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Sample records for gev monoenergetic ion

  1. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-05-15

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ''laser breakout afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100 s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of {approx}2 GeV.

  2. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    Laser-plasma ion accelerators have the potential to produce beams with unprecedented characteristics of ultra-short bunch lengths (100s of fs) and high bunch-charge (1010 particles) over acceleration length of about 100 microns. However, creating and controlling mono-energetic bunches while accelerating to high-energies has been a challenge. If high-energy mono-energetic beams can be demonstrated with minimal post-processing, laser (ω0)-plasma (ωpe) ion accelerators may be used in a wide-range of applications such as cancer hadron-therapy, medical isotope production, neutron generation, radiography and high-energy density science. Here we demonstrate using analysis and simulations that using relativistic intensity laser-pulses and heavy-ion (Mi ×me) targets doped with a proton (or light-ion) species (mp ×me) of trace density (at least an order of magnitude below the cold critical density) we can scale up the energy of quasi-mono-energetically accelerated proton (or light-ion) beams while controlling their energy, charge and energy spectrum. This is achieved by controlling the laser propagation into an overdense (ω0 <ωpeγ = 1) increasing plasma density gradient by incrementally inducing relativistic electron quiver and thereby rendering them transparent to the laser while the heavy-ions are immobile. Ions do not directly interact with ultra-short laser that is much shorter in duration than their characteristic time-scale (τp <<√{mp} /ω0 <<√{Mi} /ω0). For a rising laser intensity envelope, increasing relativistic quiver controls laser propagation beyond the cold critical density. For increasing plasma density (ωpe2 (x)), laser penetrates into higher density and is shielded, stopped and reflected where ωpe2 (x) / γ (x , t) =ω02 . In addition to the laser quivering the electrons, it also ponderomotively drives (Fp 1/γ∇za2) them forward longitudinally, creating a constriction of snowplowed e-s. The resulting longitudinal e--displacement from

  3. Extension of the BRYNTRN code to monoenergetic light ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1994-01-01

    A monoenergetic version of the BRYNTRN transport code is extended to beam transport of light ions (H-2, H-3, He-3, and He-4) in shielding materials (thick targets). The redistribution of energy in nuclear reactions is included in transport solutions that use nuclear fragmentation models. We also consider an equilibrium target-fragment spectrum for nuclei with mass number greater than four to include target fragmentation effects in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. Illustrative results for water and aluminum shielding, including energy and LET spectra, are discussed for high-energy beams of H-2 and He-4.

  4. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; He, X. T.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state ( Z - 2 ) + to ( Z - 1 ) + ]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7 × 10 20 W / cm 2 through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe26+) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10 22 W / cm 2 .

  5. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Monoenergetic source of kilodalton ions from Taylor cones of ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larriba, C.; Castro, S.; Fernandez de la Mora, J.; Lozano, P.

    2007-04-01

    The ionic liquid ion sources (ILISs) recently introduced by Lozano and Martinez Sanchez [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 282, 415 (2005)], based on electrochemically etched tungsten tips as emitters for Taylor cones of ionic liquids (ILs), have been tested with ionic liquids [A+B-] of increasing molecular weight and viscosity. These ILs have electrical conductivities well below 1S/m and were previously thought to be unsuitable to operate in the purely ionic regime because their Taylor cones produce mostly charged drops from conventional capillary tube sources. Strikingly, all the ILs tried on ILIS form charged beams composed exclusively of small ions and cluster ions A+(AB)n or B-(AB)n, with abundances generally peaking at n =1. Particularly interesting are the positive and negative ion beams produced from the room temperature molten salts 1-methyl-3-pentylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate (C5MI-(C2F5)3PF3) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(pentafluoroethyl) sulfonylimide (EMI-(C2F5SO3)2N). We extend to these heavier species the previous conclusions from Lozano and Martinez Sanchez on the narrow energy distributions of the ion beams. In combination with suitable ILs, this source yields nanoamphere currents of positive and negative monoenergetic molecular ions with masses exceeding 2000amu. Potential applications are in biological secondary ion mass spectrometry, chemically assisted high-resolution ion beam etching, and electrical propulsion. Advantages of the ILISs versus similar liquid metal ion sources include the possibility to form negative as well as positive ion beams and a much wider range of ion compositions and molecular masses.

  7. Quasi-monoenergetic ion generation by hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas using tailored laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, S. M. Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.; Wang, J. W.; Tasoko, N.; Chen, M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Mulser, P.; Yu, W.; Shen, B. F.

    2014-01-15

    It is proposed that laser hole-boring at a steady speed in inhomogeneous overdense plasma can be realized by the use of temporally tailored intense laser pulses, producing high-fluence quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. A general temporal profile of such laser pulses is formulated for arbitrary plasma density distribution. As an example, for a precompressed deuterium-tritium fusion target with an exponentially increasing density profile, its matched laser profile for steady hole-boring is given theoretically and verified numerically by particle-in-cell simulations. Furthermore, we propose to achieve fast ignition by the in-situ hole-boring accelerated ions using a tailored laser pulse. Simulations show that the effective energy fluence, conversion efficiency, energy spread, and collimation of the resulting ion beam can be significantly improved as compared to those found with un-tailored laser profiles. For the fusion fuel with an areal density of 1.5 g cm{sup –2}, simulation indicates that it is promising to realize fast ion ignition by using a tailored driver pulse with energy about 65 kJ.

  8. Quasi-monoenergetic ion beam acceleration by laser-driven shock and solitary waves in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Huang, T. W.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-07-01

    Ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas driven by intense laser pulses is investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model has been given for clarification of the ion acceleration dynamics in relation to different laser and target parameters. Two distinct regimes have been identified, where ions are accelerated by, respectively, the laser-induced shock wave in the weakly driven regime (comparatively low laser intensity) and the nonlinear solitary wave in the strongly driven regime (comparatively high laser intensity). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 94.6 MeV and an energy spread 15.8% are obtained by intense laser pulses at intensity I0 = 3 × 1020 W/cm2 and pulse duration τ = 0.5 ps in the strongly driven regime, which is more advantageous than that got in the weakly driven regime. In addition, 233 MeV proton beams with narrow spread can be produced by extending τ to 1.0 ps in the strongly driven regime.

  9. Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

  10. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contributemore » to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.« less

  11. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C; Hamilton, Christopher E; Santiago, Miguel A; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B; Shah, Rahul C; Fernández, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼10(12) V m(-1)) and magnetic (∼10(4) T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  12. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.

  13. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼1012 V m−1) and magnetic (∼104 T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  14. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavy ion beams via staged shock wave acceleration driven by intense laser pulses in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Huang, T. W.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration potentially offers a compact, cost-effective alternative to conventional accelerators for scientific, technological, and health-care applications. A novel scheme for heavy ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas via staged shock waves driven by intense laser pulses is proposed, where, in front of the heavy ion target, a light ion layer is used for launching a high-speed electrostatic shock wave. This shock is enhanced at the interface before it is transmitted into the heavy ion plasmas. Monoenergetic heavy ion beam with much higher energy can be generated by the transmitted shock, comparing to the shock wave acceleration in pure heavy ion target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic {{{C}}}6+ ion beams with peak energy 168 MeV and considerable particle number 2.1 × {10}11 are obtained by laser pulses at intensity of 1.66 × {10}20 {{W}} {{cm}}-2 in such staged shock wave acceleration scheme. Similarly a high-quality {{Al}}10+ ion beam with a well-defined peak with energy 250 MeV and spread δ E/{E}0=30 % can also be obtained in this scheme.

  15. Mono-energetic ion acceleration in the RPA regime: a tale of two temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2014-10-01

    We develop an analytical theory of the laser-accelerated plasma target irradiated by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the RPA regime. We demonstrate that relationship between electron and ion temperatures is the key to understanding the structure of the accelerated target. To illustrate this point, we discuss two simplest analytically treatable limiting cases of (1) cold ions and hot electrons, and (2) hot ions and cold electrons. In the first case, hot electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials while the ions are force-balanced by the electrostatic and non-inertial fields. In the second case the situation is very different: hot ions are trapped in the potential well formed by the ion-sheath's electric and non-inertial potentials while the cold electrons are force-balanced by the electrostatic and ponderomotive fields. Using PIC simulations we study the target stability with respect to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. US DOE grants DE-FG02-04ER41321 and DE-FG02-07ER54945.

  16. Demonstrated Efficient Quasi-Monoenergetic Carbon-Ion Beams Approaching Fast Ignition (FI) Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Juan C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Huang, C.; Gautier, D. C.; Santiago, M.

    2015-11-01

    Using massive computer simulations of relativistic laser-plasma interactions, we have identified a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric (~TV/m) and magnetic (~104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion energy spread of intense laser-driven ion beams after the laser exits the plasma. Consistent with the scheme, we have demonstrated on the LANL Trident laser carbon-ion beams with narrow spectral peaks at 220 MeV, with high conversion efficiency (~ 5%). These parameters are within a factor of 2 of FI requirements. The remaining gap may be bridged by increasing the laser intensity by a factor of 4, according to our data. We also discuss how this beam may be focused, to address the remaining requirement for FI, besides the total laser energy. This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  17. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoio, A.; Tudisco, S.; Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Trifirò, A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  18. 8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

  19. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films deposited from C60 monoenergetic fullerene ion beam.

    PubMed

    Pukha, V E; Stetsenko, A N; Dub, S N; Lee, J K

    2007-01-01

    Carbon films 250 division by 500 nm in thickness deposited on Si wafers from mass-selected flow of accelerated C60 ions with energies of 5.0 +/- 0.1 keV at temperatures of 300 K and 673 K are characterized by TEM and nanoindentation. On the TEM images of the films deposited at 673 K, nanocrystalline graphite with the typical grain size of -6 nm is observed. The films deposited at 300 K are transparent in visible light. TEM study of these films has revealed structural elements with lattice spacing close to that of diamond and the grain size of about 4 nm. Nanohardness and elastic modulus of the films prepared at a substrate temperature of 300 K were 23.1 +/- 0.2 GPa and 200 +/- 1 GPa, respectively. Possible mechanisms of the carbon films structure formation are suggested in the framework of a hydrodynamic shock wave model.

  20. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Gemmel, A; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Rietzel, E

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (s(w, air)), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (s(w, air)) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (s(w, air)) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on I(w, air) and I(air) has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, s(w,air)(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of I(w) and I(air) values with I(air)/I(w) = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of s(w,air) = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in s(w,air)(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  1. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Gemmel, A.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Rietzel, E.

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (sw, air), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (sw, air) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (sw, air) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on Iw, air and Iair has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, sw,air(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of Iw and Iair values with Iair/Iw = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of sw,air = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in sw,air(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  2. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  3. Generation of monoenergetic positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Dale, J.M.; Miller, P.D. Jr.; Moak, C.D.; Pendyala, S.; Triftshaeuser, W.; Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the generation and application of monoenergetic positron beams using annealed tungsten moderators and fast sources of /sup 58/Co, /sup 22/Na, /sup 11/C, and LINAC bremstrahlung. This paper will compare the degrees of success from our various approaches. Moderators made from both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten have been tried. Efforts to grow thin films of tungsten to be used as transmission moderators and brightness enhancement devices are in progress.

  4. A procedure for benchmarking laboratory exposures with 1 A GeV iron ions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tweed, John; Walker, Steve A; Cucinotta, Francis A; Tripathi, Ram K; Blattnig, Steve; Mertens, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    A new version of the HZETRN code capable of simulating HZE ions with either laboratory or space boundary conditions is under development. The computational model consists of combinations of physical perturbation expansions based on the scales of atomic interaction, multiple scattering, and nuclear reactive processes with use of asymptotic/Neumann expansions with non-perturbative corrections. The code contains energy loss with straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and downshifts, and off-axis dispersion with multiple scattering under preparation. The present benchmark is for a broad directed beam for 1 A GeV iron ion beams with 2 A MeV width and four targets of polyethylene, polymethyl metachrylate, aluminum, and lead of varying thickness from 5 to 30 g/cm2. The benchmark quantities will be dose, track averaged LET, dose averaged LET, fraction of iron ion remaining, and fragment energy spectra after 23 g/cm2 of polymethyl metachrylate. PMID:15934193

  5. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt

    2011-01-04

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  6. Laser-driven collimated tens-GeV monoenergetic protons from mass-limited target plus preformed channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, F. L.; Wu, H. C.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Cai, H. B.; He, X. T.; Yu, M. Y.; Tajima, T.; Yan, X. Q.

    2013-01-15

    Proton acceleration by ultra-intense laser pulse irradiating a target with cross-section smaller than the laser spot size and connected to a parabolic density channel is investigated. The target splits the laser into two parallel propagating parts, which snowplow the back-side plasma electrons along their paths, creating two adjacent parallel wakes and an intense return current in the gap between them. The radiation-pressure pre-accelerated target protons trapped in the wake fields now undergo acceleration as well as collimation by the quasistatic wake electrostatic and magnetic fields. Particle-in-cell simulations show that stable long-distance acceleration can be realized, and a 30 fs monoenergetic ion beam of >10 GeV peak energy and <2 Degree-Sign divergence can be produced by a circularly polarized laser pulse at an intensity of about 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams up to 18 MeV/nucleon via self-generated plasma fields in relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald; Hamilton, Christopher; Santiago, Miguel; Kreuzer, Christian; Shah, Rahul; Fernandez, Juan; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team; Ludwig-Maximilian-University Team

    2015-11-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators seldom achieve narrow energy spreads, and never without serious compromises in efficiency, particle yield, etc. Using massive computer simulations, we identify a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric (~ TV/m) and magnetic (~ 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma - separating the ion acceleration from the energy spread reduction. Consistent with the scheme, we experimentally demonstrate aluminum and carbon ion beams with narrow spectral peaks at energies up to 310 MeV (11.5 MeV/nucleon) and 220 MeV (18.3 MeV/nucleon), respectively, with high conversion efficiency (~ 5%, i.e., 4J out of 80J laser). This is achieved with 0.12 PW high-contrast Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils with optimal thicknesses of up to 250 nm that scale with laser intensity. When increasing the focused laser intensity fourfold (by reducing the focusing optic f/number twofold), the spectral-peak energy increases twofold. These results pave the way for next generation compact accelerators suitable for applications. For example, 400 MeV (33.3 MeV/nucleon) carbon-ion beam with narrow energy spread required for ion fast ignition could be generated using PW-class lasers.

  8. Diffuse, Monoenergetic, and Broadband (wave) Aurora: Relative Importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.

    2008-12-01

    Auroral precipitation can be divided into three broad categories. The mono-energetic peak aurora, in which most of the energy flux occurs in a relatively narrow electron energy range, is perhaps the most studied. Fairly good evidence associates mono-energetic peak aurora (often occurring in misleadingly named "inverted V" events) with quasi-static electric fields. In recent years, better appreciation of wave aurora has arisen. In wave aurora, the electron acceleration is distributed over a range of energies. Finally the direct dumping of plasma sheet electrons and ions produces the diffuse, or unaccelerated aurora. Twenty-two years of DMSP electron and ion data (about 60 satellite years) were surveyed, and each spectrum sorted into one of these three categories. For example, electron precipitation with most of the energy flux in one or two DMSP channels, and with signs of acceleration (energy flux above 10**8 eV/cm2 s str eV) were classified as mono-energetic, whereas if the acceleration occurred in 3 or more channels, it was considered broadband acceleration. Spectra which had neither the signature of broadband nor monoenergetic aurora were treated as diffuse aurora - with both electron and ion contributions included. As a result, we are able for the first time to report on the relative importance of these three types of precipitation over a wide variety of circumstances. The effects of UV insolation are incorporated and discussed. Data is functionally fitted to solar wind conditions rather than being binned into coarse Kp categories.

  9. Multifractal moments in heavy ion Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    In present work, we use the method of scaled factorial moments to search for intermittent behavior in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 A GeV. The analysis is done on photon distributions obtained using preshower photon multiplicity detector. Scaled factorial moments are used to study short range fluctuations in pseudorapidity distributions of photons. Scaled factorial moments are calculated using horizontal corrected and vertical analysis. The results are compared with simulation analysis using VENUS event generator.

  10. Effects of fast monoenergetic electrons on the generalized Bohm criterion for electronegative dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chekour, S.; Tahraoui, A.; Zaham, B.

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we have generalized the computation of Bohm criterion for electronegative complex plasma in the presence of fast monoenergetic electrons coming from a plane electrode. For this, we have established a 1D, collisionless, stationary, and unmagnetized electronegative plasma sheath model. The electrons and negative ions are considered in thermodynamic equilibrium; however, the positive ions, the dust grains, and the fast monoenergetic electrons are described by cold fluid equations. The generalized Bohm criterion has been calculated by using Sagdeev's pseudo potential method and the dust grain charge equation. The self-consistent relation between the dust grain surface potential at the edge and dust grains density is also derived. The numerical results reveal that the presence of the fast monoenergetic electrons increases the positive ion Mach number. On the other hand, the raise of electronegativity decreases this positive Mach number. The evolution of dust grain surface potential at the sheath edge is also illustrated and discussed.

  11. Preliminary experience with monoenergetic photon mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.E.; Washburn, D.; Pisano, E.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, D.; Gmur, N.F.; Zhong, Zhong; Sayers, D.

    1995-12-31

    We are using a beam port at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a source of monoenergetic photons. The photon source is radiation from a bending magnet on the X-ray storage ring and provides a usable X-ray spectrum from 5 keV to over 50 keV. A tunable crystal monochromotor is used for energy selection. The beam is 79mm wide and 0.5 mm high. We imaged the ACR mammography phantom and a contrast-detail phantom using a phosphor plate as the unaging detector. Phantom images were obtained at 16, 18, 20 and 22 keV. Phantom thickness varied from 15 mm to 82 mm. These images were compared to images obtained with a conventional dedicated mammography unit. Subjective preliminary results show that image contrast of the monoenergetic images is similar to those obtained from the conventional x-ray source with somewhat sharper and cleaner images from the monoenergetic source. Quantitative analysis shows that the monoenergetic images have improved contrast compared to the polyenergetic derived images. Entrance skin dose measurements show a factor of 5 to 10 times less radiation for the monoenergetic images with equivalent or better contrast Although there remain a number of technical problems to be addressed and much more work to be done, we are encouraged to further explore the use of monoenergetic imaging.

  12. Systematics of central heavy ion collisions in the 1A GeV regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisdorf, W.; Andronic, A.; Averbeck, R.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Hartmann, O. N.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Kang, T. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Kiš, M.; Koczoń, P.; Kress, T.; Leifels, Y.; Merschmeyer, M.; Piasecki, K.; Schüttauf, A.; Stockmeier, M.; Barret, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Čaplar, R.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gasik, P.; Grishkin, Y.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Lopez, X.; Matulewicz, T.; Neubert, W.; Petrovici, M.; Rami, F.; Ryu, M. S.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K. S.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stoicea, G.; Tymiński, Z.; Wiśniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xu, H. S.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A.; FOPI Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    Using the large acceptance apparatus FOPI, we study central collisions in the reactions (energies in A GeV are given in parentheses): 40Ca + 40Ca (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 1.93), 58Ni + 58Ni (0.15, 0.25, 0.4), 96Ru + 96Ru (0.4, 1.0, 1.5), 96Zr + 96Zr (0.4, 1.0, 1.5), 129Xe + CsI (0.15, 0.25, 0.4), 197Au + 197Au (0.09, 0.12, 0.15, 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5). The observables include cluster multiplicities, longitudinal and transverse rapidity distributions and stopping, and radial flow. The data are compared to earlier data where possible and to transport model simulations.

  13. Generating X-ray in MeV regime from interactions of mono-energetic electrons with Sn and Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Masalehdan, Hossein

    2012-09-06

    Quasi mono-energetic x-ray beams generated from thin targets by interaction of mono-energetic electron beams from 600 mJ, 80 fs laser pulse. A micron-scale laser-produced plasma creates, accelerates relativistic mono-energetic electron bunches. As such electrons propagate in the ion channel produced in the wake of the laser pulse; the accelerated electrons can interact with Sn, Pb targets and generate X-ray radiation of MeV energy and MeV/cm2 flux.

  14. Systematics of azimuthal asymmetries in heavy ion collisions in the 1A GeV regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisdorf, W.; Leifels, Y.; Andronic, A.; Averbeck, R.; Barret, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Čaplar, R.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gasik, P.; Grishkin, Y.; Hartmann, O. N.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Hong, B.; Kang, T. I.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kiš, M.; Koczoń, P.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Kress, T.; Lebedev, A.; Lopez, X.; Matulewicz, T.; Merschmeyer, M.; Neubert, W.; Petrovici, M.; Piasecki, K.; Rami, F.; Ryu, M. S.; Schüttauf, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K. S.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stockmeier, M.; Stoicea, G.; Tymiński, Z.; Wiśniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xu, H. S.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A.; FOPI Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    Using the large acceptance apparatus FOPI, we study central and semi-central collisions in the reactions (energies in A GeV are given in parentheses): 40Ca + 40Ca (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 1.93), 58Ni + 58Ni (0.15, 0.25, 0.4), 96Ru + 96Ru (0.4, 1.0, 1.5), 96Zr + 96Zr (0.4, 1.0, 1.5), 129Xe + CsI (0.15, 0.25, 0.4), 197Au + 197Au (0.09, 0.12, 0.15, 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5). The observables include directed and elliptic flow. The data are compared to earlier data where possible and to transport model simulations. A stiff nuclear equation of state is found to be incompatible with the data. Evidence for extra-repulsion of neutrons in compressed asymmetric matter is found.

  15. Elliptical flow in relativistic ion collisions at \\sqrt{s}= 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2008-07-01

    A consistent picture of the Au + Au and D + Au, \\sqrt{s}= 200 A GeV measurements at RHIC obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors including both the rapidity and transverse momentum spectra was previously developed with the simulation LUCIFER. The approach was modelled on the early production of a fluid of pre-hadrons after the completion of an initial phase of high-energy interactions. The formation of pre-hadrons is discussed here, in a perturbative QCD approach as advocated by Kopeliovich, Nemchik and Schmidt. In the second phase of LUCIFER, a considerably lower energy hadron-like cascade ensues. Since the dominant collisions occurring in this latter phase are meson-meson in character while the initial collisions are between baryons, i.e. both involve hadron-sized interaction cross-sections, there is good reason to suspect that the observed elliptical flow will be produced naturally, and this is indeed found to be the case.

  16. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells after Irradiation with Filtered and Unfiltered Beams of 1 Gev/amu Iron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Williams, A.; Nagasawa, H.; Peng, Y.; Chatterjee, A.; Bedford, J.

    To determine whether shielding materials that might be utilized for radiation protection of astronauts would affect the RBE of HZE particles such as those of concern for deep space missions we irradiated non cycling G0 monolayer cultures of contact inhibited normal human fibroblasts with 1 Gev amu iron ions with and without filtration with various thicknesses of Aluminum Al or polyethylene CH 2 and then measured the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations dicentrics and excess fragments in the first post-irradiation mitosis Irradiations were carried out at the NRSL facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory For doses ranging up to 4 to 6 Gy the dose response for the total of these aberrations per cell was not significantly affected by beam filtrations up to 5 4 cm Al or up to 11 cm polyethylene relative to the unfiltered beam Neither was the dose response significantly different for unfiltered beams of 300 or 600 Mev amu iron ions relative to the 1 Gev amu iron ions The studies with 1 Gev amu iron ions were repeated four different times over a period of four years in each case with coded samples so the individual scoring aberrations would not know the irradiation conditions employed Comparison of the same effects in parallel experiments using 137 Cs gamma-rays allowed us to estimate that the RBE for aberration induction by these HZE iron ions for these acute high dose-rate exposures was approximately

  17. Simulation of heavy ion collisions at {radical}s = 20--200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H. |

    1996-11-01

    A new hadronic cascade code (LUCIFER) is introduced, for simulation of relativistic heavy ion collisions at CERN energies and up to RHIC. It is based on a simple, experimentally and theoretically motivated picture of hh interactions. Final state hadrons are produced by decay of intermediate state clusters, or lumps of excited hadronic matter. These are similar to resonances, but have a continuous mass distribution. Clusters are the objects that re-interact in the cascade. Single diffractive dissociation is used to fix the cluster properties. The model has just two parameters: {tau}{sub d}, the decay time of the clusters, and {tau}{sub f} the formation time of the clusters. Comparison is made with recent CERN data in the Pb + Pb system. The first consistent cascade simulation, of J/{psi} production/suppression is presented. It appears likely that a purely hadronic interpretation can be given to recent CERN data on apparently anomalous J/{psi} suppression in Pb + Pb.

  18. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  19. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  20. Centrality dependence of identified particle elliptic flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions at √{sN N}=7.7 -62.4 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chisman, O.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Elliptic flow (v2) values for identified particles at midrapidity in Au + Au collisions measured by the STAR experiment in the Beam Energy Scan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at √{sN N}= 7.7 -62.4 GeV are presented for three centrality classes. The centrality dependence and the data at √{sN N}= 14.5 GeV are new. Except at the lowest beam energies, we observe a similar relative v2 baryon-meson splitting for all centrality classes which is in agreement within 15% with the number-of-constituent quark scaling. The larger v2 for most particles relative to antiparticles, already observed for minimum bias collisions, shows a clear centrality dependence, with the largest difference for the most central collisions. Also, the results are compared with a multiphase transport (AMPT) model and fit with a blast wave model.

  1. Laser Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons Trapped in Moving Double Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, X.

    2008-10-15

    We present analytic theory of monoenergetic protons acceleration by short pulse laser irradiation on a thin foil with specific thickness suggested by Yan et al. in simulations. The laser ponderomotive force pushes the electrons forward, leaving ions behind until the space charge field balances the ponderomotive force at distance {delta}. For the optimal target thickness D = {delta}>c/{omega}{sub p}, the electron sheath piled up at the rear surface of width skin depth moves into vacuum, carrying with it the protons contained in the sheath. These protons are trapped by the self field of the electron sheath and are collectively accelerated as a double layer by the laser ponderomotive force. We present here the analytic expression for the energy of the accelerated protons as a function of time, laser intensity, wavelength, and plasma density. For example, proton energy can reach {approx_equal}200 MeV at a = 5, and pulse length 90 fs.

  2. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P.

    2015-06-22

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X}≲15 Gev. KamLAND’s sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  3. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P. E-mail: sandick@physics.utah.edu

    2015-06-01

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X} ∼< 15 Gev. KamLAND's sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  4. Parametric injection for monoenergetic electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, A.; Zhidkov, A.; Takano, K.; Hotta, E.; Nemoto, K.; Nakajima, K.

    2008-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in the laser wakefield (LWFA). This mechanism has been studied by 2D or 3D Particle In Cell simulation. However, how the electrons are injected in the wakefield is not understood. In this paper, we consider about the process of self -injection and propose new scheme. When plasma electron density modulates, parametric resonance of electron momentum is induced. The parametric resonance depends on laser waist modulation. We carried out 2D PIC simulation with the initial condition decided from resonance condition. Moreover, we analyze experimental result that generated 200-250 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with 400TW intense laser in CAEP in China.

  5. Centrality dependence of midrapidity density from GeV to TeV heavy-ion collisions in the effective-energy universality picture of hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, Edward K. G.; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence on centrality, or on the number of nucleon participants, of the midrapidity density of charged particles measured in heavy-ion collisions at the collision energy of about 20 GeV at RHIC to the highest LHC energy of 5 TeV is investigated within the recently proposed effective-energy approach. This approach relates multihadron production in different types of collisions by combining, under the proper scaling of the collision energy, the constituent quark picture with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics. The measurements are shown to be well described based on the similarity of multihadron production process in (anti)proton-proton interactions and heavy-ion collisions driven by the centrality-dependent effective energy of participants.

  6. Chemical freeze-out in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at sNN=130 and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, J.; Becattini, F.

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive and detailed analysis of hadronic abundances measured in Au-Au collisions at RHIC at sNN=130 and 200 GeV is presented. The rapidity densities measured in the central rapidity region have been fitted to the statistical hadronization model and the chemical freeze-out parameters determined as a function of centrality, using data from experiments BRAHMS, PHENIX, and STAR. The chemical freeze-out temperature turns out to be independent of centrality to accuracy of a few percentages, whereas the strangeness undersaturation parameter γS decreases from almost unity in central collisions to a significantly lower value in peripheral collisions. Our results are in essential agreement with previous analyses, with the exception that fit quality at sNN=200 GeV is not as good as previously found. From the comparison of the two different energies, we conclude that the difference in fit quality, as described by χ2 values, is owing to the improved resolution of measurements that has probably exceeded the intrinsic accuracy of the simplified theoretical formula used in the fits.

  7. p{sup 0} photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    Photoproduction reactions occur when the electromagnetic field of a relativistic heavy ion interacts with another heavy ion. The STAR Collaboration presents a measurement of {rho}{sup 0} and direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe both exclusive photoproduction and photoproduction accompanied by mutual Coulomb excitation. We find a coherent cross section of {sigma} (AuAu {yields} Au{sup +}Au{sup +} {rho}{sup 0}) = 530 {+-} 19(stat.) {+-} 57(syst.) mb, in accord with theoretical calculations based on a Glauber approach, but considerably below the predictions of a color dipole model. The {rho}{sup p} transverse momentum spectrum (p{sub T}{sup 2}) is fit by a double exponential curve including both coherent and incoherent coupling to the target nucleus; we find {sigma}{sub inc}/{sigma}{sub coh} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.). The ratio of direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} to {rho}{sup 0} production is comparable to that observed in {gamma}{sub p} collisions at HERA and appears to be independent of photon energy. Finally, the measured {rho}{sup 0} spin helicity matrix elements agree within errors with the expected s-channel helicity conservation.

  8. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV (7)Li (d, n) neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J R; Zhang, X P; Yuan, D W; Li, Y T; Li, D Z; Rhee, Y J; Zhang, Z; Li, F; Zhu, B J; Li, Yan F; Han, B; Liu, C; Ma, Y; Li, Yi F; Tao, M Z; Li, M H; Guo, X; Huang, X G; Fu, S Z; Zhu, J Q; Zhao, G; Chen, L M; Fu, C B; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel "laser-collider" method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via (7)Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  9. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons.

  10. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  11. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV (7)Li (d, n) neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J R; Zhang, X P; Yuan, D W; Li, Y T; Li, D Z; Rhee, Y J; Zhang, Z; Li, F; Zhu, B J; Li, Yan F; Han, B; Liu, C; Ma, Y; Li, Yi F; Tao, M Z; Li, M H; Guo, X; Huang, X G; Fu, S Z; Zhu, J Q; Zhao, G; Chen, L M; Fu, C B; Zhang, J

    2016-06-02

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel "laser-collider" method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via (7)Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons.

  12. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiuchi, M. Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Nishio, K.; Orlandi, R.; Koura, H.; Imai, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Sako, H.; Matsukawa, K.; and others

    2015-03-15

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  13. Validation of the HZETRN code for laboratory exposures with 1A GeV iron ions in several targets.

    PubMed

    Walker, S A; Tweed, J; Wilson, J W; Cucinotta, F A; Tripathi, R K; Blattnig, S; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L; Miller, J

    2005-01-01

    A new version of the HZETRN code capable of validation with HZE ions in either the laboratory or the space environment is under development. The computational model consists of the lowest order asymptotic approximation followed by a Neumann series expansion with non-perturbative corrections. The physical description includes energy loss with straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and downshift. Measurements to test the model were performed at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory with iron ions. Surviving beam particles and produced fragments were measured with solid-state detectors. Beam analysis software has been written to relate the computational results to the measured energy loss spectra of the incident ions for rapid validation of modeled target transmission functions.

  14. Uniform Description of Soft Observables in Heavy-Ion Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Florkowski, Wojciech; Chojnacki, Mikolaj; Kisiel, Adam

    2008-07-11

    We investigate the hydrodynamic evolution of the system formed in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions and find that an appropriate choice of the initial condition, specifically a simple two-dimensional Gaussian profile for the transverse energy, in conjunction with a realistic equation of state, leads to a uniform description of soft observables measured at the relativistic heavy-ion collider. In particular, the transverse-momentum spectra, the elliptic-flow, and the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss correlation radii, including the ratio R{sub out}/R{sub side} as well as the dependence of the radii on the azimuthal angle, are all properly described.

  15. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D L; Townsend, L W; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively. PMID:12539754

  16. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. L. Jr; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, D. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71 st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R 2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R 2 respectively.

  18. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D L; Townsend, L W; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively.

  19. Swift heavy ion irradiation of water ice from MeV to GeV energies. Approaching true cosmic ray compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; Ding, J. J.; de Barros, A. L. F.; Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Chabot, M.; Domaracka, A.; Godard, M.; Lv, X. Y.; Mejía Guamán, C. F.; Pino, T.; Rothard, H.; da Silveira, E. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Cosmic ray ion irradiation affects the chemical composition of and triggers physical changes in interstellar ice mantles in space. One of the primary structural changes induced is the loss of porosity, and the mantles evolve toward a more compact amorphous state. Previously, ice compaction was monitored at low to moderate ion energies. The existence of a compaction threshold in stopping power has been suggested. Aims: In this article we experimentally study the effect of heavy ion irradiation at energies closer to true cosmic rays. This minimises extrapolation and allows a regime where electronic interaction always dominates to be explored, providing the ice compaction cross section over a wide range of electronic stopping power. Methods: High-energy ion irradiations provided by the GANIL accelerator, from the MeV up to the GeV range, are combined with in-situ infrared spectroscopy monitoring of ice mantles. We follow the IR spectral evolution of the ice as a function of increasing fluence (induced compaction of the initial microporous amorphous ice into a more compact amorphous phase). We use the number of OH dangling bonds of the water molecule, i.e. pending OH bonds not engaged in a hydrogen bond in the initially porous ice structure as a probe of the phase transition. These high-energy experiments are combined with lower energy experiments using light ions (H, He) from other facilities in Catania, Italy, and Washington, USA. Results: We evaluated the cross section for the disappearance of OH dangling bonds as a function of electronic stopping power. A cross-section law in a large energy range that includes data from different ice deposition setups is established. The relevant phase structuring time scale for the ice network is compared to interstellar chemical time scales using an astrophysical model. Conclusions: The presence of a threshold in compaction at low stopping power suggested in some previous works seems not to be confirmed for the high

  20. Features of compound multiplicity in heavy-ion interactions at 4. 5 A GeV/ c

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, T.; Irfan, M. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper mainly deals with some important features of compound multiplicity in the inelastic nuclear reactions induced by 4.5{ital A} GeV/{ital c} carbon and silicon ions in nuclear emulsion. The characteristics of this parameter observed in the present study are compared with the corresponding values obtained for proton-emulsion interactions at the same incident momentum per nucleon. The average compound multiplicity is found to vary linearly with black and heavy particle multiplicities. Finally, the compound multiplicity distributions for carbon- and silicon-emulsion interactions are observed to obey a Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) type of scaling law.

