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  1. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... special diet. In general, when you have gestational diabetes your diet should: Be moderate in fat and protein Provide ... drinks, fruit juices, and pastries If managing your diet does not ... diabetes medicine by mouth or insulin therapy. Most women ...

  2. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, L-citrulline, L-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases.

  3. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  4. Screening for Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for gestational diabetes: (1) All women ... not enough evidence to judge the benefits and harms of screening women before 24 weeks of pregnancy. ...

  5. What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and MODY Gestational Diabetes What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that ... 8747 and request a copy. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when your body can't ...

  6. Preventing diabetes in women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Feig, Denice

    2012-05-01

    The immediate consequences of gestational diabetes on pregnancy are well known but the complications decades later for the mother and child are just now emerging. This trio of papers discuss the long-term consequences of gestational diabetes, the importance of screening this high risk group of women for type 2 diabetes, and the evidence for lifestyle, medications and breastfeeding for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in these women.

  7. Gestational diabetes insipidus. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ejmocka-Ambroziak, Anna; Grzechocińska, Barbara; Jastrzebska, Helena; Kochman, Magdalena; Cyganek, Anna; Wielgoś, Mirosław; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a very rare complication. However, undiagnosed and untreated may lead to serious complications in both mother and fetus. In this study, a case of 34-year-old female patient with diabetes insipidus associated with pregnancy was reported. We discussed process of diagnosis and treatment with particular emphasis on the monitoring of water-electrolyte imbalance during labor.

  8. Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep; Kumar, Arun

    2016-09-01

    Prevention of Gestational diabetes mellitus holds the key to prevention of the diabetes and metabolic syndrome epidemic sweeping the world. This review discusses prevention of gestational diabetes and provides a scientific framework for the study of this topic. It classifies prevention in various ways, and suggests strategies which fit the different levels of prevention of gestational diabetes. The review also cites recent evidence and best practices to support the feasibility of prevention of gestational diabetes. PMID:27582141

  9. Gestational Diabetes and Future Risk of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Subash Chander; Vinnamala, Sudheer; Jenkins, David

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study of women with gestational diabetes we attempted to (a) Determine the magnitude of the long term risk of progression to diabetes and (b) Identify factors that predict the development of diabetes. Methods All women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK from 1995 to 2003 were included in this observational cohort study and followed up till 2009. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, random/two-hour glucose following 75 gram oral glucose test (OGTT) ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Results The risk of developing diabetes was 6.9% at five years and 21.1% at ten years following the initial diagnosis of GDM. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels in the oral glucose tolerance test during pregnancy were associated with future risk of diabetes. There was no association with age, gestational age at diagnosis of GDM, numbers of previous and subsequent pregnancies. Conclusion Risk of progression to diabetes in a UK based cohort of women with GDM is estimated. Women with fasting antenatal glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and/or an antenatal two-hour glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L are at higher risk and need close follow up. PMID:23519363

  10. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exercise Regularly Exercise is another way to keep blood sugar under control. It helps to balance food intake. After checking ... it as directed in order to help keep blood sugar under control. Get Tested for Diabetes after Pregnancy Get tested ...

  11. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  12. Genetics of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Radha, Venkatesan; Kanthimathi, Sekar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has now become a major public health problem because of its prevalence and its associated complications during pregnancy. Earlier studies have suggested that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and GDM might have similar pathophysiology, such as increased insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion resulting in hyperglycaemia. Evidence for a genetic basis of GDM has been poorly understood. To some extent, the current advancement in genomic techniques has thrown better light on the genetics of GDM. Based on the candidate gene approach and genome wide association studies, genetic loci in several genes that are responsible for insulin secretion, insulin resistance, lipid and glucose metabolism and other pathways have shown association with the GDM susceptibility. Understanding the possible underlying genetic factors of GDM would help us in gaining knowledge on the pathophysiologic mechanism of the disease. PMID:27582142

  13. [Gestational diabetes insipidus during a twin pregnancy].

    PubMed

    De Mesmay, M; Rigouzzo, A; Bui, T; Louvet, N; Constant, I

    2013-02-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is an uncommon clinical disease whose prevalence is approximately two to three pregnancies per 100,000. It may be isolated or associated with preeclampsia. We report a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a twin pregnancy, originally isolated during two months, and secondarily complicated by HELLP-syndrome. We recall the specific pathophysiology of polyuric-polydipsic syndrome during pregnancy and summarize its various causes. Finally, we discuss the indications, in case of isolated gestational diabetes insipidus, of treatment by dDAVP.

  14. Understanding Gestational Diabetes: A Practical Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This brochure addresses the problem of gestational diabetes and answers the most frequently asked questions about the disease. It begins by defining gestational diabetes and discussing its cause, then addresses such topics as: (1) how gestational diabetes differs from other types of diabetes; (2) who is at risk for developing gestational diabetes…

  15. Placenta changes in pregnancy with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Edu, Antoine; Teodorescu, Cristina; Dobjanschi, Carmen Gabriela; Socol, ZiŢa Zsuzsana; Teodorescu, Valeriu; Matei, Alexandru; Albu, Dinu Florin; Radulian, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Placental damage may be responsible for the fetal complications in pregnancies complicated by diabetes. We have analyzed the prevalence of gestational diabetes (GD) in a population of 109 pregnant women, the risk factors and the placental changes associated with gestational diabetes. Tests carried out were oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of gestation, using the IADPSG (International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups) criteria for gestational diabetes, glycated hemoglobin, fasting insulin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound and, also, there were analyzed macro and microscopic placental fragments from pregnant women with÷without GD. It has been recorded the weight of placenta at birth and there were analyzed the possible pathological changes. The prevalence of GD was 11.9%. We have applied the direct logistic regression to determine the impact of some factors over the probability of association with gestational diabetes. The most powerful predictor was the placental maturity grade, the patients with decreased maturity grade having chances 52.6 times higher than those with an increased placental maturity grade to associate gestational diabetes. Sizes of placentas in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus were significantly increased than in patients without this diagnosis (p=0.012) from week 24-28. Pathological changes were discovered in six of the 13 placentas of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, independent of the level of glycated hemoglobin (p=0.72). The level of hyperglycemia is only partially associated with the presence of placental changes, which may be caused by other maternal factors. PMID:27516026

  16. Diabetes: Treatment of gestational diabetes reduces obstetric morbidity.

    PubMed

    Zera, Chloe A; Seely, Ellen W

    2010-02-01

    Should women with gestational diabetes mellitus be treated to minimize both fetal and maternal complications? Although unanswered questions remain about the long-term benefits, the findings of a large, multicenter,randomized controlled trial suggest that treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus decreases perinatal complications. PMID:20098447

  17. Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... level is: High 1 Average 0 Low Your health care provider: Will test you as soon as you know you are ... their lifetime. If you had gestational diabetes, your health care provider will test you for diabetes 6 weeks after you give ...

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus in South Asia: Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Fatema; Ejaz, Kiran

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus, is defined by the American Diabetes Association as "diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes". WHO has further classified the period of diagnosis as Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. The former term is applicable in the early period of gestation and GDM is detected after 24 weeks. Irrespective of the guidelines followed, the presence of Diabetes Mellitus during pregnancy, has to be taken seriously as it is an important metabolic derangement and can prove to be harmful for the mother and dangerous for the foetus. The rising incidence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the world along with obesity, is a major contributing factor for GDM. The trend of this rise is more steep in the low and middle income countries thus proportionately increasing the risk for GDM. South Asia falls in this bracket and the responsible factors have to be identified and corrected. Management should begin from primordial prevention for which education is a key factor. Every woman should be taught the way to follow a healthy life style. Identification of the contributing factors and universal screening facilities for all pregnant women living in both rural and urban areas, should be given prime importance. On detecting Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy or GDM, monitoring and health care facilities should be provided. This review provides some available figures of GDM in South Asia, the risk factors in this population and the steps for prevention.

  19. Gestational diabetes mellitus in South Asia: Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Fatema; Ejaz, Kiran

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus, is defined by the American Diabetes Association as "diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes". WHO has further classified the period of diagnosis as Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. The former term is applicable in the early period of gestation and GDM is detected after 24 weeks. Irrespective of the guidelines followed, the presence of Diabetes Mellitus during pregnancy, has to be taken seriously as it is an important metabolic derangement and can prove to be harmful for the mother and dangerous for the foetus. The rising incidence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the world along with obesity, is a major contributing factor for GDM. The trend of this rise is more steep in the low and middle income countries thus proportionately increasing the risk for GDM. South Asia falls in this bracket and the responsible factors have to be identified and corrected. Management should begin from primordial prevention for which education is a key factor. Every woman should be taught the way to follow a healthy life style. Identification of the contributing factors and universal screening facilities for all pregnant women living in both rural and urban areas, should be given prime importance. On detecting Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy or GDM, monitoring and health care facilities should be provided. This review provides some available figures of GDM in South Asia, the risk factors in this population and the steps for prevention. PMID:27582153

  20. Placental vanadium in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Manci, E A; Coffin, C M; Smith, S M; Ganong, C A

    1989-01-01

    Although many studies in animal models and in cell cultures have shown that vanadate has insulin-like effects, it has not been studied in human diabetes mellitus. In this study the levels of vanadium in human placentae from 23 pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus were compared with 18 uncomplicated non-diabetic pregnancies closely matched for maternal age, gravidity, and gestational age. Using the unpaired Student's t-test, the mid-disc placental levels in gestational diabetes (7.62 +/- 1.29 micrograms/g dry weight) were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) than controls (8.73 +/- 1.85 micrograms/g dry weight). These findings appear to be independent of placental size and birthweight. When these data were analyzed according to treatment, the vanadium levels in insulin-treated cases (8.07 +/- 1.32 micrograms/g dry weight) were not significantly different from the matched controls (8.84 +/- 1.69 micrograms/dry weight); the levels in noninsulin treated cases (7.08 +/- 1.25 micrograms/g dry weight), however, were significantly (p less than 0.005) lower than controls (8.99 +/- 1.96 micrograms/g dry weight). It is interesting to speculate that there may be increased binding of vanadium to maternal tissues in human diabetes mellitus when insulin is deficient.

  1. Management of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boinpally, Tara; Jovanovic, Lois

    2009-06-01

    Although previously thought to be predominantly transient gestational diabetes, diabetes in pregnancy can be attributed more and more to type 2 diabetes today. Although all types of diabetes in pregnancy pose a threat to the health and future well-being of both the mother and child affected, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes can be significantly more devastating in complications because of effects starting from conception. This rise of type 2 diabetes thus imparts a great sense of urgency to uncover undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy and to take active measures in establishing tight glucose control. From preconception care before pregnancy to medical treatment postpartum, it is essential that immediate care be taken to help mediate the effects of diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:19421970

  2. Screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashdeep; Kalra, Bharti

    2016-09-01

    American Diabetes Association defines gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as diabetes which is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of pregnancy and is not clearly overt diabetes. GDM, if missed or not treated properly can result in maternal and foetal complications, short as well as long term. Screening for overt diabetes, especially for high risk women should be done at the earliest in pregnancy and for GDM, universally at 24-28 weeks of gestation. One step screening by IADPSG (75 gram OGTT), has been recently adopted by most of professional bodies to achieve uniformity. IADPSG criteria have resulted in increase in prevalence of GDM, and consequently increase pressure on health care services as well as on patients. This has resulted in discordance of view on universal adoption of the criteria. Many feel this criteria results in over diagnosis without clear benefits. This brief review will provide the answers to some of the important questions pertaining to screening for GDM. PMID:27582144

  3. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Ashwal, Eran; Hod, Moshe

    2015-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any carbohydrate intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM is about 2-5% of normal pregnancies and depends of the prevalence of same population to type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is associated with adverse outcome for the mother, the fetus, neonate, child and adult offspring of the diabetic mother. Detection of GDM lies on screening, followed as necessary by diagnostic measures. Screening can either be selective, based upon risk stratification or universal. Timely testing enables the obstetrician to assess glucose tolerance in the presence of the insulin-resistant state of pregnancy and permits treatment to begin before excessive fetal growth has occurred. Once a diagnosis of GDM was made close perinatal surveillance is warranted. The goal of treatment is reducing fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality related with GDM. The exact glucose values needed are still not absolutely proved. The decision whether and when to induce delivery depends on gestational age, estimated fetal weight, maternal glycemic control and bishop score. Future research is needed regarding prevention of GDM, treatment goals and effectiveness of interventions, guidelines for pregnancy care and prevention of long term metabolic sequel for both the infant and the mother.

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Non-insulin management.

    PubMed

    Magon, Navneet; Seshiah, V

    2011-10-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a substantial number of pregnancies. There is consensus that in patients of GDM, excellent blood glucose control, with diet and, when necessary, oral hypoglycemics and insulin results in improved perinatal outcomes, and appreciably reduces the probability of serious neonatal morbidity compared with routine prenatal care. Goals of metabolic management of a pregnancy complicated with GDM have to balance the needs of a healthy pregnancy with the requirements to control glucose level. Medical nutrition therapy is the cornerstone of therapy for women with GDM. Surveillance with daily self-monitoring of blood glucose has been found to help guide management in a much better way than blood glucose checking in labs and clinics, which tends to be less frequent. Historically, insulin has been the therapeutic agent of choice for controlling hyperglycemia in pregnant women. However, difficulty in medication administration with multiple daily injections, potential for hypoglycemia, and increase in appetite and weight make this therapeutic option cumbersome for many pregnant patients. Use of oral hypogycemic agents (OHAs) in pregnancy has opened new vistas for GDM management. At present, there is a growing acceptance of glyburide (glibenclamide) use as the primary therapy for GDM. Glyburide and metformin have been found to be safe, effective and economical for the treatment of gestational diabetes. Insulin, however, still has an important role to play in GDM. GDM is a window of opportunity, which needs to be seized, for prevention of diabetes in future life. Goal of our educational programs should be not only to improve pregnancy outcomes but also to promote healthy lifestyle changes for the mother that will last long after delivery. Team effort on part of obstetricians and endocrinologists is required to make "the diabetes capital of the world" into "the diabetes care capital of the world".

  5. Physical activity and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    van Poppel, Mireille N M; Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Mottola, Michelle F

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as 'carbohydrate intolerance resulting in hyperglycemia of variable severity with onset or first recognition during pregnancy'. GDM is associated with several detrimental health consequences during pregnancy and delivery for both mother and baby. The largest public health impact of GDM is through its role on future diabetes in the mother and obesity and diabetes in the offspring. Physical activity (PA) is likely an effective intervention for prevention and treatment of GDM, given its known effectiveness in prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Based on observational studies, PA initiated before and/or during pregnancy has a positive influence on maternal glucose and insulin metabolism and reduces the risk of GDM. However, although PA interventions have been reported to be effective at improving glycemic control in women who already developed GDM, prenatal PA interventions aimed at preventing GDM have shown modest effectiveness in increasing PA levels and thus were not effective in improving glucose/insulin metabolism or reducing GDM incidence. There is therefore a strong need to develop effective strategies for increasing PA levels, especially in women at high risk for GDM who are often obese and inactive. The optimal intervention for preventing or managing GDM is still unknown, and further studies are needed to determine the type, intensity, frequency and duration for the most successful PA intervention. Furthermore, the effects of PA on neonatal outcomes are not clear, and it is highly recommended that future studies examine more specific neonatal outcomes such as body composition. PMID:25226805

  6. Approach to the Patient with Gestational Diabetes after Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identifies patients with a pancreatic β-cell defect. In some patients, the defect is transient or stable, but in most it is progressive, imparting a high risk of diabetes for at least a decade after the index pregnancy. The β-cell defects in GDM can result from many causes, including genetic variants typical of monogenic forms of diabetes and autoimmunity typical of evolving type 1 diabetes. No specific disease-modifying therapies are available for those patients. The majority of women with GDM have clinical characteristics indicating a risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Available evidence indicates that T2D can be prevented or delayed by intensive lifestyle modification and by medications, particularly those that ameliorate insulin resistance. Clinical management should include assessment of glucose tolerance in the postpartum period to detect diabetes or assess diabetes risk. Women who don't have diabetes should be advised about their risk and participate in family planning to prevent subsequent pregnancies with undiagnosed hyperglycemia. All patients should be monitored for rising glycemia indicative of progressive β-cell deterioration. We suggest a combination of fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin measurements for this purpose. Monitoring should be initiated at least annually and should be intensified if glycemia is rising and/or impaired. Lifestyle modification is advised to reduce the risk for T2D. Like monitoring, lifestyle modification should be intensified for rising glycemia and/or development of impaired glucose levels. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend medications to prevent T2D. Close follow-up and monitoring will allow initiation of pharmacological treatment as soon as diabetes develops. Children of women with GDM are at increased risk for obesity and diabetes. They should receive education, monitoring, and lifestyle advice to minimize obesity and diabetes risk. PMID

  7. Vitamin D and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Heather H.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates 7–14% of pregnancies in the United States. Vitamin D deficiency also is common in pregnancy. Emerging evidence suggests that Vitamin D administration can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, but whether vitamin D supplementation can prevent GDM is unknown. Observational studies provide conflicting evidence as to whether low serum 25-hydroxyvitmain D (25(OH)D) levels are associated with GDM. Two recent systematic reviews concluded that vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of GDM. However, these reviews are limited by the observational and diverse nature of the included studies. Of greatest concern is the inability to understand how important confounding variables such as race/ethnicity and adiposity might affect the association. Randomized controlled trial data remain limited but are critical to understanding whether supplementation with vitamin D beyond what is contained in routine prenatal vitamins will prevent GDM or improve glucose tolerance for women with GDM. PMID:24277676

  8. Preconceptional Iron Intake and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Darling, Anne Marie; Mitchell, Allen A; Werler, Martha M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the impact of preconceptional heme and non-heme iron on gestational diabetes mellitius (GDM) in the Boston University Slone Epidemiology Birth Defects Study (BDS). This retrospective cohort analysis included 7229 participants enrolled in the BDS between 1998 and 2008 who gave birth to non-malformed infants and were free of pre-existing diabetes. All data were collected through structured interviews conducted within 6 months of delivery. Calorie-adjusted and multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. Preconceptional dietary heme iron was modestly associated with an elevated risk of GDM among those (multivariable OR comparing the fifth quintile to the first: 1.55; 95% CI 0.98, 2.46). Conversely, preconceptional dietary non-heme iron was associated with a decreased risk of GDM among those in the fifth quintile of intake compared to the first (multivariable OR: 0.48; 95% CI 0.28, 0.81). Women who consumed supplemental iron during preconception also had a decreased risk of GDM (multivariable OR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.60, 1.02). In conclusion, our data support a positive association between preconceptional heme iron intake and GDM and an inverse association between preconceptional non-heme iron intake from foods and preconceptional intake from supplements. PMID:27231921

  9. Preconceptional Iron Intake and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Anne Marie; Mitchell, Allen A.; Werler, Martha M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the impact of preconceptional heme and non-heme iron on gestational diabetes mellitius (GDM) in the Boston University Slone Epidemiology Birth Defects Study (BDS). This retrospective cohort analysis included 7229 participants enrolled in the BDS between 1998 and 2008 who gave birth to non-malformed infants and were free of pre-existing diabetes. All data were collected through structured interviews conducted within 6 months of delivery. Calorie-adjusted and multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. Preconceptional dietary heme iron was modestly associated with an elevated risk of GDM among those (multivariable OR comparing the fifth quintile to the first: 1.55; 95% CI 0.98, 2.46). Conversely, preconceptional dietary non-heme iron was associated with a decreased risk of GDM among those in the fifth quintile of intake compared to the first (multivariable OR: 0.48; 95% CI 0.28, 0.81). Women who consumed supplemental iron during preconception also had a decreased risk of GDM (multivariable OR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.60, 1.02). In conclusion, our data support a positive association between preconceptional heme iron intake and GDM and an inverse association between preconceptional non-heme iron intake from foods and preconceptional intake from supplements. PMID:27231921

  10. Metformin in gestational diabetes: An emerging contender

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance occurring first time during pregnancy. Its prevalence is simultaneously increasing with the global rise of diabesity. GDM commonly develops, when maternal glucose metabolism is unable to compensate for the progressive development of insulin resistance, arising primarily from the consistently rising diabetogenic placental hormones. It classically develops during the second or third trimester. Theoretically, insulin sensitizers should have been the ideal agent in its treatment, given the insulin resistance, the major culprit in its pathogenesis. Fortunately, majority of women can be treated satisfactorily with lifestyle modification, and approximately 20% requires more intensive treatment. For several decades, insulin has been the most reliable treatment strategy and the gold standard in GDM. Metformin is effective insulin sensitizing agent and an established first line drug in type 2 diabetes currently. As it crosses the placenta, a safety issue remains an obstacle and, therefore, metformin is currently not recommended in the treatment of GDM. Nevertheless, given the emerging clinically equivalent safety and efficacy data of metformin compared to insulin, it appears that it may perhaps open a rather new door in managing GDM. The aim of this review is to critically analyze, the safety and efficacy data of metformin regarding its use in GDM and pregnant mothers with polycystic ovarian disease, which has emerged in past decades. PMID:25729685

  11. Gestational Diabetes Insipidus Associated with HELLP Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gambito, Renela; Chan, Michael; Sheta, Mohamed; Ramirez-Arao, Precious; Gurm, Harmeet; Tunkel, Allan; Nivera, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare, but well recognized, complication of pregnancy. It is related to excess vasopressinase enzyme activity which is metabolized in the liver. A high index of suspicion of gestational diabetes insipidus is required in a correct clinical setting especially in the presence of other risk factors such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and twin pregnancies. We are presenting a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a patient with HELLP syndrome. The newborn in this case also had hypernatremia thereby raising possibilities of vasopressinase crossing the placenta.

  12. Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Padayachee, Cliantha; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. This disease has many detrimental consequences for the woman, the unborn foetus and child. The management of GDM aims to mediate the effects of hyperglycaemia by controlling blood glucose levels. Along with pharmacology and dietary interventions, exercise has a powerful potential to assist with blood glucose control. Due to the uncertainty of risks and benefits of exercise during pregnancy, women tend to avoid exercise. However, under adequate supervision exercise is both safe and beneficial in the treatment of GDM. Therefore it is vital that exercise is incorporated into the continuum of care for women with GDM. Medical doctors should be able to refer to competently informed exercise professionals to aid in GDM treatment. It is important that exercise treatment is informed by research. Hence, the development of evidence-based guidelines is important to inform practice. Currently there are no guidelines for exercise in GDM. This review aims to assess the efficacy of exercise for the management of GDM in order to establish an exercise prescription guideline specific to the condition. It is recommended that women with GDM should do both aerobic and resistance exercise at a moderate intensity, a minimum of three times a week for 30-60 min each time. PMID:26240700

  13. The effects of polycystic ovary syndrome on gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aktun, Hale Lebriz; Yorgunlar, Betul; Acet, Mustafa; Aygun, Banu Kumbak; Karaca, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the inter-relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational diabetes mellitus, and demonstrate maternal and fetal outcomes. This was a case-control study in 1360 pregnant women who received a diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus between 24 and 28 weeks of gestational age. Among all diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus, 150 pregnant women had received a polycystic ovary syndrome, and 160 women who did not have polycystic ovary syndrome were designated as controls. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was 26.3% and 12% in the case and control groups, respectively. Preeclampsia was seen at an incidence of 12% and 6% in case and in control groups, respectively. The difference in neonatal hypoglycemia between the two groups was statistically significant, with an incidence of 17% and 5% in the case and in control groups, respectively. This study demonstrated that the presence of polycystic ovary syndrome along with gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of pregnancy induced hypertension by 2.4 fold, preeclampsia by 2 fold and neonatal hypoglycemia by 3.2 fold, compared to gestational diabetes mellitus alone.

  14. Survey on testing for gestational diabetes mellitus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Flack, Jeff R; Ross, Glynis P

    2016-08-01

    We surveyed members of National Association of Diabetes Centres (NADC) assessing use of new Australasian Diabetes In Pregnancy Society (ADIPS) and Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) diagnostic guidelines in Australia. We found piecemeal adoption of recommended changes, with cessation of the 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) universal, early screening implementation common, but by varied methodologies, and new diagnostic criteria acceptance far from complete with significant workload increases almost universal.

  15. Myo-Inositol Supplementation to Prevent Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Celentano, Claudio; Matarrelli, Barbara; Mattei, Peter A; Pavone, Giulia; Vitacolonna, Ester; Liberati, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common complication characterized by increased insulin resistance, and by increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes affecting both the mother and the fetus. International guidelines describe optimal ways to recognize it, and the recommended treatment of patients affected to reduce adverse outcomes. Improving insulin resistance could reduce incidence of GDM and its complications. Recently, a few trials have been published on the possible prevention of GDM. Inositol has been proposed as a food supplement that might reduce gestational diabetes incidence in high-risk pregnant women. PMID:26898405

  16. Myo-Inositol Supplementation to Prevent Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Celentano, Claudio; Matarrelli, Barbara; Mattei, Peter A; Pavone, Giulia; Vitacolonna, Ester; Liberati, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common complication characterized by increased insulin resistance, and by increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes affecting both the mother and the fetus. International guidelines describe optimal ways to recognize it, and the recommended treatment of patients affected to reduce adverse outcomes. Improving insulin resistance could reduce incidence of GDM and its complications. Recently, a few trials have been published on the possible prevention of GDM. Inositol has been proposed as a food supplement that might reduce gestational diabetes incidence in high-risk pregnant women.

  17. Association between gestational diabetes and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Chris L; Ioannou, George N; Rulyak, Stephen J; Critchlow, Cathy

    2003-12-15

    Gestational diabetes and pregnancy-induced hypertension are common, and their relation is not well understood. The authors conducted a population-based case-control study using 1992-1998 Washington State birth certificate and hospital discharge records to investigate this relation. Consecutive cases of pregnancy-induced hypertension were divided into four groups based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes: eclampsia (n=154), severe preeclampsia (n=1,180), mild preeclampsia (n=5,468), and gestational hypertension (n=8,943). Cases were compared with controls who did not have pregnancy-induced hypertension (n=47,237). Gestational diabetes was more common in each case group (3.9% in eclamptics, 4.5% in severe preeclamptics, and 4.4% in both mild preeclamptics and those with gestational hypertension) than in controls (2.7%). After adjustment for body mass index, age, ethnicity, parity, and prenatal care, gestational diabetes was associated with increased risk of severe preeclampsia (odds ratio (OR)=1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 2.1), mild preeclampsia (OR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 1.8), and gestational hypertension (OR=1.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.6). Gestational diabetes was more strongly associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension among women who received less prenatal care (OR=4.2 for eclampsia and OR=3.1 for severe preeclampsia, p<0.05 for both) and among Black women (OR for eclampsia and preeclampsia together=3.9, p<0.05).

  18. [Diabetes in Pregnancy - Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, Helmut; Demandt, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    In Germany in 5.5% of all births diabetes is registered. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes planning pregnancy, preconception counseling, diabetologic care with optimized periconceptional metabolic control and folic acid supplementation are essential for good pregnancy outcome. Gestational diabetes (GDM) should be diagnosed timely and managed according to existing guidelines. GDM is treated with insulin in approximately 20%. In 1-2% of GDM cases a glucokinase gene mutation is present (MODY 2). Pregnancies after bariatric-metabolic surgery are increasing and show high risks. PMID:27598916

  19. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher's exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ(2)=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ(2)=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

  20. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher’s exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ2=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ2=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. PMID:26823865

  1. Gestational diabetes insipidus: a morphological study of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, F; Buccoliero, A M; Garbini, F; Gheri, C F; Moncini, D; Poggi, G; Saladino, V; Rossi Degl'Innocenti, D; Gheri, R G; Taddei, G L

    2009-12-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) refers to the state of excessive water intake and hypotonic polyuria. Those cases manifesting in pregnancy and referred to as GDI may persist thereafter or may be a transient latent form that resolves after delivery. Microscopic examination of affected subjects has not been previously reported. In the literature, there are various case reports and case series on diabetes insipidus in pregnancy. In this study, we present a case that had transient diabetes insipidus during pregnancy in which the placenta was examined.

  2. [Translational research in gestational diabetes mellitus and mild gestational hyperglycemia: current knowledge and our experience].

    PubMed

    Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Piculo, Fernanda; Marini, Gabriela; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Barbosa, Angélica Pascon

    2013-10-01

    Maternal diabetes constitutes an unfavorable environment for fetal-placental and embryonic development. It is has important repercussion in modern obstetrics, since it is associated to an increased risk of neonatal and maternal morbidity, and it still is a significant medical challenge. The increased occurrence of diabetes worldwide, the increase in diabetes type 2 in women at reproductive age and the crossed generation of intrauterine programming for diabetes type 2 are the bases for the growing interest in utilization of diabetic experimental samples, with the aim to acquire knowledge about the mechanisms that induce development alterations in gestational diabetes. Several studies have shown the benefits of diabetes prevention, with interventions in lifestyle, metabolic improvement and control of cardiovascular risk factors to substantially prevent the complications of this devastating disease. Despite these findings, the recent revolution in the scientific knowledge, and the infinite number of new therapies for diabetes, there is still a large gap between what was learned through research and what is really done in public, clinical and community health. The negative economic impact of this complacency in people, families, and national economies is alarming. It is expected that translational research in the binomial diabetes and pregnancy are implemented in centers of excellence, in both basic and applied research, and complemented by multicenter clinical studies, conducted in a pragmatic way to increase the level of scientific evidence with more reliable diagnostic and propaedeutic resources.

  3. Outcomes of offspring born to mothers with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Noel Pratheepan; Subasinghe, Chandrika Jayakanthi; Maheshi Gimhani Amarawardena, Wickrama Kankanamge

    2016-09-01

    With the global explosion of Diabetes and obesity at epidemic proportions, keeping Asia at its epicenter, 1 in 7 live births get complicated with hyperglycaemia; either pre-existing Diabetes or Gestational Diabetes. In utero, exposure to an adverse metabolic environment with nutrient excess or deficiencies and toxic metabolites with teratogenic potential, leads to short and long term consequences to the offspring. Multisystemic congenital malformations, macrosomia associated obstetric complications and perinatal metabolic derangements complicate the early neonatal stage. Epigenetic changes taking place during foetal development initiate foetal metabolic programming and create adverse metabolic memory leading to childhood obesity, metabolic syndrome and Diabetes. Hyperglycaemia and poor metabolic parameters throughout pregnancy correlate with adverse offspring outcomes. Novel management strategies targeting near normoglycaemia have achieved marked improvements in rates of perinatal mortality and other adverse outcomes. Therapies for management of Diabetes in pregnancy should be carefully selected upon the safety profile for the offspring. PMID:27582165

  4. Prevention of gestational diabetes in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Govinden, Gemma; Bustani, R; Song, S; Farrell, TA

    2015-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus can be defined as ‘glucose intolerance or hyperglycaemia with onset or first recognition during pregnancy.’ Objective The objective of our systematic review was to see if there was any intervention that could be used for primary prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Search strategy Major databases were searched from 1966 to Aug 2012 without language restriction. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing intervention with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes were included. Meta-analysis was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. The primary outcome assessed was the incidence of gestational diabetes. Data collection and analysis Data from included trials were extracted independently by two authors and analysed using Rev-Man 5. Main results A total of 2422 women from 14 randomised trials were included; which compared diet (four randomised trials), exercise (three randomised trials), lifestyle changes (five randomised trials) and metformin (two randomised trials) with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Dietary intervention was associated with a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes (Odds ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.76) and gestational hypertension (Odds ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.09, 0.86) compared to standard care. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus or in the secondary outcomes with exercise, lifestyle changes or metformin use compared to standard care. Conclusions The use of dietary intervention has shown a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus and gestational hypertension compared to standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27512459

  5. Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient’s Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy Related Science Advances Healthy Diet May Fend Off Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes (featured on NICHD website) Physical Activity May Stave Off Diabetes for Women At ...

  6. [Gestational diabetes mellitus: importance of blood glucose monitoring].

    PubMed

    Flores Le-Roux, Juana A; Benaiges Boix, David; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is common during pregnancy, and is frequently associated with maternal and perinatal complications. Intensive treatment of hyperglycaemia during pregnancy has been shown to reduce perinatal morbidity. In women with pregestational type 1 or 2 diabetes, hyperglycaemia during labour and delivery is an important factor in the development of neonatal hypoglycaemia. There are no generally accepted recommendations for women with GDM. Recent studies evaluating patients with GDM show that peripartum glucose control can be achieved in these women without the need for insulin use in the majority of cases. Hyperglycaemia during labour is not related with treatment established during pregnancy but rather with non-compliance of endocrinological follow-up. Factors such as ethnic origin, neonatal hypoxaemia, and large for gestational age seem to play an important role in the development of neonatal hypoglycaemia.

  7. [Gestational diabetes from the perspective of hospitalized pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Pessoa, Sarah Maria Fraxe; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological qualitative study aimed to understand the meaning of the experiences lived by women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The sample consisted of 12 patients hospitalized at a maternity hospital in the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceará, Brazil, which expressed their feelings and perceptions through open interviews and drawings. The empirical material was fully transcribed and then organized and analyzed by the phenomenological method. The results revealed two themes: (1) Living experiences that bring happiness and well-being, and (2) Living experiences that cause suffering. This phenomenological study showed the experience of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, thus enabling to plan and to implement intervention programs based on a participatory model of health in order to prioritize the subjective aspects involved in high-risk pregnancy. PMID:23743842

  8. The role of lifestyle interventions in the prevention of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Ilana J; Feig, Denice S

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, increased costs, and long-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the mother. Observational data have shown an association between reduced weight gain, healthy eating, and physical activity and reduced rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Despite this, most randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions to prevent GDM have been negative. Dietary approaches appear to be more successful than exercise or a combination of diet and exercise at decreasing GDM. Reasons for negative studies may include lack of power, lack of intervention uptake, and severity of placenta mediated insulin resistance. Future studies should be powered for a reduction in GDM, monitor lifestyle changes closely, and include a psychological component in the intervention.

  9. Gestational diabetes mellitus: does an effective prevention strategy exist?

    PubMed

    Agha-Jaffar, Rochan; Oliver, Nick; Johnston, Desmond; Robinson, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The overall incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. Preventing pathological hyperglycaemia during pregnancy could have several benefits: a reduction in the immediate adverse outcomes during pregnancy, a reduced risk of long-term sequelae and a decrease in the economic burden to healthcare systems. In this Review we examine the evidence supporting lifestyle modification strategies in women with and without risk factors for GDM, and the efficacy of dietary supplementation and pharmacological approaches to prevent this disease. A high degree of heterogeneity exists between trials so a generalised recommendation is problematic. In population studies of dietary or combined lifestyle measures, risk of developing GDM is not improved and those involving a physical activity intervention have yielded conflicting results. In pregnant women with obesity, dietary modification might reduce fetal macrosomia but in these patients, low compliance and no significant reduction in the incidence of GDM has been observed in trials investigating physical activity. Supplementation with probiotics or myoinositol have reduced the incidence of GDM but confirmatory studies are still needed. In randomized controlled trials, metformin does not prevent GDM in certain at-risk groups. Given the considerable potential for reducing disease burden, further research is needed to identify strategies that can be easily and effectively implemented on a population level. PMID:27339886

  10. Avoiding the slippery slope: preventing the development of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Feig, Denice S

    2012-05-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By identifying this high-risk group who has not yet developed the disease, we have the opportunity to try to prevent this progression to diabetes. In this article, we review the evidence for different strategies used to prevent the onset of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes. These strategies include lifestyle changes, medications and breastfeeding.

  11. The Therapeutic Effect of Zuogui Wan in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Liu, Xinshe; Xu, Kaixia; Yang, Xiangzhu; Wang, Huifeng

    2014-01-01

    In this experiment, we established an animal model of gestational diabetes mellitus rats using streptozotocin. Using the rat model of GDM, the pregnant rats in 1-19d were divided into three groups: (1) Zuogui Wan gestational diabetes mellitus group (group I, n = 12), (2) gestational diabetes mellitus rats as the control group (group II, n = 11), and (3) rats of normal pregnancy group (group III, n = 11). Compared with gestational diabetes mellitus rats as the control group, Zuogui Wan can change the indexes of fasting blood glucose, body weight, total cholesterol, insulin, and metabolism cage index significantly in Zuogui Wan gestational diabetes mellitus group. We can conclude that Zuogui Wan has the therapeutic effect on gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:25136475

  12. A review of prevention strategies for gestational diabetes: is there a missing X-factor?

    PubMed

    Castorino, Kristin; Bradley, Paige K; Truong, Lydia; Martinez, Jenny

    2016-12-01

    Gestational diabetes affects up to one in five pregnancies and can have significant consequences for both mother and baby. There have been great efforts to identify strategies to prevent gestational diabetes during pregnancy. These efforts have been extended to the pre-pregnancy and postpartum periods to address limitations during pregnancy. In this review we explore how diet, exercise and lifestyle modification can be used to prevent gestational diabetes.

  13. Placental lipases in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Barrett, Helen L; Kubala, Marta H; Scholz Romero, Katherin; Denny, Kerina J; Woodruff, Trent M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2014-01-01

    Infants of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are more likely to be born large for gestational age with a higher percentage body fat. Elevated maternal lipids may contribute to this. Placental lipases such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), endothelial lipase (EL) and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) are involved in transferring lipids from mother to fetus. Previous studies of expression of these lipases in placentae in women with diabetes in pregnancy have reported divergent results. Intracellular lipases such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and HSL are central to lipid droplet metabolism. The activities of these lipases are both influenced by Perilipin 1, and ATGL is also activated by a co-factor comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and inhibited by G0/G1 switch gene 2 (GS02). None of these modifying factors or ATGL have been examined previously in placenta. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the expression of ATGL, HSL, LPL, EL, as well as Perilipin 1, GS02 and CGI-58 in term pregnancies complicated by GDM. mRNA and protein expression of the lipases were measured in placentae from 17 women with GDM and 17 normoglycaemic pregnancies, matched for maternal BMI and gestational age of delivery. ATGL mRNA expression was increased and HSL mRNA expression reduced in placentae from GDM although there was no differences in protein expression of any of the lipases. All lipases were localised to trophoblasts and endothelial cells. The expression of Perilipin 1 and CGI-58 mRNA was increased and GS02 not altered in GDM. These results suggest that there is no difference in expression in these four lipases between GDM and normoglycaemic placentae, and therefore altered lipid transfer via these lipases does not contribute to large for gestational age in infants of women with GDM. PMID:25118138

  14. Gestational diabetes: An overview with attention for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, M; Putoto, G; Laterza, F; Pizzol, Damiano

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as a glucose intolerance that occurs for the first time or it is first identified during pregnancy. The GDM etiology is multifactorial. It has not completely been established yet and several known risk factors may contribute to its onset. To date, there are no shared guidelines on the management and follow-up, especially regarding the low-income countries. In this paper, we describe the state of art about epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnosis, and management of GDM. Moreover, we focus on the current state in low income countries trying to outline basis for further research. PMID:27560638

  15. Gestational diabetes, pregnancy hypertension, and late vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Marshall W

    2007-07-01

    The complexity of the several pathogenic pathways that cause hypertension and vascular disease and the prolonged interval that appears to predate clinical morbidity have hindered inquiry into the association between GDM and vascular disorders. As a forme fruste of later type 2 diabetes, GDM-affected gravidas are identified as at risk of diabetes-related atherosclerosis, glomerular disruption, and pathogenic retinal angio-genesis. That GDM is evidence for underlying chronic conditions such as dysregulation of innate immune response that, independent of the diabetic state, produces vascular disease is difficult state, produces vascular disease is difficult to assert with the present published literature. Cross-sectional studies of patients with established gestational hypertension or preeclampsia are ambiguous as to the possible pathogenic effect of insulin resistance. Cohort studies initiated in early and mid-pregnancy show evidence that both gestational hypertension and preeclampsia may be more prevalent in gravidas with greater insulin resistance. The association of gestational glucose intolerance with gestational hypertension appears to be independent of obesity and ambient glycemia but explained in part by insulin resistance. Late pregnancy preeclampsia is associated with elevated mid-pregnancy BMI, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin, urate, and C-reactive protein, suggestive of metabolic and immune dysregulation. GDM appears to be associated with overexpressed innate immune response, which, in turn, is associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease. Among women with GDM, markers of insulin resistance do not appear to correlate with hypertension in short-term cohort studies. However, when non-GDM subjects are compared with subjects with GDM, postpregnancy studies do show an associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease. Among women with GDM, markers of insulin resistance do not appear to correlate with hypertension in short

  16. Prevention of type 2 diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hod, Moshe; Hadar, Eran; Cabero-Roura, Luis

    2015-10-01

    The morbidity and mortality rates related to diabetes are constantly rising, as well as those for other noncommunicable diseases. The epidemic is spreading throughout the world, in both low- and high-resource countries. Prevention is a key aspect in the battle against the disease and obstetricians play a critical role in the fight. Prevention starts in utero-for the diabetic mother, her infant, and future generations. The postpartum period should not be neglected because it provides another window of opportunity to address prevention. Data on the prevention of type 2 diabetes among women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are discussed.

  17. Sedentary behavior, gestational diabetes mellitus, and type 2 diabetes risk: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven T; Lynch, Brigid; Vallance, Jeff; Davenport, Margie H; Gardiner, Paul A; Butalia, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A substantial number of pregnancies are complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and up to 70 % of women with GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Given the extensive body of research suggesting physical activity reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, facilitating physical activity, and reducing sedentary time may be effective approaches to promote the health of women with a previous GDM diagnosis. Here, we discuss physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior, in the context of GDM and the potential for type 2 diabetes risk reduction. PMID:26823010

  18. Review of gestational diabetes mellitus effects on vascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise A; Chik, Constance L; Ryan, Edmond A

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dysfunction has been described in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, previous gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Factors contributing to vascular changes remain uncertain. The aim of this review was to summarize vascular structure and function changes found to occur in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and to identify factors that contribute to vascular dysfunction. A systematic search of electronic databases yielded 15 publications from 1998 to March 2014 that met the inclusion criteria. Our review confirmed that previous gestational diabetes mellitus contributes to vascular dysfunction, and the most consistent risk factor associated with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and vascular dysfunction was elevated body mass index. Heterogeneity existed across studies in determining the relationship of glycaemic levels and insulin resistance to vascular dysfunction.

  19. Two Cases of Allergy to Insulin in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Shin Bum; Jo, Seong Il; Shin, Jin Kyeong; Kwon, Hee Sun; Jeong, Heekyung; Son, Jang Won; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Sung Rae; Kim, Byung Kee

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reaction to insulin is uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations and is more rare in pregnant than non-pregnant females due to altered immune reaction during pregnancy. Herein, we report two cases of allergic reaction to insulin in gestational diabetes that were successfully managed. One case was a 33-year-old female using isophane-neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin and insulin lispro. She experienced dyspnea, cough, urticaria and itching sensation at the sites of insulin injection immediately after insulin administration. We discontinued insulin therapy and started oral hypoglycemic agents with metformin and glibenclamide. The other case was a 32-year-old female using insulin lispro and insulin detemer. She experienced pruritus and burning sensation and multiple nodules at the sites of insulin injection. We changed the insulin from insulin lispro to insulin aspart. Assessments including immunoglobulin E (IgE), IgG, eosinophil, insulin antibody level and skin biopsy were performed. In the two cases, the symptoms were resolved after changing the insulin to oral agents or other insulin preparations. We report two cases of allergic reaction to human insulin in gestational diabetes due to its rarity. PMID:26435137

  20. Two Cases of Allergy to Insulin in Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Shin Bum; Jo, Seong Il; Shin, Jin Kyeong; Kwon, Hee Sun; Jeong, Heekyung; Son, Jang Won; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Sung Rae; Kim, Byung Kee; Yoo, Soon Jib

    2015-09-01

    Allergic reaction to insulin is uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations and is more rare in pregnant than non-pregnant females due to altered immune reaction during pregnancy. Herein, we report two cases of allergic reaction to insulin in gestational diabetes that were successfully managed. One case was a 33-year-old female using isophane-neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin and insulin lispro. She experienced dyspnea, cough, urticaria and itching sensation at the sites of insulin injection immediately after insulin administration. We discontinued insulin therapy and started oral hypoglycemic agents with metformin and glibenclamide. The other case was a 32-year-old female using insulin lispro and insulin detemer. She experienced pruritus and burning sensation and multiple nodules at the sites of insulin injection. We changed the insulin from insulin lispro to insulin aspart. Assessments including immunoglobulin E (IgE), IgG, eosinophil, insulin antibody level and skin biopsy were performed. In the two cases, the symptoms were resolved after changing the insulin to oral agents or other insulin preparations. We report two cases of allergic reaction to human insulin in gestational diabetes due to its rarity. PMID:26435137

  1. Relationship between red cell distribution width and early renal injury in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Zhao, Jiangtao; Jian, Liguo; Ding, Tongbin; Liu, Shichao

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that red cell distribution width was related to adverse cardiovascular events. However, few studies reported the relationship between red cell distribution width and early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Using a cross-sectional design, 334 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus were enrolled according to the criterion of inclusion and exclusion. Demographic and clinical examination data were collected. Depended on the urine albumin, study population were divided into case group (n = 118) and control group (n = 216). Compared with control group, the case group tend to be higher red cell distribution width level (13.6 ± 0.9 vs.12.5 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). The red cell distribution width was positively associated with albuminuria creatinine ratio (r = 0.567, p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regressions showed that red cell distribution width was still associated with early-stage renal injury after adjusting for many other potential cofounders. Compared with the first quartile, the risk ratio of the second, the third and the fourth quartile were 1.38 (95%CI: 1.06-1.80), 1.57 (95%CI: 1.21-2.97), 2.71 (95%CI: 2.08-3.54), respectively. Besides, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, uric acid and blood urea nitrogen were also significantly associated with renal injury in gestational diabetes mellitus patients. The elevated red cell distribution width level might be a predictor of early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. As an easy and routine examination index, red cell distribution width may provide better clinical guidance when combined with other important indices.

  2. Plasma YKL-40 during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rinnov, Anders R; Rathcke, Camilla N; Bonde, Lisbeth; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2015-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is characterised by hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. The clinical circumstances involved in the development of GDM leaves the patient at a high risk of the subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. Plasma levels of the inflammation marker YKL-40 are elevated in type 2 diabetes and correlate with fasting plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. With the present study we aimed to determine if pregnancy (and associated insulin resistance) with or without GDM affects plasma YKL-40 levels. Plasma from women diagnosed with GDM and healthy normal glucose-tolerant pregnant women (non-GDM) was obtained at the third trimester of pregnancy and again 3-4 months following delivery, and levels of YKL-40 and interleukin 6 (IL-6; known to regulate YKL-40) were measured. Plasma YKL-40 levels were similarly low during pregnancy in both groups and increased significantly after delivery, but remained lower in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group postpartum. In contrast, plasma IL-6 levels were not affected by pregnancy or diagnosis of GDM, Nevertheless, YKL-40 levels were associated with IL-6 levels in the non-GDM group (but not in the GDM group). Pregnancy seems to be associated with a temporary reduction in circulating YKL-40, which increases after delivery, but to a much lesser extent in women with GDM than in non-GDM women.

  3. Migrant Health: A Preliminary Report on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes in a Hispanic Migrant Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the preliminary results of an attempt to screen pregnant Hispanic migrant farm workers for gestational diabetes. They are slightly more prone than the overall population of pregnant women to suffer from it. Provides recommendations for management of women with gestational diabetes, and describes how this is performed at the Indian Health…

  4. Gestational Diabetes: Long-Term Central Nervous System Developmental and Cognitive Sequelae.

    PubMed

    Perna, Robert; Loughan, Ashlee R; Le, Jessica; Tyson, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is a common complication of pregnancy and occurs in approximately 7% of all pregnancies. It has been associated with an increased rate of congenital anomalies including disturbances of intrauterine growth, delayed brain maturity, and neurobehavioral abnormalities in the offspring. The resulting maternal and fetal metabolic dysfunction leads to diminished iron stores (which can affect red blood cell [RBC] production and subsequent organogenesis), a metabolism-placental perfusion mismatch, increased FFA, increased lactic acidosis, and potential hypoxia. Though most newborns born in the context of gestational diabetes are not significantly affected by it, empirical research suggests gestational diabetes has been associated with lower general intelligence, language impairments, attention weaknesses, impulsivity, and behavioral problems. In extreme cases, it may essentially function as a gestational brain insult. Children who are exposed to poorly controlled gestational diabetes may benefit from some form of tracking or follow-up assessments. Additionally, clinicians evaluating children with developmental learning or cognitive dysfunction may want to seek appropriate gestational diabetes-related information from the parents. A greater understanding of this significant gestational risk may help foster improved prenatal diabetes management and may help reduce the neurodevelopmental effects of gestational diabetes. PMID:25265045

  5. Attenuating type 2 diabetes with postpartum interventions following gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wasalathanthri, Sudharshani

    2015-01-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes should be screened during and after the postpartum period because of a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although differences exist between guidelines practiced throughout various parts of the world, all recommend the use of cutoffs for fasting and/or post-load plasma glucose to diagnose diabetes or pre-diabetes. The use of these glycemic parameters could be optimized when a trend is observed, rather than considering them as isolated values at various time points. As the presence of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction start before glycemic changes are evident, the estimation of insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function by Homeostatic Model Assessment is suggested for women who have additional risk factors for diabetes, such as obesity. Disease-modifying lifestyle intervention should be the first-line strategy to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Intensive lifestyle interventions are designed to decrease caloric intake and increase physical activity in order to reduce body weight and fat, which will in turn reduce insulin resistance. This article also reviews unique problems of postpartum women, which should be considered when designing and implementing an intervention. Innovative “out of the box” thinking is appreciated, as continued adherence to a program is a challenge to both the women and the health care personnel who deal with them. PMID:25987963

  6. Attenuating type 2 diabetes with postpartum interventions following gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wasalathanthri, Sudharshani

    2015-05-15

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes should be screened during and after the postpartum period because of a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although differences exist between guidelines practiced throughout various parts of the world, all recommend the use of cutoffs for fasting and/or post-load plasma glucose to diagnose diabetes or pre-diabetes. The use of these glycemic parameters could be optimized when a trend is observed, rather than considering them as isolated values at various time points. As the presence of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction start before glycemic changes are evident, the estimation of insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function by Homeostatic Model Assessment is suggested for women who have additional risk factors for diabetes, such as obesity. Disease-modifying lifestyle intervention should be the first-line strategy to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Intensive lifestyle interventions are designed to decrease caloric intake and increase physical activity in order to reduce body weight and fat, which will in turn reduce insulin resistance. This article also reviews unique problems of postpartum women, which should be considered when designing and implementing an intervention. Innovative "out of the box" thinking is appreciated, as continued adherence to a program is a challenge to both the women and the health care personnel who deal with them. PMID:25987963

  7. Attenuating type 2 diabetes with postpartum interventions following gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wasalathanthri, Sudharshani

    2015-05-15

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes should be screened during and after the postpartum period because of a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although differences exist between guidelines practiced throughout various parts of the world, all recommend the use of cutoffs for fasting and/or post-load plasma glucose to diagnose diabetes or pre-diabetes. The use of these glycemic parameters could be optimized when a trend is observed, rather than considering them as isolated values at various time points. As the presence of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction start before glycemic changes are evident, the estimation of insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function by Homeostatic Model Assessment is suggested for women who have additional risk factors for diabetes, such as obesity. Disease-modifying lifestyle intervention should be the first-line strategy to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Intensive lifestyle interventions are designed to decrease caloric intake and increase physical activity in order to reduce body weight and fat, which will in turn reduce insulin resistance. This article also reviews unique problems of postpartum women, which should be considered when designing and implementing an intervention. Innovative "out of the box" thinking is appreciated, as continued adherence to a program is a challenge to both the women and the health care personnel who deal with them.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  9. Changing trends in management of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Poomalar, Gunasekaran Kala

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is on the rise globally. In view of the increasing prevalence of GDM and fetal and neonatal complications associated with it, there is a splurge of research in this field and management of GDM is undergoing a sea change. Trends are changing in prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and future follow up. There is emerging evidence regarding use of moderate exercise, probiotics and vitamin D in the prevention of GDM. Regarding treatment, newer insulin analogs like aspart, lispro and detemir are associated with better glycemic control than older insulins. Continuous glucose monitoring systems and continuous subcutaneous insulin systems may play a role in those who require higher doses of insulin for sugar control. Evidence exists that favors metformin as a safer alternative to insulin in view of good glycemic control and better perinatal outcomes. As the risk of developing GDM in subsequent pregnancies and also the risk of overt diabetes in later life is high, regular assessment of these women is required in future. Lifestyle interventions or metformin should be offered to women with a history of GDM who develop pre-diabetes. Further studies are required in the field of prevention of GDM for optimizing obstetric outcome. PMID:25789109

  10. Childhood Cognitive Ability: Relationship to Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in India

    PubMed Central

    Veena, S R; Krishnaveni, G V; Srinivasan, K; Kurpad, A V; Muthayya, S; Hill, J C; Kiran, K N; Fall, C H D

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis To test the hypothesis that maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with poorer cognitive ability in children born to mothers with GDM compared to children born to non-GDM mothers in India. Methods During 1997-98 maternal GDM status was assessed at 30±2 weeks of gestation. Between 2007-2008, at a mean age of 9.7 years, 515 children (32-offspring of GDM mothers (ODM’s); 483-offspring of non-GDM mothers (controls)) from the Mysore Parthenon birth cohort underwent cognitive function assessment using tests from the Kaufman Assessment Battery for children-second edition and additional tests measuring learning, long-term storage/retrieval, short-term memory, reasoning, attention and concentration, visuo-spatial and verbal abilities. Results Compared to controls, ODM’S scored higher in tests for learning, long-term retrieval/storage (p=0.008), reasoning (p=0.02), verbal ability (p=0.01) and attention and concentration (p=0.003). In multiple regression, adjusted for the child’s age, sex, gestation, neonatal weight and head circumference, maternal age, parity, BMI, parent’s socio-economic status, education and rural/urban residence, this difference remained significant only for learning, long-term retrieval/storage (β=0.4SD (95% CI: 0.01, 0.75); p=0.042) and verbal ability (β=0.5SD (95% CI: 0.09, 0.83); p=0.015) and not with other test scores. Conclusions/interpretation In this population of healthy Indian children, there was no evidence of lower cognitive ability in ODM’s. In fact some cognitive scores were higher in ODM’s. PMID:20614102

  11. Gestational diabetes insipidus and intrauterine fetal death of monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Wiser, A; Hershko-Klement, A; Fishman, A; Nachasch, N; Fejgin, M

    2008-10-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare disorder. The onset is usually in the third trimester of pregnancy. We present a 24-year-old primigravida in her 35th week of a monochorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancy. The patient presented with intrauterine death of both twins accompanied by HELLP syndrome, hypernatremia and hemoconcentration. Urine osmolality below that of the plasma suggested GDI. 1-deamino-8D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP) treatment was started with a quick response. GDI is probably the result of excessive activity of placental vasopressinase. In cases of liver dysfunction, the clearance rate of vasopressinase decreases, explaining the association of GDI with acute fatty liver and HELLP syndrome. Alert to this diagnosis, its evaluation and treatment is important.

  12. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Screening with fasting plasma glucose.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2016-07-25

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has had a checkered history. During the last three decades, a few initial anecdotal reports have given way to the recent well-conducted studies. This review: (1) traces the history; (2) weighs the advantages and disadvantages; (3) addresses the significance in early pregnancy; (4) underscores the benefits after delivery; and (5) emphasizes the cost savings of using the FPG in the screening of GDM. It also highlights the utility of fasting capillary glucose and stresses the value of the FPG in circumventing the cumbersome oral glucose tolerance test. An understanding of all the caveats is crucial to be able to use the FPG for investigating glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Thus, all health professionals can use the patient-friendly FPG to simplify the onerous algorithms available for the screening and diagnosis of GDM - thereby helping each and every pregnant woman. PMID:27525055

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Screening with fasting plasma glucose

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has had a checkered history. During the last three decades, a few initial anecdotal reports have given way to the recent well-conducted studies. This review: (1) traces the history; (2) weighs the advantages and disadvantages; (3) addresses the significance in early pregnancy; (4) underscores the benefits after delivery; and (5) emphasizes the cost savings of using the FPG in the screening of GDM. It also highlights the utility of fasting capillary glucose and stresses the value of the FPG in circumventing the cumbersome oral glucose tolerance test. An understanding of all the caveats is crucial to be able to use the FPG for investigating glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Thus, all health professionals can use the patient-friendly FPG to simplify the onerous algorithms available for the screening and diagnosis of GDM - thereby helping each and every pregnant woman. PMID:27525055

  14. Bariatric Surgery and the Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kent; Alexander, Charlotte; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasingly common obstetrical problem. Due to the global escalation in the prevalence of obesity, as many as 15 % of pregnant women may soon be classified as having GDM. While often not diagnosed until late gestation, GDM is now recognized as a disorder of glucose and lipid metabolism, systemic inflammation, and insulin resistance that begins early in pregnancy. Recent large randomized trials have clarified the risk of maternal and neonatal complications caused by GDM, as well as the potential to ameliorate these risks. There is significant interest in the potential to reduce the risk for developing GDM in obese women through the performance of bariatric surgery (BS) before pregnancy. BS significantly reduces the risk for GDM, preeclampsia, and large neonates. However, it seems that the risk for small neonates and preterm delivery is increased. No significant differences are observed in regard to cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, or perinatal mortality. In this article, we address the effects of GDM on the mother and child, and explore the risks and benefits of BS in the obstetrical population.

  15. Maternal obesity characterized by gestational diabetes increases the susceptibility of rat offspring to hepatic steatosis via a disrupted liver metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Troy J; Fonseca, Mario A; Campbell, Kristyn E; Moyce, Brittany L; Cole, Laura K; Hatch, Grant M; Doucette, Christine A; Klein, Julianne; Aliani, Michel; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-01-01

    weight gain, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinaemia and mild hyperglycaemia. Compared to the offspring of lean dams, exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus during the prenatal period resulted in obesity, hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in young rat offspring that consumed a postnatal diet that was low in fat. The combination of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and the postnatal consumption of a high-fat diet by the offspring caused a more severe metabolic phenotype. Metabolomic profiling of the liver tissues of the offspring of gestational diabetic dams revealed accumulation of lipotoxic lipids and reduced phosphatidylethanolamine levels compared to the offspring of lean dams. The results establish that gestational diabetes mellitus is a driver of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in the offspring. PMID:25922055

  16. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child.

  17. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child. PMID:25885278

  18. Free Thyroxine During Early Pregnancy and Risk for Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Haddow, James E; Craig, Wendy Y; Neveux, Louis M; Palomaki, Glenn E; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Malone, Fergal D; D'Alton, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have now reported associations between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low free thyroxine (fT4) during the second and third trimesters, but not in the first trimester. The present study further examines relationships between low fT4, maternal weight, and GDM among women in the FaSTER (First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk) trial, in an effort to determine the extent to which thyroid hormones might contribute to causality. The FaSTER cohort includes 9351 singleton, euthyroid women; 272 of these women were subsequently classified as having GDM. Thyrotropin (TSH), fT4, and thyroid antibodies were measured at 11-14 weeks' gestation (first trimester) and 15-18.9 weeks' gestation (second trimester). An earlier report of this cohort documented an inverse relationship between fT4 in the second trimester and maternal weight. In the current analysis, women with GDM were significantly older (32 vs. 28 years) and weighed more (75 vs. 64.5 kg). Maternal weight and age (but not TSH) were significantly associated univariately with fT4 (dependent variable), in the order listed. Second trimester fT4 odds ratios (OR) for GDM were 2.06 [95% CI 1.37-3.09] (unadjusted); and 1.89 [95% CI 1.26-2.84] (adjusted). First trimester odds ratios were not significant: OR 1.45 [95%CI 0.97-2.16] (unadjusted) and 1.11 [95% CI 0.74-1.62] (adjusted). The second trimester fT4/GDM relationship thus appeared to strengthen as gestation progressed. In FaSTER, high maternal weight was associated with both low fT4 and a higher GDM rate in the second trimester. Peripheral deiodinase activity is known to increase with high caloric intake (represented by high weight). We speculate that weight-related low fT4 (the metabolically inactive prohormone) is a marker for deiodinase activity, serving as a substrate for conversion of fT4 to free triiodothyronine (fT3), the active hormone responsible for glucose-related metabolic activity. PMID:26910563

  19. Free Thyroxine During Early Pregnancy and Risk for Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, James E.; Craig, Wendy Y.; Neveux, Louis M.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Malone, Fergal D.; D’Alton, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have now reported associations between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low free thyroxine (fT4) during the second and third trimesters, but not in the first trimester. The present study further examines relationships between low fT4, maternal weight, and GDM among women in the FaSTER (First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk) trial, in an effort to determine the extent to which thyroid hormones might contribute to causality. The FaSTER cohort includes 9351 singleton, euthyroid women; 272 of these women were subsequently classified as having GDM. Thyrotropin (TSH), fT4, and thyroid antibodies were measured at 11–14 weeks’ gestation (first trimester) and 15–18.9 weeks’ gestation (second trimester). An earlier report of this cohort documented an inverse relationship between fT4 in the second trimester and maternal weight. In the current analysis, women with GDM were significantly older (32 vs. 28 years) and weighed more (75 vs. 64.5 kg). Maternal weight and age (but not TSH) were significantly associated univariately with fT4 (dependent variable), in the order listed. Second trimester fT4 odds ratios (OR) for GDM were 2.06 [95% CI 1.37–3.09] (unadjusted); and 1.89 [95% CI 1.26–2.84] (adjusted). First trimester odds ratios were not significant: OR 1.45 [95%CI 0.97–2.16] (unadjusted) and 1.11 [95% CI 0.74–1.62] (adjusted). The second trimester fT4/GDM relationship thus appeared to strengthen as gestation progressed. In FaSTER, high maternal weight was associated with both low fT4 and a higher GDM rate in the second trimester. Peripheral deiodinase activity is known to increase with high caloric intake (represented by high weight). We speculate that weight-related low fT4 (the metabolically inactive prohormone) is a marker for deiodinase activity, serving as a substrate for conversion of fT4 to free triiodothyronine (fT3), the active hormone responsible for glucose-related metabolic activity. PMID:26910563

  20. Moderate and Vigorous Intensity Exercise during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain in Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Krefman, Amy E.; Hedderson, Monique M.; Brown, Susan D.; Mevi, Ashley; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Ferrara, Assiamira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy with the rate of gestational weight gain (GWG) from gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to delivery, overall and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Methods Prospective cohort study with physical activity reported shortly after the GDM diagnosis and prepregnancy weight and post-diagnosis GWG obtained from electronic medical records (n= 1,055). Multinomial logistic regression models in the full cohort and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity estimated associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise with GWG below and above the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) prepregnancy BMI-specific recommended ranges for weekly rate of GWG in the second and third trimesters. Results In the full cohort, any participation in vigorous intensity exercise was associated with decreased odds of GWG above recommended ranges as compared to no participation [Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval): 0.63 (0.40, 0.99)], with a significant trend for decreasing odds of excess GWG with increasing level of vigorous intensity exercise. Upon stratification by prepregnancy overweight/obesity, significant associations were only observed for BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2: any vigorous intensity exercise, as compared to none, was associated with 54% decreased odds of excess GWG [0.46 (0.27, 0.79)] and significant trends were detected for decreasing odds of GWG both below and above the IOM’s recommended ranges with increasing level of vigorous exercise (both P ≤ 0.03). No associations were observed for moderate intensity exercise. Conclusions In women with GDM, particularly overweight and obese women, vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy may reduce the odds of excess GWG. PMID:26955997

  1. Epigenetic programming of obesity and diabetes by in utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Hivert, Marie-France; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    It is now well accepted that offspring exposed to maternal undernutrition, obesity, or gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk for chronic diseases later in life, supporting the theory of the early origins of chronic diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which the exposure to an altered in utero environment translates into the development of chronic diseases are not yet well understood. Recently reported promising results help to resolve this issue. They suggest that epigenetic modifications are a potential mechanism for fetal metabolic programming. This review provides an overview of the relationship between the exposure to an altered intrauterine environment and fetal metabolic programming, focusing on gestational diabetes mellitus and epigenetic variations at adipokine candidate genes.

