showed significant differences among temperature treatments, but not to light; while S. cissoides showed high germination rates (66-78%), independently of treatment. However, S. polyantha had low germination rates (19-24%). After one year, the expanded leaves showed different characteristics among the studied species. Leaves of S. brasiliensis were ovate, coriaceous, three main veins and prickle-like structures only on the midrib on abaxial face. S. campestris leaves were oblong, coriaceous and prickle-like structures were located at the leaf midrib and margin. S. cissoides had ovate-elliptic, membranaceous leaves, with three main veins with prickle-like structures on the abaxial face. S. polyantha leaves showed ovate-elliptic, coriaceous leaves, with three main veins, translucent secondary veins and no prickle-like structures. A seedling identification key was elaborated based on morphological characteristics.

  13. Effects of a warmer climate on seed germination in the subarctic

    PubMed Central

    Milbau, Ann; Graae, Bente Jessen; Shevtsova, Anna; Nijs, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims In a future warmer subarctic climate, the soil temperatures experienced by dispersed seeds are likely to increase during summer but may decrease during winter due to expected changes in snow depth, duration and quality. Because little is known about the dormancy-breaking and germination requirements of subarctic species, how warming may influence the timing and level of germination in these species was examined. Methods Under controlled conditions, how colder winter and warmer summer soil temperatures influenced germination was tested in 23 subarctic species. The cold stratification and warm incubation temperatures were derived from real soil temperature measurements in subarctic tundra and the temperatures were gradually changed over time to simulate different months of the year. Key Results Moderate summer warming (+2·5 °C) substantially accelerated germination in all but four species but did not affect germination percentages. Optimum germination temperatures (20/10°C) further decreased germination time and increased germination percentages in three species. Colder winter soil temperatures delayed the germination in ten species and decreased the germination percentage in four species, whereas the opposite was found in Silene acaulis. In most species, the combined effect of a reduced snow cover and summer warming resulted in earlier germination and thus a longer first growing season, which improves the chance of seedling survival. In particular the recruitment of (dwarf) shrubs (Vaccinium myrtillus, V. vitis-idaea, Betula nana), trees (Alnus incana, Betula pubescens) and grasses (Calamagrostis lapponica, C. purpurea) is likely to benefit from a warmer subarctic climate. Conclusions Seedling establishment is expected to improve in a future warmer subarctic climate, mainly by considerably earlier germination. The magnitudes of the responses are species-specific, which should be taken into account when modelling population growth and migration

  14. Light quality and not quantity segregates germination of grazing increasers from decreasers in Mediterranean grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobarro, Iker; Valladares, Fernando; Peco, Begoña

    2010-01-01

    Grassland plant species have traditionally been classified into two groups, increasers and decreasers, based on changes in their relative abundance in the presence or absence of grazing. However, the ecophysiological mechanisms underlying these opposing strategies remain unclear. Seeds of ten Mediterranean species of known grazing status were germinated in different light environments to test the hypothesis that grazing selects light-dependent germination amongst grazing increasers. Two light quantity levels (Photosynthetical Active Radiation, PAR) and five light quality levels (red:far-red ratio, R:FR) were used to quantify percentages of germination of viable seeds and number of days elapsed to reach 50% of germination (T50), measured using five replicates of each light treatment and species combination. There were no differences in response to light quantity between the two grazing status groups; germination was inhibited in both groups at higher light intensities. However, increasers had lower germination percentages at low R:FR ratios, while decreasers were not affected by light quality. Germination speed (T50) was affected differently by light quality in each grazing status. There was an increase in germination speed at the lowest R:FR ratio only in increaser seeds, whereas decreaser germination speed was not affected by the treatment. PAR affected T50, regardless of grazing status; germination was faster at lower light intensities. Increaser seeds germinated faster than decreasers. These results reveal that the differential control of germination by light quality is a key factor in determining the species composition of grassland plant communities affected by herbivores in semi-arid Mediterranean grasslands.

  15. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method Applied Through Transparent Test Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    Research conducted at NASA Ames Research Center has shown that the color-change response of a shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) to aerodynamic shear depends on both the magnitude of the local shear vector and its direction relative to the observer's in-plane line of sight. In conventional applications, the surface of the SSLCC exposed to aerodynamic shear is illuminated with white light from the normal direction and observed from an oblique above-plane view angle of order 30 deg. In this top-light/top-view mode, shear vectors with components directed away from the observer cause the SSLCC to exhibit color-change responses. At any surface point, the maximum color change (measured from the no-shear red or orange color) always occurs when the local vector is aligned with, and directed away from, the observer. The magnitude of the color change at this vector-observer-aligned orientation scales directly with shear stress magnitude. Conversely, any surface point exposed to a shear vector with a component directed toward the observer exhibits a non-color-change response, always characterized by a rusty-red or brown color, independent of both shear magnitude and direction. These unique, highly directional color-change responses of SSLCCs to aerodynamic shear allow for the full-surface visualization and measurement of continuous shear stress vector distributions. The objective of the present research was to investigate application of the SSLCC method through a transparent test surface. In this new back-light/back-view mode, the exposed surface of the SSLCC would be subjected to aerodynamic shear stress while the contact surface between the SSLCC and the solid, transparent wall would be illuminated and viewed in the same geometrical arrangement as applied in conventional applications. It was unknown at the outset whether or not color-change responses would be observable from the contact surface of the SSLCC, and, if seen, how these color-change responses might

  16. Leveraging a high resolution microfluidic assay reveals insights into pathogenic fungal spore germination.

    PubMed

    Barkal, Layla J; Walsh, Naomi M; Botts, Michael R; Beebe, David J; Hull, Christina M

    2016-05-16

    Germination of spores into actively growing cells is a process essential for survival and pathogenesis of many microbes. Molecular mechanisms governing germination, however, are poorly understood in part because few tools exist for evaluating and interrogating the process. Here, we introduce an assay that leverages developments in microfluidic technology and image processing to quantitatively measure germination with unprecedented resolution, assessing both individual cells and the population as a whole. Using spores from Cryptococcus neoformans, a leading cause of fatal fungal disease in humans, we developed a platform to evaluate spores as they undergo morphological changes during differentiation into vegetatively growing yeast. The assay uses pipet-accessible microdevices that can be arrayed for efficient testing of diverse microenvironmental variables, including temperature and nutrients. We discovered that temperature influences germination rate, a carbon source alone is sufficient to induce germination, and the addition of a nitrogen source sustains it. Using this information, we optimized the assay for use with fungal growth inhibitors to pinpoint stages of germination inhibition. Unexpectedly, the clinical antifungal drugs amphotericin B and fluconazole did not significantly alter the process or timing of the transition from spore to yeast, indicating that vegetative growth and germination are distinct processes in C. neoformans. Finally, we used the high temporal resolution of the assay to determine the precise defect in a slow-germination mutant. Combining advances in microfluidics with a robust fungal molecular genetic system allowed us to identify and alter key temporal, morphological, and molecular events that occur during fungal germination.

  17. Leveraging a high resolution microfluidic assay reveals insights into pathogenic fungal spore germination

    PubMed Central

    Barkal, Layla J.; Walsh, Naomi M.; Botts, Michael R.; Beebe, David J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Germination of spores into actively growing cells is a process essential for survival and pathogenesis of many microbes. Molecular mechanisms governing germination, however, are poorly understood in part because few tools exist for evaluating and interrogating the process. Here, we introduce an assay that leverages developments in microfluidic technology and image processing to quantitatively measure germination with unprecedented resolution, assessing both individual cells and the population as a whole. Using spores from Cryptococcus neoformans, a leading cause of fatal fungal disease in humans, we developed a platform to evaluate spores as they undergo morphological changes during differentiation into vegetatively growing yeast. The assay uses pipet-accessible microdevices that can be arrayed for efficient testing of diverse microenvironmental variables, including temperature and nutrients. We discovered that temperature influences germination rate, a carbon source alone is sufficient to induce germination, and the addition of a nitrogen source sustains it. Using this information, we optimized the assay for use with fungal growth inhibitors to pinpoint stages of germination inhibition. Unexpectedly, the clinical antifungal drugs amphotericin B and fluconazole did not significantly alter the process or timing of the transition from spore to yeast, indicating that vegetative growth and germination are distinct processes in C. neoformans. Finally, we used the high temporal resolution of the assay to determine the precise defect in a slow-germination mutant. Combining advances in microfluidics with a robust fungal molecular genetic system allowed us to identify and alter key temporal, morphological, and molecular events that occur during fungal germination. PMID:27026574

  18. The effect of temperature on germination of chlamydospores of Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Paul W; Browning, Marsha; Leighty, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Mycelium-free chlamydospores of 12 isolates of P. ramorum representing three clonal lineages were produced with a method involving incubation in nonsterile sand at 20 C in darkness for 30 d. Chlamydospores were incubated on selective agar medium at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 C and germination assessed after 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 d incubation. The optimal temperature for germination based on 8 d incubation was 20 C for all three clonal lineages tested (NA1, NA2, EU1). Mean germination rates were 2, 21, 44, 67, 32 and 0 percent at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 C respectively for all isolates combined. The highest mean germination rate was scored by isolates of the EU1 clonal lineage at 20 C (85%) after 8 d incubation However, substantial variation was observed among isolates within each clonal lineage. Overall temperatures and days of incubation on which germination was assessed isolates of the NA1 clonal lineage had the lowest mean germination, even though one isolate had the highest germination of any isolate in any lineage. The results indicate that 20 C is the optimal germination temperature for P. ramorum chlamydospores and that a great disparity in germination percentage can exist within isolates, even within a single clonal lineage.

  19. Stimulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid synthesis activity in brown rice by a chitosan/glutamic acid germination solution and calcium/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk-Heung

    2003-05-31

    Changes in the concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), soluble calcium ions, glutamic acid, and the activity of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) were investigated in non-germinated vs. germinated brown rice. Brown rice was germinated for 72 h by applying each of the following solutions: (1) distilled water, (2) 5 mM lactic acid, (3) 50 ppm chitosan in 5 mM lactic acid, (4) 5 mM glutamic acid, and (5) 50 ppm chitosan in 5 mM glutamic acid. GABA concentrations were enhanced in all of the germinated brown rice when compared to the non-germinated brown rice. The GABA concentration was highest in the chitosan/glutamic acid that germinated brown rice at 2,011 nmol/g fresh weight, which was 13 times higher than the GABA concentration in the non-germinated brown rice at 154 nmol/g fresh weight. The concentrations of glutamic acid were significantly decreased in all of the germinated rice, regardless of the germination solution. Soluble calcium and GAD were higher in the germinated brown rice with the chitosan/glutamic acid solution when compared to the rice that was germinated in the other solutions. GAD that was partially purified from germinated brown rice was stimulated about 3.6-fold by the addition of calmodulin in the presence of calcium. These data show that the germination of brown rice in a chitosan/glutamic acid solution can significantly increase GABA synthesis activity and the concentration of GABA.

  20. Bioactive compounds in legumes and their germinated products.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yin; Lai, Hsi-Mei

    2006-05-31

    Nineteen domestic legume varieties, including 6 soybeans, 7 black soybeans, 4 azuki beans, and 2 mung beans, were evaluated for contents of dietary fiber, total phenolics, and flavonoids. Nine varieties of legumes (black soybean TN6, TN3, BM, and WY; soybean KS1, KS2, and KS8; azuki bean AKS5 and AKS6) were good sources of bioactive compounds and were selected for germination tests. After short- and long-term germinations, the bioactive compounds were determined and compared with compositions of isoflavones in soybeans. The reducing power of legumes correlated well with their total flavonoid contents (r (2) = 0.9414), whereas less correlation was found between reducing power and total phenolics contents (r (2) = 0.6885). The dark-coat seeds, such as azuki beans and black soybeans, contained high amounts of phenolic compounds and contributed to high antioxidative ability, whereas their phenolics content and antioxidative abilities significantly decreased after short-term germination due to losses of pigments in the seed coats. After long-term germination, the contents of bioactive compounds (total phenolics and flavonoids) increased again and the ratio of aglycones to total isoflavones significantly increased in black soybeans. TN3 and TN6 seeds and their long-term germinated seeds and AKS5 seeds were identified as the legume samples that might have the highest antioxidant ability according to the results of chemometric analysis. Selection of the right legume varieties combined with a suitable germination process could provide good sources of bioactive compounds from legumes and their germinated products for neutraceutical applications.

  1. Carbon nanofibers suppress fungal inhibition of seed germination of maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) crop

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Anjali Sharma, Arti; Nayyar, Harsh; Verma, Gaurav; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-08-28

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are one of allotropes of carbon, consists of graphene layers arrangement in the form of stacked cones or like a cup diameter in nanometer and several millimeters in length. Their extraordinary mechanical, chemical and electronic properties are due to their small size. CNFs have been successfully applied in field of medicine in variety of diagnostic methods. They proven to be an excellent system for drug delivery, tissue regeneration, biosensor etc. This research focuses the applications of CNFs in all fields of Agriculture. In the we treated some fungal disease seed of maize and barley using functionalised CNFs. We find that the tested seeds grow just as well as the healthy seeds whereas the untreated fungal disease seeds, by themselves show very poor germination and seedling growth. This simple experiment shows the extraordinary ability of Carbon nanofibers in carrying effectively inside the germinated seeds.

  2. Carbon nanofibers suppress fungal inhibition of seed germination of maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Sharma, Arti; Nayyar, Harsh; Verma, Gaurav; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are one of allotropes of carbon, consists of graphene layers arrangement in the form of stacked cones or like a cup diameter in nanometer and several millimeters in length. Their extraordinary mechanical, chemical and electronic properties are due to their small size. CNFs have been successfully applied in field of medicine in variety of diagnostic methods. They proven to be an excellent system for drug delivery, tissue regeneration, biosensor etc. This research focuses the applications of CNFs in all fields of Agriculture. In the we treated some fungal disease seed of maize and barley using functionalised CNFs. We find that the tested seeds grow just as well as the healthy seeds whereas the untreated fungal disease seeds, by themselves show very poor germination and seedling growth. This simple experiment shows the extraordinary ability of Carbon nanofibers in carrying effectively inside the germinated seeds.

  3. Applying Linear and Logistic Regression to a Required English Proficiency Test. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weimer, Don

    Prompted by repeated failure on a required English language proficiency test by a large proportion of undergraduates, educators at Cardinal Stritch College (Wisconsin) conducted a study to determine predictors of failure or success on the test, and whether revision of course placement standards should be considered to improve test performance.…

  4. Training Teachers and Serving Students: Applying Usability Testing in Writing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Teachers often test course materials by using them in class. Usability testing provides an alternative: teachers receive student feedback and revise materials "before" teaching a class. Case studies based on interviews and observations with two teaching assistants who usability tested materials before teaching introductory technical writing…

  5. Training Teachers and Serving Students: Applying Usability Testing in Writing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Teachers often test course materials by using them in class. Usability testing provides an alternative: teachers receive student feedback and revise materials "before" teaching a class. Case studies based on interviews and observations with two teaching assistants who usability tested materials before teaching introductory technical writing…

  6. 40 CFR 1051.505 - What special provisions apply for testing snowmobiles?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM RECREATIONAL ENGINES AND VEHICLES Test... for all testing you perform for that engine family. If we test your engines to confirm that they meet... cycle using the weighting factors specified for each mode. In each mode, operate the engine for at...

  7. Development of a Threshold Model to Predict Germination of Populus tomentosa Seeds after Harvest and Storage under Ambient Condition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Song, Song-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Effects of temperature, storage time and their combination on germination of aspen (Populus tomentosa) seeds were investigated. Aspen seeds were germinated at 5 to 30°C at 5°C intervals after storage for a period of time under 28°C and 75% relative humidity. The effect of temperature on aspen seed germination could not be effectively described by the thermal time (TT) model, which underestimated the germination rate at 5°C and poorly predicted the time courses of germination at 10, 20, 25 and 30°C. A modified TT model (MTT) which assumed a two-phased linear relationship between germination rate and temperature was more accurate in predicting the germination rate and percentage and had a higher likelihood of being correct than the TT model. The maximum lifetime threshold (MLT) model accurately described the effect of storage time on seed germination across all the germination temperatures. An aging thermal time (ATT) model combining both the TT and MLT models was developed to describe the effect of both temperature and storage time on seed germination. When the ATT model was applied to germination data across all the temperatures and storage times, it produced a relatively poor fit. Adjusting the ATT model to separately fit germination data at low and high temperatures in the suboptimal range increased the models accuracy for predicting seed germination. Both the MLT and ATT models indicate that germination of aspen seeds have distinct physiological responses to temperature within a suboptimal range. PMID:23658654

  8. Intraexaminer comparison of applied kinesiology manual muscle testing of varying durations: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Conable, Katharine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the difference in results (strong/facilitated vs weak/functionally inhibited) between short (1 second) and long (3 seconds) manual muscle tests (MMTs) on the same subject and to pilot the use of thin-film force transducers for characterizing the parameters of MMT and for measuring maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Method Forty-four healthy chiropractic students were tested. A thin-film force transducer recorded force over time during MVIC of the middle deltoid and 1- and 3-second MMTs of the same subjects. The MMTs were graded as strong (able to resist the testing pressure) or weak (unable to resist testing pressure, breaking away). Results Forty-two short tests were strong, and 2 were weak. Thirty-nine long tests were strong, and 5 were weak. κ (0.54) showed fair agreement for results between short and long tests. Peak force in both short and long weak tests was higher than that in strong tests when expressed as a proportion of maximum contraction. All manual tests used less force than MVICs. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a study of this nature is feasible. Longer test durations demonstrate some muscle weaknesses that are not evident on 1-second MMTs. Thin-film transducers show promise for recording MMT parameters for research purposes. PMID:21572637

  9. Number of succussion strokes affects effectiveness of ultra-high-diluted arsenic on in vitro wheat germination and polycrystalline structures obtained by droplet evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Betti, Lucietta; Trebbi, Grazia; Kokornaczyk, Maria Olga; Nani, Daniele; Peruzzi, Maurizio; Dinelli, Giovanni; Bellavite, Paolo; Brizzi, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether the number of succussion strokes applied after each dilution step when preparing the homeopathic treatments influences the effectiveness of ultra-high-diluted (UHD) arsenic trioxide at the 45th decimal dilution/dynamization (As2O3 45x). Wheat seeds, previously stressed with ponderal As2O3, were treated with: As2O3 45x, H2O 45x (dynamized control), or pure water (negative control). The succussion was done manually, and various succussion durations (numbers of strokes) were tested for each treatment. Treatment effectiveness was tested blind using the in vitro germination test and the droplet evaporation method (DEM). Data were processed by the Poisson test (germination test) and by two-way analysis of variance (DEM). We evaluated both the in vitro germination rate, by counting the non-germinated seeds, and the complexity of polycrystalline structures (PCS) (local connected fractal dimension (LCFD)) obtained by evaporating leakage droplets from stressed seeds that had been watered with the different treatments. We observed a highly significant increase in germination rate when the number of strokes (NS) was ≥32 for both As2O3 45x and H2O 45x, and a significant increase in the LCFD of PCS for As2O3 45x when the NS was ≥32 and for H2O 45x when it was 70. Both experimental approaches showed increased effectiveness for treatments prepared with a higher number of succussion strokes. These results indicate that succussion may have an important influence on treatment effectiveness, and so highlight the need for further research. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Germinating pokeberry seed (Phytolacca americana L.)

    Treesearch

    Arnold Krochmal

    1970-01-01

    The seeds of pokeberry (Phytolacca americana L.) can be germinated successfully by storing them dry over winter and then nicking them with a needle to break the seed coat, followed by germination treatment at about 75ºF.

  11. [Study on morphology, quality and germination characteristics of Acanthopanax trifoliatus seeds under different habitats].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan

    2014-05-01

    To preliminary explore the difference of the morphological, quality and germinal characteristics of Acanthopanax trifoliatus seeds under different habitats. Collect the wild seeds from different habitats in West Mountain, and then observe their external appearances and internal structure, and test the thousand seeds weight,water content and seed vigor. What's more, the influence to germination rates of the seeds from different temperatures and light intensities in artificial bioclimatic chamber was studied. Orthogonal test in experimental plots was carried out to screen the different sowing dates, matrix types and soil depths which may influence germination rate. The external appearances and quality characteristics of wild seeds from three habitats were different. Seeds could germinate in the both light and dark, the germination rate of the habitat II was as high as 70.5% at the optimum temperature 20 degrees C in artificial bioclimatic chamber. The optimal combination A1, B1, C1 was screened out through orthogonal test, namely, the germination rate would be the highest when the seeds sowed in autumn covering with 2 cm depth of matrix type which component of the ratio of soil, sand and organic fertilizer was 6: 3: 1. There was significant difference in the morphology and germination rate of the three habitats seeds. The habitat II seeds were the optimal choice when culture seedling. The influences of different temperatures on germination rate were different, and the dried seeds should sow in current autumn, better than the next spring.

  12. Contrasting germination responses to vegetative canopies experienced in pre- vs. post-dispersal environments.

    PubMed

    Leverett, Lindsay D; Auge, Gabriela A; Bali, Aman; Donohue, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Seeds adjust their germination based on conditions experienced before and after dispersal. Post-dispersal cues are expected to be more accurate predictors of offspring environments, and thus offspring success, than pre-dispersal cues. Therefore, germination responses to conditions experienced during seed maturation may be expected to be superseded by responses to conditions experienced during seed imbibition. In taxa of disturbed habitats, neighbours frequently reduce the performance of germinants. This leads to the hypotheses that a vegetative canopy will reduce germination in such taxa, and that a vegetative canopy experienced during seed imbibition will over-ride germination responses to a canopy experienced during seed maturation, since it is a more proximal cue of immediate competition. These hypotheses were tested here in Arabidopsis thaliana METHODS: Seeds were matured under a simulated canopy (green filter) or white light. Fresh (dormant) seeds were imbibed in the dark, white light or canopy at two temperatures (10 or 22 °C), and germination proportions were recorded. Germination was also recorded in after-ripened (less dormant) seeds that were induced into secondary dormancy and imbibed in the dark at each temperature, either with or without brief exposure to red and far-red light. Unexpectedly, a maturation canopy expanded the conditions that elicited germination, even as seeds lost and regained dormancy. In contrast, an imbibition canopy impeded or had no effect on germination. Maturation under a canopy did not modify germination responses to red and far-red light. Seed maturation under a canopy masked genetic variation in germination. The results challenge the hypothesis that offspring will respond more strongly to their own environment than to that of their parents. The observed relaxation of germination requirements caused by a maturation canopy could be maladaptive for offspring by disrupting germination responses to light cues after dispersal

  13. Analysis of the slow germination of multiple individual superdormant Bacillus subtilis spores using multifocus Raman microspectroscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Kong, L; Wang, G; Scotland, M; Ghosh, S; Setlow, B; Setlow, P; Li, Y-Q

    2012-03-01

    To analyse the dynamic germination of hundreds of individual superdormant (SD) Bacillus subtilis spores. Germination of hundreds of individual SD B. subtilis spores with various germinants and under different conditions was followed by multifocus Raman microspectroscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy for 12h and with temporal resolutions of ≤30s. SD spores germinated poorly with the nutrient germinant used to isolate them and with alternate germinants targeting the germinant receptor (GR) used originally. The mean times following mixing of spores and nutrient germinants to initiate and complete fast release of Ca-dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) (T(lag) and T(release) times, respectively) of SD spores were much longer than those of dormant spores. However, the ΔT(release) times (T(release) -T(lag) ) of SD spores were essentially identical to those of dormant spores. SD spores germinated almost as well as dormant spores with nutrient germinants targeting GRs different from the one used to isolate the SD spores and with CaDPA that does not trigger spore germination via GRs. Since (i) ΔT(release) times were essentially identical in GR-dependent germination of SD and dormant spores; (ii) rates of GR-independent germination of SD and dormant spores were identical; (iii) large increases in T(lag) times were the major difference in the GR-dependent germination of SD as compared with spores; and (iv) higher GR levels are correlated with shorter T(lag) times, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that low levels of a GR are the major reason that some spores in a population are SD with germinants targeting this same GR. This study provides information on the dynamic germination of individual SD spores and improves the understanding of spore superdormancy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Campanulaceae: a family with small seeds that require light for germination.

    PubMed

    Koutsovoulou, Katerina; Daws, Matthew I; Thanos, Costas A

    2014-01-01

    The Campanulaceae is a large cosmopolitan family, but is understudied in terms of germination, and seed biology in general. Small seed mass (usually in the range 10-200 µg) is a noteworthy trait of the family, and having small seeds is commonly associated with a light requirement. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of light on germination in 131 taxa of the Campanulaceae family, from all five continents of its distribution. For all taxa, seed germination was tested in light (8 or 12 h photoperiod) and continuous darkness under constant and alternating temperatures. For four taxa, the effect of light on germination was examined over a wide range of temperatures on a thermogradient plate, and the possible substitution of the light requirement by gibberellic acid and nitrate was examined in ten taxa. For all 131 taxa, seed germination was higher in light than in darkness for every temperature tested. Across species, the light requirement decreased significantly with increasing seed mass. For larger seeded species, germination in the dark reached higher levels under alternating than under constant temperatures. Gibberellic acid promoted germination in darkness whereas nitrates partially substituted for a light requirement only in species showing some dark germination. A light requirement for germination, observed in virtually all taxa examined, constitutes a collective characteristic of the family. It is postulated that smaller seeded taxa might germinate only on the soil surface or at shallow depths, while larger seeded species might additionally germinate when buried in the soil if cued to do so by fluctuating temperatures.

  15. Dispersal and Germination Patterns of Monterey Spineflower at Fort Ord Natural Reserve.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Some species are rare because they are restricted to certain habitats and/or have small population sizes. Monterey spineflower, a federally listed threatened annual plant, is found in open sandy regions of the California coast, in chaparral vegetation around the Monterey Bay. A model based on previous research suggests that the Monterey spineflower population at Fort Ord Natural Reserve should be rapidly increasing, but it is not. This suggests that the model may be using data that overestimates the percentage of spineflower seeds that successfully germinate. I tested three hypotheses to determine the cause of the difference in population sizes between the predicted model and the field results. First, I predicted that the spineflower seeds are blown by the wind into shrubs such as manzanita, and are unable to germinate due to the lack of a suitable environment. I tested this in two ways. A field experiment showed that seeds are easily blow by wind. Next, I took soil cores and found spineflower seeds within the manzanita shrubs. Secondly, I predicted that the germination rate used by the model (90%) was too high. However, my germination experiments did not support this hypothesis because 91% of new seeds successfully germinated. Lastly, I predicted that the newer seeds are more viable than older seeds and therefore have a higher chance of successfully germinating. After germinating seeds in a controlled environment I observed that the seeds from 2014 had a higher number of successfully germinated seeds compared to the number of successfully germinated seeds from 1995 (91% vs 33%). I conclude that the loss of seeds due to wind decreases germination expectancies and older seeds are less viable than new seeds. Therefore, Monterey spineflower is a rare plant because environmental barriers hinder seeds from dispersing to a suitable habitat and successfully germinating while seeds lose viability as they age.

  16. Ambiguities in applying traditional Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate tests to quantify endotoxin in nanoparticle formulations

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Neun, Barry W; Clogston, Jeffrey D; Ding, Hui; Ljubimova, Julia; McNeil, Scott E

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is finding increasing application in biology and medicine. As with other pharmaceutical formulations and medical devices intended for use in animals and human patients, contamination of nanoparticles with bacterial endotoxins should be thoroughly investigated before preclinical in vitro and in vivo characterization. Traditional methods to study endotoxin contamination include the in vitro quantitative limulus amoebocyte lysate test and the in vivo qualitative rabbit pyrogen test. Both of these tests have long history of use for traditional pharmaceuticals and medical devices and are routinely used in drug development. Here we report that nanoparticles often interfere with these traditional endotoxin detection tests and suggest approaches to detect and overcome such interferences. PMID:20528451

  17. Applying Model Checking to Generate Model-Based Integration Tests from Choreography Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Sebastian; Kozyura, Vitaly; Roth, Andreas; Leuschel, Michael; Bendisposto, Jens; Plagge, Daniel; Schieferdecker, Ina

    Choreography models describe the communication protocols between services. Testing of service choreographies is an important task for the quality assurance of service-based systems as used e.g. in the context of service-oriented architectures (SOA). The formal modeling of service choreographies enables a model-based integration testing (MBIT) approach. We present MBIT methods for our service choreography modeling approach called Message Choreography Models (MCM). For the model-based testing of service choreographies, MCMs are translated into Event-B models and used as input for our test generator which uses the model checker ProB.

  18. Methods for assessing Phytophthora ramorum chlamydospore germination

    Treesearch

    Joyce Eberhart; Elilzabeth Stamm; Jennifer Parke

    2013-01-01

    Germination of chlamydospores is difficult to accurately assess when chlamydospores are attached to remnants of supporting hyphae. We developed two approaches for closely observing and rigorously quantifying the frequency of chlamydospore germination in vitro. The plate marking and scanning method was useful for quantifying germination of large...

  19. 7 CFR 201.20 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Germination. 201.20 Section 201.20 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.20 Germination. The label shall show the percentage of germination for each kind or kind and variety or kind and type of kind and hybrid of agricultural seed...

  20. 7 CFR 201.20 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Germination. 201.20 Section 201.20 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.20 Germination. The label shall show the percentage of germination each kind, or kind and variety, or kind and type, or kind and hybrid of agricultural seed...