  1. Hadronic resonance production in d+au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV measured at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0},K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p{sub T}. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m{sub T}. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of {pi},K and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0},K{sup +}, and {Sigma}{sup +} scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

  2. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Antolak, A.J.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,gamma)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,gamma)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 mu s long pulses, and a 1percent duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  3. Oblique incidence for broad monoenergetic proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, David; Yuan Jiankui; Chen Weimin

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The depth dose of a monoenergetic broad parallel proton beam has been modeled in a number of ways, but evidently not yet for oblique incidence. The purpose of this investigation is to find an accurate analytic formula for this case, which can then be used to model the depth dose of a broad beam with an initial Gaussian angular distribution. Methods: The Bortfeld model of depth dose in a broad normally incident proton beam has been extended to the case of oblique incidence. This extension uses an empirically determined Gaussian parameter {sigma}{sub x} which (roughly) characterizes the off-axis dose of a proton pencil beam. As with Bortfeld's work, the modeling is done in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. To obtain the depth dose for an initial angular distribution, the result is integrated over the angle of incidence, weighted by a Gaussian probability function. The predictions of the theory have been compared to MCNPX Monte Carlo calculations for four phantom materials (water, bone, aluminum, and copper) and for initial proton energies of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 MeV. Results: Comparisons of the depth dose predicted by this theory with Monte Carlo calculations have established that with very good accuracy, {sigma}{sub x} can be taken to be independent both of the depth and of the angle of incidence. As a function of initial proton range or of initial proton energy, {sigma}{sub x} has been found to obey a power law to very high accuracy. Good fits to Monte Carlo calculations have also been found for an initial Gaussian angular distribution. Conclusions: This investigation is the first step in the accurate modeling of a proton pencil beam with initial Gaussian angular distribution. It provides the longitudinal factor, with its Bragg peak buildup and sharp distal falloff. A transverse factor must still be incorporated into this theory and this will give the lateral penumbra of a collimated proton beam. Also, it will be necessary to model the dose of

  4. Baryon production and collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the AGS, SPS, RHIC, and LHC energy regions ({radical}(s{sub NN}){<=}5 GeV to 5.5 TeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Shengqin; Zhong Yang

    2011-03-15

    The features of net-baryon productions and collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies reached at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), and BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with the model of nonuniform flow model (NUFM) are systematically studied in this paper. In particular we predict the feature of net-baryon productions and collective flow at LHC {radical}(s{sub NN})=5500 GeV based on the detailed study at RHIC {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV. The dependencies of the features of baryon stopping and collective flow on the collision energies and centralities are investigated.

  5. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  6. Measurement of elliptic flow of light nuclei at √{sN N}=200 , 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We present measurements of second-order azimuthal anisotropy (v2) at midrapidity (|y |<1.0 ) for light nuclei d ,t ,3He (for √{sN N}=200 , 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV) and antinuclei d ¯ (√{sN N}=200 , 62.4, 39, 27, and 19.6 GeV) and ¯3He (√{sN N}=200 GeV) in the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) experiment. The v2 for these light nuclei produced in heavy-ion collisions is compared with those for p and p ¯. We observe mass ordering in nuclei v2(pT) at low transverse momenta (pT<2.0 GeV/c ). We also find a centrality dependence of v2 for d and d ¯. The magnitude of v2 for t and 3He agree within statistical errors. Light-nuclei v2 are compared with predictions from a blast-wave model. Atomic mass number (A ) scaling of light-nuclei v2(pT) seems to hold for pT/A <1.5 GeV /c . Results on light-nuclei v2 from a transport-plus-coalescence model are consistent with the experimental measurements.

  7. XRD study of yttria stabilized zirconia irradiated with 7.3 MeV Fe, 10 MeV I, 16 MeV Au, 200 MeV Xe and 2.2 GeV Au ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Yoshizaki, H.; Saitoh, Y.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2016-03-01

    To simulate energetic neutron irradiation effects, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is one of the major materials for electrical corrosion potential sensors (ECP sensors) was irradiated with heavy ions at energies ranging from 7.3 MeV to 2.2 GeV. Ion irradiation effects on the lattice structure were analyzed using the X-ray diffraction (XRD). The increase in lattice constant was induced by the ion irradiation. It was dominated by the elastic collision process and not by the electronic excitation process. The lattice disordering which was observed as a broadening of XRD peaks was also induced by the irradiation especially for 200 MeV Xe ion irradiation. The present result suggests that the expansion and/or the disordering of YSZ lattice induced by energetic neutrons may affect the durability of a joint interface between a metal housing and YSZ membrane for the usage of ECP sensors in nuclear power reactors.

  8. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Rygg, J R; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; LePape, S; Bachmann, B; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Kong, Y Z; Gatu-Johnson, M; Khan, S F; Lahmann, B J; McKenty, P W; Petrasso, R D; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sayre, D B; Sio, H W

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the (3)He(d,p)(4)He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10(10) protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)(3)He reactions also show 2 × 10(10) isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons. PMID:26628185

  9. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  10. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  11. Observation of Quasi Mono-Energetic Protons in Laser Spray-Target Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, B.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Andreev, A.; Ehrentraut, L.; Sandner, W.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.

    2010-02-02

    Laser driven ion acceleration arises from charge separation effects caused by an ultrahigh intensity laser pulse. Limited mass targets confine the accelerated electrons within the target size and prevent the large area spreading seen in extended foil targets. Furthermore, if the target size is smaller than the laser wavelength and focal spot diameter, homogeneous heating of the target is ensured. Observation of quasi-monoenergetic protons in the interaction of a high intensity high contrast laser pulse at 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with 150 nm--diameter water droplets is investigated. An ensemble of such objects is formed in a spray. Quasi mono energetic proton bursts of energy Eapprox1.6 MeV are observed and are associated with a specific ionization and explosion dynamics of the spheres.

  12. Compact quasi-monoenergetic photon sources from laser-plasma accelerators for nuclear detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Rykovanov, Sergey; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Steinke, Sven; Vay, Jean-Luc; Esarey, Eric H.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Nakamura, Kei; Quiter, Brian J.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-05-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources at MeV energies offer improved sensitivity at greatly reduced dose for active interrogation, and new capabilities in treaty verification, nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel and emergency response. Thomson (also referred to as Compton) scattering sources are an established method to produce appropriate photon beams. Applications are however restricted by the size of the required high-energy electron linac, scattering (photon production) system, and shielding for disposal of the high energy electron beam. Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) produce GeV electron beams in centimeters, using the plasma wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser. Recent LPA experiments are presented which have greatly improved beam quality and efficiency, rendering them appropriate for compact high-quality photon sources based on Thomson scattering. Designs for MeV photon sources utilizing the unique properties of LPAs are presented. It is shown that control of the scattering laser, including plasma guiding, can increase photon production efficiency. This reduces scattering laser size and/or electron beam current requirements to scale compatible with the LPA. Lastly, the plasma structure can decelerate the electron beam after photon production, reducing the size of shielding required for beam disposal. Together, these techniques provide a path to a compact photon source system.

  13. Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in √sNN =200 GeV Au + Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2013-12-01

    Previous experimental results based on data (˜15×106 events) collected by the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest event-by-event charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular to the event plane in noncentral heavy-ion collisions. Here we present the correlator previously used split into its two component parts to reveal correlations parallel and perpendicular to the event plane. The results are from a high-statistics 200-GeV Au + Au collisions data set (57×106 events) collected by the STAR experiment. We explicitly count units of charge separation from which we find clear evidence for more charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular than parallel to the event plane. We also employ a modified correlator to study the possible P-even background in same- and opposite-charge correlations, and find that the P-even background may largely be explained by momentum conservation and collective motion.

  14. Contribution of {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} Dalitz decays to the dilepton invariant-mass spectrum in 1A GeV heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    TAPS Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    The Dalitz-decay contributions of {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} mesons to the di-electron invariant-mass spectrum at 1 A GeV have been obtained from a systematics of inclusive meson production cross sections measured for the collision systems {sup 12}C+{sup nat}C and {sup 40}Ar,{sup 40}Ca+{sup nat}Ca in the bombarding-energy range of 0.8{endash}2.0 A GeV. These results are compared with the recently published di-electron mass spectra of the DLS collaboration. Systematic errors and angular-distribution effects are discussed. We conclude that the low-mass part of the DLS data cannot be explained by the Dalitz decays of light neutral mesons only. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  16. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  17. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  18. Chemical freeze-out in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=130 and 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, J.; Becattini, F.

    2008-11-15

    A comprehensive and detailed analysis of hadronic abundances measured in Au-Au collisions at RHIC at {radical}(s{sub NN})=130 and 200 GeV is presented. The rapidity densities measured in the central rapidity region have been fitted to the statistical hadronization model and the chemical freeze-out parameters determined as a function of centrality, using data from experiments BRAHMS, PHENIX, and STAR. The chemical freeze-out temperature turns out to be independent of centrality to accuracy of a few percentages, whereas the strangeness undersaturation parameter {gamma}{sub S} decreases from almost unity in central collisions to a significantly lower value in peripheral collisions. Our results are in essential agreement with previous analyses, with the exception that fit quality at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV is not as good as previously found. From the comparison of the two different energies, we conclude that the difference in fit quality, as described by {chi}{sup 2} values, is owing to the improved resolution of measurements that has probably exceeded the intrinsic accuracy of the simplified theoretical formula used in the fits.

  19. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  20. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenfus, C.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Creus, W.; Ferella, A.; Rochet, J.; Walter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of developments for liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a laboratory setup to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (Ekin = 2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from alpha particles at working points relevant for dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the population strength of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  1. Energy Differential Response of Cancer Cells for Low Dose Irradiation:Impact of Monoenergetic Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Prilepskiy, Yuriy; Keppel, Cynthia; Britten, R

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the energy differential response of cancer cells under identical dose exposure to asses the relevancy of mono-energetic sources for Brachytherapy treatments. Method and Materials: An electron energy spectrum impinging on lived breast cancer cell lines (MDA321) was obtained by placing a 19.65 {micro}Ci {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y radioactive source in front of a non-uniform magnetic field constructed from two 5.08 x 5.0 cm x 2.54 cm neodimium ion permanent dipole magnets with a 1 cm separation gap. The cell lines were placed on the exit pole face of the magnet and were subsequently irradiated with different electron energies ranging from about 0.75 MeV to 1.85 MeV. The energy distribution was accurately measured with a scintillating fiber detector system that provided a 0.5% agreement with ICRU and a 5% energy resolution. The dosimetry was performed using a series of data acquired with a {sup 9}Sr/{sup 90}Y 4.5 mCi SIA-6 eye applicator, 6-21 MeV fixed energies from a Varian 2100 EX linac, EBT Gafchromic and Kodak ERT2 films, and an ion chamber detector. The accuracy of the dose rate obtained at different locations along and away from the magnet inside the cell containers was within 10.7%. Results: The cell lines were irradiated with a 0.5-4 Gy dose range. The data indicate a very strong differential energy response for electrons around 1 MeV (more lethal) compare to those with lesser or greater energy and a survival rate of at most 10% at very low dose (0.5-2 Gy). Conclusion: Mono-energetic Brachytherapy sources may provide a new pathway for radio-therapy treatment optimizations following a dedicated study showing very unusual high lethality in a specific energy window for MDA321 breast cancer cells.

  2. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

  3. Longitudinal spin transfer in inclusive Lambda and Lambda barproduct ion in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt s = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qinghua; STAR Collaboration

    2006-10-01

    This contribution reports on a proof-of-principle measurement of the longitudinal spin transfer D{sub LL} in inclusive {Lambda} and {Lambda} production in polarized proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data sample consists of about 3 x 10{sup 6} minimum bias events collected in the year 2005 by the STAR experiment at RHIC with proton beam polarizations of up to 50%. The {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) candidates are reconstructed at mid-rapidity (|{eta}| < 1) using the STAR Time Projection Chamber via the dominant decay channel {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} ({Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +}). Their mean transverse momentum p{sub T} is about 1.3 GeV/c and longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} = 7.5 x 10{sup -3}. The longitudinal {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) polarization is determined using a method in which the detector acceptance mostly cancels.

  4. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  5. Monoenergetic computed tomography reconstructions reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Stolzmann, Paul; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Schwendener, Nicole; Alkadhi, Hatem; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of monoenergetic computed tomography (CT) images to reduce beam hardening artifacts in comparison to standard CT images of dental restoration on dental post-mortem CT (PMCT). Thirty human decedents (15 male, 58 ± 22 years) with dental restorations were examined using standard single-energy CT (SECT) and dual-energy CT (DECT). DECT data were used to generate monoenergetic CT images, reflecting the X-ray attenuation at energy levels of 64, 69, 88 keV, and at an individually adjusted optimal energy level called OPTkeV. Artifact reduction and image quality of SECT and monoenergetic CT were assessed objectively and subjectively by two blinded readers. Subjectively, beam artifacts decreased visibly in 28/30 cases after monoenergetic CT reconstruction. Inter- and intra-reader agreement was good (k = 0.72, and k = 0.73 respectively). Beam hardening artifacts decreased significantly with increasing monoenergies (repeated-measures ANOVA p < 0.001). Artifact reduction was greatest on monoenergetic CT images at OPTkeV. Mean OPTkeV was 108 ± 17 keV. OPTkeV yielded the lowest difference between CT numbers of streak artifacts and reference tissues (-163 HU). Monoenergetic CT reconstructions significantly reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations and improve image quality of post-mortem dental CT.

  6. Neutrino Mass Measurement Using a Directed Mono-Energetic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsifrinovich, Vladimir; Folan, Lorcan

    2015-04-01

    It was shown that a directed mono-energetic neutrino beam can be generated by electron capture beta-decay in a sample with a strong hyperfine field at the radioactive nuclei. We study the conditions required to measure the neutrino rest mass using the recoil force produced by a directed neutrino beam. We consider the displacement of an atomic force microscope cantilever due to such a recoil force. We find the change in the cantilever displacement associated with the non-zero neutrino mass, as a function of nuclear half-life T1 / 2, cantilever spring constant, and temperature. We consider the opportunity to increase the sensitivity of the neutrino mass measurement using averaging of the measurement signal. We show that the optimal time for the signal accumulation is, approximately, 1.8T1 / 2. We compute the optimal signal-to-noise ratio for 119Sb nuclei decaying to 119Sn with a decrease in the nuclear spin from I = 5/2 to I = 3/2, and T1 / 2 = 38.2 hours. Finally, we present the parameters values required for detection of sub-eV neutrino rest mass, and estimate the angular distribution of neutrino radiation as a function of temperature.

  7. Effect of 5. 3-GeV Pb-ion irradiation on irreversible magnetization in Y-Ba-Cu-O crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Konczykowski, M.; Rullier-Albenque, F. ); Yacoby, E.R.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y. ); Lejay, P. )

    1991-10-01

    We report a dramatic change in the irreversibility line of Y-Ba-Cu-O crystals after irradiation with Pb ions. Near the transition temperature, following irradiation, the irreversibility temperature increases and the curvature of the irreversibility line changes sign. These changes are accompanied by a strong enhancement of critical current density and a decrease in flux creep rate. Pb irradiation induces damage in the form of amorphous tracks which penetrate throughout the thickness of the sample. We maintain that these defects are most efficient in terms of flux trapping and are responsible for the observed changes in irreversible magnetic features in the irradiated sample.

  8. Unified description of nuclear stopping in central heavy-ion collisions from 10A MeV to 1.2A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G. Q.; Zhou, C. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Cao, X. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Fang, D. Q.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2011-09-15

    A detailed analysis of the wide excitation function of nuclear stopping has been conducted within a transport model, isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model, and an overall good agreement with the INDRA and FOPI Collaborations' experimental data has been achieved. It is found that the mean value of isotropy in central heavy-ion collision (HIC) reaches a minimum near-Fermi energy and approaches a maximum at around 300-400A MeV. This suggests that, in statistical average, the equilibration is far from being reached, even in central HIC especially near Fermi energy. A hierarchy in the stopping of fragments, which favors heavy fragments to penetrate, provides a robust restriction on the global trend of nuclear stopping and could serve as a probe for nuclear equations of state.

  9. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  10. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  11. The exact solution of the monoenergetic transport equation for critical cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, R. M.; Metcalf, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic solution for the critical, monoenergetic, bare, infinite cylinder is presented. The solution is obtained by modifying a previous development based on a neutron density transform and Case's singular eigenfunction method. Numerical results for critical radii and the neutron density as a function of position are included and compared with the results of other methods.

  12. Inclusive particle spectra at (56 and 130)A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2001-03-01

    A simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of s=56,130A GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at s=17.2A GeV. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC.

  13. Tumor induction by monoenergetic neutrons in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kashimoto, Naoki; Kajimura, Junko; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kamiya, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate induction of tumors by monoenergetic neutrons in B6C3F1 mice. Individual groups of 6 week-old animals of both sexes (about 30 mice/group) were exposed to 0.5 Gy of various monoenergetic neutrons (dose rate 0.5 cGy/min) and then observed for 13 months. The incidences of tumors (mainly liver neoplasms) in non-irradiated male and female controls were 11% and 0%, respectively. In the irradiated animals, the incidences were 53%, 50%, 60% and 43% in males, and 75%, 81%, 71%, and 85% in females, after 0.18, 0.32, 0.6 and 1.0 MeV neutron exposure, respectively. There were no significant differences in the tumor induction rate among the different energy groups.

  14. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  15. Characterization of Bonner sphere systems at monoenergetic and thermal neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V; Gressier, V; Pochat, J-L; Fernández, F; Bakali, M; Bouassoule, T

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the GFR, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) use Bonner spheres (BS) for neutron spectrometry at workplaces. The two systems, equipped with similar cylindrical 3He proportional counters, were simulated with the MCNP Monte-Carlo code to determine the response to neutrons of different energies for each polyethylene sphere. The BS systems were characterized at monoenergetic and thermal neutron fields. Measurements were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) standard laboratories, and with the newly characterized IRSN 'SIGMA' thermal neutron facility. The energy distribution of the reference neutron fluence was folded with the response functions for comparison purposes with the experimental data. In almost all cases related to monoenergetic neutrons, a good agreement between the experimental and the calculated count rates was found, and some discrepancies of a few per cent were observed in the thermal region.

  16. Simulation of monoenergetic electron generation via laser wakefield accelerators for 5-25 TW lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, F.S.; Lu, W.; Tzoufras, M.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.; Vieira, J.M.; Silva, L.O.; Fonseca, R.A.

    2006-05-15

    In 2004, using a 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) model [F. S. Tsung et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 185004 (2004)], it was predicted that a 16.5 TW, 50 fs laser propagating through nearly 0.5 cm of 3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} preformed plasma channel would generate a monoenergetic bunch of electrons with a central energy of 240 MeV after 0.5 cm of propagation. In addition, electrons out to 840 MeV were seen if the laser propagated through 0.8 cm of the same plasma. The simulations showed that self-injection occurs after the laser intensity increases due to a combination of photon deceleration, group velocity dispersion, and self-focusing. The monoenergetic beam is produced because the injection process is clamped by beam loading and the rotation in phase space that results as the beam dephases. Nearly simultaneously [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Nature 431, 535 (2004); C. G. R. Geddes et al., ibid. 431, 538 (2004); J. Faure et al., ibid. 431, 541 (2004)] three experimental groups from around the world reported the generation of near nano-Coulomb of low emittance, monoenergetic electron beams using similar laser powers and pulse lengths as those reported in our simulations. Each of these experiments is modeled using the same 3D PIC code OSIRIS. The simulations indicate that although these experiments use a range of plasma parameters, density profiles, laser powers, and spot sizes; there are some commonalities to the mechanism for the generation of monoenergetic beams. Comments are given on how the energy and beam quality can be improved in the future.

  17. Solutions of Boltzmann`s Equation for Mono-energetic Neutrons in an Infinite Homogeneous Medium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-11-30

    Boltzman's equation is solved for the case of monoenergetic neutrons created by a plane or point source in an infinite medium which has spherically symmetric scattering. The customary solution of the diffusion equation appears to be multiplied by a constant factor which is smaller than 1. In addition to this term the total neutron density contains another term which is important in the neighborhood of the source. It varies as 1/r{sup 2} in the neighborhood of a point source. (auth)

  18. A Figure of Merit Comparison between Bremsstrahlung and Monoenergetic X-Ray Sources for Angiography.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A

    1994-01-01

    A figure of merit (FOM) has been developed which embodies parameters related to image quality in the numerator and radiation integral dose to the patient in the denominator. In this manner, maximizing image quality and minimizing radiation dose amounts to maximizing the FOM. Furthermore, the FOM is designed to be independent of x-ray exposure (number of photons used), and this eliminates one important parameter in an optimization scenario. Monoenergetic x-ray beams (0% bandwidth) are compared with conventional Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources from a tungsten target, for angiographic imaging systems using 144 mg/cm2 Csl image intensifiers as the detector. Thus the results are applicable to both digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and digital fluoroscopic procedures involving iodine-based contrast (e.g., roadmapping). The results demonstrate improvement factors (the ratio of the best FOM of the monoenergetic beam over the best FOM of the polyenergetic beam) ranging from 2.3 to 1.4. The improvement factors averaged over four iodine contrast thicknesses (50, 100, 500, and 1000 mg/cm2) were 1.61 (σ = 0.159) for the 10 cm thick patient, 1.68 (σ= 0.172) for the 20 cm thick patient, and 1.82 (σ= 0.186) for the 30 cm thick patient. The conclusions are that monoenergetic x-ray beams are capable of delivering the same image quality at about half the radiation dose to the patient compared to conventional X-ray tubes. PMID:21307470

  19. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, T.; Denis-Petit, D.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Aleonard, M. M.

    2013-01-15

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Region Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  20. First polarized proton collision at a beam energy of 250 GeV in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai,M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; et al.

    2009-05-04

    After providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL had its first opportunity to collide polarized protons at its maximum beam energy of 250 GeV in the 2009 polarized proton operations. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes [1] in each ring, RHIC preserves polarization during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with precise control of the betatron tunes and vertical orbit distortions. However, the strong intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are more than two times stronger than those below 100 GeV, requiring much tighter tolerances on vertical orbit distortions and betatron tunes. With the currently achieved orbit correction and tune control, average polarizations of {approx_equal} 42% at top energy and average polarizations of {approx_equal} 55% at injection energy were achieved. Polarization measurements as a function of beam energy also indicated aU polarization losses occurred around three strong intrinsic resonances at 136 GeV, 199.3 GeV and 220.8 GeV Peak luminosity of 122 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} was also demonstrated. This paper presents the performance of the first RHIC 250 GeV operation and discusses the depolarization issues encountered during the run.

  1. Monoenergetic collimated nano-Coulomb electron beams driven by crossed laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jingwei; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Ruhl, H.; Luan Shixia; Yu Wei

    2013-07-08

    Monoenergetic collimated electron acceleration by two crossed laser beams is investigated through an analytical model and particle-in-cell simulations. Electron bunches with a total charge of order nano-Coulombs are accelerated by the axial electric field formed by the crossed laser beams to nearly 760 MeV with an energy spread of 2.7%. The transverse components of both electric and magnetic fields vanish along the axis, making the electron beam highly collimated. This acceleration scheme appears promising in producing high quality electron beams.

  2. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  3. Potential formation in front of an electron emitting electrode immersed in a plasma that contains a monoenergetic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovacic, J.; Cercek, M.

    2010-08-15

    A one-dimensional fluid model of the sheath formation in front of a large, planar electron emitting electrode (collector) immersed in a plasma that contains a monoenergetic electron beam is presented. Expressions for the Bohm criterion, the total electric current to the collector, and for the zero electric field at the collector are derived. When there is no electron emission, the model predicts, in some cases, up to three different solutions. The low and the high solutions correspond to the fact that the presheath potential drop can be determined either by thermal or by the beam electrons. The middle solution between them has no physical meaning. When the electron emission is space charge limited, the model may have up to five solutions because the low solution can sometimes split into three parts. The current-voltage characteristic of the collector that exhibits triple floating potential is calculated and it shows qualitative similarity with experimental ones [C.-H. Nam et al., J. Appl. Phys. 63, 5674 (1988)]. When the emission is below the space charge limit, the model again exhibits up to five solutions, which are the low, middle, high, and two additional 'singularity solutions'. These two appear because of the singularity in the Bohm criterion. Regions of validity of the low and high solutions are determined from numerical solutions of the Poisson equation [T. Gyergyek et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 035001 (2009)] and with the maximum positive ion flux test [J. I. Fernandez Palop et al., J. Appl. Phys. 91, 2587 (2002)]. In the case of no or small emission, both methods give the same results. If the emission is space charge limited, the numerical solution method is much more reliable.

  4. Benchmarking of the mono-energetic transport coefficients-results from the International Collaboration on Neoclassical Transport in Stellarators (ICNTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Beidler, C. D.; Allmaier, K.; Isaev, Maxim Yu; Kasilov, K.; Kernbichler, W.; Leitold, G.; Maassberg, H.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Murakami, Masanori; Schmidt, M.; Spong, Donald A; Tribaidos, V.; Wakasa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical results for the three mono-energetic transport coefficients required for a complete neoclassical description of stellarator plasmas have been benchmarked within an international collaboration. These transport coefficients are flux-surface-averaged moments of solutions to the linearized drift kinetic equation which have been determined using field-line-integration techniques, Monte Carlo simulations, a variational method employing Fourier-Legendre test functions and a finite-difference scheme. The benchmarking has been successfully carried out for past, present and future devices which represent different optimization strategies within the extensive configuration space available to stellarators. A qualitative comparison of the results with theoretical expectations for simple model fields is provided. The behaviour of the results for the mono-energetic radial and parallel transport coefficients can be largely understood from such theoretical considerations but the mono-energetic bootstrap current coefficient exhibits characteristics which have not been predicted.

  5. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  6. The interaction of quasi-monoenergetic protons with pre-compressed inertial fusion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Koohrokhi, T.; Azadifar, R.

    2012-08-01

    The interaction of a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam with a pre-compressed plasma is studied in the context of inertial fusion fast ignition (FI). Based on fundamental principles, a kinetic model is developed by considering hard collisions, nuclear scattering, and the contribution due to collective processes. The penetration depth, longitudinal straggling, and the transverse blooming are evaluated by solving the Boltzmann transport equation using the multiple scattering theory. The stopping power, transport scattering cross sections, and convenient expressions for the angular moments of the proton distribution function have been used in modeling the collisional proton transport in a three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo code. The transport of a proton beam with a quasi-monoenergetic energy ⟨E⟩=10 MeV is studied for pre-compressed deuterium-tritium plasma with an average density of ρ =400 g cm-3 and temperatures T =1 keV, 5 keV, and 10 keV. The net effects of multiple scattering are to reduce the penetration from 1.028 to 0.828 g cm-2 with range straggling ρΣR=0.044 g cm-2 and beam blooming ρΣB=0.272 g cm-2, for 10 MeV protons in a ρ =400 gcm-3 plasma at T = 5 keV. This model can be used for quantitatively assessing ignition requirements for proton fast ignition.

  7. Characterization of Mono-Energetic, Charged-Particle Radiography for HEDP Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Casey, D.; Frenje, J.; Rygg, J.; Petrasso, R.; Gotchev, O.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J.; Smalyuk, V.

    2008-11-01

    Charged-particle radiography, which utilizes mono-energetic protons and alphas, has been used to image various High-Energy-Density Physics (HEDP) phenomena of interest, including capsule implosions, laser-plasma interactions, and Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth. An imploded D^3He- filled glass capsule -- the backlighter -- provides mono-energetic 15-MeV and 3-MeV protons and 3.6-MeV alphas for radiographing these various phenomena. This technique provides simultaneously information about areal density and electromagnetic fields in the imaged systems. For successful study of these phenomena, the backlighter yield and size need to be optimized for the imaging geometry and detector used. Understanding the experimental parameters that affect it is therefore essential. Empirical studies of backlighter performance under a variety of conditions are presented. GEANT4 is used as well to investigate the limits and capabilities of this technique. This work was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE, LLNL, LLE and the Fusion Science Center at Univ. Rochester. *Currently at LLNL.

  8. LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR PRECISION MONOENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCE R&D AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Bayramian, A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Prantil, M; Wu, S; Ebbers, C; Scarpetti, R D; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Bonanno, R E; Barty, C P

    2010-04-20

    Generation of mono-energetic, high brightness gamma-rays requires state of the art lasers to both produce a low emittance electron beam in the linac and high intensity, narrow linewidth laser photons for scattering with the relativistic electrons. Here, we overview the laser systems for the 3rd generation Monoenergetic Gamma-ray Source (MEGa-ray) currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). We also describe a method for increasing the efficiency of laser Compton scattering through laser pulse recirculation. The fiber-based photoinjector laser will produce 50 {micro}J temporally and spatially shaped UV pulses at 120 Hz to generate a low emittance electron beam in the X-band RF photoinjector. The interaction laser generates high intensity photons that focus into the interaction region and scatter off the accelerated electrons. This system utilizes chirped pulse amplification and commercial diode pumped solid state Nd:YAG amplifiers to produce 0.5 J, 10 ps, 120 Hz pulses at 1064 nm and up to 0.2 J after frequency doubling. A single passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber oscillator seeds both laser systems and provides a timing synch with the linac.

  9. Research Perspectives At Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-07-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade is illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of up to 65 GeV.

  10. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis De Jager

    2003-05-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of over 40 GeV.

  11. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2003-05-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade is illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of up to 65 GeV with a 25 GeV fixed-target facility.

  12. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-09-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of over 40 GeV.

  13. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range.

  14. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range. PMID:24324248

  15. RESULTS FROM PP AT 62.4 AND 200 GeV WITH THE BRAHMS EXPERIMENTATION.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK,F.

    2007-02-11

    Measurements of elementary pp collisions are essential for understanding heavy ion collisions. R.esu1ts for pp collisions at 200 and 62.4 GeV are presented. At both energies NLO pQCD describes pion production well. The measured pion transverse single spin asymmetries are very large at 62.4 GeV and are reasonably well described by models relying on pQCD at transverse momenta larger than 1 GeV/c.

  16. Native cation vacancies in Si-doped AlGaN studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, A.; Tenjinbayashi, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Shimahara, Y.; Miyake, H.; Hiramatsu, K.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.; Ishibashi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Native defects in Si-doped AlGaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and positron lifetimes were measured, and these were compared with results obtained using first-principles calculation. For Si-doped AlxGa1-xN (4 × 1017 Si/cm3), the vacancy-type defects were introduced at above x = 0.54, and this was attributed to the transition of the growth mode to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism from the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism. For Si-doped Al0.6Ga0.4N, the vacancy concentration increased with increasing Si concentration, and the major defect species was identified as Al vacancies. A clear correlation between the suppression of cathodoluminescence and the defect concentration was obtained, suggesting the cation vacancies act as nonradiative centers in AlGaN.

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation of monoenergetic neutrons traversing rectangular and spherical polyethylene moderators.

    PubMed

    Monk, S D; Selwood, M

    2011-03-01

    A Monte Carlo-based simulation of the transport of a series of monoenergetic neutron sources through first a rectangular block of 0.93 g cm(-3) density polyethylene and secondly through a sphere made of the same substance is presented here. In both instances, the neutron fields are monitored at closely spread intervals through the moderator mass, producing a lot of data in the process. To reduce the amount of data presented, a figure of merit is created by estimating the cross section for each discrete neutron energy and by applying this to the number of neutrons present of each energy giving an arbitrary response figure. This work was undertaken in order to aid the design and development of a novel neutron spectrometer.

  18. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Li, D. Z.; Aeschlimann, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  19. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, D. Z.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Aeschlimann, M.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-01

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  20. Studies on the response of 3He and 4He proportional counters to monoenergetic fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Fragopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Koukorava, C.; Spyrou, A.; Perdikakis, G.; Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Zamani, M.

    2006-06-01

    Two helium filled proportional counters ( 3He and 4He) were studied to establish the optimum operating conditions when these counters are used for fast neutron measurements, as well as to examine the linearity of the pulse height with neutron energy. The detectors were irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons in the energy range of 230 keV-22 MeV, produced via 7Li(n,p) 7Be, 2H(d,n) 3He and 3H(d,n) 4He reactions in a Tandem Van de Graff accelerator. The gamma ray contribution to the obtained pulse height distribution and the resolution of the counters as a function of shaping time constant and applied high voltage were studied.

  1. Comparison of Techniques to Reduce Bremsstrahlung Background Radiation from Monoenergetic Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M; McNabb, D

    2006-06-29

    An important applied technology is a tunable mono-energetic photon source [1]. These sources are made of relativistic electron accelerators coupled to low-energy lasers, which produce high-energy, mono-energetic-rays. One challenge associated with systems such as this is a continuum of bremsstrahlung background created when an electron beam passes through an aperture of some sort and the electron bunch or its halo impinges on the aperture pictured in figure 1. For instance, in the current T-REX [1] design for the interaction point between the laser- and electron-beam, the electron-beam passes through the center of a mirror used to reflect the laser. There is a potential with this design that bremsstrahlung radiation may be produced at the edges of the mirror openings and contaminate the mono-energetic photon beam. Certain applications [2] may be sensitive to this contamination. To reduce the bremsstrahlung contaminate a collimator (thickness {approx}24in. (calculated from XCOM database [3]) to attenuate by a factor of 10{sup -3} the 112MeV photons expected in the T-REX demonstration [1]) is situated between the aperture and target. To maximize the brightness of the photon-beam, the collimator opening must be no less than the size of the photon-beam spot size expected to be about 1mm. This fixes the collimator opening. a priori the aperture size must be greater than the collimator opening and is a function distance between the aperture and collimator. In this paper we focus on two approaches to estimate the aperture size, given a collimator and a target whose sizes and distances from the aperture are given. In the next section we will discuss these approaches.