  2. The metallome of the human placenta in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Roverso, Marco; Berté, Chiara; Di Marco, Valerio; Lapolla, Annunziata; Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo; Visentin, Silvia; Cosmi, Erich

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining the knowledge of the "omics" and therefore of the metallomics of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) appears to be a necessary task to obtain information about the molecular causes of this disease. In this study, the metallome of GDM and of other types of diabetes mellitus was first reviewed. The comparative analysis of the published data revealed that no GDM elemental markers could be identified with sufficient reliability in blood or in the other considered samples, with the partial exception of selenium. The placenta was chosen as an alternative target organ for the analysis of the GDM metallome. The full elemental average composition of 19 healthy placentas was obtained by ICP-MS. Analyses were then performed on 28 placentas from women affected by GDM. The statistical tests and the principal component analysis evidenced that cadmium was found in lower concentrations and selenium was found in higher concentrations in GDM placentas than in those of the control group. These results were interpreted in light of literature data, and they attract attention on two key elements for understanding the molecular pathways of GDM.

  3. Prescribing physical activity to prevent and manage gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R; Castorino, Kristin; Jovanovič, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most prevalent metabolic disorder during pregnancy. Women diagnosed with GDM have a substantially greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 5-10 years after delivery, and the risk is increased by excess body weight. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia during pregnancy is potentially harmful to both mother and fetus, resulting in a greater need for Caesarian-section deliveries, delivery of larger infants with more excess body fat, a greater risk of infant death and stillbirth, and an elevated risk of infant hypoglycemia immediately after birth. Fortunately, engaging in physical activity prior to and during pregnancy may lower the risk of developing GDM. Pregnant women should also be advised how to safely increase their physical activity during pregnancy and the postpartum period. An initial approach to becoming more physically active can simply be to encourage women to incorporate more unstructured physical activity into daily living, both before and during pregnancy. Giving women an appropriate exercise prescription can encourage them to participate in physical activity safely and effectively throughout pregnancy to prevent and/or manage GDM. Engaging in 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week has been adopted as a recommendation for all pregnant women. PMID:24379915

  4. Impact of prenatal glucose screening on the diagnosis of gestational diabetes and on pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wen, S W; Liu, S; Kramer, M S; Joseph, K S; Levitt, C; Marcoux, S; Liston, R M

    2000-12-01

    The authors examined the impact of universal screening on the diagnosis of gestational diabetes and its complications. All mothers and newborns registered by the Canadian Institute for Health Information from 1984 to 1996 (even-numbered fiscal years only) were included in the analysis. Over this time period, the proportion of women with gestational diabetes increased ninefold (from 0.3% to 2.7%) while the proportion with prepregnancy diabetes fell from 0.7% to 0.4%. As rates of gestational diabetes increased, a corresponding reduction in the risks of complications (polyhydramnios, amniotic cavity infection, cesarean delivery, and preeclampsia) occurred for women with gestational diabetes. The incidence of gestational diabetes fell in Metro-Hamilton (where screening was discontinued in 1989) but remained high in the rest of Ontario (where screening continued in most areas). No related temporal trends for fetal macrosomia, cesarean delivery, or other diabetes-related complications were observed, regardless of screening policy. The authors concluded that the substantial increase in gestational diabetes in Canada is an artifact caused by universal screening, with no evidence of beneficial effects on pregnancy outcomes. PMID:11117609

  5. Gestational diabetes mellitus with diabetic ketoacidosis in a Yorkshire terrier bitch.

    PubMed

    Armenise, Andrea; Pastorelli, Gianfranco; Palmisano, Angela; Sontas, Hasan B; Romagnoli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A 6 yr old pregnant Yorkshire terrier bitch presented 62 days after mating with an acute history of vomiting and coughing. The owners also reported that the dog was polyuric and polydypsic for the last 2 weeks. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis revealed hyperglycemia, ketonemia, ketonuria, and metabolic acidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed and after emergency treatment, including fluid therapy, prophylactic antibiotics, and regular insulin, the bitch whelped six healthy normal puppies. Two weeks after treatment, the bitch was clinically normal with normal fructosamine levels. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of gestational diabetes mellitus in a small breed dog.

  6. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM.

  7. Lifestyle Interventions to Reduce Risk of Diabetes among Women with Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by more than 50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English-language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, 9 studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. PMID:25220104

  8. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Africa: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Shelley; Dunger, David B.; Norris, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is any degree of impaired glucose tolerance first recognised during pregnancy. Most women with GDM revert to normal glucose metabolism after delivery of their babies; however, they are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life as are their offspring. Determining a country’s GDM prevalence can assist with policy guidelines regarding GDM screening and management, and can highlight areas requiring research. This systematic review assesses GDM prevalence in Africa. Methods and Findings Three electronic databases were searched without language restrictions; PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library. Thirty-one search terms were searched. Eligible articles defined GDM, stated what GDM screening approaches were employed and reported GDM prevalence. The reporting quality and risk of bias within each study was assessed. The PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. The literature search identified 466 unique records. Sixty full text articles were reviewed of which 14 were included in the systematic review. One abstract, for which the full text article could not be obtained, was also included. Information regarding GDM classification, screening methods and prevalence was obtained for six African countries; Ethiopia (n = 1), Morocco (n = 1), Mozambique (n = 1), Nigeria (n = 6), South Africa (n = 4) and Tanzania (n = 1). Prevalence figures ranged from 0% (Tanzania) to 13.9% (Nigeria) with some studies focussing on women with GDM risk factors. Most studies utilised the two hour 75 g oral glucose tolerance test and applied the World Health Organization’s diagnostic criteria. Conclusions Six countries, equating to 11% of the African continent, were represented in this systematic review. This indicates how little is known about GDM in Africa and highlights the need for further research. Considering the increasing public health burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes, it is essential that

  9. Is There a Tendency for Thrombosis in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus?

    PubMed Central

    Gorar, Suheyla; Alioglu, Bulent; Ademoglu, Esranur; Uyar, Seyit; Bekdemir, Handan; Candan, Zehra; Saglam, Beylan; Koc, Gonul; Culha, Cavit; Aral, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Impact of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the coagulation system, dynamics involved at a pathophysiological level and the exact mechanism remain unclear. Aims: To evaluate the association between diabetes-related parameters and hemostatic factors to search for a tendency of thrombosis in GDM. Settings and Design: Nineteen pregnant women who had GDM, 16 healthy pregnant and 13 healthy nonpregnant controls admitted to the Endocrinology outpatient clinics were enrolled in the study. Subjects and Methods: Fasting and postprandial glucose, hemoglobin A1c and insulin levels, and insulin resistance; fructosamine, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), plasminogen activator inhibitor Type-1 (PAI-1), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), fibrinogen, plasminogen and hemoglobin levels, platelet counts, prothrombin time (PT), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis, and post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference or Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison tests for comparison of the study groups. Results: PT and aPTT were significantly lower in GDM patients compared to controls (P < 0.05), whereas fibrinogen and plasminogen levels were significantly higher in this group compared to both nonpregnant and healthy pregnant controls (P < 0.05 for each). TAFI, TFPI, PAI-1, and tissue t-PA levels were not significantly different among groups. Conclusions: Our findings indicate tendency to develop thrombosis in GDM similar to diabetes mellitus; but more comprehensive studies with larger sample size are needed to determine the relationship between GDM and hemostasis. PMID:27365919

  10. Excessive secretion of insulin precursors characterizes and predicts gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Swinn, R A; Wareham, N J; Gregory, R; Curling, V; Clark, P M; Dalton, K J; Edwards, O M; O'Rahilly, S

    1995-08-01

    Using assays that specifically measure insulin, intact proinsulin, and 32,33 split proinsulin, we examined the beta-cell secretory response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 64 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 154 pregnant normoglycemic control subjects of comparable age and body mass index. Women with GDM were characterized by a lower 30-min insulin increment (40.8 [34.9-47.6] vs. 58.6 [53.6-64] pmol insulin/mmol glucose, P < 0.001; geometric mean [95% confidence interval]) and a higher plasma insulin level at 120 min (702 [610-808] vs. 444 [400-492] pmol/l, P < 0.001). 32,33 split proinsulin levels were elevated in GDM patients in both fasting (9.1 [7.3-11.4] vs. 6.7 [6.0-7.5] pmol/l, P < 0.02) and 120-min (75.2 [62.9-90.0] vs. 52.2 [46.7-58.3] pmol/l, P < 0.001) samples, respectively. Intact proinsulin levels were significantly elevated at 120 min in the women with GDM (21.3 [18.1-25.1] vs. 14.8 [13.4-16.3] pmol/l, P < 0.001). Thus, the qualitative abnormalities of insulin secretion in GDM patients (low 30-min insulin increment, high 120-min plasma insulin, and elevated 32,33 split proinsulin) are similar to those seen in nonpregnant subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. To determine whether measures of proinsulin-like molecules (PLMs) might assist in the prediction of GDM, women who had a 1-h glucose level of > 7.7 mmol/l after a 50-g glucose challenge at 28-32 weeks' gestation had insulin and PLMs measured in the 1-h sample.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  12. Effects of Low Glycemic Index Diets on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jinhua; Heng, Weijun; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies of the effects of low glycemic index (LGI) diets on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on maternal and neonatal outcomes in GDM patients. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for studies of the effects of LGI diets in GDM patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of the LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on GDM outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- and fixed-effects models. Five RCTs involving 302 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No statistically significant differences in the risks of cesarean section delivery, large for gestational age, and small for gestational age were observed. The risk of macrosomia in the LGI groups was significantly lower (RR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10–0.71; P = 0.008) than that in the control groups. Our subgroup analysis of the effects of DF showed that LGI diets with an increased level of DF, relative to the control diet, reduced the risk of macrosomia beyond that of the LGI diets alone (RR: 0.17 vs 0.47, respectively). The subgroup analysis also showed that LGI diets in which the level of DF was approximately equivalent to that in the control diets significantly reduced the risk of insulin usage (RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52–0.92; P = 0.01). The LGI diets reduced the risk of macrosomia in GDM patients, and LGI diets with added DF reduced the risk of macrosomia further. The LGI diets with levels of DF approximately equivalent to that in the control diets reduced the risk of insulin usage in GDM patients. PMID:27258511

  13. Did You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? Additional Resources Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... encourages people to share this content freely. [ Top ]​​ Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  14. Neuropsychological Impairment in School-Aged Children Born to Mothers With Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Lourdes; Matute, Esmeralda; Ramírez-Dueñas, María de Lourdes; Zarabozo, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether school-aged children born to mothers with gestational diabetes show delays in their neuropsychological development. Several key neuropsychological characteristics of 32 children aged 7 to 9 years born to mothers with gestational diabetes were examined by comparing their performance on cognitive tasks to that of 28 children aged 8 to 10 years whose mothers had glucose levels within normal limits during pregnancy. The gestational diabetes group showed low performance on graphic, spatial, and bimanual skills and a higher presence of soft neurologic signs. Lower scores for general intellectual level and the working memory index were also evident. Our results suggest that gestational diabetes is associated with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:25814475

  15. Ethnic enclaves and gestational diabetes among immigrant women in New York City.

    PubMed

    Janevic, T; Borrell, L N; Savitz, D A; Echeverria, S E; Rundle, A

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has shown that immigrants living in their own ethnic enclave are at decreased risk of poor health outcomes, but this question has not been studied in relation to gestational diabetes, an important early marker of lifecourse cardiovascular health. We ascertained gestational diabetes, census tract of residence, and individual-level covariates for Sub-Saharan African, Chinese, South Central Asian, Non-Hispanic Caribbean, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Central and South American migrant women using linked birth-hospital discharge data for 89,703 singleton live births in New York City for the years 2001-2002. Using 2000 census data, for each immigrant group we defined a given census tract as part of an ethnic enclave based on the population distribution for the corresponding ethnic group. We estimated odds ratios for associations between living in an ethnic enclave and risk of gestational diabetes adjusted for neighborhood deprivation, percent commercial space, education, age, parity, and insurance status, using multilevel logistic regression. Overall, we found no effect of ethnic enclave residence on gestational diabetes in most immigrant groups. Among South Central Asian and Mexican women, living in a residential ethnic enclave was associated with an increased odds of gestational diabetes. Several explanations are proposed for these findings. Mechanisms explaining an increased risk of gestational diabetes in South Central Asian and Mexican ethnic enclaves should be examined.

  16. Could Metformin Manage Gestational Diabetes Mellitus instead of Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Walid A.; Mowafy, Hala E.; Abd ElHameid, Azza A.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a significant number of pregnancies. Blood glucose control improves perinatal outcomes. Medical nutrition therapy is the foundation in management. Aim of This Study. To evaluate efficacy of metformin in comparison to insulin for managing GDM. Methods. In prospective randomized comparative study, 150 antenatal women whose pregnancies had been complicated by GDM and did not respond to diet alone were recruited from antenatal clinics at Obstetrics Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from November 2012 to December 2014. They were divided randomly into two groups, 75 patients in each, and were subjected to either insulin or metformin medication. Outcomes were comparing the effects of both medications on maternal glycemic control, antenatal complications, and neonatal outcome. Results. No significant difference in controlling high blood sugar in GDM with the use of metformin or insulin (P = 0.95, 0.15). Maternal complications in both groups had no significant difference and fetal outcomes were as well similar except the fact that the hypoglycemia occurred more in insulin group with P value 0.01. Conclusion. Glycaemic control in GDM can be achieved by using metformin orally without increasing risk of maternal hypoglycemia with satisfying neonatal outcome.

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus. Unresolved issues and future research directions.

    PubMed Central

    Okun, N.; Verma, A.; Demianczuk, N.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the controversial aspects of gestational diabetes (GDM) and introduce readers to possible relevant research questions that could be examined to provide clinicians with good-quality data on which to base decisions about this relatively common pregnancy-related issue. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Ongoing review of the English literature related to GDM. Sources were not restricted to prospective, controlled trials, as these are severely limited in number. SYNTHESIS: Controversial issues include the relevance of GDM to clinically meaningful outcomes in the index pregnancy, the effectiveness of current therapy in altering these outcomes, and the resultant questionable relevance of routine screening and diagnosis of an entity with as yet uncertain significance in pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Suggested questions to be addressed in multicentre controlled trials include randomization with respect to screening and with respect to treatment. Until such trials are completed, continuing with a standard approach to screening, diagnosis, and treatment, such as that suggested by the third international workshop on GDM, is recommended. PMID:9626427

  18. Inflammation in Maternal Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pantham, Priyadarshini; Aye, Irving L. M. H; Powell, Theresa L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of maternal obesity is rising rapidly worldwide and constitutes a major obstetric problem, increasing mortality and morbidity in both mother and offspring. Obese women are predisposed to pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and children of obese mothers are more likely to develop cardiovascular and metabolic disease in later life. Maternal obesity and GDM may be associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation termed “metainflammation”, as opposed to an acute inflammatory response. This inflammatory environment may be one mechanism by which offspring of obese women are programmed to develop adult disorders. Herein we review the evidence that maternal obesity and GDM are associated with changes in the maternal, fetal and placental inflammatory profile. Maternal inflammation in obesity and GDM may not always be associated with fetal inflammation. We propose that the placenta ‘senses’ and adapts to the maternal inflammatory environment, and plays a central role as both a target and producer of inflammatory mediators. In this manner, maternal obesity and GDM may indirectly program the fetus for later disease by influencing placental function. PMID:25972077

  19. Gestational diabetes mellitus: advocating for policy change in India.

    PubMed

    Madhab, Anand; Prasad, Vishwa Mohan; Kapur, Anil

    2011-11-01

    A multimedia awareness and advocacy campaign for mainstreaming gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the public health domain is described. The multimedia campaign has created awareness about the relevance of GDM to women's health and the health of future generations through direct contact, reaching out to over half a million people in 7 districts of 4 states in northern India. Using mass media, over 3.7 million people have received information on GDM. Through multistakeholder forums, more than 1000 key stakeholders have been encouraged to mainstream GDM into the existing health delivery system. The Indian Ministry of Health has introduced free screening for GDM among the 5 services offered to pregnant women below the poverty line in the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) program. In addition, several state governments, such as in Bihar, Delhi, Jharkhand, and Punjab, have pledged similar initiatives addressing GDM; the Government of Tamil Nadu is already implementing such a policy. Policy development is a complex process that requires action on many fronts. By showcasing evidence, raising awareness, creating public opinion through dialogue and discussion, media can help build a positive environment and momentum for effective policy creation as well as service utilization.

  20. Could Metformin Manage Gestational Diabetes Mellitus instead of Insulin?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Walid A.; Mowafy, Hala E.; Abd ElHameid, Azza A.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) complicates a significant number of pregnancies. Blood glucose control improves perinatal outcomes. Medical nutrition therapy is the foundation in management. Aim of This Study. To evaluate efficacy of metformin in comparison to insulin for managing GDM. Methods. In prospective randomized comparative study, 150 antenatal women whose pregnancies had been complicated by GDM and did not respond to diet alone were recruited from antenatal clinics at Obstetrics Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from November 2012 to December 2014. They were divided randomly into two groups, 75 patients in each, and were subjected to either insulin or metformin medication. Outcomes were comparing the effects of both medications on maternal glycemic control, antenatal complications, and neonatal outcome. Results. No significant difference in controlling high blood sugar in GDM with the use of metformin or insulin (P = 0.95, 0.15). Maternal complications in both groups had no significant difference and fetal outcomes were as well similar except the fact that the hypoglycemia occurred more in insulin group with P value 0.01. Conclusion. Glycaemic control in GDM can be achieved by using metformin orally without increasing risk of maternal hypoglycemia with satisfying neonatal outcome. PMID:27597988

  1. Postpartum development of type 1 diabetes in Asian Indian women with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Shanthi Rani, Coimbatore Subramanian; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Uthra, Subash Chandrabose; Vidya, Jaydeep; Sankari, Ganesan Uma; Venkatesan, Ulagamathesan; Rani, Saravanan Jeba; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the postpartum conversion of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to different types of diabetes among Asian Indian women. Materials and Methods: Using data from electronic medical records, 418 women with GDM seen at a tertiary diabetes care center for diabetes in Chennai in South India between 1991 and 2014 were evaluated for development of diabetes postpartum. Results: Of the 418 GDM women followed up postpartum, 388 progressed to diabetes. Of these 359 (92.5%) developed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 29 women (7.5%) developed type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The median time to development of T1DM was 2 years (interquartile range 2 [IQR]) while for T2DM it was 5 years (IQR 6). Women who developed T1DM had significantly lower mean body mass index (BMI) (20.4 ± 2.8 vs. 27.5 ± 4.4 kg/m2, P = 0.001), and higher fasting plasma glucose (222 ± 105 vs. 165 ± 62 mg/dl P = 0.008) and glycated hemoglobin levels (10.2 ± 2.7 vs. 8.5 ± 2.1% P < 0.001) compared to those who developed T2DM. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies were present in 24/29 (82.7%) of women who developed T1DM. Conclusion: A small but significant proportion of women with GDM progress to T1DM postpartum. Measurement of GAD antibodies in leaner women with more severe diabetes could help to identify women who are likely to develop T1DM and thus prevent their presentation with acute hyperglycemic emergencies after delivery. PMID:27730084

  2. Glycosylated haemoglobin for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Eileen; Al-Barazan, Abdul Majeed; Nikakis, Irena; Radford, Andrea; Clarkson, Wade; Trevett, Clinton; Brain, Terry; Gebski, Val; Corbould, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and testing facility staff and resources. Further investigations are required to integrate and optimise the HbA1c as a single, non-fasting, screening tool for GDM. Trial registration number ACTRN

  3. Increased Maternal and Cord Blood Betatrophin in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Telejko, Beata; Kuzmicki, Mariusz; Sobota, Angelika; Lipinska, Danuta; Pliszka, Justyna; Raczkowska, Beata; Kuc, Pawel; Urban, Remigiusz; Szamatowicz, Jacek; Kretowski, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr; Gorska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to compare maternal and cord blood levels of betatrophin – a new peptide potentially controlling beta cell growth - as well as in its mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue and placental tissue obtained from pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and gestational diabetes (GDM). Methods Serum betatrophin and irisin concentrations were measured by ELISA in 93 patients with GDM and 97 women with NGT between 24 and 28 week of gestation. Additionally, maternal and cord blood betatrophin and irisin, as well as their genes (C19orf80 and Fndc5) expression were evaluated in 20 patients with GDM and 20 women with NGT at term. Results In both groups, serum betatrophin concentrations were significantly higher in the patients with GDM than in the controls (1.91 [1.40-2.60] ng/ml vs 1.63 [1.21-2.22] ng/ml, p=0.03 and 3.45 [2.77-6.53] ng/ml vs 2.78 [2.16-3.65] ng/ml, p=0.03, respectively). Cord blood betatrophin levels were also higher in the GDM than in the NGT group (20.43 [12.97-28.80] ng/ml vs 15.06 [10.11-21.36] ng/ml, p=0.03). In both groups betatrophin concentrations in arterial cord blood were significantly higher than in maternal serum (p=0.0001). Serum irisin levels were significantly lower in the patients with GDM (1679 [1308-2171] ng/ml) than in the healthy women between 24 and 28 week of pregnancy (1880 [1519-2312] ng/ml, p=0.03). Both C19orf80 and Fndc5 mRNA expression in fat and placental tissue did not differ significantly between the groups studied. Conclusions Our results suggest that an increase in maternal and cord blood betatrophin might be a compensatory mechanism for enhanced insulin demand in GDM. PMID:26115519

  4. Diet during early pregnancy and development of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Radesky, Jenny S; Oken, Emily; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Kleinman, Ken P; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Gillman, Matthew W

    2008-01-01

    Diet composition may be a modifiable predictor of risk for abnormal glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Prior studies suggest that diets high in total fat, saturated fat, red and processed meats, and with high glycaemic load increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), while polyunsaturated fats, carbohydrates and fibre are protective. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of these and other nutrients and foods, including n-3 fatty acids, trans fats, whole grains and dietary patterns, with risk of GDM. We studied 1733 women with singleton pregnancies enrolled in Project Viva, a prospective pregnancy and birth cohort study in eastern MA. Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined associations of first trimester diet, assessed by validated food frequency questionnaire, with results of glucose tolerance testing at 26-28 weeks of gestation. A total of 91 women developed GDM and 206 women had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was a strong predictor for GDM risk (OR 3.44 [95% CI 1.88, 6.31] for pre-pregnancy BMI > or =30 vs. <25 kg/m(2)). After adjustment for confounders, the OR [95% CI] for risk of GDM for total dietary fat was 1.00 [0.96, 1.05], for saturated fat 0.98 [0.88, 1.08], for polyunsaturated fat 1.09 [0.94, 1.26], for trans fat 0.87 [0.51, 1.49], and for carbohydrates 1.00 [0.96, 1.03] per each 1% of total energy. The adjusted OR [95% CI] for risk of GDM for a one standard deviation increase in energy-adjusted glycaemic load (32 units, about two soft drinks) was 0.96 [0.76, 1.22] and for each daily serving of whole grains was 0.90 [0.73, 1.13]. Dietary patterns and intake of red and processed meats were not predictive of glucose tolerance outcome. Estimates for IGT were similar to those for GDM. Intake of n-3 fatty acids was associated with increased GDM risk (OR 1.11 [95% CI 1.02, 1.22] per each 300 mg/day), but not with IGT risk. Except for this finding, perhaps due to

  5. Gestational diabetes mellitus among African-American women.

    PubMed

    Roseman, J M; Go, R C; Perkins, L L; Barger, B D; Bell, D H; Goldenberg, R L; DuBard, M B; Huddleston, J F; Sedlacek, C M; Acton, R T

    1991-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased risk of poor outcomes for the pregnancy. It is a strong risk factor for subsequent diabetes. The epidemiology of GDM in African-American women is not well known. It has not been demonstrated that their risk factors are similar in character and weight to those among White women. There is considerable multicollinearity among GDM risk factors such as age, parity, obesity, hypertension, and family history of diabetes, and this needs to be sorted out. This review is based on the results of a nested case-control study to evaluate the frequency of, and the relationships of the known risk factors with, the onset of GDM among African-American women. All cases of GDM within a cohort of women seen at any of the county health department clinics in Jefferson County, Alabama from 1981 to 1987 were identified. The cohort represents approximately 63% of all African-American pregnancies in the county during the period. With few exceptions (5.1% based on fasting plasma glucose greater than or equal to 120 mg/dl), potential GDM cases (7.1%) were selected on the basis of a 2 h post 100 g carbohydrate meal screening plasma glucose measure at their second prenatal visit and again at 28-32 weeks greater than or equal to 115 mg/dl and diagnosed on the basis of the results of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) using the criteria of O'Sullivan and Mahan. Women with any prior history of diabetes (even in pregnancy), 1.6%, were excluded. The frequency of the new diagnosis of GDM among African-American women in this pregnancy in the cohort was 2.5% of pregnancies and 3.4% of women, which is similar to the values reported in the other studies. Controls were selected from women with negative screening tests who delivered after a GDM subject. The results reported in this paper reflect 358 cases (86% of all eligible GDM cases identified) and 273 controls. Cases were significantly older (28.3 vs. 21.7 years), of higher gravidity (2

  6. Second Trimester Fetal and Maternal Epicardial Fat Thickness in Gestational Diabetic Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, A; Akkurt, M O; Yalcin, S; Karakoc, G; Varol, E; Sezik, M

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the association between gestational diabetes mellitus and sonographically measured fetal epicardial fat thickness between 24-28 weeks' gestation. This was a cross-sectional study that included 40 pregnancies with gestational diabetes mellitus, matched with 40 normal pregnancies with similar maternal age, body-mass index, gestational age, fetal gender, and fetal abdominal circumference on ultrasound. Fetal epicardial fat thickness was measured and recorded during ultrasonography at 24-28 weeks of gestation. Maternal evaluation included measurement of maternal epicardial fat thickness, using echocardiography. Fetal and maternal epicardial fat thickness values were compared across the groups. Ultrasound views of fetal epicardial fat thickness were evaluated independently by 3 perinatology fellows to determine inter- and intra-observer variability. Partial and intraclass correlation analyses were used. Fetal and maternal epicardial fat thickness measurements were moderately correlated (r=0.63). Mean fetal and maternal epicardial fat thickness values were higher in gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancies (p=0.004 and p<0.0001, respectively) compared to controls. Fetal epicardial fat thickness was positively correlated (r=0.43) with postchallenge 2-h glucose values. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was high, demonstrated by strong correlations (r=0.99 and r=0.99, respectively) across fetal epicardial fat thickness measurements of the examiners. Fetuses from gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancies have significantly higher fetal and maternal epicardial fat thickness values compared to nongestational diabetes mellitus pregnancies. Fetal epicardial fat thickness obtained during second trimester fetal anatomy ultrasound may potentially be a reliable indicator for gestational diabetes mellitus. However, clinical validation studies are needed.

  7. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  8. Using oral agents to manage gestational diabetes: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Buschur, Elizabeth; Brown, Florence; Wyckoff, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    Insulin has been the mainstay of treatment of diabetes during pregnancy for decades. Although glyburide and metformin are classified as category B during pregnancy, recent research has suggested that these oral agents alone or in conjunction with insulin may be safe for the treatment of gestational diabetes (GDM). This paper summarizes the data on the use of glyburide and metformin for treatment of GDM.

  9. Insulin and Leptin Signaling in Placenta from Gestational Diabetic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, A; Guadix, P; Maymó, J; Dueñas, J L; Varone, C; Fernández-Sánchez, M; Sánchez-Margalet, V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and leptin receptors are known to share signaling pathways, such as JAK2/STAT-3 (Janus kinase2/signal transduction and activator of transcription3), MAPK (Mitogen activated protein kinase), and PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase). Both positive and negative cross-talk have been previously found in different cellular systems. Gestational diabetes (GDM) is a pathophysiological state with high circulating levels of both insulin and leptin. We have previously found that these 3 signaling pathways are activated in placenta from GDM patients to promote translation, involving the activation of leptin receptor. Now, we have tested the hypothesis that both leptin and insulin receptors might contribute to this activation in a positive way that may become negative when the system is overactivated. We studied the activation of leptin and insulin receptors in placenta from GDM and healthy pregnancies. We have also performed in vitro studies with insulin and leptin stimulation of trophoblast explants from healthy placenta. We have found that both leptin and insulin receptors are activated in placenta from GDM. In vitro stimulation of trophoblast explants with both leptin and insulin at submaximal doses (0.1 nM) potentiated the activation of signaling, whereas preincubation with maximal concentrations of insulin (10 nM) and further stimulation with leptin showed negative effect. Trophoblastic explants from GDM placenta, which presented high signaling levels, had a negative signaling effect when further incubated in vitro with leptin. In conclusion, insulin and leptin receptors have positive effects on signaling, contributing to high signaling levels in GDM placenta, but insulin and leptin have negative effects upon overstimulation.

  10. Fast Food Consumption and Gestational Diabetes Incidence in the SUN Project

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Ligia J.; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Basterra-Gortari, Francisco Javier; Gea, Alfredo; Barbagallo, Mario; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes prevalence is increasing, mostly because obesity among women of reproductive age is continuously escalating. We aimed to investigate the incidence of gestational diabetes according to the consumption of fast food in a cohort of university graduates. Methods The prospective dynamic “Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra” (SUN) cohort included data of 3,048 women initially free of diabetes or previous gestational diabetes who reported at least one pregnancy between December 1999 and March 2011. Fast food consumption was assessed through a validated 136-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fast food was defined as the consumption of hamburgers, sausages, and pizza. Three categories of fast food were established: low (0–3 servings/month), intermediate (>3 servings/month and ≤2 servings/week) and high (>2 servings/week). Non-conditional logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounders. Results We identified 159 incident cases of gestational diabetes during follow-up. After adjusting for age, baseline body mass index, total energy intake, smoking, physical activity, family history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease/hypertension at baseline, parity, adherence to Mediterranean dietary pattern, alcohol intake, fiber intake, and sugar-sweetened soft drinks consumption, fast food consumption was significantly associated with a higher risk of incident gestational diabetes, with multivariate adjusted OR of 1.31 (95% conficence interval [CI]:0.81–2.13) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.13–3.06) for the intermediate and high categories, respectively, versus the lowest category of baseline fast food consumption (p for linear trend: 0.007). Conclusion Our results suggest that pre-pregnancy higher consumption of fast food is an independent risk factor for gestational diabetes. PMID:25215961

  11. [Nutritional status of women with gestational diabetes and characteristics of newborn].

    PubMed

    González Stäger, Maria Angelica; Rodríguez Fernández, Alejandra; Ortega Quintana, Victoria; Oliveras Vega, Leslie

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to determine the relationship between the mother's nutritional status and the newborn's gestational characteristics. A sample of 149 women with gestational diabetes was controlled in the High Risk Obstetric Unit of the Medical Specialties Public Health Center before delivery in the maternity ward of the Hospital Clinico Herminda Martín de Chillán, Chile in 2010. Data were obtained from the perinatal clinical history and the newborn's chart. The variables recorded for the mother were nutritional status, type of delivery, number of pregnancies, and metabolic control. Data for the newborn were weight, length, head circumference, and gestational diagnosis. These data were analyzed by ANOVA, Chi-square test, and Multiple Correspondence. Women with a normal nutritional status were multiparous with natural childbirth; the newborn had an adequate gestational age and normal head circumference. On the other hand, maternal obesity was related to a Cesarean; the newborn was large for gestational age and had a larger head circumference. Overweight women were primiparous and the newborn was small for gestational age with a smaller head circumference (p < 0.01). It was concluded that obesity in women with gestational diabetes explains variables such as type of delivery, number of gestations, and the newborn's diagnosis.

  12. The role of gestational diabetes, pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on the risk of newborn macrosomia: results from a prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is crucial to identify in large population samples the most important determinants of excessive fetal growth. The aim of the study was to evaluate the independent role of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes on the risk of macrosomia. Methods A prospective study collected data on mode of delivery and maternal/neonatal outcomes in eleven Hospitals in Italy. Multiple pregnancies and preterm deliveries were excluded. The sample included 14109 women with complete records. Associations between exposure variables and newborn macrosomia were analyzed using Pearson’s chi squared test. Multiple logistic regression models were built to assess the independent association between potential predictors and macrosomia. Results Maternal obesity (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4-2.2), excessive gestational weight gain (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2) and diabetes (adjusted OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-3.0 for gestational; adjusted OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.6 for pre-gestational) resulted to be independent predictors of macrosomia, when adjusted for other recognized risk factors. Since no significant interaction was found between pre-gestational BMI and gestational weight gain, excessive weight gain should be considered an independent risk factor for macrosomia. In the sub-group of women affected by gestational or pre-gestational diabetes, pre-gestational BMI was not significantly associated to macrosomia, while excessive pregnancy weight gain, maternal height and gestational age at delivery were significantly associated. In this sub-population, pregnancy weight gain less than recommended was not significantly associated to a reduction in macrosomia. Conclusions Our findings indicate that maternal obesity, gestational weight gain excess and diabetes should be considered as independent risk factors for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of pregnancy all three variables need to be carefully assessed and

  13. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-07-25

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

  14. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This ... as 10 pounds or more at term. Gestational diabetes In the NHSII 1989 baseline questionnaire and subsequent ...

  15. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients.

  16. Prevention of gestational diabetes through lifestyle intervention: study design and methods of a Finnish randomized controlled multicenter trial (RADIEL)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal overweight, obesity and consequently the incidence of gestational diabetes are increasing rapidly worldwide. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a combined diet and physical activity intervention implemented before, during and after pregnancy in a primary health care setting for preventing gestational diabetes, later type 2 diabetes and other metabolic consequences. Methods RADIEL is a randomized controlled multi-center intervention trial in women at high risk for diabetes (a previous history of gestational diabetes or prepregnancy BMI ≥30 kg/m2). Participants planning pregnancy or in the first half of pregnancy were parallel-group randomized into an intervention arm which received lifestyle counseling and a control arm which received usual care given at their local antenatal clinics. All participants visited a study nurse every three months before and during pregnancy, and at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months postpartum. Measurements and laboratory tests were performed on all participants with special focus on dietary and exercise habits and metabolic markers. Of the 728 women [mean age 32.5 years (SD 4.7); median parity 1 (range 0-9)] considered to be eligible for the study 235 were non-pregnant and 493 pregnant [mean gestational age 13 (range 6 to 18) weeks] at the time of enrollment. The proportion of nulliparous women was 29.8% (n = 217). Out of all participants, 79.6% of the non-pregnant and 40.4% of the pregnant women had previous gestational diabetes and 20.4% of the non-pregnant and 59.6% of the pregnant women were recruited because of a prepregnancy BMI ≥30 kg/m2. Mean BMI at first visit was 30.1 kg/m2 (SD 6.2) in the non-pregnant and 32.7 kg/m2 (SD 5.6) in the pregnant group. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first randomized lifestyle intervention trial, which includes, besides the pregnancy period, both the prepregnancy and the postpartum period. This study design also

  17. The relationship between maternal serum iron and zinc levels and their nutritional intakes in early pregnancy with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Behboudi-Gandevani, Samira; Safary, Kolsum; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Lamyian, Minoor; Goshtasebi, Azita; Goshtasbi, Azita; Alian-Moghaddam, Narges

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal iron/zinc serum levels and their nutritional intake in early pregnancy with gestational diabetes. The maternal serum zinc/iron levels were measured in 1,033 healthy singleton pregnant women aged 20-35 between 14 and 20 weeks of gestation, within two groups: namely, normal and gestational diabetes, and participants were followed up to 24-28 weeks of gestation. Food frequency questionnaire was used to assess nutritional intakes of iron/zinc. The main outcome was gestational diabetes screened with the 50-g glucose challenge test and diagnosed with oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of gestation. Gestational diabetes occurred in 72 (6.96 %) of 1,033 women in study. There was a statistical relationship between early pregnancy maternal serum iron and gestational diabetes, mean (SD), 143.8 (48.7) vs. 112.5 (83.5) μg/dl, P value of <0.0001. There was no statistical significant difference in zinc levels and iron/zinc nutritional intake between groups. The results remained unchanged after using regression model for adjustment of potential risk factors with an adjusted OR of 1.006 (95 % CI 1.002 to 1.009; P = 0.001) for early pregnancy maternal serum iron to cause gestational diabetes. The receiver-operator characteristic curve identified that a maternal serum iron above 100 μg/dl in early pregnancy is the optimum cutoff value for predicting gestational diabetes, which showed a sensitivity and specificity of 80.6 and 50.7 %, respectively. In conclusion, high maternal serum iron in early pregnancy could increase the risk of gestational diabetes. Also, it could be used as a sensitive and specific predictor for gestational diabetes.

  18. Prevention of Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: Better Translation of Nutrition and Lifestyle Messages Needed

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Sharleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and Gestational Diabetes (GDM) are important and escalating problems worldwide. GDM increases the risk of complications in pregnancy and birth, as well as a 1 in 2 chance of developing T2DM later in life. The burden of GDM extends to offspring, who have an increased risk of obesity and diabetes—further perpetuating the cycle of diabetes within families. Clinical trial evidence demonstrates T2DM incidence reduced by up to 50% for women with GDM with nutrition and physical activity changes and the economic modeling suggests cost effectiveness. The key diet-related changes to reduce T2DM risk are reviewed, in addition to breastfeeding. The difficulties associated with the delivery of dietary and lifestyle behaviour change to women after GDM are discussed and focus on: complex healthcare system interactions needed for care delivery; women finding postpartum self-care challenging; and low levels of awareness being present across the board. In addition, studies currently underway to improve care provision in this important area will be examined. PMID:27429288

  19. Increased circulating heat shock protein 70 (HSPA1A) levels in gestational diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garamvölgyi, Zoltán; Prohászka, Zoltán; Rigó, János; Kecskeméti, András; Molvarec, Attila

    2015-07-01

    Recent data indicate that serum Hsp70 (HSPA1A) levels are increased in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is no report in the literature on circulating Hsp70 levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we measured serum Hsp70 levels in 11 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes, 38 women with gestational diabetes, and 40 healthy pregnant women with ELISA. Plasma glucose levels, serum insulin concentrations, HbA1c values, and the Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index were also determined. According to our results, serum Hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher in women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus than in healthy pregnant women. In addition, pregestational diabetic women had significantly higher Hsp70 levels than those with gestational diabetes. Furthermore, in the group of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, serum Hsp70 levels showed a significant positive correlation with HbA1c values. However, there was no other relationship between clinical features and metabolic parameters of the study subjects and their serum Hsp70 levels in either study group. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time in the literature that serum Hsp70 levels are increased and correlate with HbA1c values in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to determine whether circulating Hsp70 plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes or elevated serum Hsp70 levels are only consequences of the disease.

  20. Identification of trends in scientific publications related to genetic polymorphisms in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J S; Minasi, L B; da Cruz, A D; Rodrigues, F M

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is a genetic multifactorial systemic disease that has been extensively studied. Consequently, there is a large volume of scientific literature pertaining to genes associated with gestational diabetes. The aim of this study was to characterize the main trends in scientific publications focusing on the associations between genetic polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The related articles were extracted from Scopus using the key words "genetic polymorphism" and "gestational diabetes mellitus"; the collected data focused on various fields (medical, biochemical, etc.) and included papers published within December 2013. One hundred and eighty-three relevant articles published between 1987 and 2013 were identified; we observed a significantly increasing trend in the number of publications pertaining to GDM. A majority of the articles focused on the medical (59.9%), biochemical, and genetics and molecular biological (29.6%) aspects of the disease. The genes coding for transcription factor 7-like 2 and glucokinase (TCF7L2, 29% and GCK, 28%) were predominantly studied and reported. This study helped quantify the growth in research pertaining to GDM; researchers from the USA have published a majority of the publications related to GDM. Several candidate genes have been linked to diabetes; however, the specific gene locus responsible for GDM has not yet been identified. The results of this study could help determine the orientation of future research on genetic factors associated with GDM. PMID:27173344

  1. Association of leptin genetic polymorphism -2548 G/A with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vaskú, Julie Anna Bienertová; Vaskú, Anna; Dostálová, Zuzana; Bienert, Petr

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations of -2548 G/A polymorphism in leptin gene promoter and pregnancy-associated diseases with abnormal fetal growth such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. The study was also focused on whether it is rather maternal or fetal variants that determines the pathological growth status. Peripheral or cord blood samples obtained from 49 preeclamptic women and their 39 newborns, 53 healthy controls and their 53 healthy newborns and 48 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus were evaluated for leptin gene (LEP) locus -2548 genotypes. The significantly higher risk for gestational diabetes mellitus was observed in the presence of an allele (AA and AG genotypes) against carriers of GGgenotype(OR=2.84, 95%CI1.14-7.07,p=0.02). Thereisa significant risk of diabetes mellitus associated to A allele (OR=1.79, 95%CI 1.02-3.14, p=0.03). Furthermore, evaluations of preeclamptic patients' data revealed a significant association of genotype distribution and delivery and spontaneous abortion rate, where the GG carriers performed the highest pregnancy rate while the AG carriers performed the lowest spontaneous abortion rate. Our results support the hypothesis for -2548 G/A leptin gene polymorphism involvement in ethiopathogenesis of pregnancy-associated diseases with abnormal fetal growth, especially gestational diabetes mellitus.

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    JAFARI-SHOBEIRI, Mehri; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; PIRI, Reza; POURALI-AKBAR, Yasmin; NASROLLAH-ZADEH, Raheleh; BAYAT-KHAJEH, Parvaneh; MOHAMMADI, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD) is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran. Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as “prevalence”, “gestational diabetes mellitus”, “GDM”, “risk factor*”, “Iran” and “Postpartum Diabetes”. The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic review was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software. Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDM was 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively). Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, potential causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable. PMID:26587467

  3. Evaluation of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G in peripheral blood of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shobeiri, Saeide-sadat; Abediankenari, Saeid; Lashtoo-Aghaee, Bahareh; Rahmani, Zahra; Esmaeili-gorji, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research says that diabetes may develop in over 10% of non-diabetic pregnant women. Diabetes which generally occurs late in second trimester and third trimester of pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Overweight or suffering from obesity before pregnancy is type 2 diabetes risk factor. In most cases, diabetic symptoms disappear after delivery. HLA-G has an important role both in mother and fetus tolerance during pregnancy, it may also be effective in the protection of pancreatic islet cells. In this study, concentration of these molecules in pregnant women with gestational diabetes in comparison with normal pregnant women was investigated. Methods: In this case-control study, we measured serum HLA-G levels in 24 pregnant women with gestational diabetes compared with 30 normal pregnant women using sandwich ELISA. Results: HLA-G levels were significantly low in pregnant women with gestational diabetes in contrast to normal pregnant women (P=0.001). Conclusion: In this study, we found that HLA-G levels were reduced in women with gestational diabetes compared with control group. Therefore, it is suggested that measurement of HLA-G in pregnant women can be considered as an indicator in prognosis of gestational diabetes. PMID:27757202

  4. Transient gestational diabetes insipidus: report of two cases and review of pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, A S; Bassi, T; Koradia, N; Bocirnea, A

    2003-11-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia due to the inability of the kidneys to concentrate urine. We report two cases of transient gestational diabetes insipidus in which patients responded to intranasal DDAVP (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin) with greater than 50% increase in urine osmolality and marked reduction in urine output. Intranasal DDAVP was discontinued after their discharge and both patients maintained normal urine output and appropriate urine osmolality. In determining whether diabetes insipidus is present in a patient who is polyuric and hypernatremic, a urine osmolality below that of the plasma suggests the presence of diabetes insipidus. Understanding of the pathophysiology may soon lead to improved methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Association of polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with gestational diabetes mellitus in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Parul; Agarwal, Nutan; Das, Nibhriti; Dalal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous genes have been reported in relation with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the findings were not consistently replicated across populations, or there have been no detailed studies on them. Previous literatures suggested that, out of all angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms, only ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has a strong association with GDM in Asian Indian women. Aim: This study was devoted to evaluate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A and I/D with GDM and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study recruited 105 GDM cases, 119 Type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and 120 controls. PCR-RFLP was used for identifying genotypes of ACE A240T, C1237T and G2350A and PCR was performed in the case of ACE I/D. Results: Significant associations of ACE SNP's, C1237T, and G2350A with GDM were observed. Haplotype analysis revealed the remarkably significant evidence of association with SNP combination ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A, and I/D with GDM patients (P = 0.024). Individuals possessing haplotype “TTAI” (frequency 30% in GDM and 0 in controls) derived from these SNPs had 185 fold increased risk of developing GDM (95% of confidence interval: 11.13–3102.15), which was highest when compared with other 15 haplotypes. Conclusion: Shorter-range haplotypes were also significant, but the only consistently associated alleles were found to be in ACE C1237T, G2350A, and I/D. These results suggested that the variant in close proximity to ACE C1237T, G2350A and/or I/D modulates susceptibility to GDM and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Indian women. PMID:26958520

  6. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  7. Metabolic syndrome independently predicts future diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam H; Ahn, Chang Ho; Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Metzger, Boyd E; Jang, Hak C

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an established predisposing condition for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is not thoroughly evaluated whether MetS increases the risk of T2DM in women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who already at high risk of T2DM compared with the general population. We investigated the impact of MetS on the development of postpartum diabetes in women with a history of GDM.This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with GDM. The follow-up evaluations, including the oral glucose tolerance test, were completed at 6 weeks postpartum and annually thereafter. MetS was diagnosed at the initial postpartum evaluation according to the revised criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the follow-up period was analyzed based on the presence of MetS, and the adjusted risk was calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model.A total of 412 women without diabetes at the initial postpartum evaluation participated in the annual follow-up for median 3.8 years. MetS was prevalent in 66 (19.2%) women at the initial postpartum evaluation. The incidences of diabetes in women with and without MetS were 825 and 227 per 10,000 person-years, respectively (P < 0.001). The presence of MetS was an independent risk factor for T2DM, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04-5.08) in multivariate analysis after adjustment for clinical and metabolic parameters. When we considered MetS and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) separately, women with MetS, IFG, or both had an increased risk of T2DM, with HRs of 4.17, 4.36, and 6.98, respectively.The presence of MetS during the early postpartum period is an independent risk factor for the development of T2DM in women with a previous history of GDM. PMID:27583868

  8. Metabolic syndrome independently predicts future diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Nam H.; Ahn, Chang Ho; Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Metzger, Boyd E.; Jang, Hak C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an established predisposing condition for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is not thoroughly evaluated whether MetS increases the risk of T2DM in women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who already at high risk of T2DM compared with the general population. We investigated the impact of MetS on the development of postpartum diabetes in women with a history of GDM. This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with GDM. The follow-up evaluations, including the oral glucose tolerance test, were completed at 6 weeks postpartum and annually thereafter. MetS was diagnosed at the initial postpartum evaluation according to the revised criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the follow-up period was analyzed based on the presence of MetS, and the adjusted risk was calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 412 women without diabetes at the initial postpartum evaluation participated in the annual follow-up for median 3.8 years. MetS was prevalent in 66 (19.2%) women at the initial postpartum evaluation. The incidences of diabetes in women with and without MetS were 825 and 227 per 10,000 person-years, respectively (P < 0.001). The presence of MetS was an independent risk factor for T2DM, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04–5.08) in multivariate analysis after adjustment for clinical and metabolic parameters. When we considered MetS and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) separately, women with MetS, IFG, or both had an increased risk of T2DM, with HRs of 4.17, 4.36, and 6.98, respectively. The presence of MetS during the early postpartum period is an independent risk factor for the development of T2DM in women with a previous history of GDM. PMID:27583868

  9. Long-term implications of gestational diabetes for the mother.

    PubMed

    Henry, O A; Beischer, N A

    1991-06-01

    Women with GDM have a greater risk of developing diabetes in the future compared with those women who have normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Using life table techniques, 17 years after the initial diagnosis of GDM, 40% of women were diabetic compared with 10% in a matched control group of women who had normal glucose tolerance in pregnancy. The incidence of diabetes was higher among women who were older, more obese, of greater parity and with more severe degrees of glucose intolerance during pregnancy. Diabetes also occurred more commonly among women who had a first-degree relative who was diabetic, in women born in Mediterranean and East Asian countries, and in those who had GDM in two or more pregnancies. Despite differing testing techniques and varying criteria for the diagnosis of GDM, follow-up studies from across the world consistently show a higher rate of subsequent diabetes among GDM mothers. NIDDM is associated with increased morbidity and a higher mortality rate, especially in women. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are the leading causes of death. High lipid levels, hypertension and obesity are often already present when diabetes is diagnosed and may antedate the development of overt diabetes; treatment of diabetes at this stage may therefore be too late to prevent complications occurring. A follow-up programme for women with GDM facilitates screening of a group known to be at increased risk of developing diabetes so that the diagnosis can be made before associated risk factors for complications develop. Intervention in the form of counselling regarding cigarette smoking, exercise and a healthy, high-residue, unrefined carbohydrate, low cholesterol diet, given together with weight monitoring, may prevent the onset of both diabetes and its associated cerebrovascular and cardiovascular problems.

  10. A comparison of fasting plasma glucose and glucose challenge test for screening of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Poomalar, G K; Rangaswamy, V

    2013-07-01

    Glucose challenge test (GCT) has been used as an effective screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), though it has its own limitations. Hence, we assessed the effectiveness of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a simpler alternative procedure. A prospective study was done in 500 pregnant women with gestational age between 22 and 37 weeks. FPG, GCT and GTT were performed in all patients using the glucose oxidase/peroxidase method. The overall sensitivity and specificity of GCT were 75.0% and 92.0%, respectively and the corresponding values for FPG were 88.8% and 95.2%. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 42.2% and 97.9% for GCT and 59.2% and 99.1% for FPG, respectively. We conclude that FPG can be used as an effective screening tool for gestational diabetes mellitus.

  11. Factors associated with diabetes mellitus prediction among pregnant Arab subjects with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aljohani, Naji; Al Serehi, Amal; Ahmed, Amjad M; Buhary, Badr Aldin M; Alzahrani, Saad; At-Taras, Eeman; Almujally, Najla; Alsharqi, Maha; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Almalki, Mussa

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of available information on the possible significant risk factors related to diabetes mellitus (DM) prediction among expectant Saudi mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The present study is the first to identify such risk factors in the Arab cohort. A total of 300 pregnant subjects (mean age 33.45 ± 6.5 years) were randomly selected from all the deliveries registered at the Obstetrics Department of King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh Saudi Arabia from April 2011 to March 2013. Demographic and baseline glycemic information were collected. A total of 7 highly significant and independent risk factors were identified: age, obesity, and family history of DM, GDM < 20 weeks, macrosomia, insulin therapy and recurrent GDM. Among these factors, subjects who had insulin therapy use are 5 times more likely to develop DMT2 (p-value 3.94 × 10(-14)) followed by recurrent GDM [odds-ratio 4.69 (Confidence Interval 2.34-4.84); P = 1.24 × 10(-13)). The identification of the risk factors mentioned with their respective predictive powers in the detection of DMT2 needs to be taken seriously in the post-partum assessment of Saudi pregnant patients at highest risk.

  12. Gestational Diabetes and Preeclampsia in Association with Air Pollution at Levels below Current Air Quality Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Kristina; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Rylander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications. Objective: We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Methods: High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999–2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders. Results: The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5–8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only. Conclusion: NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below current air quality guidelines. PMID:23563048

  13. Food Perceptions and Concerns of Aboriginal Women Coping with Gestational Diabetes in Winnipeg, Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Hannah Tait

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe how Aboriginal women in an urban setting perceive dietary treatment recommendations associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design: Semi-structured explanatory model interviews explored Aboriginal women's illness experiences with GDM. Setting and Participants: Twenty-nine self-declared Aboriginal women who had…

  14. Are the new IADPSG criteria for gestational diabetes useful in a country with a very high prevalence?

    PubMed

    Minsart, Anne-Frederique; N'guyen, Thai-Son Pierre; Dimtsu, Hirut; Ratsimandresy, Rachel; Dada, Fouad; Ali Hadji, Rachid

    2014-09-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups released new recommendations on screening methods and diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes. The main objectives of the present study were to analyze characteristics of mothers who underwent the new screening test, and to assess the prevalence of gestational diabetes and related pregnancy complications such as the 5-minute Apgar score <7, in a urban maternity clinic in Djibouti. The effect of treating gestational diabetes was also evaluated. Totally, 231 mothers underwent the new screening test, and 106 were diagnosed as having gestational diabetes (45.9%). Mothers with gestational diabetes had an excess risk of low Apgar scores, even after adjustment for socio-economic and medical covariates, with an odds ratio of 6.34 (1.77-22.66), p value <0.005. Only 46.2% of mothers with gestational diabetes followed the recommendations regarding treatment. Among these patients, 18.6% of infants from untreated mothers had a 5-minute Apgar score <7, compared to 3.9% infants from treated mothers (p value = 0.017). After adjustment, untreated mothers still had a high excess risk of low Apgar scores, although non-significant, with an odds ratio of 4.67 (0.78-27.87), p value = 0.09. In conclusion, gestational diabetes is highly prevalent in Djibouti and is related to low Apgar scores. PMID:24805833

  15. Macrosomia Predictors in Infants Born to Cuban Mothers with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeddú; Grandía, Raiden; Padilla, Liset; Rodríguez, Suilbert; Hernández García, Pilar; Lang Prieto, Jacinto; Márquez-Guillén, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Fetal macrosomia is the most important complication in infants of women with diabetes, whether preconceptional or gestational. Its occurrence is related to certain maternal and fetal conditions and negatively affects maternal and perinatal outcomes. The definitive diagnosis is made at birth if a newborn weighs >4000 g. OBJECTIVE Identify which maternal and fetal conditions could be macrosomia predictors in infants born to Cuban mothers with gestational diabetes. METHODS A case-control study comprising 236 women with gestational diabetes who bore live infants (118 with macrosomia and 118 without) was conducted in the América Arias University Maternity Hospital, Havana, Cuba, during 2002-2012. The dependent variable was macrosomia (birth weight >4000 g). Independent maternal variables included body mass index at pregnancy onset, overweight or obesity at pregnancy onset, gestational age at diabetes diagnosis, pregnancy weight gain, glycemic control, triglycerides and cholesterol. Fetal variables examined included third-semester fetal abdominal circumference, estimated fetal weight at ≥28 weeks (absolute and percentilized by Campbell and Wilkin, and Usher and McLean curves). Chi square was used to compare continuous variables (proportions) and the student t test (X ± SD) for categorical variables, with significance threshold set at p <0.05. ORs and their 95% CIs were calculated. RESULTS Significant differences between cases and controls were found in most variables studied, with the exception of late gestational diabetes diagnosis, total fasting cholesterol and hypercholesterolemia. The highest OR for macrosomia were for maternal hypertriglyceridemia (OR 4.80, CI 2.34-9.84), third-trimester fetal abdominal circumference >75th percentile (OR 7.54, CI 4.04-14.06), and estimated fetal weight >90th percentile by Campbell and Wilkin curves (OR 4.75, CI 1.42-15.84) and by Usher and McLean curves (OR 8.81, CI 4.25-18.26). CONCLUSIONS Most variables assessed

  16. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Ana CI; Lima, Paula HO; Sinzato, Yuri K; Takaku, Mariana; Takeno, Marisa A; Rudge, Marilza VC; Damasceno, Débora C

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl) and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl) on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. Methods On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16), severe (n = 50) and mild diabetes (n = 30). At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Results Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Conclusion Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy reproduced maternal and

  17. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming; Dai, Feihan F; Ning, Xian; Osborne, Lucy R; Cox, Brian J; Gunderson, Erica P; Wheeler, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 3-14% of pregnancies, with 20-50% of these women progressing to type 2 diabetes (T2D) within 5 years. This study sought to develop a metabolomics signature to predict the transition from GDM to T2D. A prospective cohort of 1,035 women with GDM pregnancy were enrolled at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and were screened for T2D annually for 2 years. Of 1,010 women without T2D at baseline, 113 progressed to T2D within 2 years. T2D developed in another 17 women between 2 and 4 years. A nested case-control design used 122 incident case patients matched to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence with a discriminative power of 83.0% in the training set and 76.9% in an independent testing set, which is far superior to measuring fasting plasma glucose levels alone. The American Diabetes Association recommends T2D screening in the early postpartum period via oral glucose tolerance testing after GDM, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient procedure. Our metabolomics signature predicted T2D incidence from a single fasting blood sample. This study represents the first metabolomics study of the transition from GDM to T2D validated in an independent testing set, facilitating early interventions. PMID:27338739

  18. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming; Dai, Feihan F; Ning, Xian; Osborne, Lucy R; Cox, Brian J; Gunderson, Erica P; Wheeler, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 3-14% of pregnancies, with 20-50% of these women progressing to type 2 diabetes (T2D) within 5 years. This study sought to develop a metabolomics signature to predict the transition from GDM to T2D. A prospective cohort of 1,035 women with GDM pregnancy were enrolled at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and were screened for T2D annually for 2 years. Of 1,010 women without T2D at baseline, 113 progressed to T2D within 2 years. T2D developed in another 17 women between 2 and 4 years. A nested case-control design used 122 incident case patients matched to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence with a discriminative power of 83.0% in the training set and 76.9% in an independent testing set, which is far superior to measuring fasting plasma glucose levels alone. The American Diabetes Association recommends T2D screening in the early postpartum period via oral glucose tolerance testing after GDM, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient procedure. Our metabolomics signature predicted T2D incidence from a single fasting blood sample. This study represents the first metabolomics study of the transition from GDM to T2D validated in an independent testing set, facilitating early interventions.

  19. The potential impact of new diagnostic criteria on the frequency of gestational diabetes mellitus in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Rickard; Ekelund, Magnus; Berntorp, Kerstin

    2013-10-01

    The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) has suggested new diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. Many centers in Europe still use the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In southern Sweden we use the 2-h threshold of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes criteria based on universal screening with a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. We have retrospectively scrutinized oral glucose tolerance tests in a subset of 174 women included in a previous study, diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus 1996-1999. A complete repeat oral glucose tolerance test was performed directly after diagnosis in 120 women. When applying the current Swedish criteria, and the IADPSG and the WHO criteria to the material, gestational diabetes mellitus was confirmed in 67% (80/120), 84% (101/120), and 80% (96/120), respectively. Hence, 26% (101/80) more women were identified by the IADPSG criteria and 20% (96/80) more women by the WHO criteria, compared with the criteria presently in use.

  20. Increased Maternal Serum Interleukin-6 Concentrations at 11 to 14 Weeks of Gestation in Low Risk Pregnancies Complicated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Development of a Prediction Model.

    PubMed

    Hassiakos, D; Eleftheriades, M; Papastefanou, I; Lambrinoudaki, I; Kappou, D; Lavranos, D; Akalestos, A; Aravantinos, L; Pervanidou, P; Chrousos, G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine interleukin-6 (IL-6) maternal serum concentration at 11 to 14 gestational weeks in normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and to create first trimester prediction models for GDM. Case-control study conducted in a Fetal Medicine Unit. Study population included 40 GDM cases and 94 controls. Maternal characteristics, first trimester ultrasound markers, biochemical indices, and IL-6 levels were used for our analysis. IL-6 was related to maternal weight among the maternal characteristics, (R(2)=0.0679, p=0.01). IL-6 was increased (p=0.001) in the GDM group (median=2 pg/ml) compared to the control group (median=1.5 pg/ml) even after adjustment for maternal weight. IL-6 was inversely related to birth weight adjusted for gestational age at delivery (r=-0.3382, p<0.001) and glucose levels at oral glucose test. Maternal weight and age were the only predictors of GDM among the maternal characteristics [Detection Rate (DR)=59.4%; for 25% False Positive Rate (FPR); Area Under the Curve (AUC)=0.7291; Model R(2)=0.1096, p<0.001]. IL-6 alone was a significant predictor of GDM (DR=51.3%; for 25% FPR; AUC=0.6731; Model R(2)=0.0616, p<0.001). Combination of maternal characteristics with IL-6 yielded an improved prediction (DR=67.5%; for 25% FPR; AUC=0.7586; Model R(2)=0.1521, p<0.001). IL-6 concentrations are increased at 11-14 weeks in pregnancies with GDM. Combination of maternal characteristics and maternal serum IL-6 levels may provide effective first trimester screening for GDM.

  1. Comparison of Glibenclamide and Insulin on Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Behrashi, Mitra; Samimi, Mansooreh; Ghasemi, Tayyebeh; Saberi, Farzaneh; Atoof, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Untreated or poorly controlled gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for mother and newborn. Glibenclamide is rarely used in treating mothers with this disease. This study aimed at comparing the effect of glibenclamide and insulin on neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 249 pregnant women aged 18–45 years within the 11th–33rd weeks of gestation with gestational diabetes, single fetus pregnancy, and in need of hyperglycemia treatment were entered and grouped randomly as either glibenclamide or insulin. In the insulin group (n = 129), insulin was administered with an initial dose of 0.2 IU/kg subcutaneously twice per day, whereas in the glibenclamide group (n = 120), 1.25 mg oral glibenclamide was administered once daily and increased if needed. Results: The results showed no significant difference in means age, gestational age, and body mass index between women in the two groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in the frequency of neonatal hypoglycemia, anomaly, hyperbilirubinemia, admission in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and neonatal respiratory distress between two groups. Macrosomia was lower in the glibenclamide group than the insulin group (3.3% vs. 13.2%, respectively, P = 0.005). Regression logistics model results showed that the type of treatment (odds ratio [OR]: 4.62; confidence interval [CI]: 1.45–14.02; P = 0.01) and gestational age at delivery (OR: 1.41; CI: 1.04–1.74; P = 0.01) were as predictor factors of macrosomia. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that glibenclamide is able to reduce the risk of fetal macrosomia without increasing neonatal anomalies, jaundice, hypocalcemia, infant respiratory distress, and NICU admission. PMID:27413519

  2. The significance of placental ratios in pregnancies complicated by small for gestational age, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sun; Cho, Soo Hyun; Kwon, Han Sung; Sohn, In Sook

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the placental weight, volume, and density, and investigate the significance of placental ratios in pregnancies complicated by small for gestational age (SGA), preeclampsia (PE), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Two hundred and fifty-four pregnant women were enrolled from August 2005 through July 2013. Participants were divided into four groups: control (n=82), SGA (n=37), PE (n=102), and GDM (n=33). The PE group was classified as PE without intrauterine growth restriction (n=65) and PE with intrauterine growth restriction (n=37). Birth weight, placental weight, placental volume, placental density, and placental ratios including birth weight/placental weight ratio (BPW) and birth weight/placental volume ratio (BPV) were compared between groups. Results Birth weight, placental weight, and placental volume were lower in the SGA group than in the control group. However, the BPW and BPV did not differ between the two groups. Birth weight, placental weight, placental volume, BPW, and BPV were all significantly lower in the PE group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, birth weight, BPW, and BPV were higher in the GDM group, whereas placental weight and volume did not differ in the two groups. Placental density was not significantly different among the four groups. Conclusion Placental ratios based on placental weight, placental volume, placental density, and birth weight are helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of complicated pregnancies. Moreover, they can be used as predictors of pregnancy complications. PMID:25264525

  3. Accelerated metabolic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in older women with a history of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alice S; McLenithan, John C; Zietowski, Gretchen M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare central obesity, insulin sensitivity, and cardiovascular disease risk factors between premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), controls, and women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Subjects were 73 overweight/obese and sedentary women who had a history of GDM (n=31) and were either premenopausal (n=11, 44±1 years, X±s.e.m.), postmenopausal (n=20, 58±1 years), or without a history of GDM as healthy postmenopausal controls (n=27, 57±1 years) or postmenopausal with T2DM (n=16, 59±1 years). The premenopausal GDM women had higher maximal oxygen uptake and lower visceral fat than the other three groups (P<0.05). BMI, %body fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and intramuscular fat did not differ significantly among the four groups. Glucose utilization (M, 3 h 40 mU/m(2) per min hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps) was 27% higher (P=0.05) in pre- than postmenopausal GDM and was not different between premenopausal GDM and postmenopausal controls. M was 28% lower (P=0.06) in postmenopausal GDM than controls and was not significantly different between postmenopausal GDM and T2DM groups. Thus, despite being younger and more physically fit, premenopausal women with prior GDM display similar central obesity, glucose, and metabolic profiles as postmenopausal controls. Postmenopausal women with prior GDM are more insulin resistant than controls of similar age, adiposity, and fitness levels and display comparable glucose utilization rates as similar as women with T2DM suggesting that a prior history of GDM may be an early manifestation of increased risk of later T2DM. PMID:23781323

  4. Consensus evidence-based guidelines for management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India.

    PubMed

    Seshiah, V; Banerjee, Samar; Balaji, V; Muruganathan, A; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus represents both a clear pathological condition of glycaemic dysregulation and a factor aggravating the risk of future diabetes in both the mother and child. Thus it is of paramount importance to control and manage pregnancy complicated by diabetes to improve the health and well-being of the mother and avert the risk of diabetes across generations. Currently, a wide variety of national and international guidelines address clinical questions pertinent to diabetes management during pregnancy. Of them, the pioneering Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group India (DIPSI) guideline for the management of diabetes during pregnancy has previously set new standards for quality diabetes care in India and around the world. The advent of insulin analogues, pen delivery devices and insulin pumps, has enriched our armamentarium to manage diabetes and thus warrants our due attention. The current guideline is an attempt to present an overview of current knowledge relating to the management of diabetes in pregnancy and to update available guidelines in view of advances in insulin therapy. These guidelines represent the amalgamation of updated clinical evidence with expert inputs in the context of Indian clinical practice.

