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  1. Nanomaterial Solutions for the Protection of Insulin Producing Beta Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, Nicole Ann

    Islet transplantation is a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, even with the many successes, islet transplantation has yet to reach its full potential. Limited islet sources, loss of cell viability during isolation and culture, and post-transplant graft loss are a few of the issues preventing extensive use of islet transplantation. The application of biomaterial systems to alleviate some of the stresses affecting islet viability has led to improvements in isolation and transplantation outcomes, but problems persist. In this work we approach two distinct issues affecting islet viability; ischemic conditions and immunological attack post-transplant. Ischemic conditions have been linked to a loss of islet graft function and occur during organ preservation, islet isolation and culture, and after islets are transplanted. We show that liposomal delivery of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to beta cells can limit cell death and loss of function in ischemic conditions. We demonstrate that by functionalizing liposomes with the fibronectin-mimetic peptide PR_b, delivery of liposomes to porcine islets and rat beta cells is increased compared to nontargeted controls. Additionally, liposomes are shown to protect by providing both ATP and lipids to the ischemic cells. The delivery of ATP was investigated here but application of PR_b functionalized liposomes could be extended to other interesting cargos as well. The second area of investigation involves encapsulation of islets with silica nanoparticles to create a permselective barrier. Silica nanoparticles are an interesting material for encapsulation given their ability to be fine-tuned and further functionalized. We demonstrate that size-tunable, fluorescent silica nanoparticles can be assembled layer-by-layer on the surface of cells and that silica nanoparticle encapsulated islets are able to secrete insulin in response to a glucose challenge.

  2. Improved antioxidative defence protects insulin-producing cells against homocysteine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Siobhan M; Hahn, Claudine; Tyka, Karolina; Flatt, Peter R; McClenaghan, Neville H; Lenzen, Sigurd; Gurgul-Convey, Ewa

    2016-08-25

    Homocysteine (HC) is considered to play an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome complications. Insulin-producing cells are prone to HC toxicity and this has been linked to oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore it was the aim of this study to determine the nature of reactive oxygen species responsible for HC toxicity. Chronic exposure of RINm5F and INS1E insulin-producing cells to HC decreased cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner and led to a significant induction of hydrogen peroxide generation in the cytosolic, but not the mitochondrial compartment of the cell. Cytosolic overexpression of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide detoxifying enzyme, provided a significant protection against viability loss and hydrogen peroxide generation, while mitochondrial overexpression of catalase did not protect against HC toxicity. Overexpression of CuZnSOD, a cytosolic superoxide dismutating enzyme, also protected against HC toxicity. However, the best protection was achieved in the case of a combined overexpression of CuZnSOD and catalase. Incubation of cells in combination with alloxan resulted in a significant increase of HC toxicity and an increase of hydrogen peroxide generation. Overexpression of CuZnSOD or catalase protected against the toxicity of HC plus alloxan, with a superior protection achieved again by combined overexpression. The results indicate that HC induces oxidative stress in insulin-producing cells by stimulation of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation in the cytoplasm. The low antioxidative defence status makes the insulin-producing cells very vulnerable to HC toxicity.

  3. JNK1 Deficient Insulin-Producing Cells Are Protected against Interleukin-1β-Induced Apoptosis Associated with Abrogated Myc Expression.

    PubMed

    Prause, Michala; Mayer, Christopher Michael; Brorsson, Caroline; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard; Billestrup, Nils; Størling, Joachim; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The relative contributions of the JNK subtypes in inflammatory β-cell failure and apoptosis are unclear. The JNK protein family consists of JNK1, JNK2, and JNK3 subtypes, encompassing many different isoforms. INS-1 cells express JNK1α1, JNK1α2, JNK1β1, JNK1β2, JNK2α1, JNK2α2, JNK3α1, and JNK3α2 mRNA isoform transcripts translating into 46 and 54 kDa isoform JNK proteins. Utilizing Lentiviral mediated expression of shRNAs against JNK1, JNK2, or JNK3 in insulin-producing INS-1 cells, we investigated the role of individual JNK subtypes in IL-1β-induced β-cell apoptosis. JNK1 knockdown prevented IL-1β-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis associated with decreased 46 kDa isoform JNK protein phosphorylation and attenuated Myc expression. Transient knockdown of Myc also prevented IL-1β-induced apoptosis as well as caspase 3 cleavage. JNK2 shRNA potentiated IL-1β-induced apoptosis and caspase 3 cleavage, whereas JNK3 shRNA did not affect IL-1β-induced β-cell death compared to nonsense shRNA expressing INS-1 cells. In conclusion, JNK1 mediates INS-1 cell death associated with increased Myc expression. These findings underline the importance of differentiated targeting of JNK subtypes in the development of inflammatory β-cell failure and destruction.