  2. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  3. Spin alignment measurements of the K{sup *0}(892) and {sup}{o}(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN}=200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first spin alignment measurements for the K*{sup 0}(892) and (1020) vector mesons produced at midrapidity with transverse momenta up to 5 GeV/c at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at RHIC. The diagonal spin-density matrix elements with respect to the reaction plane in Au+Au collisions are {rho}{sub 00} = 0.32 {+-} 0.04 (stat) {+-} 0.09 (syst) for the K*{sup 0} (0.8 < p{sub T} < 5.0 GeV/c) and {rho}{sub 00} = 0.34 {+-} 0.02 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst) for the {phi} (0.4 < p{sub T} < 5.0 GeV/c) and are constant with transverse momentum and collision centrality. The data are consistent with the unpolarized expectation of 1/3 and thus no evidence is found for the transfer of the orbital angular momentum of the colliding system to the vector-meson spins. Spin alignments for K*{sup 0} and {phi} in Au+Au collisions were also measured with respect to the particle's production plane. The {phi} result, {rho}{sub 00} = 0.41 {+-} 0.02 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst), is consistent with that in p+p collisions, {rho}{sub 00} = 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (stat) {+-} 0.06 (syst), also measured in this work. The measurements thus constrain the possible size of polarization phenomena in the production dynamics of vector mesons.

  4. Beta-Decay Study of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb: Candidates for a Monoenergetic Neutrino Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Estevez Aguado, M. E.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Bernabeu, J.; Nacher, E.; Tain, J. L.; Gadea, A.; Agramunt, J.; Burkard, K.; Hueller, W.; Doring, J.; Kirchner, R.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E.; Grawe, H.; Collatz, R.; Hellstrom, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Karny, M.; Janas, Z.; Gierlik, M.; Plochocki, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batist, L.; Moroz, F.; Wittman, V.; Blazhev, A.; Valiente, J. J.; Espinoza, C.

    2011-01-01

    The beta decays of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb nuclei are investigated using the total absorption spectroscopy technique. These nuclei can be considered possible candidates for forming the beam of a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility based on the electron capture (EC) decay of radioactive nuclei. Our measurements confirm that for the cases studied, the EC decay proceeds mainly to a single state in the daughter nucleus.

  5. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S. A.; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y.-Y.; Korzekwa, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Pai, C.-H.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Borger, T.; Spinks, M.; Donovan, M.; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre’s length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy. PMID:23756359

  6. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  7. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be ˜16% and ˜26% of the mean for DD and D3He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of ≳50 rad-1 contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)], 10.1016/S0168-9002(03)01368-8 framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within ≲10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  8. Decisive disappearance search at high Δ m2 with monoenergetic muon neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axani, S.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-11-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the Δ m2˜1 eV2 anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged-current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for νμ disappearance associated with currently favored light sterile neutrino models and features the ability to reconstruct the neutrino oscillation wave within a single, extended detector. The required detector design, technology, and costs are modest. The KPipe measurements will be robust since they depend on a known energy neutrino source with low expected backgrounds. Further, since the measurements rely only on the measured rate of detected events as a function of distance, with no required knowledge of the initial flux and neutrino interaction cross section, the results will be largely free of systematic errors. The experimental sensitivity to oscillations, based on a shape-only analysis of the L /E distribution, will extend an order of magnitude beyond present experimental limits in the relevant high-Δ m2 parameter space.

  9. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2015-11-24

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  10. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David E-mail: seongjin.in@gmail.com E-mail: yaylali@email.arizona.edu

    2015-11-01

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  11. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Mizushima, Yoriko; Kim, Youngsuk; Nakamura, Tomoji; Ohba, Takayuki; Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500°C. After 600–700°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  12. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  13. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S A; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y-Y; Korzekwa, R; Tsai, H-E; Pai, C-H; Quevedo, H; Dyer, G; Gaul, E; Martinez, M; Bernstein, A C; Borger, T; Spinks, M; Donovan, M; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Ditmire, T; Downer, M C

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre's length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy.

  14. A 0. 5 to 3. 0 MeV monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huomo, H.; AsokaKumar, P.; Henderson, S.D.; Phlips, B.F.; Mayer, R.; McDonough, J.; Hacker, H.; McCorkle, S.; Schnitzenbaumer, P.; Greenberg, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    An adjustable, 0.5--3 MeV monoenergetic positron beam has been constructed at Brookhaven. Currently a /sup 22/Na source with a W(100) foil transmission moderator produces a 1.1 mm FWHN beam with an intensity of 3/times/10/sup 5/ e/sup +//sec at a target located downstream from the accelerator. The divergence of the beam is less than 0.1/degree/ at 2.2 MeV energy. A SOA gun with 2 lens transport system brings the beam to a focus at the entrance of an electrostatic 3 MeV Dynamitron accelerator. The post acceleration beam transport system comprises 3 focusing solenolds, 4 sets of steering magnets and a 90/degree/ double focusing bending magnet. The beam energy spread at the target is <1 keV FWHN deduced from the beam size. Below we describe the positron extraction optics and acceleration, the construction of the beamline and the beam diagnostic devices. The salient beam parameters are listed at the end of this paper. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Response of a lithium gadolinium borate scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Williams, A M; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires knowledge of the neutron energy distribution in the working environment. Existing neutron spectrometry systems, Bonner spheres for example, are large and bulky, and require long data acquisition times. A portable system that could indicate the approximate neutron energy spectrum in a short time would be extremely useful in radiation protection. A composite scintillator, consisting of lithium gadolinium borate crystals in a plastic scintillator matrix, produced by Photogenics is being tested for this purpose. A prototype device based on this scintillator and digital pulse processing electronics has been calibrated using quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields at the low-scatter facility of the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Energies selected were 144, 250, 565, 1400, 2500 and 5000 keV, with correction for scattered neutrons being made using the shadow cone technique. Measurements were also made in the NPL thermal neutron field. Pulse distributions collected with the digitiser in capture-gated mode are presented, and detection efficiency and energy resolution derived. For comparison, neutron spectra were also collected using the commercially available Microspec N-Probe from Bubble Technology Industries, which consists of an NE213 scintillator and a 3He proportional counter.

  16. Properties and applications of mono-energetic gamma-rays from laser-Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Anderson, Gerry; Betts, Shawn; Gibson, David; Hagmann, Christian; Johnson, Micah; Messerly, Mike; Shverdin, Miroslav; Hartemann, Frederic; Siders, Craig; McNabb, Dennis; Barty, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    Properties of a Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering source are presented. It produces 0.1 MeV-0.9 MeV photons. Its experimental key parameters are: its size (0.01 mm^2), divergence (10x6 mrad^2), duration (ps), spectrum (15% bandwidth) and intensity (10^5 photons/shot), which yield an on-axis peak brightness of ˜10^15 photons/mm^2/mrad^2/s/0.1% bandwidth at 0.478 MeV. We detected the 0.478 MeV nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) line of ^7Li. A LiH sample was in the beam path, and the NRF scattered photons were detected by a germanium detector oriented at 90^o with respect to the incident beam axis. The resulting spectrum shows the 0.478 MeV line of ^7Li, with several characteristic lines from the interaction. With this experiment, we have shown that MEGa-Ray sources will provide a unique specific isotope detection capability. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Fred; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Bayramian, Andy; Chu, Tak Sum; Cross, R.; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Marsh, Roark; McNabb, Dennis; Messerly, Michael; Shverdin, Miroslav; Siders, Craig; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  18. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30-100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the effects

  19. Bremsstrahlung versus Monoenergetic Photon Dose and Photonuclear Stimulation Comparisons At Long Standoff Distances

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Jones; J.W. Sterbentz; W.Y. Yoon

    2009-06-01

    Energetic photon sources with energies greater than 6 MeV continue to be recognized as viable source for various types of inspection applications, especially those related to nuclear and/or explosive material detection. These energetic photons can be produced as a continuum of energies (i.e., bremsstrahlung distribution) or as a set of one or more discrete photon energies (i.e., monoenergetic distribution). This paper will provide a follow-on extension of the photon dose comparison presented at the 9th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques (June 2008). The latter paper showed the comparative advantages and disadvantages of the photon doses provided by these two energetic interrogation sources and highlighted the higher energy advantage of the bremsstrahlung source, especially at long standoff distances (i.e., distance from source to the inspected object). Specifically, this paper will pursue this higher energy photon inspection advantage (up to 100 MeV) by providing dose and stimulated photonuclear interaction predictions for air and an infinitely dilute interrogated material (used for comparative interaction rate assessments since it excludes material self-shielding) as the interrogation object positioned forward on the inspection beam axis at increasing standoff distances. In addition to the direct energetic photon-induced stimulation, the predictions will identify the importance of any secondary downscattered/attenuated source-term effects arising from the photon transport in the intervening atmosphere. *Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office under Contract Number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  20. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in monoenergetic neutron fields: CCRI(III)-K11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressier, V.; Bonaldi, A. C.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Harano, H.; Masuda, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Moiseev, N.; Nico, J. S.; Nolte, R.; Oberstedt, S.; Roberts, N. J.; Röttger, S.; Thomas, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the validity of their national standards, National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) participate regularly in international comparisons. In the area of neutron metrology, Section III of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation is in charge of the organization of these comparisons. From September 2011 to October 2012, the eleventh key comparison, named CCRI(III)-K11, took place at the AMANDE facility of the LNE-IRSN, in France. Participants from nine NMIs came with their own primary reference instruments, or instruments traceable to primary standards, with the aim of determining the neutron fluence, at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum, per monitor count at four monoenergetic neutron fields: 27 keV, 565 keV, 2.5 MeV and 17 MeV. The key comparison reference values (KCRV) were evaluated as the weighted mean values of the results provided by seven participants. The uncertainties of each KCRV are between 0.9% and 1.7%. The degree of equivalence (DoE), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding KCRV, and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported and discussed. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Systematics of the charged-hadron P{sub T} spectrum and the nuclear suppression factor in heavy-ion collisions from {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV to {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten; Holopainen, Hannu; Paatelainen, Risto; Eskola, Kari J.

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, our goal is to make a simultaneous analysis of the high- and low-P{sub T} parts of the charged-hadron P{sub T} spectrum measured by the ALICE collaboration [K. Aamodt et al. (ALICE Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 696, 30 (2011)] in central Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), based on models which have been successfully applied and constrained in Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). For the hydrodynamical modeling with which we obtain the low-P{sub T} spectrum, we have computed the initial conditions based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) minijet production and saturation. The sensitivity of the obtained charged-hadron P{sub T} spectrum on the hydrodynamic model parameters is studied. For the high-P{sub T} part, we apply a number of parton-medium interaction models, which are tuned to describe the nuclear suppression factor R{sub AA} measured at RHIC in central Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. We find that the higher kinematic reach of the LHC, manifest in the hardening of the pQCD parton spectral slope, is in principle very efficient in discriminating the various models. However, due to the uncertainties in the p-p baseline, none of the tested models can be firmly ruled out with the present ALICE data. Comparison with the LHC data in this approach shows that the combined hydrodynamic and pQCD + jet quenching components can reproduce the data well in the whole measured P{sub T} range.

  2. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  3. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  4. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  5. Isotope-specific detection of low-density materials with laser-based monoenergetic gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G A; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Hall, J; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P J

    2010-02-01

    What we believe to be the first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z and low density object shielded by a high-Z and high-density material using monoenergetic gamma rays is reported. The isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of L7i at 478 keV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general, and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray and gamma-ray techniques in these situations.

  6. VELOCIRAPTOR: An X-band photoinjector and linear accelerator for the production of Mono-Energetic γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. G.; Albert, F.; Bayramian, A. J.; Beer, G.; Bonanno, R. E.; Cross, R. R.; Deis, G.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Hartemann, F. V.; Houck, T. L.; Marsh, R. A.; McNabb, D. P.; Messerly, M. J.; Scarpetti, R. D.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Siders, C. W.; Wu, S. S.; Barty, C. P. J.; Adolphsen, C. E.; Chu, T. S.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Tantawi, S. G.; Vlieks, A. E.; Wang, F.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.; Raubenheimer, T. O.

    2011-11-01

    The rf photoinjector and linear accelerator in the Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) facility at LLNL is presented. This machine uses 11.4 GHz rf technology to accelerate a high-brightness electron beam up to 250 MeV to produce MeV γ-rays through Compton scattering with a Joule-class laser pulse. Compton scattering-based generation of high flux, narrow bandwidth γ-rays places stringent requirements on the performance of the accelerator. The component parts of the accelerator are presented and their requirements described. Simulations of expected electron beam parameters and the resulting light source properties are presented.

  7. Isotope-specific detection of low-density materials with laser-based monoenergetic gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G A; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Hall, J; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P J

    2010-02-01

    What we believe to be the first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z and low density object shielded by a high-Z and high-density material using monoenergetic gamma rays is reported. The isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of L7i at 478 keV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general, and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray and gamma-ray techniques in these situations. PMID:20125719

  8. Energy spectra of electrons and positrons produced in semi-infinite and infinite water phantoms irradiated by photons with energies up to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, M L; Pandey, L N; Kassaee, A; Long, S A

    1989-04-01

    Previous Monte Carlo calculations for the energy spectra of electrons produced in water irradiated by photons are extended to 1 GeV. All of the physical processes believed to be important in the transport of electrons and positrons above 100 keV and photons starting with the ejection of L photoelectrons are considered. The results are presented in tabular form and can be conveniently used to compute kerma in water. The contributions of several physical processes, such as Compton scattering and pair-production to electron spectra, are separately tabulated. The results are compared with those of Todo et al. (1982) for the single interactions of monoenergetic photons. It is found that the inclusion of processes such as multiple Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung production, positron annihilation in flight, Møhiller and Bhabha scattering from electrons and Molière multiple scattering from atomic nuclei make a considerable difference in the inferred electron spectrum in water.

  9. GeV electron microtron design report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. E.

    1982-05-01

    Rising interest in the nuclear physics community in a GeV CW electron accelerator reflects the growing importance of high resolution short-range nuclear physics to future advances in the field. Major current problems are reviewed and the details of prospective measurements which could be made with a GeV CW electron facility are discussed, together with their impact on an understanding of nuclear forces and the structure of nuclear matter. The microtron accelerator was chosen as the technology to generate the electron beams required for the research discussed because of the advantages of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost and capability of furnishing beams of several energies and intensities simultaneously. A complete technical description of the conceptual design for a 2 GeV double-sided CW electron microtron is presented. The accelerator can furnish three beams with independently controlled energy and intensity.

  10. Correction and verification of AECL Bonner Sphere response matrix based on mono-energetic neutron calibration performed at NPL.

    PubMed

    Atanackovic, J; Thomas, D J; Roberts, N J; Witharana, S; Dubeau, J; Yonkeu, A

    2014-10-01

    The AECL Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was taken to National Physical Laboratory (NPL) for calibration in mono-energetic neutron fields and bare (252)Cf neutron fields. The mono-energetic radiations were performed using ISO-8529 prescribed neutron energies: 0.071, 0.144, 0.565, 1.2, 5 and 17 MeV. A central SP9 proportional counter was also evaluated at the NPL thermal neutron calibration facility in order to assess an effective pressure of (3)He inside the counter, i.e. number density of (3)He atoms. Based on these measurements and methods outlined by Thomas and Soochak, a new BSS response matrix was generated. The response matrix is then verified by unfolding spectra corresponding to various neutron fields. Those are NPL bare (252)Cf source, National Institute of Standards and Technology bare and heavy water moderated (252)Cf source and (241)AmBe calibration source located at National Research Council. A good agreement was observed with expected neutron fluence rates, as well as derived dosimetric quantities, such as International Commission on Radiological Protection-74 ambient dose equivalent.

  11. Measurements of low energy auroral ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, A.

    1981-12-01

    Ion measurements in the energy range 0.1-30 keV observed during the 'Substorm Phenomena' and 'Porcupine' campaigns are summarized. Acceleration of the ions by an electrostatic field aligned parallel to the magnetic field is identified and found to be accompanied by intense electron precipitation. On the other hand, deceleration of the ions is observed in other field-aligned current sheets which are indicated by the electron and magnetic field measurements. Temporal successive monoenergetic ion variations suggest energy dispersion and a location of the source region at 9 earth radii. What is more, ion fluxes higher than those of the electrons are measured at pitch angles parallel to the magnetic field. It is noted that each of the examples was observed during different flights.

  12. A Hierarchy of Transport Approximations for High Energy Heavy (HZE) Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.; Hamidullah, Farhat; Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of high energy heavy (HZE) ions through bulk materials is studied neglecting energy dependence of the nuclear cross sections. A three term perturbation expansion appears to be adequate for most practical applications for which penetration depths are less than 30 g per sq cm of material. The differential energy flux is found for monoenergetic beams and for realistic ion beam spectral distributions. An approximate formalism is given to estimate higher-order terms.

  13. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented.

  14. Future Research Program at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2007-09-06

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  15. Future Spin Physics at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2006-10-02

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  16. Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-08-19

    Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays.

  17. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platform at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Edgell, D.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2016-03-01

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE / E ∼ 4 %) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating that monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. These results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.

  18. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platforn at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; et al

    2016-01-18

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE/E~4%) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating thatmore » monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. In conclusion, these results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.« less

  19. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia, J. J.; Murakami, M.

    2015-01-15

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects, such as ion beam divergence, not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core, ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point has been analyzed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  20. Centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow for charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Carroll, A.; Gushue, S.; Heintzelman, G.A.; Holzman, B.; Nguyen, M.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L.P.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J.L.; Kulinich, P.

    2005-11-01

    This Rapid Communication describes the measurement of elliptic flow for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measured azimuthal anisotropy is presented over a wide range of pseudorapidity for three broad collision centrality classes for the first time at this energy. Two distinct methods of extracting the flow signal were used to reduce systematic uncertainties. The elliptic flow falls sharply with increasing |{eta}| at 200 GeV for all the centralities studied, as observed for minimum-bias collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=130 GeV.

  1. Precision photo-induced cross-section measurements using the monoenergetic and polarized photon beams at HIγS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Kelley, J. H.; Huibregtse, C.; Hammond, S. L.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    A research program has been initiated at TUNL to perform precision (γ,γ') and (γ,xn) cross-section measurements on actinide nuclei using the novel source of radiation at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) facility. This facility provides nearly mono-energetic (E/E ± 2%) and intense (10^8 s-1) photon beams after the recent upgrade. A precision knowledge of photoinduced processes is of practical importance for new reactor technologies, nuclear transmutation, and nuclear forensics. Our recent photodisintegration cross section measurements on radioactive ^241Am targets in the energy range from 9 < Eγ < 16 MeV will be presented. The experimental data for the ^241Am(γ,n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region will be compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  2. Vacancies and electron trapping centers in acidic ammonothermal GaN probed by a monoenergetic positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tsukada, Yusuke; Mikawa, Yutaka; Mochizuki, Tae; Fujisawa, Hideo; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Kurihara, Kaori; Fujito, Kenji; Terada, Shigeru; Ishibashi, Shoji; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2016-08-01

    Defects in ammonothermal GaN have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Through measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation, the major defect species was identified as a Ga vacancy coupled with impurities such as oxygen and/or hydrogen. Those defects were found to be stable even after annealing at 1000 °C. The shape parameter S for the Doppler broadening spectrum corresponding to positron annihilation at the surface was found to be decreased by illumination within energy ranges of 1.5-2.6 eV and 3.2-3.6 eV. This phenomenon is attributed to the suppression of recombinations between holes and electrons due to trapping centers, which can hold electrons for a long time, and a resultant accumulation of holes at the surface. Recovery of the S value required almost one day, but it was shortened by the annealing at 1000 °C.

  3. On the accuracy of homotopy perturbation and variational iteration methods for lateral broadening of a monoenergetic proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noshad, Houshyar; Bahador, Seyyedeh Samira; Mohammadi, Saeed

    2013-10-01

    In this article, dispersion of a 60 MeV proton pencil beam at various depths in a muscle tissue was numerically investigated via solving a three dimensional Fokker-Planck equation using homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and variational iteration method (VIM). The accuracy of these methods was benchmarked by comparison the radial flux distribution of protons traversing different depths in the tissue with the data of the High Charge and Energy Transport (HZETRN) model and Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, the computed depth dose distributions obtained from the HPM and VIM for monoenergetic protons passing through a medium were compared with the results of GEANT4.5.2 code as well as the experimental data reported in the literature. The satisfactory agreement obtained from our computations shows the reliability and applicability of the HPM and VIM in our analysis.

  4. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  5. Optically active vacancies in GaN grown on Si substrates probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira Zhang, Yang; Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Fujishima, Tatsuya; Palacios, Tomás; Cao, Yu; Laboutin, Oleg; Johnson, Wayne; Ishibashi, Shoji; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2014-02-24

    Native defects in GaN layers grown on Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation for GaN layers showed that optically active vacancy-type defects were formed in the layers. Charge transition of the defects due to electron capture was found to occur when the layers were irradiated by photons with energy above 2.71 eV. The concentration of such defects increased after 600–800 °C annealing, but the defects have not been annealed out even at 1000 °C. They were identified as Ga-vacancy-type defects, such as complexes between Ga vacancies and carbon impurities, and the relationship between their charge transition and optical properties were discussed.

  6. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  7. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  8. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, James; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    A wider aperture, which has been obtained along the Booster beam line recently, brings the opportunity to run beams with the intensity higher than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Extra accelerating voltages can be achieved either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate via a slower acceleration, and this motivates the 6-GeV study.

  9. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, J.; /Argonne

    2004-12-01

    Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

  10. Charged hadron distributions in 19.6-GeV gold+gold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picha, Roppon

    Experimental results from a low-energy heavy ion run in year 2001 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) detector are presented. From the collisions of gold ions at sNN = 19.6 GeV, six species of particles (pi+/-, K+/-, p, and p¯) are identified via energy loss mechanism and their transverse mass spectra are analyzed at midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) and m T - m0 < 1.0 GeV/c 2. Rapidity distributions, particle ratios, and hadronic freeze-out conditions are discussed. This study provides a low energy measurement at RHIC which is very close to that at the SPS for cross comparison between collider experiments and fixed target experiments. The analysis provides a good reference to study excitation functions of strangeness production, net baryon, and collective flow inside heavy ion collisions.

  11. Walking from 750 GeV to 950 GeV in the technipion zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    If the 750-GeV diphoton excess is identified with the color-singlet isosinglet technipion P0 (750) in the one-family walking technicolor model, as in our previous paper, then there should exist another color-singlet technipion-isotriplet one, P±,3, predicted at around 950 GeV independently of the dynamical details. The P±,3(950 ) are produced at the LHC via vector-boson and photon-fusion processes, predominantly decaying to W γ and γ γ , respectively. Those walking technicolor signals can be explored at run 2 or 3, which would further open the door for a plethora of other (colored) technipions.

  12. A CONCEPTUAL 3-GEV LANSCE LINAC UPGRADE FOR ENHANCED PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Merrill, Frank E.; O'Hara, James F.; Rees, Daniel E.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-14

    A conceptual design of a 3-GeV linac upgrade that would enable enhanced proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is presented. The upgrade is based on the use of superconducting accelerating cavities to increase the present LANSCE linac output energy from 800 MeV to 3 GeV. The LANSCE linac currently provides negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) and proton (H{sup +}) beams to several user facilities that support Isotope Production, NNSA Stockpile Stewardship, and Basic Energy Science programs. Required changes to the front-end, the accelerating structures, and to the RF systems to meet the new performance goals, and changes to the existing beam switchyard to maintain operations for a robust user program are also described.

  13. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p¯ production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p¯ should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high pT region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p¯ suppression.

  14. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-08-15

    We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high p{sub T} region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p suppression.

  15. Calculated shielding characteristics of eight materials for neutrons and secondary photons produced by monoenergetic source neutrons with energies less than 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Noriyoshi; Shikata, Takashi; Fujita, Shin; Kosako, Toshiso

    1995-10-01

    Shielding characteristics of iron, lead, ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, graphite, marble, water, and paraffin were calculated for monoenergetic source neutrons with energies < 400 MeV. The depth dependence of neutron and secondary photon transmitted dose equivalents at the exit surfaces of shields of varying thickness is exhibited for some monoenergetic source neutrons and for each material. Their shielding characteristics are compared and discussed in terms of the degradation process of neutron energy and the change of neutron spectrum in typical shielding materials. Calculations were carried out by using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN-JR and the cross-section library DLC-87/HILO. Systematic knowledge concerning the shielding of neutrons with energies < 400 MeV was successfully obtained.

  16. Giant electromagnetic vortex and MeV monoenergetic electrons generated by short laser pulses in underdense plasma near quarter critical density region.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fuji, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    Very efficient generation of monoenergetic, about 1MeV , electrons from underdense plasma with its electron density close to the critical, when irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse, is found via two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The stimulated Raman scattering of a laser pulse with frequency omega< or =2omega(pl max) gives rise to a giant electromagnetic vortex. In contrast to electron acceleration by the well-known laser pulse wake, injected plasma electrons are accelerated up to vortex ponderomotive potential forming a quite monoenergetic distribution. A relatively high charge of such an electron source makes very efficient generation of soft gamma rays with homega>300 keV .

  17. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing

    2008-08-07

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  18. Commissioning and Operation of 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Freyberger, Arne P.

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) located at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) has been recently upgraded to deliver continuous electron beams to the experimental users at a maximum energy of 12 GeV, three times the original design energy of 4 GeV. This paper will present an overview of the upgrade, referred to as the 12GeV upgrade, and highlights from recent beam commissioning results.

  19. {beta}-decay study of {sup 150}Er, {sup 152}Yb, and {sup 156}Yb: Candidates for a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility

    SciTech Connect

    Estevez Aguado, M. E.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Bernabeu, J.; Nacher, E.; Tain, J. L.; Gadea, A.; Agramunt, J.; Burkard, K.; Hueller, W.; Doering, J.; Kirchner, R.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E.; Grawe, H.; Collatz, R.; Hellstroem, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Karny, M.

    2011-09-15

    The {beta} decays of {sup 150}Er, {sup 152}Yb, and {sup 156}Yb nuclei are investigated using the total absorption spectroscopy technique. These nuclei can be considered possible candidates for forming the beam of a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility based on the electron capture (EC) decay of radioactive nuclei. Our measurements confirm that for the cases studied the EC decay proceeds mainly to a single state in the daughter nucleus.

  20. 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Z. D.

    2002-03-01

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS .ll time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS .ll time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW- 3.5microS klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5microS permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly ampli.ed. The SLED cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  1. A 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2002-03-07

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS fill time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS fill time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW-3.5 {micro}S klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5 {micro}S permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly amplified. The SLED [1] cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  2. Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A [approximately] 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies [radical]s [approximately] 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

  3. Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A {approximately} 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies {radical}s {approximately} 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

  4. An intense monoenergetic positron beam with an adjustable energy between 0.5 and 3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoka-kumar, P.; Greenberg, J. S.; Henderson, S. D.; Huomo, H.; Lubell, M. S.; Lynn, K. G.; Mayer, R.; McCorkle, S.; McDonough, J.; Palathingal, J. C.; Phlips, B. F.; Vehanen, A.; Weber, M.; Wu, X. Y.

    1993-12-01

    An adjustable 0.5 to 3.0 MeV monoenergetic positron beam has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Positrons leaving a 22Na β+ source with a ˜ 6000 Å thick W(100) transmission moderator are accelerated to higher energies in a 3.0 MeV Dynamitron. At a target position, located 12 m away from the exit of the accelerator, the beam has a maximum intensity of 5 × 10 5 e +/s inside a 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) spot and is characterized by an energy spread of < 1 keV FWHM and a high-energy contamination from the unmoderated positrons of < 1 e +/s. At an energy of 2.2 MeV the beam divergence half angle at the target is < 0.5°. This paper describes the positron beam generation, extraction, acceleration, and transport along with the tools employed for the beam diagnostics and the measured parameters. It also includes a brief description of possible applications and a summary of results from recent experiments.

  5. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  6. Simultaneous generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron and betatron X-rays from nitrogen gas via ionization injection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Li, M. H.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ge, X. L.; Liu, F.; Hafz, N. M.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-17

    Upon the interaction of 60 TW Ti: sapphire laser pulses with 4 mm long supersonic nitrogen gas jet, a directional x-ray emission was generated along with the generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beams having a peak energy of 130 MeV and a relative energy spread of ∼ 20%. The betatron x-ray emission had a small divergence of 7.5 mrad and a critical energy of 4 keV. The laser wakefield acceleration process was stimulated in a background plasma density of merely 5.4 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} utilizing ionization injection. The non-self-focusing and stable propagation of the laser pulse in the pure nitrogen gaseous plasma should be responsible for the simultaneous generation of the high-quality X-ray and electron beams. Those ultra-short and naturally-synchronized beams could be applicable to ultrafast pump-probe experiments.

  7. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-06-01

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n γ)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  8. A model of the energetic ion environment of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, J.G. ); Schwingenschuh, K. )

    1990-02-01

    Because Mars has a weak intrinsic magnetic field and a substantial atmosphere, instruments on orbiting spacecraft should detect a result from comet-like ion pickup in the solar wind and magnetosheath convection electric fields, in addition to those that might result from processes internal to a Martian magnetosphere. Although this ion exosphere has been previously discussed in the literature, detailed predictions that might be directly applied to the interpretation of data are not available. Here a test particle model is used to construct a global picture of Martian pickup ions in the Mars environment. The model makes use of the recent Nagy and Cravens (1988) model of the Martian exosphere and Spreiter and Stahara's (1980) gas dynamic model of the magnetosheath. The pickup of ions originating at Phobos is also considered. Notable properties of the resulting ion distributions include their near-monoenergetic spectra, pancake pitch angle distributions, and large gyroradii compared to the planetary scale.

  9. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  10. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  11. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-06-15

    We present a numerical study of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser proton acceleration using a thin carbon-hydrogen foil. The used proton acceleration scheme is a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion due to the carbon ions. We observe that the spot size plays a crucial role in determining the net charge of the electron-shielded carbon ion foil and consequently the efficiency of proton acceleration. Using a laser pulse with fixed input energy and pulse length impinging on a carbon-hydrogen foil, a laser beam with smaller spot sizes can generate higher energy but fewer quasi-monoenergetic protons. We studied the scaling of the proton energy with respect to the laser spot size and obtained an optimal spot size for maximum proton energy flux. Using the optimal spot size, we can generate an 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam containing more than 10{sup 8} protons using a laser beam with power 250 TW and energy 10 J and a target of thickness 0.15 wavelength and 49 critical density made of 90% carbon and 10% hydrogen.

  12. Cellular track model for study of heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1993-01-01

    Track theory is combined with a realistic model of a heavy ion beam to study the effects of nuclear fragmentation on cell survival and biological effectiveness. The effects of secondary reaction products are studied as a function of depth in a water column. Good agreement is found with experimental results for the survival of human T-l cells exposed to monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams under aerobic and hypoxia conditions. The present calculation, which includes the effect of target fragmentation, is a significant improvement over an earlier calculation because of the use of a vastly improved beam model with no change in the track theory or cellular response parameters.

  13. Simulation of Drift-Compression for Heavy-Ion-Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Barnard, J J; Grote, D P; Celata, C M; Yu, S S

    2005-03-16

    Lengthwise compression of space-charge-dominated beams is needed to obtain the high input power required for heavy-ion fusion. The ''drift-compression'' scenario studied here first applies a head-to-tail velocity variation with the beam tail moving faster than the head. As the beam drifts, the longitudinal space-charge field slows compression, leaving the beam nearly monoenergetic as it enters the final-focus magnets. This paper presents initial work to model this compression scenario. Fluid and particle simulations are compared, and several strategies for setting up the compression schedule are discussed.

  14. Microdosimetry of proton and carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Hultqvist, Martha; Lindborg, Lennart; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Uehara, Shuzo

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate microdosimetry properties of 160 MeV/u protons and 290 MeV/u{sup 12}C ion beams in small volumes of diameters 10–100 nm. Methods: Energy distributions of primary particles and nuclear fragments in the beams were calculated from simulations with the general purpose code SHIELD-HIT, while energy depositions by monoenergetic ions in nanometer volumes were obtained from the event-by-event Monte Carlo track structure ion code PITS99 coupled with the electron track structure code KURBUC. Results: The results are presented for frequencies of energy depositions in cylindrical targets of diameters 10–100 nm, dose distributionsyd(y) in lineal energy y, and dose-mean lineal energies y{sup ¯}{sub D}. For monoenergetic ions, the y{sup ¯}{sub D} was found to increase with an increasing target size for high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions, but decrease with an increasing target size for low-LET ions. Compared to the depth dose profile of the ion beams, the maximum of the y{sup ¯}{sub D} depth profile for the 160 MeV proton beam was located at ∼0.5 cm behind the Bragg peak maximum, while the y{sup ¯}{sub D} peak of the 290 MeV/u {sup 12}C beam coincided well with the peak of the absorbed dose profile. Differences between the y{sup ¯}{sub D} and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub D}) were large in the proton beam for both target volumes studied, and in the {sup 12}C beam for the 10 nm diameter cylindrical volumes. The y{sup ¯}{sub D} determined for 100 nm diameter cylindrical volumes in the {sup 12}C beam was approximately equal to the LET{sub D}. The contributions from secondary particles to the y{sup ¯}{sub D} of the beams are presented, including the contributions from secondary protons in the proton beam and from fragments with atomic number Z = 1–6 in the {sup 12}C beam. Conclusions: The present investigation provides an insight into differences in energy depositions in subcellular-size volumes when irradiated by proton and

  15. Observation of snake resonances at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Alessi, J.; et al

    2010-09-27

    The Siberian snakes are powerful tools in preserving polarization in high energy accelerators has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the Siberian snakes also introduce a new set of depolarization resonances, i.e. snake resonances as first discovered by Lee and Tepikian. The intrinsic spin resonances above 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV which raises the challenge to preserve the polarization up to 250 GeV. In 2009, polarized protons collided for the first time at the RHIC design store energy of 250 GeV. This paper presents the experimental measurements of snake resonances at RHIC. The plan for avoiding these resonances is also presented.

  16. Interpreting 750 GeV diphoton excess in plain NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-09-01

    NMSSM has enough ingredients to explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV: singlet-like (pseudo) scalar (a) s and higgsinos as heavy vector-like fermions. We consider the production of the 750 GeV singlet-like pseudo scalar a from a decay of the doublet-like pseudo scalar A, and the subsequent decay of a into two photons via higgsino loop. We demonstrate that this cascade decay of the NMSSM Higgs bosons can explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV.

  17. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  18. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  19. Control of laser-accelerated ions: Recent advances and preliminary results from the new Trident 250-TW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Albright, Brian J.; Yin, Lin; Flippo, Kirk A.; Cort Gautier, D.; Letzring, Samuel; Schulze, Roland; Schmitt, Mark; Fernandez, Juan C.