  5. Consequences of a Maternal High-Fat Diet and Late Gestation Diabetes on the Developing Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Forred, Benjamin J.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Jensen, Danielle N.; Wachal, Angela L.; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Vitiello, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Infants born to diabetic or obese mothers are at risk of respiratory distress and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), conceivably through fuel-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. Prior research and preventative measures focus on controlling maternal hyperglycemia, but growing evidence suggests a role for additional circulating fuels including lipids. Little is known about the individual or additive effects of a maternal high-fat diet on fetal lung development. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a maternal high-fat diet, alone and alongside late-gestation diabetes, on lung alveologenesis and vasculogenesis, as well as to ascertain if consequences persist beyond the perinatal period. Methods A rat model was used to study lung development in offspring from control, diabetes-exposed, high-fat diet-exposed and combination-exposed pregnancies via morphometric, histologic (alveolarization and vasculogenesis) and physiologic (echocardiography, pulmonary function) analyses at birth and 3 weeks of age. Outcomes were interrogated for diet, diabetes and interaction effect using ANOVA with significance set at p≤0.05. Findings prompted additional mechanistic inquiry of key molecular pathways. Results Offspring exposed to maternal diabetes or high-fat diet, alone and in combination, had smaller lungs and larger hearts at birth. High-fat diet-exposed, but not diabetes-exposed offspring, had a higher perinatal death rate and echocardiographic evidence of PPHN at birth. Alveolar mean linear intercept, septal thickness, and airspace area (D2) were not significantly different between the groups; however, markers of lung maturity were. Both diabetes-exposed and diet-exposed offspring expressed more T1α protein, a marker of type I cells. Diet-exposed newborn pups expressed less surfactant protein B and had fewer pulmonary vessels enumerated. Mechanistic inquiry revealed alterations in AKT activation, higher endothelin-1

  6. Alpha-tocopherol concentration in serum and colostrum of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Fernanda Barros S.; Clemente, Heleni Aires; Bezerra, Dalila Fernandes; Grilo, Evellyn Câmara; de Melo, Larisse Rayanne M.; Bellot, Paula Emília N. R.; Dantas, Raquel Costa S.; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the levels of α-tocopherol in colostrum and in the serum of healthy and diabetic mothers. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 51 volunteer mothers, 20 with the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus and 31 without associated diseases. Serum and colostrum samples were collected in fasting in the immediate postpartum period and α-tocopherol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In order to define the nutritional status of vitamin E, the cutoff point for the serum (697.7µg/dL) was adopted. Student's t-test for independent variables compared the average concentrations of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum between control and gestational diabetes mellitus groups. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between the concentration of α-tocopherol in serum and colostrum for both groups. Differences were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: The α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum was 1,483.1±533.8µg/dL for Control Group and 1,368.8±681.8µg/dL for diabetic women, without differences between groups (p=0.50). However, α-tocopherol concentration in the serum was 1,059.5±372.7µg/dL in the Control Group and 1,391.4±531.5µg/dL in the diabetic one (p<0.01). No correlation was found between the concentration of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum for control and diabetic groups. CONCLUSIONS: The groups had adequate nutritional status of vitamin E. Gestational diabetes was not associated with changes in α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum. PMID:25119748

  7. [Gestational diabetes and the new screening test's impact].

    PubMed

    Massa, Ana Catarina; Rangel, Ricardo; Cardoso, Manuela; Campos, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Em 2011, foi introduzido um novo rastreio para a diabetes gestacional que permitiu um diagnóstico mais precoce e de maior número de casos com o intuito de reduzir complicações maternas e perinatais. O objectivo deste estudo foi avaliar a prevalência da diabetes gestacional, comparar resultados obstétricos e perinatais do anterior e presente rastreio e os resultados e realização da prova de reclassificação pós-parto. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo em gestações simples e diabetes gestacional diagnosticados em 2009 (n = 223) e 2012 (n = 237), vigiadas na Maternidade Dr. Alfredo da Costa, Portugal. Após consulta de processos clínicos procedeu-se à análise de características demográficas, história médica e obstétrica, aumento ponderal durante a gravidez, idade gestacional do diagnóstico, terapêutica utilizada, resultados perinatais e reclassificação pós-parto, seguida de comparação destas variáveis entre os anos de 2009 e 2012. Resultados: Em 2012, houve maior prevalência de diabetes gestacional, ganho ponderal inferior (p < 0,001), maior recurso à terapêutica farmacológica (p < 0,001) e aumento dos casos diagnosticados no primeiro e segundo trimestres (p < 0,001). Relativamente aos resultados neonatais, o peso médio do recém-nascido ao nascer foi significativamente menor (p = 0,001) com diminuição dos recém-nascidos grandes para a idade gestacional (p = 0,002). A taxa de reclassificação pós-parto foi semelhante nos dois anos mas em 2012 houve um aumento dos resultados normais e diminuição das anomalias da glicémia em jejum. Discussão: Critérios mais apertados do actual rastreio permitiram a redução da maioria das complicações da diabetes gestacional levantando novas questões. Conclusão: A introdução do actual rastreio resultou num aumento de prevalência, diagnóstico mais precoce e redução da macrossomia.

  8. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10,630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening. PMID:26512030

  9. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10,630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening.

  10. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress and acidosis: relevant aspects in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    In this issue, Yung and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4040-2 ) report endoplasmic reticulum stress in the placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. With the use of a trophoblast-like cell line, these authors identify putative mechanisms involved in, and treatments to prevent the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, the relevance and possible implications of these findings and areas for further research are discussed. PMID:27379669

  11. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression. PMID:26254248

  12. The Possible Role of Epigenetics in Gestational Diabetes: Cause, Consequence, or Both

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Morera, J. L.; Rodríguez-Rodero, S.; Menéndez-Torre, E.; Fraga, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as the glucose intolerance that is not present or recognized prior to pregnancy. Several risk factors of GDM depend on environmental factors that are thought to regulate the genome through epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, epigenetic regulation could be involved in the development of GDM. In addition, the adverse intrauterine environment in patients with GDM could also have a negative impact on the establishment of the epigenomes of the offspring. PMID:21052542

  13. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress and acidosis: relevant aspects in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    In this issue, Yung and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4040-2 ) report endoplasmic reticulum stress in the placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. With the use of a trophoblast-like cell line, these authors identify putative mechanisms involved in, and treatments to prevent the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, the relevance and possible implications of these findings and areas for further research are discussed.

  14. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression.

  15. Aboriginal Women's Experiences With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Participatory Study With Mi'kmaq Women in Canada.

    PubMed

    Whitty-Rogers, Joanne; Caine, Vera; Cameron, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    In Canada, diabetes is 3 to 5 times more common among Aboriginal people than in the general population. Women with a diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing glucose intolerance later in life, with almost half developing type II diabetes within 15 years. A participatory action research study using a Two-Eyed Seeing approach was conducted. Conversational interviews with 9 Mi'kmaq women who experienced gestational diabetes mellitus and talking circles were held. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used for data analysis. Themes included life-altering experience; barriers limiting access to health care; social support during pregnancy; and feeling compelled to take action. PMID:27149230

  16. Factors related to prediabetes among postpartum Thai women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Youngwanichsetha, Sununta; Phumdoung, Sasitorn

    2013-12-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus are at risk of developing prediabetes. Using a cross-sectional analytic design, the factors related to prediabetes among Thai women (n = 210) with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus were investigated. The main outcomes measured were two-hour plasma glucose after taking a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at a six week postpartum visit. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation. The study showed that the incidence of prediabetes among postpartum Thai women was 26.67%. Factors associated with prediabetes were: (i) being over 35 years of age; (ii) three or more pregnancies; (iii) recurrent gestational diabetes mellitus; (iv) high plasma glucose before taking a 100 g glucose tolerance test and high postprandial plasma glucose during pregnancy; and (v) being overweight or obese at six weeks' postpartum. The results showed that nursing interventions need to be implemented to reduce plasma glucose and body mass index in order to prevent or reverse prediabetes.

  17. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  18. Diabetes Screening in US Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Turyk, Mary E.; Kominiarek, Michelle A.; Xia, Yinglin; Gerber, Ben S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. We examined individual, socioeconomic, and health care use characteristics of women with a history of GDM and the association of those characteristics with diabetes screening, and we estimated their rates of undiagnosed prediabetes and diabetes. Methods Using 3 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2008, 2009–2010, and 2011–2012), we identified 284 women with a history of GDM who were eligible for diabetes screening. Screening status was defined by self-report of having had a blood test for diabetes within the prior 3 years. Undiagnosed prediabetes and diabetes were assessed by hemoglobin A1c measurement. Results Among women with a history of GDM, 67% reported diabetes screening within the prior 3 years. Weighted bivariate analyses showed screened women differed from unscreened women in measured body mass index (BMI) category (P = .01) and number of health visits in the prior year (P = .001). In multivariable analysis, screening was associated with a greater number of health visits in the prior year (1 visit vs 0 visits, adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71–5.18; 2 or 3 visits, AOR, 7.05; and ≥4 visits, AOR, 5.83). Overall, 24.4% (95% CI, 18.3%–31.7%) of women had undiagnosed prediabetes and 6.5% (95% CI, 3.7%–11.3%) had undiagnosed diabetes. Conclusion More health visits in the prior year was associated with receiving diabetes screening. Fewer opportunities for screening may delay early detection, clinical management, and prevention of diabetes. Prediabetes in women with a history of GDM may be underrecognized and inadequately treated. PMID:27609302

  19. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Delay or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: Walking for Exercise and Nutrition to Prevent Diabetes for You.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A S; Bogossian, F E; Wilkinson, S A; Gibbons, K S; Kim, C; McIntyre, H D

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To develop a program to support behaviour changes for women with a history of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and a Body Mass Index (BMI) > 25 kg/m(2) to delay or prevent Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Methods. Women diagnosed with GDM in the previous 6 to 24 months and BMI > 25 kg/m(2) were randomized to an intervention (I) (n = 16) or a control (C) (n = 15) group. The intervention was a pedometer program combined with nutrition coaching, with the primary outcome increased weight loss in the intervention group. Secondary outcomes included decreased waist and hip measurements, improved insulin sensitivity and body composition, increased physical activity, and improved self-efficacy in eating behaviours. Results. Median (IQR) results were as follows: weight: I -2.5 (2.3) kg versus C +0.2 (1.6) kg (P = 0.009), waist: I -3.6 (4.5) cm versus C -0.1 (3.6) cm (P = 0.07), and hip: I -5.0 (3.3) cm versus C -0.2 (2.6) cm (P = 0.002). There was clinical improvement in physical activity and eating behaviours and no significant changes in glucose metabolism or body composition. Conclusion. A pedometer program and nutrition coaching proved effective in supporting weight loss, waist circumference, physical activity, and eating behaviours in women with previous GDM.

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus and long-term consequences for mother and offspring: a view from Denmark.

    PubMed

    Damm, Peter; Houshmand-Oeregaard, Azadeh; Kelstrup, Louise; Lauenborg, Jeannet; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Clausen, Tine D

    2016-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of varying severity and is present in about 2-6% of all pregnancies in Europe, making it one of the most common pregnancy disorders. Aside from the short-term maternal, fetal and neonatal consequences associated with GDM, there are long-term consequences for both mother and child. Although maternal glucose tolerance often normalises shortly after pregnancy, women with GDM have a substantially increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Studies have reported that women are more than seven times as likely to develop diabetes after GDM, and that approximately 50% of mothers with GDM will develop diabetes within 10 years, making GDM one of the strongest predictors of type 2 diabetes. In women with previous GDM, development of type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by lifestyle intervention and/or medical treatment. Systematic follow-up programmes would be ideal to prevent progression of GDM to diabetes, but such programmes are unfortunately lacking in the routine clinical set-up in most countries. Studies have found that the risks of obesity, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and impaired insulin sensitivity and secretion in offspring of mothers with GDM are two- to eightfold those in offspring of mothers without GDM. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms behind the abnormal metabolic risk profile in offspring are unknown, but epigenetic changes induced by exposure to maternal hyperglycaemia during fetal life are implicated. Animal studies indicate that treatment can prevent long-term metabolic complications in offspring, but this remains to be confirmed in humans. Thus, diabetes begets diabetes and it is likely that GDM plays a significant role in the global diabetes epidemic. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Gestational diabetes: what's up?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this

  1. The genetic polymorphism in the STK11 does not affect gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Khalid Khalaf; Khan, Imran Ali; Eldesouky, Malek H; Al-Hakeem, Malak Mohammed; Abotalib, Zeinab

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity that develops during pregnancy. Recent studies indicate that GDM onset is rapid, and that women with GDM will develop other metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in their future. Serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11) is engaged in the insulin signaling pathway and encoded protein is an important activator of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase. Based on the previously reported association between the STK11 gene and diabetes, we aimed to investigate whether the rs8111699 polymorphism in STK11 has any role in gestation diabetes in Saudi women. In this case-control study, we recruited pregnant Saudi women based on biochemical analysis of their blood samples. Genomic DNA was obtained from confirmed subjects (200 GDM cases and 300 non-GDM). PCR-RFLP analysis was performed to detect the C528G polymorphism in the STK11 gene. The anthropometric and clinical data were similar between the GDM and non-GDM subjects (p > 0.05), whereas the biochemical analysis was significantly different between the cases and controls (p < 0.05). The genotype and allele frequencies between of the STK11 gene were not statistically significant difference between the GDM and non-GDM groups (OR=0.82; 95% CI:=0.6-1.0; p=0.12). Our study suggests that the rs8111699 polymorphism has no role in the development of GDM in pregnant Saudi women.

  2. Increased Cord Blood Betatrophin Levels in the Offspring of Mothers with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shimin; Zhao, Yue; Du, Caiqi; Yuan, Guandou; Ning, Qin; McCormick, Kenneth; Luo, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Aim Exposing a fetus to hyperglycemia can increase the risk for later-life metabolic disorders. Betatrophin has been proposed as a key regulator of pancreatic beta cell proliferation and lipid regulation. Highly responsive to nutritional signals, serum betatrophin concentrations have been found to be altered by various physiological and pathological conditions. We hypothesized that betatrophin levels are increased in the cord blood in offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study including 54 mothers who underwent uncomplicated Cesarean delivery in a university hospital. Maternal gestational glucose concentration was determined at 24–48 weeks gestation after a 75-g OGTT. Cord blood and placental tissue was collected immediately post delivery. Metabolic parameters were determined in the Clinical Laboratory. Cord blood betatrophin levels were assayed using a commercially available ELISA kit. Placental mitochondrial content was determined by real-time PCR. Results Cord blood betatrophin levels were increased in the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) group compared with the normoglycemic group. Furthermore, betatrophin levels were positively correlated with maternal gestational 2h post-OGTT glucose, cord blood insulin, HOMA-IR, and inversely correlated with placental mitochondrial content. Conclusions Cord blood betatrophin may function as a potential biomarker of maternal intrauterine hyperglycemia and fetal insulin resistance, which may presage for long-term metabolic impact of GDM on offspring. PMID:27196053

  3. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Changes in the Concentration and Bioactivity of Placenta-Derived Exosomes in Maternal Circulation Across Gestation.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Sarker, Suchismita; Sweeney, Emma; Kobayashi, Miharu; Correa, Paula; Longo, Sherri; Duncombe, Gregory; Mitchell, Murray D; Rice, Gregory E; Illanes, Sebastian E

    2016-03-01

    Although there is significant interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived exosomes (PdEs) during pregnancy, the exosomal profile in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remains to be established. The aim of this study was to compare the gestational-age profile of PdEs in maternal plasma of GDM with normal pregnancies and to determine the effect of exosomes on cytokine release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. A prospective cohort of patients was sampled at three time points during pregnancy for each patient (i.e., 11-14, 22-24, and 32-36 weeks' gestation). A retrospective stratified study design was used to quantify exosomes present in maternal plasma of normal (n = 13) and GDM (n = 7) pregnancies. Gestational age and pregnancy status were identified as significant factors contributing to variation in plasma exosome concentration (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Post hoc analyses established that PdE concentration increased during gestation in both normal and GDM pregnancies; however, the increase was significantly greater in GDM (∼2.2-fold, ∼1.5-fold, and ∼1.8-fold greater at each gestational age compared with normal pregnancies). Exosomes isolated from GDM pregnancies significantly increased the release of proinflammatory cytokines from endothelial cells. Although the role of exosomes during GDM remains to be fully elucidated, exosome profiles may be of diagnostic utility for screening asymptomatic populations.

  4. A Polymorphism in the Retinol Binding Protein 4 Gene is Not Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Several Different Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Urschitz, Johann; Sultan, Omar; Ward, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Objective Various Asian and Pacifific Islander groups have higher prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. This increased incidence is likely to include genetic factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the retinol binding protein 4 gene have been linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. Hypothesizing a link between retinol binding protein 4 and gestational diabetes, we performed a candidate gene study to look for an association between an important retinol binding protein gene polymorphism (rs3758539) and gestational diabetes. Study Design Blood was collected from Caucasian, Asian, and Pacific Islander women diagnosed with gestational diabetes and from ethnically matched non-diabetic controls. DNA was extracted and real time PCR technology (TaqMan, Applied Biosystems) used to screen for the rs3758539 single nucleotide polymorphism located 5′ of exon 1 of the retinol binding protein 4 gene. Results Genotype and allele frequencies in the controls and gestational diabetes cases were tested using chi-square contingency tests. Genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was no association between the rs3758539 retinol binding protein 4 single nucleotide polymorphism and gestational diabetes in the Caucasian, Filipino, or Pacific Islander groups. Conclusion Interestingly, the rs3758539 retinol binding protein 4 single nucleotide polymorphism was not found to be associated with gestational diabetes. The absence of association suggests that gestational and type 2 diabetes may have more divergent molecular pathophysiology than previously suspected. PMID:21886308

  5. Screening and subsequent management for gestational diabetes for improving maternal and infant health

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Joanna; Middleton, Philippa; McPhee, Andrew J; Crowther, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs in pregnancy. Although GDM usually resolves following birth, it is associated with significant morbidities for mother and baby both perinatally and in the long term. There is strong evidence to support treatment for GDM. However, there is little consensus on whether or not screening for GDM will improve maternal and infant health and if so, the most appropriate protocol to follow. Objectives To assess the effects of different methods of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal and infant outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2010). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of different methods of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently conducted data extraction and quality assessment. We resolved disagreements through discussion or through a third author. Main results We included four trials involving 3972 women were included in the review. One quasi-randomised trial compared risk factor screening with universal or routine screening by 50 g oral glucose challenge testing. Women in the universal screening group were more likely to be diagnosed with GDM (one trial, 3152 women, risk ratio (RR) 0.44 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 0.75). Infants of mothers in the risk factor screening group were born marginally earlier than infants of mothers in the routine screening group (one trial, 3152 women, mean difference −0.15 weeks, 95% CI −0.27 to −0.53). The remaining three trials evaluated different methods of administering a 50 g glucose load. Two small trials compared glucose monomer with glucose polymer testing, with one of these trials including a candy bar group. One trial compared a glucose solution with food. No differences in diagnosis of GDM were found between each comparison. Overall

  6. The role of blood groups in the development of diabetes mellitus after gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karagoz, Hatice; Erden, Abdulsamet; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Bulut, Kadir; Mutlu, Hasan; Simsek, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common condition that is defined as glucose intolerance of varying degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects approximately 5% of all pregnancies all over the world. GDM is not only associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as macrosomia, dystocia, birth trauma, and metabolic complications in newborns, but it is also a strong predictor of transitioning to overt DM postpartum. The association of ABO blood groups with DM has been observed before in several epidemiological and genetic studies and resulted with inconsistent findings, but still there are not enough studies in the literature about the association of ABO blood groups with GDM. In this study, we aimed at investigating any possible relationship between the ABO blood group system and GDM and also the transitioning of GDM to overt DM postpartum, in Turkey. Patients and methods A total of 233 patients with GDM from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. The cases that have serologically determined blood groups and Rh factor in the hospital records were included in the study, and the patients with unknown blood groups were excluded. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). GDM was diagnosed based on the glucose cut-points of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Society Groups. The distributions of blood groups of the patients with GDM were compared with the distribution of blood groups of 17,314 healthy donors who were admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in 2012. Results There was a significant difference between the patients with GDM and control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups. Blood group AB was found to be higher in the patients with GDM compared to the control group (P=0.029). When the patients were compared according to the development of DM, the ratio

  7. Prenatal Clinical Assessment of NT-proBNP as a Diagnostic Tool for Preeclampsia, Gestational Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sadlecki, Pawel; Grabiec, Marek; Walentowicz-Sadlecka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Common complications of pregnancy include preeclampsia (PE), gestational hypertension (GH) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Hypertensive disorders (PE/GH) and GDM may result in greater maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Women with PE/GH, one of the most common causes of heart burden in an obstetrical setting, present with elevated serum levels of BNP and NT-proBNP. The aim of this study was to shed more light on the role of NT-proBNP in pathophysiology of PE, GH and GDM. The study included 156 pregnant women with singleton pregnancies. A total of 26 women developed arterial hypertension during pregnancy, 14 were diagnosed with PE, and GDM was detected in 81 patients. The control group included 35 women with uncomplicated pregnancies, normal arterial blood pressure and normal glucose concentrations. Patients with GH presented with significantly higher serum concentrations of NT-proBNPthan normotensive women (65.5 vs. 37.4 pg/ml; p = 0.0136). Serum levels of NT-proBNP in patients with PE were the highest of all the analyzed subsets, being significantly higher than in women without this condition (89.00 vs. 37.4pg/ml,p = 0,0136). However, women with and without GDM did not differ significantly in terms of their serum NT-proBNPconcentrations. Serum NT-proBNP (pg/ml) (p = 0.0001) and BMI (p<0.0001) turned out to be independent predictors of GH on multivariate logistic regression analysis.Moreover, serum NT-proBNP (pg/ml) was identified as an independent indicator of PE (p = 0.0016). A significant inverse correlation was found between birth weight and maternal serum NT-proBNP concentrations. In our opinion, NT-proBNP can be a useful clinical marker of GH and PE. Determination of NT-proBNP levels may be helpful in identification of patients with PE and GH and in their qualification for intensive treatment; this in turn, may be reflected by better neonatal outcomes. PMID:27685993

  8. Nutrient intake of pregnant women at high risk of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meinilä, Jelena; Koivusalo, Saila B.; Valkama, Anita; Rönö, Kristiina; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Kautiainen, Hannu; Stach-Lempinen, Beata; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gestational diabetes (GDM) has been increasing along with the obesity pandemic. It is associated with pregnancy complications and a risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective To study nutrient intake among pregnant Finnish women at increased risk of GDM due to obesity or a history of GDM. Design Food records from obese women or women with GDM history (n=394) were examined at baseline (≤20 weeks of pregnancy) of the Finnish Gestational Diabetes Prevention Study. Results The pregnant women had a mean fat intake of 33 en% (SD 7), saturated fatty acids (SFA) 12 en% (SD 3), and carbohydrate 46 en% (SD 6). Sucrose intake among pregnant women with GDM history was 7 en% (SD 3), which was different from the intake of the other pregnant women, 10 en% (SD 4) (p<0.001). Median intakes of folate and vitamins A and D provided by food sources were below the Finnish national nutrition recommendation, but, excluding vitamin A, supplements raised the total intake to the recommended level. The frequency of use of dietary supplements among pregnant women was 77%. Conclusions The observed excessive intake of SFA and low intake of carbohydrates among women at high risk of GDM may further increase their risk of GDM. A GDM history, however, seems to reduce sucrose intake in a future pregnancy. Pregnant women at high risk of GDM seem to have insufficient intakes of vitamin D and folate from food and thus need supplementation, which most of them already take. PMID:25994096

  9. Risk of Vaginal Infections at Early Gestation in Patients with Diabetic Conditions during Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marschalek, Julian; Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Göbl, Christian S; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Kueronya, Verena; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are reported to be at increased risk for infections of the genital tract. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida colonization at early gestation between pregnant women with and without diabetic conditions during pregnancy. We included data from 8, 486 singleton pregnancies that underwent an antenatal infection screen-and-treat programme at our department. All women with GDM or pre-existing diabetes were retrospectively assigned to the diabetic group (DIAB), whereas non-diabetic women served as controls (CON). Prevalence for BV and Candida colonization was 9% and 14% in the DIAB group, and 9% and 13% in the CON group, respectively (n.s.). No significant difference regarding stillbirth and preterm delivery (PTD), defined as a delivery earlier than 37 + 0 (37 weeks plus 0 days) weeks of gestation was found. We could not find an increased risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens at early gestation in pregnant women with diabetes, compared to non-diabetic women. Large prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long-term risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens during the course of pregnancy in these women. PMID:27167850

  10. The Influence of Gestational Diabetes on Neurodevelopment of Children in the First Two Years of Life: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Anqi; Broekman, Birit F. P.; Wong, Eric Qinlong; Gluckman, Peter D.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Saw, Seang Mei; Soh, Shu-E; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Meaney, Michael J.; Kramer, Michael S.; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Analyze the relation of gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels to early cognitive functions in the first two years of life. Methods In a prospective Singaporean birth cohort study, pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes at 26–28 weeks gestation using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Four hundred and seventy three children (n = 74 and n = 399 born to mothers with and without gestational diabetes respectively) underwent neurocognitive assessments at 6, 18, and/or 24 month, including electrophysiology during an attentional task and behavioral measures of attention, memory and cognition. Results Gestational diabetes is related to left hemisphere EPmax amplitude differences (oddball versus standard) at both six (P = 0.039) and eighteen months (P = 0.039), with mean amplitudes suggesting offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes exhibit greater neuronal activity to standard stimuli and less to oddball stimuli. Associations between 2-hour maternal glucose levels and the difference in EPmax amplitude were marginal at 6 months [adjusted β = -0.19 (95% CI: -0.42 to +0.04) μV, P = 0.100] and significant at 18 months [adjusted β = -0.27 (95% CI: -0.49 to -0.06) μV, P = 0.014], and the EPmax amplitude difference (oddball-standard) associated with the Bayley Scales of Infant and toddler Development-III cognitive score at 24 months [β = 0.598 (95% CI: 0.158 to 1.038), P = 0.008]. Conclusion Gestational diabetes and maternal blood glucose levels are associated with offspring neuronal activity during an attentional task at both six and eighteen months. Such electrophysiological differences are likely functionally important, having been previously linked to attention problems later in life. PMID:27603522

  11. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus and its outcome in western Rajasthan

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Priyanka; Kachhwaha, Chetan Prakash; Singh, Hilda Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. Hence, it is imperative that an early detection and management of the disease is done to ensure better maternal and fetal outcomes. Aims: This study was done to evaluate the prevalence of gestational diabetes using diabetes in pregnancy Study Group India (DIPSI) criteria and further assess its feto-maternal outcome in western Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in 500 patients between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation, attending the antenatal outdoor. These patients were given 75 g oral glucose irrespective of the meals and their plasma glucose was estimated at 2 h. Patients with plasma glucose values ΃140 mg/dl were labeled as GDM and the rest as the control or the non-GDM group. All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. Results: The prevalence of GDM in this study was 6.6%. Maternal and fetal complications in the GDM group were much higher than in the non-GDM group. Hypertension, vaginal candidiasis, and abruptio placentae were the common maternal complications, while macrosomia and stillbirths occurred in the fetuses. Conclusion: GDM as a disease entity adversely affects maternal and fetal outcomes. This also builds a strong case for following DIPSI guidelines in diagnosis and management of GDM. PMID:23961485

  12. Inflammatory and Other Biomarkers: Role in Pathophysiology and Prediction of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Sally K.; De Courten, Barbora; Boyle, Jacqueline A.; Teede, Helena J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding pathophysiology and identifying mothers at risk of major pregnancy complications is vital to effective prevention and optimal management. However, in current antenatal care, understanding of pathophysiology of complications is limited. In gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), risk prediction is mostly based on maternal history and clinical risk factors and may not optimally identify high risk pregnancies. Hence, universal screening is widely recommended. Here, we will explore the literature on GDM and biomarkers including inflammatory markers, adipokines, endothelial function and lipids to advance understanding of pathophysiology and explore risk prediction, with a goal to guide prevention and treatment of GDM. PMID:26110385

  13. A hybrid knowledge based system for therapy adjustment in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. E.; Gómez, E. J.; Corcoy, R.; del Pozo, F.; Arredondo, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    This poster describes a system to analyze self-monitoring data of gestational diabetic patients, for obtaining an assessment of their metabolic control with the final goal of supporting decision-making in therapy adjustment. The system is able to manage incomplete data and to make temporal reasoning under uncertainty, the two most important constraints when analyzing ambulatory monitoring data. Two different formalism have been used to represent and manage the knowledge: a dynamic Bayesian network and a production system based on rules. The outcomes provided by the whole system are: information on possible patient transgressions of the prescribed treatment and recommendations of treatment adjustments. PMID:7950077

  14. Glucose Fluctuations during Gestation: An Additional Tool for Monitoring Pregnancy Complicated by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dalfrà, M. G.; Chilelli, N. C.; Di Cianni, G.; Mello, G.; Lencioni, C.; Biagioni, S.; Scalese, M.; Sartore, G.; Lapolla, A.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) gives a unique insight into magnitude and duration of daily glucose fluctuations. Limited data are available on glucose variability (GV) in pregnancy. We aimed to assess GV in healthy pregnant women and cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes (GDM) and its possible association with HbA1c. CGM was performed in 50 pregnant women (20 type 1, 20 GDM, and 10 healthy controls) in all three trimesters of pregnancy. We calculated mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), standard deviation (SD), interquartile range (IQR), and continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA), as parameters of GV. The high blood glycemic index (HBGI) and low blood glycemic index (LBGI) were also measured as indicators of hyperhypoglycemic risk. Women with type 1 diabetes showed higher GV, with a 2-fold higher risk of hyperglycemic spikes during the day, than healthy pregnant women or GDM ones. GDM women had only slightly higher GV parameters than healthy controls. HbA1c did not correlate with GV indicators in type 1 diabetes or GDM pregnancies. We provided new evidence of the importance of certain GV indicators in pregnant women with GDM or type 1 diabetes and recommended the use of CGM specifically in these populations. PMID:24319455

  15. Glucose Fluctuations during Gestation: An Additional Tool for Monitoring Pregnancy Complicated by Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dalfrà, M G; Chilelli, N C; Di Cianni, G; Mello, G; Lencioni, C; Biagioni, S; Scalese, M; Sartore, G; Lapolla, A

    2013-01-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) gives a unique insight into magnitude and duration of daily glucose fluctuations. Limited data are available on glucose variability (GV) in pregnancy. We aimed to assess GV in healthy pregnant women and cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes (GDM) and its possible association with HbA1c. CGM was performed in 50 pregnant women (20 type 1, 20 GDM, and 10 healthy controls) in all three trimesters of pregnancy. We calculated mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), standard deviation (SD), interquartile range (IQR), and continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA), as parameters of GV. The high blood glycemic index (HBGI) and low blood glycemic index (LBGI) were also measured as indicators of hyperhypoglycemic risk. Women with type 1 diabetes showed higher GV, with a 2-fold higher risk of hyperglycemic spikes during the day, than healthy pregnant women or GDM ones. GDM women had only slightly higher GV parameters than healthy controls. HbA1c did not correlate with GV indicators in type 1 diabetes or GDM pregnancies. We provided new evidence of the importance of certain GV indicators in pregnant women with GDM or type 1 diabetes and recommended the use of CGM specifically in these populations. PMID:24319455

  16. Bulimia, anorexia nervosa, and diabetes. Deadly combinations.

    PubMed

    Hillard, J R; Hillard, P J

    1984-06-01

    Bulimia, anorexia nervosa, and diabetes often coexist, and eating disorders among diabetics frequently go unrecognized. This combination of conditions can have life-threatening effects. Consequently, diagnosis and the medical and psychological management of these patients is of critical importance. The authors outline the complex interactions among the biologic, psychological, and social factors involved in these disorders.

  17. A national survey of implementation of guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    O'Higgins, A; Dunne, F; Lee, B; Smith, D; Turner, M J

    2014-09-01

    In 2010, national guidelines for the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were published by the Health Service Executive (HSE). In 2012, a questionnaire was distributed to all maternity units to survey implementation of the guidelines. All units screened women for GDM, but used different screening tests with fifteen units (79%) using the recommended 75g OGTT, three units (16%) using a 100g OGTT and one unit (5%) using a 50g glucose challenge test. Optimal outcomes are best achieved through multidisciplinary diabetes-obstetric care and this was available in nine of the units (47%). The prevalence of GDM varied from 2.2 - 7.4%. Insulin usage varied from 15-56%. Six centres (31%) had not implemented the national guidelines in full because of lack of resources. Despite national endorsement of the guideline, significant variations remain in implementation. This may lead to differences in clinical outcomes depending on where a woman attends for obstetric care.

  18. The Role of Metformin in Metabolic Disturbances during Pregnancy: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of gestation implicates complex function of multiple endocrine mechanisms, and disruptions of the global metabolic environment prompt profound consequences on fetomaternal well-being during pregnancy and postpartum. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are very frequent conditions which increase risk for pregnancy complications, including early pregnancy loss, pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders, and preterm labor, among many others. Insulin resistance (IR) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both PCOS and GDM, representing an important therapeutic target, with metformin being the most widely prescribed insulin-sensitizing antidiabetic drug. Although traditional views neglect use of oral antidiabetic agents during pregnancy, increasing evidence of safety during gestation has led to metformin now being recognized as a valuable tool in prevention of IR-related pregnancy complications and management of GDM. Metformin has been demonstrated to reduce rates of early pregnancy loss and onset of GDM in women with PCOS, and it appears to offer better metabolic control than insulin and other oral antidiabetic drugs during pregnancy. This review aims to summarize key aspects of current evidence concerning molecular and epidemiological knowledge on metformin use during pregnancy in the setting of PCOS and GDM. PMID:25763406

  19. Elevated First-Trimester Total Bile Acid is Associated with the Risk of Subsequent Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Wolin; Meng, Xiyan; Zhao, Weijing; Pan, Jiemin; Tang, Junling; Huang, Yajuan; Tao, Minfang; Liu, Fang; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to assess whether total bile acid (TBA) level in first trimester pregnancy is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Biochemical parameters including serum TBA of 742 pregnant women were collected within 12 weeks of gestation and compared. At 24–28th weeks of gestation, 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. The perinatal data of 330 women were collected. The results demonstrated women with GDM (n = 268) had higher first-trimester serum levels of TBA compared with healthy subjects (n = 474) (2.3 ± 1.4 μmol/L vs. 1.9 ± 1.0 μmol/L, P < 0.001). TBA was independently associated with GDM [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–1.61, P < 0.001]. Compared to the first category of TBA, women in the highest category had a marked increase in risk for GDM (AOR, 7.72; 95% CI, 3.22–18.50, P < 0.001). In conclusion, higher first-trimester TBA levels, even within normal range, may help indicate increased risk of GDM. PMID:27667090

  20. Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nursing programs Prematurityprevention.org Product Catalog Volunteer Volunteer leaders Team Youth National service partners Advocate Get informed ... Dimes Plan Aims to Make United States a Leader in Preterm Birth Prevention March of Dimes Names ...

  1. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Delay or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: Walking for Exercise and Nutrition to Prevent Diabetes for You

    PubMed Central

    Bogossian, F. E.; Wilkinson, S. A.; Gibbons, K. S.; Kim, C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To develop a program to support behaviour changes for women with a history of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and a Body Mass Index (BMI) > 25 kg/m2 to delay or prevent Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Methods. Women diagnosed with GDM in the previous 6 to 24 months and BMI > 25 kg/m2 were randomized to an intervention (I) (n = 16) or a control (C) (n = 15) group. The intervention was a pedometer program combined with nutrition coaching, with the primary outcome increased weight loss in the intervention group. Secondary outcomes included decreased waist and hip measurements, improved insulin sensitivity and body composition, increased physical activity, and improved self-efficacy in eating behaviours. Results. Median (IQR) results were as follows: weight: I −2.5 (2.3) kg versus C +0.2 (1.6) kg (P = 0.009), waist: I −3.6 (4.5) cm versus C −0.1 (3.6) cm (P = 0.07), and hip: I −5.0 (3.3) cm versus C −0.2 (2.6) cm (P = 0.002). There was clinical improvement in physical activity and eating behaviours and no significant changes in glucose metabolism or body composition. Conclusion. A pedometer program and nutrition coaching proved effective in supporting weight loss, waist circumference, physical activity, and eating behaviours in women with previous GDM. PMID:26089886

  2. Effect of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms on susceptiblity to gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y H; Xu, Y L; Zhang, W H

    2016-06-03

    We investigate the role of the GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 IIe105Val genetic polymorphisms in the susceptibility to gestational diabetes mellitus. A total of 223 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus and 265 healthy pregnant women were examined at The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine from May 2013 to November 2013. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms was conducted using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction. There were statistically significant differences between patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and control subjects in terms of age (χ(2) = 6.68, P = 0.01) and BMI (t = 7.56, P < 0.001) levels of HDL-C (t = 2.62, P = 0.005) and LDL-C (t = 3.98, P < 0.001). By the chi-square test, we found significant differences between the present and null genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ(2) = 10.95, P = 0.0009). Null genotype of GSTM1 could influence the susceptibility to gestational diabetes mellitus compared to the present genotype [adjusted OR (95%CI) = 1.85 (1.26-2.72)]. However, the unconditional logistic analysis revealed that GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms could not influence the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. In summary, we suggest that the GSTM1 gene polymorphism could influence the susceptibility to gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

  3. "GINEXMAL RCT: Induction of labour versus expectant management in gestational diabetes pregnancies"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gestational Diabetes (GDM) is one of the most common complications of pregnancies affecting around 7% of women. This clinical condition is associated with an increased risk of developing fetal macrosomia and is related to a higher incidence of caesarean section in comparison to the general population. Strong evidence indicating the best management between induction of labour at term and expectant monitoring are missing. Methods/Design Pregnant women with singleton pregnancy in vertex presentation previously diagnosed with gestational diabetes will be asked to participate in a multicenter open-label randomized controlled trial between 38+0 and 39+0 gestational weeks. Women will be recruited in the third trimester in the Outpatient clinic or in the Day Assessment Unit according to local protocols. Women who opt to take part will be randomized according to induction of labour or expectant management for spontaneous delivery. Patients allocated to the induction group will be admitted to the obstetric ward and offered induction of labour via use of prostaglandins, Foley catheter or oxytocin (depending on clinical conditions). Women assigned to the expectant arm will be sent to their domicile where they will be followed up until delivery, through maternal and fetal wellbeing monitoring twice weekly. The primary study outcome is the Caesarean section (C-section) rate, whilst secondary measurement4s are maternal and neonatal outcomes. A total sample of 1760 women (880 each arm) will be recruited to identify a relative difference between the two arms equal to 20% in favour of induction, with concerns to C-section rate. Data will be collected until mothers and newborns discharge from the hospital. Analysis of the outcome measures will be carried out by intention to treat. Discussion The present trial will provide evidence as to whether or not, in women affected by gestational diabetes, induction of labour between 38+0 and 39+0 weeks is an effective management to

  4. Physician Care Patterns and Adherence to Postpartum Glucose Testing after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Monica L.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Lindsay, Karen; Rosenberg, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examines obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine physicians' reported care patterns, attitudes and beliefs and predictors of adherence to postpartum testing in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Research Design and Methods In November–December 2005, a mailed survey went to a random, cross-sectional sample of 683 Oregon licensed physicians in obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine from a population of 2171. Results Routine postpartum glucose tolerance testing by both family physicians (19.3%) and obstetrician/gynecologists physicians (35.3%) was reportedly low among the 285 respondents (42% response rate). Factors associated with high adherence to postpartum testing included physician stated priority (OR 4.39, 95% CI: 1.69–7.94) and physician beliefs about norms or typical testing practices (OR 3.66, 95% CI: 1.65–11.69). Specialty, sex of physician, years of practice, location, type of practice, other attitudes and beliefs were not associated with postpartum glucose tolerance testing. Conclusions Postpartum glucose tolerance testing following a gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancy was not routinely practiced by responders to this survey. Our findings indicate that physician knowledge, attitudes and beliefs may in part explain suboptimal postpartum testing. Although guidelines for postpartum care are established, some physicians do not prioritize these guidelines in practice and do not believe postpartum testing is the norm among their peers. PMID:23071709

  5. Protein turnover and 3-methylhistidine excretion in non-pregnant, pregnant and gestational diabetic women

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, W.L.; King, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Protein turnover was studied in nine non-pregnant (NP) women, eight pregnant (P) and two gestational diabetic (GDM) women. Whole body protein turnover, synthesis and catabolism rates were measured using a single oral dose of /sup 15/N-glycine followed by measurement of enrichment of urinary ammonia. Urinary 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion was measured for three consecutive days, including the day of the protein turnover study. Whole body protein turnover and synthesis rates did not differ between the P and NP women, although the synthesis rates tended to be higher in the P group. Gestational diabetic women appeared to have considerably higher rates of both turnover and synthesis. Pregnant women excreted significantly more urinary 3MH than did non-pregnant women. GDM women appeared to have lower 3MH excretion than the P women. Correlation between 3MH excretion and protein turnover rates was nearly significant (p = .06) in the NP women, but was poorly correlated (p = .43) in the P women, suggesting that muscles may be a less important site of whole body protein turnover in pregnancy than in the non-pregnant state.

  6. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  7. First trimester depression scores predict development of gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant rural Appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Chelsea; McCook, Judy G; Bailey, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) occurs in up to 9% of pregnancies. Perinatal depression affects up to 20% of women during pregnancy, and can extend into the postpartum period. A number of studies have linked depression and diabetes, however, whether this applies to GDM or which might come first is less understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential relationship between depression identified in the first trimester of pregnancy and the subsequent development of GDM. Women without pre-existing Type I/II diabetes (n = 1021) were evaluated for depression during the first trimester of pregnancy, and medical records were reviewed to identify a positive history of diabetes. Women identified as depressed during the first trimester were more likely to have GDM compared to those not depressed. After controlling for demographic factors and weight-related variables level of depression in the first trimester still predicted later GDM development. Depression identified in early pregnancy may predict increased risk of subsequent GDM development. Due to the numerous maternal, fetal and neonatal complications associated with GDM, early recognition is essential to promote the best possible outcomes for mother and infant. Recognizing depression as a possible risk factor for GDM development could lead to earlier screening and preventative measures.

  8. Women in India with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Strategy (WINGS): Methodology and development of model of care for gestational diabetes mellitus (WINGS 4)

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Arivudainambi; Mohan, Viswanathan; Malanda, Belma; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Bhavadharini, Balaji; Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Maheswari, Kumar; Uma, Ram; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Kalaiyarasi, Gunasekaran; Ninov, Lyudmil; Belton, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The Women In India with GDM Strategy (WINGS) project was conducted with the aim of developing a model of care (MOC) suitable for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in low- and middle-income countries. Methodology: The WINGS project was carried out in Chennai, Southern India, in two phases. In Phase I, a situational analysis was conducted to understand the practice patterns of health-care professionals and to determine the best screening criteria through a pilot screening study. Results: Phase II involved developing a MOC-based on findings from the situational analysis and evaluating its effectiveness. The model focused on diagnosis, management, and follow-up of women with GDM who were followed prospectively throughout their pregnancy. An educational booklet was provided to all women with GDM, offering guidance on self-management of GDM including sample meal plans and physical activity tips. A pedometer was provided to all women to monitor step count. Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) was the first line of treatment given to women with GDM. Women were advised to undergo fasting blood glucose and postprandial blood glucose testing every fortnight. Insulin was indicated when the target blood glucose levels were not achieved with MNT. Women were evaluated for pregnancy outcomes and postpartum glucose tolerance status. Conclusions: The WINGS MOC offers a comprehensive package at every level of care for women with GDM. If successful, this MOC will be scaled up to other resource-constrained settings with the hope of improving lives of women with GDM. PMID:27730085

  9. Comparison of glyburide and insulin in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and associated perinatal outcome: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mirzamoradi, Masoomeh; Heidar, Zahra; Faalpoor, Ziba; Naeiji, Zahra; Jamali, Razyeh

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is currently the drug of choice in treating patients with gestational diabetes mellitus but insulin is expensive, inconvenient to store and use and probably associated with more risks of asymptomatic hypoglycemia in comparison with some oral agents. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glyburide in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus in comparison with insulin therapy. Pregnant women aged between 18-45 years with singleton pregnancies and in their 24-36 weeks of gestation were assessed for eligibility. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus were randomly allocated to two insulin and glyburide groups and compared with maternal and neonatal outcome. Ninety-six women with gestational diabetes mellitus enrolled in the study. At screen and treated fasting and post-prandial blood glucose levels were similar in both groups. Time for beginning the treatment to control the glycemic index was 28.30 (±20.60) days in the insulin group and 22.56 (±18.86) in the glyburide group. There was no statistically significant difference in time-to-control the blood glucose level in two studied group. Time, between beginning the treatment of GDM and delivery, was 53.22 (±28.96) days in the insulin group and 56.67 (±30.47) in the glyburide group. There was no statistically significant difference between the times of treatment-to-delivery in two studied groups. There were no statistically significant differences between maternal and neonatal outcomes in two studied groups. Glyburide can effectively and safely control the glycemic index in women with gestational diabetes mellitus in comparison with insulin.

  10. Women with gestational diabetes in Vietnam: a qualitative study to determine attitudes and health behaviours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes is increasing in prevalence globally, notably amongst populations from low- and middle- income countries. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus(GDM), a precursor for type 2 diabetes, is increasing in line with this trend. Few studies have considered the personal and social effects of GDM on women living in low and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was determine attitudes and health behaviours of pregnant women with GDM in Vietnam. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group methodology conducted in Ho Chi Minh City. Pregnant women, aged over 18 years, with GDM were eligible to participate. Women were purposely sampled to obtain a range of gestational ages and severity of disease. They were invited to attend a 1-hour focus group. Questions were semi structured around six themes. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, translated and cross-referenced. Non-verbal and group interactions were recorded. Thematic analysis was performed using a theoretical framework approach. Results From December 2010 to February 2011, four focus groups were conducted involving 34 women. Median age was 31.5 years (range 23 to 44), median BMI 21.8 kg/m2. Women felt confusion, anxiety and guilt about GDM. Many perceived their baby to be at increased risk of death. Advice to reduce dietary starch was confusing. Women reported being ‘hungry’ or ‘starving’ most of the time, unaware of appropriate food substitutions. They were concerned about transmission of GDM through breast milk. Several women planned not to breastfeed. All felt they needed more information. Current sources of information included friends, magazines, a health phone line or the Internet. Women felt small group sessions and information leaflets could benefit them. Conclusions This study highlights the need for culturally appropriate clinical education and health promotion activities for women with GDM in Vietnam. PMID:22873351

  11. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity.

  12. Preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, Candace A.; Mendola, Pauline; Yeung, Edwina; Männistö, Tuija; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Liu, Danping; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Grantz, Katherine L.

    2015-02-15

    Background: Air pollution has been linked to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) but no studies have evaluated impact of preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures on GDM risk. Methods: Electronic medical records provided data on 219,952 singleton deliveries to mothers with (n=11,334) and without GDM (n=208,618). Average maternal exposures to particulate matter (PM) ≤ 2.5 μm (PM{sub 2.5}) and PM{sub 2.5} constituents, PM ≤ 10 μm (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were estimated for the 3-month preconception window, first trimester, and gestational weeks 1–24 based on modified Community Multiscale Air Quality models for delivery hospital referral regions. Binary regression models with robust standard errors estimated relative risks (RR) for GDM per interquartile range (IQR) increase in pollutant concentrations adjusted for study site, maternal age and race/ethnicity. Results: Preconception maternal exposure to NO{sub X} (RR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.13) and SO{sub 2} (RR=1.05, 1.01, 1.09) were associated with increased risk of subsequent GDM and risk estimates remained elevated for first trimester exposure. Preconception O{sub 3} was associated with lower risk of subsequent GDM (RR=0.93, 0.90, 0.96) but risks increased later in pregnancy. Conclusion: Maternal exposures to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} preconception and during the first few weeks of pregnancy were associated with increased GDM risk. O{sub 3} appeared to increase GDM risk in association with mid-pregnancy exposure but not in earlier time windows. These common exposures merit further investigation. - Highlights: • Air pollution may be related to gestational diabetes (GDM). • No prior studies have examined preconception exposure. • Maternal exposure to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} before conception increased subsequent GDM risk. • NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} exposure in the first seven weeks of pregnancy also increased

  13. Primary prevention of gestational diabetes for women who are overweight and obese: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) has well recognised adverse health implications for the mother and her newborn that are both short and long term. Obesity is a significant risk factor for developing GDM and the prevalence of obesity is increasing globally. It is a matter of public health importance that clinicians have evidence based strategies to inform practice and currently there is insufficient evidence regarding the impact of dietary and lifestyle interventions on improving maternal and newborn outcomes. The primary aim of this study is to measure the impact of a telephone based intervention that promotes positive lifestyle modifications on the incidence of GDM. Secondary aims include: the impact on gestational weight gain; large for gestational age babies; differences in blood glucose levels taken at the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) and selected factors relating to self-efficacy and psychological wellbeing. Method/design A randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted involving pregnant women who are overweight (BMI >25 to 29.9 k/gm2) or obese (BMI >30 kgm/2), less than 14 weeks gestation and recruited from the Barwon South West region of Victoria, Australia. From recruitment until birth, women in the intervention group will receive a program informed by the Theory of Self-efficacy and employing Motivational Interviewing. Brief ( less than 5 minute) phone contact will alternate with a text message/email and will involve goal setting, behaviour change reinforcement with weekly weighing and charting, and the provision of health information. Those in the control group will receive usual care. Data for primary and secondary outcomes will be collected from medical record review and a questionnaire at 36 weeks gestation. Discussion Evidence based strategies that reduce the incidence of GDM are a priority for contemporary maternity care. Changing health behaviours is a complex undertaking and trialling a composite intervention that

  14. Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Korea: A National Health Insurance Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Introduction This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and use of anti-diabetic medications for patients with GDM in Korea, using data of the period 2007–2011 from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) database, which includes the claims data of 97% of the Korean population. Materials and Methods We used the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes provided by the HIRA to identify women with delivery in the HIRA database between 2009 and 2011. GDM was defined according to ICD-10 codes, and patients with pre-existing diabetes between January 1, 2007 and pregnancy were excluded. A Poisson regression was performed to evaluate the trends in annual prevalence rates. Results The annual numbers of deliveries in 2009–2011 were 479,160 in 2009, 449,747 in 2010, and 377,374 in 2011. The prevalence of GDM during that period was 7.5% in 2009–2011: 5.7% in 2009, 7.8% in 2010, and 9.5% in 2011. The age-stratified analysis showed that the prevalence of GDM was highest in women aged 40–44 years, at 10.6% in 2009–2011, and that the annual prevalence significantly increased even in young women aged 20–29 years during that period (P < 0.05). More than 95% of the patients with GDM did not take any anti-diabetic medication. Among the anti-diabetic medications prescribed for patients with GDM, insulin was most commonly prescribed (for >98% of the patients with GDM on medication). Conclusions The prevalence of GDM in Korean women recently reached 5.7–9.5% in recent years. This represents a public health concern that warrants proper screening and medical care for GDM in women during the childbearing years. PMID:27046149

  15. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) decreases butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity and changes its relationship with lipids

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Larissa O.; de Andrade, Fabiana A.; Bono, Gleyse F.; Setoguchi, Thaís E.; Brandão, Mariana B.; Chautard-Freire-Maia, Eleidi A.; dos Santos, Izabella C.R.; Picheth, Geraldo; Faria, Ana Cristina R. de A.; Réa, Rosângela R.; Souza, Ricardo L.R.; Furtado-Alle, Lupe

    2014-01-01

    Many conditions interfere with butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity, e.g., pregnancy or presence of the BCHE gene variant −116A can decrease activity whereas obesity and types I and II diabetes mellitus can increase activity. In this study, we examined BChE activity, −116A and 1615A BCHE gene variants, and anthropometric and biochemical variables associated with diabetes in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and in healthy pregnant women. BChE activity was measured spectrophotometrically using propionylthiocholine as substrate and genotyping of the −116 and 1615 sites of the BCHE gene was done with a TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Three groups were studied: 150 patients with GDM, 295 healthy pregnant women and 156 non-pregnant healthy women. Mean BChE activity was significantly lower in healthy pregnant women than in women from the general population and was further reduced in GDM patients. BChE activity was significantly reduced in carriers of −116A in GDM patients and healthy pregnant women. Although GDM patients had a significantly higher mean body mass index (BMI) and triglycerides than healthy pregnant women, they had lower mean BChE activity, suggesting that the lowering effect of GDM on BChE activity was stronger than the characteristic enhancing effect of increased BMI and triglycerides. PMID:24688284

  16. Up-regulation of miR-98 and unraveling regulatory mechanisms in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jing-Li; Zhang, Lu; Li, Jian; Tian, Shi; Lv, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Xue-Qin; Su, Xing; Li, Ying; Hu, Yi; Ma, Xu; Xia, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    MiR-98 expression was up-regulated in kidney in response to early diabetic nephropathy in mouse and down-regulated in muscle in type 2 diabetes in human. However, the expression prolife and functional role of miR-98 in human gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remained unclear. Here, we investigated its expression and function in placental tissues from GDM patients and the possible molecular mechanisms. The results showed that miR-98 was up-regulated in placentas from GDM patients compared with normal placentas. MiR-98 over-expression increased global DNA methylational level and miR-98 knockdown reduced global DNA methylational level. Further investigation revealed that miR-98 could inhibit Mecp2 expression by binding the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of methyl CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2), and then led to the expression dysregulation of canonical transient receptor potential 3 (Trpc3), a glucose uptake related gene. More importantly, in vivo analysis found that the expression level of Mecp2 and Trpc3 in placental tissues from GDM patients, relative to the increase of miR-98, was diminished, especially for GDM patients over the age of 35 years. Collectively, up-regulation of miR-98 in the placental tissues of human GDM is linked to the global DNA methylation via targeting Mecp2, which may imply a novel regulatory mechanism in GDM. PMID:27573367

  17. miR-410 enhanced hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm transplant to alleviate gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yang; Guo, Na; He, Tongqiang; Ji, Jing; Li, Zhibin; Huang, Pu

    2015-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal mal-development. The deficit and dysfunction of insulin secreting β-cells are signature symptoms for GDM. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we first identified that microRNA-410 (miR-410) directly targets lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), a gene selectively repressed in normal insulin secreting β-cells. hESCs that can be induced to express miR-410 hence keeping LDHA levels in check were then differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, followed by transplantation into db/+ mouse model of GDM. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the pregnant females suffering from GDM. Our findings describe for the first time the method of combining miRNA with hESCs, providing proof of concept by employing genetically modified stem cell therapy for treating GDM.

  18. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lozo, Svjetlana; Atabeygi, Amir; Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). PMID:27610256

  19. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT).

  20. An Exploratory Mixed Method Assessment of Low Income, Pregnant Hispanic Women's Understanding of Gestational Diabetes and Dietary Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads-Baeza, Maria Elena; Reis, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and assess low income, healthy, pregnant Hispanic women's understanding of gestational diabetes (GDM) and willingness to change aspects of their diet. Design: One-on-one, in-person interviews conducted in Spanish with 94 women (primarily Mexican). Setting: Federal Qualified Community Health Center's prenatal clinic. Method:…

  1. Carbohydrate Content in the GDM Diet: Two Views: View 1: Nutrition Therapy in Gestational Diabetes: The Case for Complex Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L

    2016-05-01

    IN BRIEF Restriction of dietary carbohydrate has been the cornerstone for treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, there is evidence that a balanced liberalization of complex carbohydrate as part of an overall eating plan in GDM meets treatment goals and may mitigate maternal adipose tissue insulin resistance, both of which may promote optimal metabolic outcomes for mother and offspring.

  2. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). PMID:27610256

  3. Lack of predictive power of plasma lipids or lipoproteins for gestational diabetes mellitus in Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Iimura, Yuko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Yao, Zemin; Ito, Satoru; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Yoshitsugu, Michiyasu; Miyauchi, Akito; Hiyoshi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction To determine the diagnostic potential of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 1,161 Japanese women at 20–28 weeks of gestation who underwent a glucose challenge test (GCT). Materials and Methods A total of 1,161 Japanese women at 20–28 weeks of gestation underwent a GCT. Participants with a positive test (GCT[+]) underwent a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. Clinical and biochemical parameters were determined and quantification of apolipoproteins (Apo), including ApoB, ApoB48, ApoA-I and ApoC-III, was carried out. Results The prevalence of GCT(+; with a 130 mg/dL glucose cut-off) and GDM was 20% and 4%, respectively. There was a trend for increased triglycerides and ApoC-III in GDM(+) participants. However, the difference in plasma triglycerides, ApoC-III or ApoB48 did not reach statistical significance between GDM(+) and GDM(−) women. Values of 1-h glucose (P < 0.001) and fasting glucose (P = 0.002) were significant risk factors for GDM. Conclusions Prediction of GDM using only the ApoC-III value is not easy, although triglycerides and ApoC-III were higher in the GDM(+) group. The present findings show no significant difference in plasma lipid levels between women diagnosed with GDM and those with normal glucose tolerance. PMID:26543537

  4. Maternal Body Weight and Gestational Diabetes Differentially Influence Placental and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martino, J.; Sebert, S.; Segura, M. T.; García-Valdés, L.; Florido, J.; Padilla, M. C.; Marcos, A.; Rueda, R.; McArdle, H. J.; Budge, H.; Campoy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can both contribute to adverse neonatal outcomes. The extent to which this may be mediated by differences in placental metabolism and nutrient transport remains to be determined. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether raised maternal body mass index (BMI) and/or GDM contributed to a resetting of the expression of genes within the placenta that are involved in energy sensing, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic pathways. Methods: Pregnant women from Spain were recruited as part of the “Study of Maternal Nutrition and Genetics on the Foetal Adiposity Programming” survey at the first antenatal visit (12–20 weeks of gestation) and stratified according to prepregnancy BMI and the incidence of GDM. At delivery, placenta and cord blood were sampled and newborn anthropometry measured. Results: Obese women with GDM had higher estimated fetal weight at 34 gestational weeks and a greater risk of preterm deliveries and cesarean section. Birth weight was unaffected by BMI or GDM; however, women who were obese with normal glucose tolerance had increased placental weight and higher plasma glucose and leptin at term. Gene expression for markers of placental energy sensing and oxidative stress, were primarily affected by maternal obesity as mTOR was reduced, whereas SIRT-1 and UCP2 were both upregulated. In placenta from obese women with GDM, gene expression for AMPK was also reduced, whereas the downstream regulator of mTOR, p70S6KB1 was raised. Conclusions: Placental gene expression is sensitive to both maternal obesity and GDM which both impact on energy sensing and could modulate the effect of either raised maternal BMI or GDM on birth weight. PMID:26513002

  5. Metformin versus insulin for gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Ping; Sheng, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Shuang; Yang, Ting; Ma, Ling-Yue; Zhou, Ying; Cui, Yi-Min

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy and safety of metformin for the treatment of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We searched databases, including PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing metformin and insulin treatments in women with GDM. We carried out statistical analyses using RevMan 2011 and used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations profiler to rate the quality of evidence of the primary outcomes. We analysed eight studies involving 1592 subjects. Meta-analysis of the RCTs showed that metformin had statistically significant effects on pregnancy-induced hypertension [PIH; risk ratio (RR) 0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31, 0.91]. However, its effects on neonatal hypoglycaemia (RR 0.80; 95% CI 0.62, 1.02), rate of large-for-gestational age infants (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.55, 1.08), respiratory distress syndrome (RR 1.26; 95% CI 0.67, 2.37), phototherapy (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.67, 1.31) and perinatal death (RR 1.01; 95% CI 0.11, 9.53) were not significant. Our analyses suggest that there is no clinically relevant difference in efficacy or safety between metformin and insulin; however, metformin may be a good choice for GDM because of the lower risk of PIH. The advantages of metformin in terms of glycaemic control, PIH incidence and gestational age at birth are unclear, and should be verified in further trials.