  4. Transduction of PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 into insulin-producing INS-1 cells protects them against cytokine-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Hyung Kyung; Song, Dong Keun; Eum, Won Sik; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Hyeok Yil

    2015-06-05

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, thereby triggering the development of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. We recently developed a cell-permeable fusion protein, PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 (PEP-1-HO-1) and investigated the anti-inflammatory effects in macrophage cells. In this study, we transduced PEP-1-HO-1 into INS-1 insulinoma cells and examined its protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. PEP-1-HO-1 was successfully delivered into INS-1 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner and was maintained within the cells for at least 48 h. Pre-treatment with PEP-1-HO-1 increased the survival of INS-1 cells exposed to cytokine mixture (IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. PEP-1-HO-1 markedly decreased cytokine-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA). These protective effects of PEP-1-HO-1 against cytokines were correlated with the changes in the levels of signaling mediators of inflammation (iNOS and COX-2) and cell apoptosis/survival (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, PARP, JNK, and Akt). These results showed that the transduced PEP-1-HO-1 efficiently prevented cytokine-induced cell death of INS-1 cells by alleviating oxidative/nitrosative stresses and inflammation. Further, these results suggested that PEP-1-mediated HO-1 transduction may be a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent β-cell destruction in patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • We showed that PEP-1-HO-1 was efficiently delivered into INS-1 cells. • Transduced PEP-1-HO-1 exerted a protective effect against cytokine-induced cell death. • Transduced PEP-1-HO-1 inhibited cytokine-induced ROS and NO accumulation. • PEP-1-HO-1 suppressed cytokine-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, and Bax. • PEP-1-HO-1 transduction may be an efficient tool to prevent β-cell destruction.

  5. Neuro-protective effects of growth hormone (GH) after hypoxia-ischemia injury in embryonic chicken cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Alba-Betancourt, Clara; Luna-Acosta, José Luis; Ramírez-Martínez, Candy Elizabeth; Avila-González, Daniela; Granados-Ávalos, Estefany; Carranza, Martha; Martínez-Coria, Hilda; Arámburo, Carlos; Luna, Maricela

    2013-03-01

    Neuroprotection is a mechanism within the central nervous system (CNS) that protects neurons from damage as a result of a severe insult. It is known that growth hormone (GH) is involved in cell survival and may inhibit apoptosis in several cell types, including those of the CNS. Both GH and GH-receptor (GHR) genes are expressed in the cerebellum. Thus, we investigated the possible neuroprotective role of GH in this organ, which is very sensitive to hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Endogenous GH levels increased in the brain and cerebellum (30% and 74%, respectively) of 15-day-old chicken embryos exposed to hypoxia during 24h compared to normoxia. In primary embryonic cerebellar neuron cultures treated under hypoxia (0.5% O(2)) and low glucose (1g/L) conditions (HLG) for 1h, GH levels increased 1.16-fold compared to the control. The addition of 1nM recombinant chicken GH (rcGH) to cultures during HLG increased cell viability (1.7-fold) and the expression of Bcl-2 (1.67-fold); in contrast the caspase-3 activity and the proportion of apoptotic cells decreased (37% and 54.2%, respectively) compared to HLG. rcGH activated the PI3K/Akt pathway both under normoxic and HLG conditions, increasing the proportion of phosphorylated Akt (1.7- and 1.4-fold, respectively). These effects were abolished by wortmannin and by immunoneutralization, indicating that GH acts through this signaling pathway. Furthermore, the 15-kDa GH variant (10nM) significantly increased cell viability and decreased caspase-3 activity during HLG condition. Thus GH may act as a paracrine/autocrine neuroprotective factor that preserves cellular viability and inhibits apoptotic cell death.