  1. 7 CFR 201.20 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Germination. 201.20 Section 201.20 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.20 Germination. The label shall show the percentage of germination for each kind or kind and variety or kind and type of kind and hybrid of agricultural seed...

  2. 7 CFR 201.20 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Germination. 201.20 Section 201.20 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.20 Germination. The label shall show the percentage of germination for each kind or kind and variety or kind and type of kind and hybrid of agricultural seed...

  3. 7 CFR 201.20 - Germination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Germination. 201.20 Section 201.20 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.20 Germination. The label shall show the percentage of germination each kind, or kind and variety, or kind and type, or kind and hybrid of agricultural seed...

  4. Analysis of Germination Capacity and Germinant Receptor (Sub)clusters of Genome-Sequenced Bacillus cereus Environmental Isolates and Model Strains

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spore germination of 17 Bacillus cereus food isolates and reference strains was evaluated using flow cytometry analysis in combination with fluorescent staining at a single-spore level. This approach allowed for rapid collection of germination data under more than 20 conditions, including heat activation of spores, germination in complex media (brain heart infusion [BHI] and tryptone soy broth [TSB]), and exposure to saturating concentrations of single amino acids and the combination of alanine and inosine. Whole-genome sequence comparison revealed a total of 11 clusters of operons encoding germinant receptors (GRs): GerK, GerI, and GerL were present in all strains, whereas GerR, GerS, GerG, GerQ, GerX, GerF, GerW, and GerZ (sub)clusters showed a more diverse presence/absence in different strains. The spores of tested strains displayed high diversity with regard to their sensitivity and responsiveness to selected germinants and heat activation. The two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, and 11 food isolates showed a good germination response under a range of conditions, whereas four other strains (B. cereus B4085, B4086, B4116, and B4153) belonging to phylogenetic group IIIA showed a very weak germination response even in BHI and TSB media. Germination responses could not be linked to specific (combinations of) GRs, but it was noted that the four group IIIA strains contained pseudogenes or variants of subunit C in their gerL cluster. Additionally, two of those strains (B4086 and B4153) carried pseudogenes in the gerK and gerRI (sub)clusters that possibly affected the functionality of these GRs. IMPORTANCE Germination of bacterial spores is a critical step before vegetative growth can resume. Food products may contain nutrient germinants that trigger germination and outgrowth of Bacillus species spores, possibly leading to food spoilage or foodborne illness. Prediction of spore germination behavior is, however, very challenging

  5. A General Diagnostic Model Applied to Language Testing Data. Research Report. ETS RR-05-16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Davier, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Probabilistic models with more than one latent variable are designed to report profiles of skills or cognitive attributes. Testing programs want to offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide using these skill profiles. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of…

  6. Digital Image Correlation Techniques Applied to Large Scale Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Rocket engine hot-fire ground testing is necessary to understand component performance, reliability and engine system interactions during development. The J-2X upper stage engine completed a series of developmental hot-fire tests that derived performance of the engine and components, validated analytical models and provided the necessary data to identify where design changes, process improvements and technology development were needed. The J-2X development engines were heavily instrumented to provide the data necessary to support these activities which enabled the team to investigate any anomalies experienced during the test program. This paper describes the development of an optical digital image correlation technique to augment the data provided by traditional strain gauges which are prone to debonding at elevated temperatures and limited to localized measurements. The feasibility of this optical measurement system was demonstrated during full scale hot-fire testing of J-2X, during which a digital image correlation system, incorporating a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains was installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The camera and facility setup, pre-test calibrations, data collection, hot-fire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  7. 40 CFR 1051.505 - What special provisions apply for testing snowmobiles?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 5 minutes, then sample emissions for at least 1 minute. Calculate cycle statistics and compare with... end of the last mode. Calculate emissions and cycle statistics the same as for transient testing as... that such testing complies with 40 CFR 1065.10(c)(1): (1) Using good engineering judgment, instrument a...

  8. Comparison of Modal Analysis Methods Applied to a Vibro-Acoustic Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn; Pappa, Richard; Buehrle, Ralph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2001-01-01

    Modal testing of a vibro-acoustic test article referred to as the Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) has provided frequency response data for the development of validated numerical models of complex structures for interior noise prediction and control. The ATC is an all aluminum, ring and stringer stiffened cylinder, 12 feet in length and 4 feet in diameter. The cylinder was designed to represent typical aircraft construction. Modal tests were conducted for several different configurations of the cylinder assembly under ambient and pressurized conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present results from dynamic testing of different ATC configurations using two modal analysis software methods: Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and MTS IDEAS Polyreference method. The paper compares results from the two analysis methods as well as the results from various test configurations. The effects of pressurization on the modal characteristics are discussed.

  9. Cuticular lipids and silverleaf whitefly stage affect conidial germination of Beauveria bassiana and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus.

    PubMed

    James, R R; Buckner, J S; Freeman, T P

    2003-10-01

    Beauveria bassiana and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus are generalist entomopathogenic fungi that infect the silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia argentifolii). We found second and third instar whiteflies to be the most susceptible larval stage to both fungi. Conidia of B. bassiana germinated most readily on the cuticle of second instars (54% germinated) and P. fumosoroseus germination was highest on third instar cuticle (45%). Fourth instars (the ultimate instar) had low susceptibility to these pathogens, and spore germination on the cuticle of fourth instars was very low for B. bassiana (7%) and intermediate for P. fumosoroseus (33%). Cuticular lipids were found to have toxic or inhibitory effects on conidia of B. bassiana and P. fumosoroseus when the spores were germinated on nutrient agar in the presence of the lipids. In the absence of added nutrients, P. fumosoroseus conidial germination increased in the presence of the lipids. To test if the inhibitory effects of the lipids were due solely to hydrophobicity (preventing water from coming into contact with the conidia) we tested the effects of synthetic long-chain wax esters. The synthetic wax esters inhibited germination of P. fumosoroseus to a degree that was similar to the effect of the cuticular lipid extracts, but the synthetic lipids did not have a significant effect on B. bassiana. Thus, the thick coating of long-chain wax esters produced by whitefly nymphs affect spore germination of fungal pathogens, but whether they play a significant role in defense against disease is not clear.

  10. Infrared Thermography as Applied to Thermal Testing of Power Systems Circuit Boards.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jonathan James

    All operational electronic equipment dissipates some amount of energy in the form of infrared radiation. Faulty electronic components on a printed circuit board can be categorized as hard (functional) or soft (latent functional). Hard faults are those which are detected during a conventional manufacturing electronic test process. Soft failures, in contrast, are those which are undetectable through conventional testing, but which manifest themselves after a product has been placed into service. Such field defective modules ultimately result in operational failure and subsequently enter a manufacturer's costly repair process. While thermal imaging systems are being used increasingly in the electronic equipment industry as a product-testing tool, applications have primarily been limited to product design or repair processes, with minimal use in a volume manufacturing environment. Use of thermal imaging systems in such an environment has mostly been limited to low-volume products or random screening of high-volume products. Thermal measurements taken in a manufacturing environment are often taken manually, thus defeating their capability of rapid data acquisition and constraining their full potential in a high-volume manufacturing process. Integration of a thermal measurement system with automated testing equipment is essential for optimal use of expensive infrared measurement tools in a high-volume manufacturing environment. However, such a marriage presents problems with respect to both existing manufacturing test processes and infrared measurement techniques. Methods are presented in this dissertation to test automatically for latent faults, those which elude detection during conventional electronic testing, on printed circuit boards. These methods are intended for implementation in a volume manufacturing environment and involve the application of infrared imaging tools. Successful incorporation of infrared testing into existing test processes requires that: PASS

  11. Quality assurance of the Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) of the MRCGP examination - an immediate post-test questionnaire evaluation of the candidates' views.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Hilton; Blow, Carol; Milne, Paul; Siriwardena, Niroshan; Milne, Heather; Elfes, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) of the Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioners (MRCGP) examination is a computer-based assessment delivered three times a year. A computerised questionnaire, administered immediately after the test, sought candidates' views as part of the test evaluation. Of 1681 candidates taking the test 1418 (84%) responded. Most candidates believed that the test assessed their knowledge of problems relevant to general practice. Their feedback highlighted areas where improvements could be made. Candidates' views of postgraduate specialty medical examinations in the UK are rarely sought or published. We are not aware of other published evidence. The use of computer-based testing enables immediate candidate feedback and can be used routinely to evaluate the test validity and formats. The views of candidates are an important component of quality assurance in reviewing the content, format and educational experience of a high-stakes examination.

  12. Seed flotation and germination of salt marsh plants: The effects of stratification, salinity, and/or inundation regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsey-Quirk, T.; Middleton, B.A.; Proffitt, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of cold stratification and salinity on seed flotation of eight salt marsh species. Four of the eight species were tested for germination success under different stratification, salinity, and flooding conditions. Species were separated into two groups, four species received wet stratification and four dry stratification and fresh seeds of all species were tested for flotation and germination. Fresh seeds of seven out of eight species had flotation times independent of salinity, six of which had average flotation times of at least 50 d. Seeds of Spartina alterniflora and Spartina patens had the shortest flotation times, averaging 24 and 26 d, respectively. Following wet stratification, the flotation time of S. alterniflora seeds in higher salinity water (15 and 36 ppt) was reduced by over 75% and germination declined by more than 90%. Wet stratification reduced the flotation time of Distichlis spicata seeds in fresh water but increased seed germination from 2 to 16% in a fluctuating inundation regime. Fresh seeds of Iva frutescens and S. alternflora were capable of germination and therefore are non-dormant during dispersal. Fresh seeds of I. frutescens had similar germination to dry stratified seeds ranging 25-30%. Salinity reduced seed germination for all species except for S. alterniflora. A fluctuating inundation regime was important for seed germination of the low marsh species and for germination following cold stratification. The conditions that resulted in seeds sinking faster were similar to the conditions that resulted in higher germination for two of four species. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Weibull analysis applied to the pull adhesion test and fracture of a metal-ceramic interface

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A.; Schult, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Various adhesion tests have been developed to measure the mechanical bonding of thin coatings deposited on substrates. In the pull test, pins that have been bonded to the coating under test are pulled with increasing force normal to the coating until the coating is pulled from the substrate. For many systems, large scatter in the data is often observed due to uncontrolled defects in the interface and the brittle nature of the pull test. In this study, the applicability of Weibull statistics to the analysis of adhesion of Ag films to vacuum sputter-cleaned zirconia was examined. Data were obtained for smooth and rough substrates for various levels of adhesion. A good fit of the data to the Weibull distribution was observed. The Weibull modulus was found to depend on the roughness of the substrate, but was insensitive to the adhesion strength.

  14. Applying 3D measurements and computer matching algorithms to two firearm examination proficiency tests.

    PubMed

    Ott, Daniel; Thompson, Robert; Song, Junfeng

    2017-02-01

    In order for a crime laboratory to assess a firearms examiner's training, skills, experience, and aptitude, it is necessary for the examiner to participate in proficiency testing. As computer algorithms for comparisons of pattern evidence become more prevalent, it is of interest to test algorithm performance as well, using these same proficiency examinations. This article demonstrates the use of the Congruent Matching Cell (CMC) algorithm to compare 3D topography measurements of breech face impressions and firing pin impressions from a previously distributed firearms proficiency test. In addition, the algorithm is used to analyze the distribution of many comparisons from a collection of cartridge cases used to construct another recent set of proficiency tests. These results are provided along with visualizations that help to relate the features used in optical comparisons by examiners to the features used by computer comparison algorithms.

  15. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm... operating before a test, use good engineering judgment to let the engine cool down enough so measured...

  16. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm... operating before a test, use good engineering judgment to let the engine cool down enough so measured...

  17. Impact of seed germination data on genebank management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed viability data on plant genetic resource accessions in cold storage is critical information that impacts many areas of genebank management. Prior to 2002, little germination testing was conducted at the Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit (PGRCU), Griffin, GA. Seed was distributed from th...

  18. Effect of Storage Conditions and Storage Periods on Seed Germination in Eleven Populations of Swertia chirayita: A Critically Endangered Medicinal Herb in Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Bharat K.; Badola, Hemant K.

    2012-01-01

    Effect of different storage conditions (room temperature, 4°C, and −15°C) and different storage periods over 24 months on seed germination in Swertia chirayita collected from different altitudes in Sikkim Himalaya was determined. Multivariate ANOVA revealed significant (P < 0.0001) effect of storage condition and storage period on seed germination and mean germination time. Seed germination percentage significantly (P < 0.01) varied between 87.78% (Sc5) and 100% (Sc2) during initial testing. Comparatively, high seed germination, low mean germination time, and low rate of fall in seed germination percentage in seeds stored at 4°C over different storage period were recorded. In addition, above 50% seed germination in majority of the populations even after 24 months of storage suggests 4°C as the most appropriate storage condition for long-term storage of seeds of S. chirayita. PMID:22619581

  19. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  20. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  1. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY DRUGS Laboratory Controls... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60...

  2. Predicting the future: opportunities and challenges for the chemical industry to apply 21st-century toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Settivari, Raja S; Ball, Nicholas; Murphy, Lynea; Rasoulpour, Reza; Boverhof, Darrell R; Carney, Edward W

    2015-03-01

    Interest in applying 21st-century toxicity testing tools for safety assessment of industrial chemicals is growing. Whereas conventional toxicology uses mainly animal-based, descriptive methods, a paradigm shift is emerging in which computational approaches, systems biology, high-throughput in vitro toxicity assays, and high-throughput exposure assessments are beginning to be applied to mechanism-based risk assessments in a time- and resource-efficient fashion. Here we describe recent advances in predictive safety assessment, with a focus on their strategic application to meet the changing demands of the chemical industry and its stakeholders. The opportunities to apply these new approaches is extensive and include screening of new chemicals, informing the design of safer and more sustainable chemical alternatives, filling information gaps on data-poor chemicals already in commerce, strengthening read-across methodology for categories of chemicals sharing similar modes of action, and optimizing the design of reduced-risk product formulations. Finally, we discuss how these predictive approaches dovetail with in vivo integrated testing strategies within repeated-dose regulatory toxicity studies, which are in line with 3Rs principles to refine, reduce, and replace animal testing. Strategic application of these tools is the foundation for informed and efficient safety assessment testing strategies that can be applied at all stages of the product-development process.

  3. 40 CFR 1045.401 - What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service? 1045.401 Section 1045.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION...

  4. 40 CFR 1045.401 - What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service? 1045.401 Section 1045.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION...

  5. 40 CFR 1045.401 - What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service? 1045.401 Section 1045.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION...

  6. 40 CFR 1045.401 - What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service? 1045.401 Section 1045.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION...

  7. 40 CFR 1045.401 - What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What testing requirements apply to my engines that have gone into service? 1045.401 Section 1045.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION...

  8. 40 CFR 80.583 - What alternative sampling and testing requirements apply to importers who transport motor vehicle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements apply to importers who transport motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel, or ECA marine fuel...; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Sampling and Testing § 80.583 What... diesel fuel, or ECA marine fuel by truck or rail car? Importers who import diesel fuel subject to the...

  9. The Relationship of Deep and Surface Study Approaches on Factual and Applied Test-Bank Multiple-Choice Question Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonker, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of online test banks and large introductory classes, instructors have often turned to textbook publisher-generated multiple-choice question (MCQ) exams in their courses. Multiple-choice questions are often divided into categories of factual or applied, thereby implicating levels of cognitive processing. This investigation examined…

  10. Predicting the Future: Opportunities and Challenges for the Chemical Industry to Apply 21st-Century Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Settivari, Raja S; Ball, Nicholas; Murphy, Lynea; Rasoulpour, Reza; Boverhof, Darrell R; Carney, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    Interest in applying 21st-century toxicity testing tools for safety assessment of industrial chemicals is growing. Whereas conventional toxicology uses mainly animal-based, descriptive methods, a paradigm shift is emerging in which computational approaches, systems biology, high-throughput in vitro toxicity assays, and high-throughput exposure assessments are beginning to be applied to mechanism-based risk assessments in a time- and resource-efficient fashion. Here we describe recent advances in predictive safety assessment, with a focus on their strategic application to meet the changing demands of the chemical industry and its stakeholders. The opportunities to apply these new approaches is extensive and include screening of new chemicals, informing the design of safer and more sustainable chemical alternatives, filling information gaps on data-poor chemicals already in commerce, strengthening read-across methodology for categories of chemicals sharing similar modes of action, and optimizing the design of reduced-risk product formulations. Finally, we discuss how these predictive approaches dovetail with in vivo integrated testing strategies within repeated-dose regulatory toxicity studies, which are in line with 3Rs principles to refine, reduce, and replace animal testing. Strategic application of these tools is the foundation for informed and efficient safety assessment testing strategies that can be applied at all stages of the product-development process. PMID:25836969

  11. The rice Osmyb4 gene enhances tolerance to frost and improves germination under unfavourable conditions in transgenic barley plants.

    PubMed

    Soltész, Alexandra; Vágújfalvi, Attila; Rizza, Fulvia; Kerepesi, Ildikó; Galiba, Gábor; Cattivelli, Luigi; Coraggio, Immacolata; Crosatti, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    The Osmyb4 rice gene, coding for a transcription factor, proved to be efficient against different abiotic stresses as a trans(cis)gene in several plant species, although the effectiveness was dependent on the host genomic background. Eight barley transgenic lines carrying the rice Osmyb4 gene under the control of the Arabidopsis cold inducible promoter cor15a were produced to test the efficiency of this gene in barley. After a preliminary test, the best performing lines were subjected to freezing at -11°C and -12°C. Frost tolerance was assessed measured the F(v)/F(m) parameter widely used to indicate the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry in the dark adapted state. Three transgenic lines showed significantly increased tolerance. These selected lines were further studied under a complex stress applying cold and hypoxia at germinating stage. In these conditions the three selected transgenic lines outperformed the wild type barley in terms of germination vigour. The transgenic plants also showed a significant modification of their metabolism under cold/hypoxia conditions as demonstrated through the assessment of the activity of key enzymes involved in anoxic stress response. None of the transgenic lines showed dwarfism, just a slight retarded growth. These results provide evidence that the cold dependent expression of Osmyb4 can efficiently improved frost tolerance and germination vigour at low temperature without deleterious effect on plant growth.

  12. Applying Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) to support Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA).

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Scholz, Stefan; Cronin, Mark T; Edwards, Stephen W; de Knecht, Joop; Crofton, Kevin; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Hartung, Thomas; Worth, Andrew; Patlewicz, Grace

    2014-12-01

    Chemical regulation is challenged by the large number of chemicals requiring assessment for potential human health and environmental impacts. Current approaches are too resource intensive in terms of time, money and animal use to evaluate all chemicals under development or already on the market. The need for timely and robust decision making demands that regulatory toxicity testing becomes more cost-effective and efficient. One way to realize this goal is by being more strategic in directing testing resources; focusing on chemicals of highest concern, limiting testing to the most probable hazards, or targeting the most vulnerable species. Hypothesis driven Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA) have been proposed as practical solutions to such strategic testing. In parallel, the development of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework, which provides information on the causal links between a molecular initiating event (MIE), intermediate key events (KEs) and an adverse outcome (AO) of regulatory concern, offers the biological context to facilitate development of IATA for regulatory decision making. This manuscript summarizes discussions at the Workshop entitled "Advancing AOPs for Integrated Toxicology and Regulatory Applications" with particular focus on the role AOPs play in informing the development of IATA for different regulatory purposes.

  13. Applying Choice Architecture Principles to Understand HIV Testing: Findings From Malawi and Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chung, Adrienne H; Rimal, Rajiv N

    2015-08-01

    Improvements spearheaded by the World Health Organization in antenatal HIV counseling in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2011 have seen a parallel increase in HIV testing. We sought to determine the extent to which the use of choice architecture principles (one that introduces an opt-out option as the default) affect uptake of HIV testing, above and beyond individual-level attitudes and cognitions. Demographic and Health Survey data collected between 2004 and 2011 from Zimbabwe (N = 1,330) and Malawi (N = 4,043)--countries where over 10% of adults have HIV--were analyzed. We explored the influence of demographic variables, modes of knowledge about HIV, stigma against people living with HIV, attitudes about spousal abuse, and whether or not HIV testing had been offered during antenatal visits. Results demonstrated that, taking into account secular trends in higher testing rates, structural-level support was the strongest predictor of HIV testing above and beyond individual-level attitudes and cognitions.

  14. Interrelationship of Nondestructive Evaluation Methodologies Applied to Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifeste, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are commonly used in spacecraft for containment of pressurized gases and fluids, incorporating strength and weight savings. The energy stored is capable of extensive spacecraft damage and personal injury in the event of sudden failure. These apparently simple structures, composed of a metallic media impermeable liner and fiber/resin composite overwrap are really complex structures with numerous material and structural phenomena interacting during pressurized use which requires multiple, interrelated monitoring methodologies to monitor and understand subtle changes critical to safe use. Testing of COPVs at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands T est Facility (WSTF) has employed multiple in-situ, real-time nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies as well as pre- and post-test comparative techniques to monitor changes in material and structural parameters during advanced pressurized testing. The use of NDE methodologies and their relationship to monitoring changes is discussed based on testing of real-world spacecraft COPVs. Lessons learned are used to present recommendations for use in testing, as well as a discussion of potential applications to vessel health monitoring in future applications.

  15. Mechanical analysis of the ring opening test applied to human ascending aortas.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Bustos, Claudio A; Celentano, Diego J; Ortega, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    This work presents experiments, modelling and numerical simulation aimed at describing the mechanical response of human ascending aortas in the ring opening test. The objective is to quantify, from the opening angles measured in the test, the residual stress distribution along the artery wall and, afterwards, how this stress pattern changes when the artery is subjected to standard physiological pressures. The cases studied correspond to four groups including both healthy and pathological arteries. The tissues are characterized via tensile test measurements that enable to derive the material parameters of two constitutive models adopted in the present analysis. Overall, the numerical results obtained for all groups were found to be a useful data that allow to estimate the residual stress and their influence on the vessels under normal and hypertension physiological conditions.

  16. Innovative vibration technique applied to polyurethane foam as a viable substitute for conventional fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Alexander; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Shafiq, Basir; Serrano, David

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime prediction using three-point bending (TPB) can at times be prohibitively time consuming and costly, whereas vibration testing at higher frequency may potentially save time and revenue. A vibration technique that obtains lifetimes that reasonably match those determined under flexural TPB fatigue is developed. The technique designs the specimen with a procedure based on shape optimization and finite element analysis. When the specimen is vibrated in resonance, a stress pattern that mimics the stress pattern observed under conventional TPB fatigue testing is obtained. The proposed approach was verified with polyurethane foam specimens, resulting in an average error of 4.5% when compared with TPB.

  17. A procedure for specimen optimization applied to material testing in plasticity with the virtual fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Marco; Badaloni, Michele; Lava, Pascal; Debruyne, Dimitri; Pierron, Fabrice

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a numerical procedure to design an optimal geometry for specimens that will be used to identify the hardening behaviour of sheet metals with the virtual fields method (VFM). The procedure relies on a test simulator able to generate synthetic images similar to the ones obtained during an actual test. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to achieve the strain field, then the constitutive parameters are identified with the VFM and compared with the reference ones. A parametric study was conducted on different types of notched specimens and an optimal configuration was identified eventually.

  18. Germination Requirements of Bacillus macerans Spores

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, L. E.; Thompson, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    2-Phenylacetamide is an effective germinant for spores of five strains of Bacillus macerans, particularly in the presence of fructose. Benzyl penicillin, the phenyl acetamide derivative of penicillin, and phenylacetic acid are also good germinants. l-Asparagine is an excellent germinant for four strains. α-Amino-butyric acid is moderately effective. Pyridoxine, pyridoxal, adenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine are potent germinants for NCA strain 7X1 only. d-Glucose is a powerful germinant for strain B-70 only. d-Fructose and d-ribose strongly potentiate germination induced by other germinants (except l-asparagine) but have only weak activity by themselves. Niacinamide and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide, inactive by themselves, are active in the presence of fructose or ribose. Effects of pH, ion concentration, and temperature are described. PMID:4251279

  19. Lag time for germination of Penicillium chrysogenum conidia is induced by temperature shifts.

    PubMed

    Kalai, Safaa; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    In the environment, fungal conidia are subject to transient conditions. In particular, temperature is varying according to day/night periods. All predictive models for germination assume that fungal spores can adapt instantaneously to changes of temperature. The only study that supports this assumption (Gougouli and Koutsoumanis, 2012, Modelling germination of fungal spores at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 152: 153-161) was carried out on Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger conidia that, in most cases, already produced germ tubes. In contrast, the present study focuses on temperature shifts applied during the first stages of germination (i.e., before the apparition of the germ tubes). Firstly, germination times were determined in steady state conditions at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C. Secondly, temperature shifts (e.g., up-shifts and down-shifts) were applied at 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 of germination times, with 5, 10 and 15 °C magnitudes. Experiments were carried out in triplicate on Penicillium chrysogenum conidia on Potato Dextrose Agar medium according to a full factorial design. Statistical analysis of the results clearly demonstrated that the assumption of instantaneous adaptation of the conidia should be rejected. Temperature shifts during germination led to an induced lag time or an extended germination time as compared to the experiments conducted ay steady state. The induced lag time was maximized when the amplitude of the shift was equal to 10 °C. Interaction between the instant and the direction of the shift was highlighted. A negative lag time was observed for a 15 °C down-shift applied at 1/4 of the germination time. This result suggested that at optimal temperature the rate of germination decreased with time, and that the variation of this rate with time depended on temperature.

  20. Applying and testing the conveniently optimized enzyme mismatch cleavage method to clinical DNA diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Niida, Yo; Kuroda, Mondo; Mitani, Yusuke; Okumura, Akiko; Yokoi, Ayano

    2012-11-01

    Establishing a simple and effective mutation screening method is one of the most compelling problems with applying genetic diagnosis to clinical use. Because there is no reliable and inexpensive screening system, amplifying by PCR and performing direct sequencing of every coding exon is the gold standard strategy even today. However, this approach is expensive and time consuming, especially when gene size or sample number is large. Previously, we developed CEL nuclease mediated heteroduplex incision with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining (CHIPS) as an ideal simple mutation screening system constructed with only conventional apparatuses and commercially available reagents. In this study, we evaluated the utility of CHIPS technology for genetic diagnosis in clinical practice by applying this system to screening for the COL2A1, WRN and RPS6KA3 mutations in newly diagnosed patients with Stickler syndrome (autosomal dominant inheritance), Werner syndrome (autosomal recessive inheritance) and Coffin-Lowry syndrome (X-linked inheritance), respectively. In all three genes, CHIPS detected all DNA variations including disease causative mutations within a day. Direct sequencing of all coding exons of these genes confirmed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrate high sensitivity, high cost performance and reliability of this simple system, with compatibility to all inheritance modes. Because of its low technology, CHIPS is ready to use and potentially disseminate to any laboratories in the world.

  1. Investigating Content and Face Validity of English Language Placement Test Designed by Colleges of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Adawi, Sharifa S. A.; Al-Balushi, Aaisha A. K.

    2016-01-01

    An English placement test (PT) is an essential component of any foundation program. It helps place students into their suitable language proficiency level so that they do not spend time learning materials below or above their levels. It also helps teachers to prepare teaching materials to students of similar levels (Brown, 2004; Illinois, 2012).…

  2. Applying a Testing Methodology to Augmented Reality Interfaces to Simulation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    facility. mounted display (Sony Glasstron, Microvision Nomad, or Trivisio). This approach integrates spatial information with objects in the...Augmented vision for automotive mainte- nance and repair: The benefits of testing and repair data at point of task (unpublished), Microvision , Inc

  3. Genetic Algorithm Based Multi-Agent System Applied to Test Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Anbo; Ye, Luqing; Roy, Daniel; Padilla, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Automatic test generating system in distributed computing context is one of the most important links in on-line evaluation system. Although the issue has been argued long since, there is not a perfect solution to it so far. This paper proposed an innovative approach to successfully addressing such issue by the seamless integration of genetic…

  4. Developing and Testing an Online Tool for Teaching GIS Concepts Applied to Spatial Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Steve; Evans, Andy; Kingston, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The development and testing of a Web-based GIS e-learning resource is described. This focuses on the application of GIS for siting a nuclear waste disposal facility and the associated principles of spatial decision-making using Boolean and weighted overlay methods. Initial student experiences in using the system are analysed as part of a research…

  5. 76 FR 19952 - Not Applying the Mark of Inspection Pending Certain Test Results

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ...The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is announcing its intention to change its procedures and withhold a determination as to whether meat and poultry products are not adulterated, and thus eligible to enter commerce, until all test results that bear on the determination have been received. Inspection program personnel periodically sample products for adulterants to verify an......

  6. 40 CFR 1039.235 - What testing requirements apply for certification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alternate procedure. (g) Measure CO2 and CH4 with each low-hour certification test using the procedures... engine manufacturers may omit measurement of N2O and CH4. These measurements are not required for NTE... value for each constituent. Round the final values as follows: (1) Round CO2 to the nearest 1 g/kW-hr...