  6. Insufficient Vitamin D Response to Solar Radiation in German Patients with Type 2 Diabetes or Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Langer, J; Penna-Martinez, M; Bon, D; Herrmann, E; Wallasch, M; Badenhoop, K

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in all forms of diabetes mellitus. Recently, we reported how ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation affected vitamin D [25(OH)D3] concentrations in patients with type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to analyze whether patients with non-autoimmune diabetes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) also show the same vitamin D profile in relation to environmental factors including ambient temperature as an indirect parameter for outdoor activities. We analyzed 25(OH)D3 concentrations of T2DM (n=349) and GDM patients (n=327) at the University Hospital Frankfurt from 2005 to 2007. Additionally, daily UVB and monthly outside air temperature measurements for Frankfurt/Germany were obtained. We detected a positive correlation between UVB irradiation and 25(OH)D3 concentrations of T2DM and GDM patients (rho=0.50 and rho=0.63, p=0.003 and p<0.0001, respectively). UVB irradiation was in summer (April-October) higher than in winter (November-March) (5.6 kJ/m² vs. 0.5 kJ/m², p<0.0001). However, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in summer remained high with 76% in T2DM and 59% in GDM. In a stepwise regression analysis for the 25(OH)D3 concentration, significant predictors were outdoor temperature (estimate=0.02, p<0.0001), UVB radiation (estimate=-0.0015, p=0.02), year (2006 vs. 2005 estimate=-0.06, p>0.05, 2007 vs. 2005: estimate=-0.13, p<0.0001) and diabetes type (estimate=0.06, p=0.03). In conclusion, the strong correlation between UVB radiation and 25(OH)D3 concentrations in T2DM and GDM patients determines the seasonal variation. Additional determinants for the 25(OH)D3 concentrations were outdoor temperature, year, and diabetes type. Despite the effects of solar radiation both patients groups remain largely vitamin D deficient during summers. PMID:27525476

  7. Altered cytokine network in gestational diabetes mellitus affects maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Lauren; Belkacemi, Louiza

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an altered inflammatory profile, compared to the non-pregnant state with an adequate balance between pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines needed for normal development. Cytokines are small secreted proteins expressed mainly in immunocompetent cells in the reproductive system. From early developmental stages onward, the secretory activity of placenta cells clearly contributes to increase local as well as systemic levels of cytokines. The placental production of cytokines may affect mother and fetus independently. In turn because of this unique position at the maternal fetal interface, the placenta is also exposed to the regulatory influence of cytokines from maternal and fetal circulations, and hence, may be affected by changes in any of these. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an overall alteration of the cytokine network. This review discusses the changes that occur in cytokines post GDM and their negative effects on maternal insulin and placental-fetal development. PMID:27230834

  8. Role of Medical Nutrition Therapy in the Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Cristina; Mauricio, Didac; Hernandez, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and accordingly, it has a significant impact on women and newborns. The primary objective of MNT is to ensure adequate pregnancy weight gain and fetus growth while maintaining euglycemia and avoiding ketones. However, the optimal diet (energy content, macronutrient distribution, its quality and amount, among others) remains an outstanding question. Overall, the nutritional requirements of GDM are similar for all pregnancies, but special attention is paid to carbohydrates. Despite the classical intervention of restricting carbohydrates, the latest evidence, although limited, seems to favor a low-glycemic index diet. There is general agreement in the literature about caloric restrictions in the case of being overweight or obese. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to investigate the optimal MNT for GDM; this knowledge could yield health benefits and cost savings.

  9. ECG body surface mapping in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and optimal metabolic compensation.

    PubMed

    Žákovičová, E; Kittnar, O; Slavíček, J; Medová, E; Šváb, P; Charvát, J

    2014-01-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) events compared with women without GDM. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 200 parameters of the heart electric field in 35 women with GDM under optimal glycemic compensation compared to 32 healthy pregnant women. All examinations were performed in the 36th week of gestation. The parameters in ECG body surface mapping (BSM) were registered by the diagnostic system Cardiag 112.2. The absolute values of maximum and minimum in depolarization and repolarization isopotential, isointegral and isoarea maps were not significantly different between the groups. These findings correspond to the result of heart rate variability examination. However BSM revealed the significant prolongation of QRS complex (p=0.05), shortening of ventricular myocardial activation time (ICHVAT) (p=0.01), prolongation of mean QT duration (p=0.01) and increase of QT interval dispersion (p=0.01) in women with GDM. Duration of QRS and ICHVAT significantly correlated with interventricular septum and posterior wall thickness in GDM group, QTd interval correlated significantly with HbA1C level. We conclude that despite of optimal metabolic control several significant abnormalities detected by ECG BSM are still present in patients with GDM. PMID:25669679

  10. Possible contribution of (pro)renin receptor to development of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bokuda, Kanako; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    (Pro)renin receptor [(P)RR], a receptor for renin and prorenin, was first cloned in 2002. Since then, the pathophysiological roles of (P)RR have been growing concerns. (P)RR binds renin and prorenin, with two important consequences, nonproteolytic activation of prorenin, leading to the tissue renin-angiotensin system activation and the intracellular signalings. It is now also known to play an important role as vacuolar H+-ATPase associated protein, involving in Wnt signaling, main component of embryonic development. Extracellular domain of full-length (P)RR is cleaved in golgi-complex forming soluble (P)RR [s(P)RR]. The s(P)RR is now possible to be measured in human blood and urine. It is now measured in different pathophysiological states, and recent study showed that elevated plasma s(P)RR levels in the early stage of pregnancies are associated with higher incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus later in the pregnancies. Plasma s(P)RR levels of neonates are known to be higher than that of adults. It was also shown that, increased s(P)RR concentrations in cord blood, associated with a lower small for gestational age birth likelihood. These data suggests the involvement of (P)RR in embryo’s growth. In this review article, we attempt to figure out the possible pathophysiological roles of the (P)RR in maternal glucose intolerance and embryo’s growth, through reviewing previous studies. PMID:25512796

  11. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O

    2015-11-01

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16-41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice", "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese", and "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood". GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4-17.0) for "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice" pattern, 7.5 (1.8-32.3) for "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese" pattern, and 22.3 (3.9-127.4) for "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood" pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log

  12. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O

    2015-11-12

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16-41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice", "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese", and "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood". GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4-17.0) for "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice" pattern, 7.5 (1.8-32.3) for "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese" pattern, and 22.3 (3.9-127.4) for "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood" pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log

  13. [Outcomes in women with history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Literature review].

    PubMed

    Vérier-Mine, O

    2010-12-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are characterized by a high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (X 7), metabolic syndrome (X 2 to 5) and cardiovascular diseases (X 1,7). Women with lesser degrees of glucose intolerance share the same risks. T2DM may occur from postpartum (5 to 14%) to several years later, up to 25 years. Some factors associated with T2DM are identified: obesity, early diagnostic before 24 weeks, high pregnancy OGTT blood glucose or insulinotherapy. Screening for T2DM only with fasting glucose provides less sensibility than with OGTT; HbA1c may supplant these dosages. The recurrence rate of GDM is between 30 and 84%, non-white ethnicity and insulinotherapy during GDM being the best proven predictors. High risk women need repeated life-long screenings for glycemic abnomalies, or when another pregnancy is planned. Among overweight or obese women with history of GDM who show minor glycoregulation disturbances, it is proved that modifications of lifestyle in intensive programs or metformin halve the risk of DT2. However, studies analysing practices show low adhesion to screening; without an intensive program, few women implement lifestyle modifications. These intensive programs should be implemented and proposed to high-risk women. Their therapeutic education should also include prevention of cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. The stool microbiota of insulin resistant women with recent gestational diabetes, a high risk group for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Marina; Breier, Michaela; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Banning, Friederike; Ferrari, Uta; Sacco, Vanessa; Grallert, Harald; Parhofer, Klaus G; Seissler, Jochen; Clavel, Thomas; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to metabolic diseases. However, information on the microbiome of young adults at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking. The aim of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate whether insulin resistant women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM), a high risk group for T2D, differ in their stool microbiota from women after a normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Bacterial communities were analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing using fecal samples from 42 pGDM and 35 control subjects 3-16 months after delivery. Clinical characterization included a 5-point OGTT, anthropometrics, clinical chemistry markers and a food frequency questionnaire. Women with a Prevotellaceae-dominated intestinal microbiome were overrepresented in the pGDM group (p < 0.0001). Additionally, the relative abundance of the phylum Firmicutes was significantly lower in women pGDM (median 48.5 vs. 56.8%; p = 0.013). Taxa richness (alpha diversity) was similar between the two groups and with correction for multiple testing we observed no significant differences on lower taxonomic levels. These results suggest that distinctive features of the intestinal microbiota are already present in young adults at risk for T2D and that further investigations of a potential pathophysiological role of gut bacteria in early T2D development are warranted. PMID:26279179

  15. Experimental Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Induces Blunted Vasoconstriction and Functional Changes in the Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Tufiño, Cecilia; Villanueva-López, Cleva; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Bracho-Valdés, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic conditions increase vascular reactivity to angiotensin II in several studies but there are scarce reports on cardiovascular effects of hypercaloric diet (HD) induced gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), so the objective of this work was to determine the effects of HD induced GDM on vascular responses. Angiotensin II as well as phenylephrine induced vascular contraction was tested in isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from rats fed for 7 weeks (4 before and 3 weeks during pregnancy) with standard (SD) or hypercaloric (HD) diet. Also, protein expression of AT1R, AT2R, COX-1, COX-2, NOS-1, and NOS-3 and plasma glucose, insulin, and angiotensin II levels were measured. GDM impaired vasoconstrictor response (P < 0.05 versus SD) in intact (e+) but not in endothelium-free (e−) vessels. Losartan reduced GDM but not SD e− vasoconstriction (P < 0.01 versus SD). AT1R, AT2R, and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression were significantly increased in GDM vessels (P < 0.05 versus SD). Results suggest an increased participation of endothelium vasodilator mediators, probably prostaglandins, as well as of AT2 vasodilator receptors as a compensatory mechanism for vasoconstrictor changes generated by experimental GDM. Considering the short term of rat pregnancy findings can reflect early stage GDM adaptations. PMID:25610861

  16. Thiamin status of gravidas treated for gestational diabetes mellitus compared to their neonates at parturition.

    PubMed

    Baker, H; Hockstein, S; DeAngelis, B; Holland, B K

    2000-12-01

    Since thiamin plays a role in glucose metabolism we wanted to know if blood thiamin influx from gravida to neonate was influenced by treatment of gravidas having gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In this study we found thiamin hypovitaminemia in 19% of the 77 pregnancies despite vitamin supplementation and treatment for GDM; neonates born to mothers with hypovitaminemia were also thiamin hypovitaminemic. All neonatal blood had significantly higher thiamin concentration than gravidas. Indeed, cord blood from neonates born to mothers treated with insulin for GDM had significantly higher thiamin concentration than other neonates in the study. A significant weight depression was noted in neonates born to treated GDM mothers. Healthy gravidas giving birth to macrosomia neonates, had significant thiamin hypovitaminosis, but only macrosomic neonates of treated diabetic mothers had significantly depressed blood thiamin concentrations. We noted that subclinical thiamin hypovitaminemia is prominent during pregnancy despite vitamin supplementation. Perhaps increased thiamin supplementation during pregnancy seems warranted to avoid metabolic stress in mother and fetus due to thiamin hypovitaminemia.

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus: An update on the current international diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2015-01-01

    The approach to screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) around the world is disorderly. The protocols for diagnosis vary not only in-between countries, but also within countries. Furthermore, in any country, this disparity occurs in-between its hospitals and often exists within a single hospital. There are many reasons for these differences. There is the lack of an international consensus among preeminent health organizations (e.g., American College of Gynecologists and World Health Organization). Often there is a disagreement between the country’s national diabetes organization, its local health society and its regional obstetric organization with each one recommending a different option for approaching GDM. Sometimes the causes for following an alternate approach are very obvious, e.g., a resource strapped hospital is unable to follow the ivory-tower demanding recommendation of its obstetric organization. But more often than not, the rationale for following or not following a guideline, or following different guideline within the same geographic area is without any perceivable explanation. This review is an attempt to understand the problems afflicting the screening and diagnosis of GDM globally. It traces the major temporal changes in the diagnostic criteria of (1) some respected health organizations; and (2) a few selected countries. With an understanding of the reasons for this disparity, a way forward can be found to reach the ultimate goal: a single global guideline for GDM followed worldwide. PMID:26131321

  18. Cultural diversity as a factor in self-monitoring blood glucose in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Langer, O; Langer, N; Piper, J M; Elliott, B; Anyaegbunam, A

    1995-01-01

    The routine use of self-monitoring of capillary blood glucose by pregnant diabetic patients currently provides the basis for both clinical management and ongoing investigation. Strategies must therefore be developed to ensure that these data are reliable and accurately reported by patients and are not influenced by diverse socioeconomic levels or varied geographic locations. To explore this issue, we used glucose reflectance meters with a memory microchip capable of storing up to 440 consecutive blood glucose determinations. Two diverse groups of women from Texas and New York who had gestational diabetes performed self-monitoring of blood glucose from diagnosis until delivery. Both groups recorded their blood glucose results daily in a logbook. The reporting performance of all the participating subjects resulted in an actual compliance rate of 60% to 70% of testings required of the patients. Comparison of African-American, Mexican-American, and white populations revealed no significant differences in patient performance or compliance. Moreover, no differences were found between the groups at different geographic locations (New York, Texas) in patients' willingness and ability to comply with the regimen of self-monitoring blood glucose. These findings suggest that the use of memory reflectance meters, in conjunction with patient education and positive interaction between patient and care provider, will result in high patient compliance regardless of socioeconomic level or ethnic diversity.

  19. Risk Factors and Plasma Glucose Profile of Gestational Diabetes in Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Chitme, Havagiray R; Al Shibli, Sumaiya Abdallah Said; Al-Shamiry, Raya Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to conduct a detailed study on the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Omani women to determine the actual and applicable risk factors and glucose profile in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study using pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. Pregnant women without GDM were used as a control group. We collected information related to age, family history, prior history of pregnancy complications, age of marriage, age of first pregnancy, fasting glucose level, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from three hospitals in Oman through face-to-face interviews and hospital records. Results The median age of women with GDM was 33 years old (p < 0.050). A significant risk was noted in women with a history of diabetes (p < 0.001), and those with mothers’ with a history of GDM. A significant (p < 0.010) relationship with a likelihood ratio of 43.9 was observed between the incidence of GDM in women with five or six pregnancies, a history of > 3 deliveries, height < 155 cm, and pregnancy or marriage at age < 18 years (p < 0.010). The mean difference in random plasma glucose, one-hour OGTT, and two-hour OGTT was significantly higher in GDM cases compared to control. Conclusions Glucose profile, family history, anthropometric profile, and age of first pregnancy and marriage should be considered while screening for GDM and determining the care needs of Omani women with GDM.

  20. Risk Factors and Plasma Glucose Profile of Gestational Diabetes in Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Chitme, Havagiray R; Al Shibli, Sumaiya Abdallah Said; Al-Shamiry, Raya Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to conduct a detailed study on the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Omani women to determine the actual and applicable risk factors and glucose profile in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study using pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. Pregnant women without GDM were used as a control group. We collected information related to age, family history, prior history of pregnancy complications, age of marriage, age of first pregnancy, fasting glucose level, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from three hospitals in Oman through face-to-face interviews and hospital records. Results The median age of women with GDM was 33 years old (p < 0.050). A significant risk was noted in women with a history of diabetes (p < 0.001), and those with mothers’ with a history of GDM. A significant (p < 0.010) relationship with a likelihood ratio of 43.9 was observed between the incidence of GDM in women with five or six pregnancies, a history of > 3 deliveries, height < 155 cm, and pregnancy or marriage at age < 18 years (p < 0.010). The mean difference in random plasma glucose, one-hour OGTT, and two-hour OGTT was significantly higher in GDM cases compared to control. Conclusions Glucose profile, family history, anthropometric profile, and age of first pregnancy and marriage should be considered while screening for GDM and determining the care needs of Omani women with GDM. PMID:27602192

  1. [Impact of HAPO study findings on future diagnostics and therapy of gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Graf, Ute

    2009-01-01

    The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study is a trial on a high evidence level that included 25,000 women recruited in 15 centers all over the world who underwent a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) at 24-32 weeks of gestation. Data remained blinded if the fasting plasma glucose level was below 105 mg/dl (5.8 mmol/l) and the 2-hour plasma glucose level was below 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l). The aim of the study was to clarify whether maternal hyperglycemia less severe than that in diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The results indicate a continuous association of maternal glucose levels below those diagnostic of diabetes with an adverse outcome, with the strongest risk for increased birth weight and cord blood serum C peptide levels indicating fetal hyperinsulinism. Additionally an increased risk for maternal complications like preeclampsia was seen. Like in many biological processes, there were no obvious thresholds at which risks increased. An international expert committee proposed how to transfer the HAPO data into criteria for the oGTT in pregnancy for the future diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) which will be based on acute pregnancy problems in contrast to the recent Carpenter and Coustan criteria. The availability of uniform, internationally accepted and applied GDM criteria will provide more clinical and legal security for the caregivers which will be a big advantage also in Germany where a wide diversity of GDM criteria is used. Beside the threshold discussion, the HAPO data are of enormous relevance for Germany. The HAPO data will significantly influence the decision of the German Health Authorities whether to finally establish a general screening for GDM as obligatory part of prenatal care. A report from the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) which was ordered from the German Health Authorities describes--mainly based on the HAPO Study

  2. Lost opportunities to prevent early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith A; McCloskey, Lois; Gebel, Christina M; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) greatly increases the risk of developing diabetes in the decade after delivery, but few women receive appropriately timed postpartum glucose testing (PPGT) or a referral to primary care (PC) for continued monitoring. This qualitative study was designed to identify barriers and facilitators to testing and referral from patient and providers' perspectives. Methods We interviewed patients and clinicians in depth about knowledge, values, priorities, challenges, and recommendations for increasing PPGT rates and PC linkage. Interviews were coded with NVIVO data analysis software, and analyzed using an implementation science framework. Results Women reported motivation to address GDM for the health of the fetus. Most women did not anticipate future diabetes for themselves, and focused on delivery outcomes rather than future health risks. Patients sought and received reassurance from clinicians, and were unlikely to discuss early onset following GDM or preventive measures. PPGT barriers described by patients included provider not mentioning the test or setting it up, transportation difficulties, work responsibilities, fatigue, concerns about fasting while breastfeeding, and timing of the test after discharge from obstetrics, and no referral to PC for follow-up. Practitioners described limited communication among multiple care providers during pregnancy and delivery, systems issues, and separation of obstetrics from PC. Conclusions Patients' barriers to PPGT included low motivation for self-care, structural obstacles, and competing priorities. Providers reported the need to balance risk with reassurance, and identified systems failures related to test timing, limitations of electronic medical record systems (EMR), lack of referrals to PC, and inadequate communication between specialties. Prevention of early onset has great potential for medical cost savings and improvements in quality of life. PMID:27347422

  3. Exposure to Maternal Gestational Diabetes Is Associated With Higher Cardiovascular Responses to Stress in Adolescent Indians

    PubMed Central

    Veena, Sargoor R.; Jones, Alexander; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Osmond, Clive; Karat, Samuel C.; Kurpad, Anura V.; Fall, Caroline H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Altered endocrinal and autonomic nervous system responses to stress may link impaired intra-uterine growth with later cardiovascular disease. Objective: To test the hypothesis that offspring of gestational diabetic mothers (OGDM) have high cortisol and cardiosympathetic responses during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C). Design: Adolescents from a birth cohort in India (n = 213; mean age, 13.5 y), including 26 OGDM, 22 offspring of diabetic fathers (ODF), and 165 offspring of nondiabetic parents (controls) completed 5 minutes each of public speaking and mental arithmetic tasks in front of two unfamiliar “evaluators” (TSST-C). Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured at baseline and at regular intervals after the TSST-C. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP), stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were measured continuously at baseline, during the TSST-C, and for 10 minutes after the test using a finger cuff; the beat-to-beat values were averaged for these periods. Results: Cortisol and cardiosympathetic parameters increased from baseline during stress (P < .001). OGDM had greater systolic BP (mean difference, 5.6 mm Hg), cardiac output (0.5 L/min), and stroke volume (4.0 mL) increases and a lower total peripheral resistance rise (125 dyn · s/cm5) than controls during stress. ODF had greater systolic BP responses than controls (difference, 4.1 mm Hg); there was no difference in other cardiosympathetic parameters. Cortisol responses were similar in all three groups. Conclusions: Maternal diabetes during pregnancy is associated with higher cardiosympathetic stress responses in the offspring, which may contribute to their higher cardiovascular disease risk. Further research may confirm stress-response programming as a predictor of cardiovascular risk in OGDM. PMID:25478935

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus identification based on self-monitoring of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Allard, Catherine; Sahyouni, Elie; Menard, Julie; Houde, Ghislaine; Pesant, Marie-Hélène; Perron, Patrice; Ouellet, Annie; Moutquin, Jean-Marie; Ardilouze, Jean-Luc; Hivert, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    In Sherbrooke, the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) Regional Committee proposed GDM screening during the first trimester for all pregnant women based on a 50 g glucose challenge test (50 g GCT) followed directly by capillary self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) at home. We evaluated implementation of committee's recommendations on the clinical trajectory of women receiving prenatal care at our institution. We analyzed data collected systematically by the Blood Sampling in Pregnancy clinic from 2008 to 2011. We evaluated the clinical trajectory of 7710 pregnant women to assess GDM screening/diagnoses and referral rates to the diabetes care centre (DCC) for education and treatment during both the first and second trimesters. The Canadian Diabetes Association glycemic treatment targets in women with GDM were used as diagnosis thresholds and DCC referral decisions: Fasting glucose of 5.3 mmol/L and postprandial 2 h glucose of 6.7 mmol/L. We found that pregnant women were 28.0±4.8 years old, and their body mass indexes were 24.5±5.5 kg/m(2). During the first trimester, 47% of women were screened for GDM, mostly (84%) using the 50 g GCT. Following SMBG, 5.7% were referred to the DCC. Only 32% of women with early GDM had >1 GDM risk factor. Thereafter, 67% of normoglycemic women screened during the first trimester were screened again during the second trimester. Among women screened during the second trimester, most screening was done using 50 g GCT, and 8.8% were referred to the DCC following SMBG. Implementation of 50 g GCT testing followed by direct home SMBG was well implemented in our area. The importance of early GDM screening and rescreening during the second trimester still needs to be emphasized.

  5. Influence of maternal overnutrition and gestational diabetes on the programming of metabolic health outcomes in the offspring: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Moyce, Brittany L; Kereliuk, Stephanie M; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have risen across the world during the past few decades and has also reached an alarming level among children. In addition, women are currently more likely than ever to enter pregnancy obese. As a result, the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus is also on the rise. While diet and lifestyle contribute to these trends, population health data show that maternal obesity and diabetes during pregnancy during critical stages of development are major factors that contribute to the development of chronic disease in adolescent and adult offspring. Fetal programming of metabolic function, through physiological and (or) epigenetic mechanisms, may also have an intergenerational effect, and as a result may perpetuate metabolic disorders in the next generation. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that characterizes how maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in the offspring. In particular, we focus on animal studies that investigate the molecular mechanisms that are programmed by the gestational environment and lead to disease phenotypes in the offspring. We also review interventional studies that prevent disease with a developmental origin in the offspring.

  6. Influence of maternal overnutrition and gestational diabetes on the programming of metabolic health outcomes in the offspring: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Moyce, Brittany L; Kereliuk, Stephanie M; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have risen across the world during the past few decades and has also reached an alarming level among children. In addition, women are currently more likely than ever to enter pregnancy obese. As a result, the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus is also on the rise. While diet and lifestyle contribute to these trends, population health data show that maternal obesity and diabetes during pregnancy during critical stages of development are major factors that contribute to the development of chronic disease in adolescent and adult offspring. Fetal programming of metabolic function, through physiological and (or) epigenetic mechanisms, may also have an intergenerational effect, and as a result may perpetuate metabolic disorders in the next generation. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that characterizes how maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in the offspring. In particular, we focus on animal studies that investigate the molecular mechanisms that are programmed by the gestational environment and lead to disease phenotypes in the offspring. We also review interventional studies that prevent disease with a developmental origin in the offspring. PMID:25673017

  7. Long-term protective effect of lactation on the development of type 2 diabetes in women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Anette-G; Wallner, Maike; Kaiser, Imme; Rossbauer, Michaela; Harsunen, Minna H; Lachmann, Lorenz; Maier, Jörg; Winkler, Christiane; Hummel, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing postpartum type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent postpartum type 2 diabetes are important to reduce the epidemic of diabetes and its societal impact. Breastfeeding was reported to improve early postpartum glucose tolerance and reduce the subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. To investigate whether breastfeeding influences short- and long-term postpartum diabetes outcomes, women with GDM (n = 304) participating in the prospective German GDM study were followed from delivery for up to 19 years postpartum for diabetes development. All participants were recruited between 1989 and 1999. Postpartum diabetes developed in 147 women and was dependent on the treatment received during pregnancy (insulin vs. diet), BMI, and presence/absence of islet autoantibodies. Among islet autoantibody-negative women, breastfeeding was associated with median time to diabetes of 12.3 years compared with 2.3 years in women who did not breastfeed. The lowest postpartum diabetes risk was observed in women who breastfed for >3 months. On the basis of these results, we recommend that breastfeeding should be encouraged among these women because it offers a safe and feasible low-cost intervention to reduce the risk of subsequent diabetes in this high-risk population.

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency Increases the Risk of Adverse Neonatal Outcomes in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Reichelt, Angela Jacob; Schmitt, Leonardo Rauber; Boff, Roberta; Oppermann, Maria Lucia Rocha; Camargo, Joiza Lins; Silveiro, Sandra Pinho

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and vitamin D deficiency have been associated with increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes but the consequences of both conditions simultaneously present in pregnancy have not yet been evaluated. Our objective was to study the influence of vitamin D deficiency in neonatal outcomes of pregnancies with GDM. Methods 184 pregnant women with GDM referred to specialized prenatal monitoring were included in this cohort and had blood sampled for 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurement. Vitamin D was measured by chemiluminescence and deficiency was defined as < 20 ng/mL. Participants were followed until puerperium and adverse neonatal outcomes were evaluated. Results Newborns of women with vitamin D deficiency had higher incidences of hospitalization in intensive care units (ICU) (32 vs 19%, P = 0.048), of hypoglycemia (any, 17.3 vs 7.1%, P = 0.039requiring ICU, 15.3 vs 3.6%, P = 0.008), and were more frequently small for gestational age (SGA) (17.3 vs 5.9%, P = 0.017). After adjustment, relative risk (RR) for hypoglycemia requiring ICU was 3.63 (95%CI 1.09–12.11) and for SGA was 4.32 (95%CI 1.75–10.66). The incidence of prematurity, jaundice and shoulder dystocia was no statistically different between groups. Conclusions In this cohort of pregnant women with GDM, vitamin D deficiency was associated with a major increase in the incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes such as SGA newborns and neonatal hypoglycemia. PMID:27764194

  9. Maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and overweight and obesity in offspring: a study in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y L; Ma, R M; Lao, T T; Chen, Z; Du, M Y; Liang, K; Huang, Y K; Zhang, L; Yang, M H; Sun, Y H; Li, H; Ding, Z B

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and breast feeding on childhood overweight and obesity in a mainland Chinese population. The incidence of and factors associated with overweight and obesity were compared between children of mothers with (n=1068) and without (n=1756) GDM. The independent roles of the associated factors were examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. The incidence of overweight was higher (16.6 v. 12.6%, P=0.002) in the GDM group, but that of obesity was not different (10.7 v. 12.0%, P=0.315). At age 1-2 and 2-5 years, no difference in overweight (11.0 v. 12.0%, P=0.917, and 15.7 v. 14.6%, P=0.693, respectively) was found, while obesity (8.0 v. 13.6%, P=0.019, and 8.4 v. 13.4%, P=0.014, respectively) was less frequent in the GDM offspring. At age 5-10 years, increased overweight (22.2 v. 12.1%, P<0.001) and obesity (15.9 v. 9.0%, P=0.001) were found in the GDM group, which was associated with maternal obesity, being born large-for-gestational age, male gender and formula feeding. After adjusting for confounding factors, GDM remained an independent determinant of offspring overweight and obesity (aOR 2.28, 95% CI 1.61-3.22), suggesting that the effects of GDM were independent of breast feeding, as well as of maternal obesity and birth size.

  10. Transient gestational diabetes insipidus diagnosed in successive pregnancies: review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and management of delivery.

    PubMed

    Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Kubat Uzum, Ayse; Yildirim, Alkan; Ozkan, Tulay; Gungor, Funda; Has, Recep

    2007-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare disorder characterised by polyuria, polydypsia, and excessive thirst usually manifesting in the third trimester of pregnancy. The etiology is thought to depend on excessive vasopressinase activity, a placental enzyme that degrades arginine-vasopressin (AVP), but not 1-deamino-8-D: -arginine vasopressin (dDAVP), which is a synthetic form. This is a transient syndrome and may be associated with acute fatty liver of pregnancy and preeclampsia. The use of dDAVP in symptomatic cases has been proven as a safe method for both the mother and the fetus during the pregnancy. We report a case of recurrent gestational diabetes insipidus in successive pregnancies, which responded to dDAVP and subsided after delivery.

  11. Accurate assessment of early gestational age in normal and diabetic women by serum human placental lactogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, P G; Aspillaga, M O; Lind, T

    1983-08-01

    Serum human placental lactogen (hPL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were assayed and fetal crown-rump length (CRL) was determined by sonar in three groups of pregnant women--35 with uncomplicated pregnancies, 13 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and 21 who represented a general pregnancy population. Each patient had a regular cycle and recorded last menstrual period, ovulated spontaneously, and was delivered of a single live baby. Serum hPL concentrations within the range 0.01-0.80 microU/ml in patients in the first group gave estimates of gestation with an SD of 6.3 days which was the same as the SD derived from CRL measurements. When the hPL regression equation was applied to the diabetic mothers the difference between the gestational age estimated from hPL and that estimated from LMP had a mean value of - 0.9 days with an SD of 6.2 days; this difference was not significantly different from zero. The third group of patients had a mean difference between hPL and LMP derived gestational age of 0.7 days (+/- 6.7 SD). Serum hPL offers a method of estimating gestation sufficiently precise to be used as a practical alternative to sonar measurements of CRL.

  12. Health system and societal barriers for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) services - lessons from World Diabetes Foundation supported GDM projects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality and morbidity remains high in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) represents an underestimated and unrecognised impediment to optimal maternal health in LMIC; left untreated – it also has severe consequences for the offspring. A better understanding of the barriers hindering detection and treatment of GDM is needed. Based on experiences from World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) supported GDM projects this paper seeks to investigate societal and health system barriers to such efforts. Methods Questionnaires were filled out by 10 WDF supported GDM project partners implementing projects in eight different LMIC. In addition, interviews were conducted with the project partners. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Results Barriers to improving maternal health related to GDM nominated by project implementers included lack of trained health care providers - especially female doctors; high staff turnover; lack of standard protocols, consumables and equipment; financing of health services and treatment; lack of or poor referral systems, feedback mechanisms and follow-up systems; distance to health facility; perceptions of female body size and weight gain/loss in relation to pregnancy; practices related to pregnant women’s diet; societal negligence of women’s health; lack of decision-making power among women regarding their own health; stigmatisation; role of women in society and expectations that the pregnant woman move to her maternal home for delivery. Conclusions A number of barriers within the health system and society exist. Programmes need to consider and address these barriers in order to improve GDM care and thereby maternal health in LMIC. PMID:23217159

  13. Poor sleep quality is associated with impaired glucose tolerance in women after gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, U; Künzel, H; Tröndle, K; Rottenkolber, M; Kohn, D; Fugmann, M; Banning, F; Weise, M; Sacco, V; Hasbargen, U; Hutter, S; Parhofer, K G; Kloiber, S; Ising, M; Seissler, J; Lechner, A

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed the association of sleep quality and glucose metabolism in women after gestational diabetes (pGDM) and in women after normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Data during pregnancy and a visit within the first 15 months after delivery were collected from 61 pGDM and 30 controls in a prospective cohort study. This included a medical history, physical examination, questionnaires (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)), and 5-point oral glucose tolerance test with insulin measurements to determine indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. We used Spearman correlation coefficients and multivariate regression models for analysis.9.3 ± 3.2 months after delivery, pGDM had significantly higher fasting and 2 h glucose levels and lower insulin sensitivity than controls. There was no significant difference in age, BMI and sleep quality as assessed with the PSQI between the two groups. The PSQI score correlated with the ogtt-2 h plasma glucose in pGDM (δ = 0.41; p = 0.0012), but not in controls. This association was confirmed with a multivariate linear regression model with adjustment for age, BMI and months post-delivery. Perceived stress was an independent risk factor (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) for impaired sleep. Our findings suggest that post-delivery sleep quality significantly influences glucose tolerance in women after GDM and that impaired sleep is associated with increased stress perception. Measures to improve of sleep quality and reduce perceived stress should therefore be tested as additional strategies to prevent progression to type 2 diabetes after GDM. PMID:25930074

  14. Macronutrient Composition or Social Determinants? Impact on Infant Outcomes With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trout, Kimberly K; Homko, Carol J; Wetzel-Effinger, Lisa; Mulla, Wadia; Mora, Ricardo; McGrath, Joanna; Basel-Brown, Lisa; Arcamone, Angelina; Sami, Parichehr; Makambi, Kepher H

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, through a randomized, controlled trial, the effects of a maternal carbohydrate-restricted diet on maternal and infant outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women diagnosed with GDM were randomly allocated into one of two groups: an intervention group that was placed on a lower-carbohydrate diet (35-40% of total calories) or a control group that was placed on the usual pregnancy diet (50-55% carbohydrate). A convenience sample of participants diagnosed with GDM (ages 18-45 years) was recruited from two different sites: one urban and low-income and the other suburban and more affluent. Individual face-to-face diet instruction occurred with certified diabetes educators at both sites. Participants tested their blood glucose four times daily. Specific socioeconomic status indicators included enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children or Medicaid-funded health insurance, as well as cross-sectional census data. All analyses were based on an intention to treat. Although there were no differences found between the lower-carbohydrate and usual-care diets in terms of blood glucose or maternal-infant outcomes, there were significant differences noted between the two sites. There was a lower mean postprandial blood glucose (100.59 ± 7.3 mg/dL) at the suburban site compared to the urban site (116.3 ± 15 mg/dL) (P <0.01), even though there was no difference in carbohydrate intake. There were increased amounts of protein and fat consumed at the suburban site (P <0.01), as well as lower infant complications (P <0.01). Further research is needed to determine whether these disparities in outcomes were the result of macronutrient proportions or environmental conditions. PMID:27182173

  15. Gestational diabetes mellitus epigenetically affects genes predominantly involved in metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Houde, Andrée-Anne; Voisin, Grégory; St-Pierre, Julie; Perron, Patrice; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Gaudet, Daniel; Hivert, Marie-France; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Offspring exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for chronic diseases, and one promising mechanism for fetal metabolic programming is epigenetics. Therefore, we postulated that GDM exposure impacts the offspring’s methylome and used an epigenomic approach to explore this hypothesis. Placenta and cord blood samples were obtained from 44 newborns, including 30 exposed to GDM. Women were recruited at first trimester of pregnancy and followed until delivery. GDM was assessed after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24–28 weeks of pregnancy. DNA methylation was measured at > 485,000 CpG sites (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted to identify metabolic pathways epigenetically affected by GDM. Our results showed that 3,271 and 3,758 genes in placenta and cord blood, respectively, were potentially differentially methylated between samples exposed or not to GDM (p-values down to 1 × 10−06; none reached the genome-wide significance levels), with more than 25% (n = 1,029) being common to both tissues. Mean DNA methylation differences between groups were 5.7 ± 3.2% and 3.4 ± 1.9% for placenta and cord blood, respectively. These genes were likely involved in the metabolic diseases pathway (up to 115 genes (11%), p-values for pathways = 1.9 × 10−13 < p < 4.0 × 10−03; including diabetes mellitus p = 4.3 × 10−11). Among the differentially methylated genes, 326 in placenta and 117 in cord blood were also associated with newborn weight. Our results therefore suggest that GDM has epigenetic effects on genes preferentially involved in the metabolic diseases pathway, with consequences on fetal growth and development, and provide supportive evidence that DNA methylation is involved in fetal metabolic programming. PMID:23975224

  16. GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS ALTERS APOPTOTIC AND INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION OF TROPHOBASTS FROM HUMAN TERM PLACENTA

    PubMed Central

    MAGEE, Thomas R.; ROSS, Michael G.; WEDEKIND, Lauren; DESAI, Mina; KJOS, Siri; BELKACEMI, Louiza

    2014-01-01

    AIM Increased placental growth secondary to reduced apoptosis may contribute to the development of macrosomia in GDM pregnancies. We hypothesize that reduced apoptosis in GDM placentas is caused by dysregulation of apoptosis related genes from death receptors or mitochondrial pathway or both to enhance placental growth in GDM pregnancies. METHODS Newborn and placental weights from women with no pregnancy complications (controls; N=5), or with GDM (N=5) were recorded. Placental villi from both groups were either fixed for TUNEL assay, or snap frozen for gene expression analysis by apoptosis PCR microarrays and qPCR. RESULTS Maternal, placental and newborn weights were significantly higher in the GDM group vs. Controls. Apoptotic index of placentas from the GDM group was markedly lower than the Controls. At a significant threshold of 1.5, seven genes (BCL10, BIRC6, BIRC7, CASP5, CASP8P2, CFLAR, and FAS) were down regulated, and 13 genes (BCL2, BCL2L1, BCL2L11, CASP4, DAPK1, IκBκE, MCL1, NFκBIZ, NOD1, PEA15, TNF, TNFRSF25, and XIAP) were unregulated in the GDM placentas. qPCR confirmed the consistency of the PCR microarray. Using Western blotting we found significantly decreased placental pro-apoptotic FAS receptor and FAS ligand (FASL), and increased mitochondrial anti-apoptotic BCL2 post GDM insult. Notably, caspase-3, which plays a central role in the execution-phase of apoptosis, and its substrate poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were significantly down regulated in GDM placentas, as compared to non-diabetic Control placentas. CONCLUSION . Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) are at increased risk for having macrosomic newborns, and larger placentas with reduced apoptosis. Decreased apoptosis subsequent to alterations in apoptotic and inflammatory genes may promote elevated weight in the GDM placentas. PMID:24768206

  17. Current practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India (WINGS-5)

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Bhavadharini, Balaji; Maheswari, Kumar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Jebarani, Saravanan; Ninov, Lyudmil; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Malanda, Belma; Belton, Anne; Uma, Ram; Mohan, Viswanathan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To obtain information on existing practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs) in India. Methods: Details regarding diagnostic criteria used, screening methods, management strategies, and the postpartum follow-up of GDM were obtained from physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs across 24 states of India using online/in-person surveys using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 3841 doctors participated in the survey of whom 68.6% worked in private clinics. Majority of OB/GYNs (84.9%) preferred universal screening for GDM, and screening in the first trimester was performed by 67% of them. Among the OB/GYNs, 600 (36.7%) reported using the nonfasting 2 h criteria for diagnosing GDM whereas 560 (29.4%) of the diabetologists/endocrinologists reported using the same. However, further questioning on the type of blood sample collected and the glucose load used revealed that, in reality, only 208 (12.7%) and 72 (3.8%), respectively, used these criteria properly. The survey also revealed that the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria was followed properly by 299 (18.3%) of OB/GYNs and 376 (19.7%) of physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists. Postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing was advised by 56% of diabetologists and 71.6% of OB/GYNs. Conclusion: More than half of the physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India do not follow any of the recommended guidelines for the diagnosis of GDM. This emphasizes the need for increased awareness about screening and diagnosis of GDM both among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India. PMID:27186555

  18. Influence of gestational diabetes mellitus on human umbilical vein endothelial cell miRNA.

    PubMed

    Tryggestad, Jeanie B; Vishwanath, Anu; Jiang, Shaoning; Mallappa, Ashwini; Teague, April M; Takahashi, Yusuke; Thompson, David M; Chernausek, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to identify miRNAs whose expression levels in fetal tissues are altered by exposure to a diabetic milieu and elucidate the impact on target protein expression. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects both immediate and future disease risk in the offspring. We hypothesized that GDM alters miRNA expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that may influence metabolic processes. A cross-sectional design compared differences in miRNA expression in HUVECs and target protein abundance in placentae between infants of women with GDM (IGDM) and infants born to normoglycaemic controls. miRNAs were identified using microarray profiling and literature review and validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro transfection studies explored the impact of the miRNA on target protein expression. Expression of seven miRNA species, miR-30c-5p, miR-452-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-130b-3p, miR-148a-3p, miR-let-7a-5p and miR-let-7g-5p, was higher in the HUVECs of IGDM. Abundance of the catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) was decreased in the HUVECs and BeWo cells (transformed trophoblast cell line) transfected with miR-130b and miR-148a mimics. AMPKα1 expression was also decreased in placental tissues of IGDM. The expression of several miRNAs were altered by in utero exposure to DM in infants of women whose dysglycaemia was very well controlled by current standards. Decreased expression of AMPKα1 as a result of increased levels of miR-130b and miR-148a may potentially explain the decrease in fat oxidation we reported in infants at 1 month of age and, if persistent, may predispose offspring to future metabolic disease. PMID:27562513

  19. Trends in Gestational Diabetes Among Hospital Deliveries in 19 U.S. States, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Bardenheier, Barbara H.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Geiss, Linda S.; Saydah, Sharon H.; Devlin, Heather M.; Kim, Shin Y.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is one of the most common and fastest-growing comorbidities of pregnancy. Temporal trends in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have not been examined at the state level. This study examines GDM prevalence trends overall and by age, state, and region for 19 states, and by race/ethnicity for 12 states. Sub-analysis assesses trends among GDM deliveries by insurance type and comorbid hypertension in pregnancy. Methods Using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s National and State Inpatient Databases, deliveries were identified using diagnosis-related group codes for GDM and comorbidities using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes among all community hospitals. General linear regression with a log-link and binomial distribution was used in 2014 to assess annual change in GDM prevalence from 2000 through 2010. Results The age-standardized prevalence of GDM increased from 3.71 in 2000 to 5.77 per 100 deliveries in 2010 (relative increase, 56%). From 2000 through 2010, GDM deliveries increased significantly in all states (p < 0.01), with relative increases ranging from 36% to 88%. GDM among deliveries in 12 states reporting race and ethnicity increased among all groups (p < 0.01), with the highest relative increase in Hispanics (66%). Among GDM deliveries in 19 states, those with pre-pregnancy hypertension increased significantly from 2.5% to 4.1% (relative increase, 64%). The burden of GDM delivery payment shifted from private insurers (absolute decrease of 13.5 percentage points) to Medicaid/Medicare (13.2–percentage point increase). Conclusions Results suggest that GDM deliveries are increasing. The highest rates of increase are among Hispanics and among GDM deliveries complicated by pre-pregnancy hypertension. PMID:26094225

  20. Comprehensive analysis of serum metabolites in gestational diabetes mellitus by UPLC/Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianhu; Li, Jiaxun; Xu, Fengcheng; Wang, Mengni; Ding, Shijia; Xu, Hongbing; Dong, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) refers to the first sign or onset of diabetes mellitus during pregnancy rather than progestation. In recent decades, more and more research has focused on the etiology and pathogenesis of GDM in order to further understand GDM progress and recovery. Using an advanced metabolomics platform based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS), we explored the changes in serum metabolites between women with GDM and healthy controls during and after pregnancy. Some significant differences were discovered using multivariate analysis including partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal PLS-DA (OPLS-DA). The dysregulated metabolites were further compared and verified in several databases to understand how these compounds might function as potential biomarkers. Analyses of the metabolic pathways associated with these potential biomarkers were subsequently explored. A total of 35 metabolites were identified, contributing to GDM progress to some extent. The identified biomarkers were involved in some important metabolic pathways including glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism; steroid hormone biosynthesis; tyrosine metabolism; glycerophospholipid metabolism; and fatty acid metabolism. The above mentioned metabolic pathways mainly participate in three major metabolic cycles in humans, including lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. In this pilot study, the valuable comprehensive analysis gave us further insight into the etiology and pathophysiology of GDM, which might benefit the feasibility of a rapid, accurate diagnosis and reasonable treatment as soon as possible but also prevent GDM and its related short- and long-term complications. PMID:26677023

  1. Genetic Determinants for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Related Metabolic Traits in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16x10-06; OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98x10-05; OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60’ OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM. PMID:25973943

  2. Changes in weight and health behaviors after pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus: The CARDIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su-Hsun; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Gunderson, Erica P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Clark, Jeanne M.

    2012-01-01

    We compared pre- to post-pregnancy change in weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, diet and physical activity in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Using the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study we identified women with at least one pregnancy during 20 years of follow-up (n=1,488 with 3,125 pregnancies). We used linear regression with generalized estimating equations to compare pre- to post-pregnancy changes in health behaviors and anthropometric measurements between 137 GDM pregnancies and 1,637 non GDM pregnancies, adjusted for parity, age at delivery, outcome measure at the pre-pregnancy exam, race, education, mode of delivery, and interval between delivery and post-pregnancy examination. Compared with women without GDM in pregnancy, women with GDM had higher pre-pregnancy mean weight (158.3 vs. 149.6 lb, p=0.011) and BMI (26.7 vs. 25.1 kg/m2, p=0.002), but non-significantly lower total daily caloric intake and similar levels of physical activity. Both GDM and non GDM groups had higher average postpartum weight of 7–8 lbs and decreased physical activity on average 1.4 years after pregnancy. Both groups similarly increased total caloric intake but reduced fast food frequency. Pre- to post- pregnancy changes in body weight, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity and diet did not differ between women with and without GDM in pregnancy. Following pregnancy women with and without GDM increased caloric intake, BMI and weight, decreased physical activity, but reduced their frequency of eating fast food. Given these trends, postpartum lifestyle interventions, particularly for women with GDM, are needed to reduce obesity and diabetes risk. PMID:23666593

  3. Genetic variants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Cui, Long; Tam, Wing Hung; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) share common genetic polymorphisms. We conducted meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of all available variants and determined the effects of confounding and experimental components on the genetic association of GDM. Any case-controlled or cohort studies with genotype distribution compared GDM cases with controls were included. In total, 28 articles including 8,204 cases and 15,221 controls for 6 polymorphisms were studied. rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1) were significantly associated with the increased GDM risk. The association of rs4402960(IGF2BP2) and rs1800629(TNF-α) was significant only when the studies with control allele frequency deviation and publication bias were excluded. Further subgroup analysis showed the risk alleles of rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significantly associated with the GDM risk only in Asian, but not in Caucasian population. The OGTT test using 100 g, but not 75 g; and genotype detection by other assays, but not Taqman method, were also significantly associated with increased GDM risk in rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2). Overall GDM was associated with rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1), but only rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significant in Asian populations. While rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2) were significantly affected by OGTT protocol and genotyping methods. PMID:27468700

  4. Genetic determinants for gestational diabetes mellitus and related metabolic traits in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Vargas-García, Carlos; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16 x 10(-06); OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98 x 10(-05); OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60' OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM.

  5. Inflammation and impaired endothelium-dependant vasodilatation in non obese women with gestational diabetes mellitus: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether abnormal endothelial function, a common finding in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnancies, can be explained by inflammatory cytokines. Methods Forearm skin blood flow (FSBF), into response to acetylcholine (Ach) (endothelium-dependent vasodilatation), were measured in 24 pregnant control subjects and 28 gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) women, in the third trimester of gestation. A fasting glycemic and lipidic panel was obtained, and inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and adiponectin were also determined. Results FSBF is significantly reduced in GDM group compared with control subjects (344.59 ± 57.791 vs.176.38 ± 108.52, P < 0.05). Among all subjects, FSBF showed a strong negative correlation with TNF-α and IL-6 (r = −0.426, P < 0.0001 and r = −0.564, P < 0.0001, respectively) and positive correlation with adiponectin (r = 0.468, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Endothelial function, an early marker of macrovascular disease, is present in non-obese pregnancies complicated by GDM. This alteration seems to be directly related to inflammatory status, which may represent a patho-physiological link between GDM and type 2 diabetes and, later on, metabolic syndrome. PMID:23805905

  6. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these individuals may have a larger genetic contribution. Methods In this study we tested the association between SGA and polymorphisms in genes that have previously been associated with obesity and/or diabetes. We undertook analysis of 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 546 samples from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative (ABC) study. 227 children were born small for gestational age (SGA) and 319 were appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Results and Conclusion The results demonstrated that genetic variation in KCNJ11, BDNF, PFKP, PTER and SEC16B were associated with SGA and support the concept that genetic factors associated with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are more prevalent in those born SGA compared to those born AGA. We have previously determined that environmental factors are associated with differences in birthweight in the ABC study and now we have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution, suggesting that the interaction between genetics and the environment are important. PMID:20712903

  7. Mothers after Gestational Diabetes in Australia (MAGDA): A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Postnatal Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Sharleen L.; Versace, Vincent; Best, James D.; Carter, Rob; Oats, Jeremy J. N.; Ackland, Michael; Ebeling, Peter R.; Shih, Sophy T. F.; Hagger, Virginia; Coates, Michael; Wildey, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasingly prevalent risk factor for type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the effectiveness of a group-based lifestyle modification program in mothers with prior GDM within their first postnatal year. Methods and Findings In this study, 573 women were randomised to either the intervention (n = 284) or usual care (n = 289). At baseline, 10% had impaired glucose tolerance and 2% impaired fasting glucose. The diabetes prevention intervention comprised one individual session, five group sessions, and two telephone sessions. Primary outcomes were changes in diabetes risk factors (weight, waist circumference, and fasting blood glucose), and secondary outcomes included achievement of lifestyle modification goals and changes in depression score and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The mean changes (intention-to-treat [ITT] analysis) over 12 mo were as follows: −0.23 kg body weight in intervention group (95% CI −0.89, 0.43) compared with +0.72 kg in usual care group (95% CI 0.09, 1.35) (change difference −0.95 kg, 95% CI −1.87, −0.04; group by treatment interaction p = 0.04); −2.24 cm waist measurement in intervention group (95% CI −3.01, −1.42) compared with −1.74 cm in usual care group (95% CI −2.52, −0.96) (change difference −0.50 cm, 95% CI −1.63, 0.63; group by treatment interaction p = 0.389); and +0.18 mmol/l fasting blood glucose in intervention group (95% CI 0.11, 0.24) compared with +0.22 mmol/l in usual care group (95% CI 0.16, 0.29) (change difference −0.05 mmol/l, 95% CI −0.14, 0.05; group by treatment interaction p = 0.331). Only 10% of women attended all sessions, 53% attended one individual and at least one group session, and 34% attended no sessions. Loss to follow-up was 27% and 21% for the intervention and control groups, respectively, primarily due to subsequent pregnancies. Study limitations include low exposure to the full intervention and glucose metabolism profiles

  8. Vitamin D Status in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Pleskačová, Anna; Bartáková, Vendula; Pácal, Lukáš; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    Of many vitamin D extraskeletal functions, its modulatory role in insulin secretion and action is especially relevant for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the present study were to determine midgestational and early postpartum vitamin D status in pregnant women with and without GDM and to describe the relationship between midgestational and postpartum vitamin D status and parallel changes of glucose tolerance. A total of 76 pregnant women (47 GDM and 29 healthy controls) were included in the study. Plasma levels of 25(OH)D were measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Vitamin D was not significantly decreased in GDM compared to controls during pregnancy; however, both groups of pregnant women exhibited high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Prevalence of postpartum 25(OH)D deficiency in post-GDM women remained significantly higher and their postpartum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower compared to non-GDM counterparts. Finally, based on the oGTT repeated early postpartum persistent glucose abnormality was ascertained in 15% of post-GDM women; however, neither midgestational nor postpartum 25(OH)D levels significantly differed between subjects with GDM history and persistent postpartum glucose intolerance and those with normal glucose tolerance after delivery. PMID:26000285

  9. Return for Postpartum Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mohd Suan, Mohd Azri

    2015-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence and characteristics of women who received a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test and to examine barriers as reported by women who failed to return for the test. Data were collected using a mobile phone-based short messaging service. Only 352 (81.9%) women returned for the test. Women who failed to return for the test were younger (30.1 vs 32.1, P = .003) and did not have a previous history of gestational diabetes (93.6% vs 84.9%, P = .043) compared to women who returned for the test. The commonest reasons given for not returning for the test was "Still waiting for the appointment date for the test" (37.2%), "had family/health problems" (11.5%), and "busy/no time" (10.3%). Flexible time for the test, active involvement from health care staff, and strengthening continuous care system were among the interventions needed to improve the return rate for this screening test.

  10. Toxic effects of glibenclamide in fetuses of normoglycemic rats: an alternative therapy for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aguillar-Gomes, L.; Lopes, C.M.; Barbieri, D.S.; Rocha, T.; Randazzo-Moura, P.

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The treatment aims at glycemic control through changes in the patient’s diet with or without exercise, but some patients need insulin therapy. An alternative would be to use oral hypoglycemic agents such as glibenclamide (GLIB). The present study aims to analyze the toxic effects of GLIB in fetuses of pregnant rats which received 5 or 20mg/kg doses of GLIB. Glycemic dosage reveals no significant difference between control (deionized water) and treated groups, showing that these concentrations of GLIB were not effective to cause hypoglycemia in rats. The vitality of the fetuses in all groups was 100%. GLIB administration promoted increase in weight and significant changes in measures of external morphological parameters of treated fetuses. Histological analysis revealed that liver lobes, lobules and central lobular veins were well defined for all treatments. However, GLIB animals presented a light brownish precipitate into the center-lobular veins and in the liver parenchyma among the hepatocytes. These results indicated a possible passage of the drug through the blood-placental membrane, without serious changes that impair the development of neither bone tissue, nor the liver of these animals. PMID:26623340

  11. Gestational Diabetes Reduces Adenosine Transport in Human Placental Microvascular Endothelium, an Effect Reversed by Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Salomón, Carlos; Westermeier, Francisco; Puebla, Carlos; Arroyo, Pablo; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) courses with increased fetal plasma adenosine concentration and reduced adenosine transport in placental macrovascular endothelium. Since insulin modulates human equilibrative nucleoside transporters (hENTs) expression/activity, we hypothesize that GDM will alter hENT2-mediated transport in human placental microvascular endothelium (hPMEC), and that insulin will restore GDM to a normal phenotype involving insulin receptors A (IR-A) and B (IR-B). GDM effect on hENTs expression and transport activity, and IR-A/IR-B expression and associated cell signalling cascades (p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44mapk) and Akt) role in hPMEC primary cultures was assayed. GDM associates with elevated umbilical whole and vein, but not arteries blood adenosine, and reduced hENTs adenosine transport and expression. IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44mapk/Akt ratios (‘metabolic phenotype’) were lower in GDM. Insulin reversed GDM-reduced hENT2 expression/activity, IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44mapk/Akt ratios to normal pregnancies (‘mitogenic phenotype’). It is suggested that insulin effects required IR-A and IR-B expression leading to differential modulation of signalling pathways restoring GDM-metabolic to a normal-mitogenic like phenotype. Insulin could be acting as protecting factor for placental microvascular endothelial dysfunction in GDM. PMID:22808198

  12. Factors in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Predicting the Needs for Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Shao, Jiashen; Li, Feifei; Xu, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify factors predicting the need for insulin therapy in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. A total of 1352 patients with GDM diagnosed by the 75-g/2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were enrolled in this study. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed; receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were also drawn. Results. There was a significant difference in factors such as maternal age, pregestational BMI, first visit SBP, first visit DBP, FBG of first visit, FBG at time of OGTT, 75-g OGTT glucose value (fasting, after 1 h and 2 h), and serum HbA1c level at diagnosis between patients with insulin therapy and patients with medical nutrition therapy (MNT) alone. Multivariate analysis showed that higher FBG at time of OGTT, first 75 g OGTT 2 h plasma glucose, and HbA1c concentration at diagnosis lead to more likely need of insulin therapy. Conclusion. The probability of insulin therapy can be estimated in pregnant women with GDM based on fasting and 2 h glucose values during OGTT and HbA1c value at diagnosis of GDM. PMID:27478440

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Smartphone Application for Managing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an application (app) that provides tailored recommendations based on lifestyle and clinical data entered by the user. Methods Knowledge and functions required for the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) management app were extracted from clinical practice guidelines and evaluated through an online survey. Common and tailored recommendations were developed and evaluated with a content validity index. Algorithms to link tailored recommendations with a patient's data were developed and evaluated by experts. An Android-based app was developed and evaluated by comparing the process of data entry and recommendation retrieval and the usability of the app. After the app was revised, the user acceptance of the app was evaluated. Results Six domains of knowledge and 14 functions were extracted. Seven common and 49 tailored recommendations were developed. Nine lifestyle and clinical data elements were modeled. Eight algorithms with 18 decision nodes presenting tailored recommendations based on patient's data and 12 user interface screens were developed. All recommendations obtained from the use of app concurred with recommendations derived by algorithms. The average usability score was 69.5 out of 100. The user acceptance score with behavioral intention to use was 5.5, intrinsic motivation 4.3, the perceived ease of use score was 4.6, and the perceived usefulness score was 5.0 out of 7, respectively. Conclusions The GDM management knowledge and tailored recommendations obtained in this study could be of help in managing GDM. PMID:26893946

  14. Lipid Fingerprinting in Mild versus Severe Forms of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gueuvoghlanian-Silva, Bárbara Yasmin; Cordeiro, Fernanda Bertuccez; Lobo, Thalita Frutuoso; Cataldi, Thaís Regiani; Lo Turco, Edson Guimarães; Bertolla, Ricardo Pimenta; Mattar, Rosiane; Torloni, Maria Regina; Daher, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The blood serum lipid profile of women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is still under study. There are no data on the serum lipid profile of GDM patients with more severe (insulin treated) compared to milder forms (diet treated) GDM. The aim of our study was to analyze the blood serum lipid profile of patients with milder versus more severe forms of GDM and to compare these findings with those of healthy pregnant women. This cross-sectional analytical study included 30 insulin-treated GDM, 30 diet-only GDM and 30 healthy pregnant women. Serum lipid was extracted from the 90 participants and their lipid profiles were analyzed by lipid fingerprinting using liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 143 parent ions were differentially represented in each of the three groups, belonging to the following classes: Glycerophospholipids, Sterol Lipids, Sphingolipids, Prenol Lipids, Fatty Acyls and Glycerolipids. There were significant differences in the lipid profiles of healthy pregnant women compared to GDM patients and also between milder versus more severe forms of GDM. There are marked differences in lipid fingerprinting between healthy pregnant women compared to those with GDM in the third trimester. Moreover, the lipid profile of women with more severe forms of GDM differs considerably from that of women with milder forms of GDM. These findings may be useful to help clarify the pathogenesis of milder and more severe forms of GDM.

  15. Lipid Fingerprinting in Mild versus Severe Forms of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gueuvoghlanian-Silva, Bárbara Yasmin; Cordeiro, Fernanda Bertuccez; Lobo, Thalita Frutuoso; Cataldi, Thaís Regiani; Lo Turco, Edson Guimarães; Bertolla, Ricardo Pimenta; Mattar, Rosiane; Torloni, Maria Regina; Daher, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The blood serum lipid profile of women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is still under study. There are no data on the serum lipid profile of GDM patients with more severe (insulin treated) compared to milder forms (diet treated) GDM. The aim of our study was to analyze the blood serum lipid profile of patients with milder versus more severe forms of GDM and to compare these findings with those of healthy pregnant women. This cross-sectional analytical study included 30 insulin-treated GDM, 30 diet-only GDM and 30 healthy pregnant women. Serum lipid was extracted from the 90 participants and their lipid profiles were analyzed by lipid fingerprinting using liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 143 parent ions were differentially represented in each of the three groups, belonging to the following classes: Glycerophospholipids, Sterol Lipids, Sphingolipids, Prenol Lipids, Fatty Acyls and Glycerolipids. There were significant differences in the lipid profiles of healthy pregnant women compared to GDM patients and also between milder versus more severe forms of GDM. There are marked differences in lipid fingerprinting between healthy pregnant women compared to those with GDM in the third trimester. Moreover, the lipid profile of women with more severe forms of GDM differs considerably from that of women with milder forms of GDM. These findings may be useful to help clarify the pathogenesis of milder and more severe forms of GDM. PMID:26633694

  16. Pesticide Exposure and Self-Reported Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Saldana, Tina M.; Basso, Olga; Hoppin, Jane A.; Baird, Donna D.; Knott, Charles; Blair, Aaron; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between pesticide use during pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among wives of licensed pesticide applicators. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using data from the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), we estimated the association between self-reported pesticide-related activities during the first trimester of the most recent pregnancy and GDM among 11,273 women whose pregnancy occurred within 25 years of enrollment. RESULTS A total of 506 (4.5%) women reported having had GDM. Women who reported agricultural pesticide exposure (mixing or applying pesticides to crops or repairing pesticide application equipment) during pregnancy were more likely to report GDM (odds ratio [OR] 2.2 [95% CI 1.5–3.3]). We saw no association between residential pesticide exposure (applying pesticides in the home and garden during pregnancy) and GDM (1.0 [0.8–1.3]). Among women who reported agricultural exposure during pregnancy, risk of GDM was associated with ever-use of four herbicides (2,4,5-T; 2,4,5-TP; atrazine; or butylate) and three insecticides (diazinon, phorate, or carbofuran). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that activities involving exposure to agricultural pesticides during the first trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of GDM. PMID:17327316

  17. Secular Trends of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Changes in Its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Geum Joon; Kim, Log Young; Sung, Ye Na; Kim, Jee Ae; Hwang, Soon Young; Hong, Hye-Ri; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the secular trends of incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and insulin treatment for GDM in a Korean population and to determine the factors that contribute to the trends in the incidence of GDM. Study Design We used data collected by the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea and analyzed data from women who had given birth from 2006 to 2010. We evaluated the trends in the incidence of GDM and GDM requiring insulin treatment and the changes in risk factors. Results There were 1,824,913 births during the study period, which included 129,666 cases of GDM, an incidence of 7.11% over this period. The incidence of GDM increased from 3.86% in 2007 to 11.83% in 2010, with a continuous increase after adjustment for age. However, the number of GDM cases that required insulin treatment decreased significantly from 13.87% in 2007 to 5.94% in 2010. The proportion of patients who were at an older age and multiparity, 2 GDM risk factors, increased during the study period. Conclusions In Korea, the incidence of GDM, especially mild GDM, increased dramatically during the period from 2006 to 2010. Further efforts are needed to monitor this trend and to identify associated factors. PMID:26292282

  18. Return for Postpartum Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mohd Suan, Mohd Azri

    2015-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence and characteristics of women who received a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test and to examine barriers as reported by women who failed to return for the test. Data were collected using a mobile phone-based short messaging service. Only 352 (81.9%) women returned for the test. Women who failed to return for the test were younger (30.1 vs 32.1, P = .003) and did not have a previous history of gestational diabetes (93.6% vs 84.9%, P = .043) compared to women who returned for the test. The commonest reasons given for not returning for the test was "Still waiting for the appointment date for the test" (37.2%), "had family/health problems" (11.5%), and "busy/no time" (10.3%). Flexible time for the test, active involvement from health care staff, and strengthening continuous care system were among the interventions needed to improve the return rate for this screening test. PMID:26041835

  19. Insulin Is a Key Modulator of Fetoplacental Endothelium Metabolic Disturbances in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sobrevia, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Lilian; Silva, Luis; Pizarro, Carolina; Subiabre, Mario; Villalobos, Roberto; Araos, Joaquín; Toledo, Fernando; González, Marcelo; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Farías, Marcelo; Chiarello, Delia I.; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a disease of the mother that associates with altered fetoplacental vascular function. GDM-associated maternal hyperglycaemia result in fetal hyperglycaemia, a condition that leads to fetal hyperinsulinemia and altered L-arginine transport and synthesis of nitric oxide, i.e., endothelial dysfunction. These alterations in the fetoplacental endothelial function are present in women with GDM that were under diet or insulin therapy. Since these women and their newborn show normal glycaemia at term, other factors or conditions could be altered and/or not resolved by restoring normal level of circulating D-glucose. GDM associates with metabolic disturbances, such as abnormal handling of the locally released vasodilator adenosine, and biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol lipoproteins, or metabolic diseases resulting in endoplasmic reticulum stress and altered angiogenesis. Insulin acts as a potent modulator of all these phenomena under normal conditions as reported in primary cultures of cells obtained from the human placenta; however, GDM and the role of insulin regarding these alterations in this disease are poorly understood. This review focuses on the potential link between insulin and endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypercholesterolemia, and angiogenesis in GDM in the human fetoplacental vasculature. Based in reports in primary culture placental endothelium we propose that insulin is a factor restoring endothelial function in GDM by reversing ERS, hypercholesterolaemia and angiogenesis to a physiological state involving insulin activation of insulin receptor isoforms and adenosine receptors and metabolism in the human placenta from GDM pregnancies. PMID:27065887

  20. Could gestational diabetes mellitus be managed through dietary bioactive compounds? Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Carmela; Zicari, Alessandra; Mandosi, Elisabetta; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Mari, Emanuela; Morano, Susanna; Masella, Roberta

    2016-04-14

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious problem growing worldwide that needs to be addressed with urgency in consideration of the resulting severe complications for both mother and fetus. Growing evidence indicates that a healthy diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, extra-virgin olive oil and fish has beneficial effects in both the prevention and management of several human diseases and metabolic disorders. In this review, we discuss the latest data concerning the effects of dietary bioactive compounds such as polyphenols and PUFA on the molecular mechanisms regulating glucose homoeostasis. Several studies, mostly based on in vitro and animal models, indicate that dietary polyphenols, mainly flavonoids, positively modulate the insulin signalling pathway by attenuating hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, reducing inflammatory adipokines, and modifying microRNA (miRNA) profiles. Very few data about the influence of dietary exposure on GDM outcomes are available, although this approach deserves careful consideration. Further investigation, which includes exploring the 'omics' world, is needed to better understand the complex interaction between dietary compounds and GDM.