  6. Reprogramming of liver cells into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Meivar-Levy, Irit; Ferber, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Tissue replacement is a promising direction for the treatment of diabetes, which will become widely available only when islets or insulin-producing cells that will not be rejected by the diabetic recipients are available in unlimited amounts. The present review addresses the research in the field of generating functional insulin-producing cells by transdifferentiation of adult liver cells both in vitro and in vivo. It presents recent knowledge of the mechanisms which underlie the process and assesses the challenges which should be addressed for its efficient implementation as a cell based replacement therapy for diabetics.

  7. [Insulin producing cells as therapy in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Schnedl, W J; Hohmeier, H E; Newgard, C B

    1996-01-01

    Even with intensive insulin therapy it is impossible to reach physiological blood glucose levels in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Because of the high costs and technical problems involved in islet cell transplantation broad applicability of this therapy seems uncertain. An alternative approach is the development of molecular-engineered insulin-producing clonal cell lines. The main interest is in rodent insulinoma cell lines and neuroendocrine AtT-20ins cells. This paper reviews the current knowledge about glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and the problems that have to be solved before these cells can be used for therapy in diabetes mellitus.

  8. Foot-and-mouth disease marker vaccine: cattle protection with a partial VP1 G-H loop deleted virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V L; Bashiruddin, J B; Maree, F F; Mutowembwa, P; Bankowski, B; Gibson, D; Cox, S; Knowles, N; Barnett, P V

    2011-10-26

    Contrary to the dogma that the VP1 G-H loop is essential for FMD vaccine efficacy, it has been previously shown that foot-and-mouth disease 146s antigen containing heterologous VP1 G-H loops confers complete protection in pigs and cattle. Moreover, serological evaluation of cattle vaccinated with an antigen lacking a large proportion of the VP1 G-H loop indicated that these animals should be protected against infection with FMD. Absence of this loop provides opportunity for the development of an FMD negative marker vaccine, allowing infection to be detected by antibodies against this missing region. Cattle vaccinated with this negative marker vaccine were fully protected following virus challenge 28 days post vaccination as determined by the absence of generalised lesions on their feet. Furthermore, use of our improved differentiation ELISA identified animals exposed to infection as early as 7 days post-challenge. We thus demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of this FMD negative marker vaccine to fully protect cattle from experimental challenge and rapidly distinguish animals that are subsequently exposed to infection.

  9. Differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells under the influence of nanostructural polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Bâlici, Ştefana; Şuşman, Sergiu; Rusu, Dan; Nicula, Gheorghe Zsolt; Soriţău, Olga; Rusu, Mariana; Biris, Alexandru S; Matei, Horea

    2016-03-01

    Two polyoxometalates (POMs) with W were synthesized by a two-step, self-assembling method. They were used for stimulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into insulin-producing cells. The nanocompounds (tris(vanadyl)-substituted tungsto-antimonate(III) anions [POM1] and tris-butyltin-21-tungsto-9-antimonate(III) anions [POM2]) were characterized by analytical techniques, including ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. We found that these polyoxotungstates, with 2-4 nm diameters, did not present toxic effects at the tested concentrations. In vitro, POM1 stimulated differentiation of a greater number of dithizone-positive cells (also organized in clusters) than the second nanocompound (POM2). Based on our in vitro studies, we have concluded that both the POMs tested had significant biological activity acting as active stimuli for differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells.

  10. Superficial necrolytic dermatitis in a dog with an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isidoro-Ayza, M; Lloret, A; Bardagí, M; Ferrer, L; Martínez, J

    2014-07-01

    A 10-year-old dog presented with convulsive crisis and symmetrical hyperkeratotic cutaneous lesions affecting the abdomen, inguinal area, eyelids, muzzles, both pinnae, and all the paw pads. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were the main biochemical findings. A mass 2 cm in diameter was detected within the left pancreatic lobe by ultrasonography. It was surgically removed and histologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as an insulin-producing pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. The animal was eventually euthanized due to lack of clinical improvement. At necropsy, metastatic nodules were observed in the pancreatic lymph nodes and liver. Histopathological findings of cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of superficial necrolytic dermatitis and were interpreted as a paraneoplastic syndrome derived from the islet cell carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of superficial necrolytic dermatitis associated with an insulin-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma in dogs.