  7. Applied Cognition: Testing the Effects of Independent Silent Reading on Secondary Students' Achievement and Attribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Joshua A.; Irving, Miles A.; Russell, L. Roxanne

    2014-01-01

    This study implemented an independent silent reading (ISR) program with 145 10th grade students. Students were measured on total reading ability, vocabulary, reading comprehension, a state-mandated high stakes end-of-course test (EOCT), and reading attribution. After controlling for initial skill and disposition levels, the results indicated that…

  8. Genetic Algorithm Based Multi-Agent System Applied to Test Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Anbo; Ye, Luqing; Roy, Daniel; Padilla, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Automatic test generating system in distributed computing context is one of the most important links in on-line evaluation system. Although the issue has been argued long since, there is not a perfect solution to it so far. This paper proposed an innovative approach to successfully addressing such issue by the seamless integration of genetic…

  9. Developing and Testing an Online Tool for Teaching GIS Concepts Applied to Spatial Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Steve; Evans, Andy; Kingston, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The development and testing of a Web-based GIS e-learning resource is described. This focuses on the application of GIS for siting a nuclear waste disposal facility and the associated principles of spatial decision-making using Boolean and weighted overlay methods. Initial student experiences in using the system are analysed as part of a research…

  10. The effect of the germination temperature on the phytochemical content of broccoli and rocket sprouts.

    PubMed

    Ragusa, Lucia; Picchi, Valentina; Tribulato, Alessandro; Cavallaro, Chiara; Lo Scalzo, Roberto; Branca, Ferdinando

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of different germination temperatures (10, 20 and 30 °C) on the phytochemical content as well as reducing and antioxidant capacity of broccoli and rocket sprouts. In both seeds and sprouts, the total glucosinolates and ascorbic acid contents did not differ between vegetables, while broccoli exhibited exceptionally higher polyphenols and greater reducing and antioxidant capacity compared to rocket. In both species, an increase in germination temperature positively affected the glucosinolate content. Ascorbic acid increased during germination without a difference among the three tested temperatures. The phenol content in broccoli sprouts increased when they were grown at 30 °C, but the amount decreased at the highest temperatures in rocket. The reducing and antioxidant capacities increased with germination, and higher indexes were detected at 10 °C, particularly in rocket. Different germination temperatures differentiate the health-promoting phytochemical content and antioxidant properties in broccoli and rocket sprouts.

  11. Effects of olive oil mill wastewater used as irrigation water on in vitro pollen germination.

    PubMed

    Aybeke, Mehmet; Sidal, Uour

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effects of Olive Oil Mill Wastewater (OOMW) application as irrigation water on in vitro pollen germination, focusing on total protein quantity. In test groups, pollen germination substances such as sucrose, H3BO3 and Ca(NO3)2 were added to different concentrations of OOMW and used as germination media. Regarding control group, the same substance melted into water instead of OOMW. As a result, in general, pollen germination percentage was decreased significantly in all OOMW concentrations than that of the control group, except 1/1000 concentrations. Similarly, total protein quantities declined linearly depending on decreasing OOMW concentrations, except 1/1 concentration which has 4-5 times the control value. Consequently, it was established that OOMW generally decreased pollen germination ratio and had carcinogenic effects on protein synthesis mechanism and must not be used as irrigation water without purification.

  12. Bet hedging in desert winter annual plants: optimal germination strategies in a variable environment.

    PubMed

    Gremer, Jennifer R; Venable, D Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    In bet hedging, organisms sacrifice short-term success to reduce the long-term variance in success. Delayed germination is the classic example of bet hedging, in which a fraction of seeds remain dormant as a hedge against the risk of complete reproductive failure. Here, we investigate the adaptive nature of delayed germination as a bet hedging strategy using long-term demographic data on Sonoran Desert winter annual plants. Using stochastic population models, we estimate fitness as a function of delayed germination and identify evolutionarily stable strategies for 12 abundant species in the community. Results indicate that delayed germination meets the criteria as a bet hedging strategy for all species. Density-dependent models, but not density-independent ones, predicted optimal germination strategies that correspond remarkably well with observed patterns. By incorporating naturally occurring variation in seed and seedling dynamics, our results present a rigorous test of bet hedging theory within the relevant environmental context.

  13. Seed dormancy and germination of Ficus lundellii and tropical forest restoration.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ximena; Hong, Tran D; Ellis, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    We investigated seed dormancy and germination in Ficus lundellii Standl. (Moraceae), a native species of Mexico's Los Tuxtlas tropical rain forest. In an 8-h photoperiod at an alternating diurnal (16/8 h) temperature of 20/30 degrees C, germination was essentially complete (96%) within 28 days, whereas in darkness, all seeds remained dormant. Neither potassium nitrate (0.05-0.2%) applied continuously nor gibberellic acid applied either continuously (10-200 ppm) or as a 24 hour pretreatment (2000 ppm) induced germination in the dark. Germination in the light was not reduced by a 24-h hydrochloric acid (0.1-1%) pretreatment, but it was reduced both by a 24-h pretreatment with either H(2)O(2) (0.1-5 M) or 5% HCl, or by more than 5 days of storage at 40 degrees C (4.5% seed water content). In a study with a 2-dimensional temperature gradient plate, seeds germinated fully and rapidly in the light at a constant temperature of 30 degrees C, and fully but less rapidly in the light at alternating temperatures with low amplitudes (< 12 degrees C) about the optimal constant temperature. The base, optimal and ceiling temperatures for rate of germination were estimated as 13.8, 30.1 and 41.1 degrees C, respectively. In all temperature regimes, light was essential for the germination of F. lundellii seeds.

  14. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching. PMID:27307669

  15. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states.

    PubMed Central

    Ansoborlo, E; Chalabreysse, J; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pujol, E

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions: a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophages to decrease uranium solubility in medium. PMID:1396449

  16. Germination Shifts of C3 and C4 Species under Simulated Global Warming Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxiang; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Yingxin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yu; Song, Yantao; Li, Guangdi; Zhou, Daowei

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination) of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night) and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night), simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature), maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies. PMID:25137138

  17. Germination shifts of C3 and C4 species under simulated global warming scenario.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxiang; Yu, Qiang; Huang, Yingxin; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yu; Song, Yantao; Li, Guangdi; Zhou, Daowei

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts around the world have been increasingly devoted to investigating changes in C3 and C4 species' abundance or distribution with global warming, as they provide important insight into carbon fluxes and linked biogeochemical cycles. However, changes in the early life stage (e.g. germination) of C3 and C4 species in response to global warming, particularly with respect to asymmetric warming, have received less attention. We investigated germination percentage and rate of C3 and C4 species under asymmetric (+3/+6°C at day/night) and symmetric warming (+5/+5°C at day/night), simulated by alternating temperatures. A thermal time model was used to calculate germination base temperature and thermal time constant. Two additional alternating temperature regimes were used to test temperature metrics effect. The germination percentage and rate increased continuously for C4 species, but increased and then decreased with temperature for C3 species under both symmetric and asymmetric warming. Compared to asymmetric warming, symmetric warming significantly overestimated the speed of germination percentage change with temperature for C4 species. Among the temperature metrics (minimum, maximum, diurnal temperature range and average temperature), maximum temperature was most correlated with germination of C4 species. Our results indicate that global warming may favour germination of C4 species, at least for the C4 species studied in this work. The divergent effects of asymmetric and symmetric warming on plant germination also deserve more attention in future studies.

  18. Mechanical Resistance of the Seed Coat and Endosperm during Germination of Capsicum annuum at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J T; Cantliffe, D J

    1983-05-01

    Decoated pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv Early Calwonder) seeds germinated earlier at 25 degrees C, but not at 15 degrees C, compared to coated seeds. The seed coat did not appear to impose a mechanical restriction on pepper seed germination. Scarification of the endosperm material directly in front of the radicle reduced the time to germination at both 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C.The amount of mechanical resistance imposed by the endosperm on radicle emergence before germination was measured using the Instron Universal Testing Machine. Endosperm strength decreased as imbibition time increased. The puncture force decreased faster when seeds were imbibed at 25 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. The reduction in puncture force corresponded with the ability of pepper seeds to germinate. Most radicle emergence occurred at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C after the puncture force was reduced to between 0.3 and 0.4 newtons.Application of gibberellic acid(4+7) (100 microliters per liter) resulted in earlier germination at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C and decreased endosperm strength sooner than in untreated seeds. Similarly, high O(2) concentrations had similar effects on germination earliness and endosperm strength decline as did gibberellic acid(4+7), but only at 25 degrees C. At 15 degrees C, high O(2) concentrations slowed germination and endosperm strength decline.

  19. Effects of sawdust pollution on the germination of fungal spores in Lagos Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Akpata, T V

    1987-01-01

    Four fungi, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus giganteus, Cladosporium oxysporum a and Trichoderma aureoviride, isolated from Lagos Lagoon, were tested for spore germination in aqueous sawdust extract of different hardwood species (Khaya ivorensis, Mitragyna ciliata and Triplochiton scleroxylon). Extracts of M. ciliata were inhibitory to spore germination especially at higher concentrations. Germ tubes of spores decreased in length with increase in extract concentration for C. oxysporum and T. aureoviride, while Aspergillus species showed increase in length up to a peak at 3% sawdust extract concentration, and thereafter germ tube lengths decreased with increasing concentration. Extracts of T. scleroxylon stimulated the spores and percentage germination increased at higher extract concentrations with no significant difference in germ tube length. Similarly, K. ivorensis had a stimulatory effect on spore germination and length of germ tube, especially at higher extract concentrations. Addition of soluble exogenous carbon and nitrogen sources to sawdust extract enhanced spore germination. Apart from A. flavus, which had only 9% germination, all the spores failed to germinate in lagoon water having 21% salinity. The spores were also inhibited by in lagoon water having 21 per thousand salinity. The spores were also inhibited by various inorganic salts, i.e. CaCl(2), KH(2)PO(4), MgSO(4) and NaCl, present in Lagos Lagoon. The results suggest that sawdust pollution causes enrichment of the lagoon, thereby enhancing spore germination.

  20. [Effect of acid rain on seed germination of rice, wheat and rape].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing-ling; Huang, Xiao-hua; Zhou, Qing

    2005-01-01

    Rice, wheat and rape seeds were treated with simulated acid rain at pH 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 levels for 7 days in order to understand the effects of acid rain on seed germination of various acid-fast plant. The germination test showed that seed germination was absolutely inhibited at pH 2.0 for three species. Rice and wheat seeds germinated abnormally at pH 2.5. WhenpH values above 3.0, percentage germination, germination energy, germination index, vigor index of rice, wheat and rape seeds increased in relation with decreased acidity levels. In contrast, the percentage of abnormal germination of rice and wheat decreased. The experiment data about physiological aspect demonstrated that water absorption rate, respiratory rate and storage reserve transformation rate of rice, wheat and rape seeds also increased with increased pH values. The storage loss of rice and wheat increased with increased pH values but that of rape decreased. Inhibition index of shoot and root length of three kinds of seeds decreased in relation with increased pH values. The amplitude difference of index of rice was lower than that of wheat, and wheat was lower than that of rape. The experiment data showed that rice had stronger fastness than wheat and rape, wheat had stronger fastness than rape under acid rain stress.

  1. The impact of germination time on the some selected parameters through malting process.

    PubMed

    Farzaneh, Vahid; Ghodsvali, Alireza; Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Zare, Zahra; Carvalho, Isabel S

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the impacts of germination time on the enzymes activity attributed in malting and some polysaccharides contents of the malt prepared from the Joseph barley variety have been screened using a completely random design with three levels of germination time(3, 5 and 7days). The archived outcomes revealed that the highest quantity of starch has been observed in the malt resulted from 3days germination, and an enhancement in the germination period from 3 to 7days decreased the quantity of available starch. An enhancement in the germination period presented a reduction in the beta-glucan quantity in the malting seeds. The malt produced 7days after germination had the highest enzymatic activity(253U.kg(-1)). The comparison of data average using Duncan test showed that the minimum and maximum value of α-Amylase enzyme activity and diastatic power were recorded in the malts produced 3 and 7days after germination, respectively. Increasing in the germination time led to a reduction in malting efficiency, however the efficiency of the hot water extraction showed enhancement. The outcomes of the correlation between the studied parameters showed that the beta-glucan and starch quantities are negatively affected by the activities of beta-Glucanase and α-Amylase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Does thermal time for germination vary among populations of a tree legume (Peltophorum dubium)?

    PubMed

    Andrade, L F D; Cardoso, V J M

    2016-04-19

    Few works report the use of degree-days (DD) - used in crops to predict events and schedule management activities - to describe the germination of tropical trees. The cardinal temperatures (base, optimum and ceiling temperature) for germination of the species may vary depending on the seed provenance. Peltophorum dubium (Spreng.) Taub. is an early successional leguminous tree widely distributed in South America, often occurring as cultivated or naturalized trees, thus considered to be a good example for testing DD model in tree species. The main objective of this study was to describe the seed germination response of different populations of P. dubium as function of DD accumulation during germination assays in semi-controlled (fluctuating temperatures) conditions. Germination assays with manually scarified seeds sown in aluminum sheet trays filled with a composed substrate were performed under greenhouse conditions at different times. Three methods were employed in order to describe the accumulation of thermal time throughout the assays and, considering the seed lot and sowing time, a trapezoid area method was relatively more effective in describing the germination. The germination curves of P. dubium seeds from different populations, expressed in degree-days estimated directly from temperature records schedules, tend to be more clustered suggesting little variation among thermal time requirements in different seed provenances. Otherwise, the thermal time requirement can vary depending on the time of sowing, and any increase in DD requirement when the assays were performed under higher mean temperatures can be related to a thermal effect on the germination of scarified seeds.

  3. Influence of physico-chemical parameters of the aquatic medium on germination of Eichhornia crassipes seeds.

    PubMed

    Albano Pérez, E; Ruiz Téllez, T; Sánchez Guzmán, J M

    2011-07-01

    The germination of seeds of Eichhornia crassipes in locations distant from the foci of infestation may be a means of dispersal of this invasive plant. Nonetheless, no modern studies have examined the influence of single components on germination, although the influence of temperature, oxygen and redox potential was examined in earlier studies. The effects of pH, conductivity, nitrate, phosphate, potassium, calcium, iron and boron on germination of E. crassipes were determined in seed germination tests. The results showed that external input of nutrients influences germination, since neither pH nor conductivity alone had any effect, but there was a significant increase in germination in growth media containing phosphorus at 3.95 mg·l(-1) (P/L; 95.5%) and boron at 10 mg·l(-1) (B/L; 97.5%); at higher concentrations, the latter was toxic. These findings contribute to knowledge of factors controlling the germination of E. crassipes seeds. Consequently, E. crassipes seeds would find very good conditions for germination in water classified as hypereutrophic, which may play a decisive role in expansion of this plant.

  4. Remarks on Some Mechanical Small-Scale Tests Applied to Properties of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardu, Marilena; Seccatore, Jacopo

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of test campaigns on small-scale strength properties (particularly, micro-hardness) performed on two homogeneous materials: calcite, a very common and widespread mineral that is characterized by its relatively low Mohs hardness and its high reactivity with even weak acids; and glass, an amorphous solid characterized by the absence of the long-range order which defines crystalline materials. After a synthetic description of the principles underlying two of the three classical comminution laws, known as Kick's law and Rittinger's law, experimental results are discussed. The results of the tests performed show that both scale effect and size effect contribute to the non-constancy of mechanical properties at small scale for crystalline materials. On the other hand, for amorphous materials, a theoretical law considering size effects gives considerably different results from empirical measurements. Considerations and an extended discussion address these findings.

  5. System Integral Test by BWR Drywell Cooler Applied as Phase-II Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Hideo; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Tahara, Mika; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the system interaction performance using the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) in combination with containment spray as a Japanese Phase-II accident management (AM). By using almost full height simulation test facility (GIRAFFE-DWC) with scaling ratio of 1/600, the system integral tests simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence were accomplished during about 14 hours. In case of DWC application, the containment pressure increase was found milder due to DWC heat removal performance. Initial spray timing was delayed about 3 hours and each spray period was reduced almost by half. It was concluded that the application of a BWR DWC to Phase-II AM measure is quite promising from the point of delaying or preventing the containment venting. (authors)

  6. Germination tests for assessing biochar quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the impact of biochar quality on soil productivity is crucial to the agronomic acceptance of biochar amendments. Our objective in this study was to develop a quick and reliable screening procedures to characterize the quality of biochar amendments. Biochars were evaluated by both seed ...

  7. 40 CFR 1039.235 - What testing requirements apply for certification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alternate procedure. (g) Measure CO2 and CH4 with each low-hour certification test using the procedures... engine manufacturers may omit measurement of N2O and CH4. These measurements are not required for NTE.... (2) Round N2O to the nearest 0.001 g/kW-hr. (3) Round CH4 to the nearest 0.001g/kW-hr. ...

  8. 40 CFR 1039.235 - What testing requirements apply for certification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alternate procedure. (g) Measure CO2 and CH4 with each low-hour certification test using the procedures... engine manufacturers may omit measurement of N2O and CH4. These measurements are not required for NTE.... (2) Round N2O to the nearest 0.001 g/kW-hr. (3) Round CH4 to the nearest 0.001g/kW-hr. ...

  9. A Pareto Ant Colony Algorithm Applied to the Class Integration and Test Order Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Veiga Cabral, Rafael; Pozo, Aurora; Vergilio, Silvia Regina

    In the context of Object-Oriented software, many works have investigated the Class Integration and Test Order (CITO) problem, proposing solutions to determine test orders for the integration test of the program classes. The existing approaches based on graphs can generate solutions that are sub-optimal, and do not consider the different factors and measures that can affect the stubbing process. To overcome this limitation, solutions based on Genetic Algorithms (GA) have presented promising results. However, the determination of a cost function, which is able to generate the best solutions, is not always a trivial task, mainly for complex systems with a great number of measures. Therefore, we introduce, in this paper, a multi-objective optimization approach to better represent the CITO problem. The approach generates a set of good solutions that achieve a balanced compromise between the different measures (objectives). It was implemented by a Pareto Ant Colony (P-ACO) algorithm, which is described in detail. The algorithm was used in a set of real programs and the obtained results are compared to the GA results. The results allow discussing the difference between single and multi-objective approaches especially for complex systems with a greater number of dependencies among the classes.

  10. Imaging Local Chemical Microstructure of Germinated Wheat with Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koc,H.; Wetzel, D.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial resolution enabled by in situ Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy as predicted from our earlier report in Spectroscopy (1) is applied to localized chemical analysis in this vital biological process of seed germination. Germination includes several different biochemical and structural processes. Ultimately, the entire seed is consumed in sustaining the new life that results after sprouting and growth (2-4). Alpha amylase production is the standard evidence for detection of sprouted (germinated) wheat at harvest. Moist preharvest conditions can cause devastating losses and render the harvested wheat unfit for flour production. Dormancy of dry seeds following harvest retards sprouting under proper storage.

  11. Pathway of sugar transport in germinating wheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naohiro; Scofield, Graham N; Wang, Xin-Ding; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W; Furbank, Robert T

    2006-08-01

    Three homeologous genes encoding a sucrose (Suc) transporter (SUT) in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum), TaSUT1A, 1B, and 1D, were expressed in germinating seeds, where their function is unknown. All three TaSUT1 proteins were confirmed to be capable of transporting both Suc and maltose by complementation tests with the SUSY7/ura3 yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant strain. The role of Suc transporters in germinating grain was examined by combining in situ hybridization, immunolocalization, fluorescent dye tracer movement, and metabolite assays. TaSUT1 transcript and SUT protein were detected in cells of the aleurone layer, scutellar epidermis, scutellar ground cells, and sieve element-companion cell complexes located in the scutellum, shoot, and root. Ester loading of the membrane-impermeable fluorescent dye carboxyfluorescein into the scutellum epidermal cells of germinating seeds showed that a symplasmic pathway connects the scutellum to the shoot and root via the phloem. However, the scutellar epidermis provides an apoplasmic barrier to solute movement from endosperm tissue. Measurements of sugars in the root, shoot, endosperm, and scutellum suggest that, following degradation of endosperm starch, the resulting hexoses are converted to Suc in the scutellum. Suc was found to be the major sugar present in the endosperm early in germination, whereas maltose and glucose predominate during the later stage. It is proposed that loading the scutellar phloem in germinating wheat seeds can proceed by symplasmic and apoplasmic pathways, the latter facilitated by SUT activity. In addition, SUTs may function to transport Suc into the scutellum from the endosperm early in germination and later transport maltose.

  12. Pathway of Sugar Transport in Germinating Wheat Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Naohiro; Scofield, Graham N.; Wang, Xin-Ding; Offler, Christina E.; Patrick, John W.; Furbank, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    Three homeologous genes encoding a sucrose (Suc) transporter (SUT) in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum), TaSUT1A, 1B, and 1D, were expressed in germinating seeds, where their function is unknown. All three TaSUT1 proteins were confirmed to be capable of transporting both Suc and maltose by complementation tests with the SUSY7/ura3 yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant strain. The role of Suc transporters in germinating grain was examined by combining in situ hybridization, immunolocalization, fluorescent dye tracer movement, and metabolite assays. TaSUT1 transcript and SUT protein were detected in cells of the aleurone layer, scutellar epidermis, scutellar ground cells, and sieve element-companion cell complexes located in the scutellum, shoot, and root. Ester loading of the membrane-impermeable fluorescent dye carboxyfluorescein into the scutellum epidermal cells of germinating seeds showed that a symplasmic pathway connects the scutellum to the shoot and root via the phloem. However, the scutellar epidermis provides an apoplasmic barrier to solute movement from endosperm tissue. Measurements of sugars in the root, shoot, endosperm, and scutellum suggest that, following degradation of endosperm starch, the resulting hexoses are converted to Suc in the scutellum. Suc was found to be the major sugar present in the endosperm early in germination, whereas maltose and glucose predominate during the later stage. It is proposed that loading the scutellar phloem in germinating wheat seeds can proceed by symplasmic and apoplasmic pathways, the latter facilitated by SUT activity. In addition, SUTs may function to transport Suc into the scutellum from the endosperm early in germination and later transport maltose. PMID:16766668

  13. Essential oils from Mediterranean lamiaceae as weed germination inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Luciana G; Carpanese, Giovanna; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Morelli, Ivano; Macchia, Mario; Flamini, Guido

    2003-10-08

    The essential oils obtained from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), and savory (Satureja montana L.) and the four monoterpenes that are their major constituents have been analyzed by GC and GC-MS and tested for their allelopathic properties on the seeds of three different annual weeds (Chenopodium album, Portulaca oleracea, and Echinochloa crus-galli) and three crops (Raphanus sativus, Capsicum annuum, and Lactuca sativa), with the aim to evaluate in vitro their potential as germination inhibitors. The essential oil composition varied with the species, thymol being the main constituent (44%) of thyme and carvacrol (57%) that of savory oil. Differences in essential oil composition were observed within two different rosemary ecotypes, type A, with alpha-pinene (37%) and 1,8-cineole (23%), and type B, characterized by a 2-fold content of 1,8-cineole (47%). This latest essential oil inhibited completely the germination of weeds while concurrently displaying little effect on pepper. The other two oils showed less selective action. S. montana essential oil, with 57% carvacrol, is the most active compound, completely inhibiting germination both of crops and weeds. Borneol, one of the main constituents of the oil of rosemary type B, showed an activity comparable to that of the whole oil. Crop and weed seeds treated with 1,8-cineole showed germination values that were not significantly different from controls, even if a slowing of the germination process expressed in terms of a significant increase in mean germination time was observed. Monoterpene compounds also present in the essential oils mainly represented the volatile fraction released from the crops and their residues into the soil.

  14. Temperature and moisture requirements for conidial germination of an isolate of Beauveria bassiana, pathogenic to Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Luz, C; Fargues, J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of temperature, relative humidity and water activity on germination of conidia of an isolate of Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuill. pathogenic to the triatomine vector of Chagas' disease, Rhodnius prolixus Stål., were investigated in vitro. Germination occurred at temperatures between 15 degrees C and 35 degrees C under saturated atmosphere and the optima ranged from 25 degrees C to 30 degrees C. At the extreme temperatures tested (15 degrees C and 35 degrees C) the germination process was delayed, but germination rates reached more than 95%. Germination of B. bassiana conidia was strongly affected by moisture conditions. The availability of water, in both atmospheric and liquid conditions, caused changes in germination times as well as in germination rates. For example, at 25 degrees C + 0.5 degrees C, germination took place within 20 h at 95.5% RH, whereas it needed 72 h of incubation at 90% RH. Germination times increased as the water activity declined from 0.96 a(w) to 0.92 a(w). Below 0.92 a(w), no germination was observed after a 72 h incubation time.

  15. Protein Mobilization in Germinating Mung Bean Seeds Involves Vacuolar Sorting Receptors and Multivesicular Bodies1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junqi; Li, Yubing; Lo, Sze Wan; Hillmer, Stefan; Sun, Samuel S.M.; Robinson, David G.; Jiang, Liwen

    2007-01-01

    Plants accumulate and store proteins in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) during seed development and maturation. Upon seed germination, these storage proteins are mobilized to provide nutrients for seedling growth. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of protein degradation during seed germination. Here we test the hypothesis that vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) proteins play a role in mediating protein degradation in germinating seeds. We demonstrate that both VSR proteins and hydrolytic enzymes are synthesized de novo during mung bean (Vigna radiata) seed germination. Immunogold electron microscopy with VSR antibodies demonstrate that VSRs mainly locate to the peripheral membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), presumably as recycling receptors in day 1 germinating seeds, but become internalized to the MVB lumen, presumably for degradation at day 3 germination. Chemical cross-linking and immunoprecipitation with VSR antibodies have identified the cysteine protease aleurain as a specific VSR-interacting protein in germinating seeds. Further confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy studies demonstrate that VSR and aleurain colocalize to MVBs as well as PSVs in germinating seeds. Thus, MVBs in germinating seeds exercise dual functions: as a storage compartment for proteases that are physically separated from PSVs in the mature seed and as an intermediate compartment for VSR-mediated delivery of proteases from the Golgi apparatus to the PSV for protein degradation during seed germination. PMID:17322331

  16. Analysis of thermal dependence on the germination of braquiarão seeds using the thermal time model.

    PubMed

    Nakao, E A; Cardoso, V J M

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzed the thermal dependence on the germination of Urochloa brizantha (Stapf) Webster seeds under constant and fluctuating temperatures through the thermal time model. Germination tests were carried out at constant temperatures ranging from 8 °C to 41.5 °C in order to determine the model parameters: base (Tb), optimal (To) and maximum temperature (Tc) for germination; and the thermal time (θT) required for individual seeds to germinate. Braquiarão seeds germinate within a temperature interval from 8 °C to 41.5 °C, with an optimum range for germination estimated at 31.5 ° ≤ T ≤ 34.5 °C. Actual and expected distributions of cumulative germination percentages of U. brizantha seeds put to germinate both under controlled and uncontrolled temperature regimes were compared, and it can be seen that the model described relatively well the germination at isothermal assays; however the model failed to predict germination at a wide range of thermal fluctuations. Possible explanations for the results are discussed.

  17. Habitat specialization through germination cueing: a comparative study of herbs from forests and open habitats.

    PubMed

    Ten Brink, Dirk-Jan; Hendriksma, Harmen Pieter; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the adaptive association between seed germination ecology and specialization to either forest or open habitats across a range of evolutionary lineages of seed plants, in order to test the hypotheses that (1) species' specialization to open vs. shaded habitats is consistently accompanied by specialization in their regeneration niche; and (2) species are thereby adapted to utilize different windows of opportunity in time (season) and space (habitat). Seed germination response to temperature, light and stratification was tested for 17 congeneric pairs, each consisting of one forest species and one open-habitat species. A factorial design was used with temperature levels and diurnal temperature variation (10 °C constant, 15-5 °C fluctuating, 20 °C constant, 25-15 °C fluctuating), and two light levels (light and darkness) and a cold stratification treatment. The congeneric species pair design took phylogenetic dependence into account. Species from open habitats germinated better at high temperatures, whereas forest species performed equally well at low and high temperatures. Forest species tended to germinate only after a period of cold stratification that could break dormancy, while species from open habitats generally germinated without cold stratification. The empirically derived germination strategies correspond quite well with establishment opportunities for forest and open-habitat plant species in nature. Annual changes in temperature and light regime in temperate forest delimit windows of opportunity for germination and establishment. Germination strategies of forest plants are adaptations to utilize such narrow windows in time. Conversely, lack of fit between germination ecology and environment may explain why species of open habitats generally fail to establish in forests. Germination strategy should be considered an important mechanism for habitat specialization in temperate herbs to forest habitats. The findings strongly suggest that

  18. Habitat specialization through germination cueing: a comparative study of herbs from forests and open habitats

    PubMed Central

    ten Brink, Dirk-Jan; Hendriksma, Harmen Pieter; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims This study examined the adaptive association between seed germination ecology and specialization to either forest or open habitats across a range of evolutionary lineages of seed plants, in order to test the hypotheses that (1) species' specialization to open vs. shaded habitats is consistently accompanied by specialization in their regeneration niche; and (2) species are thereby adapted to utilize different windows of opportunity in time (season) and space (habitat). Methods Seed germination response to temperature, light and stratification was tested for 17 congeneric pairs, each consisting of one forest species and one open-habitat species. A factorial design was used with temperature levels and diurnal temperature variation (10 °C constant, 15–5 °C fluctuating, 20 °C constant, 25–15 °C fluctuating), and two light levels (light and darkness) and a cold stratification treatment. The congeneric species pair design took phylogenetic dependence into account. Key Results Species from open habitats germinated better at high temperatures, whereas forest species performed equally well at low and high temperatures. Forest species tended to germinate only after a period of cold stratification that could break dormancy, while species from open habitats generally germinated without cold stratification. The empirically derived germination strategies correspond quite well with establishment opportunities for forest and open-habitat plant species in nature. Conclusions Annual changes in temperature and light regime in temperate forest delimit windows of opportunity for germination and establishment. Germination strategies of forest plants are adaptations to utilize such narrow windows in time. Conversely, lack of fit between germination ecology and environment may explain why species of open habitats generally fail to establish in forests. Germination strategy should be considered an important mechanism for habitat specialization in temperate herbs

  19. An empirical test of the Theory of Planned Behaviour applied to contraceptive use in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Susan M; Hopwood, Sarah; Lule, Haruna; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2014-12-01

    There is a high unmet need for contraceptives in developing countries such as Uganda, with high population growth, where efforts are needed to promote family planning and contraceptive use. Despite this high need, little research has investigated applications of health-behaviour-change theories to contraceptive use among this population. This study tested the Theory of Planned Behaviour's ability to predict contraceptive-use-related behaviours among post-partum women in rural Uganda. Results gave modest support to the theory's application and suggest an urgent need for improved theory-based interventions to promote contraceptive use in the populations of developing countries.