  1. Could gestational diabetes mellitus be managed through dietary bioactive compounds? Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Carmela; Zicari, Alessandra; Mandosi, Elisabetta; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Mari, Emanuela; Morano, Susanna; Masella, Roberta

    2016-04-14

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious problem growing worldwide that needs to be addressed with urgency in consideration of the resulting severe complications for both mother and fetus. Growing evidence indicates that a healthy diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, extra-virgin olive oil and fish has beneficial effects in both the prevention and management of several human diseases and metabolic disorders. In this review, we discuss the latest data concerning the effects of dietary bioactive compounds such as polyphenols and PUFA on the molecular mechanisms regulating glucose homoeostasis. Several studies, mostly based on in vitro and animal models, indicate that dietary polyphenols, mainly flavonoids, positively modulate the insulin signalling pathway by attenuating hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, reducing inflammatory adipokines, and modifying microRNA (miRNA) profiles. Very few data about the influence of dietary exposure on GDM outcomes are available, although this approach deserves careful consideration. Further investigation, which includes exploring the 'omics' world, is needed to better understand the complex interaction between dietary compounds and GDM. PMID:26879600

  2. Factors in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Predicting the Needs for Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Shao, Jiashen; Li, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify factors predicting the need for insulin therapy in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. A total of 1352 patients with GDM diagnosed by the 75-g/2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were enrolled in this study. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed; receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were also drawn. Results. There was a significant difference in factors such as maternal age, pregestational BMI, first visit SBP, first visit DBP, FBG of first visit, FBG at time of OGTT, 75-g OGTT glucose value (fasting, after 1 h and 2 h), and serum HbA1c level at diagnosis between patients with insulin therapy and patients with medical nutrition therapy (MNT) alone. Multivariate analysis showed that higher FBG at time of OGTT, first 75 g OGTT 2 h plasma glucose, and HbA1c concentration at diagnosis lead to more likely need of insulin therapy. Conclusion. The probability of insulin therapy can be estimated in pregnant women with GDM based on fasting and 2 h glucose values during OGTT and HbA1c value at diagnosis of GDM. PMID:27478440

  3. Metabolic Programming of MEST DNA Methylation by Intrauterine Exposure to Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, Nady; Pliushch, Galyna; Schneider, Eberhard; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Korenkov, Michael; Aretz, Melanie; Zechner, Ulrich; Lehnen, Harald; Haaf, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic processes are primary candidates when searching for mechanisms that can stably modulate gene expression and metabolic pathways according to early life conditions. To test the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the epigenome of the next generation, cord blood and placenta tissue were obtained from 88 newborns of mothers with dietetically treated GDM, 98 with insulin-dependent GDM, and 65 without GDM. Bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to compare the methylation levels of seven imprinted genes involved in prenatal and postnatal growth, four genes involved in energy metabolism, one anti-inflammatory gene, one tumor suppressor gene, one pluripotency gene, and two repetitive DNA families. The maternally imprinted MEST gene, the nonimprinted glucocorticoid receptor NR3C1 gene, and interspersed ALU repeats showed significantly decreased methylation levels (4–7 percentage points for MEST, 1–2 for NR3C1, and one for ALUs) in both GDM groups, compared with controls, in both analyzed tissues. Significantly decreased blood MEST methylation (3 percentage points) also was observed in adults with morbid obesity compared with normal-weight controls. Our results support the idea that intrauterine exposure to GDM has long-lasting effects on the epigenome of the offspring. Specifically, epigenetic malprogramming of MEST may contribute to obesity predisposition throughout life. PMID:23209187

  4. Risk of Large-for-Gestational-Age Newborns in Women With Gestational Diabetes by Race and Ethnicity and Body Mass Index Categories

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Sneha B.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Brown, Susan D.; Hedderson, Monique M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) newborns across categories of body mass index (BMI) in five racial and ethnic groups. METHODS This cohort study examined 7,468 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who delivered a live newborn between 1995 and 2006 at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. The racial and ethnic groups were non-Hispanic white, African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Filipina. The BMI was classified using the World Health Organization International guidelines (normal, 18.50–24.99; overweight, 25.00–29.99; obese, 30.00–34.99; obese class II, 35.00 or higher). Having an LGA newborn was defined as birth weight more than 90th percentile for the study population’s race or ethnicity and gestational age–specific birth weight distribution. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds of having an LGA newborn by BMI and race and ethnicity. RESULTS Overall prevalence of LGA newborns was highest in African American women (25.1%), lowest in Asians (13.9%), and intermediate among Hispanic (17.3%), white (16.4%), and Filipina women (15.3%). The highest increased risk of LGA newborns was observed among women with class II obesity in most racial and ethnic groups, and African American and Asian women with class II obesity had a four-fold increased risk of LGA newborns compared with women of normal weight in the same racial and ethnic group. CONCLUSIONS African American women with GDM have a greater risk of LGA newborns at a lower BMI than other racial and ethnic groups. Clinicians should be aware that among women with GDM, there may be significant racial and ethnic differences in the risk of LGA newborns by BMI threshold. PMID:23812460

  5. Screening and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Where Do We Stand.

    PubMed

    Rani, P Reddi; Begum, Jasmina

    2016-04-01

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is defined as any glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. This definition helps for diagnosis of unrecognized pre-existing Diabetes also. Hyperglycemia in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and prenatal outcome. It is important to screen, diagnose and treat Hyperglycemia in pregnancy to prevent an adverse outcome. There is no international consensus regarding timing of screening method and the optimal cut-off points for diagnosis and intervention of GDM. DIPSI recommends non-fasting Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) with 75g of glucose with a cut-off of ≥ 140 mg/dl after 2-hours, whereas WHO (1999) recommends a fasting OGTT after 75g glucose with a cut-off plasma glucose of ≥ 140 mg/dl after 2-hour. The recommendations by ADA/IADPSG for screening women at risk of diabetes is as follows, for first and subsequent trimester at 24-28 weeks a criteria of diagnosis of GDM is made by 75 g OGTT and fasting 5.1mmol/l, 1 hour 10.0mmol/l, 2 hour 8.5mmol/l by universal glucose tolerance testing. Critics of these criteria state that it causes over diagnosis of GDM and unnecessary interventions, the controversy however continues. The ACOG still prefer a 2 step procedure, GCT with 50g glucose non-fasting if value > 7.8mmol/l followed by 3-hour OGTT for confirmation of diagnosis. In conclusion based on Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study as mild degree of dysglycemia are associated with adverse outcome and high prevalence of Type II DM to have international consensus It recommends IADPSG criteria, though controversy exists. The IADPSG criteria is the only outcome based criteria, it has the ability to diagnose and treat GDM earlier, thereby reducing the fetal and maternal complications associated with GDM. This one step method has an advantage of simplicity in execution, more patient friendly, accurate in diagnosis and close to international consensus. Keeping in the mind the

  6. Discrepancy in Insulin Regulation between Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Platelets and Placenta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yicong; Cooper, Anthonya; Odibo, Imelda N; Ahmed, Asli; Murphy, Pamela; Koonce, Ruston; Dajani, Nafisa K; Lowery, Curtis L; Roberts, Drucilla J; Maroteaux, Luc; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-04-29

    Earlier findings have identified the requirement of insulin signaling on maturation and the translocation of serotonin (5-HT) transporter, SERT to the plasma membrane of the trophoblast in placenta. Because of the defect on insulin receptor (IR) in the trophoblast of the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-associated placenta, SERT is found entrapped in the cytoplasm of the GDM-trophoblast. SERT is encoded by the same gene expressed in trophoblast and platelets. Additionally, alteration in plasma 5-HT levels and the 5-HT uptake rates are associated with the aggregation rates of platelets. Therefore, here, we investigated a novel hypothesis that GDM-associated defects in platelet IR should change their 5-HT uptake rates, and this should be a leading factor for thrombosis in GDM maternal blood. The maternal blood and the placentas were obtained at the time of cesarean section from the GDM and non-diabetic subjects (n = 6 for each group), and the platelets and trophoblasts were isolated to determine the IR activity, surface level of SERT, and their 5-HT uptake rates.Interestingly, no significant differences were evident in IR tyrosine phosphorylation or the downstream elements, AKT and S6K in platelets and their aggregation rates in both groups. Furthermore, insulin stimulation up-regulated 5-HT uptake rates of GDM-platelets as it does in the control group. However, the phosphorylation of IR and the downstream elements were significantly lower in GDM-trophoblast and showed no response to the insulin stimulation while they showed 4-fold increase to insulin stimulation in control group. Similarly, the 5-HT uptake rates of GDM-trophoblast and the SERT expression on their surface were severalfold lower compared with control subjects. IR is expressed in all tissues, but it is not known if diabetes affects IR in all tissues equally. Here, for the first time, our findings with clinical samples show that in GDM-associated defect on IR is tissue type-dependent. While IR is

  7. Possibility to predict early postpartum glucose abnormality following gestational diabetes mellitus based on the results of routine mid-gestational screening

    PubMed Central

    Bartáková, Vendula; Malúšková, Denisa; Mužík, Jan; Bělobrádková, Jana; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have increased risk of developing glucose abnormality, but current diagnostic criteria are evidence-based for adverse pregnancy outcome. The aims of our study were: (i) to ascertain a frequency of early conversion of GDM into permanent glucose abnormality, (ii) to determine predictive potential of current GDM diagnostic criteria for prediction of postpartum glucose abnormality and (iii) to find optimal cut-off values of oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) to stratify GDM population according to postpartum risk. Materials and methods Electronic medical records of an ethnically homogenous cohort of women diagnosed and treated for GDM in a single medical centre during the period 2005–2011 who completed postpartum oGTT up to 1 year after the index delivery were retrospectively analysed (N = 305). Results Postpartum glucose abnormality was detected in 16.7% subjects. Mid-trimester oGTT values, respective area under the curve and HbA1c were significantly associated with early postpartum glucose abnormality (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney) and exhibited significant predictive potential for postpartum glucose abnormality risk assessment. Optimal cut-off values for discrimination of at-risk sub-population were identified using ROC analysis and their comparison with WHO and IADPSG criteria exhibited superiority of IADPSG for risk-stratification of GDM population. Conclusion Risk-based stratification at the time of GDM diagnosis could improve efficiency of the post-gestational screening for diabetes. IADPSG criteria seem to optimally capture both perinatal and maternal metabolic risks and are therefore medically and economically justified. PMID:26526166

  8. The association between maternal hyperglycemia and perinatal outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Young; Jung, Inkyung; Kim, So Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are associated with increased risks of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. The risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes differ depending on the glucose values among GDM patients. For accurate and effective prenatal counseling, it is necessary to understand the relationship between different maternal hyperglycemia values and the severity of adverse outcomes. With this objective, this study reexamines the relationship between maternal hyperglycemia versus maternal and perinatal outcomes in GDM patients. For this study, maternal hyperglycemia was diagnosed using the 2-step diagnostic approach. Medical records of 3434 pregnant women, who received the 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) between March 2001 and April 2013, were reviewed. As a result, 307 patients were diagnosed with GDM, and they were divided into 2 groups according to their fasting glucose levels. A total of 171 patients had normal fasting glucose level (<95 mg/dL), and 136 patients had abnormal fasting glucose level (≥95 mg/dL). The 50-g GCT results were subdivided by 20-unit increments (140–159, n = 123; 160–179, n = 84; 180–199, n = 50; and ≥200, n = 50), and the maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared against the normal 50-g GCT group (n = 307). Maternal fasting blood glucose (FBG) level showed clear association with adverse perinatal outcomes. The odds ratio (OR) of macrosomia was 6.72 (95% CI: 2.59–17.49, P < 0.001) between the 2 groups. The ORs of large for gestational age (LGA) and neonatal hypoglycemia were 3.75 (95% CI: 1.97–7.12, P < 0.001) and 1.65 (95% CI: 0.79–3.43, P  =  0.183), respectively. Also, the results of the 50-g GCT for each category showed strong association with increased risks of adverse perinatal outcomes compared to the normal 50-g GCT group. The OR of macrosomia (up to 20.31-fold), LGA (up to 6.15-fold), and neonatal hypoglycemia (up to 84.00-fold) increased with

  9. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes: Consequences in Macrosomia and Adulthood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yessoufou, Akadiri; Nekoua, Magloire P.; Gbankoto, Adam; Moutairou, Kabirou

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th) cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases. PMID:25961055

  10. Genetic Risk of Progression to Type 2 Diabetes and Response to Intensive Lifestyle or Metformin in Prediabetic Women With and Without a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Shannon D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Florez, Jose C.; Dabelea, Dana; Franks, Paul W.; Dagogo-Jack, Sam; Kim, Catherine; Knowler, William C.; Christophi, Costas A.; Ratner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) trial investigated rates of progression to diabetes among adults with prediabetes randomized to treatment with placebo, metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention. Among women in the DPP, diabetes risk reduction with metformin was greater in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with women without GDM but with one or more previous live births. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We asked if genetic variability could account for these differences by comparing β-cell function and genetic risk scores (GRS), calculated from 34 diabetes-associated loci, between women with and without histories of GDM. RESULTS β-Cell function was reduced in women with GDM. The GRS was positively associated with a history of GDM; however, the GRS did not predict progression to diabetes or modulate response to intervention. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that a diabetes-associated GRS is associated with development of GDM and may characterize women at risk for development of diabetes due to β-cell dysfunction. PMID:24271189

  11. Lifestyle intervention can reduce the risk of gestational diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Song, C; Li, J; Leng, J; Ma, R C; Yang, X

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of lifestyle intervention on the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We searched PubMed, Springer and other databases to retrieve articles published in English and Chinese up to 30 September 2015. The inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of lifestyle intervention on risk of GDM. Exclusion criteria were studies with prepregnancy diabetes mellitus or interventions with nutrient supplements. Random-effect and fixed-effect model analyses were used to obtain pooled relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of diet and physical activity on the risk of GDM. Subgroup analyses were performed to check the consistency of effect sizes across groups where appropriate. We identified 29 randomized controlled trials with 11,487 pregnant women, addressing the effect of lifestyle intervention on the risk of GDM. In the pooled analysis, either diet or physical activity resulted in an 18% (95%CI 5-30%) reduction in the risk of GDM (P = 0.0091). Subgroup analysis showed that such intervention was effective among women with intervention before the 15th gestational week (relative risk: 0.80, 95%CI 0.66-0.97), but not among women receiving the intervention afterwards. We conclude that lifestyle modification during pregnancy, especially before the 15th gestational week, can reduce the risk of GDM. © 2016 World Obesity.

  12. Effect of a CGMS and SMBG on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    WEI, Qiong; SUN, Zilin; YANG, Yue; YU, Hong; DING, Hongjuan; WANG, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the effects of a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) on maternal and neonatal outcomes. A total of 106 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in gestational weeks 24–28 were randomly allocated to the antenatal care plus CGMS group or the self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) group. The CGMS group was subdivided into early and late subgroups. There were no significant differences in prenatal or obstetric outcomes, e.g., caesarean delivery rate, Apgar score at 5 min, macrosomia or neonatal hypoglycaemia, between the CGMS and SMBG groups. The CGMS group had lower glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) levels than the SMBG group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. The proportion of GDM women with excessive gestational weight gain was lower in the CGMS group than in the SMBG group (33.3% vs. 56.4%, P = 0.039), and women who initiated CGMS earlier gained less weight (P = 0.017). The mode of blood glucose monitoring (adjusted OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.030–5.588; P = 0.042) and pre-pregnancy BMI (adjusted OR 0.578; 95% CI 0.419–0.798; P = 0.001) were independent factors for weight gain. In conclusion, early CGMS for GDM mothers reduces gestational weight gain. A follow-up study with a large cohort is needed. PMID:26814139

  13. A study of snack consumption, night-eating habits, and nutrient intake in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Jin; Lee, Jinju; Kim, Ji-Myung; Lee, Hyun Ah; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify dietary behavior such as snack consumption, night-eating and nutrients intake associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The study was conducted on 219 normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects and 44 GDM subjects by using a questionnaire including dietary behavior, food frequency and 3-day food record. The mean age, OGTT, and delivery weight of GDM subjects were statistically higher than those in NGT. A larger proportion of NGT subjects consumed black coffee (49.8%) while the majority of GDM subjects (61.4%) drank mixed coffee with sugar and cream. Dairy products were the most frequently consumed snack item in NGT subjects (40.7%), while fruits were most frequently consumed food item in GDM subjects (34.4%). Many of NGT subjects (49.8%) answered that they hardly took night-eating snacks whereas most of GDM subjects (61.4%) took night-eating snacks more than once a week. For change of taste preference, the proportion of NGT subjects who showed less preference for salty taste (33.3%) or greasy taste (16.9%) was higher than that of GDM subjects (11.4%). Nutrient intakes of energy, fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acid (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), carbohydrate, vitamin B(1), vitamin B(2), vitamin C, and vitamin E in GDM group were significantly higher than those in NGT group. Nutrient densities of SFA and vitamin C in GDM group were higher and nutrient density of calcium was lower than those in NGT group. Taken together, it is recommended to reduce night-eating snack and choose less salty and fatty foods, black-coffee rather than coffee with cream and sugar, and more dairy products to prevent GDM.

  14. Differential expression and regional distribution of aquaporins in amnion of normal and gestational diabetic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Amy D; Beardall, Michael K; Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2015-03-01

    The region of the amnion overlying the placenta plays an active role in fluid exchange between amniotic fluid and fetal blood perfusing the surface of the placenta, whereas little transfer occurs across the reflected amnion that contacts the membranous chorion. Because aquaporins (AQPs) facilitate rapid movement of water across cells, we hypothesized that AQP gene expression in placental amnion is higher than in reflected amnion. Furthermore, because gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is often associated with polyhydramnios, we hypothesized that amnion AQP gene expression is reduced when amniotic fluid volume is elevated. Human placental and reflected amnion were obtained at cesarean delivery and subjected to relative quantitation of AQP mRNA by real-time RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Amnion mRNA levels of five AQPs differed by up to 400-fold (P < 0.001), with AQP1 and AQP3 most abundant, AQP8 least and AQP9 and AQP11 intermediately expressed. Aquaporin proteins showed a similar profile. Aquaporin mRNA abundance was higher (P < 0.001) in placental than reflected amnion, whereas protein levels were lower (P < 0.01). In GDM pregnancies, neither AQP mRNA nor protein levels were different from normal. There was no correlation between AQP mRNA or protein levels with the amniotic fluid index in normal or GDM subjects. We conclude that there is a strong differential expression profile among individual AQPs and between regions of the amnion. These findings suggest differences in contribution of individual AQPs to water transport in the two regions of the amnion. Furthermore, AQP expression in the amnion is not altered in patients with GDM.

  15. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Norwitz, Errol R.; Aukrust, Pål; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV)), in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG)/HDL cholesterol ratio). After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria. PMID:26309121

  16. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Norwitz, Errol R; Aukrust, Pål; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV)), in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG)/HDL cholesterol ratio). After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria.

  17. Screening in high-risk group of gestational diabetes mellitus with its maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nilofer, Angadi Rajasab; Raju, V. S.; Dakshayini, B. R.; Zaki, Syed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The complications associated with GDM can be prevented by early recognition, intense monitoring and proper treatment. Aims: The present study was done to screen the high-risk pregnancy group for GDM, to find the incidence of abnormal results on screening and to correlate the abnormal results with the maternal and fetal outcomes. The study was done in a tertiary care hospital and teaching institute. It was a prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: Selective screening for GDM was done in 150 pregnant women with high-risk factors. Screening was done with 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) after 18 weeks, and if GCT was negative then the test was repeated after 28 weeks of pregnancy. The patients who were having an abnormal GCT were subjected to 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. The period of study was from April 2008 to March 2009. Results: 7.3% of study population was OGCT positive. 6% of the study population was OGTT positive. Age >25 years, obesity, family history of DM, and past history of GDM were the risk factors significantly associated with GDM. One newborn had hypoglycemia and one had hyperbilirubinemia. The fetal and maternal outcome in GDM patients was good in our study due to early diagnosis and intervention. Conclusion: Women with GDM are at an increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The increased morbidity in GDM is preventable by meticulous antenatal care. PMID:22701851

  18. Female Sexual Function of Overweight Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus – A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Meireluci Costa; Nakamura, Mary Uchiyama; Torloni, Maria Regina; Scanavino, Marco de Tubino; Scomparini, Flávia Burin; Mattar, Rosiane

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are increasing worldwide and may compromise female sexual function. We hypothesize that among GDM patients in the third trimester of pregnancy, those with excess body fat would have worse female sexual function scores than normal weight women. Our aim was to assess the sexual function of overweight compared to normal weight women with GDM. This was a cross-sectional survey involving 143 Brazilian women with GDM in the third trimester of pregnancy: 76 were overweight (pre-pregnancy body mass index-BMI≥25.0 Kg/m2) and 67 were normal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9 Kg/m2). Participants were recruited from March 2010 to April 2013 at the antenatal clinic of a single public tertiary teaching institution. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire was used to assess sexual function. Overall, 51.7% of the 143 participants were at risk for sexual dysfunction symptoms (FSFI scores ≤26); this rate was significantly higher among overweight compared to normal weight women (60.5% versus 41.8%, p = 0.038). Mean total FSFI scores were significantly lower in overweight compared to normal weight women (21.7±9.2 versus 24.9±8.0, p = 0.029). Compared to normal weight women, overweight participants had lower mean scores in desire (3.4±1.2 versus 4.0±1.4, p = 0.007) and lubrication (3.8±2.0 versus 4.5±1.6, p = 0.023). According to these results, overweight women with GDM in the third trimester of pregnancy have lower female sexual function scores than normal weight women with the same disorder. PMID:24736490

  19. Impact of a Telemedicine System with Automated Reminders on Outcomes in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Larry C.; Rohrbacher, Kimberly; Mulla, Wadia; Mastrogiannis, Dimtrios; Gaughan, John; Santamore, William P.; Bove, Alfred A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Health information technology has been proven to be a successful tool for the management of patients with multiple medical conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an enhanced telemedicine system on glucose control and pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and Methods We used an Internet-based telemedicine system to also allow interactive voice response phone communication between patients and providers and to provide automated reminders to transmit data. Women with GDM were randomized to either the telemedicine group (n=40) or the control group (n=40) and asked to monitor their blood glucose levels four times a day. Women in the intervention group transmitted those values via the telemedicine system, whereas women in the control group maintained paper logbooks, which were reviewed at prenatal visits. Primary outcomes were infant birth weight and maternal glucose control. Data collection included blood glucose records, transmission rates for the intervention group, and chart review. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups (telemedicine vs. controls) in regard to maternal blood glucose values or infant birth weight. However, adding telephone access and reminders increased transmission rates of data in the intervention group compared with the intervention group in our previous study (35.6±32.3 sets of data vs.17.4±16.9 sets of data; P<0.01). Conclusions Our enhanced telemedicine monitoring system increased system utilization and contact between women with GDM and their healthcare providers but did not impact upon pregnancy outcomes. PMID:22512287

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Greenland: a national study of prevalence and testing efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Olesen, Jesper; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Damm, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Within the last 20 years, the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been reported to be increasing worldwide in correlation with ethnic and geographic variations. The actual prevalence of GDM throughout all of Greenland remains unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of GDM among Greenlanders and non-Greenlanders living in Greenland and to estimate the efficacy of testing for GDM. Design This study was performed as an observational, cross-sectional study including all women with permanent address in Greenland who had given birth to a singleton during 2014. The prevalence of GDM was calculated as the proportion of all pregnant women tested with a 75-g 2-h glucose tolerance test who had a 2-h capillary whole-blood glucose value of 8.5 mmol/l or above. Testing efficacy was calculated as the proportion of women who fulfilled the testing criteria who were actually tested in Greenland in 2014. Results A total of 794 women (727 Greenlanders and 67 non-Greenlanders) were included in the study. The prevalence of GDM among tested women was 3.3% (confidence interval, CI: 0.9–5.6) among Greenlanders and 12.5% (CI: 0–25.7) among non-Greenlanders, corresponding, respectively, to 1.0% (CI: 0.3–1.3) and 4.5% (CI: 0–9.4) of all singleton pregnancies in Greenland in 2014. The overall testing efficacy was 69.0% among all eligible residents of Greenland and 85.1% among eligible residents in the capital city, Nuuk. Conclusion In conclusion, the prevalence of GDM seems quite low in Greenland. Although diagnostic testing activity has improved within the last 6 years, still around one-third of all pregnant women in all Greenland fulfilling the testing criteria were not tested. Universal testing for GDM may be needed to improve testing of GDM in Greenland. PMID:27562574

  1. Human Breath Gas Analysis in the Screening of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Halbritter, Susanne; Fedrigo, Mattia; Höllriegl, Vera; Szymczak, Wilfried; Maier, Joerg M.; Hummel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background We present a pilot study on the feasibility of the application and advantages of online, noninvasive breath gas analysis (BGA) by proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry for the screening of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in 52 pregnant women by means of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Subjects and Methods We collected and identified samples of end-tidal breath gas from patients during OGTT. Time evolution parameters of challenge-responsive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human breath gas were estimated. Multivariate analysis of variance and permutation analysis were used to assess feasibility of BGA as a diagnostic tool for GDM. Results Standard OGTT diagnosis identified pregnant women as having GDM (n=8), impaired glucose tolerance (n=12), and normal glucose tolerance (n=32); a part of this latter group was further subdivided into a “marginal” group (n=9) because of a marginal high 1-h or 2-h OGTT value. We observed that OGTT diagnosis (four metabolic groups) could be mapped into breath gas data. The time evolution of oxidation products of glucose and lipids, acetone metabolites, and thiols in breath gas after a glucose challenge was correlated with GDM diagnosis (P=0.035). Furthermore, basal (fasting) values of dimethyl sulfide and values of methanol in breath gas were inversely correlated with phenotype characteristics such as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (R=−0.538; P=0.0002, Pcorrected=0.0034) and pregestational body mass index (R=−0.433; P=0.0013, Pcorrected=0.022). Conclusions Noninvasive BGA in challenge response studies was successfully applied to GDM diagnosis and offered an insight into metabolic pathways involved. We propose a new approach to the identification of diagnosis thresholds for GDM screening. PMID:22775148

  2. Psychosocial deprivation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with poor fetomaternal prognoses: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Emmanuel; Bihan, Hélène; Reach, Gérard; Vittaz, Laurence; Carbillon, Lionel; Valensi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prognoses associated with psychosocial deprivation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design Observational study considering the 1498 multiethnic women with GDM who gave birth between January 2009 and February 2012. Setting Four largest maternity units in the northeastern suburban area of Paris. Participants The 994 women who completed the Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers (EPICES) questionnaire. Main outcome measure Main complications of GDM (large infant for gestational age (LGA), shoulder dystocia, caesarean section, pre-eclampsia). Results Psychosocial deprivation (EPICES score ≥30.17) affected 577 women (56%) and was positively associated with overweight/obesity, parity and non-European origin, and negatively associated with family history of diabetes, fruit and vegetable consumption and working status. The psychosocially deprived women were diagnosed with GDM earlier, received insulin treatment during pregnancy more often and were more likely to have LGA infants (15.1% vs 10.6%, OR=1.5 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.2), p<0.05) and shoulder dystocia (3.1% vs 1.2%, OR=2.7 (0.97 to 7.2), p<0.05). In addition to psychosocial deprivation, LGA was associated with greater parity, obesity, history of GDM, ethnicity, excessive gestational weight gain and insulin therapy. A multivariate analysis using these covariates revealed that the EPICES score was independently associated with LGA infants (per 10 units, OR=1.12 (1.03 to 1.20), p<0.01). Conclusions In our area, psychosocial deprivation is common in women with GDM and is associated with earlier GDM diagnoses and greater insulin treatment, an increased likelihood of shoulder dystocia and, independently of obesity, gestational weight gain and other confounders with LGA infants. PMID:25748416

  3. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors Associated With Risk of Progression From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Bowers, Katherine; Chavarro, Jorge; Vaag, Allan; Grunnet, Louise Groth; Strøm, Marin; Mills, James; Liu, Aiyi; Kiely, Michele; Zhang, Cuilin

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at substantially increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The identification of important modifiable factors could help prevent T2DM in this high-risk population. OBJECTIVE To examine the role of physical activity and television watching and other sedentary behaviors, and changes in these behaviors in the progression from GDM to T2DM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective cohort study of 4554 women from the Nurses’ Health Study II who had a history of GDM, as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women’s Health Study. These women were followed up from 1991 to 2007. EXPOSURES Physical activity and television watching and other sedentary behaviors were assessed in 1991, 1997, 2001, and 2005. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURE Incident T2DM identified through self-report and confirmed by supplemental questionnaires. RESULTS We documented 635 incident T2DM cases during 59287 person-years of follow-up. Each 5–metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET-h/wk) increment of total physical activity, which is equivalent to 100 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity, was related to a 9% lower risk of T2DM (adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.91; 95% CI, 0.88–0.94); this inverse association remained significant after additional adjustment for body mass index (BMI). Moreover, an increase in physical activity was associated with a lower risk of developing T2DM. Compared with women who maintained their total physical activity levels, women who increased their total physical activity levels by 7.5 MET-h/wk or more (equivalent to 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity) had a 47% lower risk of T2DM (RR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38–0.75); the association remained significant after additional adjustment for BMI. The multivariable adjusted RRs (95% CIs) for T2DM associated with television watching of 0 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 20, and 20 or more hours per week were 1 (reference), 1

  4. Primary Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Large-for-Gestational-Age Newborns by Lifestyle Counseling: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, Riitta; Kinnunen, Tarja I.; Aittasalo, Minna; Kolu, Päivi; Raitanen, Jani; Ojala, Katriina; Mansikkamäki, Kirsi; Lamberg, Satu; Vasankari, Tommi; Komulainen, Tanja; Tulokas, Sirkku

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to examine whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or newborns' high birthweight can be prevented by lifestyle counseling in pregnant women at high risk of GDM. Method and Findings We conducted a cluster-randomized trial, the NELLI study, in 14 municipalities in Finland, where 2,271 women were screened by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 8–12 wk gestation. Euglycemic (n = 399) women with at least one GDM risk factor (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2, glucose intolerance or newborn's macrosomia (≥4,500 g) in any earlier pregnancy, family history of diabetes, age ≥40 y) were included. The intervention included individual intensified counseling on physical activity and diet and weight gain at five antenatal visits. Primary outcomes were incidence of GDM as assessed by OGTT (maternal outcome) and newborns' birthweight adjusted for gestational age (neonatal outcome). Secondary outcomes were maternal weight gain and the need for insulin treatment during pregnancy. Adherence to the intervention was evaluated on the basis of changes in physical activity (weekly metabolic equivalent task (MET) minutes) and diet (intake of total fat, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, saccharose, and fiber). Multilevel analyses took into account cluster, maternity clinic, and nurse level influences in addition to age, education, parity, and prepregnancy BMI. 15.8% (34/216) of women in the intervention group and 12.4% (22/179) in the usual care group developed GDM (absolute effect size 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–2.62, p = 0.36). Neonatal birthweight was lower in the intervention than in the usual care group (absolute effect size −133 g, 95% CI −231 to −35, p = 0.008) as was proportion of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) newborns (26/216, 12.1% versus 34/179, 19.7%, p = 0.042). Women in the intervention group increased their intake of dietary fiber (adjusted coefficient 1.83, 95% CI 0.30–3.25, p = 0

  5. Preventing large birth size in women with preexisting diabetes mellitus: The benefit of appropriate gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Y.; Sharma, Andrea J.; Sappenfield, William; Salihu, Hamisu M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the percentage of infants with large birth size attributable to excess gestational weight gain (GWG), independent of prepregnancy body mass index, among mothers with preexisting diabetes mellitus (PDM). Study design We analyzed 2004–2008 Florida linked birth certificate and maternal hospital discharge data of live, term (37–41 weeks) singleton deliveries (N = 641,857). We calculated prevalence of large-for-gestational age (LGA) (birth weight-for-gestational age ≥ 90th percentile) and macrosomia (birth weight > 4500 g) by GWG categories (inadequate, appropriate, or excess). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate the relative risk (RR) of large birth size associated with excess compared to appropriate GWG among mothers with PDM. We then estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of large birth size due to excess GWG among mothers with PDM (n = 4427). Results Regardless of diabetes status, half of mothers (51.2%) gained weight in excess of recommendations. Large birth size was higher in infants of mothers with PDM than in infants of mothers without diabetes (28.8% versus 9.4% for LGA, 5.8% versus 0.9% for macrosomia). Among women with PDM, the adjusted RR of having an LGA infant was 1.7 (95% CI 1.5, 1.9) for women with excess GWG compared to those with appropriate gain; the PAF was 27.7% (95% CI 22.0, 33.3). For macrosomia, the adjusted RR associated with excess GWG was 2.1 (95% CI 1.5, 2.9) and the PAF was 38.6% (95% CI 24.9, 52.4). Conclusion Preventing excess GWG may avert over one-third of macrosomic term infants of mothers with PDM. Effective strategies to prevent excess GWG are needed. PMID:27539071

  6. Nutritional Manipulation for the Primary Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Randomised Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hitman, Graham A.; Khan, Khalid S.; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rise in gestational diabetes (GDM), defined as first onset or diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, is a global problem. GDM is often associated with unhealthy diet and is a major contributor to adverse outcomes maternal and fetal outcomes. Manipulation of nutrition has the potential to prevent GDM. Methods We assessed the effects of nutritional manipulation in pregnancy on GDM and relevant maternal and fetal outcomes by a systematic review of the literature. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database from inception to March 2014 without any language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) of nutritional manipulation to prevent GDM were included. We summarised dichotomous data as relative risk (RR) and continuous data as standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results From 1761 citations, 20 RCTs (6,444 women) met the inclusion criteria. We identified the following interventions: diet-based (n = 6), mixed approach (diet and lifestyle) interventions (n = 13), and nutritional supplements (myo-inositol n = 1, diet with probiotics n = 1). Diet based interventions reduced the risk of GDM by 33% (RR 0.67; 95% CI 0.39, 1.15). Mixed approach interventions based on diet and lifestyle had no effect on GDM (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.89, 1.22). Nutritional supplements probiotics combined with diet (RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.20, 0.78) and myo-inositol (RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.16, 0.99) were assessed in one trial each and showed a beneficial effect. We observed a significant interaction between the groups based on BMI for diet-based intervention. The risk of GDM was reduced in obese and overweight pregnant women for GDM (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.18, 0.86). Conclusions Nutritional manipulation in pregnancy based on diet or mixed approach do not appear to reduce the risk of GDM. Nutritional supplements show potential as agents for primary prevention of GDM. PMID:25719363

  7. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus: The accuracy of the NSW perinatal data collection based on a private hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anna S Y; Morris, Gary; Moses, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Past studies have shown that the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been underestimated, and this can have major implications for healthcare planning. With the changes in diagnostic criteria for GDM, we wanted to assess the accuracy of the diagnosis in a private hospital setting. Using data from the hospital's obstetric database, medical records and a private pathology provider, we established the true prevalence of GDM and compared it with the NSW Perinatal Data Collection. The recorded prevalence of 6.8% was well below the real value of 15.0%. PMID:26799616

  8. Comparison of Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension with NPH Insulin in Pregnant Women with Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Visalli, Natalia; Abbruzzese, Santina; Bongiovanni, Marzia; Napoli, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Insulin therapy is still the gold standard in diabetic pregnancy. Insulin lispro protamine suspension is an available basal insulin analogue. Aim. To study pregnancy outcomes of women with type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus when insulin lispro protamine suspension or human NPH insulin was added to medical nutrition therapy and/or short-acting insulin. Methods. In this retrospective study, for maternal outcome we recorded time and mode of delivery, hypertension, glycaemic control (fasting blood glucose and HbA1c), hypoglycemias, weight increase, and insulin need. For neonatal outcome birth weight and weight class, congenital malformations was recorded and main neonatal complications. Two-tail Student's t-test and chi-square test were performed when applicable; significant P < 0.05. Results. Eighty-nine pregnant women (25 with type 2 diabetes and 64 with gestational diabetes mellitus; 53 under insulin lispro protamine suspension and 36 under human NPH insulin) were recruited. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were quite similar between the two therapeutic approaches; however, insulin need was higher in NPH. At the end of pregnancy, eight women with gestational diabetes continued to use only basal insulin analogue. Conclusions. Pregnancy outcome in type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus with insulin lispro protamine suspension was similar to that with NPH insulin, except for a lower insulin requirement. PMID:23840206

  9. Comparison of Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension with NPH Insulin in Pregnant Women with Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Colatrella, Antonietta; Visalli, Natalia; Abbruzzese, Santina; Leotta, Sergio; Bongiovanni, Marzia; Napoli, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Insulin therapy is still the gold standard in diabetic pregnancy. Insulin lispro protamine suspension is an available basal insulin analogue. Aim. To study pregnancy outcomes of women with type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus when insulin lispro protamine suspension or human NPH insulin was added to medical nutrition therapy and/or short-acting insulin. Methods. In this retrospective study, for maternal outcome we recorded time and mode of delivery, hypertension, glycaemic control (fasting blood glucose and HbA1c), hypoglycemias, weight increase, and insulin need. For neonatal outcome birth weight and weight class, congenital malformations was recorded and main neonatal complications. Two-tail Student's t-test and chi-square test were performed when applicable; significant P < 0.05. Results. Eighty-nine pregnant women (25 with type 2 diabetes and 64 with gestational diabetes mellitus; 53 under insulin lispro protamine suspension and 36 under human NPH insulin) were recruited. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were quite similar between the two therapeutic approaches; however, insulin need was higher in NPH. At the end of pregnancy, eight women with gestational diabetes continued to use only basal insulin analogue. Conclusions. Pregnancy outcome in type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus with insulin lispro protamine suspension was similar to that with NPH insulin, except for a lower insulin requirement. PMID:23840206

  10. Plasma Markers of Oxidative Stress in Patients with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Second and Third Trimester

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Zhenbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine plasma markers of oxidative stress during the second and third trimester of pregnancy in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Study Design. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study involving 400 pregnant women, 22 of whom developed GDM. As control group, 30 normal pregnant women were chosen randomly. Plasma samples were analyzed for 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α), advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs), protein carbonyl (PCO), glutathione peroxidase-3 (GPX-3), and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) at 16–20 weeks, 24–28 weeks, and 32–36 weeks of gestation. Results. Compared to control subjects, the plasma levels of PCO, AOPPs, and 8-iso-PGF2α were elevated at 16–20 weeks' and 32–36 weeks' gestation in GDM. There was no significant difference in PCO and 8-iso-PGF2α at 24–28 weeks in GDM. GPX-3 was statistically significantly increased at 16–20 weeks and 32–36 weeks in GDM. PON1 reduced in patients with GDM. No significant differences were found at 24–28 and 32–36 weeks between the GDM and control groups. In GDM, PCO, AOPPs, and 8-iso-PGF2α levels were higher and GPX-3 and PON1 levels were lower in the second than the third trimester. Conclusion. Oxidation status increased in GDM, especially protein oxidation, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of GDM. PMID:27803713

  11. Factors associated with depressive symptoms in the early postpartum period among women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Jacinda M; Miller, Laura J; Zera, Chloe A; Davis, Roger B; Levkoff, Sue E; Seely, Ellen W

    2013-11-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a substantial risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes. This risk may be mitigated by engaging in healthy eating, physical activity, and weight loss when indicated. Since postpartum depressive symptoms may impair a woman's ability to engage in lifestyle changes, we sought to identify factors associated with depressive symptoms in the early postpartum period among women with recent GDM. The participants are part of the baseline cohort of the TEAM GDM (Taking Early Action for Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus) study, a one-year randomized trial of a lifestyle intervention program for women with a recent history of GDM, conducted in Boston, Massachusetts between June 2010 and September 2012. We administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 4-15 weeks postpartum to women whose most recent pregnancy was complicated by GDM (confirmed by laboratory data or medical record review). An EPDS score ≥9 indicated depressive symptoms. We measured height and thyroid stimulating hormone, and administered a questionnaire to collect demographic data and information about breastfeeding and sleep. We calculated body mass index (BMI) using self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height. We reviewed medical records to obtain data about medical history, including history of depression, mode of delivery, and insulin use during pregnancy. We conducted bivariable analyses to identify correlates of postpartum depressive symptoms, and then modeled the odds of postpartum depressive symptoms using multivariable logistic regression. Our study included 71 women (mean age 33 years ± 5; 59 % White, 28 % African-American, 13 % Asian, with 21 % identifying as Hispanic; mean pre-pregnancy BMI 30 kg/m(2) ± 6). Thirty-four percent of the women scored ≥9 on the EPDS at the postpartum visit. In the best fit model, factors associated with depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum included cesarean

  12. Factors associated with depressive symptoms in the early postpartum period among women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Jacinda M; Miller, Laura J; Zera, Chloe A; Davis, Roger B.; Levkoff, Sue E; Seely, Ellen W

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a substantial risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes. This risk may be mitigated by engaging in healthy eating, physical activity, and weight loss when indicated. Since postpartum depressive symptoms may impair a woman's ability to engage in lifestyle changes, we sought to identify factors associated with depressive symptoms in the early postpartum period among women with recent GDM. Methods The participants are part of the baseline cohort of the TEAM GDM (Taking Early Action for Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus) study, a one-year randomized trial of a lifestyle intervention program for women with a recent history of GDM, conducted in Boston, Massachusetts between June 2010 and September 2012. We administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 4-15 weeks postpartum to women whose most recent pregnancy was complicated by GDM (confirmed by laboratory data or medical record review). An EPDS score ≥9 indicated depressive symptoms. We measured height and thyroid stimulating hormone, and administered a questionnaire to collect demographic data and information about breastfeeding and sleep. We calculated body mass index (BMI) using self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height. We reviewed medical records to obtain data about medical history, including history of depression, mode of delivery, and insulin use during pregnancy. We conducted bivariable analyses to identify correlates of postpartum depressive symptoms, and then modeled the odds of postpartum depressive symptoms using multivariable logistic regression. Results Our study included 71 women (mean age 33 years ±5; 59% White, 28% African-American, 13% Asian, with 21% identifying as Hispanic; mean pre-pregnancy BMI 30 kg/m2±6). Thirty-four percent of the women scored ≥9 on the EPDS at the postpartum visit. In the best fit model, factors associated with depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum included

  13. Costs and consequences of treatment for mild gestational diabetes mellitus – evaluation from the ACHOIS randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Moss, John R; Crowther, Caroline A; Hiller, Janet E; Willson, Kristyn J; Robinson, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    Background Recommended best practice is that economic evaluation of health care interventions should be integral with randomised clinical trials. We performed a cost-consequence analysis of treating women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus by dietary advice, blood glucose monitoring and insulin therapy as needed compared with routine pregnancy care, using patient-level data from a multi-centre randomised clinical trial. Methods Women with a singleton pregnancy who had mild gestational diabetes diagnosed by an oral glucose-tolerance test between 24 and 34 weeks' gestation and their infants were included. Clinical outcomes and outpatient costs derived from all women and infants in the trial. Inpatient costs derived from women and infants attending the hospital contributing the largest number of enrolments (26.1%), and charges to women and their families derived from a subsample of participants from that hospital (in 2002 Australian dollars). Occasions of service and health outcomes were adjusted for maternal age, ethnicity and parity. Analysis of variance was used with bootstrapping to confirm results. Primary clinical outcomes were serious perinatal complications; admission to neonatal nursery; jaundice requiring phototherapy; induction of labour and caesarean delivery. Economic outcome measures were outpatient and inpatient costs, and charges to women and their families. Results For every 100 women with a singleton pregnancy and positive oral glucose tolerance test who were offered treatment for mild gestational diabetes mellitus in addition to routine obstetric care, $53,985 additional direct costs were incurred at the obstetric hospital, $6,521 additional charges were incurred by women and their families, 9.7 additional women experienced induction of labour, and 8.6 more babies were admitted to a neonatal nursery. However, 2.2 fewer babies experienced serious perinatal complication and 1.0 fewer babies experienced perinatal death. The incremental cost per

  14. Factors associated with depressive symptoms in the early postpartum period among women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Jacinda M; Miller, Laura J; Zera, Chloe A; Davis, Roger B; Levkoff, Sue E; Seely, Ellen W

    2013-11-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a substantial risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes. This risk may be mitigated by engaging in healthy eating, physical activity, and weight loss when indicated. Since postpartum depressive symptoms may impair a woman's ability to engage in lifestyle changes, we sought to identify factors associated with depressive symptoms in the early postpartum period among women with recent GDM. The participants are part of the baseline cohort of the TEAM GDM (Taking Early Action for Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus) study, a one-year randomized trial of a lifestyle intervention program for women with a recent history of GDM, conducted in Boston, Massachusetts between June 2010 and September 2012. We administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 4-15 weeks postpartum to women whose most recent pregnancy was complicated by GDM (confirmed by laboratory data or medical record review). An EPDS score ≥9 indicated depressive symptoms. We measured height and thyroid stimulating hormone, and administered a questionnaire to collect demographic data and information about breastfeeding and sleep. We calculated body mass index (BMI) using self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height. We reviewed medical records to obtain data about medical history, including history of depression, mode of delivery, and insulin use during pregnancy. We conducted bivariable analyses to identify correlates of postpartum depressive symptoms, and then modeled the odds of postpartum depressive symptoms using multivariable logistic regression. Our study included 71 women (mean age 33 years ± 5; 59 % White, 28 % African-American, 13 % Asian, with 21 % identifying as Hispanic; mean pre-pregnancy BMI 30 kg/m(2) ± 6). Thirty-four percent of the women scored ≥9 on the EPDS at the postpartum visit. In the best fit model, factors associated with depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum included cesarean

  15. Rapid screening test for gestational diabetes: public health need, market requirement, initial product design, and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Zwisler, Greg; Peck, Roger; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Gestational diabetes is a global epidemic where many urban areas in Southeast Asia have found prevalence rates as high as 20%, exceeding the highest prevalence rates in the developed world. It can have serious and life-threatening consequences for mothers and babies. We are developing two variants of a new, simple, low-cost rapid test for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus for use primarily in low-resource settings. The pair of assays, both semiquantitative rapid diagnostic strip tests for glycated albumin, require neither fasting nor an oral glucose challenge test. One variant is an extremely simple strip test to estimate the level of total glycated albumin in blood. The other, which is slightly more complex and expensive, is a test that determines the ratio of glycated albumin to total albumin. The screening results can be used to refer women to receive additional care during delivery to avoid birth complications as well as counseling on diet and exercise during and after pregnancy. Results with the latter test may also be used to start treatment with glucose-lowering drugs. Both assays will be read visually. We present initial results of a preliminary cost-performance comparison model evaluating the proposed test versus existing alternatives. We also evaluated user needs and schematic paper microfluidics-based designs aimed at overcoming the challenge of visualizing relatively narrow differences between normal and elevated levels of glycated albumin in blood.

  16. Combination immunotherapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2015-05-01

    Immunotherapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have been the focus of intense basic and clinical research over the past few decades. Restoring β-cell function is the ultimate goal of intervention trials that target the immune system in T1DM. In an attempt to achieve this aim, different combination therapies have been proposed over the past few years that are based on treatments tackling the various mechanisms involved in the destruction of β cells. The results of clinical trials have not matched expectations based on the positive results from preclinical studies. The heterogeneity of T1DM might explain the negative results obtained, but previous trials have not addressed this issue. However, novel promising combination therapies are being developed, including those that couple immunomodulators with drugs that stimulate β-cell regeneration in order to restore normoglycaemia. This strategy is an encouraging one to pursue the goal of finding a cure for T1DM. This Review summarizes the available data about combination immunotherapies in T1DM, particularly addressing their clinical importance. The available data supporting the use of registered drugs, such as proton pump inhibitors and incretin-based agents, that have been shown to induce β-cell regeneration will also be discussed.

  17. Serum 25(OH) Vitamin D Levels in Polish Women during Pregnancies Complicated by Hypertensive Disorders and Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Domaracki, Piotr; Sadlecki, Pawel; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Dzikowska, Ewa; Walentowicz, Pawel; Siodmiak, Joanna; Grabiec, Marek; Walentowicz-Sadlecka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background: An association between the level of vitamin D and the risk of pregnancy-related complications remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine concentrations of 25(OH) vitamin D in Polish women with normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension, preeclampsia or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Moreover, we analyzed an association between maternal serum 25(OH)D and the risk of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and GDM. Material and Methods: The study included 207 pregnant women, among them 171 with pregnancy-related complications: gestational hypertension (n = 45), preeclampsia (n = 23) or GDM (n = 103). The control group consisted of 36 women with normal pregnancies. Concentrations of serum 25(OH)D were measured at admission to the hospital prior to delivery Results: Patients with hypertension did not differ significantly from the controls in terms of their serum 25(OH)D concentrations (18.20 vs. 22.10 ng/mL, p = 0.15). Highly significant differences were found in 25(OH)D concentrations of women with preeclampsia and the controls (14.75 vs. 22.10 ng/mL, p = 0.0021). GDM was not associated with significant differences in 25(OH)D concentration. A low level of 25(OH)D turned out to be associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy on both univariate and multivariate regression analysis, and was a significant predictor of this condition on ROC (receiver operating characteristic) analysis (AUC = 0.70, p < 0.01). Conclusions: 25(OH)D deficiency is common among pregnant Polish women. Low concentrations of 25(OH)D may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of preeclampsia. Routine assessment of the 25(OH)D level during pregnancy may be crucial for the identification of women at increased risk of preeclampsia. PMID:27690002

  18. Zinc-α2-Glycoprotein Is Unrelated to Gestational Diabetes: Anthropometric and Metabolic Determinants in Pregnant Women and Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Näf, Silvia; Escote, Xavier; Yañez, Rosa Elena; Ballesteros, Mónica; Simón, Inmaculada; Gil, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Context Zinc-α2-Glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with lipolytic action and is positively associated with adiponectin in adipose tissue. We hypothesize that ZAG may be related with hydrocarbonate metabolism disturbances observed in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Objective The aim of this study was to analyze serum ZAG concentration and its relationship with carbohydrate metabolism in pregnant women and its influence on fetal growth. Design 207 pregnant women (130 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 77 with GDM) recruited in the early third trimester and their offspring were studied. Cord blood was obtained at delivery and neonatal anthropometry was assessed in the first 48 hours. ZAG was determined in maternal serum and cord blood. Results ZAG concentration was lower in cord blood than in maternal serum, but similar concentration was observed in NGT and GDM pregnant women. Also similar levels were found between offspring of NGT and GDM women. In the bivariate analysis, maternal ZAG (mZAG) was positively correlated with adiponectin and HDL cholesterol, and negatively correlated with insulin and triglyceride concentrations, and HOMA index. On the other hand, cord blood ZAG (cbZAG) was positively correlated with fat-free mass, birth weight and gestational age at delivery. After adjusting for confounding variables, gestational age at delivery and HDL cholesterol emerged as the sole determinants of cord blood ZAG and maternal ZAG concentrations, respectively. Conclusion mZAG was not associated with glucose metabolism during pregnancy. ZAG concentration was lower in cord blood compared with maternal serum. cbZAG was independently correlated with gestational age at delivery, suggesting a role during the accelerated fetal growth during latter pregnancy. PMID:23272038

  19. Gestational diabetes mellitus prevalence in Maela refugee camp on the Thai–Myanmar Border: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, Mary Ellen; Zin, Thet Wai; Wai, Nan San; Ner, Ma; Say, Paw Si; Htoo, Myint; Say, Say; Htay, Win Win; Simpson, Julie A.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Nosten, Francois; McGready, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals in conflict-affected areas rarely get appropriate care for chronic or non-infectious diseases. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide, and new evidence shows conclusively that the negative effects of hyperglycemia occur even at mild glucose elevations and that these negative effects can be attenuated by treatment. Scientific literature on gestational diabetes in refugee camp settings is critically limited. Methods A 75 g 2-hour glucose tolerance test was administered to 228 women attending the antenatal care (ANC) clinic in Maela refugee camp on the Thai–Myanmar border. Prevalence of GDM was determined using the HAPO trial cut-offs [≥92 mg/dL (fasting),≥180 (1 hour), and≥153 (2 hour)] and the WHO criteria [≥126 mg/dL (fasting), and 140 mg/dL (2 hour)]. Results From July 2011 to March 2012, the prevalence of GDM was 10.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.2–14.0] when the cut-off determined by the HAPO trial was applied. Applying the older WHO criteria yielded a prevalence of 6.6% (95% CI 3.3–9.8). Age, parity, and BMI emerged as characteristics that may be significantly associated with GDM in this population. Other risk factors that are commonly used in screening guidelines were not applicable in this diabetes-naïve population. Discussion The prevalence of GDM is lower in this population compared with other populations, but still complicates 10% of pregnancies. New evidence regarding gestational diabetes raises new dilemmas for healthcare providers in resource-poor settings. Efforts to identify and treat patients at risk for adverse outcomes need to be balanced with awareness of the risks and burdens associated with over diagnosis and unnecessary interventions. Screening approaches based on risk factors or using higher cut-off values may help minimize this burden and identify those most likely to benefit from intervention. PMID:24824580

  20. Acceptability and user satisfaction of a smartphone-based, interactive blood glucose management system in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Jane E; Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Kevat, Dev A; Bartlett, Katy; Gibson, Oliver; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is challenging maternity services. We have developed an interactive, smartphone-based, remote blood glucose (BG) monitoring system, GDm-health. The objective was to determine women's satisfaction with using the GDm-health system and their attitudes toward their diabetes care. In a service development program involving 52 pregnant women (September 2012 to June 2013), BG was monitored using GDm-health from diagnosis until delivery. Following birth, women completed a structured questionnaire assessing (1) general satisfaction, (2) equipment issues, and (3) relationship with the diabetes care team. Responses were scored on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were assessed using statistical methods. Of 52 women, 49 completed the questionnaire; 32 had glucose tolerance test confirmed GDM (gestation at recruitment 29 ± 4 weeks (mean ± SD), and 17 women previous GDM recommended for BG monitoring (18 ± 6 weeks). In all, 45 of 49 women agreed their care was satisfactory and the best for them, 47 of 49 and 43 of 49 agreed the equipment was convenient and reliable respectively, 42 of 49 agreed GDm-health fitted into their lifestyle, and 46 of 49 agreed they had a good relationship with their care team. Written comments supported these findings, with very positive reactions from the majority of women. Cronbach's alpha was .89 with factor analysis corresponding with question thematic trends. This pilot demonstrates that GDm-health is acceptable and convenient for a large proportion of women. Effects on clinical and economic outcomes are currently under investigation in a randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01916694).

  1. Acceptability and User Satisfaction of a Smartphone-Based, Interactive Blood Glucose Management System in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Kevat, Dev A.; Bartlett, Katy; Gibson, Oliver; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C.; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is challenging maternity services. We have developed an interactive, smartphone-based, remote blood glucose (BG) monitoring system, GDm-health. Aims: The objective was to determine women’s satisfaction with using the GDm-health system and their attitudes toward their diabetes care. Methods: In a service development program involving 52 pregnant women (September 2012 to June 2013), BG was monitored using GDm-health from diagnosis until delivery. Following birth, women completed a structured questionnaire assessing (1) general satisfaction, (2) equipment issues, and (3) relationship with the diabetes care team. Responses were scored on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were assessed using statistical methods. Results: Of 52 women, 49 completed the questionnaire; 32 had glucose tolerance test confirmed GDM (gestation at recruitment 29 ± 4 weeks (mean ± SD), and 17 women previous GDM recommended for BG monitoring (18 ± 6 weeks). In all, 45 of 49 women agreed their care was satisfactory and the best for them, 47 of 49 and 43 of 49 agreed the equipment was convenient and reliable respectively, 42 of 49 agreed GDm-health fitted into their lifestyle, and 46 of 49 agreed they had a good relationship with their care team. Written comments supported these findings, with very positive reactions from the majority of women. Cronbach’s alpha was .89 with factor analysis corresponding with question thematic trends. Conclusions: This pilot demonstrates that GDm-health is acceptable and convenient for a large proportion of women. Effects on clinical and economic outcomes are currently under investigation in a randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01916694). PMID:25361643

  2. Transplacental Distribution of Lidocaine and Its Metabolite in Peridural Anesthesia Administered to Patients With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Luciana de Barros; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Carvalho, Daniela Miarelli; Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Marques, Maria Paula; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Duarte, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal effects of drugs administered to mothers before delivery depend on the quantity that crosses the placental barrier, which is determined by the pharmacokinetics of the drug in the mother, fetus, and placenta. Diabetes mellitus can alter the kinetic disposition and the metabolism of drugs. This study investigated the placental transfer of lidocaine and its metabolite monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) submitted to peridural anesthesia. Patients and Methods: A total of 10 normal pregnant women (group 1) and 6 pregnant women with GDM (group 2) were studied, all at term. The patients received 200 mg 2% lidocaine hydrochloride by the peridural locoregional route. Maternal blood samples were collected at the time of delivery and, after placental expulsion, blood samples were collected from the intervillous space, umbilical artery, and vein for determination of lidocaine and MEGX concentrations and analysis of the placental transfer of the drug. Results: The following respective lidocaine ratios between the maternal and the fetal compartments were obtained for groups 1 and 2: umbilical vein/maternal peripheral blood, 0.60 and 0.46; intervillous space/maternal blood, 1.01 and 0.88; umbilical artery/umbilical vein, 0.77 and 0.91; and umbilical vein/intervillous space, 0.53 and 0.51. The following MEGX ratios for groups 1 and 2 were, respectively, fetal/maternal, 0.43 and 0.97; intervillous space/maternal blood, 0.64 and 0.90; umbilical artery/umbilical vein, 1.09 and 0.99; and umbilical vein/intervillous space, 0.55 and 0.78. Conclusion: Gestational diabetes mellitus did not affect the transplacental transfer of lidocaine but interfered with the transfer of MEGX, acting as a mechanism facilitating the transport of the metabolite. PMID:25563756

  3. DALI: Vitamin D and lifestyle intervention for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) prevention: an European multicentre, randomised trial – study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasing problem world-wide. Lifestyle interventions and/or vitamin D supplementation might help prevent GDM in some women. Methods/design Pregnant women at risk of GDM (BMI≥29 (kg/m2)) from 9 European countries will be invited to participate and consent obtained before 19+6 weeks of gestation. After giving informed consent, women without GDM will be included (based on IADPSG criteria: fasting glucose<5.1mmol; 1 hour glucose <10.0 mmol; 2 hour glucose <8.5 mmol) and randomized to one of the 8 intervention arms using a 2×(2×2) factorial design: (1) healthy eating (HE), 2) physical activity (PA), 3) HE+PA, 4) control, 5) HE+PA+vitamin D, 6) HE+PA+placebo, 7) vitamin D alone, 8) placebo alone), pre-stratified for each site. In total, 880 women will be included with 110 women allocated to each arm. Between entry and 35 weeks of gestation, women allocated to a lifestyle intervention will receive 5 face-to-face, and 4 telephone coaching sessions, based on the principles of motivational interviewing. The lifestyle intervention includes a discussion about the risks of GDM, a weight gain target <5kg and either 7 healthy eating ‘messages’ and/or 5 physical activity ‘messages’ depending on randomization. Fidelity is monitored by the use of a personal digital assistance (PDA) system. Participants randomized to the vitamin D intervention receive either 1600 IU vitamin D or placebo for daily intake until delivery. Data is collected at baseline measurement, at 24–28 weeks, 35–37 weeks of gestation and after delivery. Primary outcome measures are gestational weight gain, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, with a range of obstetric secondary outcome measures including birth weight. Discussion DALI is a unique Europe-wide randomised controlled trial, which will gain insight into preventive measures against the development of GDM in overweight and obese women. Trial registration ISRCTN70595832 PMID:23829946

  4. Lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes prevention in women with prior gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of behavioural, anthropometric and metabolic outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Gilinsky, A.S.; Kirk, A.F.; Hughes, A.R.; Lindsay, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review lifestyle interventions for women with prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) to report study characteristics, intervention design and study quality and explore changes in 1) diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour; 2) anthropometric outcomes and; 3) glycaemic control and diabetes risk. Methods Databases (Web of Science, CCRCT, EMBASE and Science DIRECT) were searched (1980 to April 2014) using keywords for controlled or pre–post design trials of lifestyle intervention targeting women with previous GDM reporting at least one behavioural, anthropometric or diabetes outcome. Selected studies were narratively synthesized with anthropometric and glycaemic outcomes synthesized using meta-analysis. Results Three of 13 included studies were rated as low bias risk. Recruitment rates were poor but study retention good. Six of 11 studies reporting on physical activity reported favourable intervention effects. All six studies reporting on diet reported favourable intervention effects. In meta-analysis, significant weight-loss was attributable to one Chinese population study (WMD = − 1.06 kg (95% CI = − 1.68, − 0.44)). Lifestyle interventions did not change fasting blood glucose (WMD = − 0.05 mmol/L, 95% CI = − 0.21, 0.11) or type 2 diabetes risk. Conclusions Lack of methodologically robust trials gives limited evidence for the success of lifestyle interventions in women with prior GDM. Recruitment into trials is challenging. PMID:26844102

  5. Gestational age

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to ...