  11. Hox6 genes modulate in vitro differentiation of mESCs to insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian M; Marty-Santos, Leilani; Newman, Micaleah; Lukacs, Derek T; Spence, Jason R; Wellik, Deneen M

    2016-10-01

    The differentiation of glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells from ESCs in vitro is promising as a cellular therapy for the treatment of diabetes, a devastating and common disease. Pancreatic β-cells are derived from the endoderm in vivo and therefore most current protocols attempt to generate a pure population of first endoderm, then pancreas epithelium, and finally insulin-producing cells. Despite this, differentiation protocols result in mixed populations of cells that are often poorly defined, but also contain mesoderm. Using an in vitro mESC-to-β cell differentiation protocol, we show that expression of region-specific Hox genes is induced. We also show that the loss of function of the Hox6 paralogous group, genes expressed only in the mesenchyme of the pancreas (not epithelium), affect the differentiation of insulin-producing cells in vitro. This work is consistent with the important role for these mesoderm-specific factors in vivo and highlights contribution of supporting mesenchymal cells in in vitro differentiation.

  12. Cellular therapies based on stem cells and their insulin-producing surrogates: a 2015 reality check.

    PubMed

    Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell technology has recently gained a substantial amount of interest as one method to create a potentially limitless supply of transplantable insulin-producing cells to treat, and possibly cure diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the art of stem cell technology and list the potential sources of stem cells that have been shown to be useful as insulin-expressing surrogates. We also discuss the milestones that have been reached and those that remain to be addressed to generate bona fide beta cell-similar, insulin-producing surrogates. The caveats, limitations, and realistic expectations are also considered for current and future technology. In spite of the tremendous technical advances realized in the past decade, especially in the field of reprogramming adult somatic cells to become stem cells, the state-of-the art still relies on lengthy and cumbersome in vitro culture methods that yield cell populations that are not particularly glucose-responsive when transplanted into diabetic hosts. Despite the current impediments toward clinical translation, including the potential for immune rejection, the availability of technology to generate patient-specific reprogrammable stem cells has, and will be critical for, important insights into the genetics, epigenetics, biology, and physiology of insulin-producing cells in normal and pathologic states. This knowledge could accelerate the time to reach the desired breakthrough for safe and efficacious beta cell surrogates.

  13. Insulin-Producing Endocrine Cells Differentiated In Vitro From Human Embryonic Stem Cells Function in Macroencapsulation Devices In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ambruzs, Dana M.; Moorman, Mark A.; Bhoumik, Anindita; Cesario, Rosemary M.; Payne, Janice K.; Kelly, Jonathan R.; Haakmeester, Carl; Srijemac, Robert; Wilson, Alistair Z.; Kerr, Justin; Frazier, Mauro A.; Kroon, Evert J.; D’Amour, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    The PEC-01 cell population, differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), contains pancreatic progenitors (PPs) that, when loaded into macroencapsulation devices (to produce the VC-01 candidate product) and transplanted into mice, can mature into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells and other pancreatic endocrine cells involved in glucose metabolism. We modified the protocol for making PEC-01 cells such that 73%–80% of the cell population consisted of PDX1-positive (PDX1+) and NKX6.1+ PPs. The PPs were further differentiated to islet-like cells (ICs) that reproducibly contained 73%–89% endocrine cells, of which approximately 40%–50% expressed insulin. A large fraction of these insulin-positive cells were single hormone-positive and expressed the transcription factors PDX1 and NKX6.1. To preclude a significant contribution of progenitors to the in vivo function of ICs, we used a simple enrichment process to remove remaining PPs, yielding aggregates that contained 93%–98% endocrine cells and 1%–3% progenitors. Enriched ICs, when encapsulated and implanted into mice, functioned similarly to the VC-01 candidate product, demonstrating conclusively that in vitro-produced hESC-derived insulin-producing cells can mature and function in vivo in devices. A scaled version of our suspension culture was used, and the endocrine aggregates could be cryopreserved and retain functionality. Although ICs expressed multiple important β cell genes, the cells contained relatively low levels of several maturity-associated markers. Correlating with this, the time to function of ICs was similar to PEC-01 cells, indicating that ICs required cell-autonomous maturation after delivery in vivo, which would occur concurrently with graft integration into the host. Significance Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects approximately 1.25 million people in the U.S. alone and is deadly if not managed with insulin injections. This paper describes the production of insulin-producing