    2007-11-01

    Advanced target design, treatment and characterization enable progress in laser-driven ion acceleration. We demonstrate spectral shaping and mono-energetic features from in-situ formed source layers on different substrate materials. Advanced targets and experimental techniques allow control of the properties of laser accelerated ion beams, which is of importance to future applications like Ion Fast Ignition (IFI), WDM research and others. We will also present preliminary results from the new 250-TW Trident laser system that will allow the extrapolation of scaling laws similar to those derived for proton acceleration.

  20. X-Ray Counterparts of Puzzling Gev-Tev Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    We propose to look for X-ray counterparts of the extended TeV source HESS J1616-508 that may also have been detected with Fermi at GeV energies. The nature of the source and the connection between the TeV source and the nearby GeV sources are unknown. It has been suggested that it may be a relic plerion powered by the offset PSR J1617-5055, but a deep Chandra observation of this pulsar and its wind nebula has not confirmed this hypothesis. To understand the nature of this long-standing "dark accelerator", we propose to observe the GeV sources (which could be young pulsars) and another nearby young pulsar (J1614-5048) to check whether or not they could supply relativistic particles and power the TeV source. We will also explore the nature of the GeV sources.

  1. 3 GeV RCS at the JKJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Fumiaki

    2002-12-01

    3GeV RCS at the JAERI-KEK joint project (JKJ) is a rapid cycling synchrotron designed for high intensity proton beam. The designed output power is 1MW with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. In this paper, the outline of 3GeV RCS, key issues to achieve the goal, R&D status and time schedule of construction are reported.

  2. Transverse-mass dependence of two-pion correlations in Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-05-13

    Two-pion correlations in square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC have been measured over a broad range of pair transverse momentum k(T) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The k(T) dependent transverse radii are similar to results from heavy-ion collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 4.1, 4.9, and 17.3 GeV, whereas the longitudinal radius increases monotonically with beam energy. The ratio of the outwards to sidewards transverse radii (R(out)/R(side)) is consistent with unity and independent of k(T).

  3. Collimated GeV proton beam generated by the interaction of ultra-intense laser with a uniform near-critical underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Chen, C. Y.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2011-08-01

    An ultra-intense short-pulsed laser interacting with a uniform underdense plasma with near-critical density is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that a collimated proton beam with maximum energy up to the GeV was generated. The corresponding proton acceleration mechanism is analyzed. The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) electrons play an important role as a driving beam. Due to the features of LWFA electrons, quasi-monoenergetic distribution and good collimation, the protons can be accelerated for a long distance by the charge-separated electric field. The proton beam in this regime is also well collimated and the amount can reach several nC. Moreover, it is found that the LWFA electrons can overtake the laser and stand quasi-synchronized in the center of pulse. Therefore the electrons can absorb energy from the laser and transfer it to the protons like in the break-out afterburner (BOA) scheme in laser irradiated on ultra-thin film target.

  4. Energy response of GR-200A thermoluminescence dosemeters to 60Co and to monoenergetic synchrotron radiation in the energy range 28-40 keV.

    PubMed

    Emiro, F; Di Lillo, F; Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-01

    The response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosemeters (type GR-200A) to monoenergetic radiation of energy 28, 35, 38 and 40 keV was evaluated with respect to irradiation with a calibrated (60)Co gamma-ray source. High-precision measurements of the relative air kerma response performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) showed a significant deviation of the average response to low-energy X-rays from that to (60)Co, with an over-response from 6 % (at 28 keV) to 22 % (at 40 keV). These data are not consistent with literature data for these dosemeters, where model predictions gave deviation from unity of the relative air kerma response of about 10 %. The authors conclude for the need of additional determinations of the low-energy relative response of GR-200A dosemeters, covering a wider range of monoenergetic energies sampled at a fine energy step, as planned in future experiments by their group at the ELETTRA facility.

  5. Surface sealing using self-assembled monolayers and its effect on metal diffusion in porous low-k dielectrics studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, Akira; Armini, Silvia; Zhang, Yu; Kakizaki, Takeaki; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface sealing effects on the diffusion of metal atoms in porous organosilicate glass (OSG) films were studied by monoenergetic positron beams. For a Cu(5 nm)/MnN(3 nm)/OSG(130 nm) sample fabricated with pore stuffing, C4F8 plasma etch, unstuffing, and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) sealing process, it was found that pores with cubic pore side lengths of 1.1 and 3.1 nm coexisted in the OSG film. For the sample without the SAM sealing process, metal (Cu and Mn) atoms diffused from the top Cu/MnN layer into the OSG film and were trapped by the pores. As a result, almost all pore interiors were covered with those metals. For the sample damaged by an Ar/C4F8 plasma etch treatment before the SAM sealing process, SAMs diffused into the OSG film, and they were preferentially trapped by larger pores. The cubic pore side length in these pores containing self-assembled molecules was estimated to be 0.7 nm. Through this work, we have demonstrated that monoenergetic positron beams are a powerful tool for characterizing capped porous films and the trapping of atoms and molecules by pores.

  6. An Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; Lia Merminga; Ya. Derbenev

    2002-10-01

    Electron-ion colliders with a center of mass energy between 15 and 100 GeV, a luminosity of at least 10{sup 33}cm{sup -1}s{sup -1}, and a polarization of both beams at or above 80% have been proposed for future studies of hadronic structure. The scheme proposed here would accelerate the electron beam using the CEBAF recirculating linac with energy recovery. If all accelerating structures presently installed in the CEBAF tunnel are replaced by ones with a {approx}20 MV/m gradient, then a single recirculation results in an electron beam energy of about 5 GeV. After colliding with protons/light ions circulating in a figure-of-eight storage ring (for flexibility of spin manipulation) at an energy of up to 100 GeV, the electrons are re-injected into the CEBAF accelerator for deceleration and energy recovery. In this report several lay-out options and their respective feasibilities will be presented and discussed, together with parameters which would provide a luminosity of up to 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The feasibility of combining such a collider at a center-of-mass energy [sq rt] s of up to 43 GeV with a fixed target facility of 25 GeV is also explored.

  7. Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.

    2004-03-15

    The idea of using nuclear fusion as a source of commercial electrical power has been pursued worldwide since the 1950s. Two approaches, using magnetic and inertial confinement of the reactants, are under study. This paper describes the difference between the two approaches, and discusses in more detail the heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion concept. A multibeam induction linear accelerator would be used to bring {approx}100 heavy ion beams to a few GeV. The beams would then heat and compress a target of solid D-T. This approach is unique among fusion concepts in its ability to protect the reaction chamber wall from neutrons and debris.

  8. Laser stripping of relativistic H{sup {minus}} ions with practical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlin, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes laser stripping of H{sup {minus}} ions. Some applications are suggested for HEP including stripping 2GeV ions circulating in an accelerator with radius 75 meters where laser meets ion head on in a three meter interaction region. The paper describes photoionizaton cross section, laser power calculation, and how to generate the 5 micrometer light.

  9. High-PT Direct Photon Spectra and Azimuthal Anisotropy Measurements in 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Kentaro; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri V; Enokizono, Akitomo; Hornback, Donald; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Direct photons are a powerful probe to study the property of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in high energy heavy-ion collisions. In non-central collisions, the anisotropy of the collision region produces the different pressure gradients and particle density that results in different anisotropy of particle emission, depending on the production processes of photons. Therefore, an azimuthal anisotropy parameter {upsilon}{sub 2} is a powerful tool to explore the source of direct photons. We report on the latest direct photon analysis of the nuclear modification factor in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV Au + Au collisions, and {upsilon}{sub 2} at high p{sub T} in 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at RHIC-PHENIX (Run4). We also present the analysis status, using a larger statistics and better reaction plane information from a new detector available from RHIC Run7 data.

  10. Jet fragmentation functions for identified particles in p+p collisions at 200 GeV in the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Elena

    2008-10-01

    According to theoretical predictions, jet quenching in heavy-ion collisions modifies the jet energy and multiplicity distributions, as well as the jet hadrochemical composition. The measurement of jet fragmentation functions in p+p collisions at 200 GeV provides a baseline to study jet modifications in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. A cone algorithm is used to reconstruct jets in the STAR Time Projection Chamber and Electromagnetic Calorimeter; a study of the jet energy resolution based on PYTHIA+GEANT simulations is reported. We present the results on distributions of jet fragments in p+p collisions at 200 GeV in STAR for charged hadrons and identified particles at different jet energies and cone radii. The results are compared to MLLA (modified leading logarithmic approximation) calculations which provide a good description of the data at higher jet energies.

  11. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-08-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm‑2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies.

  12. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-01-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm−2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies. PMID:27531755

  13. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M.

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  14. Hadron Production and Freeze-Out Dynamics at square root of sNN = 3.0 GeV Au+Al and square root of sNN = 19.6 GeV Au+Au Collisions as Measured at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, Samantha Gail

    The Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC was commissioned to search for the critical point and the turn-off of QGP signatures. The program has completed collisions of Au+Au at energies from 7.7 to 62.4 GeV per nucleon pair in 2010 and 2011. The addition of a full-coverage Time-of-Flight detector at STAR extended the momentum range for clean particle identification. Mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.5) hadron spectra will be used to determine the freeze-out dynamics of the system. Particle spectra for pi, K, p and p¯ as a function of mT -- m0 will be presented and these will be used to discuss in particular the source's Coulombic effect on soft pions, as well as three of the four signs of the onset of deconfinement: the "Kink," the "Horn," and the "Step." Comparisons will be made to √s NN) = 7.7 GeV, 11.5 GeV, 19.6 GeV (from 2001), 27 GeV, 39 GeV Au+Au data from STAR, and (sqrt of sNN = 17.3 GeV Pb+Pb data from the SPS heavy ion program. Collisions between gold ions in the RHIC beam with aluminum nuclei in the beam pipe allow us to analyze fixed-target interactions with the STAR detector at RHIC. These lower-energy fixed-target collisions may allow us to extend the low-energy reach of the RHIC beam energy scan and possibly improve the chance of finding the critical point of the hadronic to quark matter phase boundary. In this thesis, we will present preliminary results of spectra analyses for a fixed target collision system at √sNN)= 3.0 GeV and colliding beam system at √sNN = 19.6 GeV . Also, the viability of doing fixed-target experiments with a collider detector will be discussed. Comparisons to simulation, using UrQMD, will also be made. The analysis provides a good reference to study excitation functions of strangeness production, net baryon number, and collective flow in heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Key conditions for stable ion radiation pressure acceleration by circularly polarized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Gibbon, P.; Borghesi, M.; Schreiber, J.; Geissler, M.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) theoretically may have great potential to revolutionize the study of laserdriven ion accelerators due to its high conversion efficiency and ability to produce high-quality monoenergetic ion beams. However, the instability issue of ion acceleration has been appeared to be a fundamental limitation of the RPA scheme. To solve this issue is very important to the experimental realization and exploitation of this new scheme. In our recent work, we have identified the key condition for efficient and stable ion RPA from thin foils by CP laser pulses, in particular, at currently available moderate laser intensities. That is, the ion beam should remain accompanied with enough co-moving electrons to preserve a local "bunching" electrostatic field during the acceleration. In the realistic LS RPA, the decompression of the co-moving electron layer leads to a change of local electrostatic field from a "bunching" to a "debunching" profile, resulting in premature termination of acceleration. One possible scheme to achieve stable RPA is using a multi-species foil. Two-dimensional PIC simulations show that 100 MeV/u monoenergetic C6+ and/or proton beams are produced by irradiation of a contaminated copper foil with CP lasers at intensities 5 × 1020W/cm2, achievable by current day lasers.

  16. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC AT 100 GEV / NUCLEON.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; DREES,A.; FLILLER,R.P.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    This report describes commissioning of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for 100 GeV/nucleon collisions at designed luminosity. To achieve these goals new systems had to be commissioned: Gamma-t transition crossing jump quadrupoles, rebucketing with the new RF storage cavities, phase lock loop feedback, betatron and crystal collimation, beta squeeze along the ramp, Siberian snake magnets for the proton polarization run, AC dipole system chromaticity measurements along the acceleration ramp, orbit correction, new ramp management system, upgraded sequencer, new data instrumentation and logger acquisition system etc.

  17. Calculation of the Coulomb Fission Cross Sections for Pb-Pb and Bi-Pb Interactions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poyser, William J.; Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The Weizsacker-Williams (WW) method of virtual quanta is used to make approximate cross section calculations for peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We calculated the Coulomb fission cross sections for projectile ions of Pb-208 and Bi-209 with energies of 158 A GeV interacting with a Pb-208 target. We also calculated the electromagnetic absorption cross section for Pb-208 ion interacting as described. For comparison we use both the full WW method and a standard approximate WW method. The approximate WW method in larger cross sections compared to the more accurate full WW method.

  18. The RHIC polarized H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, A.; Atoian, G.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Steski, D.

    2016-02-01

    A novel polarization technique had been successfully implemented for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) polarized H- ion source upgrade to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from external source) in the He-gaseous ionizer cell. Further proton polarization is produced in the process of polarized electron capture from the optically pumped Rb vapor. The use of high-brightness primary beam and large cross sections of charge-exchange cross sections resulted in production of high intensity H- ion beam of 85% polarization. The source very reliably delivered polarized beam in the RHIC Run-2013 and Run-2015. High beam current, brightness, and polarization resulted in 75% polarization at 23 GeV out of Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and 60%-65% beam polarization at 100-250 GeV colliding beams in RHIC.

  19. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  20. CEBAF SRF Performance during Initial 12 GeV Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Allison, Trent; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Hovater, J; Lahti, George; Mounts, Clyde; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of eleven new 100 MV cryomodules (88 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. Not all the cavities were operated at the minimum gradient of 19.3 MV/m with the beam. Though the initial 12 GeV milestones were achieved during the initial commissioning of CEBAF, there are still some issues to be addressed for long term reliable operation of these modules. This paper reports the operational experiences during the initial commissioning and the path forward to improve the performance of C100 (100 MV) modules.

  1. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  2. Characterising the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Goudelis, Andreas; Kraml, Sabine; Mawatari, Kentarou; Sengupta, Dipan

    2016-05-01

    We study kinematic distributions that may help characterise the recently observed excess in diphoton events at 750 GeV at the LHC Run 2. Several scenarios are considered, including spin-0 and spin-2 750 GeV resonances that decay directly into photon pairs as well as heavier parent resonances that undergo three-body or cascade decays. We find that combinations of the distributions of the diphoton system and the leading photon can distinguish the topology and mass spectra of the different scenarios, while patterns of QCD radiation can help differentiate the production mechanisms. Moreover, missing energy is a powerful discriminator for the heavy parent scenarios if they involve (effectively) invisible particles. While our study concentrates on the current excess at 750 GeV, the analysis is general and can also be useful for characterising other potential diphoton signals in the future.

  3. The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    R.D. McKeown

    2010-09-01

    Construction of the 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is presently underway. This upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and the construction of upgraded detector hardware. An overview of this upgrade project is presented, along with highlights of the anticipated experimental program. The 12 GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab will enable a powerful new experimental program that will advance our understanding of the quark/gluon structure of hadronic matter, the nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, and the properties of a new extended standard model of particle interactions. Commissioning of the upgraded beam will be begin in 2013, and the full complement of upgraded experimental equipment will be completed in 2015. This unique facility will provide many opportunities for exploration and discovery for a large international community of nuclear scientists.

  4. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  5. Multistrange Baryon elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root of sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fornazier, K S F; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovsky, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2005-09-16

    We report on the first measurement of elliptic flow v2(pT) of multistrange baryons Xi- +Xi+ and Omega- + Omega+ in heavy-ion collisions. In minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN)=200 GeV, a significant amount of elliptic flow, comparable to other nonstrange baryons, is observed for multistrange baryons which are expected to be particularly sensitive to the dynamics of the partonic stage of heavy-ion collisions. The pT dependence of v2 of the multistrange baryons confirms the number of constituent quark scaling previously observed for lighter hadrons. These results support the idea that a substantial fraction of the observed collective motion is developed at the early partonic stage in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PMID:16197068

  6. Vacancy-type defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloys probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, A.; Watanabe, T.; Ishibashi, S.; Wang, X. Q.; Liu, S. T.; Chen, G.; Shen, B.; Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M.

    2012-07-01

    Native defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were probed by a monoenergetic positron beam. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation were measured, and these were compared with results obtained using first-principles calculation. The defect concentration increased with increasing In composition x and reached the maximum at x = 0.44{approx}0.56. A clear correlation between the line-width of photoluminescence and the defect concentration was obtained. The major defect species detected by positron annihilation was identified as cation vacancies coupled with multiple nitrogen vacancies (V{sub N}s), and their introduction mechanism is discussed in terms of the strain energy due to bond-length/angle distortions and the suppression of the V{sub N} formation energy by neighboring In atoms.

  7. Annealing behaviors of vacancy-type defects near interfaces between metal contacts and GaN probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Fujishima, Tatsuya; Piedra, Daniel; Palacios, Tomás; Ishibashi, Shoji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Laboutin, Oleg; Johnson, Wayne

    2014-08-04

    Vacancy-type defects near interfaces between metal contacts and GaN grown on Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation for Ti-deposited GaN showed that optically active vacancy-type defects were introduced below the Ti/GaN interface after annealing at 800 °C. Charge transition of those defects due to electron capture was observed and was found to correlate with a yellow band in the photoluminescence spectrum. The major defect species was identified as vacancy clusters such as three to five Ga-vacancies coupled with multiple nitrogen-vacancies. The annealing behaviors of vacancy-type defects in Ti-, Ni-, and Pt-deposited GaN were also examined.

  8. Neutron-Induced Partial Gamma-Ray Cross-Section Measurements on 238U Using a Monoenergetic and Pulsed Beam at TUNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Pedroni, R. S.; Weisel, G. J.; Becker, J. A.; Fotiades, N.; Lantuejoul, I.

    2005-04-01

    An experimental program is being developed at TUNL to study (n,2n) excitation functions on actinide nuclei using monoenergetic neutrons in the 5 to 18 MeV energy range with the goal of improving the partial cross-section data for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. Measurements have been performed on a ^238U target in the TUNL shielded neutron source area using a pulsed neutron beam with incident neutron energies of 6, 8, 10, and 14 MeV. The emitted gamma rays were measured using different types of HPGe detectors. The pulsed beam permitted the use of time-of-flight techniques to distinguish (n,2n) events from background events. Experimental techniques and analysis of the measurements will be presented.

  9. Design of High Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron- Light Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz; Antje Bruell; Jean Delayen; Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolf Ent; Joseph Grames; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Byung Yunn; Yuhong Zhang; C Montag

    2007-06-25

    Experimental studies of fundamental structure of nucleons require an electron-ion collider of a center-of-mass energy up to 90 GeV at luminosity up to 1035 cm-2s-1 with both beams polarized. A CEBAF-based collider of 9 GeV electrons/positrons and 225 GeV ions is envisioned to meet this science need and as a next step for CEBAF after the planned 12 GeV energy upgrade of the fixed target program. A ring-ring scheme of this collider developed recently takes advantage of the existing polarized electron CW beam from the CEBAF and a green-field design of an ion complex with electron cooling. We present a conceptual design and report design studies of this high-luminosity collider.

  10. SU-F-18C-04: A Combination of Monoenergetic Reconstruction and Stoichiometric Calibration for Tissue Characterization Using Dual Energy Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bedwani, S; Tremblay, J; Bouchard, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) pre-reconstruction methods require the prior knowledge of the X-ray source spectrum to allow extracting physical parameters needed for radiation therapy dose calculation, such as electron density (ED) and the effective atomic number (EAN). While DECT stoichiometric calibration may provide reliable performance for typical radiation therapy clinical conditions, it is yet to be adapted to prereconstruction methods. The presence of noise and inaccurate spectrum description may lead to systematic errors and artifacts which compromise the accuracy of treatment planning. Methods: A new technique is investigated which consists in applying a DECT stoichiometric calibration method to a set of monoenergetic images obtained with a DECT prereconstruction method. To evaluate the performance of this extended method, a simulation environment is developed to generate DECT scans under well controlled conditions, to reconstruct monoenergetic images of a tissue-equivalent phantom from transformed sinograms and to extract ED and EAN maps using a DECT formalism. Result: Under simulated clinical conditions, the accuracy in determining ED with the extended method versus a pre-reconstruction method alone is shown to be better than 0.35% versus 0.5%, respectively. In the presence of a realistic noise level, EAN determination presents a relative mean error that drops from 2.5% to 0.5% once the calibration is applied. Considering a spectrum alteration by a 1 mm Cu layer, EAN errors are up to 30% for the pre-reconstruction method alone versus less than 3% for the extended method. Conclusion: This study shows that combining pre-reconstruction DECT methods with a stoichiometric calibration considerably improves the accuracy and reliability of tissue characterization for radiation therapy in a clinical context. The presented method could potentially be adapted as gold standard for dose calculation methods based on DECT.

  11. Evaluating the dynamic aperture evaluation for the new RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Tepikian, S.

    2011-03-28

    To increase luminosity in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's (RHIC's) polarized proton 250 GeV operations, we are considering reducing {beta}* to 0.65 m at the interaction points (IPs), and increasing bunch intensity. The new working point near the 2/3 integer will used on the ramp to preserve polarization. In addition, we plan to adjust the betatron-phase advances between IP6 and IP8 to (k+1/2)*{pi} so to lower the dynamic beta-beat from the beam-beam interaction. The effects of all these changes will impact the dynamic aperture, and hence, it must be evaluated carefully. In this article, we present the results of tracking the dynamic aperture with the proposed lattices.

  12. Beam physics of the 8-GeV H-minus linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-11-01

    Fermilab is developing the concept and design of an 8-GeV superconducting H-minus linac with the primary mission of increasing the intensity of the Main Injector for the production of neutrino superbeams. The front-end of the linac up to 420 MeV operates at 325 MHz and accelerates beam from the ion source using a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole followed by short CH type resonators and superconducting spoke resonators. In the high energy section, the acceleration is provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style superconducting elliptical 1.3 GHz cavities. The beam physics for the linac is presented in this paper using two beam dynamics codes: TRACK and ASTRA.

  13. Produced Hadron Spectra in p + p Collisions at √s=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagel, K.

    2007-10-01

    The rapidity dependence of particle production in high energy p + p collisions can provide important information of parton distribution functions and the transport of baryon number. In addition, p + p collisions provide an elementary reference for heavy ion collisions. Identified charged hadron spectra resulting from p + p collisions at RHIC have been measured over a wide range of rapidity with BRAHMS for √s=200 GeV. We will present the spectra of positive and negative π and p. The spectra are analyzed to extract rapidity densities over the rapidity range from 0 to near 4 which we compare to rapidity distributions of the same species of produced hadrons in Au + Au collisions at the same energy. The proton rapidity densities are used to determine nuclear stopping while the pion yields constrain the total entropy production.

  14. Mapping and uncertainty analysis of energy and pitch angle phase space in the DIII-D fast ion loss detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C. Fisher, R. K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pipes, R.

    2014-11-15

    New phase space mapping and uncertainty analysis of energetic ion loss data in the DIII-D tokamak provides experimental results that serve as valuable constraints in first-principles simulations of energetic ion transport. Beam ion losses are measured by the fast ion loss detector (FILD) diagnostic system consisting of two magnetic spectrometers placed independently along the outer wall. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic and single-pitch ions reaching the FILDs are used to determine the expected uncertainty in the measurements. Modeling shows that the variation in gyrophase of 80 keV beam ions at the FILD aperture can produce an apparent measured energy signature spanning across 50-140 keV. These calculations compare favorably with experiments in which neutral beam prompt loss provides a well known energy and pitch distribution.

  15. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T {perpendicular} {ne} T{parallel}and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single ``dressed`` test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between ``kinetic or causal instabilities`` and ``hydrodynamic instabilities`` are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k{parallel} = 0 for k{parallel} {ne} 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an ``inverted`` population of states.

  16. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T [perpendicular] [ne] T[parallel]and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between kinetic or causal instabilities'' and hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k[parallel] = 0 for k[parallel] [ne] 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an inverted'' population of states.

  17. Ultra-relativistic ion acceleration in the laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yongsheng; Wang Naiyan; Tang Xiuzhang; Shi Yijin; Xueqing Yan

    2012-09-15

    An analytical relativistic model is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration in the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with thin-foil plasmas. It is found that there is a critical value of the ion momentum to make sure that the ions are trapped by the light sail and accelerated in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) region. If the initial ion momentum is smaller than the critical value, that is in the classical case of RPA, the potential has a deep well and traps the ions to be accelerated, as the same described before by simulation results [Eliasson et al., New J. Phys. 11, 073006 (2009)]. There is a new ion acceleration region different from RPA, called ultra-relativistic acceleration, if the ion momentum exceeds the critical value. In this case, ions will experience a potential downhill. The dependence of the ion momentum and the self-similar variable at the ion front on the acceleration time has been obtained. In the ultra-relativistic limit, the ion momentum at the ion front is proportional to t{sup 4/5}, where t is the acceleration time. In our analytical hydrodynamical model, it is naturally predicted that the ion distribution from RPA is not monoenergetic, although the phase-stable acceleration mechanism is effective. The critical conditions of the laser and plasma parameters which identify the two acceleration modes have been achieved.

  18. ELIC: A High Luminosity And Efficient Spin Manipulation Electron-Light Ion Collider Based At CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga; Yaroslav Derbenev

    2004-02-01

    Electron-light ion colliders with center of mass energy between 20 and 100 GeV, luminosity between 10{sup 33} and 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}, and polarization of both beams at or above 80% have been proposed for the study of hadronic structure. The Electron-Light Ion Collider (ELIC) facility would require the upgrade of CEBAF to 5-7 GeV energy recovering linac and the realization of an ion storage ring complex, accelerating and storing light ions of up to 150 GeV. In this report several innovative features of electron and ion beam designs and their advantages in delivering the luminosity and spin are described. These features include: electron circulator ring to reduce electron polarized source and energy recovering linac requirements, twisted spin booster and collider ring; interaction points with low beta-star and crab-crossing using the short, cooled ion bunches. Accelerator physics and technology issues for both protons/ions and electrons are presented. The feasibility of an integrated fixed target program at 25 GeV and collider program with center of mass energy between 20 and 65 GeV is explored.

  19. Shielding Design Aspects of SR Beamlines for 3-GeV And 8-GeV Class Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-09-24

    Differences in synchrotron radiation beamline shielding design between the facilities of 3 GeV class and 8 GeV class are discussed with regard to SLAC SSRL and SPring-8 beamlines. Requirements of beamline shielding as well as the accelerator shielding depend on the stored electron energy, and here some factors in beamline shielding depending on the stored energy in particular, are clarified, namely the effect of build up, the effect of double scattering of photons at branch beamlines, and the spread of gas bremsstrahlung.

  20. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-15

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  1. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-12-31

    Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion. PMID:14754044

  2. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-15

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented. PMID:11177841

  3. Pseudorapidity distribution of multiplicity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ya-Fei; Jiang, Zhi-Jin; Wang, Zeng-Wei

    2008-04-01

    Using the Glauber model, we discuss the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in heavy-ion collisions. Based on the latter, after considering the effect of energy loss of the nucleons in multiple collisions, we derive the pseudorapidity distribution of the multiplicity as a function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Using this, we analyze the experimental measurements carried out by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Supported by Key Foundation of Shanghai (06JC14075)

  4. The JLAB 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Leigh H.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation should describe the progress of the 12GeV Upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The status of the upgrade should be presented as well as details on the construction, procurement, installation and commissioning of the magnet and SRF components of the upgrade.

  5. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.; Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

    2013-04-19

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  6. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2013-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  7. 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    During the past decade, synchrotron radiation emitted by circulating electron beams has come into wide use as a powerful, versatile source of x-rays for probing the structure of matter and for studying various physical processes. Several synchrotron radiation facilities with different designs and characteristics are now in regular operation throughout the world, with recent additions in this country being the 0.8-GeV and 2.5-GeV rings of NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, none of the operating facilities has been designed to use a low-emittance, high-energy stored beam, together with modern undulator devices, to produce a large number of hard x-ray beams of extremely high brilliance. This document is a proposal to the Department of Energy to construct and operate high-energy synchrotron radiation facility at Argonne National Laboratory. We have now chosen to set the design energy of this facility at 7.0 GeV, with the capability to operate at up to 7.5 GeV.

  8. JLab's Hall A after the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    John Lerose

    2004-11-14

    An overview is presented of the planned physics program for JLab's Hall A following the 12 GeV upgrade with emphasis on the equipment needed to achieve the desired experimental goals. Results of simulations of sample experiments with anticipated uncertainties are presented.

  9. Nucleon Form Factors experiments with 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2008-10-13

    A number of precision form factor experiments at high momentum transfer will be performed with the 11 GeV electron beam of CEBAF. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual schemes of several new suggestions. Form factor data will serve as a major input for the construction of a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  10. 750 GeV diphoton resonance and electric dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Im, Sang Hui; Kim, Hyungjin; Mo, Doh Young

    2016-09-01

    We examine the implication of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess for the electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron. If the excess is due to a spin zero resonance which couples to photons and gluons through the loops of massive vector-like fermions, the resulting neutron electric dipole moment can be comparable to the present experimental bound if the CP-violating angle α in the underlying new physics is of O (10-1). An electron EDM comparable to the present bound can be achieved through a mixing between the 750 GeV resonance and the Standard Model Higgs boson, if the mixing angle itself for an approximately pseudoscalar resonance, or the mixing angle times the CP-violating angle α for an approximately scalar resonance, is of O (10-3). For the case that the 750 GeV resonance corresponds to a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson formed by a QCD-like hypercolor dynamics confining at ΛHC, the resulting neutron EDM can be estimated with α ∼(750 GeV /ΛHC) 2θHC, where θHC is the hypercolor vacuum angle.

  11. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  12. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  13. Potential clinical impact of laser-accelerated beams in cancer ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obcemea, Ceferino

    2016-09-01

    In this article, I present three advantages of plasma-accelerated ion beams for cancer therapy. I discuss how: 1. low-emittance and well-collimated beams are advantageous in proximal normal tissue-sparing; 2. highly-peaked quasi-monoenergetic beams are ideal for fast energy selection and switching in Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) as a treatment delivery; 3. high fluence and ultra-short pulse delivery produce collective excitations in the medium and enhance the stopping power. This in turn produces denser ionization track signatures (spurs, blobs, etc.) in target tumors, higher linear energy transfer, higher Bragg peak, and higher radiobiological effectiveness at the micro-level.

  14. Why is GeV physics relevant in the age of the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    The contribution that Jefferson Lab has made, with its 6 GeV electron beam, and will make, with its 12 GeV upgrade, to our understanding of the way the fundamental interactions work, particularly strong coupling QCD, is outlined. The physics at the GeV scale is essential even in TeV collisions.

  15. INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR THE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; PARKER, B.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at luminosities in the 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range (e-p case), adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accommodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region will be presented.

  16. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  17. EXTERNAL INVERSE COMPTON SPECTRA FOR MONOENERGETIC AND BLACKBODY PHOTON FIELDS UPSCATTERED BY A POWER-LAW ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION WITH A FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-08-20

    We have calculated the inverse Compton (IC) integrated spectral power within the Thomson limit for a monoenergetic isotropic photon field upscattered off highly relativistic electrons assuming an isotropic power-law distribution of the latter, N({gamma}) = C{gamma}{sup -p}, with Lorentz parameter values {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}. Our interest was essentially focused on the case of a finite energy range (finite {gamma}{sub 2}) possibly having realistic applications in high-energy astrophysical sites, mainly relativistic shock regions. To this end, we have defined and derived a dimensionless parametric function, F{sub p} (z{sub 1}, {eta}), with variables z{sub 1} = {epsilon}{sub 1}/4{gamma}{sup 2}{sub 1}{epsilon} and {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. This result was used to derive the IC-integrated spectral power for an upscattered blackbody (BB) photon field using a dimensionless parametric function, W{sub p} ({xi}, {eta}), with variable {xi} = {epsilon}{sub 1}/4{gamma}{sup 2}{sub 1} kT. Asymptotic forms of this function have been derived for three energy ranges, i.e., {xi} << 1, 1 << {xi} << {eta}{sup 2}, and {xi} >> {eta}{sup 2}. Then, a characteristic value, {eta}{sub c}(p, {epsilon}) with {epsilon} << 1, of parameter {eta} was defined such that the middle range asymptotic form of W{sub p} ({xi}, {eta}) could be valid and good when {eta} {approx}> {eta}{sub c}(p, {epsilon}), by deriving an approximate expression of this particular value for {epsilon} = 10{sup -3}. The resulting spectra featured by a high-energy cutoff in the case of low values of the ratio {eta} can be discussed at least for a population of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), those best described by the cutoff power-law model with a low-energy spectral index, {alpha} {approx} 0. Furthermore, it is suggested that for GRB spectra with {alpha} < -1/2 pertaining to the prompt emission phase, the IC is a likely emission mechanism for both monoenergetic and BB photon fields if one

  18. eRHIC, the BNL design for a future Electron-Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    With the addition of a 20 GeV polarized electron accelerator to the existing Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the world's only high energy heavy ion and polarized proton collider, a future eRHIC facility will be able to produce polarized electron-nucleon collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 145 GeV and cover the whole science case as outlined in the Electron-Ion Collider White Paper and endorsed by the 2015 Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan with high luminosity. The presentation will describe the eRHIC design concepts and recent efforts to reduce the technical risks of the project.

  19. Identified high-pT spectra in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We report new results on identified (anti)proton and charged pion spectra at large transverse momenta (3 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c) from Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This study explores the system size dependence of two novel features observed at RHIC with heavy ions: the hadron suppression at high-p{sub T} and the anomalous baryon to meson enhancement at intermediate transverse momenta. Both phenomena could be attributed to the creation of a new form of QCD matter. The results presented here bridge the system size gap between the available pp and Au+Au data, and allow the detailed exploration for the on-set of the novel features. Comparative analysis of all available 200 GeV data indicates that the system size is a major factor determining both the magnitude of the hadron spectra suppression at large transverse momenta and the relative baryon to meson enhancement.