  20. Universal pulse shape scaling function and exponents: critical test for avalanche models applied to Barkhausen noise.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit P; Mills, Andrea C; Dahmen, Karin A; Sethna, James P

    2002-04-01

    In order to test if the universal aspects of Barkhausen noise in magnetic materials can be predicted from recent variants of the nonequilibrium zero-temperature Random Field Ising Model, we perform a quantitative study of the universal scaling function derived from the Barkhausen pulse shape in simulations and experiment. Through data collapses and scaling relations we determine the critical exponents tau and 1/sigma nu z in both simulation and experiment. Although we find agreement in the critical exponents, we find differences between theoretical and experimental pulse shape scaling functions as well as between different experiments.

  1. Making, testing, applying: some progress in the field of micro-optics at ITO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, W.; Baer, G.; Häfner, M.; Lyda, W.; Pruss, C.; Reichle, R.; Schaal, F.

    2013-06-01

    Microoptical components play an increasing role in different technology fields such as medical engineering, materials and information processing, imaging and metrology. But their realization needs the combination of modern design concepts with sophisticated processing technologies, new materials and design tools. Furthermore, the introduction of ambitious processing technologies must be accompanied by effective metrology and inspection tools. Therefore, this paper reports about the technologies for making microoptics at ITO. Because sophisticated measurement tools are an indispensable part of the fabrication process, the paper describes our multi-scale inspection approach for the testing of microstructures on wafer-scale level. Finally, some representative applications of microoptical components for advanced measurement and imaging are explained.

  2. An Empirical Test of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Contraceptive Use in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Susan M.; Hopwood, Sarah; Lule, Haruna; Wanyenze, Rhoda K.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high unmet need for contraceptives in developing countries such as Uganda, with high population growth, where efforts are needed to promote family planning and contraceptive use. Despite this high need, little research has investigated applications of health behaviour change theories to contraceptive use amongst this population. The present study tested the Theory of Planned Behaviour’s ability to predict contraceptive use-related behaviours among postpartum women in rural Uganda. Results gave modest support to the theory’s application and suggest an urgent need for improved theory-based interventions to promote contraceptive use in the populations of developing countries. PMID:23928989

  3. An applied test of the social learning theory of deviance to college alcohol use.

    PubMed

    DeMartino, Cynthia H; Rice, Ronald E; Saltz, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Several hypotheses about influences on college drinking derived from the social learning theory of deviance were tested and confirmed. The effect of ethnicity on alcohol use was completely mediated by differential association and differential reinforcement, whereas the effect of biological sex on alcohol use was partially mediated. Higher net positive reinforcements to costs for alcohol use predicted increased general use, more underage use, and more frequent binge drinking. Two unexpected finding were the negative relationship between negative expectations and negative experiences, and the substantive difference between nondrinkers and general drinkers compared with illegal or binge drinkers. The discussion considers implications for future campaigns based on Akers's deterrence theory.

  4. An interferometric imaging test bench: The densified pupil concept applied to the VLTI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Mourard, Denis; Lardière, Olivier; Spang, Alain; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Bresson, Yves; Lagarde, Stéphane

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this poster is to present a test bench that we are developing at Observatoire de la Cote d'Azut to study the performances of interferometric imaging systems. The goal is to study the densified pupil concept in different configurations of the VLTI. This work is linked to the next generation instrument VIDA (VLTI Imaging with a Densified Array). This bench is used to specify the technical requirements like tip-tilt correction and cophasing. We will compare the imaging performances of the aperture synthesis, Fizeau and densified pupils configuration.

  5. Pilot-testing an applied competency-based approach to health human resources planning.

    PubMed

    Tomblin Murphy, Gail; MacKenzie, Adrian; Alder, Rob; Langley, Joanne; Hickey, Marjorie; Cook, Amanda

    2013-10-01

    A competency-based approach to health human resources (HHR) planning is one that explicitly considers the spectrum of knowledge, skills and judgement (competencies) required for the health workforce based on the health needs of the relevant population in some specific circumstances. Such an approach is of particular benefit to planners challenged to make optimal use of limited HHR as it allows them to move beyond simply estimating numbers of certain professionals required and plan instead according to the unique mix of competencies available from the existing health workforce. This kind of flexibility is particularly valuable in contexts where healthcare providers are in short supply generally (e.g. in many developing countries) or temporarily due to a surge in need (e.g. a pandemic or other disease outbreak). A pilot application of this approach using the context of an influenza pandemic in one health district of Nova Scotia, Canada, is described, and key competency gaps identified. The approach is also being applied using other conditions in other Canadian jurisdictions and in Zambia.

  6. Geographic profiling applied to testing models of bumble-bee foraging

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Nigel E.; Rossmo, D. Kim; Le Comber, Steven C.

    2008-01-01

    Geographic profiling (GP) was originally developed as a statistical tool to help police forces prioritize lists of suspects in investigations of serial crimes. GP uses the location of related crime sites to make inferences about where the offender is most likely to live, and has been extremely successful in criminology. Here, we show how GP is applicable to experimental studies of animal foraging, using the bumble-bee Bombus terrestris. GP techniques enable us to simplify complex patterns of spatial data down to a small number of parameters (2–3) for rigorous hypothesis testing. Combining computer model simulations and experimental observation of foraging bumble-bees, we demonstrate that GP can be used to discriminate between foraging patterns resulting from (i) different hypothetical foraging algorithms and (ii) different food item (flower) densities. We also demonstrate that combining experimental and simulated data can be used to elucidate animal foraging strategies: specifically that the foraging patterns of real bumble-bees can be reliably discriminated from three out of nine hypothetical foraging algorithms. We suggest that experimental systems, like foraging bees, could be used to test and refine GP model predictions, and that GP offers a useful technique to analyse spatial animal behaviour data in both the laboratory and field. PMID:18664426

  7. Blade Displacement Measurement Technique Applied to a Full-Scale Rotor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Olson, Lawrence E.; Romander, Ethan A.; Barrows, Danny A.; Burner, Alpheus W.

    2012-01-01

    Blade displacement measurements using multi-camera photogrammetry were acquired during the full-scale wind tunnel test of the UH-60A Airloads rotor, conducted in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The objectives were to measure the blade displacement and deformation of the four rotor blades as they rotated through the entire rotor azimuth. These measurements are expected to provide a unique dataset to aid in the development and validation of rotorcraft prediction techniques. They are used to resolve the blade shape and position, including pitch, flap, lag and elastic deformation. Photogrammetric data encompass advance ratios from 0.15 to slowed rotor simulations of 1.0, thrust coefficient to rotor solidity ratios from 0.01 to 0.13, and rotor shaft angles from -10.0 to 8.0 degrees. An overview of the blade displacement measurement methodology and system development, descriptions of image processing, uncertainty considerations, preliminary results covering static and moderate advance ratio test conditions and future considerations are presented. Comparisons of experimental and computational results for a moderate advance ratio forward flight condition show good trend agreements, but also indicate significant mean discrepancies in lag and elastic twist. Blade displacement pitch measurements agree well with both the wind tunnel commanded and measured values.

  8. Analysis of the absorbed hydrogen in cladding tubes applied in the QUENCH-LOCA tests

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, M.; Roessger, C.; Stuckert, J.; Steinbrueck, M.; Walter, M.; Klimenkov, M.; Kaestner, A.

    2012-07-01

    A shortened loss of coolant scenario was simulated experimentally at fuel rod bundle scale in the QUENCH-LO test. All pressurized rods burst at temperatures between 790 and 855 deg. C. The hydrogen distribution in the cladding of chosen fuel rod simulators was studied by neutron radiography and tomography. It was shown that the time between burst and quenching as well as the temperatures occurring during this period, and hence the degree of inner oxidation, are important parameters for the hydrogen uptake. No hydrogen uptake was measured for the specimen with 63 s or less between burst and quenching. For longer time intervals, hydrogen enriched bands were formed. These bended bands are oriented non-symmetrically to the tube axis. Micro-structure investigations give hints that the hydrogen keeps in solution in the a-zirconium lattice. The hydrogen enriched bands influence the mechanical properties of the rods, characterized by a higher hardness. Brittle fracture occurs in these bands in the tensile test. (authors)

  9. Angles-centroids fitting calibration and the centroid algorithm applied to reverse Hartmann test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhu; Hui, Mei; Xia, Zhengzheng; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Zhao, Yuejin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop an angles-centroids fitting (ACF) system and the centroid algorithm to calibrate the reverse Hartmann test (RHT) with sufficient precision. The essence of ACF calibration is to establish the relationship between ray angles and detector coordinates. Centroids computation is used to find correspondences between the rays of datum marks and detector pixels. Here, the point spread function of RHT is classified as circle of confusion (CoC), and the fitting of a CoC spot with 2D Gaussian profile to identify the centroid forms the basis of the centroid algorithm. Theoretical and experimental results of centroids computation demonstrate that the Gaussian fitting method has a less centroid shift or the shift grows at a slower pace when the quality of the image is reduced. In ACF tests, the optical instrumental alignments reach an overall accuracy of 0.1 pixel with the application of laser spot centroids tracking program. Locating the crystal at different positions, the feasibility and accuracy of ACF calibration are further validated to 10-6-10-4 rad root-mean-square error of the calibrations differences.

  10. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  11. Strategy for selection of soybean genotypes tolerant to drought during germination.

    PubMed

    Dantas, S A G; Silva, F C S; Silva, L J; Silva, F L

    2017-05-10

    Water deficit is the main reason for instability in the context of soybean culture. The development of strategies for the selection of more tolerant genotypes is necessary. These strategies include the use of polyethylene glycol 6000 solutions (PEG-6000) for conducting the germination test under conditions of water restriction. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the osmotic potential and the main characteristics that promote the discrimination of soybean genotypes with regard to water stress tolerance during germination and the vigor test. Thirteen soybean cultivars were used. The seeds were allowed to germinate on sheets of germitest paper moistened in solution with PEG-6000, simulating different levels of water availability, which is expressed as osmotic potential (0.0, -0.2, -0.4, and -0.6 MPa). We assessed germination, length, and dry mass for seedlings and seeds, as well as reserve dynamics. Germination and variables related to the dynamics of reservation have great influence on the expression of variability in environments under stress. Among the different osmotic potentials, the -0.2 MPa was the most efficient for the expression of genetic variability among the cultivars. Conducting the germination test with PEG-6000 solution to -0.2 MPa was efficient for selecting soybean cultivars tolerant to water stress. This was accomplished by evaluating the percentage of germination, along with variables related to the dynamics of reservation.

  12. Engineering tissue alternatives to animals: applying tissue engineering to basic research and safety testing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Anthony; Brown, Robert; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2009-07-01

    The focus for the rapid progress in the field of tissue engineering has been the clinical potential of the technology to repair, replace, maintain or enhance the function of a particular tissue or organ. However, tissue engineering has much wider applicability in basic research and safety testing, which is often not recognized owing to the clinical focus of tissue engineers. Using examples from a recent National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council symposium, which brought together tissue engineers and scientists from other research communities, this review highlights the potential of tissue engineering to provide scientifically robust alternatives to animals to address basic research questions and improve drug and chemical development in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  13. An interferometric imaging test bench: the densified pupil concept applied to the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Mourard, Denis; Lardiere, Olivier; Spang, Alain; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Antonelli, Pierre; Bresson, Yves; Lagarde, Stephane

    2004-10-01

    We describe a test bench designed to study the performances of interferometric imaging systems. The main goal is to study the densified pupil concept in the framework of the VLTI. This work is linked to the proposition of a second generation instrument called VIDA (VLTI Imaging with a Densified Array). This bench aims at comparing the imaging performances of the aperture synthesis, Fizeau and densified pupils beam combination schemes and at specifying the technical requirements like cophasing and tip-tilt correction. A Fizeau assembly, using a multi-apertures mask and associated with a wavefront sensor, has been designed. It allows to measure the differential piston between sub-apertures and to link them to the characteristics of the image recovered. A densified assembly is under study by using reflective surfaces or optical fibers to carry the beams and to densify the pupils before the combination.

  14. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, N.; Thesken, J. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Palko, J.; Eldridge, J.; Sutter, J.; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar(TradeMark) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar(TradeMark) filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However, due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to the experimental investigation reported in [1] and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel's residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  15. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  16. A bi-cistronic, reporter-encoding bovine viral diarrhea virus applied in a new, effective diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Mandy; Behrens, Martina; König, Matthias; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2014-07-01

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have a huge economic impact on cattle production and reproduction worldwide. A key factor for BVDV surveillance and eventual eradication is to efficiently detect infections and to monitor herd immunity. In this study, we generated a stable, bi-cistronic BVDV that encoded EGFP in addition to the viral proteins. Applying this recombinant virus, a new flow-cytometry-based virus neutralization test was established that enabled accurate and reliable detection of field-virus-infected and vaccinated animals. The test, which is simple and fast, is expected to support novel, effective screening procedures in eradication and vaccination programmes.

  17. H2O2 mediates the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis seed dormancy and germination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Moxian; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    H(2)O(2) is known as a signal molecule in plant cells, but its role in the regulation of aqbscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism and hormonal balance is not yet clear. In this study it was found that H(2)O(2) affected the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis during seed imbibition and thus exerted control over seed dormancy and germination. As seen by quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), H(2)O(2) up-regulated ABA catabolism genes (e.g. CYP707A genes), resulting in a decreased ABA content during imbibition. This action required the participation of nitric oxide (NO), another signal molecule. At the same time, H(2)O(2) also up-regulated GA biosynthesis, as shown by QRT-PCR. When an ABA catabolism mutant, cyp707a2, and an overexpressing plant, CYP707A2-OE, were tested, ABA content was negatively correlated with GA biosynthesis. Exogenously applied GA was able to over-ride the inhibition of germination at low concentrations of ABA, but had no obvious effect when ABA concentrations were high. It is concluded that H(2)O(2) mediates the up-regulation of ABA catabolism, probably through an NO signal, and also promotes GA biosynthesis. High concentrations of ABA inhibit GA biosynthesis but a balance of these two hormones can jointly control the dormancy and germination of Arabidopsis seeds.

  18. H2O2 mediates the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis seed dormancy and germination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Moxian; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    H2O2 is known as a signal molecule in plant cells, but its role in the regulation of aqbscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism and hormonal balance is not yet clear. In this study it was found that H2O2 affected the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis during seed imbibition and thus exerted control over seed dormancy and germination. As seen by quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), H2O2 up-regulated ABA catabolism genes (e.g. CYP707A genes), resulting in a decreased ABA content during imbibition. This action required the participation of nitric oxide (NO), another signal molecule. At the same time, H2O2 also up-regulated GA biosynthesis, as shown by QRT-PCR. When an ABA catabolism mutant, cyp707a2, and an overexpressing plant, CYP707A2-OE, were tested, ABA content was negatively correlated with GA biosynthesis. Exogenously applied GA was able to over-ride the inhibition of germination at low concentrations of ABA, but had no obvious effect when ABA concentrations were high. It is concluded that H2O2 mediates the up-regulation of ABA catabolism, probably through an NO signal, and also promotes GA biosynthesis. High concentrations of ABA inhibit GA biosynthesis but a balance of these two hormones can jointly control the dormancy and germination of Arabidopsis seeds. PMID:20460363

  19. Laboratory investigation and commercial test for rotors-assembled strand applied in smooth tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feng-Xiang; Ding, Yu-Mei; Guan, Chang-Feng; Xie, Peng-Cheng; Yan, Hua; Yang, Wei-Min

    2008-10-15

    In the commercial test for smooth tube inserted with rotors-assembled strand comparing with non-inserted ones on condensers in electric power plant, using water as working fluid, the single-phase pressure drop and heat transfer were measured. It was found difficult to receive reliable and accurate enough data through commercial test. Meanwhile, the single-phase pressure drop and heat transfer in a rotors-assembled strand inserted tube were measured in laboratory, with the tube side Prandtl numbers varying from 5.67 to 5.80 and the tube side Reynolds numbers varying from 21,300 to 72,200. Before that, a validation experiment based on the same smooth tube was carried out to testify the experimental system and the data reduction method, in which fixed mounts were employed to eliminate entrance effects. The Prandtl numbers varied from 5.64 to 5.76 and the Reynolds numbers varied from 19,000 to 56,000 in the tube. The annular side Reynolds numbers remained nearly constant at the value of around 50,000 for all experiments, with the annular side Prandtl numbers varying from 8.02 to 8.22. The experimental results of smooth tube show that employment of fixed mounts leads to a visible bias of friction factor at relative low Reynolds numbers while it hardly affects the Nusselt numbers. On the other hand, experiment for the tube inserted with rotors-assembled strand show remarkable improvement for heat transfer with the Nusselt number increased by 9.764-11.87% and the overall heat transfer coefficient increased by 7.08-7.49% within the range of Reynolds number from about 21,300 to 55,500. Meanwhile, friction factor increases inevitably by 278.1-353.9% within the same range of Reynolds number. Based on through multivariant linear normal regression method, the Reynolds number and Prandtl number dependencies of the Nusselt number and friction factor were determined to be Nu = 0.0031Re{sup 0.9}Pr{sup 1.0849} and f = 0.993Re{sup -0.22}. (author)

  20. Advancing the vesosome, a multifunctional drug delivery platform, toward applied in vivo testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Benjamin J.

    An optimal drug delivery vehicle should circulate long enough to reach the site of illness or disease, possess a large drug loading capacity, retain its contents over the course of treatment, and be able deliver its contents at a rate appropriate for maximum therapeutic benefit at the site of interest. The vesosome, a large lipid bilayer enclosing multiple, smaller liposomes, is our solution to addressing these needs. The external lipid bilayer offers a second barrier of protection for interior components and can also serve as the anchor for active targeting components. Furthermore, internal compartmentalization permits customization of separate environments for multiple therapeutics and release triggers. Previous work established the ability of the vesosome to retain its contents in vitro an order of magnitude longer than liposomes. To be viable in vivo, the vesosome must be functionalized for biocompatibility and tracking, and its synthetic procedure must be repeatable, reliable and result in a purified product. The vesosome was functionalized by introducing biocompatible polymers, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and fluorescent dyes in their lipid-bound forms into the external membrane of the vesosome. The external vesosomal membrane is formed from large, flat lipid sheets in the interdigitated (L betaI) phase which, when heated, are used to encapsulate smaller drug-containing vesicles. Through X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM), we established that the molar amounts of functionalized lipid required to label the vesosome for tracking and biocompatibility (˜5--7mol% total) did not prevent the formation of the interdigitated phase. Thus, functionalization of the external vesosome membrane can be achieved through functionalization of interdigitated sheets. For in vivo testing, functionalized vesosomes must be separated from unencapsulated vesicles and purification was performed using size exclusion

  1. Expansion of Perturbation Theory Applied to Shim Rotation Automation of the Advanced Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joshua Loren

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) declared the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This declaration expanded the focus of the ATR to include diversified classes of academic and industrial experiments. An essential part of the new suite of more accurate and flexible codes being deployed to support the NSUF is their ability to predict reactor behavior at startup, particularly the position of the outer shim control cylinders (OSCC). The current method used for calculating the OSCC positions during a cycle startup utilizes a heuristic trial and error approach that is impractical with the computationally intensive reactor physics tools, such as NEWT. It is therefore desirable that shim rotation prediction for startup be automated. Shim rotation prediction with perturbation theory was chosen to be investigated as one method for use with startup calculation automation. A modified form of first order perturbation theory, called phase space interpolated perturbation theory, was developed to more accurately model shim rotation prediction. Shim rotation prediction is just one application for this new modified form of perturbation theory. Phase space interpolated perturbation theory can be used on any application where the range of change to the system is known a priori, but the magnitude of change is not known. A cubic regression method was also developed to automate shim rotation prediction by using only forward solutions to the transport equation.

  2. Testing the cleaning effectiveness of new ecological aqueous dispersions applied on old icons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilache, Viorica; Sandu, Irina Crina Anca; Pruteanu, Silvea; Caldeira, Ana Teresa; Simionescu, Atena Elena; Sandu, Ion

    2016-03-01

    Adherent deposits are very aggressive towards ancient heritage paintings since they affect the varnish and the painting's layers, sometimes reaching the preparative layers. The biggest problem to the restorer is their removal without affecting the patina, the transparent varnish (well preserved) and fine colour glazes made during painting. Therefore, their removal requires preliminary cleaning tests that allow the optimization of the cleaning system composition that is going to be used. The study was focused on organic natural systems, as colourless supernatants, some of them used during ages, but insufficiently studied. The paper presents an evaluation of the effectiveness of cleaning varnished icons of the nineteenth century, with complex conservation cases using supernatants derived from aqueous dispersions extracted from vegetables and dry indigenous herbal infusions. Best results, after six consecutive cleaning steps, on tempera old icon was obtained for a mixture made of mature white onion juice + extract of Soapwort flowers + corn silk tea + acacia tea. As a best result after just one cleaning step was obtained for a quaternary mixture composed from mature white onion juice + mature carrot juice + corn silk tea + aqueous extract of Soapwort flowers.

  3. Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

    2004-12-01

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

  4. Recent advances in germination of Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Members of Clostridium genus are a diverse group of anaerobic spore-formers that includes several pathogenic species. Their anaerobic requirement enhances the importance of the dormant spore morphotype during infection, persistence and transmission. Bacterial spores are metabolically inactive and may survive for long times in the environment and germinate in presence of nutrients termed germinants. Recent progress with spores of several Clostridium species has identified the germinant receptors (GRs) involved in nutrient germinant recognition and initiation of spore germination. Signal transduction from GRs to the downstream effectors remains poorly understood but involves the release of dipicolinic acid. Two mechanistically different cortex hydrolytic machineries are present in Clostridium spores. Recent studies have also shed light into novel biological events that occur during spore formation (accumulation of transcriptional units) and transcription during early spore outgrowth. In summary, this review will cover all of the recent advances in Clostridium spore germination. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Do seed mass and family affect germination and juvenile performance in Knautia arvensis? A study using failure-time methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vange, Vibekke; Heuch, Ivar; Vandvik, Vigdis

    2004-05-01

    Germination and seedling establishment are vulnerable stages in the plant life cycle. We investigated how seed mass and family (progeny origin) affect germination and juvenile performance in the grassland herb Knautia arvensis. Seeds were produced by cross-pollination by hand. The fate of 15 individually weighed seeds from each of 15 plants was followed during a 3-month growth chamber experiment. Progeny origin affected germination, both through seed mass and as an independent factor. Two groups of progenies could be distinguished by having rapid or delayed germination. The two groups had similar mean seed masses, but a positive relationship between seed mass and germination rate could be established only among the rapidly germinating progenies. These biologically relevant patterns were revealed because timing of germination was taken into account in the analyses, not only frequencies. Time-to-event data were analysed with failure-time methods, which gave more stable estimates for the relation between germination and seed mass than the commonly applied logistic regression. Progeny origin and seed mass exerted less impact on later characters like juvenile survival, juvenile biomass, and rosette number. These characters were not affected by the timing of germination under the competition-free study conditions. The decrease in the effect of progeny origin from the seed and germination to the juvenile stages suggests that parental effects other than those contributing to the offspring genotype strongly influenced the offspring phenotype at the earliest life stages. Further, the division of progeny germination patterns into two fairly distinct groups indicates that there was a genetic basis for the variation in stratification requirements among parental plants. Field studies are needed to elucidate effects of different timing of germination in the seasonal grasslands that K. arvensis inhabits.

  6. Prevention of Preharvest Sprouting through Hormone Engineering and Germination Recovery by Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Nonogaki, Mariko; Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Vivipary, germination of seeds on the maternal plant, is observed in nature and provides ecological advantages in certain wild species, such as mangroves. However, precocious seed germination in agricultural species, such as preharvest sprouting (PHS) in cereals, is a serious issue for food security. PHS reduces grain quality and causes economical losses to farmers. PHS can be prevented by translating the basic knowledge of hormone biology in seeds into technologies. Biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), which is an essential hormone for seed dormancy, can be engineered to enhance dormancy and prevent PHS. Enhancing nine-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a rate-limiting enzyme of ABA biosynthesis, through a chemically induced gene expression system, has successfully been used to suppress germination of Arabidopsis seeds. The more advanced system NCED positive-feedback system, which amplifies ABA biosynthesis in a seed-specific manner without chemical induction, has also been developed. The proofs of concept established in the model species are now ready to be applied to crops. A potential problem is recovery of germination from hyperdormant crop grains. Hyperdormancy induced by the NCED systems can be reversed by inducing counteracting genes, such as NCED RNA interference or gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis genes. Alternatively, seed sensitivity to ABA can be modified to rescue germination using the knowledge of chemical biology. ABA antagonists, which were developed recently, have great potential to recover germination from the hyperdormant seeds. Combination of the dormancy-imposing and -releasing approaches will establish a comprehensive technology for PHS prevention and germination recovery. PMID:28197165

  7. Prevention of Preharvest Sprouting through Hormone Engineering and Germination Recovery by Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Mariko; Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Vivipary, germination of seeds on the maternal plant, is observed in nature and provides ecological advantages in certain wild species, such as mangroves. However, precocious seed germination in agricultural species, such as preharvest sprouting (PHS) in cereals, is a serious issue for food security. PHS reduces grain quality and causes economical losses to farmers. PHS can be prevented by translating the basic knowledge of hormone biology in seeds into technologies. Biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), which is an essential hormone for seed dormancy, can be engineered to enhance dormancy and prevent PHS. Enhancing nine-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a rate-limiting enzyme of ABA biosynthesis, through a chemically induced gene expression system, has successfully been used to suppress germination of Arabidopsis seeds. The more advanced system NCED positive-feedback system, which amplifies ABA biosynthesis in a seed-specific manner without chemical induction, has also been developed. The proofs of concept established in the model species are now ready to be applied to crops. A potential problem is recovery of germination from hyperdormant crop grains. Hyperdormancy induced by the NCED systems can be reversed by inducing counteracting genes, such as NCED RNA interference or gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis genes. Alternatively, seed sensitivity to ABA can be modified to rescue germination using the knowledge of chemical biology. ABA antagonists, which were developed recently, have great potential to recover germination from the hyperdormant seeds. Combination of the dormancy-imposing and -releasing approaches will establish a comprehensive technology for PHS prevention and germination recovery.

  8. Nonparametric and parametric estimation for a linear germination-growth model.

    PubMed

    Chiu, S N; Quine, M P; Stewart, M

    2000-09-01

    Seeds are planted on the interval [0, L] at various locations. Each seed has a location x and a potential germination time t epsilon [0, infinity), and it is assumed that the collection of such (x, t) pairs forms a Poisson process in [0, L] x [0, infinity) with intensity measure dxd lambda(t). From each seed that germinates, an inhibiting region grows bidirectionally at rate 2v. These regions inhibit germination of any seed in the region with a later potential germination time. Thus, seeds only germinate in the uninhibited part of [0, L]. We want to estimate lambda on the basis of one or more realizations of the process, the data being the locations and germination times of the germinated seeds. We derive the maximum likelihood estimator of v and a nonparametric estimator of lambda and describe methods of obtaining parametric estimates from it, illustrating these with reference to gamma densities. Simulation results are described and the methods applied to some neurobiological data. An Appendix outlines the S-PLUS code used.

  9. Germination of Medicago sativa is inhibited by soluble compounds in cement dust.

    PubMed

    Lafragüeta, Cristina; García-Criado, Balbino; Arranz, Angel; Vázquez-de-Aldana, Beatriz R

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of cement dust on soils and plant surfaces is known to affect plant growth and the species composition of plant communities, but little is known about its effects (and those of its pH and constituents) on germination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of an aqueous cement extract, constituents of the extract and pH on the germination of seeds of a selected species, Medicago sativa. First, the effects of the extract were tested in assays with concentrations and exposure durations ranging from 0 to 1.0 g/mL and 4 to 96 h, respectively. At 0.8 g/mL, the extract strongly inhibited germination; a 4-h exposure reduced the germination rate, from 77 ± 1.8 to 50 ± 2.6% (mean ± SE), while 8-h exposure completely inhibited it. Further, treatment at this concentration killed the non-germinating seeds, thus the inhibition was due to toxic effects. Neither the pH of the extract nor the concentration of its main soluble elements separately (K, Ca, S, Na, or Cr) caused the toxicity since germination rates were not significantly reduced when these variables were tested individually. However, a mixture of the elements in solution reduced germination rates, suggesting that they have adverse synergistic effects.