  14. Diabetes recovery by age-dependent conversion of pancreatic δ-cells into insulin producers.

    PubMed

    Chera, Simona; Baronnier, Delphine; Ghila, Luiza; Cigliola, Valentina; Jensen, Jan N; Gu, Guoqiang; Furuyama, Kenichiro; Thorel, Fabrizio; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Herrera, Pedro L

    2014-10-23

    Total or near-total loss of insulin-producing β-cells occurs in type 1 diabetes. Restoration of insulin production in type 1 diabetes is thus a major medical challenge. We previously observed in mice in which β-cells are completely ablated that the pancreas reconstitutes new insulin-producing cells in the absence of autoimmunity. The process involves the contribution of islet non-β-cells; specifically, glucagon-producing α-cells begin producing insulin by a process of reprogramming (transdifferentiation) without proliferation. Here we show the influence of age on β-cell reconstitution from heterologous islet cells after near-total β-cell loss in mice. We found that senescence does not alter α-cell plasticity: α-cells can reprogram to produce insulin from puberty through to adulthood, and also in aged individuals, even a long time after β-cell loss. In contrast, before puberty there is no detectable α-cell conversion, although β-cell reconstitution after injury is more efficient, always leading to diabetes recovery. This process occurs through a newly discovered mechanism: the spontaneous en masse reprogramming of somatostatin-producing δ-cells. The juveniles display 'somatostatin-to-insulin' δ-cell conversion, involving dedifferentiation, proliferation and re-expression of islet developmental regulators. This juvenile adaptability relies, at least in part, upon the combined action of FoxO1 and downstream effectors. Restoration of insulin producing-cells from non-β-cell origins is thus enabled throughout life via δ- or α-cell spontaneous reprogramming. A landscape with multiple intra-islet cell interconversion events is emerging, offering new perspectives for therapy.

  15. A Broadly Cross-protective Vaccine Presenting the Neighboring Epitopes within the VP1 GH Loop and VP2 EF Loop of Enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Yang, Lisheng; Li, Zhiqun; Ye, Xiangzhong; Yu, Hai; zhao, Huan; Li, Shuxuan; Yuan, Lunzhi; Qian, Hongliu; Que, Yuqiong; Shih, James Wai Kuo; Zhu, Hua; Li, Yimin; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-08-05

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) are the major etiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and are often associated with neurological complications. Currently, several vaccine types are being developed for EV71 and CA16. In this study, we constructed a bivalent chimeric virus-like particle (VLP) presenting the VP1 (aa208-222) and VP2 (aa141-155) epitopes of EV71 using hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier, designated HBc-E1/2. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs HBc-E1/2 induced higher IgG titers and neutralization titers against EV71 and CA16 in vitro than immunization with only one epitope incorporated into HBc. Importantly, passive immunization with the recombinant HBc-E2 particles protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 and CA16 infections. We demonstrate that anti-VP2 (aa141-155) sera bound authentic CA16 viral particles, whereas anti-VP1 (aa208-222) sera could not. Moreover, the anti-VP2 (aa141-155) antibodies inhibited the binding of human serum to virions, which demonstrated that the VP2 epitope is immunodominant between EV71 and CA16. These results illustrated that the chimeric VLP HBc-E1/2 is a promising candidate for a broad-spectrum HFMD vaccine, and also reveals mechanisms of protection by the neighboring linear epitopes of the VP1 GH and VP2 EF loops.