  20. Centrality dependence of charged hadron transverse momentum spectra in d+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr{sup S}NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; George, N.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; BNL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    2003-08-15

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 62.4 GeV. The spectra are presented for transverse momenta 0.25 < p{sub T} < 4.5 GeV/c, in a pseudo-rapidity range of 0.2 < {eta} < 1.4. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} is calculated relative to p+p data at the same collision energy as a function of collision centrality. For 2 < p{sub T} < 4.5 GeV/c, R{sub AA} is found to be significantly larger than in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 130 and 200 GeV. In contrast to the large change in R{sub AA}, we observe a very similar centrality evolution of the p{sub T} spectra at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV. The dynamical origin of this surprising factorization of energy and centrality dependence of particle production in heavy ion collisions remains to be understood.

  1. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.

    2009-01-22

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  2. THE LASER EMITTANCE SCANNER FOR 1 GEV H- BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Dong-O; Pogge, James R; Menshov, Alexander A; Nesterenko, Igor N; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Webster, Anthony W; Grice, Warren P

    2009-01-01

    A transverse phase space laser emittance scanner is proposed [1] and under development for the 1-GeV H- SNS linac, using a laser beam as a slit. For a 1-GeV H- beam, it is difficult to build a slit because the stopping distance is more than 50 cm in copper. We propose a Laser Emittance Scanner (LES) to use a laser beam as an effective slit by stripping off the outer electron of the H- (making it neutral) upstream of a bend magnet and measuring the stripped component downstream of the bend magnet. The design and modeling of the system will be discussed. We are expecting to make a preliminary measurement in 2009.

  3. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C.G.R; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-09-08

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  4. Meson Spectroscopy at JLab@12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Meson, being the simplest hadronic bound system, is the ideal "laboratory" to study the interaction between quarks, to understand the role of the gluons inside hadrons and to investigate the origin of color confinement. To perform such studies it is important to measure the meson spectrum, with precise determination of resonance masses and properties, looking for rare qbar q states and for unconventional mesons with exotic quantum numbers (i.e. mesons with quantum numbers that are not compatible with a qbar q structure). With the imminent advent of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab a new generation of meson spectroscopy experiments will start: "Meson-Ex" in Hall B and "GLUEX" in Hall D. Both will use photo-production to explore the spectrum of mesons in the light-quark sector, in the energy range of few GeVs.

  5. Beyond the MSSM Higgs bosons at 125 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Drieu La Rochelle, G.

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the MSSM framework is an effective theory approach that encapsulates a variety of extensions beyond the MSSM with which it shares the same field content. The lightest Higgs mass can be much heavier than in the MSSM without creating a tension with naturalness or requiring superheavy stops. The phenomenology of the Higgs sector is at the same time much richer. We critically review the properties of a Higgs with mass around 125 GeV in this model. In particular, we investigate how the rates in the important inclusive 2γ channel, the 2γ+2 jets and the ZZ→4l (and/or WW) can be enhanced or reduced compared to the standard model and what kind of correlations between these rates are possible. We consider both a vanilla model where stops have moderate masses with no trilinear stop mixing term and a model having a large stop mixing with a light stop. We show that in both cases there are scenarios that lead to enhancements in these rates at a mass of 125 GeV corresponding to either the lightest Higgs or the heaviest CP-even Higgs of the model. In all of these scenarios we study the prospects of finding other signatures of either the 125 GeV Higgs or those of the heavier Higgses. In most cases the τ¯τ channels are the most promising. Exclusion limits from the recent LHC Higgs searches are folded in our analyses while the tantalizing hints for a Higgs signal at 125 GeV are used as an example of how to constrain beyond the MSSM and/or direct future searches.

  6. A model of the energetic ion environment of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.

    1990-01-01

    Because Mars has a weak intrinsic magnetic field and a substantial atmosphere, instruments on orbiting spacecraft should detect a population of energetic heavy planetary ions which result from comet-like ion pickup in the solar wind and magnetosheath convection electric fields, in addition to those that might result from processes internal to a Martian 'magnetosphere.' Although this ion exosphere has been previously discussed in the literature, detailed predictions that might be directly applied to the interpretation of data are not available. Here a test particle model is used to construct a global picture of Martian pickup ions in the Mars environment. The model makes use of the recent Nagy and Cravens (1988) model of the Martian exosphere and Spreiter and Stahara's (1980) gas dynamic model of the magnetosheath. The pickup of ions originating at Phobos is also considered. Notable properties of the resulting ion distributions include their near-monoenergetic spectra, pancake pitch angle distributions, and large gyroradii compared to the planetary scale.

  7. Ion assisted deposition of optical coatings. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, J.J.

    1986-08-01

    The effects on the properties of Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SiO/sub 2/ and HfO/sub 2/ single- and multi-layer optical coatings deposited using ion-assisted deposition (IAD) were investigated. IAD is a novel deposition technique which utilizes a separate ion source to direct a beam of ions at the growing film. A Kaufman ion source was used to provide a monoenergetic, neutralized beam of oxygen ions independent of the material evaporation process. The optical and physical properties, as well as laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) values, were studied for coatings bombarded with 200, 300, 500 and 1000 eV oxygen ions at values of current density from 0 to 200 microAmp/sq cm. IAD was successfully applied to deposit coatings at low temperature on heavy metal fluoride (HMF) glass substrates. The coatings deposited using IAD were hard and dense. The IAD coatings improved the durability and abrasion resistance of the HMF glass substrates. The results of this investigation show that IAD can be used to improve the optical and physical properties of optical coatings.

  8. Extended conversion coefficients for use in radiation protection of the embryo and fetus against external neutrons from 10 MeV to 100 GeV.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2006-03-01

    External neutron exposure is of concern in the environment and in some workplaces. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients. A problem of concern in radiation protection is exposure of pregnant women to ionizing radiation because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in ICRP publications and ICRU reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study uses the Monte Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A previous study has dealt with neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV. In this study, monoenergetic neutrons ranging from 10 MeV to 100 GeV are considered. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior, postero-anterior, lateral, rotational, and isotropic. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated for the embryo of 8 wk and the fetus of 3, 6, or 9 mo. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four prenatal ages. The results showed that the fetus at about 3 mo of prenatal age should receive more radiation protection to prevent long-term brain damage. During prenatal life, the fetus generally receives the highest absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence for antero-posterior irradiation. In cases where the irradiation geometry is not specified or not adequately known, conversion coefficients of AP-irradiation can therefore be used in a conservative dose assessment of fetus exposure to external neutrons.

  9. Cross-section measurements of neutron-induced reactions on GaAs using monoenergetic beams from 7.5 to 15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, R.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-04-01

    Cross-section measurements for neutron-induced reactions on GaAs have been carried out at twelve different neutron energies from 7.5 to 15 MeV using the activation technique. The monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the H2(d,n)He3 reaction. GaAs samples were activated along with Au and Al monitor foils to determine the incident neutron flux. The activities induced by the reaction products were measured using high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Cross sections for five reaction channels, viz., Ga69(n,2n)Ga68, Ga69(n,p)Zn69m, Ga71(n,p)Zn71m, As75(n,2n)As74, and As75(n,p)Ge75, are reported. The results are compared with the previous measurements and available data evaluations. Statistical-model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS and the COH3 codes and are compared with the experimental results.

  10. Cross Section Measurements of Neutron Induced Reactions on GaAs using Monoenergetic Beams from 7.5 to 15 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, R.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-09-01

    Cross section measurements for the neutron induced reactions on GaAs have been carried out at ten different neutron energies from 7.5 to 15 MeV, using the activation technique. The monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, known for it's high neutron yield in the chosen energy regime. GaAs samples were activated along with the Au and Al monitor foils, for estimating the incident neutron flux. The induced activiy was measured using high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Five reaction channels viz., 69Ga(n, 2n) Ga, 69Ga(n,p)69mZn, 71Ga(n,p)71mZn, 75As(n, 2n)74As and 75As(n,p)75Ge, have been reported for the comprehensive cross section measurements. The results are compared with the existing literature data and the available evaluations. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS and EMPIRE codes and are compared with the experimental values.

  11. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. C.; Santos, W. S.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Hunt, John G.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  12. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Hunt, John G; Carvalho Júnior, A B

    2014-12-21

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  13. Vacancy-type defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N grown on GaN templates probed using monoenergetic positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira; Watanabe, Tomohito; Kimura, Shogo; Zhang, Yang; Lozac'h, Mickael; Sang, Liwen; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ishibashi, Shoji; Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi

    2013-11-14

    Native defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and lifetime spectra of positrons for a 200-nm-thick In{sub 0.13}Ga{sub 0.87}N layer showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced by InN alloying, and the major species of such defects was identified as complexes between a cation vacancy and nitrogen vacancies. The presence of the defects correlated with lattice relaxation of the In{sub 0.13}Ga{sub 0.87}N layer and the increase in photon emissions from donor-acceptor-pair recombination. The species of native defects in In{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N layers was the same but its concentration was decreased by decreasing the InN composition. With the layer thickness increased from 120 nm to 360 nm, a defect-rich region was introduced in the subsurface region (<160 nm), which can be associated with layer growth with the relaxation of compressive stress.

  14. Point defects introduced by InN alloying into In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, A.; Tsutsui, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kimura, S.; Zhang, Y.; Lozac'h, M.; Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M.; Ishibashi, S.

    2013-03-28

    Native defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.06-0.14) grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation as a function of incident positron energy for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced with increasing InN composition, and the major defect species was identified as complexes between a cation vacancy and a nitrogen vacancy. The concentration of the divacancy, however, was found to be suppressed by Mg doping. The momentum distribution of electrons at the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface was close to that in defect-free GaN or In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, which was attributed to localization of positrons at the interface due to the built-in electric field, and to suppression of positron trapping by vacancy-type defects. We have also shown that the diffusion property of positrons is sensitive to an electric field near the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface.

  15. Response of a BaF 2 scintillation detector to quasi-monoenergetic fast neutrons in the range of 45 to 198 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzert-Marx, K.; Schardt, D.; Simon, R. S.; Gutermuth, F.; Radon, T.; Dangendorf, V.; Nolte, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the neutron response of a scintillation detector consisting of a 14 cm long, hexagonal-shaped BaF 2-crystal with an inner diameter of 8.75 cm coupled to an EMI9821QB photomultiplier tube. The detector was exposed to calibrated quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields obtained from 7Li(p,n) 7Be reactions. The measurements were performed at neutron energies of 45, 60, 96, 147 and 198 MeV as given by the energies of the incident protons. The experimental pulse-height spectra of the BaF 2-detector are compared with Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. The detection efficiency of the BaF 2-detector in the energy range of 45-198 MeV was determined as a function of the discriminator threshold and compared to the literature data. At neutron energies above 100 MeV the detection efficiency of the BaF 2-detector was found to be a factor of two higher than that of an NE213-detector of comparable size.

  16. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-Man anatomical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.; Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project®. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1×10-9 MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  17. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2008-03-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided.

  18. Enhanced damage buildup in C{sup +}-implanted GaN film studied by a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. F.; Chen, Z. Q. Liu, C.; Zhang, H. J.; Kawasuso, A.

    2015-02-28

    Wurtzite GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy were implanted with 280 keV C{sup +} ions to a dose of 6 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}. Vacancy-type defects in C{sup +}-implanted GaN were probed using a slow positron beam. The increase of Doppler broadening S parameter to a high value of 1.08–1.09 after implantation indicates introduction of very large vacancy clusters. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures up to 800 °C makes these vacancy clusters to agglomerate into microvoids. The vacancy clusters or microvoids show high thermal stability, and they are only partially removed after annealing up to 1000 °C. The other measurements such as X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and Photoluminescence all indicate severe damage and even disordered structure induced by C{sup +}-implantation. The disordered lattice shows a partial recovery after annealing above 800 °C. Amorphous regions are observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurement, which directly confirms that amorphization is induced by C{sup +}-implantation. The disordered GaN lattice is possibly due to special feature of carbon impurities, which enhance the damage buildup during implantation.

  19. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Centrality dependence of soft photon production and its collective flow in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Sanshiro

    2014-11-01

    Direct photons coming from heavy-ion collisions are of particular interest since once produced, they are unmodified, thus carrying information about the space-time evolution and properties of the hot and dense medium produced in such collisions. We present new results on the centrality dependence of soft single photon production in √{sNN} = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions. Photons are measured down to pT = 400 GeV / c via conversion of real photons into e+e- pairs in the detector material. Our measurement of the photon pT spectra indicates that the spectral shape does not depend on centrality. In addition, the azimuthal emission patterns of photons carry additional information on their production mechanisms. Previously published PHENIX results [2] indicate that the 2nd order Fourier coefficient (v2) is positive for pT < 4 GeV / c, which is qualitatively explained by hydrodynamical model calculations, but not quantitatively. The 3rd order Fourier coefficient (v3) of photons has been proposed as a critical additional handle to understand the photon emission. We found that the v3 of photons is positive for pT < 4 GeV / c, and both the strength and shape of v3 are comparable to those of hadrons, similarly to the case of v2. We report the latest results on the centrality dependence of the soft photon production and the v3 coefficients in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. These measurements provide stringent tests of the hydrodynamic space-time evolution as a function of the collision geometry.

  1. Measurement of the midrapidity transverse energy distribution from square root of [(s)NN] = 130 GeV Au + Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, D; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2001-07-30

    The first measurement of energy produced transverse to the beam direction at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is presented. The midrapidity transverse energy density per participating nucleon rises steadily with the number of participants, closely paralleling the rise in charged-particle density, such that / remains relatively constant as a function of centrality. The energy density calculated via Bjorken's prescription for the 2% most central Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV is at least epsilon(Bj) = 4.6 GeV/fm(3), which is a factor of 1.6 larger than found at sqrt[s(NN)] = 17.2 GeV ( Pb+Pb at CERN).

  2. Inclusive jet production in proton-proton and copper-gold collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Arbin

    Jets are a dominant feature of high energy particle interactions and can be interpreted in terms of the fragmentation of quarks and gluons produced in a hard scattering process. Jets provide important tools for studying hot and dense Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) matter that is created in high energy collisions of heavy nuclei. In heavy ion collisions, such as Cu+Au, large transverse momentum partons traverse the colored Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) medium and lose energy which modifies the jet structure relative to jets generated in the vacuum. Jet production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is investigated using the Cu+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The measurements reported here utilize 200 GeV Cu+Au and p+p data recorded by the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in 2012 RHIC running period. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles and electromagnetic calorimeter clusters using the anti-kt algorithm with R = 0.2. Inclusive, centrality-dependent jet yields within |eta| < 0:35 and 12:0 < pT < 42.0 GeV/c are presented. The jet yield in Cu+Au collisions relative to the geometric expectation is found to be suppressed by approximately a factor of two in the most central events, nearly independent of the jet pT. These results are compared with theoretical calculations with implications for sensitivity to the parton energy loss models in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Charmed Meson Production in 800 GEV Proton-Proton Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Mark Frederick

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x_ {F} >=q 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies sqrt{s} <=q 27 GeV and sqrt {s} >=q 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of sqrt{s} . The result of our experiment, sigma (D/| D) = 42.7 +/- 7.8 mub at sqrt{s} = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d^2sigma/dx_{F}dp _sp{|}{2} ~ (1 - | x_{F }|)^{n}e^{-bp _sp{|}{2}} gives the results n = 8.4_sp {-1.9}{+2.2}, b = 0.78_sp{-0.16}{+0.19} (GeV/c)^{-2}, and < pbot > = 1.1_sp{-0.1}{+0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and < pbot > being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions. Lastly, analysis has shown that sigma(D ^*^+/-)/sigma(D^0) is governed primarily by spin statistics, displaying no energy dependence. The resulting cross section for D^*^+/- production is sigma(D^*^+/-) = 13.31 +/- 5.74 mub.

  4. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy Ebreak = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of mχ=49+6.4-5.4 GeV.

  5. The 12 GeV JLab Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Elton

    2009-01-01

    The upgrade of the CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV will deliver high luminosity and high quality beams, which will open unique opportunities for studies of the quark and gluon structure of hadrons in the valence region. Such physics will be made accessible by substantial additions to the experimental equipment in combination with the increased energy reach of the upgraded machine. The emphasis of the talk will be on the program in a new experimental Hall D designed to search for gluonic excitations.

  6. Preliminary Study of the Efficacy of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence with Quasi-Monoenergetic Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Safeguards Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P; Hall, J M; Gonzalez, J J

    2011-02-17

    We have studied the efficacy of using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)-based techniques to assay spent nuclear fuel for Pu content using quasi-monoenergetic sources. We have developed two techniques to precisely determine the Pu content in a fuel rod/pin. One of our approaches is virtually free of systematic uncertainties. Using analytical models, we have determined the amount of time required to measure the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel rods and spent fuel assemblies to within 1% precision. We note that Pu content can be determined in a fuel assembly about as fast as in a single fuel pin. The performance of NRF-based assay techniques with improved photon sources, which are currently under development, will also estimated. For follow-on research we propose to: (1) Construct research prototype detection systems for both of the NRF-based assay systems proposed in this paper and measure their calibration curves; (2) Determine the systematic errors associated with both assay methods, explore ways to reduce the errors and fold the results into future performance calculations; (3) Develop an algorithm to assay a fuel assembly; (4) Perform validation measurements using a single pin and scaled assemblies; (5) Research and develop current-mode detection and/or threshold detection techniques to improve assay times; (6) Characterize the flux of newly constructed sources and fold the results into the calculations presented here to determine the feasibility of a variety of proposed sources; and (7) Collaborate with others in the safeguards community to build a prototype system and perform an NRF-based assay demonstration on spent fuel.

  7. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I.; Perozziello, Francesca M.; Manti, Lorenzo; Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona; McMahon, Stephen J.; Kavanagh, Joy N.; Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The biological optimization of proton therapy can be achieved only through a detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the full range of the Bragg curve. The clinically used RBE value of 1.1 represents a broad average, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). With particular attention to the key endpoint of cell survival, our work presents a comparative investigation of cell killing RBE variations along monoenergetic (pristine) and modulated (SOBP) beams using human normal and radioresistant cells with the aim to investigate the RBE dependence on LET and intrinsic radiosensitvity. Methods and Materials: Human fibroblasts (AG01522) and glioma (U87) cells were irradiated at 6 depth positions along pristine and modulated 62-MeV proton beams at the INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy). Cell killing RBE variations were measured using standard clonogenic assays and were further validated using Monte Carlo simulations and the local effect model (LEM). Results: We observed significant cell killing RBE variations along the proton beam path, particularly in the distal region showing strong dose dependence. Experimental RBE values were in excellent agreement with the LEM predicted values, indicating dose-averaged LET as a suitable predictor of proton biological effectiveness. Data were also used to validate a parameterized RBE model. Conclusions: The predicted biological dose delivered to a tumor region, based on the variable RBE inferred from the data, varies significantly with respect to the clinically used constant RBE of 1.1. The significant RBE increase at the distal end suggests also a potential to enhance optimization of treatment modalities such as LET painting of hypoxic tumors. The study highlights the limitation of adoption of a constant RBE for proton therapy and suggests approaches for fast implementation of RBE models in treatment planning.

  8. Optimization of the 8 GeV AP3-P1 Lattice for Antiproton Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    2001-01-22

    During 8 GeV antiproton transfers between the Accumulator to the Main Injector, the antiprotons must travel through four separate beam lines, AP3, AP1, P2, and P1. This note describes the optimization of a single lattice that describes these beam lines for 8 GeV antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Main Injector and 8 GeV proton transfers from the Main Injector to the Accumulator.

  9. Baryon stopping in heavy-ion collisions at Elab = 2A-200A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Blaschke, D.

    2016-08-01

    It is argued that an irregularity in the baryon stopping is a natural consequence of the onset of deconfinement occurring in the compression stage of a nuclear collision. It is an effect of the softest point inherent in an equation of state (EoS) with a deconfinement transition. In order to illustrate this effect, calculations within the three-fluid model were performed with three different EoSs: a purely hadronic EoS, an EoS with a first-order phase transition and a third one with a smooth crossover transition. It is demonstrated that this irregularity is a very robust signal of the first-order phase transition that survives under acceptance conditions of the NICA MPD experiment.

  10. Commissioning of the 123 MeV injector for 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza

    2015-09-01

    The upgrade of CEBAF to 12GeV included modifications to the injector portion of the accelerator. These changes included the doubling of the injection energy and relocation of the final transport elements to accommodate changes in the CEBAF recirculation arcs. This paper will describe the design changes and the modelling of the new 12GeV CEBAF injector. Stray magnetic fields have been a known issue for the 6 GeV CEBAF injector, the results of modelling the new 12GeV injector and the resulting changes implemented to mitigate this issue are described in this paper. The results of beam commissioning of the injector are also presented.

  11. The Jefferson Lab program: From 6 GeV operations to the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Battaglieri

    2012-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and the CEBAF accelerator operated for more than a decade, running a comprehensive scientific program that improved our understanding of the strong interaction. The facility is now moving toward an upgrade of the machine, from 6 to 12 GeV; a new experimental hall will be added and the equipment of the three existing halls will be enhanced. In this contribution some selected results from the rich physics program run at JLab, as well as the prospects for the near future, will be presented.

  12. 750 GeV diphotons from supersymmetry with Dirac gauginos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Kribs, Graham D.; Nelson, Ann E.; Ostdiek, Bryan

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recent excess in the diphoton invariant mass near 750 GeV, we explore a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model that includes the minimal set of superpartners as well as additional Dirac partner chiral superfields in the adjoint representation for each gauge group. The bino partner pseudoscalar is identified as the 750 GeV resonance, while superpotential interactions between it and the gluino (wino) partners yield production via gluon fusion (decay to photon pairs) at one-loop. The gauginos and these additional adjoint superpartners are married by a Dirac mass and must also have Majorana masses. While a large wino partner Majorana mass is necessary to explain the excess, the gluino can be approximately Dirac-like, providing benefits consistent with being both "supersoft" (loop corrections to the scalar masses from Dirac gauginos are free of logarithmic enhancements) and "supersafe" (the experimental limits on the squark/gluino masses can be relaxed due to the reduced production rate). Consistency with the measured Standard Model-like Higgs boson mass is imposed, and a numerical exploration of the parameter space is provided. Models that can account for the diphoton excess are additionally characterized by having couplings that can remain perturbative up to very high scales, while remaining consistent with experimental constraints, the Higgs boson mass, and an electroweak scale which is not excessively fine-tuned.

  13. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  14. 750 GeV diphotons from a D3-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Jonathan J.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV observed by both CMS and ATLAS, we study string-based particle physics models which can accommodate this signal. Quite remarkably, although Grand Unified Theories in F-theory tend to impose tight restrictions on candidate extra sectors, the case of a probe D3-brane near an E-type Yukawa point naturally leads to a class of strongly coupled models capable of accommodating the observed signature. In these models, the visible sector is realized by intersecting 7-branes, and the 750 GeV resonance is a scalar modulus associated with motion of the D3-brane in the direction transverse to the Standard Model 7-branes. Integrating out heavy 3-7 string messenger states leads to dimension five operators for gluon fusion production and diphoton decays. Due to the unified structure of interactions, these models also predict that there should be additional decay channels to ZZ and Zγ. We also comment on models with distorted unification, where both the production mechanism and decay channels can differ.

  15. 12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

    2012-07-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

  16. Search for GeV GRBs at Chacaltaya

    SciTech Connect

    Castellina, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Morello, C.; Trinchero, G.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Navarra, G.; Saavedra, O.; Yoshii, H.; Kaneko, T.; Kakimoto, K.; Nishi, K.; Cabrera, R.; Urzagasti, D.; Velarde, A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Fishman, G. J.

    1998-05-16

    In this paper we present the results of a search for GeV Gamma Ray Bursts made by the INCA experiment during the first 9 months of operation. INCA, an air shower array located at Mount Chacaltaya (Bolivia) at 5200 m a.s.l., has been searching for GRBs since December 1996. Up to August, 1997, 34 GRBs detected by BATSE occurred in the field of view of the experiment. For any burst, the counting rate of the array in the 2 hours interval around the burst trigger time has been studied. No significant excess has been observed. Assuming for the bursts a power low energy spectrum extending up to 1 TeV with a slope {alpha}=-2 and a duration of 10 s, the obtained 1 GeV-1 TeV energy fluence upper limits range from 7.9 10{sup -5} erg cm{sup -2} to 3.5 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} depending on the event zenith angles.

  17. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  18. Galactic Diffuse Gamma Ray Emission Is Greater than 10 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AGILE and Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) are the next high-energy gamma-ray telescopes to be flown in space. These instruments will have angular resolution about 5 times better than Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) above 10 GeV and much larger field of view. The on-axis effective area of AGILE will be about half that of EGRET, whereas GLAST will have about 6 times greater effective area than EGRET. The capabilities of ground based very high-energy telescopes are also improving, e.g. Whipple, and new telescopes, e.g. Solar Tower Atmospheric Cerenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE), Cerenkov Low Energy Sampling and Timing Experiment (CELESTE), and Mars Advanced Greenhouse Integrated Complex (MAGIC) are expected to have low-energy thresholds and sensitivities that will overlap the GLAST sensitivity above approximately 10 GeV. In anticipation of the results from these new telescopes, our current understanding of the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, including the matter and cosmic ray distributions is reviewed. The outstanding questions are discussed and the potential of future observations with these new instruments to resolve these questions is examined.

  19. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  20. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more » the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  1. Transition from baryon-to meson-dominated freeze-out—early decoupling around 30 A GeV?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeschler, H.; Cleymans, J.; Redlich, K.; Wheaton, S.

    2006-12-01

    The recently discovered sharp peak in the excitation function of the K+/π+ ratio around 30 A GeV in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed in the framework of the statistical model. In this model, the freeze-out of an ideal hadron gas changes from a situation where baryons dominate to one with mainly mesons. This transition occurs at a temperature T = 140 MeV and a baryon chemical potential μB = 410 MeV corresponding to an energy of \\sqrt{s_NN} = 8.2\\,GeV . The calculated maximum in the K+/π+ ratio is, however, much less pronounced than that observed by the NA49 Collaboration. The smooth increase of the K-/π- ratio with incident energy and the shape of the excitation functions of the Λ/π+, Ξ-/π+ and Ω-/π+ ratios all exhibiting maxima at different incident energies is consistent with the presently available experimental data. The measured K+/π+ ratio exceeds the calculated one just at the incident energy when the freeze-out condition is changing. We speculate that at this point freeze-out might occur in a modified way. We discuss a scenario of an early freeze-out which indeed increases the K+/π+ ratio while most other particle ratios remain essentially unchanged. Such an early freeze-out is supported by results from HBT studies.

  2. Investigation of direct photon production in 200 A GeV S + Au reactions

    SciTech Connect

    WA80 Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Direct thermal photons in the p{sub T} range of 0--5 GeV/c are expected to provide a sensitive probe of the early conditions of the Quark Gluon Plasma which may be formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The production of single photons in 200 A GeV S + Au reactions has been investigated using the 3,800 element Pbglass calorimeter of CERN experiment WA80. Neutral {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} cross sections have been measured via their two-photon decay branch yields. The measured {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} cross sections have been used to calculate the expected inclusive yield of decay photons. Excess photon yield, beyond that attributed to radiative decays and background sources, may be associated with thermal photon emission. Excess, ``direct`` photon yields have been extracted from high-statistics S + Au photon data for different event centrality classes. A slight excess photon yield above that which may be accounted for by hadronic decays was observed for central events.

  3. Design of Electron and Ion Crabbing Cavities for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Castilla Loeza, Geoffrey Krafft, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the 12 GeV upgrade at the Jefferson Lab a Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been considered. In order to achieve the desired high luminosities at the Interaction Points (IP), the use of crabbing cavities is under study. In this work, we will present to-date designs of superconducting cavities, considered for crabbing both ion and electron bunches. A discussion of properties such as peak surface fields and higher-order mode separation will be presented. Keywords: super conducting, deflecting cavity, crab cavity.

  4. Gaussian energy distribution of fast ions emitted by laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, J.

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of ion collector signals with the use of a time-of-fight signal function derived from a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution is used to quantify the ion characteristics as the ion temperature and velocity of centre-of-mass motion of groups of ionized species constituting the ablated plasma. The analysis is also focused on velocity and energy distributions derived from the signal of a time-of-flight detector taking into account the underlying principle of sensor operation. The energy Maxwell spectra of ions are compared with the Gauss distribution with respect to the ratio of the centre-of-mass energy of ions to their temperature. The difference threshold between the Gauss and energy Maxwell spectra is determined via the limited validity of the basic relationship between spreads in energy and time-of-flight spectra ½ΔE/E = Δt/t. The analysis of velocity spectrum of fast ions emitted by Ti plasma produced with 300 ps, kJ-class iodine laser operating at PALS facility shows that ion bursts consist of almost monoenergetic ion beams.

  5. Shower development of particles with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Eigen, G.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Brianne, E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Tran, H. L.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Onel, Y.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Nanni, J.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Chen, S.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Kozakai, C.; Nakanishi, H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of showers initiated by electrons, pions, kaons, and protons with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter. The data were recorded at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron in 2011. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type as well as measurements of the energy resolution and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development for selected particles. The results are compared to Geant4 simulations (version 9.6.p02). In the study of the energy resolution we include previously published data with beam momenta from 1 GeV to 10 GeV recorded at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2010.

  6. 750 GeV diphoton resonance, 125 GeV Higgs and muon g - 2 anomaly in deflected anomaly mediation SUSY breaking scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Wu, Lei; Yang, Jin Min; Zhang, Mengchao

    2016-08-01

    We propose to interpret the 750 GeV diphoton excess in deflected anomaly mediation supersymmetry breaking scenarios, which can naturally predict couplings between a singlet field and vector-like messengers. The CP-even scalar component (S) of the singlet field can serve as the 750 GeV resonance. The messenger scale, which is of order the gravitino scale, can be as light as Fϕ ∼ O (10) TeV when the messenger species NF and the deflection parameter d are moderately large. Such messengers can induce the large loop decay process S → γγ. Our results show that such a scenario can successfully accommodate the 125 GeV Higgs boson, the 750 GeV diphoton excess and the muon g - 2 without conflicting with the LHC constraints. We also comment on the possible explanations in the gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking scenario.

  7. Deep Subthreshold XI{sup -} Production in Ar+KCl Reactions at 1.76A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, G.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Metag, V.; Mishra, D.; Pechenova, O.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Balanda, A.; Dybczak, A.; Michalska, B.; Otwinowski, J.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.

    2009-09-25

    We report first results on a deep subthreshold production of the doubly strange hyperon XI{sup -} in a heavy-ion reaction. At a beam energy of 1.76A GeV the reaction Ar+KCl was studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer at SIS18/GSI. A high-statistics and high-purity LAMBDA sample was collected, allowing for the investigation of the decay channel XI{sup -}->LAMBDApi{sup -}. The deduced XI{sup -}/(LAMBDA+SIGMA{sup 0}) production ratio of (5.6+-1.2{sub -1.7}{sup +1.8})x10{sup -3} is significantly larger than available model predictions.

  8. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  9. Transverse momentum dependence of η meson suppression in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hegyi, S.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niita, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2010-07-01

    New measurements by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider for η production at midrapidity as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and p+p collisions are presented. They indicate nuclear modification factors (RAA) which are similar in both magnitude and trend to those found in earlier π0 measurements. Linear fits to RAA as a function of pT in 5-20 GeV/c show that the slope is consistent with zero within two standard deviations at all centralities, although a slow rise cannot be excluded. Having different statistical and systematic uncertainties, the π0 and η measurements are complementary at high pT; thus, along with the extended pT range of these data they can provide additional constraints for theoretical modeling and the extraction of transport properties.

  10. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  11. Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, G; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2003-10-24

    We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5

  12. Dynamically generated N* and {Lambda}* resonances in the hidden charm sector around 4.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-07-15

    The interactions of D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. A series of meson-baryon dynamically generated relatively narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are predicted around 4.3 GeV in the hidden charm sector. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for the experiment of antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) at the forthcoming GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) facility.

  13. Neutral Kaon Interferometry in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) =200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-05

    We present the first statistically meaningful results fromtwo-K0s interferometry in heavy-ion collisions. A model that takes theeffect of the strong interaction into account has been used to fit themeasured correlation function. The effects of single and coupled channelwere explored. At the mean transverse mass m_T = 1.07 GeV, we obtain thevalues R = 4.09 +- 0.46 (stat.) +- 0.31 (sys) fm and lambda = 0.92 +-0.23 (stat) +- 0.13 (sys), where R and lambda are the invariant radiusand chaoticity parameters respectively. The results are qualitativelyconsistent with m_T systematics established with pions in a scenariocharacterized by a strong collective flow.

  14. Scaling properties of hyperon production in Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, H A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Guo, Y; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-02-01

    We present the scaling properties of Lambda, Xi, and Omega in midrapidity Au+Au collisions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The yield of multistrange baryons per participant nucleon increases from peripheral to central collisions more rapidly than that of Lambda, indicating an increase of the strange-quark density of the matter produced. The strange phase-space occupancy factor gamma_{s} approaches unity for the most central collisions. Moreover, the nuclear modification factors of p, Lambda, and Xi are consistent with each other for 2

  15. Third harmonic flow of charged particles in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Ostrowski, P.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Redwine, R.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-07-01

    We report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, v3, known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV, based on data from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Two-particle correlations as a function of their pseudorapidity separation are fit with narrow and wide Gaussians. Measurements of triangular flow are extracted from the wide Gaussian, from two-particle cumulants with a pseudorapidity gap, and also from event plane analysis methods with a large pseudorapidity gap between the particles and the event plane. These results are reported as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. A large dependence on the pseudorapidity gap is found. Results are compared with other experiments and model calculations.

  16. Analysis Of The Structure Of Ion Micro-Beams Emitted From RPI- And PF-Type Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Czaus, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Schmidt, H.

    2006-01-15

    The paper concerns measurements and quantitative analysis of micro-beams of fast ions produced by high-current pulse plasma discharges, which are investigated within different experimental facilities of the Rod Plasma Injector (RPI) and Plasma-Focus (PF) type. The reported ion measurements were performed mainly within the RPI-IBIS device at the IPJ in Swierk and within the large PF-1000 facility at the IPPLM in Warsaw. The pulsed ion streams were recorded by means of ion-pinhole cameras equipped with solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). Before their irradiation those detectors were calibrated, i.e. their responses to different ion species of various energies were determined. For this purpose there were used mono-energetic ion beams (obtained from particle accelerators) or ion tracks measured along the ion parabolas recorded by means of a Thomson-type spectrometer. During the described ion measurements the ion-pinhole cameras were placed at different angles to the symmetry axes of the investigated experimental facilities.