  10. Phytotoxic activity of Ocimum tenuiflorum extracts on germination and seedling growth of different plant species.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Mominul; Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Phytotoxic activity of Ocimum tenuiflorum (Lamiaceae) plant extracts was investigated against the germination and seedling growth of cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), and timothy (Phleum pratense) at four different concentrations. The plant extracts at concentrations greater than 30 mg dry weight equivalent extract mL(-1) reduced significantly the total germination percent (GP), germination index (GI), germination energy (GE), speed of emergence (SE), seedling vigour index (SVI), and coefficient of the rate of germination (CRG) of all test species except barnyard grass and GP of lettuce. In contrast, time required for 50% germination (T 50) and mean germination time (MGT) were increased at the same or higher than this concentration. The increasing trend of T 50 and MGT and the decreasing trend of other indices indicated a significant inhibition or delay of germination of the test species by O. tenuiflorum plant extracts and vice versa. In addition, the shoot and root growth of all test species were significantly inhibited by the extracts at concentrations greater than 10 mg dry weight equivalent extract mL(-1). The I 50 values for shoot and root growth were ranged from 26 to 104 mg dry weight equivalent extract mL(-1). Seedling growth was more sensitive to the extracts compared to seed germination. Results of this study suggest that O. tenuiflorum plant extracts have phytotoxic properties and thus contain phytotoxic substances. Isolation and characterization of those substances from this plant may act as a tool for new natural, biodegradable herbicide development to control weeds.

  11. Phytotoxic Activity of Ocimum tenuiflorum Extracts on Germination and Seedling Growth of Different Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Phytotoxic activity of Ocimum tenuiflorum (Lamiaceae) plant extracts was investigated against the germination and seedling growth of cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), and timothy (Phleum pratense) at four different concentrations. The plant extracts at concentrations greater than 30 mg dry weight equivalent extract mL−1 reduced significantly the total germination percent (GP), germination index (GI), germination energy (GE), speed of emergence (SE), seedling vigour index (SVI), and coefficient of the rate of germination (CRG) of all test species except barnyard grass and GP of lettuce. In contrast, time required for 50% germination (T 50) and mean germination time (MGT) were increased at the same or higher than this concentration. The increasing trend of T 50 and MGT and the decreasing trend of other indices indicated a significant inhibition or delay of germination of the test species by O. tenuiflorum plant extracts and vice versa. In addition, the shoot and root growth of all test species were significantly inhibited by the extracts at concentrations greater than 10 mg dry weight equivalent extract mL−1. The I 50 values for shoot and root growth were ranged from 26 to 104 mg dry weight equivalent extract mL−1. Seedling growth was more sensitive to the extracts compared to seed germination. Results of this study suggest that O. tenuiflorum plant extracts have phytotoxic properties and thus contain phytotoxic substances. Isolation and characterization of those substances from this plant may act as a tool for new natural, biodegradable herbicide development to control weeds. PMID:25032234

  12. Seed germination as a thermobiological problem.

    PubMed

    Labouriau, L G

    1978-12-22

    Thermal effects on seed germination are considered through the changes brought about by temperature in the germination capacity, in the germination rate, and in the distribution of the relative frequency of germination along the incubation times. A number of questions of general thermobiological interest are thus raised, entailing the need of an analysis of the temperature dependence of the seed germination rate. A treatment of these rates by the activation-energy approach cannot be general, for their Arrhenius plots are not always linear. Moreover, it is shown that any process displaying a temperature optimum (as happens in the germination of most seed species) cannot follow one of the fundamental tenets of the collision rate theory. The need of a theoretical treatment stressing the essential role of the partition of energy within the seed system has led to an anlysis using the absolute reaction rate theory. New experimental prospects for the physiology of seed germination are thus raised, concerning the meaning of the temperature cardinal points, the growth pattern of the embryo in germinating seeds, the dual effect of protein thermodenaturation, the effects of high hydrostatic pressures, and a whole pharmacological line of work. The cybernetic counterpart of the thermodynamic view of seed germination appears in the study of the distribution of the relative frequency of germination along the isothermal incubation time. In some species of seeds the thermal communication between the environment and the seed growth effector can be shown to proceed by molecular collisions at all germination isotherms. In the seeds of Dolichos biflorus this communication through random thermal noise prevails only at temperatures close to both extreme limits of germination. Both in this species and in Calotropis procera there is a temperature range (encompassing the optimum) within which a temperature signal is superimposed upon the gaussian noise. An interpretation is proposed

  13. Effects of water potential on spore germination and viability of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Palmero Llamas, D; de Cara Gonzalez, M; Iglesias Gonzalez, C; Ruíz Lopez, G; Tello Marquina, J C

    2008-11-01

    Germination of macroconidia and/or microconidia of 24 strains of Fusarium solani, F. chlamydosporum, F. culmorum, F. equiseti, F. verticillioides, F. sambucinum, F. oxysporum and F. proliferatum isolated from fluvial channels and sea beds of the south-eastern coast of Spain, and three control strains (F. oxysporum isolated from affected cultures) was studied in distilled water in response to a range of water potentials adjusted with NaCl. (0, -13.79, -41.79, -70.37, -99.56 and -144.54 bars). The viability (UFC/ml) of suspensions was also tested in three time periods (0, 24 and 48 h). Conidia always germinated in distilled water. The pattern of conidial germination observed of F. verticilloides, F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. chlamydosporum and F. culmorum was similar. A great diminution of spore germination was found in -13.79 bars solutions. Spore germination percentage for F. solani isolates was maximal at 48 h and -13.79 bars with 21.33% spore germination, 16% higher than germination in distilled water. F. equiseti shows the maximum germination percentage in -144.54 bars solution in 24 h time with 12.36% germination. This results did not agree with those obtained in the viability test were maximum germination was found in distilled water. The viability analysis showed the great capacity of F. verticilloides strains to form viable colonies, even in such extreme conditions as -144.54 bars after 24 h F. proliferatum colony formation was prevented in the range of -70.37 bars. These results show the clear affectation of water potential to conidia germination of Fusaria. The ability of certain species of Fusarium to develop a saprophytic life in the salt water of the Mediterranean Sea could be certain. Successful germination, even under high salty media conditions, suggests that Fusarium spp. could have a competitive advantage over other soil fungi in crops irrigated with saline water. In the specific case of F. solani, water potential of -13.79 bars affected

  14. Gravitational stress on germinating Pinus pinea seeds.

    PubMed

    Ranaldi, Francesco; Giachetti, Eugenio; Guerin, Elizabeth; Bacci, Stefano; Paoletti, Elena; Boddi, Vieri; Vanni, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    In the germination of lipid-rich seeds, the glyoxylate cycle plays a control role in that, bypassing the two decarboxylative steps of the Krebs cycle; it allows the net synthesis of carbohydrates from lipids. The activity of isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, is an indicator of the state of seed germination: stage of germination, growth of embryo, activation and progress of protein synthesis, depletion of lipidic supplies. In order to investigate the effects of gravity on seed germination, we carried out a study on the time pattern of germination of Pinus pinea seeds that were subjected to a hypergravitational stress (1000 g for 64 h at 4 degrees C), either in a dry or in a wet environment, before to be placed in germination plates. During the whole time of germination, we monitored the state of embryo growth and the most representative enzymes of the main metabolic pathways. In treated wet seeds, we observed an average germination of only 20% with a slowdown of the enzyme activities assayed and a noticeable degradation of lipidic reserves with respect to the controls. These differences in germination are not found for dry seeds.

  15. Acid phosphatase activities during the germination of Glycine max seeds.

    PubMed

    dos Prazeres, Janaina Nicanuzia; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a study concerning the determination of some characteristics of soybean seedlings and the detection of acid phosphatase activities towards different substrates during the germination. Enzyme activities with p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) as substrates were detected from the 5th and 7th days after germination, respectively. Acid phosphatase activities with tyrosine phosphate (TyrP), glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) were also observed but to a lesser extent. Under the same conditions, no enzyme activity was detected with phytic acid (PhyAc) as substrate. The appearance of phosphatase activity was coincident with the decrease of inorganic phosphate content during germination; over the same period, the protein content increased up to the 5th day, decreased until the 8th day, and remained constant after this period. Relative to phosphatase activity in the cotyledons, the activities detected in the hypocotyl and roots were 82% and 38%, respectively. During storage the enzyme maintained about 63% of its activity for 3 months at 5 degrees C. The specificity constant (Vmax/Km) values for pNPP and PPi were 212 and 64 mu kat mM-1 mg-1, respectively. Amongst the substrates tested, PPi could be a potential physiological substrate for acid phosphatase during the germination of soybean seeds.

  16. Identification of embryo proteins associated with seed germination and seedling establishment in germinating rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Jun; Xu, Heng-Heng; Wang, Wei-Qing; Li, Ni; Wang, Wei-Ping; Lu, Zhuang; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2016-06-01

    Seed germination is a critical phase in the plant life cycle, but the mechanism of seed germination is still poorly understood. In the present study, rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Peiai 64S) seeds were sampled individually when they reached different germination stages, quiescent, germinated sensu stricto, germinated completely and seedling, and were used to study the changes in the embryo proteome. A total of 88 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance during germination in water, and the results showed an activation of metabolic processes. Cell division, cell wall synthesis, and secondary metabolism were activated at late seed germination and during preparation for subsequent seedling establishment. Cycloheximide (CHX) at 70μM inhibited seedling establishment without an apparent negative effect on seed germination, while CHX at 500μM completely blocked seed germination. We used this observation to identify the potentially important proteins involved in seed germination (coleoptile protrusion) and seedling establishment (coleoptile and radicle protrusion). Twenty-six protein spots, mainly associated with sugar/polysaccharide metabolism and energy production, showed a significant difference in abundance during seed germination. Forty-nine protein spots, mainly involved in cell wall biosynthesis, proteolysis as well as cell defense and rescue, were required for seedling establishment. The results help improve our understanding of the key events (proteins) involved in germination and seedling development.

  17. In vitro germination characteristics of maize pollen to detect biological activity of environmental pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Pfahler, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro pollen germination in maize was evaluated as a method of assessing the mutagenic and physiological effects of environmental pollutants on higher organisms. The extent of mutations was effectively determined by testing sporophytes homozygous for the mutated allele. Physiological effects were effectively determined when chemical agents were added directly into the in vitro medium. Exposure of pollen grains during in vitro germination to ultraviolet radiation in the range 280-320 nm produced little or no change in the germination or rupture percentage but a sharp decrease in pollen tube growth after 1 hr.

  18. Development of natto with germination-defective mutants of Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Nobuo; Murasawa, Hisashi; Sekiguchi, Junichi

    2009-03-01

    The effects of cortex-lysis related genes with the pdaA, sleB, and cwlD mutations of Bacillus subtilis (natto) NAFM5 on sporulation and germination were investigated. Single or double mutations did not prevent normal sporulation, but did affect germination. Germination was severely inhibited by the double mutation of sleB and cwlD. The quality of natto made with the sleB cwlD double mutant was tested, and the amounts of glutamic acid and ammonia were very similar to those in the wild type. The possibility of industrial development of natto containing a reduced number of viable spores is presented.

  19. The Effect of Germination on Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Ghiassi Tarzi, Babak; Gharachorloo, Maryam; Baharinia, Marzieh; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Germination is one of the most effective processes to improve the quality of legumes. Vitamins and some other compounds that might be considered beneficial as antioxidants, often change dramatically during the course of germination. Antioxidants might be defined as compounds which are capable of preventing, delaying or retarding the development of rancidity or other flavor deterioration in foods or as protective factors against the oxidative damage in the human body. In this research, three different solvents were employed to extract the phenolic compounds present in chickpea seeds and sprouts. Total phenolic contents were measured by Folin Ciocalteau method and the antioxidant activity was determined by two different methods including the assay of hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and the oven test method. For the later, different concentrations of extracts (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08 and 0.1% w/w) were added to tallow and the stabilities of the treatments were determined. Peroxide value and induction period measurements were used as means to evaluate the antioxidant activities. The results indicated that germination process modifies the antioxidant activity. Although the amount of phenolic compounds was higher when acetone solvent was employed, methanolic extract indicated better hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. The evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the extracts activity was concentration-dependent by delaying the indicated oxidation and increased when higher concentrations of the extracts were applied. Therefore, chickpea sprout flour or extract might be used as a source of natural antioxidants in functional foods or in the formulation of the oil-based supplements or medicine in the form of capsule. PMID:24250547

  20. Applying the theory of planned behaviour to explain HIV testing in antenatal settings in Addis Ababa - a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To facilitate access to the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) services, HIV counselling and testing are offered routinely in antenatal care settings. Focusing a cohort of pregnant women attending public and private antenatal care facilities, this study applied an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to explain intended- and actual HIV testing. Methods A sequential exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in Addis Ababa in 2009. The study involved first time antenatal attendees from public- and private health care facilities. Three Focus Group Discussions were conducted to inform the TPB questionnaire. A total of 3033 women completed the baseline TPB interviews, including attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intention with respect to HIV testing, whereas 2928 completed actual HIV testing at follow up. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square tests, Fisher's Exact tests, Internal consistency reliability, Pearson's correlation, Linear regression, Logistic regression and using Epidemiological indices. P-values < 0.05 was considered significant and 95% Confidence Interval (CI) was used for the odds ratio. Results The TPB explained 9.2% and 16.4% of the variance in intention among public- and private health facility attendees. Intention and perceived barriers explained 2.4% and external variables explained 7% of the total variance in HIV testing. Positive and negative predictive values of intention were 96% and 6% respectively. Across both groups, subjective norm explained a substantial amount of variance in intention, followed by attitudes. Women intended to test for HIV if they perceived social support and anticipated positive consequences following test performance. Type of counselling did not modify the link between intended and actual HIV testing. Conclusion The TPB explained substantial amount of variance in intention to test but was less sufficient in explaining

  1. Comparative analysis on thermal non-destructive testing imagery applying Candid Covariance-Free Incremental Principal Component Thermography (CCIPCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Bardia; Sfarra, Stefano; Ibarra Castanedo, Clemente; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal and infrared imagery creates considerable developments in Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) area. Here, a thermography method for NDT specimens inspection is addressed by applying a technique for computation of eigen-decomposition which refers as Candid Covariance-Free Incremental Principal Component Thermography (CCIPCT). The proposed approach uses a shorter computational alternative to estimate covariance matrix and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to obtain the result of Principal Component Thermography (PCT) and ultimately segments the defects in the specimens applying color based K-medoids clustering approach. The problem of computational expenses for high-dimensional thermal image acquisition is also investigated. Three types of specimens (CFRP, Plexiglas and Aluminium) have been used for comparative benchmarking. The results conclusively indicate the promising performance and demonstrate a confirmation for the outlined properties.

  2. A race for survival: Can Bromus tectorum seeds escape Pyrenophora semeniperda-caused mortality by germinating quickly?

    Treesearch

    Julie Beckstead; Susan E. Meyer; Cherrilyn J. Molder; Caitlyn Smith

    2007-01-01

    Pathogen-seed interactions may involve a race for seed resources, so that seeds that germinate more quickly, mobilizing reserves, will be more likely to escape seed death than slow-germinating seeds. This race-for-survival hypothesis was tested for the North American seed pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda on seeds of the annual grass Bromus tectorum, an invasive plant...

  3. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in precipitation patterns explain population-level germination strategies in an edaphic specialist.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, Lorena; Weldy, Phillip; Levy, Morris; Emery, Nancy C

    2017-01-01

    Many locally endemic species in biodiversity hotspots are restricted to edaphic conditions that are fixed in the landscape, limiting their potential to track climate change through dispersal. Instead, such species experience strong selection for germination strategies that can track suitable conditions through time. Germination strategies were compared among populations across the geographic range of a California vernal pool annual, Lasthenia fremontii Local germination strategies were tested to determine the associations with geographic variation in precipitation patterns. This study evaluated patterns of seed germination, dormancy and mortality in response to simulated variation in the timing, amount and duration of the first autumn precipitation event using seeds from six populations that span a geographic gradient in precipitation. Next, it was tested whether the germination strategies of different populations can be predicted by historical precipitation patterns that characterize each site. A significant positive relationship was observed between the historical variability in autumn precipitation and the extent of dormancy in a population. Marginal populations, with histories of the most extreme but constant autumn precipitation levels, expressed the lowest dormancy levels. Populations from sites with historically higher levels of autumn precipitation tended to germinate faster, but this tendency was not statistically significant. Germination in L. fremontii is cued by the onset of the first rains that characterize the beginning of winter in California's Great Central Valley. However, populations differ in how fast they germinate and the fraction of seeds that remain dormant when germination cues occur. The results suggest that seed dormancy may be a key trait for populations to track increasingly drier climates predicted by climate change models. However, the low dormancy and high mortality levels observed among seeds of the southernmost, driest populations

  4. Smart Salinity Management in Low-lying Deltaic Areas: A Model Predictive Control Scheme Applied to a Test Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekin Aydin, Boran; Rutten, Martine; Oude Essink, Gualbert H. P.; Delsman, Joost; Abraham, Edo

    2017-04-01

    Saline groundwater exfiltration to surface water increases surface water salinization and degrades the water quality in low-lying deltaic areas. As the use of surface water is less appropriate for agricultural, industrial and drinking water production due to salinization, freshwater diverted from a river is often utilised for flushing canals and ditches in these areas. Current water management strategies for flushing control in low-lying deltaic areas have to be revised to mitigate expected negative effects of climate change, sea level increase and decreasing fresh water availability. Model predictive control (MPC) is a powerful control method that is increasingly used for managing water systems. The explicit consideration of constraints and multi-objective management are important features of MPC. In this study, an MPC scheme is developed and tested for combined salinity and water level control of a ditch/water course. Saline groundwater exfiltration fluxes and salinities are modelled by applying the Rapid Saline Groundwater Exfiltration Model (RSGEM) and used as known disturbances for the MPC scheme. The developed control scheme is applied to a test canal using real data from a Dutch polder (Polders are low lying and artificially drained areas surrounded by dikes, with a controlled surface water level below M.S.L) which is affected by high saline groundwater exfiltration. This test demonstrates the performance of the controller for a real scenario. Simulation results show that MPC can increase the operational efficiency of flushing operations.

  5. Germination response of Hylocereus setaceus (Salm-Dyck ex DC: ) Ralf Bauer (Cactaceae) seeds to temperature and reduced water potentials.

    PubMed

    Simão, E; Takaki, M; Cardoso, V J M

    2010-02-01

    The germination response of Hylocereus setaceus seeds to isothermic incubation at different water potentials was analysed by using the thermal time and hydrotime models, aiming to describe some germination parameters of the population and to test the validity of the models to describe the response of the seeds to temperature and water potential. Hylocereus setaceus seeds germinated relatively well in a wide range of temperatures and the germination was rate limited from 11 to 20 degrees C interval and beyond 30 degrees C until 40 degrees C, in which the germination rate respectively shifts positively and negatively with temperature. The minimum or base temperature (T(b)) for the germination of H. setaceus was 7 degrees C, and the ceiling temperature varied nearly from 43.5 to 59 degrees C depending on the percent fraction, with median set on 49.8 degrees C. The number of degrees day necessary for 50% of the seeds to germinate in the infra-optimum temperature range was 39.3 degrees C day, whereas at the supra-optimum interval the value of theta = 77 was assumed to be constant throughout. Germination was sensitive to decreasing values of psi in the medium, and both the germinability and the germination rate shift negatively with the reduction of psi, but the rate of reduction changed with temperature. The values of base water potential (psi(b)) shift to zero with increasing temperatures and such variation reflects in the relatively greater effect of low psi on germination in supra optimum range of T. In general, the model described better the germination time courses at lower than at higher water potentials. The analysis also suggest that Tb may not be independent of psi and that psi(b(g)) may change as a function of temperature at the infra-otimum temperature range.

  6. Endoreduplication in the germinating embryo and young seedling is related to the type of seedling establishment but is not coupled with superoxide radical accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rewers, Monika; Sliwinska, Elwira

    2014-08-01

    During germination, the embryo axis elongates and the radicle emerges through the surrounding structures of the seed. However, this elongation is not even along the axis, and it has been suggested that the region responsible for radicle protrusion is related to the type of subsequent seedling establishment. Eleven epigeal- and five hypogeal-type species were selected to study endoreduplication, a process coupled with cell elongation, in the radicle, hypocotyl-radicle transition zone, hypocotyl, and cotyledons of dry and germinating seeds, and in seedlings after radicle protrusion. Flow cytometry was used to establish the proportions of nuclei with different DNA contents, the mean C-value, and the (Σ>2C)/2C ratio. Additionally, a nitroblue tetrazolium chloride test was applied to the embryos/seedlings in the dry state and during and after germination to localize superoxide radical (O2(•-)) accumulation, which has been suggested to play a role in cell elongation. Endoreduplication intensity varied in different species, in the embryo/seedling regions, and with the type of seedling establishment. In most of the cases, it was highest in the transition zone of epigeal species and in the hypocotyl in hypogeal species. O2(•-) was invariably produced during germination in the radicle, and additionally in the transition zone at the time of radicle protrusion; thus, it was not coupled with endoreduplication, and most probably played a role in defence against biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. These results provide information to aid in the selection of the most suitable plant material for molecular research on germination and for monitoring seed priming. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The biomechanics of seed germination.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Tina; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    From a biomechanical perspective, the completion of seed (and fruit) germination depends on the balance of two opposing forces: the growth potential of the embryonic axis (radicle-hypocotyl growth zone) and the restraint of the seed-covering layers (endosperm, testa, and pericarp). The diverse seed tissues are composite materials which differ in their dynamic properties based on their distinct cell wall composition and water uptake capacities. The biomechanics of embryo cell growth during seed germination depend on irreversible cell wall loosening followed by water uptake due to the decreasing turgor, and this leads to embryo elongation and eventually radicle emergence. Endosperm weakening as a prerequisite for radicle emergence is a widespread phenomenon among angiosperms. Research into the biochemistry and biomechanics of endosperm weakening has demonstrated that the reduction in puncture force of a seed's micropylar endosperm is environmentally and hormonally regulated and involves tissue-specific expression of cell wall remodelling proteins such as expansins, diverse hydrolases, and the production of directly acting apoplastic reactive oxygen. The endosperm-weakening biomechanics and its underlying cell wall biochemistry differ between the micropylar (ME) and chalazal (CE) endosperm domains. In the ME, they involve cell wall loosening, cell separation, and programmed cell death to provide decreased and localized ME tissue resistance, autolysis, and finally the formation of an ME hole required for radicle emergence. Future work will further unravel the molecular mechanisms, environmental regulation, and evolution of the diverse biomechanical cell wall changes underpinning the control of germination by endosperm weakening. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Binax NOW Streptococcus pneumoniae test applied on nasopharyngeal aspirates to support pneumococcal aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Athlin, Simon; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2013-06-01

    The use of nasopharyngeal secretions to enhance diagnostic yields of pneumococcal aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is of interest. We evaluated the Binax NOW Streptococcus pneumoniae immunochromatographic test (ICT) on nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) in order to support pneumococcal aetiology in CAP. The NPA ICT was applied on 180 adult CAP patients and 64 healthy controls. The rate of pneumococcal detection in the nasopharynx was compared to rates for lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture on NPA. According to blood and sputum culture and urine ICT, the test sensitivity in 59 patients with a pneumococcal aetiology was 81%. The specificity was suboptimal, with 72% negative tests among CAP patients without a pneumococcal aetiology. However, the test was positive in only 11% of patients with atypical pneumonia and in 4.7% of healthy controls. The positivity rate was higher for NPA ICT compared to culture on NPA in all CAP patients, and to both PCR and culture on NPA in non-pneumococcal non-atypical CAP patients. In 113 (63%) patients with β-lactam monotherapy, cure without treatment alteration was noted more often in cases with positive compared to negative NPA ICT at admission (91% vs 69%; p < 0.01). The high sensitivity and the low positivity rates in patients with atypical pneumonia and healthy controls, in combination with the correlation between positive test results and clinical cure with β-lactam therapy, may support a pneumococcal aetiology in CAP in populations with low pneumococcal carriage rates.

  9. High-resolution image reconstruction technique applied to the optical testing of ground-based astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhenyu; Lin, Jing; Liu, Zhong

    2008-07-01

    By study of the classical testing techniques (such as Shack-Hartmann Wave-front Sensor) adopted in testing the aberration of ground-based astronomical optical telescopes, we bring forward two testing methods on the foundation of high-resolution image reconstruction technology. One is based on the averaged short-exposure OTF and the other is based on the Speckle Interferometric OTF by Antoine Labeyrie. Researches made by J.Ohtsubo, F. Roddier, Richard Barakat and J.-Y. ZHANG indicated that the SITF statistical results would be affected by the telescope optical aberrations, which means the SITF statistical results is a function of optical system aberration and the atmospheric Fried parameter (seeing). Telescope diffraction-limited information can be got through two statistics methods of abundant speckle images: by the first method, we can extract the low frequency information such as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the telescope PSF to estimate the optical quality; by the second method, we can get a more precise description of the telescope PSF with high frequency information. We will apply the two testing methods to the 2.4m optical telescope of the GMG Observatory, in china to validate their repeatability and correctness and compare the testing results with that of the Shack-Hartmann Wave-Front Sensor got. This part will be described in detail in our paper.

  10. Post-burning regeneration of the Chaco seasonally dry forest: germination response of dominant species to experimental heat shock.

    PubMed

    Jaureguiberry, Pedro; Díaz, Sandra

    2015-03-01

    Plant species of the Chaco seasonally dry forest of central Argentina have presumably been under a low evolutionary pressure to develop specialized fire-response traits, such as heat-stimulated germination. Nevertheless, other historical factors such as seasonal drought and/or endozoochorus dispersal could have led some species to develop heat-tolerant seeds. Therefore, heat-tolerant germination should be more common than heat-stimulated or heat-sensitive germination. To test this, we exposed seeds of 26 dominant species from the Chaco region to a broad range of experimental heat treatments and incubated them for 30 days at 25 °C and 12 h photoperiod. We then scored the percent germination and classified them as heat-stimulated, heat-tolerant or heat-sensitive based on their germination following heat treatments relative to control. Seventeen species showed heat-tolerant germination, including all native graminoids. Seven species showed heat-stimulated germination, under the less-intense heat treatments. Only two species showed heat-sensitive germination. Endozoochory had no influence on germination responses. We suggest that, unlike Mediterranean-climate ecosystems, fire was not a major evolutionary force in the development of Chaco forests, and our results provide greater understanding of the potential response of Chaco plant communities in the face of increasingly frequent fires.

  11. Reduced germination success of temperate grassland seeds sown in dung: consequences for post-dispersal seed fate.

    PubMed

    Milotić, T; Hoffmann, M

    2016-11-01

    Endozoochory is one of the main drivers shaping temperate grassland communities by maintaining plant populations of its constituents and enabling plants to colonize new habitats. Successful endozoochorous dispersal implies that seeds not only get consumed and survive the digestive tract but are also able to develop into viable seedlings in a dung environment. We experimentally assessed the germination probability and timing of 15 annual and perennial temperate European grassland species in cattle and horse dung and in different climatic conditions (greenhouse and outdoor conditions). Interspecific variation in germinability and germination timing are found, while life strategy had only an effect on germination timing. We found adverse effects of both cattle and horse dung on the germination characteristics of all tested grassland species, but the effects of cattle dung were more pronounced. In comparison with the control treatment, fewer seeds emerged in dung and more time was needed to germinate. Also, germination metrics clearly differed between the artificial greenhouse and outdoor conditions, with generally a lower germinability in outdoor conditions. According to our results, a large cost seems to be associated with endozoochorous dispersal in this stage of the life cycle, as seed dispersal effectiveness strongly depends on the quality of the deposition site with a lowered survival and germination probability when seeds are deposited in dung.

  12. Effect of cryopreservation on in vitro seed germination and protocorm growth of Mediterranean orchids.

    PubMed

    Pirondini, A; Sgarbi, E

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an effective method for the long-term conservation of plant germplasm. In the present study the effect of liquid nitrogen on seed structure, germination and protocorm development of eight Mediterranean orchid species was evaluated. A scanning electron microscopy analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of the immersion in liquid nitrogen on seed integuments. Germination and protocorms growth were obtained applying in vitro cultures techniques. No micro-morphological differences emerged between cryopreserved and untreated seeds. The effect of the treatment on the seed germination varied on the basis of the species. For Ophrys sphegodes ssp. passionis and Orchis mascula, freezing resulted in a significant increase of germination percentages. Protocorms of all species showed a positive growth trend although some significant differences of size occurred among the protocorms derived from treated and untreated seeds. Cryogenic techniques seem to have great potential in orchid germplasm conservation.

  13. Effect of phytohormones on seed germination and seedling growth of Coriandrum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahender; Agnihotri, R K; Vamil, R; Sharma, R

    2014-04-01

    Coriander commonly known as Dhania or Chinese parsley is generally grown for its use in soups, salads, dressing vegetables, seasoning and chutney. Effect of two phytohormones viz. GA3 and 2,4-D on seed germination, seedling growth and various physiological and biochemical parameters were studied. The hormones were applied individually in different concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μM concentrations). Both the hormones enhanced the germination percentage, seedling growth (root and shoot length), leaf area, chlorophyll and carotenoid content. The application of these hormones also decreased the germination time. Maximum germination, shoot length, leaf area and carotenoid content was observed in 100 μm concentration of GA3. Root length, chl. a and chl. b was maximum in 50 μM of 2,4-D and 100 μm GA3, respectively. The application of two hormones exhibited a marked increase on all the parameters studied as compared to the control.