  16. A Broadly Cross-protective Vaccine Presenting the Neighboring Epitopes within the VP1 GH Loop and VP2 EF Loop of Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Yang, Lisheng; Li, Zhiqun; Ye, Xiangzhong; Yu, Hai; zhao, Huan; Li, Shuxuan; Yuan, Lunzhi; Qian, Hongliu; Que, Yuqiong; Kuo Shih, James Wai; Zhu, Hua; Li, Yimin; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) are the major etiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and are often associated with neurological complications. Currently, several vaccine types are being developed for EV71 and CA16. In this study, we constructed a bivalent chimeric virus-like particle (VLP) presenting the VP1 (aa208-222) and VP2 (aa141-155) epitopes of EV71 using hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier, designated HBc-E1/2. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs HBc-E1/2 induced higher IgG titers and neutralization titers against EV71 and CA16 in vitro than immunization with only one epitope incorporated into HBc. Importantly, passive immunization with the recombinant HBc-E2 particles protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 and CA16 infections. We demonstrate that anti-VP2 (aa141-155) sera bound authentic CA16 viral particles, whereas anti-VP1 (aa208-222) sera could not. Moreover, the anti-VP2 (aa141-155) antibodies inhibited the binding of human serum to virions, which demonstrated that the VP2 epitope is immunodominant between EV71 and CA16. These results illustrated that the chimeric VLP HBc-E1/2 is a promising candidate for a broad-spectrum HFMD vaccine, and also reveals mechanisms of protection by the neighboring linear epitopes of the VP1 GH and VP2 EF loops. PMID:26243660

  17. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  18. Lack of “Hemichannel” Activity in Insulin-Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    SCEMES, ELIANA; BAVAMIAN, SABINE; CHAROLLAIS, ANNE; SPRAY, DAVID C.; MEDA, PAOLO

    2008-01-01

    Connexins and pannexins have been implicated in the formation of “hemichannels,” which may account for the uptake and release of membrane-impermeant molecules in single cells. The in vivo existence of “hemichannels” and their protein composition is still debated. Investigations on these matters are complicated by the lack of adequate negative controls. In search for such essential controls, the authors have investigated transformed (MIN6 line) and primary insulin-producing cells. Here, the authors report that these cells, which express Cx36 and pannexin1, cannot be shown to display functional “hemichannels,” as evaluated by (1) uptake of the membrane-impermeant tracer ethidium bromide, whether in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, following stimulation of P2X7 receptors, and after exposure to hypotonic medium; and (2) lack of exocytosis-independent release of endogenous ATP. Moreover, electrophysiological recordings indicated the absence of carbenoxolone-sensitive pannexin1 currents evoked by membrane potentials above +30 mV. Thus, insulin-producing cells are expected to provide a useful tool in the further characterization of hemichannel composition, properties, and physiological relevance. PMID:18649186

  19. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  20. Cold-sensing regulates Drosophila growth through insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoran; Gong, Zhefeng

    2015-01-01

    Across phyla, body size is linked to climate. For example, rearing fruit flies at lower temperatures results in bigger body sizes than those observed at higher temperatures. The underlying molecular basis of this effect is poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that the temperature-dependent regulation of Drosophila body size depends on a group of cold-sensing neurons and insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Electrically silencing IPCs completely abolishes the body size increase induced by cold temperature. IPCs are directly innervated by cold-sensing neurons. Stimulation of these cold-sensing neurons activates IPCs, promotes synthesis and secretion of Drosophila insulin-like peptides and induces a larger body size, mimicking the effects of rearing the flies in cold temperature. Taken together, these findings reveal a neuronal circuit that mediates the effects of low temperature on fly growth. PMID:26648410

  1. Insulin - producing cells derived from stem cells: recent progress and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Santana, A; Enseñat - Waser, R; Arribas, Maria Isabel; Reig, J A; Roche, E

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β-cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology which, in addition to β-cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β-cell dedifferentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. β-Cells are responsible for insulin production, storage and secretion in accordance to the demanding concentrations of glucose and fatty acids. The absence of insulin results in death and therefore diabetic patients require daily injections of the hormone for survival. However, they cannot avoid the appearance of secondary complications affecting the peripheral nerves as well as the eyes, kidneys and cardiovascular system. These afflictions are caused by the fact that external insulin injection does not mimic the tight control that pancreaticderived insulin secretion exerts on the body’s glycemia. Restoration of damaged β-cells by transplantation from exogenous sources or by endocrine pancreas regeneration would be ideal therapeutic options. In this context, stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin (including β-cell/islet progenitors) offer some interesting alternatives, taking into account the recent data indicating that these cells could be the building blocks from which insulin secreting cells could be generated in vitro under appropriate culture conditions. Although in many cases insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells have been shown to reverse experimentally induced diabetes in animal models, several concerns need to be solved before finding a definite medical application. These refer mainly to the obtainment of a cell population as similar as possible to pancreatic β-cells, and to the problems related with the immune compatibility and tumor formation. This review will summarize the different approaches that have been used to obtain insulin-producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells, and the main problems that hamper the clinical