  17. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-03-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  18. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  19. Higgs stability and the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvio, Alberto; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-04-01

    We study the implications of a possible unstable particle with mass MX GeV, suggested by recent results of ATLAS and CMS on diphoton final states, and work within the minimal model: we add to the Standard Model field content a pseudoscalar and a vector-like fermion carrying both color and electric charge. This can stabilize the electroweak vacuum without invoking new physics at very high energies, which would give an unnaturally large contribution to the Higgs mass. We also show that inflation can be obtained via a UV modification of General Relativity.

  20. Nucleon Form Factors above 6 GeV

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Taylor, R. E.

    1967-09-01

    This report describes the results from a preliminary analysis of an elastic electron-proton scattering experiment... . We have measured cross sections for e-p scattering in the range of q{sup 2} from 0.7 to 25.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, providing a large region of overlap with previous measurements. In this experiment we measure the cross section by observing electrons scattered from a beam passing through a liquid hydrogen target. The scattered particles are momentum analyzed by a magnetic spectrometer and identified as electrons in a total absorption shower counter. Data have been obtained with primary electron energies from 4.0 to 17.9 GeV and at scattering angles from 12.5 to 35.0 degrees. In general, only one measurement of a cross section has been made at each momentum transfer.

  1. LHC future prospects of the 750 GeV resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryosuke; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2016-09-01

    A quantitative discussion on the future prospects of the 750 GeV resonance at the LHC experiment is given using a simple effective field theory analysis. The relative size of two effective operators relevant to diphoton decays can be probed by ratios of diboson signals in a robust way. We obtain the future sensitivities of Zγ, ZZ and WW resonance searches at the high luminosity LHC, rescaling from the current sensitivities at √{ s} = 13 TeV. Then, we show that a large fraction of parameter space in the effective field theory will be covered with 300 fb-1 and almost the whole parameter space will be tested with 3000 fb-1. This discussion is independent of production processes, other decay modes and total decay width.

  2. Pressure Safety of JLAB 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gary; Wiseman, Mark A.; Daly, Ed

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews pressure safety considerations, per the US Department of Energy (DOE) 10CFR851 Final Rule [1], which are being implemented during construction of the 100 Megavolt Cryomodule (C100 CM) for Jefferson Lab’s 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The C100 CM contains several essential subsystems that require pressure safety measures: piping in the supply and return end cans, piping in the thermal shield and the helium headers, the helium vessel assembly which includes high RRR niobium cavities, the end cans, and the vacuum vessel. Due to the vessel sizes and pressure ranges, applicable national consensus code rules are applied. When national consensus codes are not applicable, equivalent design and fabrication approaches are identified and implemented. Considerations for design, material qualification, fabrication, inspection and examination are summarized. In addition, JLAB’s methodologies for implementation of the 10 CFR 851 requirements are described.

  3. The Upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV: Physics Motivations and Technical Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Mecking; Larry Cardman

    2002-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, CEBAF, makes use of electron and photon beams with an energy up to 6 GeV to investigate the electromagnetic structure of mesons, nucleons, and nuclei. We discuss the physics motivation for upgrading the facility to a maximum energy of 12 GeV and some of the key technological aspects of the upgrade.

  4. 750 GeV messenger of dark conformal symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Zhang, Cen

    2016-03-01

    The tentative hints for a diphoton resonance at a mass of ˜750 GeV from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC may be interpreted as first contact with a "dark" sector with a spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. The implied TeV scale of the dark sector may be motivated by the interaction strength required to accommodate a viable thermal relic dark matter (DM) candidate. We model the conformal dynamics using a Randall-Sundrum-type five-dimensional geometry whose IR boundary is identified with the dynamics of the composite dark sector, while the Standard Model (SM) matter content resides on the UV boundary, corresponding to "elementary" fields. We allow the gauge fields to reside in the five-dimensional bulk, which can be minimally chosen to be S U (3 )c×U (1 )Y. The "dark" radion is identified as the putative 750 GeV resonance. Heavy vectorlike fermions, often invoked to explain the diphoton excess, are not explicitly present in our model and are not predicted to appear in the spectrum of TeV scale states. Our minimal setup favors scalar DM of O (TeV ) mass. A generic expectation in this scenario, suggested by DM considerations, is the appearance of vector bosons at ˜ few TeV, corresponding to the gluon and hypercharge Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes that couple to UV boundary states with strengths that are suppressed uniformly compared to their SM values. Our analysis suggests that these KK modes could be within the reach of the LHC in the coming years.

  5. J /ψ production at low transverse momentum in p +p and d + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report on the measurement of J /ψ production in the dielectron channel at midrapidity (|y |<1 ) in p +p and d +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum pT spectra in p +p for pT<4 GeV /c and d +Au collisions for pT<3 GeV /c are presented. These measurements extend the STAR coverage for J /ψ production in p +p collisions to low pT. The from the measured J /ψ invariant cross section in p +p and d +Au collisions are evaluated and compared to similar measurements at other collision energies. The nuclear modification factor for J /ψ is extracted as a function of pT and collision centrality in d +Au and compared to model calculations using the modified nuclear parton distribution function and a final-state J /ψ nuclear absorption cross section.

  6. Identified hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au + Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S} {sub NN} = 62.4 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Physics; BNL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Maryland; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Univ. of Rochester; National Central Univ.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The identification of particles relies on three different methods: low momentum particles stopping in the first detector layers; the specific energy loss (dE/dx) in the silicon spectrometer, and time-of-flight measurement. These methods cover the transverse momentum ranges 0.03-0.2, 0.2-1.0, and 0.5-3.0 GeV/c, respectively. Baryons are found to have substantially harder transverse momentum spectra than mesons. The p{sub T} region in which the proton to pion ratio reaches unity in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV fits into a smooth trend as a function of collision energy. At low transverse mass, the spectra of various species exhibit a significant deviation from transverse mass scaling. The observed particle yields at very low p{sub T} are comparable to extrapolations from higher p{sub T} for kaons, protons and antiprotons. By comparing our results to Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200 GeV, we conclude that the net proton yield at midrapidity is proportional to the number of participant nucleons in the collision.

  7. Identified hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; George, N.; Hauer, M.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.

    2007-02-15

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 62.4 GeV have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The identification of particles relies on three different methods: low momentum particles stopping in the first detector layers; the specific energy loss (dE/dx) in the silicon spectrometer, and time-of-flight measurement. These methods cover the transverse momentum ranges 0.03-0.2, 0.2-1.0, and 0.5-3.0 GeV/c, respectively. Baryons are found to have substantially harder transverse momentum spectra than mesons. The p{sub T} region in which the proton to pion ratio reaches unity in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 62.4 GeV fits into a smooth trend as a function of collision energy. At low transverse mass, the spectra of various species exhibit a significant deviation from transverse mass scaling. The observed particle yields at very low p{sub T} are comparable to extrapolations from higher p{sub T} for kaons, protons and antiprotons. By comparing our results to Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV, we conclude that the net proton yield at midrapidity is proportional to the number of participant nucleons in the collision.

  8. Tests of a Compton imaging prototype in a monoenergetic 4.44 MeV photon field—a benchmark setup for prompt gamma-ray imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnik, C.; Bemmerer, D.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Hueso-González, F.; Pausch, G.; Römer, K.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Wagner, L.; Kormoll, T.

    2016-06-01

    The finite range of a proton beam in tissue opens new vistas for the delivery of a highly conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy. However, the actual particle range, and therefore the accurate dose deposition, is sensitive to the tissue composition in the proton path. Range uncertainties, resulting from limited knowledge of this tissue composition or positioning errors, are accounted for in the form of safety margins. Thus, the unverified particle range constrains the principle benefit of proton therapy. Detecting prompt γ-rays, a side product of proton-tissue interaction, aims at an on-line and non-invasive monitoring of the particle range, and therefore towards exploiting the potential of proton therapy. Compton imaging of the spatial prompt γ-ray emission is a promising measurement approach. Prompt γ-rays exhibit emission energies of several MeV. Hence, common radioactive sources cannot provide the energy range a prompt γ-ray imaging device must be designed for. In this work a benchmark measurement-setup for the production of a localized, monoenergetic 4.44 MeV γ-ray source is introduced. At the Tandetron accelerator at the HZDR, the proton-capture resonance reaction 15N(p,α γ4.439)12C is utilized. This reaction provides the same nuclear de-excitation (and γ-ray emission) occurrent as an intense prompt γ-ray line in proton therapy. The emission yield is quantitatively described. A two-stage Compton imaging device, dedicated for prompt γ-ray imaging, is tested at the setup exemplarily. Besides successful imaging tests, the detection efficiency of the prototype at 4.44 MeV is derived from the measured data. Combining this efficiency with the emission yield for prompt γ-rays, the number of valid Compton events, induced by γ-rays in the energy region around 4.44 MeV, is estimated for the prototype being implemented in a therapeutic treatment scenario. As a consequence, the detection efficiency turns out to be a key parameter for prompt

  9. TPD-based evaluation of near threshold mono-energetic proton energies for the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be production of neutrons for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bengua, Gerard; Kobayashi, Tooru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Unesaki, Hironobu

    2006-08-21

    An evaluation of mono-energetic proton energies ranging from 1.885 MeV to 1.920 MeV was carried out to determine the viability of these near threshold energies in producing neutrons for BNCT via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. Neutron fields generated at these proton energies were assessed using the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and the maximum TPD (TPD(max)) as evaluation indices. The heavy charged particle (HCP) dose rate to tumour was likewise applied as a figure of merit in order to account for irradiation time and required proton current. Incident proton energies closer to the reaction threshold generated deeper TPDs compared to higher energy protons when no boron dose enhancers (BDE) were placed in the irradiation field. Introducing a BDE resulted in improved TPDs for high proton energies but their achievable TPD(max) were comparatively lower than that obtained for lower proton energies. In terms of the HCP dose rate to tumour, higher proton energies generated neutron fields that yielded higher dose rates both at TPD(max) and at fixed depths of comparison. This infers that higher currents are required to deliver the prescribed treatment dose to tumours for proton beams with energies closer to the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction threshold and more achievable proton currents of around 10 mA or less for proton energies from 1.900 MeV and above. The dependence on incident proton energy of the TPD, TPD(max) and the HCP dose rate to tumour with respect to the (10)B concentration in tumour and healthy tissues were also clarified in this study. Increasing the (10)B concentration in tumour while maintaining a constant T/N ratio resulted in deeper TPD(max) where a greater change in TPD(max) was obtained for proton energies closer to the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction threshold. The HCP dose rates to tumour for all proton energies also went up, with the higher proton energies benefiting more from the increased (10)B concentration.

  10. Measurement of Lambda and Lambda(macro) particles in Au+Au collisions at the square root of S(NN) = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; el-Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S; Zhou, S

    2002-08-26

    We present results on the measurement of Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at square root of (S (NN) = 130 GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum spectra were measured for minimum bias and for the 5% most central events. The Lambda;/Lambda ratios are constant as a function of p(T) and the number of participants. The measured net Lambda density is significantly larger than predicted by models based on hadronic strings (e.g., HIJING) but in approximate agreement with models which include the gluon-junction mechanism.

  11. Midrapidity Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at the square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-08-26

    We report the first measurement of strange (Lambda) and antistrange (Lambda macro) baryon production from square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Rapidity density and transverse mass distributions at midrapidity are presented as a function of centrality. The yield of Lambda and Lambda; hyperons is found to be approximately proportional to the number of negative hadrons. The production of Lambda; hyperons relative to negative hadrons increases very rapidly with transverse momentum. The magnitude of the increase cannot be described by existing hadronic string fragmentation models alone. PMID:12190390

  12. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-19

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies. PMID:15089125

  13. Narrowing of the balance function with centrality in Au+Au collisions at the square root of SNN = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderónde la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vander Molen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-05-01

    The balance function is a new observable based on the principle that charge is locally conserved when particles are pair produced. Balance functions have been measured for charged particle pairs and identified charged pion pairs in Au+Au collisions at the square root of SNN = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using STAR. Balance functions for peripheral collisions have widths consistent with model predictions based on a superposition of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Widths in central collisions are smaller, consistent with trends predicted by models incorporating late hadronization. PMID:12786068

  14. Measurement of the Bottom Quark Contribution to Nonphotonic Electron Production in p+p Collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.; Rose, A.

    2010-11-12

    The contribution of B meson decays to nonphotonic electrons, which are mainly produced by the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor mesons, in p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV has been measured using azimuthal correlations between nonphotonic electrons and hadrons. The extracted B decay contribution is approximately 50% at a transverse momentum of p{sub T{>=}}5 GeV/c. These measurements constrain the nuclear modification factor for electrons from B and D meson decays. The result indicates that B meson production in heavy ion collisions is also suppressed at high p{sub T}.

  15. Studies of beam halo formation in the 12GeV CEBAF design

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin; Arne Freyberger

    2007-06-01

    Beam halo formation in the beam transport design for the Jefferson Lab 12GeV upgrade was investigated using 12GeV beam transport models as well as data from 6GeV CEBAF operations. Various halo sources were considered; these covered both nuclear interactions with beam gas as well as optics-related effects such as non linearities in the magnetic fields of the transport elements. Halo due to beam gas scattering was found to be less of a problem at 12GeV compared to the 6GeV machine. Halo due to non linear effects of magnetic elements was characterized as a function of beam orbit and functional forms of the distribution were derived. These functional forms were used as inputs in subsequent detector optimizations studies.

  16. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  17. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  18. Dose response of alanine detectors irradiated with carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jaekel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Bassler, Niels

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behavior of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results to model predictions. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track structure based alanine response model developed by Hansen and Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and calculations were compared to experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for monoenergetic beams. Measured depth-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasimonoenergetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  20. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    SciTech Connect

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy E(break) = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of m(χ)=49(+6.4)(-)(5.4)  GeV.

  1. Inclusive charm cross sections in 800 GeV/ c p-p interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, R.; Banerjee, S.; Baland, J. F.; Ball, S.; Ball, R. C.; Bhat, P. C.; Bromberg, C.; Brun, R.; Canough, G. E.; Coffin, T.; Commichau, V.; Davis, R.; Dershem, T. O.; Dixon, R. L.; Fenker, H. C.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gensch, U.; Giokaris, N.; Girtler, P.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gress, J.; Gurtu, A.; Henri, V. P.; Hernandez, J. J.; Hrubec, J.; Iori, M.; Jones, L. W.; Knauss, D.; Kuhn, D.; Kwak, N.; Leedom, I. D.; Legros, P.; Lemonne, J.; Leutz, H.; Liu, X.; Malhotra, P. K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mendez, G. E.; Mikocki, S.; Miller, R.; Naumann, T.; Neuhofer, G.; Nguyen, A.; Nikolic, M.; Nowak, H.; Pilette, P.; Poppleton, A.; Poirier, J.; Raghavan, R.; Rasner, K.; Reucroft, S.; Robertson, W. J.; Roe, B. P.; Roos, C. E.; Roth, A.; Senko, M.; Struczinski, W.; Subramanian, A.; Touboul, M. C.; Vonck, B.; Voyvodic, L.; Walker, W. D.; Waters, J. W.; Weber, M. F.; Webster, M. S.; Wickens, J.; Wild, C. F.; Youtsey, S.; LEBC-MPS Collaboration

    1987-01-01

    We report a measurement of the inclusive D/D¯ production cross section in 800 GeV/ c proton-proton interactions. The experiment used the high resolution bubble chamber LEBC exposed to an 800 GeV/ c proton beam at the Fermilab MPS. We obtain σ( D/ D¯)=59 -15+22μ b (statistical errors), having analysed 25% of the total data sample. Comparison with 400 GeV/ c pp dat a obtained with LEBC at CERN shows a D/D¯ cross section increase by a factor of 1.7 -0.5+0.7. This is in good agreement with fusion model calculations.

  2. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  3. Quantification of the Relative Biological Effectiveness for Ion Beam Radiotherapy: Direct Experimental Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Beams and a Novel Approach for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, Thilo; Weyrather, Wilma K.; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Iancu, Gheorghe; Kraemer, Michael; Kragl, Gabriele; Brons, Stephan; Winter, Marcus; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Scholz, Michael

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To present the first direct experimental in vitro comparison of the biological effectiveness of range-equivalent protons and carbon ion beams for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed in a three-dimensional phantom using a pencil beam scanning technique and to compare the experimental data with a novel biophysical model. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was measured in the phantom after irradiation with two opposing fields, thus mimicking the typical patient treatment scenario. The novel biophysical model represents a substantial extension of the local effect model, previously used for treatment planning in carbon ion therapy for more than 400 patients, and potentially can be used to predict effectiveness of all ion species relevant for radiotherapy. A key feature of the new approach is the more sophisticated consideration of spatially correlated damage induced by ion irradiation. Results: The experimental data obtained for Chinese hamster ovary cells clearly demonstrate that higher cell killing is achieved in the target region with carbon ions as compared with protons when the effects in the entrance channel are comparable. The model predictions demonstrate agreement with these experimental data and with data obtained with helium ions under similar conditions. Good agreement is also achieved with relative biological effectiveness values reported in the literature for other cell lines for monoenergetic proton, helium, and carbon ions. Conclusion: Both the experimental data and the new modeling approach are supportive of the advantages of carbon ions as compared with protons for treatment-like field configurations. Because the model predicts the effectiveness for several ion species with similar accuracy, it represents a powerful tool for further optimization and utilization of the potential of ion beams in tumor therapy.

  4. Gev Gamma-ray Astronomy in the Era of GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a high energy astronomy mission planned for launch in 2005. GLAST features two instruments; the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating from 20 MeV - 300 GeV and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating from 10 keV - 25 MeV. GLAST observations will contribute to our understanding of active galactic nuclei and their jets, gamma-ray bursts, extragalactic and galactic diffuse emissions, dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, and the unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources. The LAT sensitivity is 4 x 10(exp -9) photons per square centimeter per second (greater than 100 MeV) for a one year all-sky survey, which is a factor of greater than 20 better than CGRO/EGRET. GLAST spectral observations of gamma-ray bursts cover over 6 orders of magnitude in energy thanks to the context observations of the GBM. The upper end of the LAT energy range merges with the low energy end of ground-based observatories to provide a remarkable new perspective on particle acceleration in the Universe.

  5. Hydrodynamical assessment of 200[ital A] GeV collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schnedermann, E.; Heinz, U. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg )

    1994-09-01

    We are analyzing the hydrodynamics of 200[ital A] GeV S+S collisions using a new approach which tries to quantify the uncertainties arising from the specific implementation of the hydrodynamical model. Based on a previous phenomenological analysis we use the global hydrodynamics model to show that the amount of initial flow, or initial energy density, cannot be determined from the hadronic momentum spectra. We additionally find that almost always a sizable transverse flow develops, which causes the system to freeze out, thereby limiting the flow velocity in itself. This freeze-out dominance in turn makes a distinction between a plasma and a hadron resonance gas equation of state very difficult, whereas a pure pion gas can easily be ruled out from present data. To complete the picture we also analyze particle multiplicity data, which suggest that chemical equilibrium is not reached with respect to the strange particles. However, the overpopulation of pions seems to be at most moderate, with a pion chemical potential far away from the Bose divergence.

  6. Variable gamma-ray sky at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2013-01-15

    We search for the long-term variability of the gamma-ray sky in the energy range E > 1 GeV with 168 weeks of the gamma-ray telescope Fermi-LAT data. We perform a full sky blind search for regions with variable flux looking for deviations from uniformity. We bin the sky into 12288 pixels using the HEALPix package and use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to compare weekly photon counts in each pixel with the constant flux hypothesis. The weekly exposure of Fermi-LAT for each pixel is calculated with the Fermi-LAT tools. We consider flux variations in a pixel significant if the statistical probability of uniformity is less than 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, which corresponds to 0.05 false detections in the whole set. We identified 117 variable sources, 27 of which have not been reported variable before. The sources with previously unidentified variability contain 25 active galactic nuclei (AGN) belonging to the blazar class (11 BL Lacs and 14 FSRQs), one AGN of an uncertain type, and one pulsar PSR J0633+1746 (Geminga).

  7. Symmetries behind the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A 750 GeV resonance has been observed at the run 2 LHC in the diphoton channel. In this paper, we explain this resonance as a C P -even scalar S that triggers the spontaneous breaking of local U (1 )B or U (1 )B+L gauge symmetries. S couples to gluon and photon pairs at the one-loop level, where particles running in the loop are introduced to cancel anomalies, and the gluon fusion is the dominate production channel of S at the LHC. The model contains a scalar dark matter candidate stabilized by the new gauge symmetry. Our study shows that both the observed production cross section at the LHC and the best fit decay width of S can be explained in this model without conflicting with any other experimental data. Constraints on couplings associated with S are studied, which show that S has a negligible mixing with the standard model Higgs boson but sizable coupling with the dark matter.

  8. Exclusive processes at JLab at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions provide a unique opportunity to probe the complex internal structure of the nucleon. They allow to access information about the correlations between parton transverse spatial and longitudinal momentum distributions from experimental observables. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out at Jefferson Lab using continuous electron beam with energies up to 6 GeV. Unpolarized cross sections, beam, target and double spin asymmetries have been measured for DVCS as well as for π0 exclusive electroproduction. The data from Hall B provide a wide kinematic coverage with Q2=1-4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1-0.5, and -t up to 2 GeV2. Hall A data have limited kinematic range partially overlapping with Hall B kinematics but provide a high accuracy measurements. Scaling tests of the DVCS cross sections provide solid evidence of twist-2 dominance, which makes chiral-even GPDs accessible even at modest Q2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) model. Successful description of the recent CLAS π0 exclusive production data within the framework of the GPD-based model provides a unique opportunity to access the chiral-odd GPDs.

  9. Nuclear interactions of 340-GeV pions in emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tufail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Khan, A.R.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Some results on heavy- and shower-particle multiplicities produced in interactions of 340-GeV pions in nuclear emulsion are presented and compared with similar results in proton-nucleus interactions at different energies. Values of {l angle}{ital N}{sub {ital g}}{r angle} in {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital A} interactions are found to be less than its value in {ital pA} interactions at similar energies. This is understood in terms of additive quark model. The result on mean normalized multiplicity reveals that the values of {ital R}{sub {ital A}1} are almost constant in the forward direction for all values of {l angle}{nu}({ital N}{sub {ital g}}){r angle} and {ital R}{sub {ital A}1} increases with {l angle}{nu}({ital N}{sub {ital g}}){r angle} in the intervals 1.2{lt}{eta}{le}2.0 and {eta}{le}1.2.

  10. 750 GeV Diphoton Excess from the Goldstino Superpartner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Christoffer; Torre, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    We interpret the diphoton excess recently reported by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations as a new resonance arising from the sgoldstino scalar, which is the superpartner of the Goldstone mode of spontaneous supersymmetry breaking, the goldstino. The sgoldstino is produced at the LHC via gluon fusion and decays to photons, with interaction strengths proportional to the corresponding gaugino masses over the supersymmetry breaking scale. Fitting the excess, while evading bounds from searches in the dijet, Z γ , Z Z , and W W final states, selects the supersymmetry breaking scale to be a few TeV and particular ranges for the gaugino masses. The two real scalars, corresponding to the C P -even and C P -odd parts of the complex sgoldstino, both have narrow widths, but their masses can be split of the order of 10-30 GeV by electroweak mixing corrections, which could account for the preference of a wider resonance width in the current low-statistics data. In the parameter space under consideration, tree level F -term contributions to the Higgs mass arise, in addition to the standard D -term contribution proportional to the Z -boson mass, which can significantly enhance the tree level Higgs mass.

  11. Measurements of Thermal Photons in Heavy Ion Collisions with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, T.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri V; Enokizono, Akitomo; Hornback, Donald; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Thermal photons are thought to be the ideal probe to measure the temperature of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. PHENIX has measured direct photons with p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c via their internal conversions into e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and has now provided a baseline measurement from p + p data.

  12. Coherent rho(0) production in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-12-30

    The STAR Collaboration reports the first observation of exclusive rho(0) photoproduction, AuAu-->AuAurho(0), and rho(0) production accompanied by mutual nuclear Coulomb excitation, AuAu-->Au*Au*rho(0), in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions. The rho(0) have low transverse momenta, consistent with coherent coupling to both nuclei. The cross sections at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV agree with theoretical predictions treating rho(0) production and Coulomb excitation as independent processes. PMID:12513197

  13. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  14. Charged Hadron Multiplicity Fluctuations in Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions from s_NN = 22.5 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of event-by-event fluctuations of charged hadron multiplicity in relativistic heavy ions is presented. The survey covers Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV, and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 22.5,62.4, and 200 GeV. Fluctuations are measured as a function of collision centrality, transverse momentum range, and charge sign. After correcting for nondynamical fluctuations due to fluctuations in the collision geometry within a centrality bin, the remaining dynamical fluctuations expressed as the variance normalized by the mean tend to decrease with increasing centrality. The dynamical fluctuations are consistent with or below the expectation from a superposition of participant nucleon-nucleon collisions based upon p+p data, indicating that this dataset does not exhibit evidence of critical behavior in terms of the compressibility of the system. A comparison of the data with a model where hadrons are independently emitted from a number of hadron clusters suggests that the mean number of hadrons per cluster is small in heavy ion collisions.

  15. Measurement of Υ (1 S +2 S +3 S ) production in p +p and Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p +p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ (1 S +2 S +3 S ) , was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au +Au and p +p collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. The Υ (1 S +2 S +3 S ) →e+e- differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beed σ /d y =108 ±38 (stat) ±15 (syst) ±11 (luminosity) pb in p +p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au +Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p +p collision data. The suppression is consistent with measurements made by STAR at RHIC and at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  16. Nuclear matter effects on J/ψ production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/ψ production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/ψ yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/ψ production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  17. Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF: New Insights and Conceptual Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev; Andrei Afanasev; Kevin Beard; Lawrence Cardman; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Pavel Degtiarenko; Jean Delayen; Rolf Ent; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Rui Li; Nikolitsa Merminga; Benard Poelker; Byung Yunn; Petr Ostroumov

    2004-07-01

    We report on progress in the conceptual development of the proposed high luminosity (up to 1035 cm-2s-1) and efficient spin manipulation (using ''figure 8'' boosters and collider rings) Electron-Ion Collider at the CEBAF. This facility would use a polarized 5-7 GeV electron beam from a superconducting energy recovering linac with a kicker-operated circulator ring, and a 30-150 GeV ion beam in a storage ring (for polarized p, d, 3He, Li and unpolarized totally stripped nuclei up to Ar). Ultra-high luminosity is envisioned to be achieved with very short crab-crossing bunches at 1.5 GHz repetition rate. Our recent studies were concentrated on understanding beam-beam interaction, ion beam instabilities, luminosity lifetime due to intrabeam scatterings, ERL-ring synchronization, and ion spin control. We also proposed a preliminary conceptual design of the interaction region.

  18. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  19. The Science and Experimental Equipment for the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Bernstein, Aron; Brooks, William; Burker, Volker; Cardman, Lawrence; Carlson, Carl; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Jian-Ping; Dzierba, Alex; Ent, Rolf; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fenker, Howard; Gao, Haiyan; Gasparian, Ashot; Goity, Jose; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holt, Roy; Hyde, Charles; De Jager, Cornelis; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiangdong; Jones, Mark; Keppel, Cynthia; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kumar, Krishna; Laget, Jean; Mack, David; Meyer, Curtis; Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Radyushkin, Anatoly; Ramsey-Musolf, Mike; Reimer, Paul; Richards, David; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Salgado, Carlos; Smith, Elton; Schiavilla, Rocco; Souder, Paul; Stoler, Paul; Thomas, Anthony; Ulmer, Paul; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weiss, Christian

    2005-01-10

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the compelling scientific case for upgrading the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV. Such a facility will make profound contributions to the study of hadronic matter.

  20. Advanced Concepts for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2002-08-01

    A superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) of 5 to 10 GeV was proposed earlier as an alternative to electron storage rings to deliver polarized electron beam for electron-ion collider (EIC). To enhance the utilization efficiency of electron beam from a polarized source, it is proposed to complement the ERL by circulator ring (CR) wherein the injected electrons undergo up to 100 revolutions colliding with the ion beam. In this way, electron injector and linac operate in pulsed current (beam energy recovery) regime of a relatively low average current, while the polarization is still easily delivered and preserved. To make it also easier delivering and manipulating the proton and light ion polarization, twisted (figure 8) synchrotrons are proposed for heavy particle booster and collider ring. Same type of beam orbit can be used then for electron circulator. Electron cooling (EC) of the ion beam is considered an inevitable component of high luminosity EIC (1033/s. cm2 or above). It is recognized that EC also gives a possibility to obtain very short ion bunches, that allows much stronger final focusing. At the same time, short bunches make feasible the crab crossing (and traveling focus for ion beam) at collision points, hence, allow maximizing the collision rate. As a result, one can anticipate the luminosity increase by one or two orders of magnitude.

  1. In-beam PET monitoring of mono-energetic (16)O and (12)C beams: experiments and FLUKA simulations for homogeneous targets.

    PubMed

    Sommerer, F; Cerutti, F; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Enghardt, W; Aiginger, H

    2009-07-01

    (16)O and (12)C ion beams will be used-besides lighter ions-for cancer treatment at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Germany. It is planned to monitor the treatment by means of in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) as it is done for therapy with (12)C beams at the experimental facility at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany. To enable PET also for (16)O beams, experimental data of the beta(+)-activity created by these beams are needed. Therefore, in-beam PET measurements of the activity created by (16)O beams of various energies on targets of PMMA, water and graphite were performed at GSI for the first time. Additionally reference measurements of (12)C beams on the same target materials were done. The results of the measurements are presented. The deduction of clinically relevant results from in-beam PET data requires reliable simulations of the beta(+)-activity production, which is done presently by a dedicated code limited to (12)C beams. Because this code is not extendable to other ions in an easy way, a new code, capable of simulating the production of the beta(+)-activity by all ions of interest, is needed. Our choice is the general purpose Monte Carlo code FLUKA which was used to simulate the ion transport, the beta(+)-active isotope production, the decay, the positron annihilation and the transport of the annihilation photons. The detector response was simulated with an established software that gives the output in the same list-mode data format as in the experiment. This allows us to use the same software to reconstruct measured and simulated data, which makes comparisons easier and more reliable. The calculated activity distribution shows general good agreement with the measurements. PMID:19494424

  2. Evaluation of dynamically downscaled extreme temperature using a spatially-aggregated generalized extreme value (GEV) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Han, Yuefeng; Stein, Michael L.; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Huang, Whitney K.

    2016-02-01

    The weather research and forecast (WRF) model downscaling skill in extreme maximum daily temperature is evaluated by using the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution. While the GEV distribution has been used extensively in climatology and meteorology for estimating probabilities of extreme events, accurately estimating GEV parameters based on data from a single pixel can be difficult, even with fairly long data records. This work proposes a simple method assuming that the shape parameter, the most difficult of the three parameters to estimate, does not vary over a relatively large region. This approach is applied to evaluate 31-year WRF-downscaled extreme maximum temperature through comparison with North American regional reanalysis (NARR) data. Uncertainty in GEV parameter estimates and the statistical significance in the differences of estimates between WRF and NARR are accounted for by conducting a novel bootstrap procedure that makes no assumption of temporal or spatial independence within a year, which is especially important for climate data. Despite certain biases over parts of the United States, overall, WRF shows good agreement with NARR in the spatial pattern and magnitudes of GEV parameter estimates. Both WRF and NARR show a significant increase in extreme maximum temperature over the southern Great Plains and southeastern United States in January and over the western United States in July. The GEV model shows clear benefits from the regionally constant shape parameter assumption, for example, leading to estimates of the location and scale parameters of the model that show coherent spatial patterns.

  3. The First Fermi-LAT Catalog of Sources Above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of gamma-ray sources at energies above 10 GeV based on data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) accumulated during the first 3 yr of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of >10 GeV sources (1FHL) has 514 sources. For each source we present location, spectrum, a measure of variability, and associations with cataloged sources at other wavelengths. We found that 449 (87%) could be associated with known sources, of which 393 (76% of the 1FHL sources) are active galactic nuclei. Of the 27 sources associated with known pulsars, we find 20 (12) to have significant pulsations in the range >10 GeV (>25 GeV). In this work we also report that, at energies above 10 GeV, unresolved sources account for 27% +/- 8% of the isotropic ? -ray background, while the unresolved Galactic population contributes only at the few percent level to the Galactic diffuse background. We also highlight the subset of the 1FHL sources that are best candidates for detection at energies above 50-100 GeV with current and future ground-based ? -ray observatories.

  4. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  5. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  6. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  7. Photoproduction of 7pi0 on hydrogen with CLAS from 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV using e+e --gamma decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Michael C.

    Photoproduction of the pi0 meson was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using tagged incident photon energies spanning the range Egamma = 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV. The measurement is performed on a liquid hydrogen target in the reaction gammap → pe +e--(gamma). The final state of the reaction is the sum of two subprocesses for pi0 decay, the Dalitz decay mode of gamma0 → e +e--gamma and conversion mode where one photon from pi0 → gammagamma decay is converted into a e+e -- pair. This specific final state reaction avoided limitations caused by single prompt track triggering, while the span of incident photon energies allowed for measurements of gamma0 photoproduction to a domain never systematically measured before. We report the measurement of the gamma0 differential cross sections dsigma/dO and dsigma/dt. The angular distributions agree well with the SAID parametrization for incident beam energies below 3 GeV. As a result with this new data, the chi2/p.d.f. of the global fit in the SAID parametrization improved to 3.1 from 3.7. For incident beam energies greater than 3 GeV a comparison of a model based on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD) with experimental data shows significant discrepancy, requiring further model developments to describe the data.

  8. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  9. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  10. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  11. Thermal electromagnetic radiation in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R.; van Hees, H.

    2016-08-01

    We review the potential of precise measurements of electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy-ion collisions for the theoretical understanding of strongly interacting matter. The penetrating nature of photons and dileptons implies that they can carry undistorted information about the hot and dense regions of the fireballs formed in these reactions and thus provide a unique opportunity to measure the electromagnetic spectral function of QCD matter as a function of both invariant mass and momentum. In particular we report on recent progress on how the medium modifications of the (dominant) isovector part of the vector current correlator ( ρ channel) can shed light on the mechanism of chiral symmetry restoration in the hot and/or dense environment. In addition, thermal dilepton radiation enables novel access to a) the fireball lifetime through the dilepton yield in the low invariant-mass window 0.3 GeV ≤ M ≤ 0.7 GeV, and b) the early temperatures of the fireball through the slope of the invariant-mass spectrum in the intermediate-mass region (1.5 GeV < M < 2.5 GeV). The investigation of the pertinent excitation function suggests that the beam energies provided by the NICA and FAIR projects are in a promising range for a potential discovery of the onset of a first-order phase transition, as signaled by a non-monotonous behavior of both low-mass yields and temperature slopes.