  14. Neonatal disorders of germinal matrix.

    PubMed

    Raets, M M A; Dudink, J; Govaert, P

    2015-11-01

    The germinal matrix (GM) is a richly vascularized, transient layer near the ventricles. It produces neurons and glial cells, and is present in the foetal brain between 8 and 36 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks, it reaches its maximum volume and subsequently withers. The GM is vulnerable to haemorrhage in preterm infants. This selective vulnerability is explained by limited astrocyte end-feet coverage of microvessels, reduced expression of fibronectin and immature tight junctions. Focal lesions in the neonatal period include haemorrhage, germinolysis and stroke. Such lesions in transient layers interrupt normal brain maturation and induce neurodevelopmental sequelae.

  15. Designing personable and informative job recruiting web sites: testing the effect of the design on attractiveness and intent to apply.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Peg; Chinn, Susan J; Goodrich, Jana; Howard, Gary

    2004-06-01

    To date, most of the limited research conducted about the efficacy of corporate job recruiting web sites has been either anecdotal or based on field surveys. In this study, the effects of using a photograph, a friendly text message, and a list of job tasks in job descriptions were measured on undergraduates' ratings of the Personableness and Informativeness of recruiting web sites. In addition, the relationships between ratings of Personableness and Informativeness on perceptions of organizational Attractiveness and Intent to Apply were tested. Use of a photograph increased ratings of both Personableness and Informativeness. Additional results are provided and directions for research suggested.

  16. Priming and temperature limits for germination of dispersal units of Urochloa brizantha (Stapf) Webster cv. basilisk.

    PubMed

    Nakao, E A; Cardoso, V J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of priming treatments on the upper and lower thermal limits for germination of Urochloa brizantha cv. basilisk, and testing the hypothesis that pré-imbibition affect thermal parameters of the germination. Pre-imbibed seeds both in distilled water (0 MPa) and PEG 6000 solution (-0.5 MPa) were put to germinate in different temperatures. It is suggested that U. brizantha seeds have low response to priming when they were placed to germinate in medium where water is not limiting. The response of U. brizantha seeds to priming is dependent on the temperature and water potential conditions at which the seeds are pre-imbibed, as well as on the germination temperature. The optimum temperature for germination of U. brizantha shift toward warmer temperatures in primed seeds. Priming effect was more pronounced at temperatures closer to the upper and lower limit for germination, but probably that response cannot be accounted for changes in the thermal time constant (θT(g)) and ceiling temperature (Tc(g)). Otherwise, a decrease in the base temperature (Tb) was observed in primed seeds, suggesting that the Tb distribution in U. brizantha seeds is influenced by priming.

  17. Does cattle dung cause differences between grazing increaser and decreaser germination response?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Carlos P.; Azcárate, Francisco M.; Peco, Begoña

    2013-02-01

    Although grassland species are usually classified as grazing increasers or decreasers, the response mechanisms to herbivore action in these two groups have yet to be clarified. One such action is dung deposition. The present study tested the hypothesis that increaser species perform more efficiently than decreasers during germination and/or establishment in the presence of dung leachates. A phytotron experiment was conducted on fourteen Mediterranean grassland species from five families, with an equal number of increaser and decreaser species chosen for each family to control for phylogeny. Seeds were germinated and grown in different concentrations of cattle dung leachate. We monitored germination percentages, median germination time and root length, measured five days after germination. To analyse the response and identify potential thresholds, we fitted piecewise mixed models using family/species as nested random factors. Differences in germination parameters between the two groups peaked in favour of increasers under intermediate leachate concentrations. Root growth was also negatively affected by leachates in decreaser species and promoted in increasers. Livestock dung deposition can increase the germination and colonising performance of increasers over decreasers, and may therefore be one of the mechanisms that explain the different species composition of grazed and ungrazed environments.

  18. Effect of animal sera on Bacillus anthracis Sterne spore germination and vegetative cell growth.

    PubMed

    Bensman, M D; Mackie, R S; Minter, Z A; Gutting, B W

    2012-08-01

     The aims of this work were to investigate the effects of sera on B. anthracis Sterne germination and growth. Sera examined included human, monkey and rabbit sera, as well as sera from eight other species.  Standard dilution plate assay (with and without heat kill) was used as a measure of germination, and spectroscopy was used to measure growth. In addition, a Coulter Counter particle counter was used to monitor germination and growth based on bacterial size. Spores germinated best in foetal bovine and monkey sera, moderately with human sera and showed limited germination in the presence of rabbit or rat sera. Vegetative bacteria grew best in foetal bovine sera and moderately in rabbit sera. Human and monkey sera supported little growth of vegetative bacteria.  The data suggested sera can have a significant impact on germination and growth of Sterne bacteria.  These data should be considered when conducting in vitro cell culture studies and may aid in interpreting in vivo infection studies. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Testing for Seed Quality in Southern Oaks

    Treesearch

    F.T. Bonner

    1984-01-01

    Expressions of germination rate, such as peak value (PV) or mean germination time (MGT), provide good estimates of acorn quality, but test completion requires a minimum of 3 weeks. For more rapid estimates, tetrazolium staining is recommended. Some seed test results were significantly correlated with nursery germination of cherrybark and water oaks, but not with...

  20. Germination of dimorphic seeds of the desert annual halophyte Suaeda aralocaspica (Chenopodiaceae), a C4 plant without Kranz anatomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Zhenying; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M; Dong, Ming

    2008-11-01

    Suaeda aralocaspica is a C4 summer annual halophyte without Kranz anatomy that is restricted to the deserts of central Asia. It produces two distinct types of seeds that differ in colour, shape and size. The primary aims of the present study were to compare the dormancy and germination characteristics of dimorphic seeds of S. aralocaspica and to develop a conceptual model of their dynamics. Temperatures simulating those in the natural habitat of S. aralocaspica were used to test for primary dormancy and germination behaviour of fresh brown and black seeds. The effects of cold stratification, gibberellic acid, seed coat scarification, seed coat removal and dry storage on dormancy breaking were tested in black seeds. Germination percentage and recovery responses of brown seeds, non-treated black seeds and 8-week cold-stratified black seeds to salt stress were tested. Brown seeds were non-dormant, whereas black seeds had non-deep Type 2 physiological dormancy (PD). Germination percentage and rate of germination of brown seeds and of variously pretreated black seeds were significantly higher than those of non-pretreated black seeds. Exposure of seeds to various salinities had significant effects on germination, germination recovery and induction into secondary dormancy. A conceptual model is presented that ties these results together and puts them into an ecological context. The two seed morphs of S. aralocaspica exhibit distinct differences in dormancy and germination characteristics. Suaeda aralocaspica is the first cold desert halophyte for which non-deep Type 2 PD has been documented.

  1. Increase in Testing Efficiency through the Development of an IT-Based Adaptive Testing Tool for Competency Measurement Applied to a Health Worker Training Test Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinhans, Janne; Schumann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In the context of education and training, competency measurement (CM) is a central challenge in competency management. For complex CMs, a compromise must be addressed between the time available and the number of dimensions to be measured or the quality of the measurements. Increasing the efficiency of existing tests for CMs therefore poses a key…

  2. Analysis of Germination Capacity and Germinant Receptor (Sub)clusters of Genome-Sequenced Bacillus cereus Environmental Isolates and Model Strains.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Xiao, Yinghua; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2017-02-15

    Spore germination of 17 Bacillus cereus food isolates and reference strains was evaluated using flow cytometry analysis in combination with fluorescent staining at a single-spore level. This approach allowed for rapid collection of germination data under more than 20 conditions, including heat activation of spores, germination in complex media (brain heart infusion [BHI] and tryptone soy broth [TSB]), and exposure to saturating concentrations of single amino acids and the combination of alanine and inosine. Whole-genome sequence comparison revealed a total of 11 clusters of operons encoding germinant receptors (GRs): GerK, GerI, and GerL were present in all strains, whereas GerR, GerS, GerG, GerQ, GerX, GerF, GerW, and GerZ (sub)clusters showed a more diverse presence/absence in different strains. The spores of tested strains displayed high diversity with regard to their sensitivity and responsiveness to selected germinants and heat activation. The two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, and 11 food isolates showed a good germination response under a range of conditions, whereas four other strains (B. cereus B4085, B4086, B4116, and B4153) belonging to phylogenetic group IIIA showed a very weak germination response even in BHI and TSB media. Germination responses could not be linked to specific (combinations of) GRs, but it was noted that the four group IIIA strains contained pseudogenes or variants of subunit C in their gerL cluster. Additionally, two of those strains (B4086 and B4153) carried pseudogenes in the gerK and gerRI (sub)clusters that possibly affected the functionality of these GRs.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of Nigella sativa extracts during germination on central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Hayatul; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Salman, Mohammad Tariq

    2015-05-01

    Nigella sativa Linn. which has many acclaimed medicinal properties is an indigenous herbaceous plant and belongs to the Ranunculaceae family, which grows in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, Pakistan and India. This study was designed to investigate the effects of N. sativa seed extracts of different germination phases on the central nervous system (CNS) responses in experimental animals. Anxiolytic, locomotor activity of extracts (1 g/kg of body weight) was evaluated in both stressed and unstressed animal models and antiepileptic effect was evaluated by maximal electroshock seizure model keeping diazepam (20 mg/kg) as a positive control. Antidepressant effect was evaluated by forced swim test and tail suspension test keeping imipramine (15 mg/kg) as a positive control. All tested extracts of N. sativa during different phases of germination (especially 5(th) day germination phase) showed significant (P < 0.001) anxiolytic effect in comparison to control. Diazepam reduced locomotor activity in control (unstressed) rats but did not show affect in stressed rats while N. sativa extracts from germination phases significantly (P < 0.001) reduced locomotor activity in unstressed as well as stressed animals. All the extracts of N. sativa from different germination phases exhibited significant (P < 0.001) reduction in various phases of epileptic seizure on comparison with the reference standard (diazepam). During antidepressant test, N. sativa extracts exhibited a slight reduction in the immobility of rats. During germination, especially in 5(th) day germination extract, N. sativa showed significant CNS depressant activity as compared to whole seeds that possibly may be due higher content of secondary metabolites produced during germination.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of Nigella sativa extracts during germination on central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Hayatul; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Salman, Mohammad Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa Linn. which has many acclaimed medicinal properties is an indigenous herbaceous plant and belongs to the Ranunculaceae family, which grows in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, Pakistan and India. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of N. sativa seed extracts of different germination phases on the central nervous system (CNS) responses in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Anxiolytic, locomotor activity of extracts (1 g/kg of body weight) was evaluated in both stressed and unstressed animal models and antiepileptic effect was evaluated by maximal electroshock seizure model keeping diazepam (20 mg/kg) as a positive control. Antidepressant effect was evaluated by forced swim test and tail suspension test keeping imipramine (15 mg/kg) as a positive control. Results: All tested extracts of N. sativa during different phases of germination (especially 5th day germination phase) showed significant (P < 0.001) anxiolytic effect in comparison to control. Diazepam reduced locomotor activity in control (unstressed) rats but did not show affect in stressed rats while N. sativa extracts from germination phases significantly (P < 0.001) reduced locomotor activity in unstressed as well as stressed animals. All the extracts of N. sativa from different germination phases exhibited significant (P < 0.001) reduction in various phases of epileptic seizure on comparison with the reference standard (diazepam). During antidepressant test, N. sativa extracts exhibited a slight reduction in the immobility of rats. Conclusion: During germination, especially in 5th day germination extract, N. sativa showed significant CNS depressant activity as compared to whole seeds that possibly may be due higher content of secondary metabolites produced during germination. PMID:26109765

  5. Assessing the Effect of Humic Acids on Germinating a Native American Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    germination and early plant growth experiments were then performed using three concentrations of: (a) two HAs originated from two Idaho soils (sites # 4 and...Series II) (HA4-IIs, HA4-IIv, and HA4-IIc). A preliminary objective was to test: (a) four well characterized standard HAs originated from (1) an...kind of seed and origin and concentration of HA used. Although no definite trend can be observed for the germination and early growth parameters

  6. Hoarding decisions by Edward's long-tailed rats (Leopoldamys edwardsi) and South China field mice (Apodemus draco): the responses to seed size and germination schedule in acorns.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gang; Xiao, Zhishu; Zhang, Zhibin

    2009-09-01

    Co-varying traits in acorns such as seed size and germination schedule are important to influence the behavioural decisions of hoarding rodents. Using acorn pairs from cork oak (Quercus variabilis) (large size and short germination schedules) serrate oak (Q. serrata) (small size and short germination schedule) and qinggang (Cyclobalanopsis glauca) (small size and long germination schedule) with contrasting seed size and germination schedule, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate hoarding preferences in response to seed size and germination schedule by Edward's long-tailed rats (Leopoldamys edwardsi) and South China field mice (Apodemus draco) in semi-natural enclosures. We found that the seed size hypothesis was consistently supported: both rodent species ate more small acorns but hoarded more large ones regardless of germination schedules. However, the germination schedule hypothesis was also supported when similar sized acorns were simultaneously provided, e.g. Q. serrata versus C. glauca or germinating versus non-germinating Q. variabilis. Our results, contrary to the studies from North America, indicate that seed size is more important than germination schedules in determining whether the tested animals eat or hoard a given seed.

  7. Germinated wheat: Phytochemical composition and mixing characteristics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Germinated grain recently attracts interest due to its beneficial effect on human health. In this research, whole wheat flour samples obtained after three days and five days of germination were analyzed for biochemical components, mixing quality, and effects on human breast cancer cells. Germinati...

  8. A Study of Germination Inhibition in Fruits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes a method for the extraction and bioassay of natural germination inhibitors, requiring only inexpensive equipment and minimal experimental skill. The method has been used to demonstrate qualitative/quantitative differences in germination inhibitor levels in a variety of different fruits or in different tissues within a single fruit.…

  9. Germination Requirements Vary in Wild Rubus Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seeds of blackberry and raspberry have a deep dormancy caused by one or more mechanisms. Rubus seeds are normally enclosed in a hard endocarp that is a major constraint for their germination. To better define the germination requirements of wild species we examined the effect of two scarification ...

  10. Seed germination and sowing options [Chapter 9

    Treesearch

    Tara Luna; Kim M. Wilkinson; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Seeds of many native species are challenging to germinate. One important thing a grower can do is to learn as much as possible about the life history, ecology, and habitat of the species he or she wishes to grow to understand the processes seeds from each target species go through in nature. Any observations will be valuable when trying to germinate and grow species...

  11. A Study of Germination Inhibition in Fruits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes a method for the extraction and bioassay of natural germination inhibitors, requiring only inexpensive equipment and minimal experimental skill. The method has been used to demonstrate qualitative/quantitative differences in germination inhibitor levels in a variety of different fruits or in different tissues within a single fruit.…

  12. Proteomics and posttranslational proteomics of seed dormancy and germination.

    PubMed

    Rajjou, Loïc; Belghazi, Maya; Catusse, Julie; Ogé, Laurent; Arc, Erwann; Godin, Béatrice; Chibani, Kamel; Ali-Rachidi, Sonia; Collet, Boris; Grappin, Philippe; Jullien, Marc; Gallardo, Karine; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The seed is the dispersal unit of plants and must survive the vagaries of the environment. It is the object of intense genetic and genomic studies because processes related to seed quality affect crop yield and the seed itself provides food for humans and animals. Presently, the general aim of postgenomics analyses is to understand the complex biochemical and molecular processes underlying seed quality, longevity, dormancy, and vigor. Due to advances in functional genomics, the recent past years have seen a tremendous progress in our understanding of several aspects of seed development and germination. Here, we describe the proteomics protocols (from protein extraction to mass spectrometry) that can be used to investigate several aspects of seed physiology, including germination and its hormonal regulation, dormancy release, and seed longevity. These techniques can be applied to the study of both model plants (such as Arabidopsis) and crops.

  13. Effect of seed stimulation on germination and sugar beet yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prośba-Białczyk, U.; Szajsner, H.; Grzyś, E.; Demczuk, A.; Sacała, E.; Bąk, K.

    2013-03-01

    Germination and sugar beet yield after seed stimulation were investigated. The seeds came from the energ'hill technology and were subject to laser irradiation. The experiments were conducted in the laboratory and field conditions. Lengthening of germinal roots and hypocotyls was observed. A positive effect of the stimulation on the morphological features was observed for the Eh seeds and laser irradiation applied in a three-fold dose. The energ'hill seeds exhibited a significantly higher content of carotenoids in seedlings and an increase in the content of chlorophylls. Laser light irradiation favourably modified the ratio of chlorophyll a to b. The leaves and roots of plants developed from the energ'hill and irradiated seeds were characterized by higher dry matter content thanin non-stimulated seeds. Seed stimulation had a positive influence on yielding and the saccharose content.

  14. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris: new methods for inhibiting spore germination.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, A; Sinigaglia, M; Corbo, M R

    2008-07-15

    For a long period the thermal processing has been considered as the only way to reduce the initial spore number of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and prevent the spoilage of acidic beverage. New methods, however, were proposed by the literature to control spore germination both in laboratory media and in real systems. After a brief introduction on the impact of A. acidoterrestris in food microbiology and a description of enumeration methods and heat processing applied by the juices manufactures, a review of innovative approaches to inhibit and/or control spore germination is proposed. In particular, this paper focuses on two different topics; the 1st is the use of some natural compounds (monolaurin, lysozyme, nisin and essential oils) or some chemicals, conventional (like sodium-benzoate, organic acids, surfactants and chlorine dioxide) or not conventional (chlorine dioxide as gas). The 2nd topic is a description of some innovative methods to reduce the initial spore number (high hydrostatic and homogenisation pressures, radiation and microwaves).

  15. [Metabolic control of seed germination].

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Job, Claudette; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    We have used proteomics to better characterize germination and early seedling vigor in sugarbeet. Our strategy includes (1) construction of proteome reference maps for dry and germinating seeds of a high-vigor reference seed lot; (2) investigation of the specific tissue accumulation of proteins (root, cotyledon, perisperm); (3) investigation of changes in protein expression profiles detected in the reference seed lot subjected to different vigor-modifying treatments, e.g. aging and/or priming. More than 1 000 sugarbeet seed proteins have been identified by LC/MS-MS mass spectrometry (albumins, globulins and glutelins have been analyzed separately). Due to the conservation of protein sequences and the quality of MS sequencing (more than 10 000 peptide sequences have been obtained), the success rate of protein identification was on the average of 80%. This is to our knowledge the best detailed proteome analysis ever carried out in seeds. The data allowed us to build a detailed metabolic chart of the sugarbeet seed, generating new insights into the molecular mechanisms determining the development of a new seedling. Also, the proteome of a seed-storage tissue as the perisperm is described for the first time.

  16. Comparison of the effects of temperature and water potential on seed germination of Fabaceae species from desert and subalpine grassland.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao Wen; Fan, Yan; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M; Wang, Yan Rong

    2015-05-01

    Temperature and water potential for germination based on the thermal and hydrotime models have been successfully applied in predicting germination requirements of physiologically dormant seeds as well as nondormant seeds. However, comparative studies of the germination requirements of physically dormant seeds from different ecosystems have not been done. Germination of scarified seeds of four legume species collected from the Qing-Tibetan Plateau and of four collected in the Alax Desert in China was compared over a range of temperatures and water potentials based on thermal time and hydrotime models. Seeds of species from the Qing-Tibetan Plateau had a lower base temperature (T b) and optimal temperature (T o) for germination than those from the Alax Desert. Seeds of the four species from the Qing-Tibetan Plateau germinated to high percentages at 5°C, whereas none of the four desert species did so. Seeds of species from the Alax Desert germinated to a high percentage at 35°C or 40°C, while no seeds of species from the Qing-Tibetan Plateau germinated at 35°C or 40°C. The base median water potential [Ψ b(50)] differed among species but not between the two habitats. The thermal time and hydrotime models accurately predicted the germination time course of scarified seeds of most of the eight species in response to temperature and water potential; thus, they can be useful tools in comparative studies on germination of seeds with physical dormancy. Habitat temperatures but not rainfall is closely related to germination requirements of these species. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  17. Generalist dispersers promote germination of an alien fleshy-fruited tree invading natural grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, María Belén; Zalba, Sergio Martín

    2017-01-01

    Plants with animal-dispersed fruits seem to overcome the barriers that limit their spread into new habitats more easily than other invasive plants and, at the same time, they pose special difficulties for containment, control or eradication. The effects of animals on plant propagules can be very diverse, with positive, neutral or negative consequences for germination and recruitment. Moreover, the environmental conditions where the seeds are deposited and where the post-dispersal processes take place can be crucial for their fate. Prunus mahaleb is a fleshy-fruited tree invading natural grasslands in the Argentine Pampas. In this study, we analyzed the importance of pulp removal, endocarp scarification and the effects of vectors on its germination response, by means of germination experiments both in the laboratory and under semi-natural conditions. Our laboratory results demonstrated that endocarp scarification enhances germination and suggests that vestiges of pulp on the stones have inhibitory effects. Frugivores exert a variety of effects on germination responses and this variation can be explained by their differing influence on pulp removal and endocarp scarification. Most frugivores produced a positive effect on germination under laboratory conditions, in comparison to intact fruits and hand-peeled stones. We observed different degrees of pulp removal from the surface of the stones by the dispersers which was directly correlated to the germination response. On the other hand, all the treatments showed high germination responses under semi-natural conditions suggesting that post-dispersal processes, like seed burial, and the exposure to natural conditions might exert a positive effect on germination response, attenuating the plant's dependence on the dispersers’ gut treatment. Our results highlight the need to consider the whole seed dispersal process and the value of combining laboratory and field tests. PMID:28207815

  18. Generalist dispersers promote germination of an alien fleshy-fruited tree invading natural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, Martín Raúl; Vázquez, María Belén; Zalba, Sergio Martín

    2017-01-01

    Plants with animal-dispersed fruits seem to overcome the barriers that limit their spread into new habitats more easily than other invasive plants and, at the same time, they pose special difficulties for containment, control or eradication. The effects of animals on plant propagules can be very diverse, with positive, neutral or negative consequences for germination and recruitment. Moreover, the environmental conditions where the seeds are deposited and where the post-dispersal processes take place can be crucial for their fate. Prunus mahaleb is a fleshy-fruited tree invading natural grasslands in the Argentine Pampas. In this study, we analyzed the importance of pulp removal, endocarp scarification and the effects of vectors on its germination response, by means of germination experiments both in the laboratory and under semi-natural conditions. Our laboratory results demonstrated that endocarp scarification enhances germination and suggests that vestiges of pulp on the stones have inhibitory effects. Frugivores exert a variety of effects on germination responses and this variation can be explained by their differing influence on pulp removal and endocarp scarification. Most frugivores produced a positive effect on germination under laboratory conditions, in comparison to intact fruits and hand-peeled stones. We observed different degrees of pulp removal from the surface of the stones by the dispersers which was directly correlated to the germination response. On the other hand, all the treatments showed high germination responses under semi-natural conditions suggesting that post-dispersal processes, like seed burial, and the exposure to natural conditions might exert a positive effect on germination response, attenuating the plant's dependence on the dispersers' gut treatment. Our results highlight the need to consider the whole seed dispersal process and the value of combining laboratory and field tests.

  19. Abscisic acid regulates seed germination of Vellozia species in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    Vieira, B C; Bicalho, E M; Munné-Bosch, S; Garcia, Q S

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between the phytohormones, gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) and light and temperature on seed germination is still not well understood. We aimed to investigate the role of the ABA and GA on seed germination of Vellozia caruncularis, V. intermedia and V. alutacea in response to light/dark conditions on different temperature. Seeds were incubated in GA (GA3 or GA4 ) or ABA and their respective biosynthesis inhibitors (paclobutrazol - PAC, and fluridone - FLU) solutions at two contrasting temperatures (25 and 40 °C). Furthermore, endogenous concentrations of active GAs and those of ABA were measured in seeds of V. intermedia and V. alutacea during imbibition/germination. Exogenous ABA inhibited the germination of Vellozia species under all conditions tested. GA, FLU and FLU + GA3 stimulated germination in the dark at 25 °C (GA4 being more effective than GA3 ). PAC reduced seed germination in V. caruncularis and V. alutacea, but did not affect germination of V. intermedia at 40 °C either under light or dark conditions. During imbibition in the dark, levels of active GAs decreased in the seeds of V. intermedia, but were not altered in those of V. alutacea. Incubation at 40 °C decreased ABA levels during imbibition in both V. caruncularis and V. alutacea. We conclude that the seeds of Vellozia species studied here require light or high temperature to germinate and ABA has a major role in the regulation of Vellozia seed germination in response to light and temperature.

  20. Genotyping of endosperms to determine seed dormancy genes regulating germination through embryonic, endospermic, or maternal tissues in rice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xing-You; Zhang, Jinfeng; Ye, Heng; Zhang, Lihua; Feng, Jiuhuan

    2014-12-04

    Seed dormancy is imposed by one or more of the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues that belong to two generations and represent two ploidy levels. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for seed dormancy as measured by gross effects on reduced germination rate or delayed germination in crop or model plants. This research developed an endosperm genotype-based genetic approach to determine specific tissues through which a mapped QTL regulates germination using rice as a model. This approach involves testing germination velocity for partially after-ripened seeds harvested from single plants heterozygous for a tested QTL and genotyping endosperms from individual germinated and nongerminated seeds with a codominant DNA marker located on the QTL peak region. Information collected about the QTL includes genotypic frequencies in germinated and/or nongerminated subpopulations; allelic frequency distributions during a germination period; endosperm or embryo genotypic differences in germination velocity; and genotypic frequencies for gametes involved in the double fertilization to form the sampled seeds. Using this approach, the seed dormancy loci SD12, SD1-2, and SD7-1 were determined to regulate germination through the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues, respectively; SD12 and SD1-2 acted additively on germination velocity in the offspring tissues; and SD12 also was associated with the preferential fertilization of male gametes in rice. This new genetic approach can be used to characterize mapped genes/QTL for tissue-specific functions in endospermic seeds and for marker-assisted selection of QTL alleles before or immediately after germination in crop breeding.

  1. Genotyping of Endosperms to Determine Seed Dormancy Genes Regulating Germination Through Embryonic, Endospermic, or Maternal Tissues in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xing-You; Zhang, Jinfeng; Ye, Heng; Zhang, Lihua; Feng, Jiuhuan

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy is imposed by one or more of the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues that belong to two generations and represent two ploidy levels. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for seed dormancy as measured by gross effects on reduced germination rate or delayed germination in crop or model plants. This research developed an endosperm genotype−based genetic approach to determine specific tissues through which a mapped QTL regulates germination using rice as a model. This approach involves testing germination velocity for partially after-ripened seeds harvested from single plants heterozygous for a tested QTL and genotyping endosperms from individual germinated and nongerminated seeds with a codominant DNA marker located on the QTL peak region. Information collected about the QTL includes genotypic frequencies in germinated and/or nongerminated subpopulations; allelic frequency distributions during a germination period; endosperm or embryo genotypic differences in germination velocity; and genotypic frequencies for gametes involved in the double fertilization to form the sampled seeds. Using this approach, the seed dormancy loci SD12, SD1-2, and SD7-1 were determined to regulate germination through the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues, respectively; SD12 and SD1-2 acted additively on germination velocity in the offspring tissues; and SD12 also was associated with the preferential fertilization of male gametes in rice. This new genetic approach can be used to characterize mapped genes/QTL for tissue-specific functions in endospermic seeds and for marker-assisted selection of QTL alleles before or immediately after germination in crop breeding. PMID:25480961

  2. The results of the "essential laboratory tests" applied to new outpatients--re-evaluation of diagnostic efficiencies of the test items.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Y; Kobayashi, H; Kugai, N; Sekiguchi, S

    1996-06-01

    We have analyzed diagnostic efficiencies of the individual "Essential laboratory test" items when these tests were applied to 520 new outpatients in the division of comprehensive medicine in a teaching hospital. The integration of these test results with history-taking and physical examination resulted in 544 primary clinical diagnoses which corresponded to the patient's illness complained and in 361 additional diagnoses unrelated to their chief complaints but found by chance by the addition of the test results. Clinical usefulness of these test items were variable depending on the disease category, demonstrating a superior diagnostic efficiency in infectious or inflammatory diseases, liver and biliary tract diseases, hematological disorders or metabolic diseases such as hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus, but a lesser degree of usefulness in gastro-intestinal or neurogenic diseases. Urine urobilinogen could not establish its clinical usefulness because of extremely low diagnostic sensitivity even in liver diseases. The leukocyte differential count provided confirmatory information for infectious or inflammatory diseases and was helpful for the estimation of the etiologic nature of infectious diseases. This study failed to terminate a controversy for the adoption of sialic acid instead of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in the "Essential laboratory test" items, since the former test showed lower sensitivity, even though higher specificity, in infectious or inflammatory status than ESR. Low albumin globulin ratio (A/G) revealed equivalent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to the elevated levels in alpha 1 and/or alpha 2 globulin fractions in infectious or inflammatory status, being helpful for the evaluation of patient's general condition at a glance. Incidental analysis for diagnostic values of cholinesterase and random blood glucose for the detection of fatty liver and diabetes mellitus, respectively, suggested that these two tests may be included in

  3. Paper-and-pencil and web-based testing: the measurement invariance of the Big Five personality tests in applied settings.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Michele; Alessandri, Guido; Barbaranelli, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the measurement equivalence of a five-factor measure of personality across two groups applying for jobs, who completed the same questionnaire using either a paper-and-pencil (n = 429) or a web online answer format (n = 651). The data were collected using the Big Five Questionnaire-2 (BFQ-2; which is a measure of the Five Factor Model) of personality traits. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to test for the equivalence of factor covariance and mean structures of the BFQ-2. Findings suggested that the Five Factor Model scales have the same measurement unit and origin across applicants using different administration modes. However, latent means were slightly higher for applicants who responded in a web and unproctored condition than for applicants who completed a paper-and-pencil version of the same test. Practical implications for personality assessment are discussed.