  6. Glucose Intolerance after a Recent History of Gestational Diabetes Based on the 2013 WHO Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Benhalima, Katrien; Jegers, Katleen; Devlieger, Roland; Verhaeghe, Johan; Mathieu, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Aims Uncertainty exists on the prevalence of glucose intolerance in women with a recent diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) based on a two-step screening strategy and the 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of postpartum screening, the prevalence and the risk factors for glucose intolerance in women with a recent history of GDM. Methods Retrospective analysis of the medical records of women with a recent history of GDM diagnosed in a universal two-step screening strategy with the 2013 WHO criteria. All women with a history of GDM are advised to undergo a 75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) around 12 weeks postpartum. Indices of insulin sensitivity (the Matsuda index and the reciprocal of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, 1/HOMA-IR) and an index of beta-cell function, the Insulin Secretion-Sensitivity Index-2 (ISSI-2) were calculated based on the OGTT postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders such as age, BMI, ethnicity and breastfeeding. Results Of the 191 women with GDM, 29.3% (56) did not attend the scheduled postpartum OGTT. These women had a higher BMI (28.6 ±6.8 vs. 26.2 ± 5.6, p = 0.015), were more often from an ethnic minority (EM) background (41.1% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.029) and smoked more often during pregnancy (14.3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.001) than women who attended the OGTT postpartum. Of all women (135) who received an OGTT postpartum, 42.2% (57) had prediabetes (11.9% impaired fasting glucose, 24.4% impaired glucose tolerance and 5.9% both impaired fasting and impaired glucose tolerance) and 1.5% (2) had overt diabetes. Compared to women with a normal OGTT postpartum, women with glucose intolerance were older (32.5±4.3 vs. 30.8±4.8 years, p = 0.049), were more often obese (34.5% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.023), were more often from an EM background (33.9% vs. 18.4%, p = 0.040), less often breastfed (69.5% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.041) and had more often an

  7. Trends in Glyburide Compared With Insulin Use for Gestational Diabetes Treatment in the United States, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Wendy Camelo; Boggess, Kim; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M. Alan; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Funk, Michele Jonsson

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe trends and identify factors associated with choice of pharmacotherapy for gestational diabetes (GDM) from 2000–2011 using a healthcare claims database. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a large nationwide population of commercially insured women with GDM and pharmacy claims for glyburide or insulin prior to delivery, 2000–2011. We excluded women younger than 15 years or older than 50 years, those with prior type 2 diabetes, or those who had multiple gestations. We estimated trends over time in the use of glyburide compared with insulin and prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between covariates of interest and treatment with glyburide compared with insulin. Results We identified 10,778 women with GDM treated with glyburide (n=5,873) or insulin (n=4,905). From 2000–2011, glyburide use increased from 7.4% to 64.5%, becoming the more common treatment in 2007. Women less likely to be treated with glyburide were those with metabolic syndrome (PR=0.71, 95%CI: 0.50– 0.99), hyperandrogenism (PR=0.77, 95%CI: 0.62–0.97), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PR=0.88, 95%CI: 0.78–0.99), hypothyroidism (PR=0.89, 95%CI: 0.83–0.96) or undergoing infertility treatment (PR=0.93, 95%CI: 0.86–1.02). The probability of receiving glyburide decreased by 5% for every 10-year increase in maternal age (PR=0.95, 95%CI: 0.91–0.99). Among women prescribed with glyburide, 7.8% switched or augmented to a different drug class compared with 1.1% of insulin initiators. Conclusion Glyburide has replaced insulin as the more common pharmacotherapy for GDM over the last decade among those privately insured. Given its rapid uptake and the potential implications of suboptimal glucose control on maternal and neonatal health, robust evaluation of glyburide’s relative effectiveness is warranted to inform treatment decisions for women with gestational diabetes. PMID:24807336

  8. Postpartum Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Among Women with History of Gestational Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Chen, Jyu-Lin; Whittemore, Robin; Whitaker, Evans

    2016-01-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Several postpartum lifestyle intervention studies have been conducted for this high-risk group; however, the randomized clinical trials have not been evaluated systematically. Thus, the aim of this article is to evaluate the outcomes of clinical trials that focus on diabetes prevention among women with DGM. This systematic review utilized Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Chinese and US databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials of postpartum lifestyle interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with prior GDM were reviewed. Outcomes included in this review are type 2 diabetes incidences, insulin insistence, and weight-related measures. The effect size of these outcomes in each study was computed. Data on intervention components were extracted, including type (in-person vs. technology-based), content (diet or physical activity or both), form (individual session vs. group session), duration, intensity, evaluation time point, and program delivery. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. The mean annual type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) incidence of the intervention group was lower than that of the comparison group (6.0% vs. 9.3%), although there was no statistical difference between the two groups. About 50% of these studies and two-thirds of studies, respectively, reported a significant decrease in insulin resistance-related measures and weight-related measures in the intervention group compared with the comparison group. The median intervention duration and study length were 6 months. Postpartum lifestyle interventions can be effective in reducing T2DM development and insulin resistance, and decrease weight in women with GDM history, regardless of the intervention types (technology-based or in-person). Effective interventions typically include dietary changes while some physical

  9. Novel lean type 2 diabetic rat model using gestational low-protein programming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in lean individuals is not well studied and up to 26% of diabetes occurs in these individuals. Although the cause is not well understood, it has been primarily attributed to nutritional issues during early development. Our objective was to develop a lean T2D model using gestati...

  10. Effects of Low Glycemic Index Diets on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinhua; Heng, Weijun; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-05-01

    Studies of the effects of low glycemic index (LGI) diets on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reported conflicting findings.The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on maternal and neonatal outcomes in GDM patients.We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for studies of the effects of LGI diets in GDM patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of the LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on GDM outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- and fixed-effects models.Five RCTs involving 302 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No statistically significant differences in the risks of cesarean section delivery, large for gestational age, and small for gestational age were observed. The risk of macrosomia in the LGI groups was significantly lower (RR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.71; P = 0.008) than that in the control groups. Our subgroup analysis of the effects of DF showed that LGI diets with an increased level of DF, relative to the control diet, reduced the risk of macrosomia beyond that of the LGI diets alone (RR: 0.17 vs 0.47, respectively). The subgroup analysis also showed that LGI diets in which the level of DF was approximately equivalent to that in the control diets significantly reduced the risk of insulin usage (RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52-0.92; P = 0.01).The LGI diets reduced the risk of macrosomia in GDM patients, and LGI diets with added DF reduced the risk of macrosomia further. The LGI diets with levels of DF approximately equivalent to that in the control diets reduced the risk of insulin usage in GDM patients. PMID:27258511

  11. Effects of Low Glycemic Index Diets on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinhua; Heng, Weijun; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-05-01

    Studies of the effects of low glycemic index (LGI) diets on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reported conflicting findings.The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on maternal and neonatal outcomes in GDM patients.We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for studies of the effects of LGI diets in GDM patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of the LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on GDM outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- and fixed-effects models.Five RCTs involving 302 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No statistically significant differences in the risks of cesarean section delivery, large for gestational age, and small for gestational age were observed. The risk of macrosomia in the LGI groups was significantly lower (RR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.71; P = 0.008) than that in the control groups. Our subgroup analysis of the effects of DF showed that LGI diets with an increased level of DF, relative to the control diet, reduced the risk of macrosomia beyond that of the LGI diets alone (RR: 0.17 vs 0.47, respectively). The subgroup analysis also showed that LGI diets in which the level of DF was approximately equivalent to that in the control diets significantly reduced the risk of insulin usage (RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52-0.92; P = 0.01).The LGI diets reduced the risk of macrosomia in GDM patients, and LGI diets with added DF reduced the risk of macrosomia further. The LGI diets with levels of DF approximately equivalent to that in the control diets reduced the risk of insulin usage in GDM patients.

  12. Perspectives on prevention of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: a qualitative study of Hispanic, African-American and White women.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joyce W; Foster, Krys E; Pumarino, Javiera; Ackermann, Ronald T; Peaceman, Alan M; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2015-07-01

    Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) have a fivefold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Furthermore, Hispanic and African-American women are disproportionately affected by GDM, but their views on prevention of T2DM after gestational diabetes are largely unknown. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 women (8 Hispanic, 8 African-American, 7 non-Hispanic White) from two academic clinics in Chicago, IL. Interview questions elicited perspectives on prevention of T2DM; the interview protocol was developed based on the Health Belief Model. Two investigators applied template analysis to identify emergent themes. Women conceptualized risk for T2DM based on family history, health behaviors, and personal history of GDM. A subgroup of women expressed uncertainty about how GDM influences risk for T2DM. Women who described a strong link between GDM and T2DM often viewed the diagnosis as a cue to action for behavior change. T2DM was widely viewed as a severe condition, and desire to avoid T2DM was an important motivator for behavior change. Children represented both a key motivator and critical barrier to behavior change. Women viewed preventive care as important to alert them to potential health concerns. Identified themes were congruent across racial/ethnic groups. Diagnosis with GDM presents a potent opportunity for engaging women in behavior change. To fully harness the potential influence of this diagnosis, healthcare providers should more clearly link the diagnosis of GDM with risk for future T2DM, leverage women's focus on their children to motivate behavior change, and provide support with behavior change during healthcare visits in the postpartum period and beyond.

  13. Perspectives on prevention of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: a qualitative study of Hispanic, African-American and White women.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joyce W; Foster, Krys E; Pumarino, Javiera; Ackermann, Ronald T; Peaceman, Alan M; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2015-07-01

    Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) have a fivefold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Furthermore, Hispanic and African-American women are disproportionately affected by GDM, but their views on prevention of T2DM after gestational diabetes are largely unknown. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 women (8 Hispanic, 8 African-American, 7 non-Hispanic White) from two academic clinics in Chicago, IL. Interview questions elicited perspectives on prevention of T2DM; the interview protocol was developed based on the Health Belief Model. Two investigators applied template analysis to identify emergent themes. Women conceptualized risk for T2DM based on family history, health behaviors, and personal history of GDM. A subgroup of women expressed uncertainty about how GDM influences risk for T2DM. Women who described a strong link between GDM and T2DM often viewed the diagnosis as a cue to action for behavior change. T2DM was widely viewed as a severe condition, and desire to avoid T2DM was an important motivator for behavior change. Children represented both a key motivator and critical barrier to behavior change. Women viewed preventive care as important to alert them to potential health concerns. Identified themes were congruent across racial/ethnic groups. Diagnosis with GDM presents a potent opportunity for engaging women in behavior change. To fully harness the potential influence of this diagnosis, healthcare providers should more clearly link the diagnosis of GDM with risk for future T2DM, leverage women's focus on their children to motivate behavior change, and provide support with behavior change during healthcare visits in the postpartum period and beyond. PMID:25421329

  14. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: are they useful for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Celik, Ayhan; Ergun, Emrah; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate whether the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) could be utilized to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and methods NLR and PLR were assessed by retrospective analysis of 762 healthy and pregnant women with GDM. The patients were stratified into four groups, as follows: GDM (n=144), impaired glucose tolerance (n=76), only screen positive (n=238), and control (n=304). Results The leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the control group (P=0.001; P<0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to the NLR and PLR (P>0.05). Conclusion We do not recommend that blood NLR and PLR can be used to screen for GDM. However, increase in the leukocyte count is an important marker for GDM as it provides evidence of subclinical inflammation. PMID:27217758

  15. Weighing the evidence of low glycemic index dietary intervention for the management of gestational diabetes mellitus: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohd Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Firouzi, Somayyeh; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mustafa, Norlaila; Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2014-03-01

    This review aims to evaluate the effectiveness of low glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), specifically from the Asian perspective. A systematic review of the literature using multiple databases without time restriction was conducted. Three studies were retrieved based upon a priori inclusion criteria. While there was a trend towards improvement, no significant differences were observed in overall glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in GDM women. However, a tendency for lower birth weight and birth centile if the intervention began earlier was noted. Low GI diets were well accepted and had identical macro-micronutrient compositions as the control diets. However, due to genetic, environment and especially food pattern discrepancies between Western countries and Asians, these results may not be contributed to Asian context. Clearly, there are limited studies focusing on the effect of low GI dietary intervention in women with GDM, particularly in Asia. PMID:24517860

  16. Weighing the evidence of low glycemic index dietary intervention for the management of gestational diabetes mellitus: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohd Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Firouzi, Somayyeh; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mustafa, Norlaila; Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2014-03-01

    This review aims to evaluate the effectiveness of low glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), specifically from the Asian perspective. A systematic review of the literature using multiple databases without time restriction was conducted. Three studies were retrieved based upon a priori inclusion criteria. While there was a trend towards improvement, no significant differences were observed in overall glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in GDM women. However, a tendency for lower birth weight and birth centile if the intervention began earlier was noted. Low GI diets were well accepted and had identical macro-micronutrient compositions as the control diets. However, due to genetic, environment and especially food pattern discrepancies between Western countries and Asians, these results may not be contributed to Asian context. Clearly, there are limited studies focusing on the effect of low GI dietary intervention in women with GDM, particularly in Asia.

  17. Maternal obesity characterized by gestational diabetes increases the susceptibility of rat offspring to hepatic steatosis via a disrupted liver metabolome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Fonseca, Mario A; Campbell, Kristyn E; Moyce, Brittany L; Cole, Laura K; Hatch, Grant M; Doucette, Christine A; Klein, Julianne; Aliani, Michel; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-07-15

    Maternal obesity is associated with a high risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is a common complication of pregnancy. The influence of maternal obesity and GDM on the metabolic health of the offspring is poorly understood. We hypothesize that GDM associated with maternal obesity will cause obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in the offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat (45%) and sucrose (HFS) diet to cause maternal obesity and GDM. Lean control pregnant rats received low-fat (LF; 10%) diets. To investigate the interaction between the prenatal environment and postnatal diets, rat offspring were assigned to LF or HFS diets for 12 weeks, and insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis were evaluated. Pregnant GDM dams exhibited excessive gestational weight gain, hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia. Offspring of GDM dams gained more weight than the offspring of lean dams due to excess adiposity. The offspring of GDM dams also developed hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. The postnatal consumption of a LF diet did not protect offspring of GDM dams against these metabolic disorders. Analysis of the hepatic metabolome revealed increased diacylglycerol and reduced phosphatidylethanolamine in the offspring of GDM dams compared to offspring of lean dams. Consistent with altered lipid metabolism, the expression of CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase, and peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor-α mRNA was reduced in the livers of GDM offspring. GDM exposure programs gene expression and hepatic metabolite levels and drives the development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in young adult rat offspring.

  18. Plasma Levels of Alanine Aminotransferase in the First Trimester Identify High Risk Chinese Women for Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Junhong; Zhang, Cuiping; Wang, Peng; Li, Nan; Li, Weiqin; Liu, Huikun; Zhang, Shuang; Hu, Gang; Yu, Zhijie; Ma, Ronald CW; Chan, Juliana CN; Yang, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) predicts type 2 diabetes but it is uncertain whether it also predicts gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We recruited 17359 Chinese women with ALT measured in their first trimester. At 24–28 weeks of gestation, all women underwent a 50-gram 1-hour glucose challenge test (GCT) followed by a 75-gram 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test if GCT result was ≥7.8 mmol/L. Restricted cubic spline analysis was used to examine full-range risk associations of ALT levels with GDM. Relative excess risk due to interaction, attributable proportion due to interaction and synergy index were used to estimate additive interaction between high ALT and overweight/obesity for GDM. Finally, 1332 (7.7%) women had GDM. ALT levels were positively associated with GDM risk without a clear threshold. Using ALT levels <22 U/L as the referent, the middle ALT levels (≥22 to <40 U/L) [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals): 1.41(1.21–1.65)] and high ALT levels (≥40 U/L) [1.62 (1.31–2.00)] were associated with increased GDM risk. Maternal overweight/obesity greatly enhanced the OR of ALT ≥22 U/L from 1.44 (1.23–1.69) to 3.46 (2.79–4.29) with significant additive interactions. In conclusion, elevated ALT levels in the first trimester even within normal range predicted GDM risk, further enhanced by overweight/obesity. PMID:27264612

  19. [SLEEP DISTURBANCES AND GESTATIONAL DIABETES PREVALENCE ON LAST TRIMESTER OF PREGNANCY].

    PubMed

    Ruiz González, Isabel; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Molina, Carmen M; Torres Sanchez, Irene; Cabrera Martos, Irene; González-Jiménez, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Introducción: estudios recientes sugieren que las mujeres con diagnóstico de diabetes gestacional tienen más probabilidad de padecer trastornos del sueño en comparación con el resto de las mujeres embarazadas. Los objetivos de este estudio fueron analizar los factores de riesgo asociados a diabetes gestacional y verificar una asociación entre padecer o no diabetes gestacional y la calidad del sueño y/o somnolencia. Material y métodos: estudio observacional de casos y controles a partir de una muestra de 130 gestantes, 46 con diabetes gestacional y 84 controles. Se realizó una valoración antropométrica, evaluando peso, estatura, índice de masa corporal (IMC) y perímetro abdominal. Se realizó una valoración sociodemográfica, evaluando edad y situación familiar y laboral, así como un estudio ginecológico, evaluando número de partos simples y múltiples, número de abortos y patología ginecológica durante los últimos tres años. Para el diagnóstico de diabetes gestacional se realizó el test de O‘Sullivan. Se midió la calidad del sueño y la somnolencia diurna. Resultados: del total de gestantes estudiadas, 46 fueron diagnosticadas de diabetes gestacional. Existen diferencias significativas (p < 0,001) en las puntuaciones del IMC entre gestantes diabéticas y no diabéticas, siendo sus valores más elevados entre las diabéticas. Existe una asociación significativa (p = 0,002) entre la existencia de antecedentes familiares de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 y padecer o no diabetes gestacional. Las gestantes diabéticas presentan un significativo empeoramiento (p < 0,001) de la calidad del sueño. Respecto a la somnolencia diurna, las gestantes diabéticas poseen una somnolencia diurna superior a la media poblacional. Conclusiones: en la población estudiada, puntuaciones elevadas en el IMC, así como antecedentes familiares de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 parecen ser factores asociados al riesgo de padecer diabetes gestacional. Las embarazadas con

  20. Innovation Practice Using Pervasive Mobile Technology Solutions to Improve Population Health Management: A Pilot Study of Gestational Diabetes Patient Care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Gururajan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare service delivery is moving forward from individual care to population health management, because of the fast growth of health records. However, to improve population health performance, it is necessary to leverage relevant data and information using new technology solutions, such as pervasive diabetes mobile technology solution of Inet International Inc., which offers the potential to facilitate patient empowerment with gestational diabetic care. Hence, this article examines the pilot study outcomes of a small clinical trial focusing on pregnant patients affected by gestational diabetes mellitus, in an Australian not for profit healthcare context. The aims include establishing proof of concept and also assessing the usability, acceptability, and functionality of this mobile solution and thereby generate hypotheses to be tested in a large-scale confirmatory clinical trial.

  1. Combined team management of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ng, C S; Lim, L S; Chng, K P; Lim, P; Cheah, J S; Yeo, P P; Gwee, H M; Tan, K L; Joseph, R; Yong, Y M

    1985-04-01

    225 women with diabetes in pregnancy were managed by a team of obstetricians, physicians (endocrinologists) and paediatricians from the National University of Singapore. A protocol of management was formulated and followed. The incidence of 1.1% or 1 in 90 pregnancies was found, with significantly higher incidence in Indians and lower in Malays. There were 37 established diabetics and 188 diagnosed during pregnancy. Of these (188), 74 were gestational diabetics. All the women were treated with Insulin and Diet or Diet alone. 177 (79%) were treated with Insulin and Diet. Blood sugar profiles were done for monitoring diabetic control. 72.8% of the women were between para 0 and 1 and 85.2% between the ages of 20 and 34. 72.5% of the women delivered at 38 weeks gestation or later. 48.9% went into spontaneous labour, 32.4% were induced and 18.7% had elective caesarean section. 62.2% of the women had labour of less than 12 hours. The overall caesarean section rate was 41.7%. There were 3 stillbirths and 2 neonatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate was 2.2%. Thirteen babies had congenital malformations (5.8%). 77.8% of the babies had Apgar score of 7 or more at 5 minutes after delivery. 79.1% of the babies weighed between 2.5 kgm and 3.9 kgm. Pre-eclamptic toxaemia was the commonest complication in pregnancy followed by Urinary Tract Infection and Polyhydramnios. Postpartum complications in the mother were confined to 14 women (6.2%), and wound infection or breakdown was the commonest cause.

  2. Maternal gestational diabetes is associated with genome-wide DNA methylation variation in placenta and cord blood of exposed offspring.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Rob; Smart, Melissa; Hillman, Sara; Foo, Lin; Sinha, Ajay; Williams, David; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure of a developing foetus to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to programme future risk of diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic variation in foetal tissue may have a mechanistic role in metabolic disease programming through interaction of the pregnancy environment with gene function. We aimed to identify genome-wide DNA methylation variation in cord blood and placenta from offspring born to mothers with and without GDM. Pregnant women of South Asian origin were studied and foetal tissues sampled at term delivery. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to assay genome-wide DNA methylation in placenta and cord blood from 27 GDM exposed and 21 unexposed offspring. We identified 1485 cord blood and 1708 placenta methylation variable positions (MVPs) achieving genome-wide significance (adjusted P-value <0.05) with methylation differences of >5%. MVPs were disproportionately located within first exons. A bioinformatic co-methylation algorithm was used to detect consistent directionality of methylation in 1000 bp window around each MVP was observed at 74% of placenta and 59% of cord blood MVPs. KEGG pathway analysis showed enrichment of pathways involved in endocytosis, MAPK signalling and extracellular triggers to intracellular metabolic processes. Replication studies should integrate genomics and transcriptomics with longitudinal sampling to elucidate stability, determine causality for translation into biomarker and prevention studies. PMID:25634562

  3. The relationships between HLA class II alleles and antigens with gestational diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong-cong; Jin, Yi-mei; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chun-xia; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. It is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications. Susceptibility to GDM is partly determined by genetics and linked with type 1 diabetes-associated high risk HLA class II genes. However, the evidence for this relationship is still highly controversial. In this study, we assessed the relationship between HLA class II variants and GDM. We performed meta-analysis on all of literatures available in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of each variant were estimated. All statistical analyses were conducted using the Comprehensive Meta Analysis 2.2.064 software. At the allelic analysis, DQB1*02, DQB1*0203, DQB1*0402, DQB1*0602, DRB1*03, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*1302 reached a nominal level of significance, and only DQB1*02, DQB1*0602 and DRB1*1302 were statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. At the serological analysis, none of DQ2, DQ6, DR13 and DR17 was statistically significant following Bonferroni correction although they reached a nominal level of significance. In sum, our meta-analysis demonstrated that there were the associations between HLA class II variants and GDM but more studies are required to elucidate how these variants contribute to GDM susceptibility. PMID:27721507

  4. Naringenin enhances the efficacy of human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in treating gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bao-Heng; Yang, Feng-Zhen; Wu, Xiao-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a disease commonly occurs during mid to late pregnancy with pathologies such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and mal-development of fetus. We have previously demonstrated that pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) effectively alleviated diabetic symptoms in a mouse model of GDM, although the clinical efficacy was limited due to oxidative stress. In this study, using the anti-oxidant agent naringenin, we aimed to further enhance the efficacy of hESC-derived PE transplant. Insulin-secreting PE was differentiated from hESCs, which were then transplanted into GDM mice. Naringenin was administered to mice receiving the PE transplant, with sham operated mice serving as negative control, to assess its effect on alleviation of GDM symptoms. We found that naringenin supplement further improved insulin response, glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the PE-transplanted female mice. Our new findings further potentiates the feasibility of using differentiated hESCs to treat GDM, in which anti-oxidative agent such as naringenin could greatly enhance the clinical efficacy of stem cell based therapies. PMID:27156928

  5. Rationale, design, and methodology for the optimizing outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and their infants study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To date, there have been few interdisciplinary interventions that target predominantly ethnic minority low-income women diagnosed with GDM. This paper describes the rationale, design and methodology of a 2-year, randomized, controlled study being conducted in North Carolina. Methods/Design Using a two-group, repeated measures, experimental design, we will test a 14- week intensive intervention on the benefits of breastfeeding, understanding gestational diabetes and risk of progression to prediabetes and T2DM, nutrition and exercise education, coping skills training, physical activity (Phase I), educational and motivational text messaging and 3 months of continued monthly contact (Phase II). A total of 100 African American, non-Hispanic white, and bilingual Hispanic women between 22–36 weeks of pregnancy who are diagnosed with GDM and their infants will be randomized to either the experimental group or the wait-listed control group. The first aim of the study is to determine the feasibility of the intervention. The second aim of study is to test the effects of the intervention on maternal outcomes from baseline (22–36 weeks pregnant) to 10 months postpartum. Primary maternal outcomes will include fasting blood glucose and weight (BMI) from baseline to 10 months postpartum. Secondary maternal outcomes will include clinical, adiposity, health behaviors and self-efficacy outcomes from baseline to 10 months postpartum. The third aim of the study is to quantify the effects of the intervention on infant feeding and growth. Infant outcomes will include weight status and breastfeeding from birth through 10 months of age. Data analysis will include general linear mixed-effects models. Safety endpoints include adverse event reporting. Discussion Findings from this trial may lead to an effective

  6. Plasma Levels of the Interleukin-1-Receptor Antagonist Are Lower in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Are Particularly Associated with Postpartum Development of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Katra, Pernilla; Dereke, Jonatan; Nilsson, Charlotta

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia. Women who develops hyperglycemia for the first time during pregnancy receive the diagnosis gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Presently, there is no consensus about the diagnostic criteria for GDM. A majority of these women subsequently develop postpartum overt diabetes making it important to identify these patients as early as possible. In this study we investigated if plasma levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1 signaling, can be used as a complementary biomarker for diagnosing GDM and predicting postpartum development of overt diabetes mellitus. Patients participating in this study (n = 227) were diagnosed with their first GDM 2004–2013 at Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Healthy pregnant volunteers (n = 156) were recruited from women’s welfare centers in the same region 2014–2015. Levels of IL-1Ra and C-peptide were analyzed in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-plasma or serum using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GDM patients had significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra than the control group (p = 0.012). In addition, GDM patients that had developed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus postpartum had significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra, and significantly higher levels of C-peptide than GDM patients that had not developed diabetes mellitus postpartum (p = 0.023) and (p = 0.0011) respectively. An inverse correlation was found between IL-1Ra and serum C-peptide levels in the control group (rs = -0.31 p = 0.0001). Our results show that IL-1Ra might be included in a future panel of biomarkers, both for diagnosing GDM to complement blood glucose, and also identifying GDM patients that are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus postpartum. However, the ROC curve analysis provided a sensitivity of 52.2% and specificity of 67.1%, which nonetheless may not be sufficient enough to

  7. Plasma Levels of the Interleukin-1-Receptor Antagonist Are Lower in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Are Particularly Associated with Postpartum Development of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Katra, Pernilla; Dereke, Jonatan; Nilsson, Charlotta; Hillman, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia. Women who develops hyperglycemia for the first time during pregnancy receive the diagnosis gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Presently, there is no consensus about the diagnostic criteria for GDM. A majority of these women subsequently develop postpartum overt diabetes making it important to identify these patients as early as possible. In this study we investigated if plasma levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1 signaling, can be used as a complementary biomarker for diagnosing GDM and predicting postpartum development of overt diabetes mellitus. Patients participating in this study (n = 227) were diagnosed with their first GDM 2004-2013 at Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Healthy pregnant volunteers (n = 156) were recruited from women's welfare centers in the same region 2014-2015. Levels of IL-1Ra and C-peptide were analyzed in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-plasma or serum using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GDM patients had significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra than the control group (p = 0.012). In addition, GDM patients that had developed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus postpartum had significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra, and significantly higher levels of C-peptide than GDM patients that had not developed diabetes mellitus postpartum (p = 0.023) and (p = 0.0011) respectively. An inverse correlation was found between IL-1Ra and serum C-peptide levels in the control group (rs = -0.31 p = 0.0001). Our results show that IL-1Ra might be included in a future panel of biomarkers, both for diagnosing GDM to complement blood glucose, and also identifying GDM patients that are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus postpartum. However, the ROC curve analysis provided a sensitivity of 52.2% and specificity of 67.1%, which nonetheless may not be sufficient enough to use IL

  8. [Effect of gestational diabetes on adiposity indicators during the first 18 years of life; systematic review].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Cruz, Arturo; Ortega Cisneros, Armando; Bacardí Gascón, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    Introducción: La diabetes gestacional ha sido asociada con la obesidad en períodos posteriores de la vida. Sin embargo, los resultados no han sido consistentes y algunos estudios contenían debilidades metodológicas. Objetivo: Analizar los resultados de estudios prospectivos y retrospectivos de cohorte que evalúen el efecto de la diabetes gestacional sobre indicadores de adiposidad en los hijos hasta los 18 años de edad. Metodología: Se realizó una búsqueda de estudios prospectivos o retrospectivos de cohorte registrados en la base de datos de Medline/Pubmed, de enero de 2011 a septiembre de 2013, que valoraran el efecto de la Diabetes Gestacional sobre los indicadores de adiposidad al nacimiento o después del nacimiento. Resultados: Once estudios cumplían con los criterios de inclusión. En total se estudiaron a 472.959 pares de madre e hijo. La edad del niño en el momento de la evaluación fue a partir del nacimiento hasta los 18 años. En nueve de once artículos se observó una asociación entre la diabetes gestacional e indicadores de obesidad. En siete de trabajos se realizaron ajustes para más de dos variables de confusión (IMC pre gestacional, edad de la madre), y en cinco de ellos se observó una asociación entre la diabetes gestacional con adiposidad. Conclusión: Los resultados de la revisión indican que la evidencia que demuestra que la diabetes gestacional aumenta el peso de los productos en períodos posteriores de la vida, es moderada.

  9. Development of a model to assess the cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes mellitus screening and lifestyle change for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Nicolai; Marseille, Elliot; Kahn, James G

    2011-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasingly recognized as an opportunity for early prevention of diabetes and other diseases over the lifespan, and may be responsible for up to 30% of cases of type 2 diabetes. A newly developed mathematical model (the GDModel) provides provisional estimates of the cost and health impact of various GDM screening and management choices, and calculates averted disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). The model was piloted in 5 different healthcare facilities in India and Israel. Universal screening of pregnant women followed by postpartum lifestyle management yielded net savings of US$78 per woman with GDM in India and US$1945 per woman in Israel. The estimated DALYs averted were 2.33 in India and 3.10 in Israel. With lower GDM prevalence, intervention efficacy, and type 2 diabetes incidence, the intervention had a net cost in India, with a cost per DALY averted of US$11.32. This was far below the WHO definition of "very cost-effective," set at annual GDP per capita. The intervention in Israel remained cost-saving. GDM screening and postpartum lifestyle management are either cost-saving or have a net cost but an attractive cost-effectiveness ratio. Some input values are currently being refined. Nevertheless, the current findings of cost-savings or favorable cost-effectiveness are robust to a wide range of plausible input values, including highly unfavorable values. The GDModel will be further developed into a user-friendly tool that can guide policy-makers on decisions regarding GDM screening strategies and guidelines.

  10. Increased expression of immune-related genes in leukocytes of patients with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Marzena; Zieleniak, Andrzej; Zurawska-Klis, Monika; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2016-03-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the immune system is linked to metabolism in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but factors participating in these processes still are awaiting identification. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, encoded by the NOS2 gene, and surfactant protein D, encoded by the SFTPD gene, have been implicated in diabetes. We investigated NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in leukocytes obtained from 125 pregnant women with (n = 87) or without (control group; n = 38) GDM, and, in turn, correlated their expression with clinical parameters of subjects. Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of pregnant women and NOS2 and SFTPD expression in these cells was determined by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Univariate correlation analyses were performed to assess an association between leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD expression and clinical characteristics of patients. qRT-PCR experiments disclosed significantly increased leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in hyperglycemic GDM patients (P < 0.05). In the entire study group, there were significant positive associations of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNAs with C-reactive protein. Additionally, transcript level of SFTPD also correlated positively with fasting glycemia and insulin resistance. This study demonstrates that an impaired glucose metabolism in GDM may be predominant predictor of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD overexpression in diabetic patients. Furthermore, alterations in the expression of these genes are associated with glucose metabolism dysfunction and/or inflammation during pregnancy. In addition, these findings support the utilization of leukocytes as good experimental model to study a relationship between immune-related genes and metabolic changes in women with GDM, as well as to assess the potential mechanisms underlying these alterations.

  11. Serum lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein changes in gestational diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional and prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Koukkou, E; Watts, G F; Lowy, C

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To compare serum lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations during and six to 12 months after pregnancy in control and diabetic women. METHODS: The serum lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations were measured in 20 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 22 women with normal glucose tolerance (controls) during the third trimester of pregnancy and six to 12 months after delivery. RESULTS: During pregnancy the women with GDM had higher serum triglyceride (mean (95% confidence interval (CI)), 2.91 (2.22-3.51) v 2.1 (1.75-2.52)) but lower low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations compared with controls (mean (SD), 3.08 (1.2) v 4.01 (1.1). Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein concentrations were not significantly different between the two groups. After pregnancy, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein A1 and B decreased in a parallel manner, resulting in lower concentrations, comparable between the two groups. LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased after pregnancy in the controls (mean (SD), 4.01 (1.1) v 2.69 (0.6)) but not in those with GDM (3.08 (1.2) v 2.72 (0.7)). The change in lipid concentrations was not related to change in weight. CONCLUSION: Development of diabetes during pregnancy induces a state of dyslipidaemia characterised by elevated triglyceride concentrations, as seen in other insulin resistance states. However, GDM seems to blunt the increase in LDL cholesterol during pregnancy and this requires further investigation. Whether the changes in lipoprotein metabolism in GDM are significant for the health status of the mother and the foetus requires further study. PMID:8881912

  12. Increased expression of immune-related genes in leukocytes of patients with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)

    PubMed Central

    Zieleniak, Andrzej; Zurawska-Klis, Monika; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the immune system is linked to metabolism in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but factors participating in these processes still are awaiting identification. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, encoded by the NOS2 gene, and surfactant protein D, encoded by the SFTPD gene, have been implicated in diabetes. We investigated NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in leukocytes obtained from 125 pregnant women with (n = 87) or without (control group; n = 38) GDM, and, in turn, correlated their expression with clinical parameters of subjects. Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of pregnant women and NOS2 and SFTPD expression in these cells was determined by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Univariate correlation analyses were performed to assess an association between leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD expression and clinical characteristics of patients. qRT-PCR experiments disclosed significantly increased leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in hyperglycemic GDM patients (P < 0.05). In the entire study group, there were significant positive associations of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNAs with C-reactive protein. Additionally, transcript level of SFTPD also correlated positively with fasting glycemia and insulin resistance. This study demonstrates that an impaired glucose metabolism in GDM may be predominant predictor of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD overexpression in diabetic patients. Furthermore, alterations in the expression of these genes are associated with glucose metabolism dysfunction and/or inflammation during pregnancy. In addition, these findings support the utilization of leukocytes as good experimental model to study a relationship between immune-related genes and metabolic changes in women with GDM, as well as to assess the potential mechanisms underlying these alterations. PMID:26568332

  13. Polymorphisms in TCF7L2 gene are associated with gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dan; Fei, Yang; Ling, Qi; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Zhe; Shu, Jing; Li, Chengjiang; Dong, Fengqin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible association between diabetes susceptibility gene transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a Chinese Han population. A total of 556 GDM patients and 500 Non-GDM were included. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated. Fifteen tag SNPs were selected from HapMap CHB database with a minor allele frequency of >0.2 and r2 of >0.8. Three additional SNPs were also chosen because these SNPs are associated with type 2 diabetes in East Asians. TCF7L2 rs290487, rs6585194, and rs7094463 polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with GDM. In multivariate analysis, rs290487 genetic variation (OR = 2.686 per each C allele, P = 0.002), pre-BMI > 24 kg/m2 (OR = 1.592, P = 0.018), age > 25 years (OR = 1.780, P = 0.012) and LDL-C > 3.6 mmol/L (OR = 2.034, P = 0.009) were identified as independent risk factors of GDM, rs7094463 genetic variation (OR = 0.429 per each G allele, P = 0.005) was identified as independent protect factor of GDM. This finding suggests that TCF7L2 rs290487, and rs7094463 were a potential clinical value for the prediction of GDM. PMID:27465520

  14. Risk assessment does not explain high prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in a large group of Sardinian women

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Cinzia; Berria, Rachele; Minerba, Luigi; Sulis, Simonetta; Murenu, Michela; Portoghese, Elaine; Garau, Nicoletta; Zedda, Pierina; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2008-01-01

    Background A very high prevalence (22.3%) of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was recently reported following our study on a large group of Sardinian women. In order to explain such a high prevalence we sought to characterise our obstetric population through the analysis of risk factors and their association with the development of GDM. Methods The prevalence of risk factors and their association with the development of GDM were evaluated in 1103 pregnancies (247 GDM and 856 control women). The association of risk factors with GDM was calculated according to logistic regression. Sensitivity and specificity of risk assessment strategy were also calculated. Results None of the risk factors evaluated showed an elevated frequency in our population. The high risk patients were 231 (20.9%). Factors with a stronger association with GDM development were obesity (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.08–6.8), prior GDM (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.69–5.69), and family history of Type 2 diabetes (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.81–3.86). Only patients over 35 years of age were more represented in the GDM group (38.2% vs 22.6% in the non-GDM cases, P < 0.001). Type 2 diabetes in second-degree relatives was equally represented in GDM and non-GDM subjects, while prior poor obstetrical outcomes mostly characterized non-GDM women (17.5% vs 10.6%, P < 0.001). The "average risk" assessment better characterized non-GDM patients (76.8% vs 57.8%, P < 0.001). The logistic regression analysis confirmed that Type 2 diabetes in second-degree relatives, prior poor obstetrical outcomes and the "average risk" definition did not predict the development of GDM. Conclusion Such a high prevalence of GDM in our population does not seem to be related to the abnormal presence of some known risk factors, and appears in contrast with the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in Sardinia. Further studies are needed to explain the cause such a high prevalence of GDM in Sardinia. The "average risk" definition is not adequate to predict GDM in our

  15. Gestational diabetes insipidus, HELLP syndrome and eclampsia in a twin pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woelk, J L; Dombroski, R A; Brezina, P R

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of eclampsia in a twin pregnancy complicated by HELLP syndrome and diabetes insipidus. This confluence of disease processes suggests that a modification of common magnesium sulfate treatment protocols may be appropriate in a certain subset of patients.

  16. Did You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... play time in front of the computer, tablets, smartphones, and TV to 2 hours per day. Contact your local parks department or local health department to learn where you can find safe places to be active and get healthy foods. National Diabetes Education Program 1-800-860-8747, TTY: 1-866- ...

  17. Maternal Obesity, Overweight and Gestational Diabetes Affect the Offspring Neurodevelopment at 6 and 18 Months of Age – A Follow Up from the PREOBE Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Espinola, Francisco J.; Berglund, Staffan K; García-Valdés, Luz Mª; Segura, Mª Teresa; Jerez, Antonio; Campos, Daniel; Moreno-Torres, Rosario; Rueda, Ricardo; Catena, Andrés; Pérez-García, Miguel; Campoy, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain development in fetal life and early infancy is critical to determine lifelong performance in various neuropsychological domains. Metabolic pathologies such as overweight, obesity, and gestational diabetes in pregnant women are prevalent and increasing risk factors that may adversely affect long-term brain development in their offspring. Objective The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of maternal metabolic pathologies on the neurodevelopment of the offspring at 6 and 18 months of life. Design This was a prospective case-control study of 331 mother- and child pairs from Granada, Spain. The mothers were included during pregnancy into four groups according to their pre-gestational body mass index and their gestational diabetes status; overweight (n:56), obese (n:64), gestational diabetic (n:79), and healthy normal weight controls (n:132). At 6 months and 18 months we assessed the children with the Bayley III scales of neurodevelopment. Results At 6 months (n=215), we found significant group differences in cognition composite language, and expressive language. Post hoc test revealed unexpectedly higher scores in the obese group compared to the normal weight group and a similar trend in overweight and diabetic group. The effects on language remained significant after adjusting for confounders with an adjusted odds ratio for a value above median in composite language score of 3.3 (95% CI: 1.1, 10.0; p=0.035) for children of obese mothers. At 18 month (n=197), the offspring born to obese mothers had lost five points in language composite scores and the previous differences in language and cognition was replaced by a suggestive trend of lower gross motor scores in the overweight, obese, and diabetic groups. Conclusions Infants of obese mothers had a temporary accelerated development of cognition and language, followed by a rapid deceleration until 18 months of age, particularly of language scores. This novel observation prompts

  18. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  19. Is a low level of free thyroxine in the maternal circulation associated with altered endothelial function in gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Veas, Carlos; Leiva, Andrea; Escudero, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3), in the human fetus starts from 17 to 19th weeks of gestation. Despite the majority of normal pregnant women reaching adequate levels of circulating thyroid hormones, in some cases, women with normal pregnancies have low level of free T4 during first trimester of pregnancy, suggesting that T4 action may be compromised in those women and their fetuses. In addition, pathological low levels of thyroid hormones are detected in isolated maternal hypothyroxemia (IMH) and clinical hypothyroidism. Nevertheless, human placenta regulates T3/T4 concentration in the fetal circulation by modulating the expression and activity of both thyroid hormone transporters (THT) and deiodinases. Then, placenta can control the availability of T3/T4 in the feto-placental circulation, and therefore may generate an adaptive response in cases where the mother courses with low levels of T4. In addition, T3/T4 might control vascular response in the placenta, in particularly endothelial cells may induce the synthesis and release of vasodilators such as nitric oxide (NO) or vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1 mediated by these hormones. On the other hand, low levels of T4 have been associated with increase in gestational diabetes (GD) markers. Since GD is associated with impaired placental vascular function characterized by increased NO synthesis in placental arteries and veins, as well as elevated placental angiogenesis, it is unknown whether reduced T4 level at the maternal circulation could result in an altered placental endothelial function during GD. In this review, we analyze available information regarding thyroid hormones and endothelial dysfunction in GD; and propose that low maternal levels of T4 observed in GD may be compensated by increased placental availability of T3/T4 via elevation in the activity of THT and/or reduction in deiodinases in the feto-placental circulation.

  20. Is Uric Acid a Missing Link between Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes at a Later Time of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Fronczyk, Aneta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Majkowska, Lilianna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A high level of uric acid (UA) is a strong, independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between UA levels and the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) remains unclear. The aim of study was to evaluate the UA levels in pGDM women in relation to their current nutritional status and carbohydrate metabolism. Material and Methods 199 women with pGDM diagnoses based on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) 5–12 years previously and a control group of 50 women without pGDM. The assessment included anthropometric parameters, body composition (Tanita SC-330S), current OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-%B), HbA1c, lipids, and uric acid. Results No differences between groups were found in terms of age, time from the index pregnancy, anthropometric parameters, lipids or creatinine levels. The incidences of overweight and obesity were similar. Carbohydrate abnormalities were more frequent in the pGDM group than the control group (43.2% vs 12.0% p<0.001). The women with pGDM had significantly higher fasting glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin levels in the OGTTs, but similar HOMA-IR values. Their UA levels were significantly higher (258±58 vs 230±50 μmol/L, p<0.005) and correlated with BMI and the severity of carbohydrate disorders. The normal weight and normoglycemic pGDM women also demonstrated higher UA levels than a similar control subgroup (232±48 vs 208±48 μmol/L, p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations of UA level with BMI (β = 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.51, p<0.0001), creatinine level (β = 0.23, 95% CI 0.11–0.35, p<0.0005), triglycerides (β = 0.20, 95% CI 0.07–0.33, p<0.005) and family history of diabetes (β = 0.13, 95% CI 0.01–0.25, p<0.05). In logistic regression analysis, the association between higher UA level (defined as value ≥297 μmol/L) and presence of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder (IFG, IGT or

  1. Impact of ethnicity on gestational diabetes identified with the WHO and the modified International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Anne K; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Sletner, Line; Vange, Siri; Torper, Johan L; Nakstad, Britt; Voldner, Nanna; Rognerud-Jensen, Odd H; Berntsen, Sveinung; Mosdøl, Annhild; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Vårdal, Mari H; Holme, Ingar; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Birkeland, Kåre I

    2012-01-01

    Objective The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recently proposed new criteria for diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We compared prevalence rates, risk factors, and the effect of ethnicity using the World Health Organization (WHO) and modified IADPSG criteria. Methods This was a population-based cohort study of 823 (74% of eligible) healthy pregnant women, of whom 59% were from ethnic minorities. Universal screening was performed at 28±2 weeks of gestation with the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Venous plasma glucose (PG) was measured on site. GDM was diagnosed as per the definition of WHO criteria as fasting PG (FPG) ≥7.0 or 2-h PG ≥7.8 mmol/l; and as per the modified IADPSG criteria as FPG ≥5.1 or 2-h PG ≥8.5 mmol/l. Results OGTT was performed in 759 women. Crude GDM prevalence was 13.0% with WHO (Western Europeans 11%, ethnic minorities 15%, P=0.14) and 31.5% with modified IADPSG criteria (Western Europeans 24%, ethnic minorities 37%, P< 0.001). Using the WHO criteria, ethnic minority origin was an independent predictor (South Asians, odds ratio (OR) 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26–3.97); Middle Easterners, OR 2.13 (1.12–4.08)) after adjustments for age, parity, and prepregnant body mass index (BMI). This increased OR was unapparent after further adjustments for body height (proxy for early life socioeconomic status), education and family history of diabetes. Using the modified IADPSG criteria, prepregnant BMI (1.09 (1.05–1.13)) and ethnic minority origin (South Asians, 2.54 (1.56–4.13)) were independent predictors, while education, body height and family history had little impact. Conclusion GDM prevalence was overall 2.4-times higher with the modified IADPSG criteria compared with the WHO criteria. The new criteria identified many subjects with a relatively mild increase in FPG, strongly associated with South Asian origin and prepregnant overweight. PMID:22108914

  2. [Early diagnostic accuracy of the O'Sullivan test in gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Carrera, Sonia Irma; Márquez-Celedonio, Félix Guillermo; Lagunes-Mijangos, Adrián; González-Arriola, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: estimar la sensibilidad y la especificidad diagnóstica de la prueba de O'Sullivan para diabetes gestacional en el embarazo temprano. Metodología: se realizó estudio piloto que incluyó 50 mujeres con embarazo de bajo riesgo, sin alteración de glucosa. Se realizó la prueba de O'Sullivan para identificación de diabetes gestacional entre las semanas 14 y 23, y entre las semanas 24 y 28 para comparar resultados. Se administraron 50 g de glucosa, se cuantificó la glucemia a los 60 minutos y se consideró positiva si los valores eran = 140 mg/dL. Se calcularon sensibilidad, especificidad y valores predictivos. Resultados: la prueba de O'Sullivan entre las semanas 14 y 23 resultó positiva en tres de las gestantes (6 %), y la realizada entre las semanas 24 y 28 fue positiva en cuatro (8 %). No hubo diferencia estadística de la prueba entre ambas mediciones (p > 0.05). La sensibilidad fue de 75 % (IC 95 % de 30.1 % a 95.4 %), la especificidad de 100.0% (IC 95 % de 92.3 % a 100.0 %). Conclusiones: la prueba de O'Sullivan realizada entre las semanas 14 y 23 de gestación mostró buena sensibilidad y especificidad para identificar diabetes gestacional temprana.

  3. Association between Maternal Serum Concentrations of Angiopoietin-like Protein 2 in Early Pregnancy and Subsequent Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Lu, Shan; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background: A recent study reported a positive association between elevated serum levels of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) and the development of type 2 diabetes in a general population. However, the relationship of serum ANGPTL2 levels with the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has not been reported to date. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of maternal serum ANGPTL2 concentrations in the first trimester of pregnancy and to determine whether ANGPTL2 is a biomarker for subsequent GDM development. Methods: We conducted a prospective, nested case-control study in a pregnancy cohort. First-trimester ANGPTL2 levels were measured using a high-resolution assay in 89 women who subsequently developed GDM and in a random sample of 177 women who remained euglycemic throughout the pregnancy. Median ANGPTL2 levels were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression was used to compute unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for developing GDM among ANGPTL2 quartiles. Results: The serum levels of ANGPTL2 was higher in women with GDM than that in women without GDM (3.06 [2.59, 3.65] ng/ml vs. 2.46 [2.05, 2.96] ng/ml, P = 0.003). Fasting blood glucose was higher in women with GDM than that in women without GDM (5.0 ± 0.9 mmol/L vs. 4.4 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P < 0.001). Glucose challenge test showed that the blood glucose was higher in women with GDM than that in women without GDM (9.1 ± 3.5 mmol/L vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 mmol/L, P < 0.001). A multivariate model adjusted for baseline characteristics, medical complications, and gestational characteristics revealed that the risk of developing GDM among women in Q4 compared with Q1 was 2.90-fold more likely to develop GDM later in pregnancy. Conclusions: At 11–13 weeks in pregnancies that develop GDM, the serum concentration of ANGPTL2 is increased, and it can be combined with maternal factors to provide effective early screening for GDM. PMID:27647189

  4. Changes in Ca2+ Signaling and Nitric Oxide Output by Human Umbilical Vein Endothelium in Diabetic and Gestational Diabetic Pregnancies1

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Heather A.; Yi, Fu-Xian; Boeldt, Derek S.; Krupp, Jennifer; Grummer, Mary A.; Shah, Dinesh M.; Bird, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes (DM) complicates 3%–10% of pregnancies, resulting in significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. DM pregnancies are also associated with vascular dysfunction, including blunted nitric oxide (NO) output, but it remains unclear why. Herein we examine changes in endothelial NO production and its relationship to Ca2+ signaling in endothelial cells of intact umbilical veins from control versus gestational diabetic (GDM) or preexisting diabetic subjects. We have previously reported that endothelial cells of intact vessels show sustained Ca2+ bursting in response to ATP, and these bursts drive prolonged NO production. Herein we show that in both GDM and DM pregnancies, the incidence of Ca2+ bursts remains similar, but there is a reduction in overall sustained phase Ca2+ mobilization and a reduction in NO output. Further studies show damage has occurred at the level of NOS3 protein itself. Since exposure to DM serum is known to impair normal human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) function, we further studied the ability of HUVEC to signal through Ca2+ after they were isolated from DM and GDM subjects and maintained in culture for several days. These HUVEC showed differences in the rate of Ca2+ bursting, with DM > GDM = control HUVEC. Both GDM- and DM-derived HUVEC showed smaller Ca2+ bursts that were less capable of NOS3 activation compared to control HUVEC. We conclude that HUVEC from DM and GDM subjects are reprogrammed such that the Ca2+ bursting peak shape and duration are permanently impaired. This may explain why ROS therapy alone is not effective in DM and GDM subjects. PMID:26203178

  5. Prevalence of pre-eclampsia, pregnancy hypertension and gestational diabetes in population-based data: impact of different ascertainment methods on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Sheng; Roberts, Christine L; Simpson, Judy M; Ford, Jane B

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated strategies for ascertaining pre-eclampsia, pregnancy hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus from birth records and/or hospital discharge data. The results showed that ascertaining these conditions from a data set that linked birth records to the corresponding maternal hospital record for birth was sufficient for health outcomes research. Antenatal hospital records provided few extra cases and may be necessary only for the ascertainment when a very accurate estimate of the prevalence is required.

  6. Moderate Hypoxia Exhibits Increased Endothelial Progenitor Vessel-forming Ability However Gestational Diabetes Caused to Impede Compensatory Defense Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dincer, U. Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Endothelium represents a defense barrier and responds and integrates neuro humoral stimulus which describes as a compensatory mechanism. Endothelium formed with endothelial cells (ECs) and their progenitors. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent minor subpopulation of mononuclear cells in the blood. During acute hypoxia, larger amount of EPCs mobilize into the peripheral blood and they directly contribute revascularization process. One of the subtypes of EPC is termed endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) which they possess de novo vessel-forming ability. The present study aims to investigate the role of hypoxia in EPCs functional and vessel-forming ability. Furthermore, it was investigated whether fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment influence EPCs adaptation ability. Human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) derived ECFCs were selected in all experimental procedures obtained from normal and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) subjects via in vitro cell culture methods. Early passage (<5) HUCB ECFCs obtain from GDM (n; 5) and control (n; 5) subjects were cultured with plates pre-coated with collagen in vitro 72 h hypoxic as well as normoxic condition. Endothelial, angiogenic and hypoxia associated gene specific primers designed to perform Real-time PCR. Senescenes assay conducted onto HUCB ECFCs to investigate their functional clonogenic ability. To quantify their vessel forming ability matrigel assay was applied. These data demonstrates that moderate hypoxia results increased vessel-forming ability and VEGFA expression in HUCB ECFCs obtained from control subjects. However, GDM caused to impede compensatory defense reaction against hypoxia which observed in control subjects. Thus, it illuminates beneficial information related future therapeutic modalities. PMID:27426097

  7. Gestational Diabetes Is Characterized by Reduced Mitochondrial Protein Expression and Altered Calcium Signaling Proteins in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Kristen E.; Hwang, Hyonson; Janssen, Rachel C.; DeVente, James M.; Barbour, Linda A.; Hernandez, Teri L.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Lappas, Martha; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2014-01-01

    The rising prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects up to 18% of pregnant women with immediate and long-term metabolic consequences for both mother and infant. Abnormal glucose uptake and lipid oxidation are hallmark features of GDM prompting us to use an exploratory proteomics approach to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying differences in skeletal muscle metabolism between obese pregnant women with GDM (OGDM) and obese pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (ONGT). Functional validation was performed in a second cohort of obese OGDM and ONGT pregnant women. Quantitative proteomic analysis in rectus abdominus skeletal muscle tissue collected at delivery revealed reduced protein content of mitochondrial complex I (C-I) subunits (NDUFS3, NDUFV2) and altered content of proteins involved in calcium homeostasis/signaling (calcineurin A, α1-syntrophin, annexin A4) in OGDM (n = 6) vs. ONGT (n = 6). Follow-up analyses showed reduced enzymatic activity of mitochondrial complexes C-I, C-III, and C-IV (−60–75%) in the OGDM (n = 8) compared with ONGT (n = 10) subjects, though no differences were observed for mitochondrial complex protein content. Upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation were not different between groups. However, AMPK phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by 75% in the OGDM women. These data suggest that GDM is associated with reduced skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation and disordered calcium homeostasis. These relationships deserve further attention as they may represent novel risk factors for development of GDM and may have implications on the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on both treatment strategies for GDM and for prevention of type 2 diabetes postpartum. PMID:25216282

  8. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women. We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed. Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05–1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM. ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM. PMID:27258493

  9. Thr130Ile polymorphism of HNF4A gene is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus in Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Virginia Sánchez; Díaz, César Antonio González; Trenado, Lucila Maritza Lozano; Peralta, José Manuel Campos; Soto, Salvador Martín Polo

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4A) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes in the liver, pancreas, kidney, intestine, and other tissues. Previous studies in the Mexican population have shown a high frequency of the Thr130Ile polymorphism and have suggested its important role in the pathogenesis of early-onset type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether this variant also contributes to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a Mexican population. We studied 213 unrelated postpartum women and their neonates, who were divided into 2 groups: control and GDM. The control group was formed by 108 healthy postpartum women and their neonates, and the GDM group was formed by 105 postpartum women diagnosed with GDM and their neonates. All subjects were genotyped for the Thr130Ile polymorphism in HNF4A by Taqman allelic discrimination assays and sequencing. Our results showed a higher frequency of the minor allele of the Thr130Ile polymorphism in the GDM group compared with the control group (P = 0.0452; odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-6.59). With respect to offspring, the frequency of the polymorphism was higher in the offspring of the GDM group than in the offspring of the control group; however, no significant differences between the groups were observed (P = 0.2551; odds ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-3.64). The findings suggest that the Thr130Ile polymorphism is associated with GDM in the studied Mexican population.

  10. Prospective Study of Pre-Gravid Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liwei; Hu, Frank B.; Yeung, Edwina; Willett, Walter; Zhang, Cuilin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) was related to an elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance in several recent studies among middle- or older-aged populations. Studies on SSB consumption and glucose intolerance among pregnant women, however, are lacking. We therefore examined the association between regular SSB consumption before pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a prospective study among 13,475 U.S. women who reported at least one singleton pregnancy between 1992 and 2001 in the Nurses' Health Study II. GDM was self-reported and validated by medical record review in a subsample. Cox proportional hazards models with multivariate adjustments were applied to examine the association of SSB consumption with GDM risk. RESULTS During 10 years of follow-up, 860 incident GDM case subjects were identified. After adjustment for age, parity, race, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, prepregnancy BMI, and Western dietary pattern, intake of sugar-sweetened cola was positively associated with the risk of GDM, whereas no significant association was found for other SSBs and diet beverages. Compared with women who consumed <1 serving/month, those who consumed ≥5 servings/week of sugar-sweetened cola had a 22% greater GDM risk (relative risk 1.22 [95% CI 1.01–1.47]). CONCLUSIONS Findings from this study suggest that prepregnancy higher consumption of sugar-sweetened cola (≥5 servings/week) is associated with an elevated GDM risk, whereas no significant association with GDM risk was observed for other SSBs and diet beverages. PMID:19940226

  11. Effect of various doses of vitamin D supplementation on pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingying; Cheng, Yan; He, Mulan; Li, Tingting; Ma, Ziwen; Cheng, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the influence of vitamin D on the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus is associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, cancer and other systemic diseases, and is considered an important indicator of general health. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of various doses of vitamin D supplementation on glucose metabolism, lipid concentrations, inflammation and the levels of oxidative stress of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The present randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 133 pregnant women with GDM during weeks 24–28 of pregnancy. The patients were randomly divided into four groups. The control group (n=20) received a placebo (sucrose; one granule/day), the low dosage group (n=38) received the daily recommended intake of 200 IU vitamin D (calciferol) daily, the medium dosage group (n=38) received 50,000 IU monthly (2,000 IU daily for 25 days) and the high dosage group (n=37) received 50,000 IU every 2 weeks (4,000 IU daily for 12.5 days). The general characteristics and dietary intakes of the patients with GDM were similar between each group. Using ELISA kits, it was determined that insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance and total cholesterol were significantly reduced by high dosage vitamin D supplementation (P<0.05). Total antioxidant capacity and total glutathione levels were significantly elevated as a result of high dosage vitamin D supplementation (P<0.01). In conclusion, high-dose vitamin D supplementation (50,000 IU every 2 weeks) significantly improved insulin resistance in pregnant women with GDM. PMID:27588106

  12. Body Composition Is Normal in Term Infants Born to Mothers With Well-Controlled Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Au, Cheryl P.; Raynes-Greenow, Camille H.; Turner, Robin M.; Carberry, Angela E.; Jeffery, Heather E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to describe body composition in term infants of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with infants of mothers with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This cross-sectional study included 599 term babies born at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Neonatal body fat percentage (BF%) was measured within 48 h of birth using air-displacement plethysmography. Glycemic control data were based on third-trimester HbA1c levels and self-monitoring blood glucose levels. Associations between GDM status and BF% were investigated using linear regression adjusted for relevant maternal and neonatal variables. RESULTS Of 599 babies, 67 (11%) were born to mothers with GDM. Mean ± SD neonatal BF% was 7.9 ± 4.5% in infants with GDM and 9.3 ± 4.3% in infants with NGT, and this difference was not statistically significant after adjustment. Good glycemic control was achieved in 90% of mothers with GDM. CONCLUSIONS In this study, neonatal BF% did not differ by maternal GDM status, and this may be attributed to good maternal glycemic control. PMID:23223404

  13. A new gestational diabetes mellitus model: hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation via inhibition of Pax6 in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tan, Rui-Rong; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Huang, Yi-Hua; Tang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Dan; Yao, Nan; Yang, Xuesong; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of fetal malformations. However, few models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of GDM-induced fetal eye malformation. In this study, a high concentration of glucose (0.2 mmol per egg) was injected into the air sac of chick embryos on embryo development day (EDD) 1 to develop a hyperglycemia model. Results showed that 47.3% of embryonic eye malformation happened on EDD 5. In this model, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, Six3 and Otx2, were downregulated by hyperglycemia. Among these genes, the expression of Pax6 was the most vulnerable to hyperglycemia, being suppressed by 70%. A reduction in Pax6 gene expression induced eye malformation in chick embryos. However, increased expression of Pax6 in chick embryos could rescue hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. Hyperglycemia stimulated O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation, which caused oxidative stress in chick embryos. Pax6 was found to be vulnerable to free radicals, but the antioxidant edaravone could restore Pax6 expression and reverse eye malformation. These results illustrated a successful establishment of a new chick embryo model to study the molecular mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. The suppression of the Pax6 gene is probably mediated by oxidative stress and could be a crucial target for the therapy of GDM-induced embryonic eye malformation. PMID:26744353

  14. The Preventive Effect of Zuogui Wan on Offspring Rats' Impaired Glucose Tolerance Whose Mothers Had Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Xu, Kaixia; Wang, Yingli; Wang, Jinlong; Mao, Yingqiu; Gao, Shuangrong

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, we used streptozotocin (STZ) to establish a model of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) rats, where Zuogui Wan was given to GDM rats. After pregnancy, offspring rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group. Rats in high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group were fed with high fat and sugar diet. Rats in control group were fed the basic diet. The means of 2hPG were higher than 7.8 mmol·L−1 and lower than 11.1 mmol·L−1 on the rats of GDM group on week 15, and IGT models were successful. Body weight, abdominal fat weight, the ratio of abdominal fat weight and body weight, fasting plasma glucose, 2hPG, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) of Zuogui Wan GDM group were significantly lower than GDM group. The level of adiponectin in Zuogui Wan GDM group was significantly higher than GDM group. And we concluded that giving Zuogui Wan to GDM rats can have a preventive effect on the offsprings' IGT induced by high fat and sugar diet. PMID:27034700

  15. Maternal Dietary Patterns and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Cohort: The GUSTO Study

    PubMed Central

    de Seymour, Jamie; Chia, Airu; Colega, Marjorelee; Jones, Beatrix; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Shirong, Cai; Godfrey, Keith; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Conlon, Cathryn; Chong, Yap-Seng; Baker, Philip; Chong, Mary F. F.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and long term health issues for both the mother and offspring. Previous research has demonstrated associations between maternal diet and GDM development, but evidence in Asian populations is limited. The objective of our study was to examine the cross-sectional relationship between maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy and the risk of GDM in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort. Maternal diet was ascertained using 24-h dietary recalls from participants in the Growing up in Singapore towards healthy outcomes (GUSTO) study—a prospective mother-offspring cohort, and GDM was diagnosed according to 1999 World Health Organisation guidelines. Dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis, and multivariate regression analyses performed to assess the association with GDM. Of 909 participants, 17.6% were diagnosed with GDM. Three dietary patterns were identified: a vegetable-fruit-rice-based-diet, a seafood-noodle-based-diet and a pasta-cheese-processed-meat-diet. After adjusting for confounding variables, the seafood-noodle-based-diet was associated with a lower likelihood of GDM (Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval)) = 0.74 (0.59, 0.93). The dietary pattern found to be associated with GDM in our study was substantially different to those reported previously in Western populations. PMID:27657116

  16. The association between maternal hyperglycemia and perinatal outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Young; Jung, Inkyung; Kim, So Jung

    2016-09-01

    Pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are associated with increased risks of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. The risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes differ depending on the glucose values among GDM patients. For accurate and effective prenatal counseling, it is necessary to understand the relationship between different maternal hyperglycemia values and the severity of adverse outcomes. With this objective, this study reexamines the relationship between maternal hyperglycemia versus maternal and perinatal outcomes in GDM patients. For this study, maternal hyperglycemia was diagnosed using the 2-step diagnostic approach.Medical records of 3434 pregnant women, who received the 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) between March 2001 and April 2013, were reviewed. As a result, 307 patients were diagnosed with GDM, and they were divided into 2 groups according to their fasting glucose levels. A total of 171 patients had normal fasting glucose level (<95 mg/dL), and 136 patients had abnormal fasting glucose level (≥95 mg/dL). The 50-g GCT results were subdivided by 20-unit increments (140-159, n = 123; 160-179, n = 84; 180-199, n = 50; and ≥200, n = 50), and the maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared against the normal 50-g GCT group (n = 307).Maternal fasting blood glucose (FBG) level showed clear association with adverse perinatal outcomes. The odds ratio (OR) of macrosomia was 6.72 (95% CI: 2.59-17.49, P < 0.001) between the 2 groups. The ORs of large for gestational age (LGA) and neonatal hypoglycemia were 3.75 (95% CI: 1.97-7.12, P < 0.001) and 1.65 (95% CI: 0.79-3.43, P  =  0.183), respectively. Also, the results of the 50-g GCT for each category showed strong association with increased risks of adverse perinatal outcomes compared to the normal 50-g GCT group. The OR of macrosomia (up to 20.31-fold), LGA (up to 6.15-fold), and neonatal hypoglycemia (up to 84.00-fold) increased with increasing 50-g GCT result

  17. Earlier Age of Onset of Chronic Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After a Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy or Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; van Rijn, Bas B; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Boer, Jolanda M A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Oudijk, Martijn A; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2015-12-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the impact of a history of hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the risk and age of onset of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, independent of hypertension and T2D. Between 1993 and 1997, 22 265 ever-pregnant women were included from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-NL study, aged 20 to 70 years at baseline. Details on complications of pregnancy and known hypertension were obtained by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured at enrollment. Participants were followed for the occurrence of CVD events. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA, multivariable logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazard (with HDP and GDM as time-dependent variables for T2D and CVD) models. At enrollment, women with a HDP reported diagnosis of hypertension 7.7 years earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.9-8.5) and women with GDM reported diagnosis of T2D 7.7 years earlier (95% CI 5.8-9.6) than women without pregnancy complications. After adjustment for potential confounders, HDP was associated with presence of hypertension at enrollment (odds ratio 2.12, 95% CI 1.98-2.28) and onset of CVD later in life (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.32). After including the intermediates hypertension and T2D in the model, the risk of CVD later in life decreased (hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.20). GDM was associated with an increased risk of developing T2D later in life (hazard ratio 3.68, 95% CI 2.77-4.90), but not with risk of CVD. HDP and GDM have a substantial impact on the risk of CVD and are potentially important indicators for preventive cardiovascular risk management.