  12. Physical Modelling of Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, M.; Bezak, E.

    2012-10-01

    Protons and heavy ion particles are considered to be ideal particles for use in external beam radiotherapy due to superior properties of the dose distribution that results when these particles are incident externally and due to their relative biological effectiveness. While significant research has been performed into the properties and physical dose characteristics of heavy ions, the nuclear reactions (direct and fragmentation) undergone by He4, C12 and Ne20 nuclei used in radiotherapy in materials other than water is still largely unexplored. In the current project, input code was developed for the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant 4 version 9.3 to simulate the transport of several mono-energetic heavy ions through water. The relative dose contributions from secondary particles and nuclear fragments originating from the primary particles were investigated for each ion in both water and dense bone (ICRU) media. The results indicated that the relative contribution to the total physical dose from nuclear fragments increased with both increasing particle mass and with increasing medium density. In the case of 150 MeV protons, secondary particles were shown to contribute less than 0.5% of the peak dose and as high as 25% when using 10570 MeV neon ions in bone. When water was substituted for a bone medium, the contributions from fragments increased by more than 6% for C12 and Ne20.

  13. Investigation of the LAPPS Ion Flux to a Surface Biased with an Arbitrary High Frequency Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Leonhardt, Darrin; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Materials etching using accelerated ions has become a widely used procedure in the semiconductor industry. Typically the substrate is biased with high frequency voltage waveforms, which cause the substrate to acquire a negative DC voltage to accelerate the ions. However, the ions do not reach the substrate as a monoenergetic beam. The ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is profoundly influenced by the frequency and shape of the applied waveform. At NRL, we have been experimenting with electron-beam produced plasmas as an alternative to radiofrequency (RF) driven discharges. The most promising of these sources is the hollow cathode driven \\underlineLarge \\underlineArea \\underlinePlasma \\underlineProcessing \\underlineSystem. This source is designed to produce large area (> 1 m^2), high density, uniform sheets of plasma. In this presentation we will show measurements of the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) from continuous and pulsed electron beam plasmas produced in 20-30 cm wide × 1 cm thick sheets by a 2 kV hollow cathode. The IEDF is obtained using a gridded energy analyzer incorporated into a biasable stage. The surface flux and IEDF as a function of the waveform input to the stage will be investigated by using various types of pulse functions and variable frequency RF voltages. Typical operating conditions are 15-20 millitorr of argon, oxygen, or nitrogen, and 150-200 Gauss magnetic field.

  14. Two-stage acceleration of interstellar ions driven by high-energy lepton plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, YunQian; Sheng, ZhengMing; Lu, QuanMing; Li, YuTong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of the interaction of a high-energy lepton plasma flow with background electron-proton plasma and focus on the acceleration processes of the protons. It is found that the acceleration follows a two-stage process. In the first stage, protons are significantly accelerated transversely (perpendicular to the lepton flow) by the turbulent magnetic field "islands" generated via the strong Weibel-type instabilities. The accelerated protons shows a perfect inverse-power energy spectrum. As the interaction continues, a shockwave structure forms and the protons in front of the shockwave are reflected at twice of the shock speed, resulting in a quasi-monoenergetic peak located near 200 MeV under the simulation parameters. The presented scenario of ion acceleration may be relevant to cosmic-ray generation in some astrophysical environments.

  15. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  16. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  17. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  18. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Mangia, F.; Riquier, R.; Atzeni, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  19. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  20. Cataracts Heavy Ions and Individual Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E.; Worgul, B.; Brenner, D.; Smilenov, L.

    Ocular cataracts represents one of the few legacies of space flight evident in a significant proportion of astronauts X-rays are known to induce cataracts Heavy ions are known to be much more effective per unit dose than gamma -rays The object of this present study was to identify genes that confer individual susceptibility and to estimate RBE values Wild type mice were compared with animals heterozygous for Atm Mrad9 or BRCA1 or animals that were double heterozygotes for pairs of genes Mice were irradiated with x-rays at Columbia University in New York City or with heavy ions 1GeV amu 56 Fe ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory Haploinsufficiency for either Atm or mRAD9 resulted in cataracts appearing earlier than in wild type animals whether exposed to gamma -rays or heavy ions Double heterozygotes were more radiosensitive than animals haploinsufficient for either gene alone Heavy ions were much more effective than x-rays in inducing cataracts of all grades in animals of all genotypes A detailed analysis suggest that the RBE varies to some extent with the genotype of the animal and the cataract grade

  1. Lattice design for the ERL electron ion collider in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Tsoupas, N.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Ptitsyn, V.; Litvinenko, V.; Hao, Y.; Parker, B.; Pozdeyev, E.

    2010-05-23

    We present electron ion collider lattice design for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) where the electrons have multi-passes through recirculating linacs (ERL) and arcs placed in the existing RHIC tunnel. The present RHIC interaction regions (IR's), where the electron ion collisions will occur, are modified to allow for the large luminosity. Staging of eRHIC will bring the electron energy from 4 up to 20 (30) GeV as the superconducting cavities are built and installed sequentially. The synchrotron radiation from electrons at the IR is reduced as they arrive straight to the collision while ions and protons come with 10 mrad crossing angle using the crab cavities.

  2. Regge approach to charged-pion photoproduction at invariant energies above 2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, A; Haidenbauer, J; Krewald, S; Lee, T S.H.; Meissner, U -G; Thomas, A W

    2007-10-01

    A Regge model with absorptive corrections is employed in a global analysis of the world data on positive and negative pion photoproduction for photon energies from 3 to 8~GeV. In this region resonance contributions are expected to be negligible so that the available experimental information on differential cross sections and single polarization observables at $-t{\\leq}2$ GeV$^2$ allows us to determine the non-resonant part of the reaction amplitude reliably. The model amplitude is then used to predict observables for photon energies below $3$ GeV. Differences between our predictions and data in this energy region are systematically examined as possible signals for the presence of excited baryons. We find that the data available for the polarized photon asymmetry show promising resonance signatures at invariant energies around 2~GeV. With regard to differential cross sections the analysis of negative pion photoproduction data, obtained recently at JLab, indicates likewise the presence of resonance structures around 2~GeV.

  3. A regional GEV scale-invariant framework for Intensity-Duration-Frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, J.; Ceresetti, D.; Molinié, G.; Creutin, J.-D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose in this paper a regional formulation of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves of point-rainfall maxima in a scale-invariant Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) framework. The two assumptions we make is that extreme daily rainfall is GEV-distributed - which is justified by Extreme Value Theory (EVT) - and that extremes of aggregated daily rainfall follow simple-scaling relationships. Following these assumptions, we develop in a unified way a GEV simple-scaling model for extremes of aggregated daily rainfall over the range of durations where scaling applies. Then we propose a way of correcting this model for measurement frequency, giving a new GEV-scaling model for extremes of aggregated hourly rainfall. This model deviates from the simple-scaling assumption. This framework is applied to the Mediterranean region of Cévennes-Vivarais, France. A network of about 300 daily raingage stations covering the last 50 years and accumulated to span the range 1 day-1 week is used to fit the scale invariant GEV-model locally. By means of spatial interpolation of the model parameters, and correction for measurement frequency, we are able to build a regional model with good performances down to 1 h duration, even though only one hourly station is used to build the model. Finally we produce mean and return level maps within the region in the range 1 h-1 week and comment on the potential rain storms leading to these maps.

  4. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  5. Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 9.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. The data were collected using the large acceptance STAR detector at {radical}s{sub NN} = 9.2 GeV from a test run of the collider in the year 2008. Midrapidity results on multiplicity density (dN/dy) in rapidity (y), average transverse momentum (), particle ratios, elliptic flow, and HBT radii are consistent with the corresponding results at similar {radical}s{sub NN} from fixed target experiments. Directed flow measurements are presented for both midrapidity and forward rapidity regions. Furthermore the collision centrality dependence of identified particle dN/dy, , and particle ratios are discussed. These results also demonstrate that the capabilities of the STAR detector, although optimized for {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, are suitable for the proposed QCD critical point search and exploration of the QCD phase diagram at RHIC.

  6. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2016-03-07

    We measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons, using the PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In the past, heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transversemore » momentum are measured in Au + Au collisions. Here, we compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p + p collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for p(T) > 4 GeV/c. We use the bottom electron fractions in Au + Au and p + p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron R(AA) to calculate the R(AA) for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. Finally, we find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3 < p(T) < 4 GeV/c.« less

  7. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Jet production rates are measured in p +p and d +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R =0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12 GeV /c , within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η | <0.3 . The nuclear-modification factor (Rd Au) values for 0%-100% d +Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. However, the centrality-selected Rd Au values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  8. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  9. System size dependence of hadron pT spectra in p + p and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandai, P. K.; Sett, P.; Shukla, P.; Singh, V.

    2014-02-01

    We make a systematic study of transverse momentum (pT) spectra of hadrons produced in p + p and in different centralities of Au+Au collisions at center of mass energy of 200 GeV using phenomenological fit functions. The Tsallis distribution gives a very good description of hadron spectra in p + p collisions with just two parameters but does not produce the same in Au+Au collisions at intermediate pT. To explain the hadron spectra in heavy ion collisions in a wider pT range we propose a modified Tsallis function by introducing an additional parameter that accounts for collective flow. The new analytical function gives a very good description of both mesons and baryons spectra at all centralities of Au+Au collisions in terms of the parameters having a potential physics interpretation. With this modified Tsallis function we study the spectra of pions, kaons, protons, Λ and Ξ- as a function of system size at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV. The parameter representing transverse flow increases with system size and is found to be more for baryons than that for mesons in central Au+Au collisions. The freeze-out temperature for baryons increases with centrality in Au+Au collisions more rapidly than for mesons.

  10. Detection of Pulsed Gamma Rays Above 100 GeV from the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nuñez, P.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar at energies above 100 giga-electron volts (GeV) with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The detection cannot be explained on the basis of current pulsar models. The photon spectrum of pulsed emission between 100 mega-electron volts and 400 GeV is described by a broken power law that is statistically preferred over a power law with an exponential cutoff. It is unlikely that the observation can be explained by invoking curvature radiation as the origin of the observed gamma rays above 100 GeV. Our findings require that these gamma rays be produced more than 10 stellar radii from the neutron star.

  11. 750 GeV dark pion: Cousin of a dark G -parity odd WIMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Berger, Joshua; Lu, Ran

    2016-04-01

    We point out a potential common origin of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton resonance and a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate. In a dark QCD sector with an unbroken dark G parity, the diphoton resonance could be a dark G -even pion, while the WIMP could be the lightest dark G -odd pion. Both particles are Standard Model gauge singlets and have the same decay constant. For the dark pion decay constant of around 500 GeV, both the diphoton excess at the LHC and the dark matter thermal abundance can be accommodated in our model. Our model predicts additional dark G -even and dark G -odd color-octet pions within reach of the 13 TeV LHC runs. For the 5 +5 ¯ model, compatible with the grand unified theories, the WIMP mass is predicted to be within (613,750) GeV.

  12. Detection of pulsed gamma rays above 100 GeV from the Crab pulsar.

    PubMed

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pizlo, F; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Sentürk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar at energies above 100 giga-electron volts (GeV) with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The detection cannot be explained on the basis of current pulsar models. The photon spectrum of pulsed emission between 100 mega-electron volts and 400 GeV is described by a broken power law that is statistically preferred over a power law with an exponential cutoff. It is unlikely that the observation can be explained by invoking curvature radiation as the origin of the observed gamma rays above 100 GeV. Our findings require that these gamma rays be produced more than 10 stellar radii from the neutron star.

  13. The JLAB 3D program at 12 GeV (TMDs + GPDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab CEBAF accelerator is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the beam energy up to 12 GeV. The three experimental Halls operating in the 6-GeV era are upgrading their detectors to adapt their performances to the new available kinematics, and a new Hall (D) is being built. The investigation of the three-dimensional nucleon structure both in the coordinate and in the momentum space represents an essential part of the 12-GeV physics program, and several proposals aiming at the extraction of related observables have been already approved in Hall A, B and C. In this proceedings, the focus of the JLab 3D program will be described, and a selection of proposals will be discussed.

  14. Fermi LAT Search for Photon Lines from 30 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; /Padua U. /Barcelona, IEEC /Stanford U. /SLAC /IASF, Milan /Padua U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /JAXA, Sagamihara /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U., Baltimore County /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Perugia U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U. /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U. /SLAC /Ecole Polytechnique /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Penn State U. /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron. /Alabama U., Huntsville /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /ICREA, Barcelona /NASA, Goddard /Ecole Polytechnique /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stanford U. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Waseda U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Wako, RIKEN /Washington U., Seattle /Toulouse, CESR /INFN, Pisa /Stanford U. /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /CENBG, Gradignan /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stanford U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /JAXA, Sagamihara /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U. /SLAC /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /Stanford U. /SLAC /Denver U. /Montpellier U. /Hiroshima U. /INFN, Pisa /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Denver U. /JAXA, Sagamihara /Stanford U. /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pisa /Innsbruck U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /UC, Santa Cruz /Barcelona, IEEC /Washington U., Seattle /UC, Santa Cruz /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /UC, Santa Cruz /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Cruz /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Pisa /Unlisted /CENBG, Gradignan /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Purdue U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U. /SLAC /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Stanford U. /SLAC /JAXA, Sagamihara /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U., Baltimore County /Toulouse, CESR /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /Banca di Roma /Stanford U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Tsukuba U., GSPAS /Kalmar U. /Stockholm U., OKC /UC, Santa Cruz

    2010-05-26

    Dark matter (DM) particle annihilation or decay can produce monochromatic {gamma}-rays readily distinguishable from astrophysical sources. {gamma}-ray line limits from 30 GeV to 200 GeV obtained from 11 months of Fermi Large Area Space Telescope data from 20-300 GeV are presented using a selection based on requirements for a {gamma}-ray line analysis, and integrated over most of the sky. We obtain {gamma}-ray line flux upper limits in the range 0.6-4.5 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and give corresponding DM annihilation cross-section and decay lifetime limits. Theoretical implications are briefly discussed.

  15. Higgs precision study of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance and the 125 GeV standard model Higgs boson with Higgs-singlet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Ko, P.; Lee, Jae Sik; Park, Jubin; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2016-08-01

    We interpret the potential observation of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the LHC in models, in which an S U (2 ) isospin-singlet scalar boson mixes with the standard model (SM) Higgs boson through an angle α . Allowing the singlet scalar boson to have renormalizable couplings to vectorlike leptons and quarks and introducing sizable decay width of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance into non-SM particles such as dark matters, we can explain the large production cross section σ (H2)×B (H2→γ γ ) as well as the apparent large total width of the boson without conflicts from the results obtained by previous global fits to the SM Higgs boson data.

  16. Structural modifications induced in Bayfol polycarbonate due to heavy highly energetic ions irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Radwan, Yasmine E.; Elfiky, Dalia; Abutalib, M. M.; Bahareth, Radiyah A.; Fouad, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of 28 GeV 56Fe and 13.72 GeV 28Si ion irradiation on the structural properties of two types of Bayfol, namely DPF 5023 and CR 1-4 polycarbonates, have been investigated. It is worth mentioning that this report is almost the first one dealing with the topic of material changes in such a high energy range. Samples from each type of Bayfol were classified into two groups. The first group has been exposed to Fe ion fluences at levels between 2000 and 8000 ion/cm2. The second group has been exposed to Si ions with similar fluences. The total energy deposited is between 27.44 and 224 E12 eV. The modifications induced in Bayfol samples due to ion irradiation have been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the Fe ion irradiation causes crosslinking in Bayfol DPF 5023, reflected as a decrease in the ordering character. Also, the tendency of Bayfol CR 1-4 to crosslinking due to Fe ion irradiation is lower than that of Bayfol DPF 5023. On the other hand, the Si ion irradiation causes mainly chain scission at the carbonate site of both types of Bayfol associated with the formation of hydroxyl group.

  17. Design of the Proposed Low Energy Ion Collider Ring at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Edward W.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The polarized Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab will cover a range of center-of-mass energies up to 65 GeV. The present MEIC design could also allow the accommodation of low energy electron-ion collisions (LEIC) for additional science reach. This paper presents the first design of the low energy ion collider ring which is converted from the large ion booster of MEIC. It can reach up to 25 GeV energy for protons and equivalent ion energies of the same magnetic rigidity. An interaction region and an electron cooler designed for MEIC are integrated into the low energy collider ring, in addition to other required new elements including crab cavities and ion spin rotators, for later reuse in MEIC itself. A pair of vertical chicanes which brings the low energy ion beams to the plane of the electron ring and back to the low energy ion ring are also part of the design.

  18. Systematic study of diphoton resonance at 750 GeV from sgoldstino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ran; Fan, Yizhou; Huang, Li; Li, Chuang; Li, Tianjun; Raza, Shabbar; Zhu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have reported an excess of events in diphoton channel with invariant mass of about 750 GeV. With low energy supersymmetry breaking, we systematically consider the sgoldstino scalar S as the new resonance, which is a linear combination of the CP-even scalar s and CP-odd pseudoscalar a. Because we show that s and a can be degenerated or have large mass splitting, we consider two cases for all the following three scenarios: (1) Single resonance, s is the 750 GeV resonance decays to a pair of 1 GeV pseudoscalar a with suitable decay length, these two a decay into collimated pair of photons which cannot be distinguished at the LHC and may appear as diphotons instead of four photons. (2) Twin resonances, ms ≃ ma with a mass difference of about 40 GeV and both s and a decay into diphoton pairs. For productions, we consider three scenarios: (I) vector-boson fusion; (II) gluon-gluon fusion; (III) qq¯ pair production. In all these scenarios with two kinds of resonances, we find the parameter space that satisfies the diphoton production cross-section from 3 to 13 fb and all the other experimental constraints. And we address the decay width as well. In particular, in the third scenario, we observe that the production cross-section is small but the decay width of s or a can be from 40 to 60 GeV. Even if the 750 GeV diphoton excesses were not confirmed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, we point out that our proposal can be used to explain the current and future diphoton excesses.

  19. Neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Kauder, K.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.

    2009-10-15

    The results of midrapidity (0GeV Au+Au collisions, measured by the STAR experiment, are presented. The neutral pions are reconstructed from photons measured either by the STAR Barrel Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter or by the Time Projection Chamber via tracking of conversion electron-positron pairs. Our measurements are compared to previously published {pi}{sup {+-}} and {pi}{sup 0} results. The nuclear modification factors R{sub CP} and R{sub AA} of {pi}{sup 0} are also presented as a function of p{sub T}. In the most central Au+Au collisions, the binary collision scaled {pi}{sup 0} yield at high p{sub T} is suppressed by a factor of about 5 compared to the expectation from the yield of p+p collisions. Such a large suppression is in agreement with previous observations for light quark mesons and is consistent with the scenario that partons suffer considerable energy loss in the dense medium formed in central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  20. Long-range pseudo-rapidity correlations in 200 GeV Au +Au collisions with STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codrington, Martin; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Two interesting correlation analyses that may be useful in describing the matter created in heavy-ion collisions are γ-hadron correlations and di-hadron long-range pseudorapidity correlations (the ``ridge''). γ-hadron correlations are interesting because photons do not strongly interact with partonic matter: They provide a momentum tag for the recoil hadron(s) which may provide a better understanding of the matter produced. Additional measurements of the ridge using π0s at high pT may lead to a better understanding of ridge formation. Previously published STAR data has shown 2-D charged di-hadron correlations, and 1-D π0 triggered correlations. Wewill show results of 2-D correlations of likely γ & π0 triggers with charged hadrons from Au +Au collisions taken during Runs 7, 10, & 11 with the STAR detector; using the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Barrel ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter (BEMC). The TPC is used to measure the trajectory and momentum of charged hadrons and the BEMC is used to calculate the energy of electromagnetic particles. π0s were reconstructed from their decay photons in the Barrel Shower-Maximum Detector which sits ~ 5.6 X0 in the BEMC. The combination of the 3 datasets should provide adequate statistics to examine the ridge at high pt above 10 GeV. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  1. Neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research; Kent State Univ.

    2009-10-01

    The results of midrapidity (0 < y < 0.8) neutral pion spectra over an extended transverse momentum range (1 < p{sub T} < 12 GeV/c) in {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions, measured by the STAR experiment, are presented. The neutral pions are reconstructed from photons measured either by the STAR Barrel Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter or by the Time Projection Chamber via tracking of conversion electron-positron pairs. Our measurements are compared to previously published {pi}{sup {+-}} and {pi}{sup 0} results. The nuclear modification factors R{sub CP} and R{sub AA} of {pi}{sup 0} are also presented as a function of p{sub T}. In the most central Au+Au collisions, the binary collision scaled {pi}{sup 0} yield at high p{sub T} is suppressed by a factor of about 5 compared to the expectation from the yield of p+p collisions. Such a large suppression is in agreement with previous observations for light quark mesons and is consistent with the scenario that partons suffer considerable energy loss in the dense medium formed in central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  2. Low Transverse Momentum KS Production in Au + Au Collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhaozhong; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) detector installed in the STAR experiment is aimed for precision measurement of charm production in heavy-ion collisions by topologically reconstructing the secondary decays of charmed hadrons. With the significantly improved pointing resolution enabled by the HFT, we can also reconstruct low transverse momentum (pT < 0.3 GeV/c) KS particles that decay very close to collision vertices, which was difficult before with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) only. Measurement of the low transverse momentum yield will further constrain the total kaon yield in the full kinematic phase space. In this presentation, we will present the first measurement of the KS production focusing on the low transverse momentum region (pT < 0.3 GeV/c) with the HFT detector from Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}= 200 GeV. We will report the invariant yield and elliptic flow vs. pT in different centrality bins. The results will be compared with previous measurements at RHIC.

  3. The production of dielectrons in Au +Au collisions at √sNN = 27 GeV from STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Joseph; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies are capable of producing hot, dense, and strongly interacting nuclear matter. From the time of collision, leptons are produced and travel through the system with minimal interaction. Thus, dileptons make an excellent probe of the matter. At SPS beam energies, a significant enhancement was observed in the low-mass range (Mee <1.1 GeVc-2) . This enhancement was found to be consistent with an in-medium modification of the ρ meson spectral function. At top RHIC energies, such enhancements have been observed again. The beam energy scan program aims to close the gap between SPS and top RHIC energies by systematically studying the intermediate center of mass energies. The STAR experiment is in an excellent position to study these medium modifications because of its high purity, large acceptance electron identification through the combined use of its Time Projection Chamber and Time of Flight detectors. In this presentation, I will present a study of the dielectron production in Au +Au collisions at √sNN = 27 GeV and compare to results at the other RHIC energies.

  4. 200 A GeV Au+Au Collisions Serve a Nearly Perfect Quark-Gluon Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Song Huichao; Bass, Steffen A.; Heinz, Ulrich; Shen, Chun; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2011-05-13

    A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity ({eta}/s){sub QGP} of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T{sub c}ion collisions is presented. Coupling viscous fluid dynamics for the QGP with a microscopic transport model for hadronic freeze-out we find for 200 A GeV Au+Au collisions that v{sub 2}/{epsilon} is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN{sub ch}/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity {epsilon}. Comparing with measurements we find 1<4{pi}({eta}/s){sub QGP}<2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of {epsilon} used to normalize the measured v{sub 2}.

  5. Observation of Direct-Photon Collective Flow in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2012-09-01

    The second Fourier component v2 of the azimuthal anisotropy with respect to the reaction plane is measured for direct photons at midrapidity and transverse momentum (pT) of 1-12GeV/c in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. Previous measurements of this quantity for hadrons with pT<6GeV/c indicate that the medium behaves like a nearly perfect fluid, while for pT>6GeV/c a reduced anisotropy is interpreted in terms of a path-length dependence for parton energy loss. In this measurement with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider we find that for pT>4GeV/c the anisotropy for direct photons is consistent with zero, which is as expected if the dominant source of direct photons is initial hard scattering. However, in the pT<4GeV/c region dominated by thermal photons, we find a substantial direct-photon v2 comparable to that of hadrons, whereas model calculations for thermal photons in this kinematic region underpredict the observed v2.

  6. J/ψ suppression at forward rapidity in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2011-11-01

    Heavy quarkonia are observed to be suppressed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions relative to their production in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. In order to determine if this suppression is related to color screening of these states in the produced medium, one needs to account for other nuclear modifications including those in cold nuclear matter. In this paper, we present new measurements from the PHENIX 2007 data set of J/ψ yields at forward rapidity (1.2<|y|<2.2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The data confirm the earlier finding that the suppression of J/ψ at forward rapidity is stronger than at midrapidity, while also extending the measurement to finer bins in collision centrality and higher transverse momentum (pT). We compare the experimental data to the most recent theoretical calculations that incorporate a variety of physics mechanisms including gluon saturation, gluon shadowing, initial-state parton energy loss, cold nuclear matter breakup, color screening, and charm recombination. We find J/ψ suppression beyond cold-nuclear-matter effects. However, the current level of disagreement between models and d+Au data precludes using these models to quantify the hot-nuclear-matter suppression.

  7. Energy Loss and Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au + Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3GeV. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC energies. A large azimuthal anisotropy v2 with respect to the reaction plane is observed for 0.5

  8. Energy Lossand Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au+Au Collisions at root-s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Klay, J; Enokizono, A; Newby, J; Heffner, M; Hartouni, E

    2007-02-26

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3 < p{sub rmT} < 9 GeV/c at midrapidity (|y| < 0.35) from heavy flavor (charm and bottom) decays in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC energies. A large azimuthal anisotropy, v{sub 2}, with respect to the reaction plane is observed for 0.5 < p{sub rmT} < 5 GeV/c indicating non-zero heavy flavor elliptic flow. A simultaneous description of R{sub AA}(p{sub rmT}) and v{sub 2}(p{sub rmT}) constrains the existing models of heavy-quark rescattering in strongly interacting matter and provides information on the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound, i.e. near a perfect fluid, is suggested.

  9. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200 A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.; Phobos Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d +Au , p +Au , and n +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV . The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p +Au and n +Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p +Au and n +Au is constructed to build a reference for Au +Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence of the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d +Au . The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p +p ¯ to central d +Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p +Au is compared to that of n +Au . No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. These studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p +A and d +A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  10. Directed and Elliptic Flow of Charged Hadrons in 22.4 GeV Cu+Cu Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Yadav

    2010-02-01

    Measurements of anisotropic flow in heavy-ion collisions provide insight into the early stage of the system's evolution. Anisotropic flow is quantified by the Fourier coefficients vn of the distribution of particles with respect to the reaction plane. This talk reports recent results for directed (v1) and elliptic flow (v2) at sNN = 22.4 GeV. The measurements are done using 0-60% central collision for charged particles at mid-pseudo rapidity region |η|<1.2 and at forward pseudorapidity region 2.5<|η|<4.0 in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The STAR Beam Beam Counters (BBC) cover the pseudorapidity (η) range 3.3 < |η| < 5.0 and provide full azimuthal coverage. They are used to reconstruct the first-order event plane for the directed flow analysis. For the elliptic flow measurements, charged tracks in the time projection chamber are used to reconstruct the event plane. Comparisons with other methods and with different energies are presented. )

  11. Observation of direct-photon collective flow in Au + Au collisions at √s(NN)] = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2012-09-21

    The second Fourier component v(2) of the azimuthal anisotropy with respect to the reaction plane is measured for direct photons at midrapidity and transverse momentum (p(T)) of 1-12 GeV/c in Au + Au collisions at √s(NN)] = 200 GeV. Previous measurements of this quantity for hadrons with p(T) < 6 GeV/c indicate that the medium behaves like a nearly perfect fluid, while for p(T) > 6 GeV/c a reduced anisotropy is interpreted in terms of a path-length dependence for parton energy loss. In this measurement with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider we find that for p(T) > 4 GeV/c the anisotropy for direct photons is consistent with zero, which is as expected if the dominant source of direct photons is initial hard scattering. However, in the p(T) < 4 GeV/c region dominated by thermal photons, we find a substantial direct-photon v(2) comparable to that of hadrons, whereas model calculations for thermal photons in this kinematic region underpredict the observed v(2).

  12. Transverse momentum dependence of η meson suppression in Au + Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.d.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-07-29

    New measurements by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider for {eta} production at midrapidity as a function of transverse momentum (p{sub T}) and collision centrality in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p collisions are presented. They indicate nuclear modification factors (R{sub AA}) which are similar in both magnitude and trend to those found in earlier {pi}{sup 0} measurements. Linear fits to R{sub AA} as a function of p{sub T} in 5-20 GeV/c show that the slope is consistent with zero within two standard deviations at all centralities, although a slow rise cannot be excluded. Having different statistical and systematic uncertainties, the {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} measurements are complementary at high p{sub T}; thus, along with the extended p{sub T} range of these data they can provide additional constraints for theoretical modeling and the extraction of transport properties.

  13. Study of particle production fluctuations in Au + Au at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruneau, Claude A.

    2001-04-01

    The presence of two or more event classes in relativistic heavy ion collisions (e.g. at RHIC) can, in principle, be identified on the basis of a study of the impact parameter dependence of the variance (and covariance) of event-by-event observables such as the production multiplicity of specific species (kaons, anti-protons, etc), or the HBT radius if the production of the two event classes, e.g. a QGP and a purely hadronic gas, lead to finite differences in collision volume or particle production. (Gavin and Pruneau, Phys. Rev. C61, 044901 (2000). We will report on a first measurement of the production fluctuations of pi+-, kaons+-, protons, and anti-protons as a function of the collision impact parameter in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV measured with the STAR TPC for pt>100 MeV/c and |eta|<0.5. The emphasis of the presentation will be in establishing whether observed particle productions are purely Poissonian or show manifestations of two or more classes of events.

  14. Supersoft SUSY models and the 750 GeV diphoton excess, beyond effective operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Colburn, Russell; Goodman, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the sbino, the scalar partner of a Dirac bino, can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations. We first argue for the existence of couplings between sbino to pairs of Standard Model gauge bosons using effective operator analysis. We then analyze the minimal completion of the effective operator model in which the sbino couples to pairs of gauge bosons through loops of heavy sfermions, with the sfermion-bino coupling originating from scalar potential D-terms. We find that the sbino model may be fit the 750 GeV excess by considering gluon fusion processes with decay to diphotons.

  15. Determination of cluster size in particle-nucleus interactions at 50 and 400 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, M.; Khushnood, H.; Shakeel, A.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M.

    1984-07-01

    We have investigated the formation of clusters and their sizes in 50-GeV ..pi../sup -/-nucleus and 400-GeV proton-nucleus interactions. The maximum multiplicity of charged shower particles constituting the clusters at the two incident energies is observed to be four. Furthermore, the cluster size has been found to be independent of the gray-particle multiplicity and hence the target mass. The cluster size has also been observed to be independent of the energy and identity of the impinging hadrons.

  16. D*-PRODUCTION and F2c for Q2 > 1 GEV2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrdieck, S.

    2002-10-01

    Results of the H1 experiment on the visible ep cross section for inclusive D*(2010) meson production in deep-inelastic scattering are presented in a kinematic range of 1 < Q2 < 100 GeV2 and 0.05 < y < 0.7 and in the visible region pt(D*) > 1.5 GeV and |η(D*)| < 1.5. The data is compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD calculations in the CCFM and NLO DGLAP scheme. The charm contribution to the proton structure function, F2c, is extracted by extrapolating the visible cross section to the full phase space.

  17. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  18. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B; Zhang, Y

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  19. Modifications of gallium phosphide single crystals using slow highly charged ions and swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Said, A. S.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Heller, R.; Akhmadaliev, Sh.; Schumann, E.; Sorokin, M.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-09-01

    GaP single crystals were irradiated with slow highly charged ions (HCI) using 114 keV 129Xe(33-40)+ and with various swift heavy ions (SHI) of 30 MeV I9+ and 374 MeV-2.2 GeV 197Au25+. The irradiated surfaces were investigated by scanning force microscopy (SFM). The irradiations with SHI lead to nanohillocks protruding from the GaP surfaces, whereas no changes of the surface topography were observed after the irradiation with HCI. This result indicates that a potential energy above 38.5 keV is required for surface nanostructuring of GaP. In addition, strong coloration of the GaP crystals was observed after irradiation with SHI. The effect was stronger for higher energies. This was confirmed by measuring an increased extinction coefficient in the visible light region.

  20. MEASUREMENT OF SINGLE TRANSVERSE-SPIN ASYMMETRY IN FORWARD PRODUCTION OF PHOTONS AND NEUTRONS IN PP COLLSION AT SQUARE ROOT = 200 GEV.

    SciTech Connect

    BAZILEVSKY,A.MAKDISI,Y.ET AL.

    2002-09-09

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was commissioned for polarized proton-proton collisions, at the center of mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the run in 2001-2002. The authors have measured the single transverse-spin asymmetry A{sub N} for production of photons, neutral pions, and neutrons at the very forward angle. The asymmetries for the photon and neutral pion sample were consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. In contrast, the neutron sample exhibited an unexpectedly large asymmetry. This large asymmetry will be used for the non-destructive polarimeter for polarized proton beams at the collision points in the RHIC interaction region.

  1. Charged Kaon interferometric probes of space-time evolution in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X H; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2009-10-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons are used to probe Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV and are compared to charged pion probes, which have a larger hadronic scattering cross section. Three-dimensional Gaussian source radii are extracted, along with a one-dimensional kaon emission source function. The centrality dependences of the three Gaussian radii are well described by a single linear function of N(part)1/3 with a zero intercept. Imaging analysis shows a deviation from a Gaussian tail at r greater than or approximately equal to 10 fm, although the bulk emission at lower radius is well described by a Gaussian. The presence of a non-Gaussian tail in the kaon source reaffirms that the particle emission region in a heavy-ion collision is extended, and that similar measurements with pions are not solely due to the decay of long-lived resonances. PMID:19905563

  2. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  3. Charged Kaon Interferometric Probes of Space-Time Evolution in Au+Au Collisions at sqrtSNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, S.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons are used to probe Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and are compared to charged pion probes, which have a larger hadronic scattering cross section. Three-dimensional Gaussian source radii are extracted, along with a one-dimensional kaon emission source function. The centrality dependences of the three Gaussian radii are well described by a single linear function of N{sub part}{sup 1/3} with a zero intercept. Imaging analysis shows a deviation from a Gaussian tail at r {approx}> 10 fm, although the bulk emission at lower radius is well described by a Gaussian. The presence of a non-Gaussian tail in the kaon source reaffirms that the particle emission region in a heavy-ion collision is extended, and that similar measurements with pions are not solely due to the decay of long-lived resonances.