  4. In mouse oocytes the mitochondrion-originated germinal body-like structures accumulate mouse Vasa homologue (MVH) protein.

    PubMed

    Reunov, Arkadiy A; Reunova, Yulia A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse Vasa homologue (MVH) antibodies were applied to mouse Graafian oocytes to clarify if mitochondrion-originated germinal body-like structures, described previously by conventional electron microscopy, were associated with the germ plasm. It was found that both the mitochondrion-like structures with cristae and the germinal body-like structures that lacked any signs of cristae were labelled specifically by the anti-MVH antibody. Moreover, some granules were MVH-positive ultrastructural hybrids of the mitochondria and germinal body-like structures, the presence of which clearly supported the idea of a mitochondrial origin for the germinal body-like structures. This finding is the first evidence that mitochondrion-originated germinal body-like granules represent mouse germ plasm.

  5. Full-field bulge test for planar anisotropic tissues: part I--experimental methods applied to human skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Theresa K; Atlan, Lorre S; Voo, Liming M; Nguyen, Thao D

    2013-04-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic properties of human skin tissue were investigated using bulge testing. Full-field displacement data were obtained during testing of human skin tissues procured from the lower back of post-mortem human subjects using 3-D digital image correlation. To measure anisotropy, the dominant fiber direction of the tissue was determined from the deformed geometry of the specimen. Local strains and stress resultants were calculated along both the dominant fiber direction and the perpendicular direction. Variation in anisotropy and stiffness was observed between specimens. The use of stress resultants rather than the membrane stress approximation accounted for bending effects, which are significant for a thick nonlinear tissue. Of the six specimens tested, it was observed that specimens from older donors exhibited a stiffer and more isotropic response than those from younger donors. It was seen that the mechanical response of the tissue was negligibly impacted by preconditioning or the ambient humidity. The methods presented in this work for skin tissue are sufficiently general to be applied to other planar tissues, such as pericardium, gastrointestinal tissue, and fetal membranes. The stress resultant-stretch relations will be used in a companion paper to obtain material parameters for a nonlinear anisotropic hyperelastic model.

  6. In vitro OECD test methods applied to screen the estrogenic effect of chemicals, used in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Park, Eun-Jung; Han, Songyi; Oh, Gyeong-Yong; Kim, Min-Hee; Kang, Hui-Seung; Suh, Jin-Hyang; Oh, Jae-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Myung-Sil; Moon, Guiim; Hong, Jin-Hwan; Hwang, In-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 27 chemicals found in household products, which became an issue in Korea were screened for the agonistoc and antagonistic effects against human estrogen receptor using official Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in vitro assays, STTA assay using ERα-HeLa-9903 cell line and BG1Luc ER TA assay. In the case of human ER agonist screening by two assays, all tested chemicals did not show agonist effect against ER. In ER antagonist test by BG1Luc ER TA assay, five surfactants α-dodecyl-ω-hydroxypoly(oxyethylene), alcohols C16-18 ethoxylated, nonylphenol, ethoxylated, 3,6,9,12,15,18,21-heptaoxatritriacontan-1-ol, and α-dodecyl-ω-hydroxypoly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl)) were found to exhibit weak antagonistic activities. The agonist/antagonist effects against human estrogen receptor of various chemicals, used in Korea by OECD test guideline are reported in this study. These results indicated that two OECD in vitro assays will can be applied in Korea by screening of agonistic/antagonistic effects against human ER of various chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of smoke, charred wood, and nitrogenous compounds on seed germination of ten species from woodland in central-western Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, M A; Rodríguez-Echeverría, S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of smoke, charred wood, and nitrogenous compounds on germination was tested on 10 species of the Cistaceae, Poaceae, Fabaceae, and Asteraceae, from fire-prone, shrubby woodlands in central-western Spain. Dry seeds were exposed to smoke, by watering with distilled water-charred wood suspensions, or NaNO2, KNO3, NH4Cl, and NH4NO3. Smoke enhanced germination in 9 of 10 of the species. In species of Poaceae, germination was stimulated by 20 min of smoke exposure. In Asteraceae and Fabaceae species, 10 min of smoke exposure was the most effective treatment for enhancing germination. Three species--Cistus ladanifer, Cistus crispus, and Cistus monspeliensis--had a positive response to 20 min of smoke exposure; germination of Cistus salviifolius L. was also enhanced after 10 min. The effect of charred wood was variable, with no consistent germination pattern within the families. Trifolium angustifolium and Retama sphaerocarpa showed no stimulation of germination under most of the charred wood concentrations. Similarly, germination of Senecio jacobea under the charred wood treatment did not surpass that of the control. NaNO2 promoted seed germination in Dactylis glomerata (10 mM), Cistus ladanifer (1, 10, and 25 mM), and Cistus crispus (1 and 10 mM). KNO3 enhanced germination in Dactylis glomerata (1 and 25 mM), Dittrichia viscosa (10 and 25 mM), C. ladanifer (1, 10, and 25 mM), Cistus crispus (1 and 25 mM), and C. salviifolius aud C. monspeliensis (25 mM). NH4Cl induced germination of Dactylis glomerata and Dittrichia viscosa (1 mM), and Cistus species germinated best in 25 mM of this salt. NH4NO3 induced germination only in Cistus species. Holcus lanatus had the highest level of germination regardless of treatment.

  8. Defective zoospore encystment and suppressed cyst germination of Phytophthora palmivora caused by transient leaching treatments.

    PubMed

    Dijksterhuis, J; Deacon, J W

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of encysting zoospores of Phytophthora palmivora during leaching conditions was studied. Zoospores encysted and germinated successfully on polycarbonate membranes after mechanical agitation. Transient (10 min) leaching treatments with nutrient-free buffer underneath the membranes resulted in abnormal encystment and poor germination. The disruption was greatest when leaching was applied during the first minutes after start of encystment and not observed after 20 min. The early sensitivity of cells to leaching coincided with the period when alkali-resistant cell walls were formed (2-6 min after mechanical agitation). Effects of calcium and organic nutrients on encystment during leaching and germination after these treatments were studied. The disruption of encystment by early leaching treatments, but not the suppression of cyst germination, was overcome by adding calcium chloride during mechanical agitation of zoospores. Leaching with calcium containing buffer resulted in suppressed cyst germination as was the case with buffer alone. Leaching with 0.1% peptone containing buffer promoted consistently high encystment and germination.

  9. Effect of high pressure on green pea seeds germination and plantlets development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Elisabete M. C.; Carvalho, Andreia M.; Saraiva, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of high pressure (50 MPa, 10 min) on germination of pea seeds with different imbibition times (0, 12 and 36 h). The parameters analysed were the percentage of germinated seeds, length of roots and stems, number of leaves developed and the weight of young plantlets. Peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), pectin methylesterase (PME) and total proteolytic activity were analysed in seeds after the pressure treatment and in leaves after the germination period. Results showed that 50 MPa applied during 10 min retarded the germination onset and inhibited seeds to germinate. The pressure treatment increased and decreased the length of roots and stems, respectively. The number of leaves per germinated seed decreased with the pressure treatment. Enzymatic activities of seeds showed that only total proteolytic activity was significantly reduced by pressure and only for 0 h of imbibition. POD and PPO activities determined in leaves of the plantlets increased with the pressure treatment, while PME activity also increased but only for 12 h of imbibition and total proteolytic activity decreased.

  10. Tomato seed germination: regulation of different response modes by phytochrome B2 and phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Appenroth, Klaus J; Lenk, Gabriele; Goldau, Lydia; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2006-04-01

    Lycopersicon esculentum seeds germinate after rehydration in complete darkness. This response was inhibited by a far-red light (FR) pulse, and the inhibition was reversed by a red light (R) pulse. Comparison of germination in phytochrome-deficient mutants (phyA, phyB1, phyB2, phyAB1, phyB1B2 and phyAB1B2) showed that phytochrome B2 (PhyB2) mediates both responses. The germination was inhibited by strong continuous R (38 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), whereas weak R (28 nmol m(-2) s(-1)) stimulated seed germination. Hourly applied R pulses of the same photon fluence partially replaced the effect of strong continuous R. This response was called 'antagonistic' because it counteracts the low fluence response (LFR) induced by a single R pulse. This antagonistic response might be an adaptation to a situation where the seeds sit on the soil surface in full sunlight (adverse for germination), while weak R might reflect that situation under a layer of soil. Unexpectedly, the effects of continuous R or repeated R pulses were mediated by phytochrome A (PhyA). We therefore suggest that low levels of PhyA in its FR-absorbing form (Pfr) cause inhibition of seed germination produced either by extended R irradiation (by degradation of PhyA-Pfr) or by extended FR irradiation [keeping a low Pfr/R-absorbing form (Pr) ratio].

  11. Evaluating the suitability of Hydrobia ulvae as a test species for sediment metal toxicity testing applying a tissue residue approach to metal mixtures in laboratory and field exposures.

    PubMed

    Campana, Olivia; Rodríguez, Antonio; Blasco, Julián

    2013-05-01

    A major weakness in evaluating the suitability of a biomonitor organism is the poor ability to predict the variability of the bioavailability of metals from measured environmental concentrations. In this study, the intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae was used to evaluate its suitability as a test organism for assessing sediment metal toxicity. Toxicity tests were run with sediments spiked with copper, cadmium and zinc applied both as single metal and as a mixture to investigate toxicological interactions evaluating different lethal and sublethal effects. Dose-response relationships were constructed based both on tissue residue approach and particulate metal concentrations. Because metal-spiked sediments used in routine toxicity tests often do not exhibit the same adsorption/desorption kinetics as the natural sediments, the laboratory results were compared to 10-d bioassays conducted with natural field sediments collected from the Guadalete estuary (SW Spain). Highly significant correlations between tissue residue concentrations and particulate metal concentrations were found for all metal-spiked or field-collected and demonstrated that: (i) H. ulvae readily accumulated copper and cadmium in response to contamination and (ii) dietary uptake was determined to be the most significant route of metal exposure. The comparison of the modeled tissue residue-response curve developed from the mixture tests was in good agreement with the results from the bioassay conducted with field sediments and strongly demonstrated that H. ulvae is also a suitable test organism for assessing copper sediment toxicity. In contrast, the dose-response curve expressed as a function of total particulate metal concentrations would fail in predicting effect, erroneously assessing higher metal toxicity.

  12. In situ seed baiting to isolate germination-enhancing fungi for an epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium aphyllum (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Zi, Xiao-Meng; Sheng, Chun-Ling; Goodale, Uromi Manage; Shao, Shi-Cheng; Gao, Jiang-Yun

    2014-10-01

    Orchid conservation efforts, using seeds and species-specific fungi that support seed germination, require the isolation, identification, and germination enhancement testing of symbiotic fungi. However, few studies have focused on developing such techniques for the epiphytes that constitute the majority of orchids. In this study, conducted in Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Yunnan, China, we used seeds of Dendrobium aphyllum, a locally endangered and medicinally valuable epiphytic orchid, to attract germination promoting fungi. Of the two fungi isolated from seed baiting, Tulasnella spp. and Trichoderma spp., Tulasnella, enhanced seed germination by 13.6 %, protocorm formation by 85.7 %, and seedling development by 45.2 % (all P < 0.0001). Epulorhiza, another seed germination promoting fungi isolated from Cymbidium mannii, also enhanced seed germination (6.5 %; P < 0.05) and protocorm formation (20.3 %; P < 0.0001), but Trichoderma suppressed seed germination by 26.4 % (P < 0.0001). Tulasnella was the only treatment that produced seedlings. Light increased seed imbibition, protocorm formation, and two-leaved seed development of Tulasnella inoculated seeds (P < 0.0001). Because the germination stage success was not dependent on fungi, we recommend that Tulasnella be introduced for facilitating D. aphyllum seed germination at the protocorm formation stage and that light be provided for increasing germination as well as further seedling development. Our findings suggest that in situ seed baiting can be used to isolate seed germination-enhancing fungi for the development of seedling production for conservation and reintroduction efforts of epiphytic orchids such as D. aphyllum.

  13. The Abbott Architect c8000: analytical performance and productivity characteristics of a new analyzer applied to general chemistry testing.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Daniela; Seyfarth, Michael; Dibbelt, Leif

    2005-01-01

    Applying basic potentiometric and photometric assays, we evaluated the fully automated random access chemistry analyzer Architect c8000, a new member of the Abbott Architect system family, with respect to both its analytical and operational performance and compared it to an established high-throughput chemistry platform, the Abbott Aeroset. Our results demonstrate that intra- and inter-assay imprecision, inaccuracy, lower limit of detection and linear range of the c8000 generally meet actual requirements of laboratory diagnosis; there were only rare exceptions, e.g. assays for plasma lipase or urine uric acid which apparently need to be improved by additional rinsing of reagent pipettors. Even with plasma exhibiting CK activities as high as 40.000 U/l, sample carryover by the c8000 could not be detected. Comparison of methods run on the c8000 and the Aeroset revealed correlation coefficients of 0.98-1.00; if identical chemistries were applied on both analyzers, slopes of regression lines approached unity. With typical laboratory workloads including 10-20% STAT samples and up to 10% samples with high analyte concentrations demanding dilutional reruns, steady-state throughput numbers of 700 to 800 tests per hour were obtained with the c8000. The system generally responded to STAT orders within 2 minutes yielding analytical STAT order completion times of 5 to 15 minutes depending on the type and number of assays requested per sample. Due to its extended test and sample processing capabilities and highly comfortable software, the c8000 may meet the varying needs of clinical laboratories rather well.

  14. Mitochondrial Proteome Studies in Seeds during Germination

    PubMed Central

    Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Janska, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination is considered to be one of the most critical phases in the plant life cycle, establishing the next generation of a plant species. It is an energy-demanding process that requires functioning mitochondria. One of the earliest events of seed germination is progressive development of structurally simple and metabolically quiescent promitochondria into fully active and cristae-containing mitochondria, known as mitochondrial biogenesis. This is a complex and tightly regulated process, which is accompanied by sequential and dynamic gene expression, protein synthesis, and post-translational modifications. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive summary of seed mitochondrial proteome studies during germination of various plant model organisms. We describe different gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches used to characterize mitochondrial proteomes of germinating seeds as well as challenges and limitations of these proteomic studies. Furthermore, the dynamic changes in the abundance of the mitochondrial proteomes of germinating seeds are illustrated, highlighting numerous mitochondrial proteins involved in respiration, tricarboxycylic acid (TCA) cycle, metabolism, import, and stress response as potentially important for seed germination. We then review seed mitochondrial protein carbonylation, phosphorylation, and S-nitrosylation as well as discuss the possible link between these post-translational modifications (PTMs) and the regulation of seed germination. PMID:28248229

  15. Towards objective evaluation of balance in the elderly: validity and reliability of a measurement instrument applied to the Tinetti test.

    PubMed

    Panella, Lorenzo; Tinelli, Carmine; Buizza, Angelo; Lombardi, Remo; Gandolfi, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the present study was the validation of an instrument for evaluating balance, applied to the Tinetti test. Trunk inclination was measured by inclinometers during the Tinetti test in 163 healthy participants scoring 28/28 in the Tinetti scale (controls: 92 women, 71 men; age 19-85 years), and 111 residents in old people's homes, able to autonomously perform the test, but scoring less than 28/28 (test group: 78 women, 33 men; age 55-96 years). Trunk inclination was quantified by 20 parameters, whose standardized values were summed and provided an overall performance index (PTOT). PTOT reliability was evaluated by Cronbach's alpha, and its validity by item scale correlation, discriminant validity and concurrent validity. Influence of age and sex was assessed by a logistic regression model. Repeatable and consistent measurements were obtained (Cronbach's alpha=0.88). Parameter distribution was significantly different in controls and patients (P<0.001). Optimal PTOT threshold for discriminating between normal and abnormal performance (153.9/200) corresponded to sensitivity of 88.3%, specificity of 84.7% and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.93. PTOT correlated with the Tinetti scale score, its partial, balance-related score and Barthel's Index, but not with the Mini Mental State score. PTOT correlated with age and level of performance but not with sex; correlation with age did not prevent the possibility of discriminating between different levels of performance and between normal and abnormal performance. The instrument provided objective discrimination between different performance levels, in particular, between normal and altered performance.

  16. Spontaneous germinal centers and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Domeier, Phillip P; Schell, Stephanie L; Rahman, Ziaur S M

    2017-02-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are dynamic microenvironments that form in the secondary lymphoid organs and generate somatically mutated high-affinity antibodies necessary to establish an effective humoral immune response. Tight regulation of GC responses is critical for maintaining self-tolerance. GCs can arise in the absence of purposeful immunization or overt infection (called spontaneous GCs, Spt-GCs). In autoimmune-prone mice and patients with autoimmune disease, aberrant regulation of Spt-GCs is thought to promote the development of somatically mutated pathogenic autoantibodies and the subsequent development of autoimmunity. The mechanisms that control the formation of Spt-GCs and promote systemic autoimmune diseases remain an open question and the focus of ongoing studies. Here, we discuss the most current studies on the role of Spt-GCs in autoimmunity.

  17. EFFECTS OF COLD STRATIFICATION AND GA3 ON GERMINATION OF ARBUTUS UNEDO SEEDS OF THREE PROVENANCES.

    PubMed

    Pipinis, Elias; Stampoulidis, Athanasios; Milios, Elias; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Radoglou, Kalliopi

    2017-01-01

    Arbutus unedo is a valuable Mediterranean shrub as an ornamental plant as well as fruit tree. Fresh fruits of A. unedo are a good source of antioxidants, of vitamins C, E and carotenoids and also are characterized by the high content of mineral elements. The effects of gibberellic acid (GA3) and cold stratification (CS) on seed germination performance were investigated in A. unedo seeds collected from three provenances in the Northern part of Greece. Seeds of each provenance were soaked in solutions of GA3 (500, 1000 or 2000 ppm) for 24 h and subsequently were subjected to CS at 3 - 5°C for 0, 1, 2, and 3 months. Non-stratified seeds of the three A. unedo provenances which were not treated with GA3 solutions exhibited very low germination. However, seed germination was significantly improved after a one-month period of CS. Similarly, the non-stratified seeds of all three provenances became non-dormant after the treatment with 2000 ppm GA3 and they germinated at high percentages. However, in untreated seeds with GA3, after a one-month CS period the seeds of the Pieria provenance exhibited higher germination percentage than that of Rodopi provenance seeds. Furthermore, in non-stratified seeds, the Pieria provenance seeds treated with GA3 germinated at higher percentages and more rapidly than those of the other two provenances. The results indicated that untreated seeds exhibited very low germination at 20/25°C. However, in all three provenances seed germinability was significantly improved by a one-month period of CS or treatment of seeds with 2000 ppm GA3. Furthermore, there was a considerable variability among seed provenances in response to the treatments which were applied.

  18. EFFECTS OF COLD STRATIFICATION AND GA3 ON GERMINATION OF ARBUTUS UNEDO SEEDS OF THREE PROVENANCES

    PubMed Central

    Pipinis, Elias; Stampoulidis, Athanasios; Milios, Elias; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Radoglou, Kalliopi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arbutus unedo is a valuable Mediterranean shrub as an ornamental plant as well as fruit tree. Fresh fruits of A. unedo are a good source of antioxidants, of vitamins C, E and carotenoids and also are characterized by the high content of mineral elements. Materials and Methods: The effects of gibberellic acid (GA3) and cold stratification (CS) on seed germination performance were investigated in A. unedo seeds collected from three provenances in the Northern part of Greece. Seeds of each provenance were soaked in solutions of GA3 (500, 1000 or 2000 ppm) for 24 h and subsequently were subjected to CS at 3 - 5°C for 0, 1, 2, and 3 months. Results: Non-stratified seeds of the three A. unedo provenances which were not treated with GA3 solutions exhibited very low germination. However, seed germination was significantly improved after a one-month period of CS. Similarly, the non-stratified seeds of all three provenances became non-dormant after the treatment with 2000 ppm GA3 and they germinated at high percentages. However, in untreated seeds with GA3, after a one-month CS period the seeds of the Pieria provenance exhibited higher germination percentage than that of Rodopi provenance seeds. Furthermore, in non-stratified seeds, the Pieria provenance seeds treated with GA3 germinated at higher percentages and more rapidly than those of the other two provenances. Conclusion: The results indicated that untreated seeds exhibited very low germination at 20/25°C. However, in all three provenances seed germinability was significantly improved by a one-month period of CS or treatment of seeds with 2000 ppm GA3. Furthermore, there was a considerable variability among seed provenances in response to the treatments which were applied. PMID:28480410

  19. [Salt resistance of different tomato genotypes at seed germination stage].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Jun; Li, Tian-Lai; Zang, Zhong-Jing; Shu, Yue; Lu, Shao-Wei

    2009-07-01

    Based on the cluster analysis of relative germination potential and relative germination rate under NaCl stress, fourteen tomato genotypes were clustered into two groups. Five tomato genotypes held high resistance to NaCl stress, and nine tomato genotypes were moderately NaCl- tolerant. The highly NaCl- tolerant genotypes wild Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium, Liaoyuanhongmanao and Hongbaoshi and the moderately NaCl- tolerant genotype Liaoyuanhongduoli were then under different Na(+)-salts and NaCl, Na+, and Cl- stresses. The responses of the four tomato genotypes to different Na(+)-salts stress were the same as those to NaCl stress. Among the test Na(+)-salts, NaHCO3 had the greatest impact. Under the stress of 100 mmol NaHCO3 x L(-1), the embryo's relative lengths of the four tomato genotypes were all below 8%. The inhibitory effect of test Na(+)-salts on tomato seed germination was in the order of NaNO3 < Na2SO4 < NaH2PO4 < NaCl < NaHCO3. As for NaCl, Na+ and Cl-, the Cl- had the smallest injury.

  20. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol developed for soluble chemicals (OPPTS 850.4200) to determine if such an approach might be useful for screening engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and whether there were differences in response across a range of commercially important plant species to two common metal oxide ENMs. Eight of 10 species responded to nTiO2, and 5 species responded to nCeO2. Overall, it appeared that early root growth may be a more sensitive indicator of potential effects from ENM exposure than germination. The observed effects did not always relate to the exposure concentration, indicating that mass-based concentration may not fully explain developmental effects of these two ENMs. The results suggest that nTiO2 and nCeO2 have different effects on early plant growth of agronomic species, which may alter the timing of specific developmental events during their life cycle. In addition, standard germination tests, which are commonly used for toxicity screening of new materials, may not detect the subtle but potentially more important changes associated with early growth and development in terrestrial plants. Engineered nanoparticles (ENMs) have been recognized as valuable components of new technologies and are current

  1. Germination under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi

    Is the agriculture on Mars without a pressured greenhouse dome possible? In order to inves-tigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant, Jute, Chrysanthemum, Komatsuna, Cucumber, Okra, and Eggplant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. Oxygen partial pressure was 1kPa which was equal to 1/100 of normal earth atmosphere. Seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species. In the case of Jute, germination rate under the oxygen partial pressure of 1kPa was very high, 70

  2. Proteomics of pollen development and germination.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaojun; Wang, Tai; Yan, Xiufeng; Chen, Sixue

    2007-12-01

    In higher plants, pollen grains represent the vestiges of a highly reduced male gametophyte generation. After germination, the pollen tube delivers the sperm cells by tip-growing to the embryo sac for fertilization. Besides the intrinsic importance for sexual reproduction, pollen development and germination serve as an attractive system to address important questions related to cell division, cell differentiation, polar growth, cell-cell interaction, and cell fate. Recently, pollen functional specification has been well-studied using multidisciplinary approaches. Here, we review recent advances in proteomics of pollen development and germination.

  3. Prior hydration of Brassica tournefortii seeds reduces the stimulatory effect of karrikinolide on germination and increases seed sensitivity to abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rowena L.; Williams, Kimberlyn; Griffiths, Erin M.; Flematti, Gavin R.; Merritt, David J.; Stevens, Jason C.; Turner, Shane R.; Powles, Stephen B.; Dixon, Kingsley W.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The smoke-derived compound karrikinolide (KAR1) shows significant potential as a trigger for the synchronous germination of seeds in a variety of plant-management contexts, from weed seeds in paddocks, to native seeds when restoring degraded lands. Understanding how KAR1 interacts with seed physiology is a necessary precursor to the development of the compound as an efficient and effective management tool. This study tested the ability of KAR1 to stimulate germination of seeds of the global agronomic weed Brassica tournefortii, at different hydration states, to gain insight into how the timing of KAR1 applications in the field should be managed relative to rain events. Methods Seeds of B. tournefortii were brought to five different hydration states [equilibrated at 15 % relative humidity (RH), 47 % RH, 96 % RH, fully imbibed, or re-dried to 15 % RH following maximum imbibition] then exposed to 1 nm or 1 µm KAR1 for one of five durations (3 min, 1 h, 24 h, 14 d or no exposure). Key Results Dry seeds with no history of imbibition were the most sensitive to KAR1; sensitivity was lower in seeds that were fully imbibed or fully imbibed then re-dried. In addition, reduced sensitivity to KAR1 was associated with an increased sensitivity to exogenously applied abscisic acid (ABA). Conclusions Seed water content and history of imbibition were found to significantly influence whether seeds germinate in response to KAR1. To optimize the germination response of seeds, KAR1 should be applied to dry seeds, when sensitivity to ABA is minimized. PMID:20348089

  4. 7 CFR 201.30a - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30a Date of test. When the percentage of germination is required to be shown, the label shall show the month and year in which the germination test was completed. No... germination test was completed and the date of transportation or delivery for transportation in...

  5. 7 CFR 201.30a - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30a Date of test. When the percentage of germination is required to be shown, the label shall show the month and year in which the germination test was completed. No... germination test was completed and the date of transportation or delivery for transportation in...

  6. 7 CFR 201.22 - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... which the germination test was completed. No more than 5 calendar months shall have elapsed between the last day of the month in which the germination test was completed and the date of transportation or... of the month in which the germination test was completed prior to packaging and the date...

  7. 7 CFR 201.22 - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... which the germination test was completed. No more than 5 calendar months shall have elapsed between the last day of the month in which the germination test was completed and the date of transportation or... of the month in which the germination test was completed prior to packaging and the date...

  8. 7 CFR 201.22 - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... which the germination test was completed. No more than 5 calendar months shall have elapsed between the last day of the month in which the germination test was completed and the date of transportation or... of the month in which the germination test was completed prior to packaging and the date...

  9. 7 CFR 201.22 - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... which the germination test was completed. No more than 5 calendar months shall have elapsed between the last day of the month in which the germination test was completed and the date of transportation or... of the month in which the germination test was completed prior to packaging and the date...

  10. 7 CFR 201.22 - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... which the germination test was completed. No more than 5 calendar months shall have elapsed between the last day of the month in which the germination test was completed and the date of transportation or... of the month in which the germination test was completed prior to packaging and the date...

  11. 7 CFR 201.30a - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30a Date of test. When the percentage of germination is required to be shown, the label shall show the month and year in which the germination test was completed. No... germination test was completed and the date of transportation or delivery for transportation in...

  12. 7 CFR 201.30a - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30a Date of test. When the percentage of germination is required to be shown, the label shall show the month and year in which the germination test was completed. No... germination test was completed and the date of transportation or delivery for transportation in...

  13. 7 CFR 201.30a - Date of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30a Date of test. When the percentage of germination is required to be shown, the label shall show the month and year in which the germination test was completed. No... germination test was completed and the date of transportation or delivery for transportation in...

  14. Reliability and validity of the test of gross motor development-II in Korean preschool children: applying AHP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Il; Han, Dong-Wook; Park, Il-Hyeok

    2014-04-01

    The Test of Gross Motor Development-II (TGMD-II) is a frequently used assessment tool for measuring motor ability. The purpose of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of TGMD-II's weighting scores (by comparing pre-weighted TGMD-II scores with post ones) as well as examine applicability of the TGMD-II on Korean preschool children. A total of 121 Korean children (three kindergartens) participated in this study. There were 65 preschoolers who were 5-years-old (37 boys and 28 girls) and 56 preschoolers who were 6-years-old (34 boys and 22 girls). For internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity, only one researcher evaluated all of the children using the TGMD-II in the following areas: running; galloping; sliding; hopping; leaping; horizontal jumping; overhand throwing; underhand rolling; striking a stationary ball; stationary dribbling; kicking; and catching. For concurrent validity, the evaluator measured physical fitness (strength, flexibility, power, agility, endurance, and balance). The key findings were as follows: first, the reliability coefficient and the validity coefficient between pre-weighted and post-weighted TGMD-II scores were quite similar. Second, the research showed adequate reliability and validity of the TGMD-II for Korean preschool children. The TGMD-II is a proper instrument to test Korean children's motor development. Yet, applying relative weighting on the TGMD-II should be a point of consideration.