  18. A proposal for the use of uniform diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes in Europe: an opinion paper by the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG).

    PubMed

    Benhalima, Katrien; Mathieu, Chantal; Damm, Peter; Van Assche, André; Devlieger, Roland; Desoye, Gernot; Corcoy, Rosa; Mahmood, Tahir; Nizard, Jacky; Savona-Ventura, Charles; Dunne, Fidelma

    2015-07-01

    Screening and diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes (GDM) are inconsistent across Europe, and the development of a uniform GDM screening strategy is necessary. Such a strategy would create opportunities for more women to receive timely treatment for GDM. Developing a consensus on screening for GDM in Europe is challenging, as populations are diverse and healthcare delivery systems also differ. The European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG) has responded to this challenge by appointing a steering committee, including members of the EBCOG and the Diabetic Pregnancy Study Group (DPSG) associated with the EASD, to develop a proposal for the use of uniform diagnostic criteria for GDM in Europe. A proposal has been developed and has now been approved by the Council of the EBCOG. The current proposal is to screen for overt diabetes at the first prenatal contact using cut-off values for diabetes outside pregnancy, with particular efforts made to screen high-risk groups. When screening for GDM is performed at 24 weeks' gestation or later, the proposal is now to use the 75 g OGTT with the new WHO diagnostic criteria for GDM. However, more research is necessary to evaluate the best GDM screening strategy for different populations in Europe. Therefore, no clear recommendation has been made on whether a universal one-step, two-step or a risk-factor-based screening approach should be used. The use of the same WHO diagnostic GDM criteria across Europe will be an important step towards uniformity.

  19. Designing and Developing a Mobile Smartphone Application for Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Followed-Up at Diabetes Outpatient Clinics in Norway.

    PubMed

    Garnweidner-Holme, Lisa Maria; Borgen, Iren; Garitano, Iñaki; Noll, Josef; Lukasse, Mirjam

    2015-05-21

    The prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. Controlling blood sugar levels is fundamental to the management of GDM. Current practice in Norway includes patients registering blood sugar levels in a booklet and receiving verbal and/or written health information. A smartphone application may provide patients individually targeted and easily available advice to control blood sugar levels. The aim of this paper is to document the process of designing and developing a smartphone application (the Pregnant+ app) that automatically transfers blood sugar levels from the glucometer and has information about healthy eating and physical activity. This formative research included expert-group discussions among health professionals, researchers and experts in data privacy and security. User-involvement studies were conducted to discuss prototypes of the app. Results indicated that the content of the application should be easy to understand given the varying degree of patients' literacy and in line with the information they receive at clinics. The final version of the app incorporated behavior change techniques such as self-monitoring and cues to action. Results from the first round of interactions show the importance of involving expert groups and patients when developing a mobile health-care device.

  20. Danhong Huayu Koufuye combined with metformin attenuated diabetic retinopathy in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Pei; Wang, Yan-Dong; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Zi-Yang; Hu, Lu-Yun; Lin, Jun-Li; Lin, Bao-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate effects of Danhong Huayu Koufuye (DHK, a Chinese medicinal formulae) alone or combined with metformin on diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, an animal model of obese type-2 diabetes, and then to investigate the mechanisms. METHODS ZDF (fa/fa) rats were administered with vehicle (distilled water), metformin, DHK, and DHK plus metformin. Electrophysiological and histological analysis were applied to evaluated effects of DHK alone or combined with metformin on DR. The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in blood were measured to evaluate the antihyperglycemic activity of DHK. Furthermore, levels of nitric oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in serum were measured to study effects of DHK on oxidative stress in ZDF rats. In addition, body weight, lipidic indexes and insulin level were also assessed. RESULTS DHK combined with metformin significantly reversed the prolongation of latency times of flash electroretinogram (FERG) and oscillatory potentials (OPs) in diabetic rats. Furthermore, DHK alone or combined with metformin showed a remarkable suppression of retinal neovascularization and amelioration of retinal internal limiting membrane morphology. Moreover, DHK alone or plus metformin reduced FBG (P<0.05), HbA1c (P<0.01) and MDA (P<0.01) levels in diabetic rats. In addition, reductions in levels of triglycerides (TG) (P<0.01) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively) were also observed in diabetic rats treated with DHK alone or plus metformin. CONCLUSION DHK in combination with metformin had a preventive and therapeutic effect on DR in type-2 diabetic rats, and the possible mechanisms may be alleviating hyperglycemia, reducing oxidative stress and improving lipid metabolism. PMID:26682154

  1. Healthful Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Hypertension Among Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Yeyi; Chavarro, Jorge E; Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K; Ley, Sylvia H; Forman, John P; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James; Bowers, Katherine; Strøm, Marin; Hansen, Susanne; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-06-01

    Women who developed gestational diabetes mellitus represent a high-risk population for hypertension later in life. The role of diet in the progression of hypertension among this susceptible population is unknown. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3818 women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus in the Nurses' Health Study II as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women's Health Study. These women were followed-up from 1989 to 2011. Incident hypertension was identified through self-administered questionnaires that were validated previously by medical record review. Adherence scores for the alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, the alternative Mediterranean diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension were computed for each participant. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between dietary scores and hypertension while adjusting for major risk factors for hypertension. We documented 1069 incident hypertension cases during a median of 18.5 years of follow-up. After adjustment for major risk factors for hypertension, including body mass index, alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, alternative Mediterranean diet, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension scores were significantly inversely associated with the risk of hypertension; hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval comparing the extreme quartiles (highest versus lowest) were 0.76 (0.61-0.94; P for linear trend =0.03) for AHEI score, 0.72 (0.58-0.90; P for trend =0.01) for Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension score, and 0.70 (0.56-0.88; P for trend =0.002) for alternative Mediterranean diet score. Adherence to a healthful dietary pattern was related to a lower subsequent risk of developing hypertension among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  2. Healthful Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Hypertension Among Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Yeyi; Chavarro, Jorge E; Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K; Ley, Sylvia H; Forman, John P; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James; Bowers, Katherine; Strøm, Marin; Hansen, Susanne; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-06-01

    Women who developed gestational diabetes mellitus represent a high-risk population for hypertension later in life. The role of diet in the progression of hypertension among this susceptible population is unknown. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3818 women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus in the Nurses' Health Study II as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women's Health Study. These women were followed-up from 1989 to 2011. Incident hypertension was identified through self-administered questionnaires that were validated previously by medical record review. Adherence scores for the alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, the alternative Mediterranean diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension were computed for each participant. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between dietary scores and hypertension while adjusting for major risk factors for hypertension. We documented 1069 incident hypertension cases during a median of 18.5 years of follow-up. After adjustment for major risk factors for hypertension, including body mass index, alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, alternative Mediterranean diet, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension scores were significantly inversely associated with the risk of hypertension; hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval comparing the extreme quartiles (highest versus lowest) were 0.76 (0.61-0.94; P for linear trend =0.03) for AHEI score, 0.72 (0.58-0.90; P for trend =0.01) for Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension score, and 0.70 (0.56-0.88; P for trend =0.002) for alternative Mediterranean diet score. Adherence to a healthful dietary pattern was related to a lower subsequent risk of developing hypertension among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27091899

  3. Knowledge and Implementation of the S3 Guideline on Gestational Diabetes among Gynecologists and Diabetologists Four Years after Publication

    PubMed Central

    Groten, T.; Schmitz, S.; Schippert, C.; Schleußner, E.; Hillemanns, P.; Lehmann, T.; von Versen-Höynck, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: An S3 guideline on the diagnosis and differentiated management of gestational diabetes (GDM) was published in Germany in 2011. This guideline replaced the previously applicable recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of GDM and, for the first time, compiled evidence-based recommendations for the care of patients with GDM. The new guideline has focused particularly on the counselling offered to all patients with GDM about the associated long-term health risks. In this study we investigated the state of knowledge about the guideline among gynecologists and diabetologists in Thuringia and Lower Saxony. Method: A questionnaire with 23 questions was sent out to 773 gynecologists and 76 diabetologists providing outpatient care in Lower Saxony and Thuringia. The statistical analysis was descriptive and inferential for comparisons between groups. Results: The response rate was 54 %; an average of 47.6 % of the individual questions were answered correctly in the completed questionnaires. The questions were answered correctly significantly more frequently by persons in the group with a good knowledge of the guidelines (75 vs. 61 %, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences between groups when differences between federal states or medical specialties were compared. Conclusions: The results of our study show a good general state of knowledge of the guideline and point to a high level of willingness to implement the recommendations of the S3 guideline on GDM. With regard to the follow-up care provided to patients with GDM and depression, this study found a significant need for further training. PMID:27582574

  4. Pre-pregnancy fried food consumption and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Zhang, Cuilin

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Fried foods are frequently consumed in Western countries. However, the health effects of frequent fried food consumption in humans are not well understood. We aimed to prospectively examine the association between pre-pregnancy fried food consumption and risk of incident gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods We included 21,079 singleton pregnancies from 15,027 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II cohort. Since 1991 and every 4 years thereafter, we collected diet information, including consumption of fried foods at home and away from home, using a validated food frequency questionnaire. We used generalised estimating equations with log-binomial models to estimate the RRs and 95% CIs. Results We documented 847 incident GDM pregnancies during 10 years of follow-up. After adjustment for age, parity, dietary and non-dietary factors, the RRs (95% CIs) of GDM among women who consumed total fried foods 1–3, 4–6 and ≥ 7 times/week, compared with those who consumed it less than once/week, were 1.13 (0.97, 1.32), 1.31 (1.08, 1.59) and 2.18 (1.53, 3.09), respectively (p for trend < 0.001). The association persisted after further adjustment for BMI (p for trend = 0.01). When analysed separately, we found a significant association of GDM with fried food consumption away from home, but not with fried food consumption at home. Conclusions/interpretation Frequent fried food consumption, particularly away from home, was significantly associated with a greater risk of incident GDM. Our study indicates potential benefits of limiting fried food consumption in the prevention of GDM in women of reproductive age. PMID:25303998

  5. Lower vitamin D levels at first trimester are associated with higher risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Marilyn; Battista, Marie-Claude; Doyon, Myriam; Houde, Ghislaine; Ménard, Julie; Ardilouze, Jean-Luc; Hivert, Marie-France; Perron, Patrice

    2014-08-01

    The progressive increase of insulin resistance observed in pregnancy contributes to the pathophysiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). There is controversy whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to abnormal glycemic regulation in pregnancy. We tested the associations between first trimester 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels and: 1) the risk of developing GDM; 2) insulin resistance/sensitivity, beta cell function and compensation indices in a large population-based prospective cohort of pregnant women. Participants (n = 655) were seen at first (6-13 weeks) and second (24-28 weeks) trimesters for blood samples. At first trimester, 25OHD levels were measured. At second trimester, glucose and insulin were measured 3 times during the oral glucose tolerance test to estimate insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), beta cell function (HOMA-B), insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index), insulin secretion (AUCins/gluc) and beta cell compensation (ISSI-2). Based on IADPSG criteria, 54 participants (8.2 %) developed GDM. Lower first trimester 25OHD levels were associated with higher risk of developing GDM even after adjustment for vitamin D confounding factors and GDM risk factors (OR = 1.48 per decrease of one SD in 25OHD levels; P = 0.04). Lower first trimester 25OHD levels were associated with higher HOMA-IR (r = - 0.08; P = 0.03), lower Matsuda index (r = 0.13; P = 0.001) and lower ISSI-2 (r = 0.08; P = 0.04). After adjustment for confounders, we found no significant association with HOMA-B and AUCins/gluc. Our results suggest that low levels of 25OHD at first trimester are (1) an independent risk factor for developing GDM and (2) associated with insulin resistance at second trimester.

  6. German gynecologists’ experience with a universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in daily practice: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Katharina; Schneider, Sven; Bock, Christina; Maul, Holger; Kleinwechter, Helmut; Görig, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Objective In March 2012, a universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was implemented in Germany. Despite international recommendations, a two-step approach was introduced [step 1: 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT); if GCT is suspicious, step 2 follows: 75-g oral glucose tolerance test with (OGTT)]. This qualitative study aimed at examining how gynecologists administer the screening for GDM in daily practice, whether they perceive any difficulties, and whether they have suggestions for improvement. Material and Methods Seventeen resident gynecologists were interviewed face-to-face in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed using qualitative content techniques. Results We revealed differences in the screening administration. Three gynecologists directly offered the second step of the two-step screening (OGTT) instead of completing the first step before offering the second step. These gynecologists only conducted GCT if the woman (with statutory health insurance) was not willing to pay for OGTT. Critique concerns the late introduction of billing codes, lack of information from official institutions, unavailability of readymade syrup with 50-g glucose, and lack of information material for pregnant women. Conclusion Our results reflect that not all gynecologists appear to conduct the screening conforming to the maternity directive. However, this has to be validated in larger quantitative surveys. That some gynecologists directly conducted OGTT may fuel the discussion regarding the screening procedure. The two-step approach was already highly controversial at the time of introducing the screening because national and international organizations recommend a one-step approach. Therefore, our results are also relevant for other countries who have implemented a two-step screening and for countries planning to implement a screening. PMID:27026773

  7. Growth factor concentrations and their placental mRNA expression are modulated in gestational diabetes mellitus: possible interactions with macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. GDM is a well known risk factor for foetal overgrowth, termed macrosomia which is influenced by maternal hypergycemia and endocrine status through placental circulation. The study was undertaken to investigate the implication of growth factors and their receptors in GDM and macrosomia, and to discuss the role of the materno-foeto-placental axis in the in-utero regulation of foetal growth. Methods 30 women with GDM and their 30 macrosomic babies (4.75 ± 0.15 kg), and 30 healthy age-matched pregnant women and their 30 newborns (3.50 ± 0.10 kg) were recruited in the present study. Serum concentrations of GH and growth factors, i.e., IGF-I, IGF-BP3, FGF-2, EGF and PDGF-B were determined by ELISA. The expression of mRNA encoding for GH, IGF-I, IGF-BP3, FGF-2, PDGF-B and EGF, and their receptors, i.e., GHR, IGF-IR, FGF-2R, EGFR and PDGFR-β were quantified by using RT-qPCR. Results The serum concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-BP3, EGF, FGF-2 and PDGF-B were higher in GDM women and their macrosomic babies as compared to their respective controls. The placental mRNA expression of the growth factors was either upregulated (FGF-2 or PDGF-B) or remained unaltered (IGF-I and EGF) in the placenta of GDM women. The mRNA expression of three growth factor receptors, i.e., IGF-IR, EGFR and PDGFR-β, was upregulated in the placenta of GDM women. Interestingly, serum concentrations of GH were downregulated in the GDM women and their macrosomic offspring. Besides, the expression of mRNAs encoding for GHR was higher, but that encoding for GH was lower, in the placenta of GDM women than control women. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that growth factors might be implicated in GDM and, in part, in the pathology of macrosomia via materno-foeto-placental axis. PMID:20144210

  8. Postpartum Glucose Testing Rates Following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Factors Affecting Testing Non-compliance from Four Tertiary Centers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Geum Joon; An, Jung-Joo; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Kwon, Han-Sung; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Kwon, Ja-Young

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate postpartum glucose testing rates in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and to determine factors affecting testing non-compliance in the Korean population. This was a retrospective study of 1,686 patients with GDM from 4 tertiary centers in Korea and data were obtained from medical records. Postpartum glucose testing was conducted using a 2-hr 75-g oral glucose tolerance, fasting glucose, or hemoglobin A1C test. Test results were categorized as normal, prediabetic, and diabetic. The postpartum glucose testing rate was 44.9% (757/1,686 patients); and of 757 patients, 44.1% and 18.4% had pre-diabetes and diabetes, respectively. According to the multivariate analysis, patients with a high parity, larger weight gain during pregnancy, and referral from private clinics due to reasons other than GDM treatment were less likely to receive postpartum glucose testing. However, patients who had pharmacotherapy for GDM were more likely to be screened. In this study, 55.1% of patients with GDM failed to complete postpartum glucose testing. Considering the high prevalence of diabetes (18.4%) at postpartum, clinicians should emphasize the importance of postpartum diabetes screening to patients with factors affecting testing noncompliance.

  9. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zandong . E-mail: zandong_yang@merck.com; Chen Meng; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Garmey, James C.; Kimble, Sarah D.; Nadler, Jerry L. . E-mail: jln2n@virginia.edu

    2006-06-09

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic {beta}-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that {beta}-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of {beta}-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for {beta}-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance {beta}-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved {beta}-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing {beta}-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans.

  10. Acute presentation of gestational diabetes insipidus with pre-eclampsia complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction: a case report and review of the published work.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Fuchs, Yael; Zafra, Kathleen; Haberman, Shoshana; Tal, Reshef

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare, self-limited complication of pregnancy. As it is related to excess placental vasopressinase enzyme activity, which is metabolized in the liver, GDI is more common in pregnancies complicated by conditions associated with liver dysfunction. We present a case of a 41-year-old woman at 38 weeks' gestation who presented with pre-eclampsia with severe features, including impaired liver function and renal insufficiency. Following cesarean section she was diagnosed with GDI, which was further complicated by cerebral vasoconstriction as demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. This case raises the possibility that cerebral vasoconstriction may be related to the cause of GDI. A high index of suspicion of GDI should be maintained in patients who present with typical signs and symptoms, especially in the setting of pregnancy complications associated with liver dysfunction.

  11. Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pathways for Programming in Mouse, Monkey, and Man—Where Do We Go Next? The 2014 Norbert Freinkel Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jacob E

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus continue to increase worldwide and span the spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Alarmingly, 1 in 10 infants and toddlers is obese, and 1 in 5 youths is both obese and at risk for metabolic syndrome prior to puberty. The mechanisms underlying how poor maternal health imparts risk for future metabolic disease in the offspring are beginning to emerge in deeply phenotyped human and nonhuman primate models. Maternal diet and obesity impact fuels, hormones, and inflammation with powerful effects on fetal metabolic systems. These are accompanied by persistent changes in the infant microbiome and epigenome and in offspring behavior. These results suggest that gestational and lactational dietary exposures are driving health risks in the next generation. Whether maternal diet can prevent changes in the womb to alter infant life-course disease risk is still unknown. Controlled, mechanistic studies to identify interventions are sorely needed for a healthier next generation. PMID:26207051

  12. Obesity and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pathways for Programming in Mouse, Monkey, and Man—Where Do We Go Next? The 2014 Norbert Freinkel Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jacob E

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus continue to increase worldwide and span the spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Alarmingly, 1 in 10 infants and toddlers is obese, and 1 in 5 youths is both obese and at risk for metabolic syndrome prior to puberty. The mechanisms underlying how poor maternal health imparts risk for future metabolic disease in the offspring are beginning to emerge in deeply phenotyped human and nonhuman primate models. Maternal diet and obesity impact fuels, hormones, and inflammation with powerful effects on fetal metabolic systems. These are accompanied by persistent changes in the infant microbiome and epigenome and in offspring behavior. These results suggest that gestational and lactational dietary exposures are driving health risks in the next generation. Whether maternal diet can prevent changes in the womb to alter infant life-course disease risk is still unknown. Controlled, mechanistic studies to identify interventions are sorely needed for a healthier next generation.

  13. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... with type 2 diabetes. Defining Safe Blood Glucose Levels for Pregnancy Many studies have shown that gestational ... of Gestational Diabetes” for blood glucose levels. OGTT Levels for Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Time of Sample ...

  14. Influence of Vitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone on Bone and Metabolic Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Monica C.; Ryan, Alice S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH), VO2max, bone (by DXA), and metabolic outcomes across age and race-matched postmenopausal women (54±1 years; mean±SEM): 1) with previous gestational diabetes (GDM) (32±1 kg/m2; N=17), 2) without previous GDM, but with a similar BMI to GDM (32±1 kg/m2; N=17), and 3) without previous GDM, but with a higher BMI than GDM (36±1 kg/m2; N=17; P<0.01). The prevalence of 25(OH)D insufficiency and deficiency was high (~80%), but not different across groups, while PTH tended to be ~30% lower in women with a history of GDM (P=0.09). Women with a history of GDM had lower HDL cholesterol and higher diastolic blood pressure and fasting and 2-hr glucose levels (by oral glucose tolerance test) (vs. groups 2 and 3; P’s<0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) tended to be slightly higher in women with prior GDM than the BMI matched women with no prior GDM (P=0.09). Overall, higher PTH was associated with lower femoral neck (r=−0.33) and (r=−0.38) (P’s<0.05), while lower 25(OH)D was associated with lower VO2max (r=0.25, P=0.05) and higher fasting glucose (r=−0.14) and insulin (r=−0.29 (P’s<0.05). We observe that the poor metabolic profiles of postmenopausal women with a history of GDM are independent of 25(OH)D and PTH. However, due to associations between 25(OH)D and PTH with bone and metabolic outcomes, maintaining recommended 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations is important regardless of a previous history of GDM. PMID:26882050

  15. Mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism in the placenta with gestational diabetes mellitus: role of miR-143

    PubMed Central

    Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    A predisposing factor for development of the hyperglycaemic state of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is obesity. We previously showed that increasing maternal obesity is associated with significant reductions in placental mitochondrial respiration. MicroRNA (miR)-143 has been previously shown to regulate the metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis in cancer tissues. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiration is reduced and aerobic glycolysis is up-regulated via changes in miR-143 expression in the placenta of women with GDM. Placental tissue was collected at term from women with A1GDM (controlled by diet), A2GDM (controlled by medication) and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (CTRL). miR-143 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Expression of mitochondrial complexes, transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1α (PGC1α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), components of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling, glucose transporter GLUT1 and glycolytic enzymes [hexokinase-2 (HK-2), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)] were measured by Western blot. Trophoblast respiration was measured by XF24 Analyser. Expression of miR-143, mitochondrial complexes, and PPARγ and PGC1α, which act downstream of miR-143, were significantly decreased in A2GDM placentae compared with A1GDM and CTRL (P<0.01). Placental hPL (human placental lactogen) levels, expression of glycolytic enzymes, GLUT1 and mTOR signalling were also significantly increased by more than 2-fold in A2GDM compared with A1GDM and CTRL (P<0.05). There was a 50% reduction in mitochondrial respiration in trophoblast cells isolated from A2GDM placentae. Overexpression of miR-143 was able to increase mitochondrial respiration, increase protein expression of mitochondrial complexes and decrease expression of glycolytic enzymes by 40% compared with A2GDM. Down-regulation of miR-143 mediates

  16. Fetal Hemodynamics and Fetal Growth Indices by Ultrasound in Late Pregnancy and Birth Weight in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Liu, Yong; Lai, Ya-Ping; Gu, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Dong-Mei; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background: The offspring of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are prone to macrosomia. However, birth weight is difficult to be correctly estimated by ultrasound because of fetal asymmetric growth characteristics. This study aimed to investigate the correlations between fetal hemodynamics, fetal growth indices in late pregnancy, and birth weight in GDM. Methods: A total of 147 women with GDM and 124 normal controls (NC) were enrolled in this study. Fetal hemodynamic indices, including the systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D), resistance index (RI), pulsatility index (PI) of umbilical artery (UA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), and renal artery (RA), were collected. Fetal growth indices, including biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC), and femur length, were also measured by ultrasound. Birth weight, newborn gender, and maternal clinical data were collected. Results: The independent samples t-test showed that BPD, HC, and AC were larger in GDM than in NC (P < 0.05). Fetal hemodynamic indices of the UA and MCA were lower (P < 0.05), but those of the RA were higher (P < 0.001) in GDM than in NC. Birth weight was higher in GDM than in NC (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that hemodynamic indices of the UA were negatively correlated with birth weight, BPD, HC, and AC in both groups (P < 0.05). MCA (S/D, PI, and RI) was negatively correlated with birth weight, HC, and AC in GDM (r = −0.164, −0.206, −0.200, −0.226, −0.189, −0.179, −0.196, −0.177, and − 0.172, respectively, P < 0.05), but there were no correlations in NC (P > 0.05). RA (S/D, PI, and RI) was positively correlated with birth weight in GDM (r = 0.168, 0.207, and 0.184, respectively, P < 0.05), but there were no correlations in NC (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Fetal hemodynamic indices in late pregnancy might be helpful for estimating newborn birth weight in women with GDM. PMID:27569240

  17. [COMBINED HONDROPROTECTION IN REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS WITH DIABETIC ARTHROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Orlenko, V L

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of combined chondroprotectors Teraflex® in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2, complicated by arthropathy were investigated. It was established, that Tera- flex® therapy positively influences on the development of diabetic arthropathy (reducing intensity of pain, increasing the range of movements and reduced volume of the affected joints, increasing the functionality of the patient). In addition, an analysis of the impact of chondroprotectors on the level of sugar among patients.It was found, that it is necessary to control blood sugar while taking chondroprotectors and if needed, increasing the dose of hypoglycohaemic drugs during this period.

  18. [COMBINED HONDROPROTECTION IN REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS WITH DIABETIC ARTHROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Orlenko, V L

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of combined chondroprotectors Teraflex® in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2, complicated by arthropathy were investigated. It was established, that Tera- flex® therapy positively influences on the development of diabetic arthropathy (reducing intensity of pain, increasing the range of movements and reduced volume of the affected joints, increasing the functionality of the patient). In addition, an analysis of the impact of chondroprotectors on the level of sugar among patients.It was found, that it is necessary to control blood sugar while taking chondroprotectors and if needed, increasing the dose of hypoglycohaemic drugs during this period. PMID:26118037

  19. The Impact of Genetic Variants for Different Physiological Characterization of Type 2 Diabetes Loci on Gestational Insulin Signaling in Nondiabetic Pregnant Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shunyao; Liu, Yunqiang; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tan, Yuande; Mei, Jie; Song, Wenzhong; Gan, Lu; Wang, Hailian; Yin, Shi; Dong, Xianjue; Chi, Shu; Deng, Shaoping

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the impact of genetic variants on transiently upregulated gestational insulin signaling. We recruited 1152 unrelated nondiabetic pregnant Han Chinese women (age 28.5 ± 4.1 years; body mass index [BMI] 21.4 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) and gave them oral glucose tolerance tests. Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indices of insulin disposition, early-phase insulin release, fasting state, and 0 to 120 minute's proinsulin to insulin conversion were used to dissect insulin physiological characterization. Several variants related to β-cell function were genotyped. The genetic impacts were analyzed using logistic regression under an additive model. By adjusting for maternal age, BMI, and the related interactions, the genetic variants in ABCC8, CDKAL1, CDKN2A, HNF1B, KCNJ11, and MTNR1B were detected to impact gestational insulin signaling through heterogeneous mechanisms; however, compared with that in nonpregnant metabolism, the genetic effects seem to be eminently and heavily influenced by maternal age and BMI, indicating possible particular mechanisms underlying gestational metabolism and diabetic pathogenesis.

  20. Diabetes diet - gestational

    MedlinePlus

    ... snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to ... can help you keep your blood sugar stable. CARBOHYDRATES Less than half the calories you eat should ...

  1. Effects of pentoxifylline and pentosan polysulphate combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Laczy, Boglárka; Cseh, Judit; Mohás, Márton; Markó, Lajos; Tamaskó, Mónika; Koszegi, Tamás; Molnár, Gergo A; Wagner, Zoltán; Wagner, László; Wittmann, István

    2009-06-01

    Vascular dysfunction, including impaired perfusion has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications in diabetes mellitus. Both pentoxifylline (PF) and pentosan polysulphate (PPS) are known to improve microcirculation. Antioxidant and antiproteinuric effects of PF are also known. In a placebo-controlled study, we determined the possible efficacy of PF-PPS combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy and nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients in Verum group (n = 77) received PF-PPS infusions (100-100 mg/day) for 5 days. Control diabetics (Placebo group; n = 12) were given only saline infusions. Specialized cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests, vibration threshold values and urinary albumin excretion were assessed before and after therapy. In Verum group, autonomic score, indicating the severity of cardiac autonomic dysfunction, decreased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Of the reflexes, deep breath and handgrip tests also improved after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Vibration threshold values, an indicator of the loss of sensory nerve function, were increased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Results of cardiac autonomic tests and vibration threshold values remained unaltered in Placebo group. Majority of patients had normalbuminuria, which was not affected by PF-PPS. In conclusion, short-term PF-PPS therapy was effective on cardiovascular autonomic function and vibration perception, whereas it failed to reduce albuminuria within normal range in type 2 diabetic patients.

  2. Is Risk Factor-based Screening Good Enough to Detect Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in High-Risk Pregnant Women? A Sri Lankan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Meththananda Herath, H. M.; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Weerasinghe, Nayani Prasangika

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a long lasting dilemma over the ideal screening and diagnostic method in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Even though universal screening is commonly practiced, selective screening based on risk factors is also practiced in some center. The aim of this study is to evaluate the most appropriate method to screen GDM in high-risk pregnant women in Sri Lanka. Methods: This study was a clinic-based, cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary referral center, Sri Lanka. All women underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24–28 weeks of gestation. Diagnosis of GDM was made according to the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results: With universal screening using IADPSG criteria, 23.2% (105/452) were found to have GDM and with risk factor-based screening 20.1% (91/452) were detected to have GDM. The prevalence of GDM dropped to 18.1% when GDM was diagnosed using the WHO criteria with universal screening approach. It was further dropped to 15.7% when the WHO criteria were used along with risk factors-based screening approach. Conclusions: The IADPSG criteria labeled considerably higher number of women as having GDM compared to the WHO criteria. With regards to the screening methods, the risk-based screening had a lower detection rate of GDM; however, it reduced the necessity of screening of women by around 20%.

  3. Is Risk Factor-based Screening Good Enough to Detect Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in High-Risk Pregnant Women? A Sri Lankan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Meththananda Herath, H. M.; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Weerasinghe, Nayani Prasangika

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a long lasting dilemma over the ideal screening and diagnostic method in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Even though universal screening is commonly practiced, selective screening based on risk factors is also practiced in some center. The aim of this study is to evaluate the most appropriate method to screen GDM in high-risk pregnant women in Sri Lanka. Methods: This study was a clinic-based, cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary referral center, Sri Lanka. All women underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24–28 weeks of gestation. Diagnosis of GDM was made according to the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results: With universal screening using IADPSG criteria, 23.2% (105/452) were found to have GDM and with risk factor-based screening 20.1% (91/452) were detected to have GDM. The prevalence of GDM dropped to 18.1% when GDM was diagnosed using the WHO criteria with universal screening approach. It was further dropped to 15.7% when the WHO criteria were used along with risk factors-based screening approach. Conclusions: The IADPSG criteria labeled considerably higher number of women as having GDM compared to the WHO criteria. With regards to the screening methods, the risk-based screening had a lower detection rate of GDM; however, it reduced the necessity of screening of women by around 20%. PMID:27625764

  4. [Primary combined oral antidiabetic therapy in type-2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gábor; Baranyi, Eva

    2002-10-27

    New target values of the metabolic control and recent directions in the therapeutic strategies of type 2 diabetes mellitus are overviewed. Attention is called to the atherogenic effect of blood glucose elevations exceeding physiological level, even when only post-prandial and with short duration. The significance of early phase prandial insulin secretion in the metabolic state is underlined, and the related new therapeutic possibilities are discussed. Practical guidelines are given to the introduction of oral antidiabetic therapy, and the importance of the early, aggressive, combined treatment with a complex mechanism of action is emphasized.

  5. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Resulting From Impaired β-Cell Compensation in the Absence of FoxM1, a Novel Downstream Effector of Placental Lactogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjie; Zhang, Jia; Pope, Christine F.; Crawford, Laura A.; Vasavada, Rupangi C.; Jagasia, Shubhada M.; Gannon, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objectives of the study were to determine whether the cell cycle transcription factor, FoxM1, is required for glucose homeostasis and β-cell mass expansion in maternal islets during pregnancy and whether FoxM1 is essential for placental lactogen (PL)-induced β-cell proliferation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS β-Cell mass, β-cell proliferation, and glucose homeostasis were assessed in virgin, pregnant, and postpartum mice with a pancreas-wide Foxm1 deletion (FoxM1Δpanc). Wild-type islets were cultured with or without PL and examined for Foxm1 induction. Transgenic mice overexpressing PL in β-cells were bred with FoxM1Δpanc mice, and β-cell proliferation was examined. RESULTS Foxm1 was upregulated in maternal islets during pregnancy. In contrast to controls, β-cell proliferation did not increase in pregnant FoxM1Δpanc females. Mutant islets showed increased Menin and nuclear p27. FoxM1Δpanc females developed gestational diabetes mellitus as pregnancy progressed. After parturition, euglycemia was restored in FoxM1Δpanc females, but islet size was significantly reduced. Strikingly, β-cell mass was normal in postpartum FoxM1Δpanc pancreata due to a combination of increased β-cell size and islet neogenesis. Evidence for neogenesis included increased number of endocrine clusters, increased proportion of smaller islets, and increased neurogenin 3 or insulin expression in cells adjacent to ducts. PL induced Foxm1 expression in cultured islets, and FoxM1 was essential for PL-mediated increases in β-cell proliferation in vivo. CONCLUSIONS FoxM1 is essential for β-cell compensation during pregnancy. In the absence of increased β-cell proliferation, neogenesis is induced in postpartum FoxM1Δpanc pancreata. Our results suggest that FoxM1 functions downstream of PL to mediate its effects on β-cell proliferation. PMID:19833884

  6. Long-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in relation to BMI and weight change among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Yeung, Edwina; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Hu, Frank B.; Vaag, Allan A.; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Mills, James L.; Grunnet, Louise G.; Bowers, Katherine; Ley, Sylvia H.; Kiely, Michele; Olsen, Sjurdur F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are advised to control their weight after pregnancy. We aimed to examine how adiposity and weight change influence the long-term risk of developing type 2 diabetes after GDM. Methods We included 1,695 women who had incident GDM between 1991 and 2001, as part of the Diabetes & Women’s Health study, and followed them until the return of the 2009 questionnaire. Body weight and incident type 2 diabetic cases were reported biennially. We defined baseline as the questionnaire period when women reported an incident GDM pregnancy. We estimated HRs and 95% CIs using Cox proportional hazards models. Results We documented 259 incident cases of type 2 diabetes during up to 18 years of follow-up. The adjusted HRs of type 2 diabetes associated with each 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI were 1.16 (95% CI 1.12, 1.19) for baseline BMI and 1.16 (95% CI 1.13, 1.20) for most recent BMI. Moreover, each 5 kg increment of weight gain after GDM development was associated with a 27% higher risk of type 2 diabetes (adjusted HR 1.27; 95% CI 1.04, 1.54). Jointly, women who had a BMI ≥30.0 kg/ m2 at baseline and gained ≥5 kg after GDM had an adjusted HR of 43.19 (95% CI 13.60, 137.11), compared with women who had a BMI <25.0 kg/m2 at baseline and gained <5 kg after GDM. Conclusions/interpretation Baseline BMI, most recent BMI and weight gain after GDM were significantly and positively associated with risk of progression from GDM to type 2 diabetes. PMID:25796371

  7. Assessment of insulin sensitivity/resistance and their relations with leptin concentrations and anthropometric measures in a pregnant population with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozgur; Kucuk, Mert; Ilgin, Aydin; Dagdelen, Muride

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-six pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 42 normal glucose tolerant (NGT) pregnant women between 26 and 36 gestational weeks were included in the study prospectively. The body fat percentage (BFP) was calculated using the Siri formula from skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements. Both groups were comparable for gestational age, height, weight, and body mass index (P>.05). Insulin resistance assessed by homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) method was significantly higher in GDM patients compared to their NGT weight-matched control group. In contrast, the insulin sensitivity calculated from quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI-IS) equation was significantly lower in GDM group. Calculated lean body mass was found to be similar in between both groups. Body fat percentage derived from SFT parameters was significantly higher in women with GDM. Women with GDM had significantly higher levels of serum insulin and leptin concentrations when compared with the NGT group. All SFT measurements were higher in GDM group when compared to those in NGT women. We did not find any correlation between leptin levels and insulin resistance; we found negative correlation between leptin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we observed that leptin may contribute development of GDM by decreasing insulin sensitivity but not increasing insulin resistance. Also, we observed that the BFP estimated by the Siri formula from SFT measurements correlated significantly with HOMA-IR and QUICKI-IS and leptin concentrations in pregnant women. We suggest that by simply evaluating SFT, we may hold a view about BFP and leptin concentrations and insulin sensitivity in pregnant women.

  8. Glutathione S-Transferase M1 and T1 Gene Polymorphisms Are Not Associated with Increased Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Development

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, O; Atalay, MA; Orhan, F; Karkucak, M; Demir, B Centinkaya; Yakut, T; Cengiz, C

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) gene polymorphisms contributed to development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and Methods: Fifty women with diagnosis of GDM and 50 control individuals without GDM or altered glucose intolerance during their pregnancy were enrolled in the study. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was applied to determine the GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphisms. Genotypes were determined according to bands detected with the agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: The difference in the frequencies of GSTM1 null genotypes between GDM and control groups was not statistically significant (60% and 54%, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between GDM and control groups with respect to GSTT1 null genotype rates (22% and 20%, respectively). Conclusion: This study shows no association between GST gene polymorphisms and GDM. PMID:25429472

  9. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Aziz, Siti Hajar; Nordin, Massita; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Adam, Aishah

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0). Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin), lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL), genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1), glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX) on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations. PMID:27379252

  10. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Abdul Aziz, Siti Hajar; John, Cini Mathew; Mohamed Yusof, Nur Intan Saidaah; Nordin, Massita; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Adam, Aishah; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0). Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin), lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL), genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1), glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX) on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations. PMID:27379252

  11. Relationships between plasma leptin levels, leptin G2548A, leptin receptor Gln223Arg polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Peng, Songxu; Li, Wei; Wan, Zhihua; Fan, Linlin; Du, Yukai

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine concentrations of leptin and biochemical parameters in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) individuals, and also to explore the links of leptin (LEP) G2548A and leptin receptor (LEPR) Gln223Arg polymorphisms with leptin levels and GDM risk among Chinese. Our study included 357 GDM and 355 NGT individuals who were at 24~30 gestational weeks. Plasma leptin and insulin levels were analyzed by ELISA. Gene polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The results showed that plasma leptin levels were significantly higher in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) group than NGT group (34.35 (26.54, 56.48) ng/mL vs 26.31 (17.99, 37.87) ng/mL, P < 0.05). Plasma leptin levels correlated with plasma fasting insulin levels, pre-pregnant body mass index, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index both in GDM and NGT group (P < 0.05). However, neither LEP G2548A nor LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphisms were significantly associated with GDM risk and plasma leptin levels (P > 0.05). Our findings showed that high leptin level was associated with GDM. And larger and more rigorous researches were needed to further explore the association of LEP and LEPR gene polymorphisms and GDM among Chinese population. PMID:27034205

  12. Animal Model of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Pathophysiological Resemblance to the Human Condition Induced by Multiple Factors (Nutritional, Pharmacological, and Stress) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Abdul Aziz, Siti Hajar; John, Cini Mathew; Mohamed Yusof, Nur Intan Saidaah; Nordin, Massita; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Adam, Aishah; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to develop an experimental gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) animal model in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were fed with high fat sucrose diet, impregnated, and induced with Streptozotocin and Nicotinamide on gestational day 0 (D0). Sleeping patterns of the rats were also manipulated to induce stress, a lifestyle factor that contributes to GDM. Rats were tested for glycemic parameters (glucose, C-peptide, and insulin), lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, and LDL), genes affecting insulin signaling (IRS-2, AKT-1, and PCK-1), glucose transporters (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and antioxidants (SOD, CAT, and GPX) on D6 and D21. GDM rats showed possible insulin resistance as evidenced by high expression of proinflammatory cytokines, PCK-1 and CRP. Furthermore, low levels of IRS-2 and AKT-1 genes and downregulation of GLUT-4 from the initial to final phases indicate possible defect of insulin signaling. GDM rats also showed an impairment of antioxidant status and a hyperlipidemic state. Additionally, GDM rats exhibited significantly higher body weight and blood glucose and lower plasma insulin level and C-peptide than control. Based on the findings outlined, the current GDM animal model closely replicates the disease state in human and can serve as a reference for future investigations.

  13. Trial protocol to compare the efficacy of a smartphone-based blood glucose management system with standard clinic care in the gestational diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Mackillop, Lucy H; Bartlett, Katy; Birks, Jacqueline; Farmer, Andrew J; Gibson, Oliver J; Kevat, Dev A; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C; Loerup, Lise; Tarassenko, Lionel; Velardo, Carmelo; Hirst, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is rising in the UK. Good glycaemic control improves maternal and neonatal outcomes. Frequent clinical review of patients with GDM by healthcare professionals is required owing to the rapidly changing physiology of pregnancy and its unpredictable course. Novel technologies that allow home blood glucose (BG) monitoring with results transmitted in real time to a healthcare professional have the potential to deliver good-quality healthcare to women more conveniently and at a lower cost to the patient and the healthcare provider compared to the conventional face-to-face or telephone-based consultation. We have developed an integrated GDm-health management system and aim to test the impact of using this system on maternal glycaemic control, costs, patient satisfaction and maternal and neonatal outcomes compared to standard clinic care in a single large publicly funded (National Health Service (NHS)) maternity unit. Methods and analysis Women with confirmed gestational diabetes in a current pregnancy are individually randomised to either the GDm-health system and half the normal clinic visits or normal clinic care. Primary outcome is mean BG in each group from recruitment to delivery calculated, with adjustments made for number of BG measurements, proportion of preprandial and postprandial readings and length of time in study, and compared between the groups. The secondary objective will be to compare the two groups for compliance to the allocated BG monitoring regime, maternal and neonatal outcomes, glycaemic control using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and other BG metrics, and patient attitudes to care assessed using a questionnaire and resource use. Ethics and dissemination Thresholds for treatment, dietary advice and clinical management are the same in both groups. The results of the study will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated electronically and in print. Trial registration

  14. Proportion of gestational diabetes mellitus attributable to overweight and obesity among non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic women in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cavicchia, Philip P; Liu, Jihong; Adams, Swann A; Steck, Susan E; Hussey, James R; Daguisé, Virginie G; Hebert, James R

    2014-10-01

    Objective was to estimate race-specific proportions of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) attributable to overweight and obesity in South Carolina. South Carolina birth certificate and hospital discharge data were obtained from 2004 to 2006. Women who did not have type 2 diabetes mellitus before pregnancy were classified with GDM if a diagnosis was reported in at least one data source. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using the log-binomial model. The modified Mokdad equation was used to calculate population attributable fractions for overweight body mass index (BMI: 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), obese (30.0-34.9 kg/m(2)), and extremely obese (≥35 kg/m(2)) women after adjusting for age, gestational weight gain, education, marital status, parity, tobacco use, pre-pregnancy hypertension, and pregnancy hypertension. Overall, the adjusted RR of GDM was 1.6, 2.3, and 2.9 times higher among the overweight, obese, and extremely obese women compared to normal-weight women in South Carolina. RR of GDM for extremely obese women was higher among White (3.1) and Hispanic (3.4) women than that for Black women (2.6). The fraction of GDM cases attributable to extreme obesity was 14.0 % among White, 18.1 % among Black, and 9.6 % among Hispanic women. The fraction of GDM cases attributable to obesity was about 12 % for all racial groups. Being overweight (BMI: 25.0-29.9) explained 8.8, 7.8, and 14.4 % of GDM cases among White, Black, and Hispanic women, respectively. Results indicate a significantly increased risk of GDM among overweight, obese, and extremely obese women. The strength of the association and the proportion of GDM cases explained by excessive weight categories vary by racial/ethnic group.

  15. Health economic modeling to assess short-term costs of maternal overweight, gestational diabetes, and related macrosomia – a pilot evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, Irene; van der Beek, Eline M.; Garssen, Johan; Nuijten, Mark J. C.; Uauy, Ricardo D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the interest in the impact of overweight and obesity on public health, little is known about the social and economic impact of being born large for gestational age or macrosomic. Both conditions are related to maternal obesity and/or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and associated with increased morbidity for mother and child in the perinatal period. Poorly controlled diabetes during pregnancy, pre- pregnancy maternal obesity and/or excessive maternal weight gain during pregnancy are associated with intermittent periods of fetal exposure to hyperglycemia and subsequent hyperinsulinemia, leading to increased birth weight (e.g., macrosomia), body adiposity, and glycogen storage in the liver. Macrosomia is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus later in life. Objective: Provide insight in the short-term health-economic impact of maternal overweight, GDM, and related macrosomia. To this end, a health economic framework was designed. This pilot study also aims to encourage further health technology assessments, based on country- and population-specific data. Results: The estimation of the direct health-economic burden of maternal overweight, GDM and related macrosomia indicates that associated healthcare expenditures are substantial. The calculation of a budget impact of GDM, based on a conservative approach of our model, using USA costing data, indicates an annual cost of more than $1,8 billion without taking into account long-term consequences. Conclusion: Although overweight and obesity are a recognized concern worldwide, less attention has been given to the health economic consequences of these conditions in women of child-bearing age and their offspring. The presented outcomes underline the need for preventive management strategies and public health interventions on life style, diet and physical activity. Also, the predisposition in people of Asian ethnicity to develop diabetes emphasizes the

  16. From screening to postpartum follow-up – the determinants and barriers for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) services, a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) – a transitory form of diabetes first recognised during pregnancy complicates between < 1% and 28% of all pregnancies. GDM has important short and long-term health consequences for both the mother and her offspring. To prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes and to prevent or delay future onset of type 2 diabetes in mother and offspring, timely detection, optimum treatment, and preventive postpartum care and follow-up is necessary. However the area remains grossly under-prioritised. Methods To investigate determinants and barriers to GDM care from initial screening and diagnosis to prenatal treatment and postpartum follow-up, a PubMed database search to identify quantitative and qualitative studies on the subject was done in September 2012. Fifty-eight relevant studies were reviewed. Results Adherence to prevailing GDM screening guidelines and compliance to screening tests seems sub-optimal at best and arbitrary at worst, with no clear or consistent correlation to health care provider, health system or client characteristics. Studies indicate that most women express commitment and motivation for behaviour change to protect the health of their unborn baby, but compliance to recommended treatment and advice is fraught with challenges, and precious little is known about health system or societal factors that hinder compliance and what can be done to improve it. A number of barriers related to health care provider/system and client characteristics have been identified by qualitative studies. Immediately following a GDM pregnancy many women, when properly informed, desire and intend to maintain healthy lifestyles to prevent future diabetes, but find the effort challenging. Adherence to recommended postpartum screening and continued lifestyle modifications seems even lower. Here too, health care provider, health system and client related determinants and barriers were identified. Studies reveal that sense of self

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of Placenta-Specific 8 Contributes to Altered Function of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Exposed to Intrauterine Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blue, Emily K; Sheehan, BreAnn M; Nuss, Zia V; Boyle, Frances A; Hocutt, Caleb M; Gohn, Cassandra R; Varberg, Kaela M; McClintick, Jeanette N; Haneline, Laura S

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked to development of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in children. Our previous studies determined that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from neonates exposed to GDM exhibit impaired function. The current goals were to identify aberrantly expressed genes that contribute to impaired function of GDM-exposed ECFCs and to evaluate for evidence of altered epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Genome-wide mRNA expression analysis was conducted on ECFCs from control and GDM pregnancies. Candidate genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite sequencing evaluated DNA methylation of placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8). Proliferation and senescence assays of ECFCs transfected with siRNA to knockdown PLAC8 were performed to determine functional impact. Thirty-eight genes were differentially expressed between control and GDM-exposed ECFCs. PLAC8 was highly expressed in GDM-exposed ECFCs, and PLAC8 expression correlated with maternal hyperglycemia. Methylation status of 17 CpG sites in PLAC8 negatively correlated with mRNA expression. Knockdown of PLAC8 in GDM-exposed ECFCs improved proliferation and senescence defects. This study provides strong evidence in neonatal endothelial progenitor cells that GDM exposure in utero leads to altered gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting the possibility of altered epigenetic regulation. PMID:25720387

  18. Moving towards efficient therapies in type 1 diabetes: To combine or not to combine?

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, D.; von Herrath, M.

    2007-01-01

    Every year, thirty thousand people worldwide are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). T1DM, also called autoimmune diabetes, is a multifactorial disease affecting predisposed individuals and involving genetic susceptibilities, environmental triggers, as well as unbalanced immune responses. Auto-reactive T cells, produced during the pathogenesis, play an important role by specifically destroying the pancreatic insulin-producing beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans. Numerous therapeutic interventions have been tested, mostly in animal models, but also in humans. To date, only three phase II/III clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy: anti-CD3 antibody, DiaPep277, and GAD65 (in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults). Unfortunately, a significant number of patients did not respond positively and remained insulin-dependant after completion of therapy. Several reasons account for this. Firstly, the severity of the disease as well as the auto-aggressive T cell repertoire vary from patient to patient leading to a broad range of therapeutic efficacies, and secondly at the time of the treatment the number of remaining beta-cells will directly impact the level of insulin production post-treatment. In this review, we will provide some clues to enhance efficacy of future immuno-interventions in patients with T1DM. We suggest that combination therapies might be the best approach. PMID:17412305

  19. [Bacterial flora in infections of the urinary system system in pregnant women with pre-gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sobczak, M; Wilczyński, J; Cypryk, K; Woch, G

    1999-10-01

    Urinary tract infections are accounted to serious complications, particularly in pregnancy complicated by diabetes. In this paper, cases of pregnancy have been analysed, affected by diabetes of type 1 and type 2, according to status of metabolic control and the type of urinary tract infection. In a group of 217 diabetic pregnant women, the incidence of urinary tract infections was 26.7%, 19.0% of them being recurrent. In the group with bad metabolic control, infections were statistically more frequent (17.4% vs. 37.3%, p = 0.001); bacteriuria without clinical demonstrations 10.4% vs. 19.6% (p > 0.05), pyelonephritis (7.0% vs. 17.7%, p = 0.001). The following types of pathogenic bacteria were found: E. coli--44.4%, Staphylococcous--28.9%, Enterococcocus--18.7%. A high frequency of Gram (+) bacteria was observed. A good metabolic control without chronic diabetic complications correlated with less frequent infections of the urinary tract. PMID:10615813

  20. Combination of telmisartan with sildenafil ameliorate progression of diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic model.

    PubMed

    El-Mahdy, Nageh Ahmed; El-Sayad, Magda El-Sayed; El-Kadem, Aya Hassan

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease in the world. Several signaling pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of DN including elevation in level of angiotensin II, formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), activation of protein kinase c (PKC), and lipid accumulation. These pathways activate one another mutually leading to oxidative stress, increasing expression of transforming growth factor beta-1(TGF-β 1) and release of interleukins and adhesion molecules, so the aim of this study is to interrupt more than pathogenic pathway to ameliorate the progression of DN. In the present study, white male rats (N=48) were divided into six groups (8 rats each), the first two groups served as normal control and a control vehicle group while the remaining four groups were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin (STZ) and being left for 4 weeks to develop DN. Thereafter, the rats were divided into DN group, DN group receiving Telmisartan or Sildenafil or Telmisartan Sildenafil combination. After the specified treatment period, urine samples were collected (using metabolic cages) to measure proteinuria, animals were then euthanized, blood and tissue samples were collected for measurement of Blood glucose,BUN, S.Cr, LDL, NO, TGF-β1, IL-1β, AGEPs, and SOD. The combination therapy showed significant decrease in BUN, S.Cr,LDL, TGF-β1, IL-1β, Proteinuria and AGEPs and significant increase in SOD and NO. The findings showed that combination therapy was able to ameliorate DN and that the effects were superior to the single drugs alone. PMID:27261587

  1. Effects of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic indices and hs-CRP levels in gestational diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yazdchi, Roya; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Sahhaf, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Vitamin D plays an important role in the etiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study evaluated the effect of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic indices and hs-C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in GDM patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Seventy-six pregnant women with GDM and gestational age between 24-28 weeks were assigned to receive four oral treatments consisting of 50,000 IU of vitamin D3 (n = 38) or placebo (n = 38) once every 2 weeks for 2 months. Fasting blood glucose (FG), insulin, HbA1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, lipid profile, hs-CRP, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured before and after treatment. Independent and paired t-tests were used to determine intra- and intergroup differences, respectively. ANCOVA was used to assess the effects of vitamin D supplementation on biochemical parameters. RESULTS Compared with the placebo group, in the vitamin D group, the serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased (19.15 vs. -0.40 ng/ml; P < 0.01) and that of FG (-4.72 vs. 5.27 mg/dl; P = 0.01) as well as HbA1c (-0.18% vs. 0.17%; P = 0.02) decreased. Improvements in the lipid profiles were observed in the vitamin D group, but without statistical significance. Significant increases in concentrations of hs-CRP, FG, HbA1c, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol were observed in the placebo group. No significant change in fasting insulin and HOMA-IR was observed in either group. CONCLUSIONS In GDM patients, vitamin D supplementation improved FG and HbA1c but had no significant effects on lipid profile or hs-CRP. PMID:27247730

  2. A Daily Snack Containing Leafy Green Vegetables, Fruit, and Milk before and during Pregnancy Prevents Gestational Diabetes in a Randomized, Controlled Trial in Mumbai, India1234

    PubMed Central

    Sahariah, Sirazul A; Potdar, Ramesh D; Gandhi, Meera; Kehoe, Sarah H; Brown, Nick; Sane, Harshad; Coakley, Patsy J; Marley-Zagar, Ella; Chopra, Harsha; Shivshankaran, Devi; Cox, Vanessa A; Jackson, Alan A; Margetts, Barrie M; Fall, Caroline HD

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prospective observational studies suggest that maternal diets rich in leafy green vegetables and fruit may help prevent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Objective: Our objective was to test whether increasing women’s dietary intake of leafy green vegetables, fruit, and milk before conception and throughout pregnancy reduced their risk of GDM. Methods: Project SARAS (“excellent”) (2006–2012) was a nonblinded, individually randomized, controlled trial in women living in slums in the city of Mumbai, India. The interventions included a daily snack made from leafy green vegetables, fruit, and milk for the treatment group or low-micronutrient vegetables (e.g., potato and onion) for the control group, in addition to the usual diet. Results for the primary outcome, birth weight, have been reported. Women were invited to take an oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) at 28–32 wk gestation to screen for GDM (WHO 1999 criteria). The prevalence of GDM was compared between the intervention and control groups, and Kernel density analysis was used to compare distributions of 120-min plasma glucose concentrations between groups. Results: Of 6513 women randomly assigned, 2291 became pregnant; of these, 2028 reached a gestation of 28 wk, 1008 (50%) attended for an OGTT, and 100 (9.9%) had GDM. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the prevalence of GDM was reduced in the treatment group (7.3% compared with 12.4% in controls; OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.36, 0.86; P = 0.008). The reduction in GDM remained significant after adjusting for prepregnancy adiposity and fat or weight gain during pregnancy. Kernel density analysis showed that this was explained by the fact that fewer women in the treatment group had a 2-h glucose concentration in the range 7.5–10.0 mmol/L. Conclusions: In low-income settings, in which women have a low intake of micronutrient-rich foods, improving dietary micronutrient quality by increasing intake of leafy green vegetables, fruit, and/or milk may

  3. Serum Activin A and Follistatin Levels in Gestational Diabetes and the Association of the Activin A-Follistatin System with Anthropometric Parameters in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Näf, Silvia; Escote, Xavier; Ballesteros, Mónica; Yañez, Rosa Elena; Simón-Muela, Inmaculada; Gil, Pilar; Albaiges, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Context The Activin A-Follistatin system has emerged as an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism with possible repercussions on fetal growth. Objective To analyze circulating activin A, follistatin and follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3) levels and their relationship with glucose metabolism in pregnant women and their influence on fetal growth and neonatal adiposity. Design and methods A prospective cohort was studied comprising 207 pregnant women, 129 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 78 with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and their offspring. Activin A, follistatin and FSTL3 levels were measured in maternal serum collected in the early third trimester of pregnancy. Serial fetal ultrasounds were performed during the third trimester to evaluate fetal growth. Neonatal anthropometry was measured to assess neonatal adiposity. Results Serum follistatin levels were significantly lower in GDM than in NGT pregnant women (8.21±2.32 ng/mL vs 9.22±3.41, P = 0.012) whereas serum FSTL3 and activin A levels were comparable between the two groups. Serum follistatin concentrations were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR and positively with ultrasound growth parameters such as fractional thigh volume estimation in the middle of the third trimester and percent fat mass at birth. Also, in the stepwise multiple linear regression analysis serum follistatin levels were negatively associated with HOMA-IR (β = −0.199, P = 0.008) and the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (β = −0.138, P = 0.049). Likewise, fractional thigh volume estimation in the middle of third trimester and percent fat mass at birth were positively determined by serum follistatin levels (β = 0.214, P = 0.005 and β = 0.231, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions Circulating follistatin levels are reduced in GDM compared with NGT pregnant women and they are positively associated with fetal growth and neonatal adiposity. These data suggest a role of the Activin

  4. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  5. Diagnostic effectiveness of 75 g oral glucose tolerance test for gestational diabetes in India based on the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Nikhat, Irfana; Nirmalan, Praveen K

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the diagnostic effectiveness of the fasting and one-hour plasma glucose levels for gestational diabetes (GDM) based on International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria. Methods A Cross-sectional study that included 2348 pregnant women booked for antenatal care in 2011 at a tertiary care perinatal institute. Pregnant women underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. Outcome measures include the incidence of GDM based on the IADPSG criteria and the diagnostic effectiveness of the recommended fasting and one-hour plasma glucose cut-off if used in isolation. Results The incidence of GDM was 21.81% (n = 520, 95% CI: 20.15, 23.57) with the IADPSG criteria. A fasting plasma glucose cut-off 92 mg/dL, in isolation, correctly classified 87.16% of GDM, with a specificity of 96.08%, clinically significant positive likelihood ratio (14.08) and a post-test probability of 79.71%. The one-hour 75 g test, in isolation, correctly classified 85.74% of GDM, had specificity of 99.68% and clinically significant positive likelihood ratio (111.12) and post-test probability of 96.87%. The application of the World Health Organization criteria would misclassify 11.91% (95% CI: 10.66, 13.26) of GDM as normal. Conclusions Additional testing of plasma glucose levels can be avoided for 18.25% (n = 435, 95% CI: 16.73, 19.84) if the IADPSG diagnostic criteria for GDM are applied with exit on a positive fasting or one-hour test result.

  6. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Two Nested Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-05-01

    There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women.We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed.Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05-1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM.ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM. PMID:27258493

  7. Development of a real-time smartphone solution for the management of women with or at high risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Bartlett, Katy; Farmer, Andrew; Gibson, Oliver J; Hirst, Jane E; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Kevat, Dev A; Levy, Jonathan C; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as new onset or recognition of glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Evidence supports tight blood glucose regulation to prevent adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Finger-prick blood glucose (BG) testing with frequent clinic review remains the most common method of managing diabetes in pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM is rising globally, pressuring resource-limited services. We have developed an intuitive, interactive, reliable, and accurate management system to record BG measurements and deliver management of GDM remotely. Following an initial scoping phase, a prototype software application was developed using an Android smartphone with BG meter linkage via Bluetooth. A custom website was built for clinician review of the data transmitted by the smartphone. After system refinement, further evaluation was undertaken for usability and reliability in a 48-patient service development project. Women used the system for an average of 13.1 weeks. In all, 19 686 BG measures were transmitted, 98.6% of which had a meal tag. A total of 466 text messages were transmitted. A mean of 30 BG readings per woman per week were transmitted, and 85% of women submitted the minimum requirement of 18 readings per week. We have developed a novel, real-time, smartphone-based BG monitoring management system that allows clinician review of real-time patient-annotated BG results. Results indicate high usage and excellent compliance by women. Robust clinical, economic, and satisfaction evaluations are required. To address these requirements, we are currently conducting a randomized controlled pilot trial. PMID:25004915

  8. Development of a Real-Time Smartphone Solution for the Management of Women With or at High Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Loerup, Lise; Bartlett, Katy; Farmer, Andrew; Gibson, Oliver J.; Hirst, Jane E.; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Kevat, Dev A.; Levy, Jonathan C.; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as new onset or recognition of glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Evidence supports tight blood glucose regulation to prevent adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Finger-prick blood glucose (BG) testing with frequent clinic review remains the most common method of managing diabetes in pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM is rising globally, pressuring resource-limited services. We have developed an intuitive, interactive, reliable, and accurate management system to record BG measurements and deliver management of GDM remotely. Following an initial scoping phase, a prototype software application was developed using an Android smartphone with BG meter linkage via Bluetooth. A custom website was built for clinician review of the data transmitted by the smartphone. After system refinement, further evaluation was undertaken for usability and reliability in a 48-patient service development project. Women used the system for an average of 13.1 weeks. In all, 19 686 BG measures were transmitted, 98.6% of which had a meal tag. A total of 466 text messages were transmitted. A mean of 30 BG readings per woman per week were transmitted, and 85% of women submitted the minimum requirement of 18 readings per week. We have developed a novel, real-time, smartphone-based BG monitoring management system that allows clinician review of real-time patient-annotated BG results. Results indicate high usage and excellent compliance by women. Robust clinical, economic, and satisfaction evaluations are required. To address these requirements, we are currently conducting a randomized controlled pilot trial. PMID:25004915

  9. High Calorie Intake Is Associated With Worsening Insulin Resistance and β-Cell Function in Hispanic Women After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhanghua; Watanabe, Richard M.; Stram, Daniel O.; Buchanan, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess associations between dietary intake and rates of change in insulin resistance and β-cell function in Hispanic women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixty-two nondiabetic Hispanic women with pregnancies complicated by GDM completed oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests and bioelectrical impedance measurements of body fat every 12–15 months postpartum for up to 12 years. Self-reported dietary intake was collected at all visits by structured food frequency questionnaires developed for Hispanics. Mixed-effects models were used to assess the relationship between dietary intake and rates of change in metabolic outcomes during follow-up. RESULTS The median length of follow-up from the first postpartum evaluation was 8.0 years (interquartile range 4.5–10.8 years). At baseline, women were 32 ± 5.7 years old and had a median calorie intake of 2,091 kcal/day. Over the course of follow-up, dietary intake did not change significantly. Higher baseline calorie intake was associated with a faster decline in insulin sensitivity, measured by the insulin sensitivity index (SI) (P = 0.029), and β-cell compensation, measured by the disposition index (DI) (P = 0.027), over time. These associations remained after adjustment for baseline characteristics; changes in BMI, calorie intake, levels of physical activity; and additional pregnancies during the follow-up period. The median rates were −0.06 vs. −0.02 units/year for SI and −810 vs. −692 units/year for DI for women with baseline calorie intake above versus below the cohort median. CONCLUSIONS High calorie intake is associated with a faster decline in insulin sensitivity and β-cell compensation in Hispanic women who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes, independent of adiposity. PMID:25404660

  10. Association between vitamin D receptor ApaI and TaqI gene polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus in an Iranian pregnant women population.