  4. Centrality Dependence of {pi}0 and {eta} Production at Large Transverse Momentum in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV d + Au Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    The dependence of transverse momentum spectra of neutral pions and {eta} mesons with p{sub T}<16 GeV/c and p{sub T}<12 GeV/c, respectively, on the centrality of the collision has been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV. The measured yields are compared to those in p+p collisions at the same {radical}s{sub NN} scaled by the number of underlying nucleon-nucleon collisions in d+Au. At all centralities, the yield ratios show no suppression, in contrast to the strong suppression seen for central Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Only a weak pT and centrality dependence can be observed.

  5. J/{psi} Production vs Centrality, Transverse Momentum, and Rapidity in Au + Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-06-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)has measured J/{psi} production for rapidities -2.2GeV. The J/{psi} invariant yield and nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} as a function of centrality, transverse momentum, and rapidity are reported. A suppression of J/{psi} relative to binary collision scaling of proton-proton reaction yields is observed. Models which describe the lower energy J/{psi} data at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron invoking only J/psi destruction based on the local medium density predicta significantly larger suppression at RHIC and more suppression at midrapidity than at forward rapidity. Both trends are contradicted by our data.

  6. Charged Kaon interferometric probes of space-time evolution in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X H; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2009-10-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons are used to probe Au+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV and are compared to charged pion probes, which have a larger hadronic scattering cross section. Three-dimensional Gaussian source radii are extracted, along with a one-dimensional kaon emission source function. The centrality dependences of the three Gaussian radii are well described by a single linear function of N(part)1/3 with a zero intercept. Imaging analysis shows a deviation from a Gaussian tail at r greater than or approximately equal to 10 fm, although the bulk emission at lower radius is well described by a Gaussian. The presence of a non-Gaussian tail in the kaon source reaffirms that the particle emission region in a heavy-ion collision is extended, and that similar measurements with pions are not solely due to the decay of long-lived resonances.

  7. Measurement of single electrons and implications for charm production in Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-05-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of electrons from Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The spectra show an excess above the background from photon conversions and light hadron decays. The electron signal is consistent with that expected from semileptonic decays of charm. The yield of the electron signal dN(e)/dy for p(T) > 0.8 GeV/c is 0.025+/-0.004(stat)+/-0.010(syst) in central collisions, and the corresponding charm cross section is 380+/-60(stat)+/-200(syst) microb per binary nucleon-nucleon collision.

  8. Flow measurements via two-particle azimuthal correlations in Au + Au collisions at sqrt [s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-11-18

    Two-particle azimuthal correlation functions are presented for charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (sqrt [s(NN)]=130 GeV). The measurements permit determination of elliptic flow without event-by-event estimation of the reaction plane. The extracted elliptic flow values (v2) show significant sensitivity to both the collision centrality and the transverse momenta of emitted hadrons, suggesting rapid thermalization and relatively strong velocity fields. When scaled by the eccentricity of the collision zone epsilon, the scaled elliptic flow shows little or no dependence on centrality for charged hadrons with relatively low p(T). A breakdown of this epsilon scaling is observed for charged hadrons with pT >1.0 GeV/c.

  9. Nuclear Modification of ψ', χc, and J/ψ Production in d+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present results for three charmonia states (ψ', χc, and J/ψ) in d+Au collisions at |y|<0.35 and sNN=200GeV. We find that the modification of the ψ' yield relative to that of the J/ψ scales approximately with charged particle multiplicity at midrapidity across p+A, d+Au, and A+A results from the Super Proton Synchrotron and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In large-impact-parameter collisions we observe a similar suppression for the ψ' and J/ψ, while in small-impact-parameter collisions the more weakly bound ψ' is more strongly suppressed. Owing to the short time spent traversing the Au nucleus, the larger ψ' suppression in central events is not explained by an increase of the nuclear absorption owing to meson formation time effects.

  10. Azimuthal anisotropy of K(0)(S) and Lambda+Lambda production at midrapidity from Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-09-23

    We report STAR results on the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v(2) for strange particles K(0)(S), Lambda, and Lambda at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The value of v(2) as a function of transverse momentum, p(t), of the produced particle and collision centrality is presented for both particles up to p(t) approximately 3.0 GeV/c. A strong p(t) dependence in v(2) is observed up to 2.0 GeV/c. The v(2) measurement is compared with hydrodynamic model calculations. The physics implications of the p(t) integrated v(2) magnitude as a function of particle mass are also discussed. PMID:12225018

  11. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-pT nonphotonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-05-11

    The STAR collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) reports measurements of the inclusive yield of nonphotonic electrons, which arise dominantly from semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range of transverse momenta (1.2GeV. The nonphotonic electron yield exhibits an unexpectedly large suppression in central Au+Au collisions at high p(T), suggesting substantial heavy-quark energy loss at RHIC. The centrality and p(T) dependences of the suppression provide constraints on theoretical models of suppression. PMID:17677616

  12. Rho0 production and possible modification in Au+Au and p+p collisions at square root [sNN] = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-01

    We report results on rho(770)(0)-->pi(+)pi(-) production at midrapidity in p+p and peripheral Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. This is the first direct measurement of rho(770)(0)-->pi(+)pi(-) in heavy-ion collisions. The measured rho(0) peak in the invariant mass distribution is shifted by approximately 40 MeV/c(2) in minimum bias p+p interactions and approximately 70 MeV/c(2) in peripheral Au+Au collisions. The rho(0) mass shift is dependent on transverse momentum and multiplicity. The modification of the rho(0) meson mass, width, and shape due to phase space and dynamical effects are discussed. PMID:15089460

  13. Centrality dependence of high-p(T) hadron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-11-11

    Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons within 0.2GeV. Hadron yields are suppressed at high p(T) in central collisions relative to peripheral collisions and to a nucleon-nucleon reference scaled for collision geometry. Peripheral collisions are not suppressed relative to the nucleon-nucleon reference. The suppression varies continuously at intermediate centralities. The results indicate significant nuclear medium effects on high-p(T) hadron production in heavy-ion collisions at high energy. PMID:12443470

  14. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons in Au+Au collisions at square root of (S(NN)) = 62.4 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; de la Barca Sánchez, M Calderón; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fornazier, K S F; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovsky, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-08-01

    We present the first measurement of pseudorapidity distribution of photons in the region 2.3 < or = eta < or = 3.7 for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at square root of (S(NN)) = 62.4 GeV. We find that the photon yield scales with the number of participating nucleons at all collision centralities studied. The pseudorapidity distribution of photons, dominated by pi0 decays, has been compared to those of charged pions, photons, and inclusive charged particles from heavy-ion and nucleon-nucleon collisions at various energies. The photon production has been shown to be consistent with the energy and centrality independent limiting fragmentation scenario. PMID:16090941

  15. Self-Organizing GeV, Nanocoulomb, Collimated Proton Beam from Laser Foil Interaction at 7x10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. Q.; Wu, H. C.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Sheng, Z. M.; Chen, J. E.

    2009-09-25

    We report on a self-organizing, quasistable regime of laser proton acceleration, producing 1 GeV nanocoulomb proton bunches from laser foil interaction at an intensity of 7x10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}. The results are obtained from 2D particle-in-cell simulations, using a circular polarized laser pulse with Gaussian transverse profile, normally incident on a planar, 500 nm thick hydrogen foil. While foil plasma driven in the wings of the driving pulse is dispersed, a stable central clump with 1-2lambda diameter is forming on the axis. The stabilization is related to laser light having passed the transparent parts of the foil in the wing region and enfolding the central clump that is still opaque. Varying laser parameters, it is shown that the results are stable within certain margins and can be obtained both for protons and heavier ions such as He{sup 2+}.

  16. Particle production at very low transverse momenta in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Carroll, A.; Gushue, S.; Heintzelman, G.A.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L.P.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Pernegger, H.

    2004-11-01

    We present results on charged particle production at very low transverse momenta in the 15% most central Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV obtained with the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The invariant yields were measured at midrapidity in the transverse momentum ranges from 30 to 50 MeV/c for charged pions, 90 to 130 MeV/c for charged kaons and 140 to 210 MeV/c for protons and antiprotons. No significant enhancement in low transverse momentum particle production is observed as compared to extrapolations of identified particle spectra measured at an intermediate p{sub T} range. The spectra tend to flatten at low p{sub T}, consistent with the expectations of transverse expansion of the system.

  17. Cluster properties from two-particle angular correlations in p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 and 410 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Lozides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephens, G. S. F.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wyslouch, B.; Back, B. B.

    2007-05-15

    We present results on two-particle angular correlations in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 200 and 410 GeV. The PHOBOS experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has a uniquely large coverage for charged particles, giving the opportunity to explore the correlations at both short- and long-range scales. At both energies, a complex two-dimensional correlation structure in {delta}{eta} and {delta}{phi} is observed. In the context of an independent cluster model of short-range correlations, the cluster size and its decay width are extracted from the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function and compared with previous measurements in proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions, as well as PYTHIA and HIJING predictions.

  18. Event-by-Event Fluctuations of Azimuthal Particle Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.

    2010-04-09

    This Letter presents the first measurement of event-by-event fluctuations of the elliptic flow parameter v{sub 2} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV as a function of collision centrality. The relative nonstatistical fluctuations of the v{sub 2} parameter are found to be approximately 40%. The results, including contributions from event-by-event elliptic flow fluctuations and from azimuthal correlations that are unrelated to the reaction plane (nonflow correlations), establish an upper limit on the magnitude of underlying elliptic flow fluctuations. This limit is consistent with predictions based on spatial fluctuations of the participating nucleons in the initial nuclear overlap region. These results provide important constraints on models of the initial state and hydrodynamic evolution of relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  19. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  20. Extension of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes to 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.G.

    1988-08-01

    Version 2.1 of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes was modified to extend their ability to model interactions up to 100 GeV. Benchmarks against experimental results conducted at 10 and 15 GeV confirm the accuracy of the extended codes. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Bennett, Aaron; Troxel, Daylin; Blaser, Kelvin J.; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2010-03-01

    We report on the progress of an ion interferometer based on a laser-cooled ^87Sr^+ beam which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions. This device will be used to implement an extremely precise electromagnetic field sensor. Design considerations and instrumentation development will be discussed. Possible practical and fundamental applications, including deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law and the search for a possible photon rest mass, will be discussed.

  2. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  3. Heavy-ion irradiation of pyrochlore oxides: Comparison between low and high energy regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattonnay, G.; Moll, S.; Thomé, L.; Legros, C.; Herbst-Ghysel, M.; Garrido, F.; Costantini, J.-M.; Trautmann, C.

    2008-06-01

    Pyrochlore pellets with Gd2(Ti2-xZrx)O7 stoichiometry were irradiated with heavy ions at energies ranging from a few MeV to a few GeV in order to compare the effects of nuclear collisions and electronic excitations. The damage created by irradiation was characterized as a function of the ion fluence by X-ray diffraction. The structural modifications induced by irradiation were shown to depend on both the sample composition and the type of irradiation. At low energy (4 MeV Au ions), the susceptibility to radiation-induced amorphization exhibits a systematic decrease with increasing Zr content. At high energy (1.5 GeV Xe or 2.6 GeV U ions), similar structural changes are observed at much lower fluences. The lattice parameter increases for low energy irradiation, particularly in the case of amorphizable pyrochlores (Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2TiZrO7), whereas it decreases for high energy irradiation.

  4. Polarized 3He+2 ions in the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron to RHIC transfer line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; Méot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will allow the collisions of 20 GeV polarized electrons with 250 GeV polarized protons, or 100 GeV /n polarized 3He+2 ions, or other unpolarized ion species. The large value of the anomalous magnetic moment of the 3He nucleus GHe=(g -2 )/2 =-4.184 (where g is the g -factor of the 3He nuclear spin) combined with the peculiar layout of the transfer line which transports the beam bunches from the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) makes the transfer and injection of polarized 3He ions from AGS to RHIC (AtR) a special case as we explain in the paper. Specifically in this paper we calculate the stable spin direction of a polarized 3He beam at the exit of the AtR line which is also the injection point of RHIC, and we discuss a simple modifications of the AtR beam-transfer-line, to perfectly match the stable spin direction of the injected polarized 3He beam to that of the circulating beam, at the injection point of RHIC.

  5. Projects of Nuclotron modernization and Nuclotron-based ion collider facility (NICA) at JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednicky, R.

    2008-09-01

    One of the basic facilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna is the 6 A GeV Nuclotron, which has replaced the old weak focusing 10-GeV proton accelerator Synchrophasotron. The first relativistic nuclear beams with the energy of 4.2 A GeV were obtained at the Synchrophasotron in 1971. Since that time, relativistic nuclear physics has been one of the main directions of the JINR research program. In the coming years, the new JINR flagship program assumes the experimental study of hot and dense strongly interacting QCD matter at the new JINR facility. This goal is proposed to be reached by (i) development of the existing Nuclotron accelerator facility as a basis for generation of intense beams over atomic mass range from protons to uranium and light polarized ions, (ii) design and construction of the Nuclotron-based heavy Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) with the maximum nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass collision energy of √ s NN = 9 GeV and averaged luminosity 1027 cm-2 s-1, and (iii) design and construction of the Multipurpose Particle Detector (MPD) at intersecting beams. Realization of the project will lead to unique conditions for research activity of the world community. The NICA energy region is of major interest because the highest nuclear (baryonic) density under laboratory conditions can be reached there. Generation of intense polarized light nuclear beams aimed at investigation of polarization phenomena at the Nuclotron is foreseen.

  6. Saturation of azimuthal anisotropy in Au + Au collisions at (square root)s(NN) = 62-200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; d'Enterria, D; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Garpman, S; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Hur, H M; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kawagishi, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kinnison, W W; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nilsson, P; Norman, B; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Skutnik, S; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vertesi, R; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudkte, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    New measurements are presented for charged hadron azimuthal correlations at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at (square root)s(NN) = 62.4 and 200 GeV. They are compared to earlier measurements obtained at (square root)s(NN) = 130 GeV and in Pb + Pb collisions at (square root)s(NN) = 17.2 GeV. Sizeable anisotropies are observed with centrality and transverse momentum (pT) dependence characteristic of elliptic flow (upsilon2). For a broad range of centralities, the observed magnitudes and trends of the differential anisotropy, upsilon2(pT), change very little over the collision energy range (square root)s(NN) = 62-200 GeV, indicating saturation of the excitation function for upsilon2 at these energies. Such a saturation may be indicative of the dominance of a very soft equation of state for (square root)s(NN) approximately 60-200 GeV.

  7. GeV Blazar flares several parsecs from the central engine. Who pays the seed photon bill?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiding, Peter; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    In Blazars, multi-wavelength observations suggest that some GeV flares take place at the location of the mm VLBI core, several pc from the black hole. This location for the GeV emission requires a yet un-identified source of seed photons to be Inverse Compton scattered to GeV energies. Our model for these flares involves a fast spine and slow sheath configuration for the relativistic jet, where the mildly beamed sheath emission will illuminate with a large opening angle the outer regions of the Molecular Torus. The heated clouds will then radiate and their emission will be relativistically boosted in the spine frame where it can they be up-scattered to GeV energies. We argue, through analytical work and simulations, that this can be the seed photon source that produces the GeV flares.

  8. Highly charged ion secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnes, Alan V.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-01-01

    A secondary ion mass spectrometer using slow, highly charged ions produced in an electron beam ion trap permits ultra-sensitive surface analysis and high spatial resolution simultaneously. The spectrometer comprises an ion source producing a primary ion beam of highly charged ions that are directed at a target surface, a mass analyzer, and a microchannel plate detector of secondary ions that are sputtered from the target surface after interaction with the primary beam. The unusually high secondary ion yield permits the use of coincidence counting, in which the secondary ion stops are detected in coincidence with a particular secondary ion. The association of specific molecular species can be correlated. The unique multiple secondary nature of the highly charged ion interaction enables this new analytical technique.

  9. LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION BEYOND 1 GeV USING IONIZATION INDUCED INJECTION*

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, K A; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Mori, W B; Pak, A; silva, L O; Lemos, N; Fonseca, R A; de Freitas, S; Albert, F; Doeppner, T; Filip, C; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Price, D; Ralph, J; Pollock, B B

    2011-03-22

    A series of laser wake field accelerator experiments leading to electron energy exceeding 1 GeV are described. Theoretical concepts and experimental methods developed while conducting experiments using the 10 TW Ti:Sapphire laser at UCLA were implemented and transferred successfully to the 100 TW Callisto Laser System at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. To reach electron energies greater than 1 GeV with current laser systems, it is necessary to inject and trap electrons into the wake and to guide the laser for more than 1 cm of plasma. Using the 10 TW laser, the physics of self-guiding and the limitations in regards to pump depletion over cm-scale plasmas were demonstrated. Furthermore, a novel injection mechanism was explored which allows injection by ionization at conditions necessary for generating electron energies greater than a GeV. The 10 TW results were followed by self-guiding at the 100 TW scale over cm plasma lengths. The energy of the self-injected electrons, at 3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} plasma density, was limited by dephasing to 720 MeV. Implementation of ionization injection allowed extending the acceleration well beyond a centimeter and 1.4 GeV electrons were measured.

  10. Performance of First C100 Cryomodules for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, Michael A.; Burrill, Andrew B.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2012-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the project is a doubling of the available beam energy of CEBAF from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due primarily to the construction and installation of ten "C100" cryomodules in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver an average 108 MV each from a string of eight seven-cell, electropolished superconducting RF cavities operating at an average accelerating gradient of 19.2 MV/m. The new cryomodules fit in the same available linac space as the original CEBAF 20 MV cryomodules. Cryomodule production started in September 2010. Initial acceptance testing started in June 2011. The first two C100 cryomodules were installed and tested from August 2011 through October 2011, and successfully operated during the last period of the CEBAF 6 GeV era, which ended in May 2012. This paper will present the results of acceptance testing and commissioning of the C100 style cryomodules to date.

  11. Measurement of the nuclear electromagnetic cascade development in glass at energies above 200 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.; Humphreys, D. R.; Jones, W. V.; Levit, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    The longitudinal development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades with energies greater than 200 GeV was measured in a low-Z (glass) absorber. This was done in the course of operating an ionization spectrometer at mountain altitude in an experiment to study the properties of gamma rays emitted from individual interactions at energies around 10,000 GeV. The ionization produced by a cascade is sampled by 20 sheets of plastic scintillator spaced uniformly in depth every 2.2 radiation lengths. Adjacent pairs of scintillators are viewed by photomultipliers which measure the mean ionization produced by an individual cascade in 10 layers each 1.1 interaction length (4.4 radiation lengths) thick. The longitudinal development of the cascades was measured for about 250 cascades having energies ranging from 200 GeV to 2500 GeV. The observations are compared with the predictions of calculations made for this specific spectrometer using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade.

  12. HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

  13. Recent developments in neutrino-nucleus interactions in 1 GeV energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino interactions in 1 GeV energy region are discussed. A role of nucleon-nucleon correlations in understanding recent quasi-elastic cross section measurements on nuclear target is explained. An importance of a correct treatment of two-body current contribution to the neutrino inclusive cross section is addressed.

  14. Pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2009-04-01

    The amplitudes for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and the George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses are compared with those of a Regge-cut model with the aim to explore the possibility to provide high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2GeV.

  15. Fabrication and Testing Status of CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, F; Davis, G K; Forehand, D; Grenoble, C; Hogan, J; Overton, R B; Reilly, A V; Rimmer, R A; Stirbet, M

    2011-09-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is under way. All cavities have been built by industry and are presently undergoing post-processing and final low and high power qualification before cryomodule assembly. The status is reported including fabrication-related experiences, observations and issues throughout production, post-processing and qualification.

  16. Pulsars above 10 GeV: Fermi LAT Observations and Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The success of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in studying gamma-ray pulsars offers hints about future work above 10 GeV. The infrastructure for discovering pulsars will be similar between LAT and any future telescope. Some of the Fermi LAT results suggest intriguing questions about the future of high-energy pulsar studies.

  17. GeV electron beams from a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Hooker, S.M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-10-01

    High-quality electron beams with up to 1 GeV energy havebeen generated by a laser-driven plasma-based accelerator by guiding a 40TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary dischargewaveguide.

  18. The NMSSM lives: with the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Florian; Heinemeyer, Sven; Kim, Jong Soo; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof

    2016-05-01

    We propose an NMSSM scenario that can explain the excess in the diphoton spectrum at 750 GeV recently observed by ATLAS and CMS. We show that in a certain limit with a very light pseudoscalar one can reproduce the experimental results without invoking exotic matter. The 750 GeV excess is produced by two resonant heavy Higgs bosons with masses {˜ }750 GeV, which subsequently decay to two light pseudoscalars. Each of these decays to collimated photon pairs that appear as a single photon in the electromagnetic calorimeter. A mass gap between heavy Higgses mimics a large width of the 750 GeV peak. The production mechanism, containing a strong component via initial b quarks, ameliorates a possible tension with 8 TeV data compared to other production modes. We also discuss other constraints, in particular from low-energy experiments. Finally, we discuss possible methods that could distinguish our proposal from other physics models describing the diphoton excess in the Run-II of the LHC.

  19. Two-Body Photodisintegration of the Deuteron up to 2. 8 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.E.; Potterveld, D.H.; Anthony, P.; Arnold, R.G.; Arrington, J.; Beck, D.; Beise, E.J.; Bosted, P.E.; Bulten, H.; Chapman, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Dietrich, F.; Ent, R.; Epstein, M.; Filippone, B.W.; Gao, H.; Gearhart, R.A.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.; Keppel, C.E.; Kinney, E.R.; Kuhn, S.; Lee, K.; Lorenzon, W.; Lung, A.; Makins, N.C.R.; Margaziotis, D.J.; McKeown, R.D.; Meziani, Z.E.; Milner, R.G.; Mueller, B.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, J.; O'Neill, T.G.; Papavassiliou, V.; Petratos, G.G.; Rock, S.E.; Segel, R.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.M.; Tao, L.H.; van Bibber, K.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; White, J.L.; Zeidman, B. Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 Department of Physics, The American University, Washington, D.C. 20016 Depa

    1995-01-30

    Measurements were performed for the photodisintegration cross section of the deuteron for photon energies from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV and center-of-mass angles from 37[degree] to 90[degree]. The measured energy dependence of the cross section at [theta][sub c.m.]=90[degree] is in agreement with the constituent counting rules.

  20. Details and justifications for the MAP concept specification for acceleration above 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2014-02-28

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) requires a concept specification for each of the accelerator systems. The Muon accelerators will bring the beam energy from a total energy of 63 GeV to the maximum energy that will fit on the Fermilab site. Justifications and supporting references are included, providing more detail than will appear in the concept specification itself.

  1. Vector leptoquarks and the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Christopher W.

    2016-06-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations recently presented evidence of a resonance decaying to pairs of photons around 750 GeV. In addition, the BaBar, Belle, and LHCb Collaborations have evidence of lepton non-universality in the semileptonic decays of B mesons. In this work, we make a first step towards a unified explanation of these anomalies. Specifically, we extend the Standard Model by including vector leptoquarks and a scalar singlet that couples linearly to pairs of the leptoquarks. We find there is parameter space that gives the correct cross section for a putative 750 GeV resonance decaying to photons that is consistent with unitarity, measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, and direct searches for resonances in other channels. In addition, we also show that constraints can be derived on any Beyond the Standard Model explanation of the 750 GeV resonance where the only new particles are scalars, which are strong enough to rule out certain types of models entirely.

  2. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction.

    PubMed

    Hárs, György; Dobos, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 micros. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10(-4) part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 10(10) V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of the

  3. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hars, Gyoergy; Dobos, Gabor

    2010-03-15

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 {mu}s. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10{sup -4} part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 10{sup 10} V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of

  4. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hárs, György; Dobos, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 μs. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10-4 part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 1010 V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of the mathematical

  5. Instrumentation: Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of ion chromatography in separating and measuring anions. The principles of ion exchange are presented, along with some applications of ion chromatography in industry. Ion chromatography systems are described, as well as ion pair and ion exclusion chromatography, column packings, detectors, and programming. (TW)

  6. Neutron yields for reactions induced by 120 GeV protons on thick copper target

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sanami, Toshiya; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Saitoh, Kiwamu; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Kenji; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ramberg, Eric; Coleman, Richard; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    We developed an experimental method to measure neutron energy spectrum for 120-GeV protons on a thick copper target at Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF). The spectrum in the energy range from 16 to 1600 MeV was obtained for 60-cm long copper target by time-of-flight technique with an NE213 scintillator and 5.5-m flight path. Energy spectra of neutrons generated from an interaction with beam and materials are important to design shielding structure of high energy accelerators. Until now, the energy spectra for the incident energy up to 3 GeV have been measured by several groups, Ishibashi et al., Amian et al., and Leray et al. In the energy region above 3 GeV, few experimental data are available because of small number of facilities for neutron experiment. On the other hand, concerning simulation codes, theoretical models for particle generation and transportation are switched from intermediate to high energy one around this energy. The spectra calculated by the codes have not been examined using experimental data. In shielding experiments using 120 GeV hadron beam, experimental data shows systematic differences from calculations. Hagiwara et al. have measured leakage neutron spectra behind iron and concrete shield from 120 GeV proton on target at anti-proton target station in Fermilab by using Bonner Spheres with unfolding technique. In CERN, Nakao et al reported experimental results of neutron spectra behind iron and concrete wall from 120 GeV/c proton and pion mixed beam on copper by using NE213 liquid scintillators with unfolding technique. Both of the results reported systematic discrepancies between experimental and calculation results. Therefore, experimental data are highly required to verify neutron production part of calculations. In this study, we developed an experimental method to measure neutron energy spectrum for 120 GeV proton on target. The neutron energy was determined using time-of-flight technique. We used the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF

  7. Ion-induced gammas for photofission interrogation of HEU.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-03-01

    High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded special nuclear material (SNM), such as HEU (highly enriched uranium), by detecting prompt and/or delayed induced fission signatures. In this work, we explore the underlying physics for a new type of photon source that generates high fluxes of mono-energetic gamma-rays from low-energy (<500 keV) proton-induced nuclear reactions. The characteristic energies (4- to 18-MeV) of the gamma-rays coincide with the peak of the photonuclear cross section. The source could be designed to produce gamma-rays of certain selected energies, thereby improving the probability of detecting shielded HEU or providing a capability to determine enrichment inside sealed containers. The fundamental physics of such an interrogation source were studied in this LDRD through scaled ion accelerator experiments and radiation transport modeling. The data were used to assess gamma and neutron yields, background, and photofission-induced signal levels from several (p,{gamma}) target materials under consideration.

  8. Hydrated Ions: From Individual Ions to Ion Pairs to Ion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-10-01

    The structure of hydrated ions plays a central role in chemical and biological sciences. In the present paper, five ions, namely, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-), are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to hydrated individual ions and ion pairs identified previously, hydrated ion clusters containing 3, 4, 5, or more ions are identified in the present paper. The dependence of hydration numbers and mole fractions of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters on the electrolyte concentration is determined. As the electrolyte concentration increases, the mole fraction of hydrated individual ions decreases, and the mole fraction of hydrated larger ion clusters increases. The results also reveal that the hydrogen bonding numbers of the H2O molecules of the first hydration shells of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters are insensitive to the electrolyte concentration, but sensitive to the nature and conformation of ions. PMID:26358093

  9. Hydrated Ions: From Individual Ions to Ion Pairs to Ion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-10-01

    The structure of hydrated ions plays a central role in chemical and biological sciences. In the present paper, five ions, namely, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-), are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to hydrated individual ions and ion pairs identified previously, hydrated ion clusters containing 3, 4, 5, or more ions are identified in the present paper. The dependence of hydration numbers and mole fractions of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters on the electrolyte concentration is determined. As the electrolyte concentration increases, the mole fraction of hydrated individual ions decreases, and the mole fraction of hydrated larger ion clusters increases. The results also reveal that the hydrogen bonding numbers of the H2O molecules of the first hydration shells of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters are insensitive to the electrolyte concentration, but sensitive to the nature and conformation of ions.

  10. Diphoton excess at 750 GeV and LHC constraints in models with vectorlike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Junichiro; Omura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations report excesses around 750 GeV in the diphoton channels. This might be the evidence which reveals new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper, we consider models with a 750 GeV scalar and vectorlike particles, which couple each other through Yukawa couplings. The decay of the scalar to diphoton is given by the loop diagrams involving the extra colored particles. We investigate not only the setup required by the excesses, but also the LHC constraints, especially concerned with the vectorlike particles. In our scenario, the extra colored particles decay to quarks and a dark matter (DM) via Yukawa couplings. Then, the signals from the vectorlike particles are dijet, b b ¯ and/or t t ¯ with large missing energy. We discuss two possibilities for the setups: One is a model with vectorlike fermions and a scalar DM, and the other is a model with vectorlike scalars and a fermionic DM. We suggest the parameter region favored by the excess in each case, and study the constraints based on the latest LHC results at √{s }=8 TeV and 13 TeV. We conclude that the favored region is almost excluded by the LHC bounds, especially when the 750 GeV scalar dominantly decays to DMs. The mass differences between the vectorlike particles and the DM should be less than O (100 ) GeV [O (10 ) GeV ] to realize the large diphoton signal and the large decay width, if the extra colored particle only decays to a top (bottom) quark and a dark matter. Otherwise, these scenarios are already excluded by the latest LHC results.

  11. Spectra and solar energetic protons over 20 GeV in Bastille Day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Jinxiu

    2006-02-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) from large solar flares give important information about the physical process in the solar corona and the heliosphere. Several observations have indicated that solar protons could sometimes be accelerated to at least tens of GeV, even hundreds of GeV, in intense solar energetic process. We studied the solar proton differential energy spectra with energy range of 1 500 MeV at several time intervals during Bastille Day event. It was shown that the spectra could be fitted by a power law function before flare and after flare the power law spectra still existed above 30 MeV although spectra became softer with time. There was a spectral “knee” occurring at ˜30 MeV. We constructed a solar proton differential spectrum from 30 MeV to 3 GeV at peak flux time 10:30 UT and fitted it in the same manner. On the basis of a supposition of having the same power law spectrum in higher energy, we calculated the solar proton integrated fluxes in energy range of from 500 MeV to 20 GeV and compared them with other results obtained from experimental, modelling and theoretical calculations in other big historic SEP events. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out for a primary proton beam at the top of the atmosphere producing secondary muons on the ground. Based on the simulation, possibility of registering the solar energetic proton beams with energies over 20 GeV was discussed.

  12. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  13. Improved ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-05-04

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

  14. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, T. R.

    2015-05-14

    We have examined microstructural evolution in irradiated ceria (CeO2) using swift heavy ion irradiation, electron microscopy, and atomistic simulation. CeO2, a UO2 fuel surrogate, was irradiated with gold ions at an energy of 1 GeV to fluences up to 1x1014 ions/cm2. Transmission electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that the ion tracks were of similar size at all fluences, and that there was no chemical change in the ion track core. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at the lower energy and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  15. Neutron induced light-ion production from Iron and Bismuth at 175 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, R.; Pomp, S.; Simutkin, V.; Tippawan, U.; Andersson, P.; Blomgren, J.; Österlund, M.; Hayashi, M.; Hirayama, S.; Naito, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Tesinsky, M.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Marie, N.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Prokofiev, A.; Kolozhvari, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured light-ion (p, d, t, 3He and α) production in the interaction of 175 MeV neutrons with iron and bismuth, using the MEDLEY setup. A large set of measurements at 96 MeV has been recently completed and published, and now higher energy region is under investigation. MEDLEY is a conventional spectrometer system that allows low-energy thresholds and offers measurements over a wide angular range. The system consists of eight telescopes, each of them composed of two silicon surface barrier detectors, to perform particle identification, and a CsI(Tl) scintillator to fully measure the kinetic energy of the produced light-ions. The telescopes are placed at angles from 20° to 160°, in steps of 20°. Measurements have been performed at The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden), where a quasi mono-energetic neutron beam is available and well characterized. Time of flight techniques are used to select light-ion events induced by neutrons in the main peak of the source neutron spectrum. We report preliminary double differential cross sections for production of protons, deuterons and tritons in comparison with model calculations using TALYS-1.0 code.

  16. Ion parking during ion/ion reactions in electrodynamic ion traps.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, Scott A; Reid, Gavin E; Wells, J Mitchell

    2002-01-15

    Under appropriate ion density conditions, it is possible to selectively inhibit rates of ion/ion reactions in a quadrupole ion trap via the application of oscillatory voltages to one or more electrodes of the ion trap. The phenomenon is demonstrated using dipolar resonance excitation applied to the end-cap electrodes of a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap. The application of a resonance excitation voltage tuned to inhibit the ion/ion reaction rate of a specific range of ion mass-to-charge ratios is referred to as "ion parking". The bases for rate inhibition are (i) an increase in the relative velocity of the ion/ion reaction pair, which reduces the cross section for ion/ion capture and, at least in some cases, (ii) reduction in the time of physical overlap of positively charged and negatively charged ion clouds. The efficiency and specificity of the ion parking experiment is highly dependent upon ion densities, trapping conditions, ion charge states, and resonance excitation conditions. The ion parking experiment is illustrated herein along with applications to the concentration of ions originally present over a range of charge states into a selected charge state and in the selection of a particular ion from a set of ions derived from a simple protein mixture.

  17. ION GUN

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  18. Luminosity limitations for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev

    2000-09-01

    The major limitations on reaching the maximum luminosity for an electron ion collider are discussed in application to the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders. It is shown that with intensive electron cooling the luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is feasible for both schemes for the center-of-mass collider energy above approximately 15 GeV. Each scheme has its own pros and cons. The ring-ring collider is better supported by the current accelerator technology while the linac-ring collider suggests unique features for spin manipulations of the electron beam. The article addresses a general approach to a choice of collider scheme and parameters leaving details for other conference publications dedicated to particular aspects of the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders.

  19. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  20. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  1. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection Between GeV Flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E. A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  2. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection between GeV flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kust Harding, Alice; Hays, Elizabeth A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Peter; Zhang, Xiao-Ling

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  3. 130 GeV fingerprint of right-handed neutrino dark matter

    N