  15. Applying User Input to the Design and Testing of an Electronic Behavioral Health Information System for Wraparound Care Coordination.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Eric J; Hyde, Kelly L; Sather, April; Hook, Alyssa N; Lyon, Aaron R

    2016-05-01

    Health information technology (HIT) and care coordination for individuals with complex needs are high priorities for quality improvement in health care. However, there is little empirical guidance about how best to design electronic health record systems and related technologies to facilitate implementation of care coordination models in behavioral health, or how best to apply user input to the design and testing process. In this paper, we describe an iterative development process that incorporated user/stakeholder perspectives at multiple points and resulted in an electronic behavioral health information system (EBHIS) specific to the wraparound care coordination model for youth with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. First, we review foundational HIT research on how EBHIS can enhance efficiency and outcomes of wraparound that was used to inform development. After describing the rationale for and functions of a prototype EBHIS for wraparound, we describe methods and results for a series of six small studies that informed system development across four phases of effort-predevelopment, development, initial user testing, and commercialization-and discuss how these results informed system design and refinement. Finally, we present next steps, challenges to dissemination, and guidance for others aiming to develop specialized behavioral health HIT. The research team's experiences reinforce the opportunity presented by EBHIS to improve care coordination for populations with complex needs, while also pointing to a litany of barriers and challenges to be overcome to implement such technologies.

  16. Applying User Input to the Design and Testing of an Electronic Behavioral Health Information System for Wraparound Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Eric J.; Hyde, Kelly L.; Sather, April; Hook, Alyssa; Lyon, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology (HIT) and care coordination for individuals with complex needs are high priorities for quality improvement in health care. However, there is little empirical guidance about how best to design electronic health record systems and related technologies to facilitate implementation of care coordination models in behavioral health, or how best to apply user input to the design and testing process. In this paper, we describe an iterative development process that incorporated user/stakeholder perspectives at multiple points and resulted in an electronic behavioral health information system (EBHIS) specific to the wraparound care coordination model for youth with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. First, we review foundational HIT research on how EBHIS can enhance efficiency and outcomes of wraparound that was used to inform development. After describing the rationale for and functions of a prototype EBHIS for wraparound, we describe methods and results for a series of six small studies that informed system development across four phases of effort – predevelopment, development, initial user testing, and commercialization – and discuss how these results informed system design and refinement. Finally, we present next steps, challenges to dissemination, and guidance for others aiming to develop specialized behavioral health HIT. The research team's experiences reinforce the opportunity presented by EBHIS to improve care coordination for populations with complex needs, while also pointing to a litany of barriers and challenges to be overcome to implement such technologies. PMID:26060099

  17. Field testing of a new flow-through directional passive air sampler applied to monitoring ambient nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun; McKenna, Paul; Timmis, Roger; Jones, Kevin C

    2010-07-08

    This paper reports the first field deployment and testing of a directional passive air sampler (DPAS) which can be used to cost-effectively identify and quantify air pollutants and their sources. The sampler was used for ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) over ten weeks from twelve directional sectors in an urban setting, and tested alongside an automatic chemiluminescent monitor. The time-integrated passive directional results were compared with the directional analysis of the active monitoring results using wind data recorded at a weather station. The DPAS discriminated air pollutant signals directionally. The attempts to derive quantitative data yielded reasonable results--usually within a factor of two of those obtained by the chemiluminescent analyser. Ultimately, whether DPAS approaches are adopted will depend on their reliability, added value and cost. It is argued that added value was obtained here from the DPAS approach applied in a routine monitoring situation, by identifying source sectors. Both the capital and running costs of DPAS were <5% of those for the automatic monitor. It is envisaged that different sorbents or sampling media will enable this rotatable DPAS design to be used for other airborne pollutants. In summary, there are reasons to be optimistic that directional passive air sampling, together with careful interpretation of results, will be of added value to air quality practitioners in future.

  18. A transposon present in specific strains of Bacillus subtilis negatively affects nutrient- and dodecylamine-induced spore germination.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Antonina O; Berendsen, Erwin M; de Jong, Anne; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Eijlander, Robyn T

    2016-12-01

    Spore germination shows a large inter-strain variability. Spores of certain Bacillus subtilis strains, including isolates from spoiled food products, exhibit different germination behavior from spores of the well-studied model organism Bacillus subtilis 168, often for unknown reasons. In this study, we analyzed spore germination efficiencies and kinetics of seventeen B. subtilis strains with previously sequenced genomes. A subsequent gene-trait matching analysis revealed a correlation between a slow germination phenotype and the presence of a mobile genetic element, i.e., a Tn1546-like transposon. A detailed investigation of the transposon elements showed an essential role of a specific operon (spoVA(2mob) ) in inhibiting spore germination with nutrients and with the cationic surfactant dodecylamine. Our results indicate that this operon negatively influences release of Ca-DPA by the SpoVA channel and may additionally alter earlier germination events, potentially by affecting proteins in the spore inner membrane. The spoVA(2mob) operon is an important factor that contributes to inter-strain differences in spore germination. Screening for its genomic presence can be applied for identification of spores that exhibit specific properties that impede spore eradication by industrial processes. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Loci for Salt Tolerance during Germination in Autotetraploid Alfalfa (Medicargo sativa L.) using Genotyping by Sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    : In this study, we used a diverse panel of alfalfa accessions to identify molecular markers associated with salt tolerance during germination by genome-wide association (GWA) mapping and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS). Three levels of salt treatments were applied during seed germination. Phenotypic...

  20. Effect of marble industry effluent on seed germination, post germinative growth and productivity of Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Hadi, Fazal; Ullah, Zakir; Zia, Muhammad Amir

    2007-11-15

    A green house study was conducted at the University of Malakand, NWFP, Pakistan to evaluate the effect of marble industry effluent on soil pH, germination, post germinative growth and productivity of maize. The experiment was conducted in triplicate form for each treatment and tape water was used as control (T0). Effluents were diluted with tap water at concentration of 20% (T1), 40% (T2), 60% (T3), 80% (T4) and also used 100% (T5) concentration in 4 kg soil pot(-1) and plants were grown for 90 days. Results showed that there was a linear increase in pH of soil with increase in effluent concentration while germination, root length and stem girth was enhanced and found maximum at 40% concentration of effluent applied. The shoot length and root dry biomass was depressed as compared to control. It is concluded from the present study that marble industry effluent can be used as a fertilizer in low concentration especially for highly acidic soil but there is still need to carry out series of greenhouse and field trials to ascertain the fertilizer potentials of this effluent for maize crop.

  1. Tomato pollen respiration in relation to in vitro germination and pollen tube growth under favourable and stress-inducing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Karapanos, I C; Akoumianakis, K A; Olympios, C M; Passam, Harold Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Tomato pollen germination, pollen tube growth and respiratory activity were recorded during incubation in a liquid medium for 7 h over a temperature range of 15-35 degrees C. Although the initial rate of respiration was highest at 30 degrees C, both at 30 degrees C and 35 degrees C respiration decreased after the first hour of incubation due to high temperature impairment of germination and pollen tube growth. The total per cent germination of pollen over the 7-h period was maximal at 15 degrees C whereas pollen tube length was maximal at 25 degrees C. Although the production of CO(2) measured at hourly intervals throughout the incubation period did not correlate to a statistically significant level with either the per cent pollen germination or the length of the pollen tubes alone, nevertheless from 2 h after the start of incubation, it closely correlated with the values for germination x pollen tube length, indicating that the respiratory activity of tomato pollen at a given time is a function of both the per cent germination and the pollen tube growth. We suggest therefore that the rate of respiration might be preferable to a simple germination test for the assessment of pollen germination ability since it expresses not only the pollen germination potential but also the growth vigour of the pollen tubes. In addition, where in vitro tests are designed to assess pollen germination-temperature interactions, they should employ a long incubation period (e.g. 7 h) to permit differences in sensitivity to temperature to be observed.

  2. Seedling survival of Handroanthus impetiginosus (Mart ex DC) Mattos in a semi-arid environment through modified germination speed and post-germination desiccation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Martins, J R; Edvaldo, A A S; Alvarenga, A A; Rodrigues, A C; Ribeiro, D E; Toorop, P E

    2015-11-01

    Uniform rapid seed germination generally forms a great risk for the plant population if subsequent intermittent precipitation causes desiccation and seedling death. Handroanthus impetiginosus can be found commonly in a wide range of biomes within Brazil including those that are semi-arid. Germination and early growth was studied to understand how germinated seeds survive under these stringent conditions. Accessions were sampled from four seasonally dry biomes in Brazil. Precipitation at the start of the rainy season in the Caatinga, a semi-arid biome, is less predictable and the number of successive dry days per dry interval in the first four months of the rainy season was higher than in the other studied biomes. Plants from the Caatinga produced thicker seeds and this trait concurred with slow germination and stronger osmotic inhibition of germination across the accessions, forming a stress avoidance mechanism in the Caatinga. Post-germination desiccation tolerance was high in the Caatinga accession, could be re-induced in accessions from biomes with more regular precipitation (Cerrado and transition zone), but remained poor in the Cerradão accession; thus forming a stress tolerance mechanism. Production of adventitious roots ascertained survival of all tested individuals from all four locations, even if protruded radicles did not survive desiccation, forming an additional stress tolerance mechanism. A sequence of stress avoidance and stress tolerance mechanisms in seeds and germinated seeds was associated with precipitation patterns in different biomes. These mechanisms purportedly allow rapid seedling establishment when conditions are suitable and enable survival of the young seedling when conditions are adverse.

  3. Intensity of regionally applied tastes in relation to administration method: an investigation based on the "taste strips" test.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Brian; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    To compare various methods to apply regional taste stimuli to the tongue. "Taste strips" are a clinical tool to determine gustatory function. How a patient perceives the chemical environment in the mouth is a result of many factors such as taste bud distribution and interactions between the cranial nerves. To date, there have been few studies describing the different approaches to administer taste strips to maximize taste identification accuracy and intensity. This is a normative value acquisition pilot and single-center study. The investigation involved 30 participants reporting a normal sense of smell and taste (18 women, 12 men, mean age 33 years). The taste test was based on spoon-shaped filter paper strips impregnated with four taste qualities (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter) at concentrations shown to be easily detectable by young healthy subjects. The strips were administered in three methods (held stationary on the tip of the tongue, applied across the tongue, held in the mouth), resulting in a total of 12 trials per participant. Subjects identified the taste from a list of four descriptors, (sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and ranked the intensity on a scale from 0 to 10. Statistical analyses were performed on the accuracy of taste identification and rated intensities. The participants perceived in order of most to least intense: salt, sour, bitter, sweet. Of the four tastes, sour consistently was least accurately identified. Presenting the taste strip inside the closed mouth of the participants produced the least accurate taste identification, whereas moving the taste strip across the tongue led to a significant increase in intensity for the sweet taste. In this study of 30 subjects at the second concentration, optimized accuracy and intensity of taste identification was observed through administration of taste strips laterally across the anterior third of the extended tongue. Further studies are required on more subjects and the additional concentrations

  4. The Role of Water in Germination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicak, Charles J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which focuses on the importance of water in germination and seedling emergence. Discusses the activity's design, expected results, and possible application. Offers suggestions for extending the experiment. (ML)

  5. The Role of Water in Germination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicak, Charles J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which focuses on the importance of water in germination and seedling emergence. Discusses the activity's design, expected results, and possible application. Offers suggestions for extending the experiment. (ML)

  6. Soil salinity delays germination and limits growth of hyphae from propagules of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Juniper, S; Abbott, L K

    2006-07-01

    Colonisation of plant roots by some arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is reduced in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), probably due to a direct effect of NaCl on the fungi. However, there appear to be differences between the fungi in their ability to colonise plants in the presence of NaCl. This experiment tested the hypothesis that propagules of different isolates and species of AM fungi from saline and nonsaline soils would differ in their ability to germinate and grow in the presence of NaCl in the soil solution. Spores or pieces of root colonised by a range of AM fungi were incubated between filters buried in soil to which NaCl had been added at concentrations of 0, 150 or 300 mM in the soil solution. At regular intervals, filters were removed from the soil and both the percentage of propagules which had germinated and the length of proliferating hyphae were determined. Germination of spores of AM fungi studied was delayed in the presence of NaCl, but the fungi differed in the extent to which germination was inhibited. Two isolates of Scutellospora calospora reached maximum germination in 300 mM NaCl, but neither of two isolates of Acaulospora laevis germinated in the presence of NaCl. Germination of spores of the other fungi, including some isolated from saline soil, fell between these extremes. For some fungi, the specific rate of hyphal extension was reduced by NaCl. For others, the specific rate of growth was similar in the presence of NaCl to that in the control treatment, but overall production of hyphae was reduced in the NaCl treatments because germination was reduced.

  7. Rapid and High Seed Germination and Large Soil Seed Bank of Senecio aquaticus in Managed Grassland

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Matthias; Lüscher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Senecio aquaticus, regionally a Red List species in Europe, has become increasingly abundant in agricultural grassland of medium to high management intensity in Switzerland, Southern Germany, and Austria in recent years, where it is a threat for animal and human health due to its toxicity. In this study, we investigated the seed ecology of S. aquaticus to help protection of the species in relic populations while improving its control when abundant in managed grassland. Germination percentages of fresh ripe seeds of S. aquaticus were on average 68% in 2008, but only 45% in 2010, indicating yearly variation. Germination was generally fast: ten days after the onset of the tests, often more than 45% of all seeds had germinated. When covered with a soil layer of 5 mm, germination was only 16% compared to 63% in full light. Seeds buried in the soil for one and two years showed a germination of 78%, significantly higher than that of fresh ripe seeds, thus suggesting a stimulating effect of cold-wet stratification on germination and long seed survival in the soil. In grasslands with established populations of S. aquaticus, the number of germinable seeds of the species ranged from 361 to 1875 m−2 in topsoil (0–10 cm) with an average of 1139 m−2. The large seed bank and the rapid and high germination of S. aquaticus suggest that allowing seed formation is important for its preservation in relic populations. With respect to agricultural grassland, strategies to control the species should initially target hindering seed production and dispersal. PMID:22272180

  8. Rapid and high seed germination and large soil seed bank of Senecio aquaticus in managed grassland.

    PubMed

    Suter, Matthias; Lüscher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Senecio aquaticus, regionally a Red List species in Europe, has become increasingly abundant in agricultural grassland of medium to high management intensity in Switzerland, Southern Germany, and Austria in recent years, where it is a threat for animal and human health due to its toxicity. In this study, we investigated the seed ecology of S. aquaticus to help protection of the species in relic populations while improving its control when abundant in managed grassland. Germination percentages of fresh ripe seeds of S. aquaticus were on average 68% in 2008, but only 45% in 2010, indicating yearly variation. Germination was generally fast: ten days after the onset of the tests, often more than 45% of all seeds had germinated. When covered with a soil layer of 5 mm, germination was only 16% compared to 63% in full light. Seeds buried in the soil for one and two years showed a germination of 78%, significantly higher than that of fresh ripe seeds, thus suggesting a stimulating effect of cold-wet stratification on germination and long seed survival in the soil. In grasslands with established populations of S. aquaticus, the number of germinable seeds of the species ranged from 361 to 1875 m⁻² in topsoil (0-10 cm) with an average of 1139 m⁻². The large seed bank and the rapid and high germination of S. aquaticus suggest that allowing seed formation is important for its preservation in relic populations. With respect to agricultural grassland, strategies to control the species should initially target hindering seed production and dispersal.

  9. Germination of Aspergillus niger conidia is triggered by nitrogen compounds related to L-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hayer, Kimran; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B

    2014-10-01

    Conidial germination is fundamentally important to the growth and dissemination of most fungi. It has been previously shown (K. Hayer, M. Stratford, and D. B. Archer, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 79:6924-6931, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02061-13), using sugar analogs, that germination is a 2-stage process involving triggering of germination and then nutrient uptake for hyphal outgrowth. In the present study, we tested this 2-stage germination process using a series of nitrogen-containing compounds for the ability to trigger the breaking of dormancy of Aspergillus niger conidia and then to support the formation of hyphae by acting as nitrogen sources. Triggering and germination were also compared between A. niger and Aspergillus nidulans using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (trigger), D-galactose (nontrigger in A. niger but trigger in A. nidulans), and an N source (required in A. niger but not in A. nidulans). Although most of the nitrogen compounds studied served as nitrogen sources for growth, only some nitrogen compounds could trigger germination of A. niger conidia, and all were related to L-amino acids. Using L-amino acid analogs without either the amine or the carboxylic acid group revealed that both the amine and carboxylic acid groups were essential for an L-amino acid to serve as a trigger molecule. Generally, conidia were able to sense and recognize nitrogen compounds that fitted into a specific size range. There was no evidence of uptake of either triggering or nontriggering compounds over the first 90 min of A. niger conidial germination, suggesting that the germination trigger sensors are not located within the spore.

  10. Decline in RNA integrity of dry-stored soybean seeds correlates with loss of germination potential.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Margaret B; Richards, Christopher M; Walters, Christina

    2017-04-12

    This study investigates the relationship between germination ability and damage to RNA in soybean seeds (cv 'Williams 82') stored dry at 5 °C for 1-27 years. Total germination of 14 age cohorts harvested between 2015 and 1989 ranged from 100% to 3%. Germination decline followed classic seed viability kinetics, with symptomatic seed aging beginning after 17 years of storage. RNA integrity was assessed in dry seeds by electrophoresis of total RNA, followed by calculation of the RNA integrity number (RIN, Agilent Bioanalyzer software), which evaluates RNA fragment size distributions. Analysis of RNA extracted from cotyledons, embryonic axes, plumules, and seed coats across the range of age cohorts showed consistent RNA degradation: older seeds had over-representation of small RNAs compared with younger seeds, which had nearly a 2:1 ratio of 25S and 18S rRNAs. RIN values for cotyledons and embryonic axes from the same seed were correlated. Decline in RIN tracked reduced germination, with a pronounced decrease in RIN after 17 years of storage. This led to a high correlation between the mean RIN of cotyledon RNA and the total germination percentage (R2=0.91, P<0.0001). Despite this relationship, germinable and non-germinable seeds within cohorts could not be distinguished unless the RIN was <3.5, indicating substantial deterioration. Our work demonstrates that seed RNA incurs damage over time, observable in fragment size distributions. Under the experimental conditions used here, RIN appears to be a promising surrogate for germination tests used to monitor viability of stored seeds.

  11. Inhibition of DNA polymerase λ and associated inflammatory activities of extracts from steamed germinated soybeans.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Kuriyama, Isoko; Yoshida, Hiromi

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of selective DNA polymerase (pol) inhibitors from more than 50 plant food materials, we found that the extract from steamed germinated soybeans (Glycine max L.) inhibited human pol λ activity. Among the three processed soybean samples tested (boiled soybeans, steamed soybeans, and steamed germinated soybeans), both the hot water extract and organic solvent extract from the steamed germinated soybeans had the strongest pol λ inhibition. We previously isolated two glucosyl compounds, a cerebroside (glucosyl ceramide, AS-1-4, compound ) and a steroidal glycoside (eleutheroside A, compound ), from dried soybean, and these compounds were prevalent in the extracts of the steamed germinated soybeans as pol inhibitors. The hot water and organic solvent extracts of the steamed germinated soybeans and compounds and selectively inhibited the activity of eukaryotic pol λ in vitro but did not influence the activities of other eukaryotic pols, including those from the A-family (pol γ), B-family (pols α, δ, and ε), and Y-family (pols η, ι, and κ), and also showed no effect on the activity of pol β, which is of the same family (X) as pol λ. The tendency for in vitro pol λ inhibition by these extracts and compounds showed a positive correlation with the in vivo suppression of TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced inflammation in mouse ear. These results suggest that steamed germinated soybeans, especially the glucosyl compound components, may be useful for their anti-inflammatory properties.

  12. [Study on configuration fabric and germinative conditions of Salvia miltiorrhizy seeds].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qun; Liang, Zong-suo; Li, Shao-jun; Liu, Wen-ting; Li, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Chuan-zhong; Wang, Jing-min; Wei, Xin-rong

    2004-10-01

    To provide theoretic warrant and technical reference for Salvia miltiorrhizr standardization planting, by carrying out various systemic studies such as observation of seeds configuration fabric, idiosyncrasy of water absorption and groping germinating conditions. In the study of configuration fabric, seeds were observed and taken photos by scanning electronic microscope, and heft method was used for measuring changes of water absorption velocity and dehydration velocity. Seeds germination conditions were probed into under the national test regulations for crop seeds and related prescription from international standards. (1) There was a layer of slime about 10-20 microm thickness covering epicarp of Danshen seeds. The slime formed as diamond meshwork (reseau) and the weight of it was 8%-10% of total seeds weight. (2) The speed of water absorption of seeds was extremely rapid. The weight of seeds could increase above 10 times as original while the dehydration velocity was quite low. (3) The optimal temperature for the seeds germination is around 25 degrees C, and the germination rate of the new seeds gained yearly was above 75%, but the rate would decrease sharply as years went by. It was also found that the seeds germination power and exponent of vigor were quite high under the temperature transformation between 23 degrees C, 28 degrees C. Such treatments as pre-cool, PEG treatment and infusing with GA3 could increase the rate of seeds germination capacity obviously.

  13. Factors Affecting Germination of Puccinia jaceae var. solstitialis Teliospores from Yellow Starthistle.

    PubMed

    Bruckart, William L; Eskandari, Farivar

    2002-04-01

    ABSTRACT The rust fungus Puccinia jaceae var. solstitialis is a candidate for biological control of yellow starthistle (YST). Part of the risk assessment includes determining if safflower seedlings are susceptible to infection by teliospores of P. jaceae. A protocol for germination of P. jaceae teliospores is needed to verify that teliospores used in comparative studies are viable. The protocol developed from this research has two steps: first, priming teliospores on water agar at 4 degrees C in the dark, and second, incubating them at warmer temperatures for 1 week in the presence of an exogenous stimulator. Priming longer than 4 weeks resulted in significantly greater germination than priming for shorter periods. Sources of effective stimulator included seeds and seedlings of YST or safflower. The greatest germination occurred during incubation at 18 degrees C in the dark. Teliospore germination was reduced after incubation with a 12- or 14-h photoperiod. A low percentage (<20%) of teliospores of two isolates germinated after 44 and 96 weeks of dry storage at room temperature; samples of each isolate tested after that did not germinate. Data indicate teliospores of several isolates of P. jaceae are viable, and the protocol will be used to prepare teliospores of P. jaceae for comparative studies with P. carthami on safflower seedlings.

  14. Multiple paths to similar germination behavior in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Liana T; Edwards, Brianne R; Donohue, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    Germination timing influences plant fitness, and its sensitivity to temperature may cause it to change as climate shifts. These changes are likely to be complex because temperatures that occur during seed maturation and temperatures that occur post-dispersal interact to define germination timing. We used the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana to determine how flowering time (which defines seed-maturation temperature) and post-dispersal temperature influence germination and the expression of genetic variation for germination. Germination responses to temperature (germination envelopes) changed as seeds aged, or after-ripened, and these germination trajectories depended on seed-maturation temperature and genotype. Different combinations of genotype, seed-maturation temperature, and after-ripening produced similar germination envelopes. Likewise, different genotypes and seed-maturation temperatures combined to produce similar germination trajectories. Differences between genotypes were most likely to be observed at high and low germination temperatures. The germination behavior of some genotypes responds weakly to maternal temperature but others are highly plastic. We hypothesize that weak dormancy induction could synchronize germination of seeds dispersed at different times. By contrast, we hypothesize that strongly responsive genotypes may spread offspring germination over several possible germination windows. Considering germination responses to temperature is important for predicting phenology expression and evolution in future climates.

  15. Seed germination and sowing options [Chapter 8

    Treesearch

    Tara Luna; Kim Wilkinson; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2009-01-01

    Seeds of many native species are challenging to germinate. One important thing a grower can do is learn as much as possible about the life history, ecology, and habitat of the species they wish to grow.What processes do seeds of this species go through in nature? Any observations will be valuable when trying to germinate and grow species that have little or no...

  16. Oxygen dependency of germinating Brassica seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myoung Ryoul; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-02-01

    Establishing plants in space, Moon or Mars requires adaptation to altered conditions, including reduced pressure and composition of atmospheres. To determine the oxygen requirements for seed germination, we imbibed Brassica rapa seeds under varying oxygen concentrations and profiled the transcription patterns of genes related to early metabolism such as starch degradation, glycolysis, and fermentation. We also analyzed the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and measured starch degradation. Partial oxygen pressure (pO2) greater than 10% resulted in normal germination (i.e., protrusion of radicle about 18 hours after imbibition) but lower pO2 delayed and reduced germination. Imbibition in an oxygen-free atmosphere for three days resulted in no germination but subsequent transfer to air initiated germination in 75% of the seeds and the root growth rate was transiently greater than in roots germinated under ambient pO2. In hypoxic seeds soluble sugars degraded faster but the content of starch after 24 h was higher than at ambient oxygen. Transcription of genes related to starch degradation, α-amylase (AMY) and Sucrose Synthase (SUS), was higher under ambient O2 than under hypoxia. Glycolysis and fermentation pathway-related genes, glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK), fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), LDH, and ADH, were induced by low pO2. The activity of LDH and ADH was the highest in anoxic seeds. Germination under low O2 conditions initiated ethanolic fermentation. Therefore, sufficient oxygen availability is important for germination before photosynthesis provides necessary oxygen and the determination of an oxygen carrying capacity is important for uniform growth in space conditions.

  17. Methods to promote germination of dormant Setaria viridis seeds.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Jose; Wong, Mandy Ka; Tang, Evan; Dinneny, José R

    2014-01-01

    Setaria viridis has recently emerged as a promising genetic model system to study diverse aspects of monocot biology. While the post-germination life cycle of S. viridis is approximately 8 weeks long, the prolonged dormancy of freshly harvested seeds can more than double the total time required between successive generations. Here we describe methods that promote seed germination in S. viridis. Our results demonstrate that treating S. viridis seeds with liquid smoke or a GA3 and KNO3 solution improves germination rates to 90% or higher even in seeds that are 6 days post-harvest with similar results obtained whether seeds are planted in soil or on gel-based media. Importantly, we show that these treatments have no significant effect on the growth of the adult plant. We have tested these treatments on diverse S. viridis accessions and show variation in their response. The methods described here will help advance research using this model grass species by increasing the pace at which successive generations of plants can be analyzed.

  18. Methods to Promote Germination of Dormant Setaria viridis Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Jose; Wong, Mandy Ka; Tang, Evan; Dinneny, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Setaria viridis has recently emerged as a promising genetic model system to study diverse aspects of monocot biology. While the post-germination life cycle of S. viridis is approximately 8 weeks long, the prolonged dormancy of freshly harvested seeds can more than double the total time required between successive generations. Here we describe methods that promote seed germination in S. viridis. Our results demonstrate that treating S. viridis seeds with liquid smoke or a GA3 and KNO3 solution improves germination rates to 90% or higher even in seeds that are 6 days post-harvest with similar results obtained whether seeds are planted in soil or on gel-based media. Importantly, we show that these treatments have no significant effect on the growth of the adult plant. We have tested these treatments on diverse S. viridis accessions and show variation in their response. The methods described here will help advance research using this model grass species by increasing the pace at which successive generations of plants can be analyzed. PMID:24748008

  19. Ultrastructure and germination of Vitis vinifera cv. Loureiro pollen.

    PubMed

    Abreu, I; Costa, I; Oliveira, M; Cunha, M; de Castro, R

    2006-08-01

    The cultivar Loureiro of Vitis vinifera is one of the most economically important, recommended in almost the totality of the Região Demarcada dos Vinhos Verdes. In vineyards, the grape productivity of this cultivar is normal while in others it is extremely low. The aim of this work was to study the morphology and germination of Vitis vinifera cv. Loureiro pollen with high and low productivity. The pollen grain was examined under light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Typically V. vinifera pollen present three furrows but in the cultivar Loureiro we found tricolporated and acolporated (without furrows or pores) pollen grains. Both pollen types present generative and vegetative cells with the usual aspect and a dense cytoplasm rich in organelles. In the acolporated pollen a continuous exine layer and an irregular intine layer were observed. Differences were found in the starch accumulation, since only in tricolporated pollen abundant plastids filled with numerous starch granules were observed. To determine the causes of the low productivity of this cultivar we tested pollen viability by the fluorochromatic reaction and pollen germinability by in vitro assays. We observed that the acolporated pollen grain is viable, but no germination was recorded.

  20. Mouse differentiating spermatogonia can generate germinal stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Lassalle, Bruno; Coureuil, Mathieu; Louis, Jean Paul; Le Page, Florence; Testart, Jacques; Allemand, Isabelle; Riou, Lydia; Fouchet, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    In adults, stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of many actively renewing tissues, such as haematopoietic, skin, gut and germinal tissues. These stem cells can self-renew or be committed to becoming progenitors. Stem-cell commitment is thought to be irreversible but in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, it was shown recently that differentiating germ cells can revert to functional stem cells that can restore germinal lineage. Whether progenitors are also able to generate stem cells in mammals remains unknown. Here we show that purified mouse spermatogonial progenitors committed to differentiation can generate functional germinal stem cells that can repopulate germ-cell-depleted testes when transplanted into adult mice. We found that GDNF, a key regulator of the stem-cell niche, and FGF2 are able to reprogram in vitro spermatogonial progenitors for reverse differentiation. This study supports the emerging concept that the stem-cell identity is not restricted in adults to a definite pool of cells that self-renew, but that stemness could be acquired by differentiating progenitors after tissue injury and throughout life.