    PubMed

    Rahmannezhad, Golzar; Mashayekhi, Farideh Jalali; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim

    2016-04-25

    It has been proposed that variants of the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene are associated with a susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Our study was aimed to evaluate a possible association between the VDR ApaI (rs7975232) and TaqI (rs731236) gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to GDM in an Iranian pregnant women population. This case-control study was performed on a population of pregnant Iranian women, including 157 GDM and 157 non-GDM subjects.VDR ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms were assessed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).Our finding showed that the genotypes frequency of VDR ApaI polymorphism was significantly different between GDM and non-GDM groups (χ(2)=8.5, P=0.014). The CC genotype increased the risk of GDM as compared to the AA genotype (AA vs.CC, OR=2.996, 95% CI=1.278-7.022, P=0.012). The genotype and allele frequencies of VDR TaqI polymorphism were significantly different between GDM and non-GDM subjects (χ(2)=7.27, P=0.026, χ(2)=4.08, P=0.043 respectively). A significant protection was shown against GDM in VDR TaqI genotypes and allele (TT vs.TC, OR=0.523, 95% CI=0.23-0.84, P=0.007, TT vs. TC+CC, OR=0.546, 95% CI=0.35-0.86, P=0.009, T vs. C, OR=0.711, 95% CI=0.511-0.99, P=0.043). In conclusion, our findings show a significant association between VDR ApaI and TaqI gene polymorphisms and the GDM at the investigated loci.

  11. A Retrospective Analysis of the Relationship between Ethnicity, Body Mass Index, and the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes in Women Attending an Australian Antenatal Clinic

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Rebecca; Karahalios, Amalia; Le, Thao; Said, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a multiethnic population, assess the association between country of birth (COB) and GDM, and assess whether the association varies by body mass index (BMI). Methods. A retrospective study of 5260 pregnant women attending Sunshine Hospital, Australia, between 1st July 2012 and 30th June 2013. We fitted logistic regression models to assess the association between COB and GDM. An interaction between BMI and COB was assessed by likelihood ratio test. Results. In the 4610 included in our analysis, most common were women born in Australia or New Zealand (ANZ, 1932, 41.9%) and in Southeast Asia (922, 20%). GDM was diagnosed in 606 (13.2%) women. After adjusting for confounders, women from East Asia were most likely to develop GDM (37, 24.0%) and 5-fold more likely than women from ANZ (OR = 4.77, 95% CI: 3.12, 7.31, p < 0.001). Women from other Asian countries had a 3-fold increased risk of GDM compared to women from ANZ. There was no evidence of an interaction by BMI (p = 0.24).  Conclusions. Women born in Asia have higher risk of GDM compared to women born in ANZ. These data provide support for including COB in GDM management policies. PMID:26504462

  12. Beliefs, Barriers, and Preferences of European Overweight Women to Adopt a Healthier Lifestyle in Pregnancy to Minimize Risk of Developing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelsma, Judith G. M.; van Leeuwen, Karen M.; Oostdam, Nicolette; Bunn, Christopher; Simmons, David; Desoye, Gernot; Corcoy, Rosa; Adelantado, Juan M.; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Harreiter, Jürgen; van Assche, Frans Andre; Devlieger, Roland; Timmerman, Dirk; Hill, David; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Zawiejska, Agnieszka; Rebollo, Pablo; Lapolla, Annunziata; Dalfrà, Maria G.; del Prato, Stefano; Bertolotto, Alessandra; Dunne, Fidelma; Jensen, Dorte M.; Andersen, Lise Lotte T.; Snoek, Frank J.; van Poppel, Mireille N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We explored beliefs, perceived barriers, and preferences regarding lifestyle changes among overweight European pregnant women to help inform the development of future lifestyle interventions in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods. An explorative mixed methods, two-staged study was conducted to gather information from pregnant European women (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). In three European countries 21 interviews were conducted, followed by 71 questionnaires in six other European countries. Content analysis and descriptive and chi-square statistics were applied (p < 0.05). Results. Women preferred to obtain detailed information about their personal risk. The health of their baby was a major motivating factor. Perceived barriers for physical activity included pregnancy-specific issues such as tiredness and experiencing physical complaints. Insufficient time was a barrier more frequently reported by women with children. Abstaining from snacking was identified as a challenge for the majority of women, especially for those without children. Women preferred to obtain support from their partner, as well as health professionals and valued flexible lifestyle programs. Conclusions. Healthcare professionals need to inform overweight pregnant women about their personal risk, discuss lifestyle modification, and assist in weight management. Lifestyle programs should be tailored to the individual, taking into account barriers experienced by overweight first-time mothers and multipara women. PMID:26885396

  13. Evaluation of home testing to improve follow up after gestational diabetes (Fingerstick Assessments of Sugar Two-months postpartum or FAST)

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Beth G; Pagan, Elvis R; Evers, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Historically the rates of postpartum glucose tolerance testing for women with gestational diabetes (GDM) average a suboptimal 33%. Barriers include the need for new mothers to miss work and/or arrange for childcare in order to engage in a two-hour test at a commercial lab. This pilot study was initiated to test the theory that a home testing regimen would be accepted by patients and increase the rate of postpartum glucose assessments relative to published rates, without requiring additional health-care staff or resources to achieve this goal. Study design Six weeks postpartum, women with GDM from an academic private practice were asked to check fingerstick blood glucose (FAST Protocol) four times a day for two days, and then obtain an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The physician consultants saw the women each month during pregnancy and arranged the postpartum testing. Results Two of 69 refused to be consented. Twelve of the remaining 67(18%) women completed both the FAST regimen and the OGTT, three completed only the OGTT and five completed only the FAST regimen for a final follow-up rate of 20/67 (30%). The demands of caring for a newborn, or the annoyance of fingersticks, were barriers to compliance. Conclusions In spite of intense physician involvement, this home testing regimen was not associated with an increase in the rates of women participating in postpartum glucose assessments.

  14. Effect of a low glycaemic index diet in gestational diabetes mellitus on post-natal outcomes after 3 months of birth: a pilot follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Markovic, Tania P; Ross, Glynis P; Foote, Deborah; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2015-07-01

    A low glycaemic index (LGI) diet during pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may offer benefits to the mother and infant pair beyond those during pregnancy. We aimed to investigate the effect of an LGI diet during pregnancy complicated with GDM on early post-natal outcomes. Fifty-eight women (age: 23-41 years; mean ± SD pre-pregnancy body mass index: 24.5 ± 5.6 kg m(-2) ) who had GDM and followed either an LGI diet (n = 33) or a conventional high-fibre diet (HF; n = 25) during pregnancy had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and blood lipid tests at 3 months post-partum. Anthropometric assessments were conducted for 55 mother-infant pairs. The glycaemic index of the antenatal diets differed modestly (mean ± SD: 46.8 ± 5.4 vs. 52.4 ± 4.4; P < 0.001), but there were no significant differences in any of the post-natal outcomes. In conclusion, an LGI diet during pregnancy complicated by GDM has outcomes similar to those of a conventional healthy diet. Adequately powered studies should explore the potential beneficial effects of LGI diet on risk factors for chronic disease.

  15. Role of T-Cell Polarization and Inflammation and Their Modulation by n-3 Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes and Macrosomia.

    PubMed

    Hichami, A; Grissa, O; Mrizak, I; Benammar, C; Khan, N A

    2016-01-01

    Th (T helper) cells are differentiated into either Th1 or Th2 phenotype. It is generally considered that Th1 phenotype is proinflammatory, whereas Th2 phenotype exerts anti-inflammatory or protective effects. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been associated with a decreased Th1 phenotype, whereas macrosomia is marked with high expression of Th1 cytokines. Besides, these two pathological situations are marked with high concentrations of inflammatory mediators like tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), known to play a pivotal role in insulin resistance. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may exert a beneficial effect by shifting Th1/Th2 balance to a Th2 phenotype and increasing insulin sensitivity. In this paper, we shed light on the role of T-cell malfunction that leads to an inflammatory and pathophysiological state, related to insulin resistance in GDM and macrosomia. We will also discuss the nutritional management of these pathologies by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). PMID:27313878

  16. Gene expression in term placentas is regulated more by spinal or epidural anesthesia than by late-onset preeclampsia or gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lekva, Tove; Lyle, Robert; Roland, Marie Cecilie Paasche; Friis, Camilla; Bianchi, Diana W.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Norwitz, Errol R.; Bollerslev, Jens; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are common complications of pregnancy, but the mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unclear. The aim was to identify the extent of altered gene expression in term placentas from pregnant women with late-onset PE and GDM compared to controls. RNAseq identified few significantly differentially regulated genes in placental biopsies between PE, GDM, or uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 10 each group). Five genes were altered in placentas from PE including 4 non-coding genes and Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2). No genes were significantly regulated by GDM. In contrast, many genes were significantly regulated by fetal, maternal and delivery-specific variables, particularly spinal and epidural anesthesia. We selected ANGPT2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 14 (CXCL14) to test with qPCR in a larger set of placentas (n = 475) and found no differences between the groups. However, regression analysis revealed a stronger association between placental ANGPT2 and CXCL14 mRNA expression and fetal, maternal and delivery-specific variables than diagnostic group. To conclude, the gene expression in term placentas are highly affected by fetal, maternal and delivery specific variables. Few regulated genes were found in late-onset PE and GDM placentas, which may suggest that these conditions could be more affected by maternal factors. PMID:27405415

  17. Role of T-Cell Polarization and Inflammation and Their Modulation by n-3 Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes and Macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    Hichami, A.; Grissa, O.; Mrizak, I.; Benammar, C.; Khan, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Th (T helper) cells are differentiated into either Th1 or Th2 phenotype. It is generally considered that Th1 phenotype is proinflammatory, whereas Th2 phenotype exerts anti-inflammatory or protective effects. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been associated with a decreased Th1 phenotype, whereas macrosomia is marked with high expression of Th1 cytokines. Besides, these two pathological situations are marked with high concentrations of inflammatory mediators like tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), known to play a pivotal role in insulin resistance. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may exert a beneficial effect by shifting Th1/Th2 balance to a Th2 phenotype and increasing insulin sensitivity. In this paper, we shed light on the role of T-cell malfunction that leads to an inflammatory and pathophysiological state, related to insulin resistance in GDM and macrosomia. We will also discuss the nutritional management of these pathologies by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). PMID:27313878

  18. Cesarean scar pregnancy: uterine artery embolization combined with a hysterectomy at 13 weeks' gestation--a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kwaśniewska, Anna; Stupak, Aleksandra; Krzyzanowski, Arkadiusz; Pietura, Radoslaw; Kotarski, Jan

    2014-12-01

    A cesarean scar pregnancy is a pregnancy located within the uterine muscle after previous cesarean sections. Recent years have shown a significant increase in the rate of CS and an improvement in the ultrasound diagnosis, and therefore a trend towards an increase in the rate of CSP cases has been reported in many countries. We report on a case of CSP diagnosed using ultrasound at 5/6 weeks'gestation and confirmedbymagnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent surgical management at 13 weeks, combined with the chemioembolization of the uterine arteries. The current review aims to update the knowledge of the available treatment modalities.

  19. Can the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Be Delayed by a Group-Based Lifestyle Intervention in Women with Prediabetes following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM)? Findings from a Randomized Control Mixed Methods Trial

    PubMed Central

    O'Dea, Angela; Tierney, Marie; McGuire, Brian E.; Newell, John; Glynn, Liam G.; Gibson, Irene; Noctor, Eoin; Danyliv, Andrii; Connolly, Susan B.; Dunne, Fidelma P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention programme for women with prediabetes following gestational diabetes (GDM). Design. A two-group, mixed methods randomized controlled trial in which 50 women with a history of GDM and abnormal glucose tolerance postpartum were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 24) or wait control (n = 26) and postintervention qualitative interviews with participants. Main Outcome Measures. Modifiable biochemical, anthropometric, behavioural, and psychosocial risk factors associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The primary outcome variable was the change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) from study entry to one-year follow-up. Results. At one-year follow-up, the intervention group showed significant improvements over the wait control group on stress, diet self-efficacy, and quality of life. There was no evidence of an effect of the intervention on measures of biochemistry or anthropometry; the effect on one health behaviour, diet adherence, was close to significance. Conclusions. Prevention programmes must tackle the barriers to participation faced by this population; home-based interventions should be investigated. Strategies for promoting long-term health self-management need to be developed and tested. PMID:26347894

  20. Low glycaemic index diets improve glucose tolerance and body weight in women with previous history of gestational diabetes: a six months randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) increases risks for type 2 diabetes and weight management is recommended to reduce the risk. Conventional dietary recommendations (energy-restricted, low fat) have limited success in women with previous GDM. The effect of lowering Glycaemic Index (GI) in managing glycaemic variables and body weight in women post-GDM is unknown. Objective To evaluate the effects of conventional dietary recommendations administered with and without additional low-GI education, in the management of glucose tolerance and body weight in Asian women with previous GDM. Method Seventy seven Asian, non-diabetic women with previous GDM, between 20- 40y were randomised into Conventional healthy dietary recommendation (CHDR) and low GI (LGI) groups. CHDR received conventional dietary recommendations only (energy restricted, low in fat and refined sugars, high-fibre). LGI group received advice on lowering GI in addition. Fasting and 2-h post-load blood glucose after 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (2HPP) were measured at baseline and 6 months after intervention. Anthropometry and dietary intake were assessed at baseline, three and six months after intervention. The study is registered at the Malaysian National Medical Research Register (NMRR) with Research ID: 5183. Results After 6 months, significant reductions in body weight, BMI and waist-to-hip ratio were observed only in LGI group (P<0.05). Mean BMI changes were significantly different between groups (LGI vs. CHDR: -0.6 vs. 0 kg/m2, P= 0.03). More subjects achieved weight loss ≥5% in LGI compared to CHDR group (33% vs. 8%, P=0.01). Changes in 2HPP were significantly different between groups (LGI vs. CHDR: median (IQR): -0.2(2.8) vs. +0.8 (2.0) mmol/L, P=0.025). Subjects with baseline fasting insulin≥2 μIU/ml had greater 2HPP reductions in LGI group compared to those in the CHDR group (−1.9±0.42 vs. +1.31±1.4 mmol/L, P<0.001). After 6 months, LGI group diets showed significantly lower

  1. Fixed-dose combinations in type 2 diabetes - role of the canagliflozin metformin combination.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Joshua W; Fleming, Laurie W; Davis, Courtney S

    2015-01-01

    Canagliflozin-metformin is one of the newest combination therapies available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Canagliflozin is an inhibitor of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 which causes an increase in the urinary excretion of glucose. In the present article, we review the safety and efficacy of canagliflozin and metformin from data obtained from Phase III metformin add-on therapy clinical trials as there are no studies to date that specifically evaluate the combination of metformin and canagliflozin. Trials included in this review were dual-therapy trials of subjects who were already taking background metformin and were assigned to receive canagliflozin, glimepiride, or sitagliptin. The addition of canagliflozin to metformin resulted in a decrease in HbA1c of 0.73%-0.93%. Canagliflozin 100 mg was considered to be non-inferior to glimepiride and sitagliptin 100 mg with the canagliflozin 300 mg dose being statistically superior to sitagliptin and glimepiride. Other advantages of the use of canagliflozin are reduction in weight (3.3-4.0 kg) and systolic blood pressure (3.3-4.7 mmHg). The primary disadvantages are potential genital mycotic infections, hypotension, and gastrointestinal side effects from metformin. All things considered, this combination appears to be safe and effective in clinical trials and represents a promising option for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:26150733

  2. Increased Proportion of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Population in Cord Blood of Neonates Born to Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hadarits, Orsolya; Zóka, András; Barna, Gábor; Al-Aissa, Zahra; Rosta, Klára; Rigó, János; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Somogyi, Anikó; Firneisz, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) population in the cord blood of neonates born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a hypothesis generating pilot study, due to that, neonatal polycythemia may be the consequence of GDM pregnancy. Forty-five pregnant women with GDM (last trimester mean HbA1C = 33.9 mmol/mol) and 42 (nondiabetic) control pregnant women were enrolled after their routine 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between the 24th and 28th gestational week (with expected differences in their mean routine clinical characteristics: plasma glucose at OGTT: 0' = 5.07 vs. 4.62 mM, 120' = 8.9 vs. 5.76 mM, age = 35.07 vs. 31.66 years, prepregnancy body mass index = 27.9 vs. 23.9 kg/m(2), GDM vs. control, respectively) on a voluntary basis after signing the informed consent. EDTA-treated cord blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry and the software Kaluza1.2 using CD45 and CD34-specific fluorescent antibodies to identify the HSPC population (CD34(+) cells within the CD45(dim) blast gate). The proportion of CD34(+)CD45(dim) HSPCs among the nucleated cells was significantly (P < 0.05, statistical power = 60.8%) higher in the cord blood samples of neonates born to mothers with GDM (median 0.38%) compared to neonates born to nondiabetic mothers (median 0.32%) and according to treatment types (P < 0.05) median: control 0.32%, GDM-diet only 0.37%, GDM-on insulin 0.45%; control versus GDM on insulin (P < 0.05). The increased proportion of circulating CD34(+)CD45(dim) cells in the cord blood may possibly be related to altered fetal stem cell mobilization in GDM pregnancy, yet these results should be interpreted only as preliminary due to the small sample sizes.

  3. The Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Post-Partum Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Gestational Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Majid; Piri, Zahra; Mohammadian, Farnaz; Kamali, Koorosh; Amir Moghadami, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypovitaminosis D has been associated with the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in many observational studies. Objectives We report the first study of the impact of prenatal vitamin D supplementation on postpartum dysglycemia in GDM patients in a randomized clinical trial. Patients and Methods Women with GDM at 12 - 32 weeks of gestation were assigned randomly to either the intervention group (in which serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25OHD] levels were measured immediately, n = 48) or the control group (in which the serum was stored and assayed at 6 - 12 weeks post-partum, n = 48). Participants with initial serum 25OHD < 30 ng/mL in the intervention group were instructed to take a total of 700,000 IU vitamin D3 during pregnancy. The primary outcomes were fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, 2-h post 75 g glucose load plasma glucose (2-hPLG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HbA1C, and 25 OHD at 6 - 12 weeks after delivery. Results The mean ± SD of serum 25OHD in the intervention group raised dramatically from 14.6 ± 6.3 to 32.4 ± 14.4 ng/mL, whereas no significant change occurred in the control group (from 17.7 ± 6.1 to 19.3 ± 9.6 ng/mL, P < 0.001). Thirteen participants developed dysglycemia in each group. Mean FPG, 2-hPLG, and HOMA-IR were not significantly different between the groups. There was no significant difference between the groups for maternal and neonatal outcomes. Conclusions Although the high vitamin D supplementation dose in the present study (compared to the 400 IU/day dose usually recommended for pregnancy) safely increases the serum 25OHD, in GDM cases, the higher dose does not affect the plasma glucose level or insulin resistance at short term follow-up after delivery. PMID:27679649

  4. Anti-diabetic activities of Acanthopanax senticosus polysaccharide (ASP) in combination with metformin.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianfang; Fu, Jufang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Nanyan; Gao, Bin; Fu, Guoqiang; Tu, Yanyang; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2012-04-01

    Combination therapy had become very popular currently for the diabetes mellitus and its complications, because of long term unreasonable drug use and adverse reaction to human body. In this study, a polysaccharide (ASP) from the roots of Acanthopanax senticosus was evaluated as an adjuvant with metformin for antidiabetic therapy in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The result identified ASP plus metformin had a more beneficial promotion for relieving the symptoms of diabetes and reversing liver and kidney damage to normal level than only metfomin administration to diabetic rats. The blood glucose, blood lipid (TC and TG), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), AST, ALT, ALP, total bilirubin, creatinine and urea levels in diabetic rats were decreased by combination of ASP and metformin. Furthermore, the body weight, liver glycogen formation, antioxidant substance (GSH) and antioxidant enzyme (SOD and GPX) levels increased evidently in diabetic mice treated with both ASP and metformin. In particular, sometimes ASP plus metformin could significantly reverse the pathophysiologic parameters of diabetic rats to normal level than only metformin administration. Therefore ASP could be developed to a new adjuvant combined with metformin for diabetes mellitus therapy in the future.

  5. Optimizing combination treatment in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Sibilla, Salvadeo

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining the suggested glycemic control is the most important achievement in order to prevent cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Monotherapy often fails after a period of treatment, so that multiple drugs are needed to achieve effective glycemic control. A number of oral glucose lowering drugs is now available such as metformin, sulfonylureas, non-sulfonylureas secretagogues (metiglinides derivatives), alpha-glucosidases inhibitors, and the newest agent: thiazolidinediones (TZD). The possible associations of oral glucose lowering drugs for optimal treatment of type 2 diabetes are briefly reviewed. In particular, the effects of different classes of drugs on cardiovascular risk factors (and particular hypertension and dyslipidemia) and well recognized cardiovascular disease markers in type 2 diabetes are analyzed: in this context TZD appear the more innovative drugs and have been shown to play a key role in the management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and endothelial disfunction in diabetic patients. The possible adverse effects derived from the association of different drug classes are also considered. PMID:18078018

  6. A Randomized Clinical Trial of an Intensive Behavior Education Program in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Women Designed to Improve Glucose Levels on the 2-Hour Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

    PubMed

    Durnwald, Celeste P; Kallan, Michael J; Allison, Kelly C; Sammel, Mary D; Wisch, Susan; Elovitz, Michal; Parry, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    Objective To evaluate whether women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) enrolled in an intensive behavior education program (IBEP) demonstrate lower mean fasting glucose levels on the 2-hour 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (2-hour OGTT) at 6 to 12 weeks postpartum compared with women who undergo routine GDM management. Study Design A prospective randomized controlled trial of women diagnosed with GDM was conducted. Exclusion criteria were GDM diagnosis ≥ 33 weeks or < 20 weeks. Women were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms: (1) routine GDM management or (2) an IBEP. Women underwent a 2-hour OGTT at 6 to 12 weeks postpartum. Fisher exact test, t-test, and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used as appropriate. Results Of the 101 women randomized, 49 were assigned to IBEP and 52 received routine GDM management. There was no difference in mean fasting and 2-hour glucose levels on the postpartum 2-hour OGTT between the IBEP and routine management group (88.5 ± 22.9 mg/dL vs. 85.2 ± 13.3 mg/dL, p = 0.49 and 109.8 ± 38.5 mg/dL vs. 109.4 ± 40.8 mg/dL, p = 0.97, respectively). Conclusion GDM women enrolled in a healthy lifestyle intervention program did not demonstrate lower glucose values on the postpartum 2-hour OGTT.

  7. Dietary Patterns and Their Associations with the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) in Korean Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Moon-Kyung; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine dietary pattern, nutritional intake, and diet quality of Korean pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Between October 2008 and May 2012, 166 pregnant women diagnosed with GDM completed a questionnaire and dietary intake was assessed using a 3-day food record. Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations were measured and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Two major dietary patterns ("carbohydrate and vegetable" and "western" patterns) were identified through factor analysis. Dietary pattern scores for each dietary pattern were categorized into tertiles. The dietary quality index-international (DQI-I) was used to measure overall diet quality. Subjects with higher carbohydrate and vegetable pattern scores reported less physical activity (p < 0.05) and have higher diastolic blood pressure levels (p = 0.05). After adjusting for age and energy intake, higher carbohydrate and vegetable pattern scores were associated with higher sodium intakes (p = 0.02), but lower intakes of fat (p = 0.002) and other micronutrients. On the other hand, higher western pattern scores were associated with higher fat intake (p = 0.0001), but lower intakes of sodium (p = 0.01) and other micronutrients. Higher scores for both dietary patterns were associated with lower scores in the moderation category of the DQI-I (p < 0.0001). HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly lower among participants with high DQI-I than those with low DQI-I (p < 0.05). The study findings suggest that many Korean women with GDM do not consume nutritionally adequate or balanced diets, regardless of dietary pattern. PMID:26566516

  8. Cost-effectiveness of an exercise program during pregnancy to prevent gestational diabetes: Results of an economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. GDM and the risks associated with GDM lead to increased health care costs and losses in productivity. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether the FitFor2 exercise program during pregnancy is cost-effective from a societal perspective as compared to standard care. Methods A randomised controlled trial (RCT) and simultaneous economic evaluation of the FitFor2 program were conducted. Pregnant women at risk for GDM were randomised to an exercise program to prevent high maternal blood glucose (n = 62) or to standard care (n = 59). The exercise program consisted of two sessions of aerobic and strengthening exercises per week. Clinical outcome measures were maternal fasting blood glucose levels, insulin sensitivity and infant birth weight. Quality of life was measured using the EuroQol 5-D and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were calculated. Resource utilization and sick leave data were collected by questionnaires. Data were analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputations. Bootstrapping techniques estimated the uncertainty surrounding the cost differences and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results There were no statistically significant differences in any outcome measure. During pregnancy, total health care costs and costs of productivity losses were statistically non-significant (mean difference €1308; 95%CI €-229 - €3204). The cost-effectiveness analyses showed that the exercise program was not cost-effective in comparison to the control group for blood glucose levels, insulin sensitivity, infant birth weight or QALYs. Conclusion The twice-weekly exercise program for pregnant women at risk for GDM evaluated in the present study was not cost-effective compared to standard care. Based on these results, implementation of this exercise program for the prevention of GDM cannot be

  9. Effects of a Multispecies Probiotic Mixture on Glycemic Control and Inflammatory Status in Women with Gestational Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Sadaf; Jafarnejad, Farzan; Arab, Arman

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This trial aims to examine the effects of a Probiotic Mixture (VSL#3) on glycemic status and inflammatory markers, in women with GDM. Materials and Methods. Over a period of 8 weeks, 82 women with gestational diabetes were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n = 41) which were given VSL#3 capsule or to a control group which were given placebo capsule (n = 41). Fasting plasma glucose, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, glycosylated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, Interferon gamma, and interleukin-10 were measured before and after the intervention. Results. After 8 wk of supplementation FPG, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, and insulin levels remained unchanged in the probiotic and placebo groups. The comparison between the two groups showed no significant differences with FPG and HbA1c, but there were significant differences in insulin levels and HOMA-IR (16.6 ± 5.9; 3.7 ± 1.5, resp.). Unlike the levels of IFN-g (19.21 ± 16.6), there was a significant decrease in levels of IL-6 (3.81 ± 0.7), TNF-α (3.10 ± 1.1), and hs-CRP (4927.4 ± 924.6). No significant increase was observed in IL-10 (3.11 ± 5.7) in the intervention group as compared with the control group. Conclusions. In women with GDM, supplementation with probiotics (VSL#3) may help to modulate some inflammatory markers and may have benefits on glycemic control. PMID:27429803

  10. Previous gestational diabetes is independently associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, similarly to metabolic syndrome – a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, consequently, a higher cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to compare the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) from young women with pGDM to those with metabolic syndrome (MS) and to healthy controls (CG) to verify whether a past history of pGDM could be independently associated with increased cIMT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed in two academic referral centers. Seventy-nine women with pGDM, 30 women with MS, and 60 CG aged between 18 and 47 years were enrolled. They all underwent physical examination and had blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), and triglycerides determined. The cIMT was measured by ultrasound in several carotid segments. The primary endpoint was cIMT and clinically relevant parameters included as predictors were: age, systolic blood pressure, waist, BMI, total cholesterol, LDLc, triglycerides, fasting glucose, previous history of GDM as a whole group, previous history of GDM without MS, presence of DM, presence of MS, and parity. Results cIMT was significantly higher in pGDM when compared to CG in all sites of measurements (P < 0.05) except for the right common carotid. The pGDM women showed similar cIMT measurements to MS in all sites of measurements, except for the left carotid bifurcation, where it was significantly higher than MS (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis which included classical cardiovascular risk factors and was adjusted for confounders, pGDM was shown to be independently associated with increased composite cIMT (P < 0.01). The pGDM without risk factors further showed similar cIMT to MS (P > 0.05) and an increased cIMT when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Conclusions Previous GDM was independently associated with increased composite cIMT in this young population, similarly to those with

  11. Efficacy of combination herbal product (Curcuma longa and Eugenia jambolana) used for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the efficacy of a combination herbal product that is traditionally used for managing diabetes mellitus. Herbal drug contains Curcuma longa and Eugenia jambolanain the ratio of 1:1. It was orally administered at the dose of 1082 mg/70 kg twice a day for a period of 6 weeks to alloxan induced diabetic rats and compared with glibenclamide (standard). The effects of drug were observed at intervals, with respect to random and fasting glucose levels. HbA1C was also monitored after the drug treatment to monitor the overall diabetic effect. Results revealed that the combination of two herbs significantly reduced fasting and random glucose levels with HbA1C of less than 6% (p<0.001) in comparison to diabetic control. The control of fasting blood glucose levels by herbal combination is similar to the standard drug, glibenclamide (p<0.05). Random glucose levels by herbal combination is better than standard drug after one week and six weeks of treatment (p<0.01 and p<0.001 respectively) and similar after third week of treatment (p<0.05). Also, herbal drug combination showed HbA1C closer to the standard drug. It shows that this herbal combination can be of potential benefit in managing diabetes mellitus in future. PMID:26826833

  12. Efficacy of combination herbal product (Curcuma longa and Eugenia jambolana) used for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the efficacy of a combination herbal product that is traditionally used for managing diabetes mellitus. Herbal drug contains Curcuma longa and Eugenia jambolanain the ratio of 1:1. It was orally administered at the dose of 1082 mg/70 kg twice a day for a period of 6 weeks to alloxan induced diabetic rats and compared with glibenclamide (standard). The effects of drug were observed at intervals, with respect to random and fasting glucose levels. HbA1C was also monitored after the drug treatment to monitor the overall diabetic effect. Results revealed that the combination of two herbs significantly reduced fasting and random glucose levels with HbA1C of less than 6% (p<0.001) in comparison to diabetic control. The control of fasting blood glucose levels by herbal combination is similar to the standard drug, glibenclamide (p<0.05). Random glucose levels by herbal combination is better than standard drug after one week and six weeks of treatment (p<0.01 and p<0.001 respectively) and similar after third week of treatment (p<0.05). Also, herbal drug combination showed HbA1C closer to the standard drug. It shows that this herbal combination can be of potential benefit in managing diabetes mellitus in future.

  13. Managing hypertension in diabetic patients – focus on trandolapril/verapamil combination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Hypertensive diabetes individuals are at higher risk for cardiovascular events and progression to end stage renal disease. Several well conducted clinical trials indicate that aggressive treatment of hypertension in individual with diabetes reduces these complications. Combinations of two or more antihypertensive drugs are frequently required to reach the target blood pressure and to improve the cardiovascular and renal outcomes in these patients. There are physiological and clinical rationales for renin-angiotensin system blockade in hypertensive diabetics. Trandolapril/verapamil sustained released (SR) is a fixed-dose combination of trandolapril and a sustained release formulation of verapamil and indicated in treatment of hypertension in patients who require more than one drug to reach target blood pressure. The antihypertensive efficacy of trandolapril/verapamil SR has been evaluated extensively in large trials. In the INVEST trial, a verapamil SR-based treatment strategy that included trandolapril in most patients was effective in reducing the primary outcome in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. The new onset of diabetes was also significantly lower in the verapamil SR/trandolapril treatment group in comparison with those on the atenolol/hydroclorothiazide treatment group. The BErgamo NEphrologic DIabetes Complications Trial (BENEDICT) documented that in hypertensive diabetes and normoalbuminuria, trandolapril plus verapamil or trandolapril alone delayed the onset of microalbuminuria independent of their blood pressure-reducing effect. Thus, trandolapril/verapamil is an effective option for treatment of hypertensive diabetes patients requiring more than one agent to achieve target blood pressure. PMID:17969376

  14. Lessons from implementing a combined workflow-informatics system for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Zai, Adrian H; Grant, Richard W; Estey, Greg; Lester, William T; Andrews, Carl T; Yee, Ronnie; Mort, Elizabeth; Chueh, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    Shortcomings surrounding the care of patients with diabetes have been attributed largely to a fragmented, disorganized, and duplicative health care system that focuses more on acute conditions and complications than on managing chronic disease. To address these shortcomings, we developed a diabetes registry population management application to change the way our staff manages patients with diabetes. Use of this new application has helped us coordinate the responsibilities for intervening and monitoring patients in the registry among different users. Our experiences using this combined workflow-informatics intervention system suggest that integrating a chronic disease registry into clinical workflow for the treatment of chronic conditions creates a useful and efficient tool for managing disease.

  15. Fixed-dose combination of sitagliptin and metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan K

    2009-01-01

    JanumetTM, a fixed dose combination of sitagliptin/metformin HCL manufactured by Merck Pharmaceuticals, has received US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes, that are inadequately controlled, either by sitagliptin or metformin alone or together in free-dose combination form. Sitagliptin, an inhibitor of the enzyme DDP-4, assists patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to achieve glycemic control. It has been shown to be safe and effective at 100 mg daily doses. The effect of giving sitagliptin in combination with metformin is thought to have a complimentary and possibly additive effect on glycemic control. PMID:21437126

  16. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes among Asian Indian pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes mellitus: A situational analysis study (WINGS-3)

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Bhavadharini, Balaji; Maheswari, Kumar; Kalaiyarasi, Gunasekaran; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ranjit, Unnikrishnan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Joseph, Kurian; Rekha, Kurian; Nallaperumal, Sivagnanam; Malanda, Belma; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Belton, Anne; Uma, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the existing maternal and fetal outcomes in Asian Indian women with or without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) before the development of the Women in India with GDM Strategy (WINGS) GDM model of care (MOC). Materials and Methods: Records of pregnant women were extracted retrospectively from three maternity centers in Chennai. GDM was diagnosed using the International Association for Pregnancy Study Groups criteria or the Carpenter and Coustan criteria. Demographic details, obstetric history, antenatal follow-up, treatment for GDM, and outcomes of delivery were collected from the electronic medical records. Results: Of the 3642 records analyzed, 799 (21.9%) had GDM, of whom 456 (57.1%) were treated with insulin and medical nutrition therapy (MNT), 339 (42.4%) with MNT alone, and 4 (0.5%) with metformin. Women with GDM were older than those without (28.5 ± 4.5 vs. 27.1 ± 4.5 years; P < 0.001) and had higher mean body mass index at first booking (26.4 ± 5.2 kg/m2 vs. 25.2 ± 5.1 kg/m2; P < 0.001). Rates of cesarean section (26.2% vs. 18.7%; P < 0.001), preeclampsia (1.8% vs. 0.8%; P = 0.04), and macrosomia (13.9% vs. 10.8%; P = 0.02) were significantly higher among women with GDM. In women with GDM treated with insulin and MNT, emergency cesarean section (16.2% vs. 36.6%; P < 0.0001), preeclampsia (0.7% vs. 3.2%; P = 0.015), and macrosomia (9.9% vs. 18.6%; P = 0.0006) were significantly lesser compared to those treated with MNT alone. Conclusion: Pregnancy outcomes were in general worse in GDM women. Treatment with insulin was associated with a significantly lower risk of complications. However, in countries with limited access to insulin and other medicines may lead to poor follow-up and management of GDM. Data from this retrospective study will form the basis for the development of the WINGS GDM MOC, which will address these gaps in GDM care in low-resource settings. PMID:27366715

  17. Positive Correlation between Enhanced Expression of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB with Insulin Resistance in Placentae of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui; Wang, Chen; Lin, Li; Ma, Jingmei; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a critical factor of the pathophysiology of Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Studies on key organs involved in IR, such as livers and adipose tissues, showed that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can regulate insulin sensitivity. As a maternal-fetal interface with multi-functions, placentae could contribute to the development of IR for GDM. Thus, we investigated the expressions of TLR4/Myeloid Differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/Nuclear Factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) in term placentae from 33 GDM women and 36 healthy pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance, evaluated local and systemic IR and furthermore identified the association between placental TLR4 and IR. TLR4 protein was expressed in various cells of term placenta, particularly in syncytiotrophoblast of villi. Compared with normal pregnancy, the expression of TLR4/MyD88/NF-kB pathway increased in the placenta of GDM (p<0.05), and these differences were more pronounced in the maternal section of the placenta and the syncytiotrophoblast of villi. In addition, more severe IR was observed in the placenta of GDM patients than the control group, evidenced with higher pIRS-1(ser312) (p<0.001) and lower IRS-1 (p<0.05) as well as pAkt proteins (p<0.01). The expression of TLR4 in placentae is positively correlated with local IR (pIRS-1: r = 0.76, p <0.001 and pAkt: r = -0.47, p <0.001) and maternal fasting (r = 0.42, p <0.01), one-hour (r = 0.52, p <0.01) and two-hour glucose (r = 0.54, p <0.01) at OGTT. We found an that enhanced expression of the TLR4-MyD88-NF-kB pathway occurs in GDM placentae, which positively correlates with heightened local IR in placentae and higher maternal hyperglycemia. The TLR4/MyD88/NF-kB pathway may play a potential role in the development of IR in placentae of GDM. PMID:27340831

  18. Combination of Vildagliptin and Pioglitazone in Experimental Type 2 Diabetes in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Rowaida; Sakr, Ahmed; Salama, Mona; El Sarha, Ashgan

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical Research The majority of studies on vildagliptin and pioglitazone have focused on their combination in glycemic control. The aim of the present study was to investigate their effects in combination on (i) hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and (ii) on organs involved in the pathophysiology of diabetes, pancreas, kidney and liver. Type 2 diabetes was induced using low-dose streptozotocin in male Wistar rats. Diabetic rats were treated for 4 weeks, with vildagliptin (10 mg/kg/day), pioglitazone (10 mg/kg/day) and their combination. Diabetic rats showed elevated fasting serum glucose, fasting serum insulin, serum transaminases together with a deleterious lipid profile and elevated serum creatinine and urea concentrations. Serum levels of the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitrite/nitrate were also elevated compared to normal rats. Oxidative stress was manifested by lowered hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Pancreatic sections from diabetic rats showed degenerated islets with poorly maintained architecture that was prevented by drug treatment. Pioglitazone was generally more effective than vildagliptin in the studied parameters except for the lipid profile where the effect of both drugs was comparable and for the liver enzymes and renal parameters where vildagliptin was more effective. The combination of vildagliptin and pioglitazone produced superior effects than either drug alone. Drug Dev Res 77 : 251-257, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27520857

  19. Berberine in Combination with Insulin Has Additive Effects on Titanium Implants Osseointegration in Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Zhijian, Huang; Lei, Li; Wenchuan, Chen; Zhimin, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of berberine in combination with insulin on early osseointegration of implants in diabetic rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: healthy rats were used as control (HC), and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with insulin, berberine, berberine + insulin (IB), or no treatment. Each rat received one machined-surface cp-Ti implant into the right tibia and was given insulin injection and/or gavage feeding with berberine daily for 8 weeks until being sacrificed. Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein (BGP) were analyzed in each group. Peri-implant mineral apposition was marked by fluorochrome double-labeling and osseointegration was histomorphologically examined. The ALP and BGP levels decreased in diabetic rats but were successfully corrected by insulin and berberine combined treatment. Moreover, untreated diabetic rats had less labeled mineral apposition and impaired osseointegration. In contrast, Groups I, B, and IB were observed with increased peri-implant bone formation. The combination treatment of insulin and berberine was more effective than each administrated as a monotherapy. These results suggest that berberine combined with insulin could promote osseointegration in diabetic rats, thereby highlighting its potential application to patients, though further studies are needed. PMID:26783411

  20. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing using a novel protease–anti-protease combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Nguyen, Trung T.; Suckow, Mark A.; Wolter, William R.; Gooyit, Major; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2015-01-01

    Nonhealing chronic wounds are major complications of diabetes resulting in >70,000 annual lower-limb amputations in the United States alone. The reasons the diabetic wound is recalcitrant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate its repair. We previously identified two active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-8 and MMP-9, in the wounds of db/db mice. We argued that the former might play a role in the body’s response to wound healing and that the latter is the pathological consequence of the disease with detrimental effects. Here we demonstrate that the use of compound ND-336, a novel highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MMP-14, accelerates diabetic wound healing by lowering inflammation and by enhancing angiogenesis and re-epithelialization of the wound, thereby reversing the pathological condition. The detrimental role of MMP-9 in the pathology of diabetic wounds was confirmed further by the study of diabetic MMP-9–knockout mice, which exhibited wounds more prone to healing. Furthermore, topical administration of active recombinant MMP-8 also accelerated diabetic wound healing as a consequence of complete re-epithelialization, diminished inflammation, and enhanced angiogenesis. The combined topical application of ND-336 (a small molecule) and the active recombinant MMP-8 (an enzyme) enhanced healing even more, in a strategy that holds considerable promise in healing of diabetic wounds. PMID:26598687

  1. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing using a novel protease-anti-protease combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Nguyen, Trung T; Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Gooyit, Major; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2015-12-01

    Nonhealing chronic wounds are major complications of diabetes resulting in >70,000 annual lower-limb amputations in the United States alone. The reasons the diabetic wound is recalcitrant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate its repair. We previously identified two active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-8 and MMP-9, in the wounds of db/db mice. We argued that the former might play a role in the body's response to wound healing and that the latter is the pathological consequence of the disease with detrimental effects. Here we demonstrate that the use of compound ND-336, a novel highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MMP-14, accelerates diabetic wound healing by lowering inflammation and by enhancing angiogenesis and re-epithelialization of the wound, thereby reversing the pathological condition. The detrimental role of MMP-9 in the pathology of diabetic wounds was confirmed further by the study of diabetic MMP-9-knockout mice, which exhibited wounds more prone to healing. Furthermore, topical administration of active recombinant MMP-8 also accelerated diabetic wound healing as a consequence of complete re-epithelialization, diminished inflammation, and enhanced angiogenesis. The combined topical application of ND-336 (a small molecule) and the active recombinant MMP-8 (an enzyme) enhanced healing even more, in a strategy that holds considerable promise in healing of diabetic wounds.

  2. Telemedicine for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (TeleGDM): A Mixed-Method Study Protocol of Effects of a Web-Based GDM Support System on Health Service Utilization, Maternal and Fetal Outcomes, Costs, and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kwang; Blackberry, Irene; Gray, Kathleen; Furler, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Women with insulin-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) require close monitoring and support to manage their diabetes. Recent changes to the diagnostic criteria have implications for service provision stemming from increased prevalence, suggesting an increased burden on health services in the future. Telemedicine may augment usual care and mitigate service burdens without compromising clinical outcomes but evidence in GDM is limited. Objective The Telemedicine for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (TeleGDM) trial aims to explore the use of telemedicine in supporting care and management of women with GDM treated with insulin. Methods The TeleGDM is a mixed-methods study comprising an exploratory randomized controlled trial (RCT) and a qualitative evaluation using semistructured interviews. It involves women with insulin-treated GDM who are up to 35 weeks gestation. Participating patients (n=100) are recruited face-to-face in outpatient GDM clinics at an outer metropolitan tertiary hospital with a culturally diverse catchment and a regional tertiary hospital. The second group of participants (n=8) comprises Credentialed Diabetes Educator Registered Nurses involved in routine care of the women with GDM at the participating clinics. The RCT involves use of a Web-based patient-controlled personal health record for GDM data sharing between patients and clinicians compared to usual care. Outcomes include service utilization, maternal and fetal outcomes (eg, glycemic control, 2nd and 3rd trimester fetal size, type of delivery, baby birth weight), diabetes self-efficacy, satisfaction, and costs. Semistructured interviews will be used to examine user experiences and acceptability of telemedicine. Results The trial recruitment is currently underway. Results are expected by the end of 2016 and will be reported in a follow-up paper. Conclusions Innovative use of technology in supporting usual care delivery in women with GDM may facilitate timely access to GDM

  3. Associations of White Blood Cell Count,Alanine Aminotransferase,and Aspartate Aminotransferase in the First Trimester withGestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To explore the associations of white blood cell (WBC) count,alanine aminotransferase (ALT),and aspartate aminotransferase(AST) in the first trimester of pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Totally 725 GDM women and 935 women who remained euglycemic throughout pregnancy were enrolled in this study. Pre-pregnancy weight/height were recorded. WBC,ALT,and AST levels were detected between 8 and 12 weeks of pregnancy.At 24 to 28 weeks of pregnancy,the glucose and insulin levels were measured. The WBC,ALT,and AST levels were compared between two groups,and the associations of WBC,ALT,and AST levels with the blood glucose and insulin levels were retrospectively analyzed. Meanwhile,the potential associations of those factors with the occurrence of GDM were analzyed. Results WBC count [9.41(8.15,10.84)?10(9)/L vs. 9.04 (7.64,10.37)?10(9)/L,P=1.0?10(-5)] and ALT levels [18.00(12.00,30.00)U/L vs. 16.00 (11.00,26.00)U/L,P=0.004] in the first trimester of pregnancy were significantly increased in GDM subjects than in normal glucose tolerance(NGT)subjects;however,the AST level showed no significant difference between these two groups [41.00 (26.00,43.00)U/L vs. 41.00 (23.00,43.00)U/L,P=0.588]. Logistic regression analysis illustrated that elevated WBC count was an independent risk factor for GDM after adjustment for age,pre-pregnancy body mass index,blood pressure,and family history of diabetes(OR=1.119,P=0.001). The ROC curve revealed that threshold of WBC count was 7.965?10(9)/L(AUC=0.566,P=1?10(-5)),which had a sensitivity of 79.4% and a specificity of 31.3%. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was positively correlated with WBC count(B=0.051,P=0.022,R(2)=0.083);1-hour blood glucose after oral 50 grams of sugar (B=0.044,P=0.001,R(2)=0.044) and fasting plasma true insulin(B=0.214,P=0.032,R(2)=0.066) were positively correlated

  4. [Correction of dyslipidemia in patients with chronic hepatitis C, combined with diabetes type 2].

    PubMed

    Derbak, M; Boldizhar, P

    2014-01-01

    The article shows the results of treatment of 118 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) which is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). When planning therapeutic interventions in chronic hepatitis C in patients with diabetes, it is considered the presence of visceral obesit , dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. The efficacy of different treatment regimens was studied. Found that the usage of ursodeoxycholic acid and ademetionin in HCV patients with diabetes type 2 receiving standard antiviral therapy (SAVT), significantly make a positive effect on the level of dyslipidemia. The normalization of lipid profile allows for a full course of SAVT, which reduces the frequency of relapse. It is also noted that the simultaneous use of ademetionin and ursodeoxycholic acid in treatment of chronic hepatitis C leads to a reduction of side effects of SAVT. Metabolic therapy may be recommended for patients with chronic hepatitis C in combination with type 2 diabetes in case of SAVT, and at its contraindications or intolerance.

  5. [Correction of dyslipidemia in patients with chronic hepatitis C, combined with diabetes type 2].

    PubMed

    Derbak, M; Boldizhar, P

    2014-01-01

    The article shows the results of treatment of 118 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) which is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). When planning therapeutic interventions in chronic hepatitis C in patients with diabetes, it is considered the presence of visceral obesit , dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. The efficacy of different treatment regimens was studied. Found that the usage of ursodeoxycholic acid and ademetionin in HCV patients with diabetes type 2 receiving standard antiviral therapy (SAVT), significantly make a positive effect on the level of dyslipidemia. The normalization of lipid profile allows for a full course of SAVT, which reduces the frequency of relapse. It is also noted that the simultaneous use of ademetionin and ursodeoxycholic acid in treatment of chronic hepatitis C leads to a reduction of side effects of SAVT. Metabolic therapy may be recommended for patients with chronic hepatitis C in combination with type 2 diabetes in case of SAVT, and at its contraindications or intolerance. PMID:24523328

  6. Gestational diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... control your blood sugar levels, you may need oral medicine (taken by mouth) or insulin therapy (shots). ... is doing well If you need insulin or oral medicine to control your blood sugar, you may need ...

  7. [Antidiabetic fixed-dose combination tablet for the management of type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sakane, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    How to use oral antidiabetic fixed-dose combination tablet for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM)? In addition to diet and exercise, the majority of diabetic patients need drug therapy to achieve optimal glycemic control. Monotherapy with oral antidiabetic agent is the firstline pharmacologic treatment option. However, in order to maintain glycemic control, additional oral antidiabetic agents are often added to monotherapies resulting in dual therapy. Dual therapy can be prescribed as separate pills, or as a single pill containing two agents. Randomized controlled trials of patients requiring dual therapy, have shown fixed-dose combination therapies to have superior efficacy when compared to loose-pills combination therapies. T2DM patients treated with fixed-dose combination therapies may have better adherence, improved satisfaction, and lower direct costs, compared to those treated with loose-pill combination therapies. PMID:22413513

  8. Independent and Combined Effects of Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain on Offspring Growth at 0–3 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the independent and combined effects of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on offspring growth at 0–3 years old. Methods. A total of 826 pairs of nondiabetic mothers and their offspring were recruited in this study. Maternal information was abstracted from medical records and questionnaires. Offspring growth trajectories of weights and BMIs were depicted based on anthropometric measurements. Results. Offspring of mothers who were prepregnancy overweight/obese or obtained excessive GWGs continuously had greater weight and BMI Z-scores throughout the first 3 years of life. Children of prepregnancy overweight/obese mothers with excessive GWGs had a phenotype of higher weight and BMI Z-scores than those prepregnancy overweight/obese ones with nonexcessive GWGs from birth to 18 months. Maternal excessive GWGs increased offspring's risk of overweight/obesity at 12 months (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.03–2.00) and 24 months (AOR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.02–2.25). Combination of excessive prepregnancy BMIs and GWGs was significantly associated with offspring's overweight/obesity at 30 months (AOR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.36–6.53). Conclusions. Maternal prepregnancy overweight/obesity and excessive GWG are both significantly associated with rapid offspring growth from birth to 3 years old. Excessive GWGs strengthen the effects of high maternal prepregnancy BMIs on excessive offspring growth during their early life.

  9. Independent and Combined Effects of Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain on Offspring Growth at 0-3 Years of Age.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wen-Yuan; Lv, Yao; Bao, Yu; Tang, Li; Zhu, Zhi-Wei; Shao, Jie; Zhao, Zheng-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the independent and combined effects of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on offspring growth at 0-3 years old. Methods. A total of 826 pairs of nondiabetic mothers and their offspring were recruited in this study. Maternal information was abstracted from medical records and questionnaires. Offspring growth trajectories of weights and BMIs were depicted based on anthropometric measurements. Results. Offspring of mothers who were prepregnancy overweight/obese or obtained excessive GWGs continuously had greater weight and BMI Z-scores throughout the first 3 years of life. Children of prepregnancy overweight/obese mothers with excessive GWGs had a phenotype of higher weight and BMI Z-scores than those prepregnancy overweight/obese ones with nonexcessive GWGs from birth to 18 months. Maternal excessive GWGs increased offspring's risk of overweight/obesity at 12 months (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.03-2.00) and 24 months (AOR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.02-2.25). Combination of excessive prepregnancy BMIs and GWGs was significantly associated with offspring's overweight/obesity at 30 months (AOR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.36-6.53). Conclusions. Maternal prepregnancy overweight/obesity and excessive GWG are both significantly associated with rapid offspring growth from birth to 3 years old. Excessive GWGs strengthen the effects of high maternal prepregnancy BMIs on excessive offspring growth during their early life. PMID:27652262

  10. Independent and Combined Effects of Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain on Offspring Growth at 0–3 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to investigate the independent and combined effects of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on offspring growth at 0–3 years old. Methods. A total of 826 pairs of nondiabetic mothers and their offspring were recruited in this study. Maternal information was abstracted from medical records and questionnaires. Offspring growth trajectories of weights and BMIs were depicted based on anthropometric measurements. Results. Offspring of mothers who were prepregnancy overweight/obese or obtained excessive GWGs continuously had greater weight and BMI Z-scores throughout the first 3 years of life. Children of prepregnancy overweight/obese mothers with excessive GWGs had a phenotype of higher weight and BMI Z-scores than those prepregnancy overweight/obese ones with nonexcessive GWGs from birth to 18 months. Maternal excessive GWGs increased offspring's risk of overweight/obesity at 12 months (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.03–2.00) and 24 months (AOR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.02–2.25). Combination of excessive prepregnancy BMIs and GWGs was significantly associated with offspring's overweight/obesity at 30 months (AOR = 2.98, 95% CI: 1.36–6.53). Conclusions. Maternal prepregnancy overweight/obesity and excessive GWG are both significantly associated with rapid offspring growth from birth to 3 years old. Excessive GWGs strengthen the effects of high maternal prepregnancy BMIs on excessive offspring growth during their early life. PMID:27652262

  11. Monitoring the Foetal Phase of Gestation in the Queen With a 12.5-MHz Ultrasound Probe and Prediction of the Parturition by Combining the Measurements of Head and Abdominal Diameters.

    PubMed

    Topie, E; Bencharif, D; Briand, L; Tainturier, D

    2015-08-01

    Ten gestations in six domestic shorthair cats (Europeans) were monitored daily during the foetal phase of gestation, from the 28th day after the first mating until parturition, using ultrasound with a 12.5-MHz probe. The development of the various organs over this period was recorded. The diameters of the head (HD) and abdomen (AD) were measured. Skeletal calcification visible on ultrasound occurred in a defined order between the 34th and 40th day of gestation. During the last 30 days of gestation, there was a significant correlation between HD and days before parturition (DBP) (r(2)  = 0.99) and between AD and DBP (r(2)  = 0.98). The following equations were obtained: DBP = -2.10*HD (mm) + 50.74; DBP = -1.01*AD (mm) + 42.19. The confidence intervals were stable over the last 30 days of gestation. For the HD, the confidence interval was ±1 day in 53% of cases and ±2 days in 85% of cases. For the AD, the confidence interval was ±1 day in 45% of cases and ±2 days in 77% of cases. A table obtained by combining the HD and AD measurements made it possible to estimate the date of parturition within 2 days with a reliability of over 85%.

  12. Combination therapy with acipimox enhances the effect of growth hormone treatment on linear body growth in the normal and small-for-gestational-age rat.

    PubMed

    Vickers, M H; Hofman, P L; Gluckman, P D; Lobie, P E; Cutfield, W S

    2006-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) therapy is often associated with adverse side effects, including impaired insulin sensitivity. GH treatment of children with idiopathic short stature does not lead to an optimized final adult height. It has been demonstrated that FFA reduction induced by pharmacological antilipolysis can stimulate GH secretion per se in both normal subjects and those with GH deficiency. However, to date, no investigation has been undertaken to establish efficacy of combination treatment with GH and FFA regulators on linear body growth. Using a model of maternal undernutrition in the rat to induce growth-restricted offspring, we investigated the hypothesis that combination treatment with GH and FFA regulators can enhance linear body growth above that of GH alone. At postnatal day 28, male offspring of normally nourished mothers (controls) and offspring born with low birth weight [small for gestational age (SGA)] were treated with saline, GH, or GH (5 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) in combination with acipimox (GH + acipimox, 20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or fenofibrate (GH + fenofibrate, 30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) for 40 days. GH plus acipimox treatment significantly enhanced linear body growth in the control and SGA animals above that of GH, as quantified by tibial and total body length. Treatment with GH significantly increased fasting plasma insulin, insulin-to-glucose ratio, and plasma volumes in control and SGA animals but was not significantly different between saline and GH-plus-acipimox-treated animals. GH-induced lipolysis was blocked by GH plus acipimox treatment in both control and SGA animals, concomitant with a significant reduction in fasting plasma FFA and insulin concentrations. This is the first study to show that GH plus acipimox combination therapy, via pharmacological blocking of lipolysis during GH exposure, can significantly enhance the efficacy of GH in linear growth promotion and ameliorate unwanted metabolic side effects.

  13. Combined central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wu, Chang-Teng; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2009-02-01

    Central diabetes insipidus, a common consequence of acute central nervous system injury, causes hypernatremia; cerebral salt wasting syndrome can cause hyponatremia. The two conditions occurring simultaneous are rarely described in pediatric patients. Pediatric cases of combined diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting after acute central nervous system injury between January 2000 and December 2007 were retrospectively reviewed, and clinical characteristics were systemically assessed. Sixteen patients, aged 3 months to 18 years, met study criteria: 11 girls and 5 boys. The most common etiologies were severe central nervous system infection (n = 7, 44%) and hypoxic-ischemic event (n = 4, 25%). In 15 patients, diabetes insipidus was diagnosed during the first 3 days after acute central nervous system injury. Onset of cerebral salt wasting syndrome occurred 2-8 days after the onset of diabetes insipidus. In terms of outcome, 13 patients died (81%) and 3 survived under vegetative status (19%). Central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome may occur after acute central nervous system injury. A combination of both may impede accurate diagnosis. Proper differential diagnoses are critical, because the treatment strategy for each entity is different.

  14. Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 Polymorphism as a Risk Factor for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Chao; Lin, Wei-Ting; Yeh, Yao-Hsien; Wung, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Background There are racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Prior meta-analyses included small samples and very limited non-Caucasian populations. Studies to determine the relationship between transcription factor 7 like-2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 polymorphism and risk of GDM in Hispanics/Latinos are recently available. The present meta-analysis was to estimate the impact of allele variants of TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism on GDM susceptibility in overall population and racial/ethnic subgroups. Methods Literature was searched in multiple databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE (Ovid SP), Airiti Library, Medline Complete, and ProQuest up to July 2015. Allelic frequency for TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism in GDM and control subjects was extracted and statistical analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (CMA) 2.0 statistical software. The association between TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism and GDM risk was assessed by pooled odd ratios (ORs) using five gene models (dominant, recessive, homozygote, heterozygote, and allele). Stratified analysis based on race/ethnicity was also conducted. The between-study heterogeneity and contribution of each single study to the final result was tested by Cochran Q test and sensitivity analyses, respectively. Publication bias was evaluated using Egger’s linear regression test. Results A total of 16 studies involving 4,853 cases and 10,631 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Significant association between the T-allele of rs7903146 and GDM risk was observed under all genetic models, dominant model (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.19–1.74), recessive model (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.08–1.70), heterozygous model (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12–1.53), homozygous model (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.31–2.12), and allele model (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12–1.53). Stratified analysis by race/ethnicity showed a statistically significant association between rs7903146 polymorphism and

  15. The blood perfusion and NADH/FAD content combined analysis in patients with diabetes foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, Victor V.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Galstyan, Gagik R.; Novikova, Irina N.; Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Abdulvapova, Zera N.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2016-03-01

    Skin blood microcirculation and the metabolism activity of tissue were examined on the patients with type 2 diabetes. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) with 1064 nm laser light source and fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) with excitation light of 365 nm and 450 nm have been used to monitor the blood perfusion and the content of coenzymes NADH and FAD. Concluding, the proposed combined LDF and tissue FS approach allows to identify the significant violations in the blood microcirculation and metabolic activity for type 2 diabetes patients.

  16. Protective effect of sitagliptin and rosuvastatin combination on vascular endothelial dysfunction in type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nade, Vandana S; Kawale, L A; Patel, K M

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the protective effects of sitagliptin, glimepiride, rosuvastatin and their combinations on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the aortic tissues in fructose-fed type-2 diabetic rats. Sitagliptin (20 mg/kg, p.o.), glimepiride (2 mg/kg, p.o.), rosuvastatin (5 mg/kg, p.o.) and their combinations were administered for 6 w after induction of diabetes by fructose (66%, w/v solution, p.o. for 8 w) in wistar rats. The effects were examined on body weight, serum glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, blood pressure, heart rate, nitric oxide and antioxidant defensive enzymes. After completion of treatment schedule, the blood pressure was determined by invasive method and vascular reactivity was tested with adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine. Endothelial dysfunction was determined by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxation studies on isolated rat aortas. Long term treatments significantly decreased body weight gain, serum glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol levels; normalize the heart rate, and blood pressure in fructose fed rats. The treatments significantly improved vascular reactivity to catecholamines with reduction in elevated blood pressure in type-2 diabetic rats. The significant improvement in the relaxant response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was obtained on isolated aortas. All the treatments were effective in restoring defensive antioxidant enzymes. Sitagliptin and rosuvastatin were able to reverse endothelial dysfunction in type-2 diabetes, but better ameliorating potential was found when used in combination. PMID:25767324

  17. [Gestational disorders].

    PubMed

    Ortigosa Corona, E; Carrasco Resendiz, I; González Flores, A; Dámaso Ortiz, M

    1993-09-01

    We present the results of an interview of 375 pregnant women which explores their gestational risk diagnoses, the types and frequencies of complaints. Five groups of 75 patients each were formed from this random sample corresponding to 30, 32, 34, 36 and 38 weeks of pregnancy respectively. We too analyze the patients' opinions about their own morbidity, the repercussion on activities of daily life and self-medication. The interview included the actions taken on their own account to deal with complaints during pregnancy, as well as to establish the relationships between these actions and medical attention they received. A total of 1534 complaints were recorded from the entire group, the mean per patient were four with a range from one to six. The reported from the entire group, the mean per patient were four with a range from one to six. The reported complaints did not caused medical consultation and were totally different with the respective risk diagnoses. Our results show that patients almost always accept their symptoms as a normal part of pregnancy, even when arise from pathology. Almost 70% of the patients view their symptoms as normal despite the fact that they produce difficulties of daily life in 41%, and that they temporarily block these activities in 19%. Around 10% of the patients admit self-medication. Over 50 types of actions were self-initiated, 1371 for the entire group as a whole. Around 95% of the complaints considered abnormal received no medical attention. We presented a series of thoughts on the effectiveness of popular practices and the possibility of integrating some of them into medical practice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8406110

  18. Combined vitrectomy and intravitreal injection versus combined laser and injection for treatment of intractable diffuse diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of combined vitrectomy, intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA), and bevacizumab injection with that of IVTA and bevacizumab injection and subsequent macular grid laser photocoagulation for the treatment of intractable diffuse diabetic macular edema. Methods Th