  2. Insight into Insulin Secretion from Transcriptome and Genetic Analysis of Insulin-Producing Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Ni, Julie; Ma, Wenxiu; Shiu, Vanessa; Milla, Luis A.; Park, Sangbin; Spletter, Maria L.; Tang, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xing; Kim, Seung K.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the Drosophila brain produce and release insulin-like peptides (ILPs) to the hemolymph. ILPs are crucial for growth and regulation of metabolic activity in flies, functions analogous to those of mammalian insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). To identify components functioning in IPCs to control ILP production, we employed genomic and candidate gene approaches. We used laser microdissection and messenger RNA sequencing to characterize the transcriptome of larval IPCs. IPCs highly express many genes homologous to genes active in insulin-producing β-cells of the mammalian pancreas. The genes in common encode ILPs and proteins that control insulin metabolism, storage, secretion, β-cell proliferation, and some not previously linked to insulin production or β-cell function. Among these novelties is unc-104, a kinesin 3 family gene, which is more highly expressed in IPCs compared to most other neurons. Knockdown of unc-104 in IPCs impaired ILP secretion and reduced peripheral insulin signaling. Unc-104 appears to transport ILPs along axons. As a complementary approach, we tested dominant-negative Rab genes to find Rab proteins required in IPCs for ILP production or secretion. Rab1 was identified as crucial for ILP trafficking in IPCs. Inhibition of Rab1 in IPCs increased circulating sugar levels, delayed development, and lowered weight and body size. Immunofluorescence labeling of Rab1 showed its tight association with ILP2 in the Golgi of IPCs. Unc-104 and Rab1 join other proteins required for ILP transport in IPCs. PMID:24558258

  3. Cytokine toxicity in insulin-producing cells is mediated by nitro-oxidative stress-induced hydroxyl radical formation in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gurgul-Convey, Ewa; Mehmeti, Ilir; Lortz, Stephan; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2011-08-01

    Although nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress both contribute to proinflammatory cytokine toxicity in pancreatic β-cells during type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) development, the interactions between NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytokine-mediated β-cell death have not been clarified. Exposure of insulin-producing RINm5F cells to IL-1β generated NO, while exposure to a combination of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ, which simulates T1DM conditions, generated both NO and ROS. In theory, two reactions between NO and ROS are possible, one with the superoxide radical yielding peroxynitrite, and the other with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) yielding hydroxyl radicals. Results of the present work exclude peroxynitrite involvement in cytokine toxicity to β-cells because its generation did not correlate with the toxic action of cytokines. On the other hand, we show that H(2)O(2), produced upon exposure of insulin-producing cell clones and primary rat islet cells to cytokines almost exclusively in the mitochondria, reacted in the presence of trace metal (Fe(++)) with NO forming highly toxic hydroxyl radicals, thus explaining the severe toxicity that causes apoptotic β-cell death. Expression of the H(2)O(2)-inactivating enzyme catalase in mitochondria protected against cytokine toxicity by preventing hydroxyl radical formation. We therefore conclude that proinflammatory cytokine-mediated β-cell death is due to nitro-oxidative stress-mediated hydroxyl radical formation in the mitochondria.

  4. Synergistic Effects of GhSOD1 and GhCAT1 Overexpression in Cotton Chloroplasts on Enhancing Tolerance to Methyl Viologen and Salt Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoli; Wu, Jiahe; Li, Yuanbao; Nan, Zhirun; Guo, Xing; Wang, Yixue; Zhang, Anhong; Wang, Zhian; Xia, Guixian; Tian, Yingchuan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, EC l.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), and catalase (CAT, EC l.11.1.6) are important scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to protect the cell from damage. In the present study, we isolated three homologous genes (GhSOD1, GhAPX1, and GhCAT1) from Gossypium hirsutum. Overexpressing cassettes containing chimeric GhSOD1, GhAPX1, or GhCAT1 were introduced into cotton plants by Agrobacterium transformation, and overexpressed products of these genes were transported into the chloroplasts by transit peptide, as expected. The five types of transgenic cotton plants that overexpressed GhSOD1, GhAPX1, GhCAT1, GhSOD1 and GhAPX1 stack (SAT), and GhSOD1 and GhCAT1 stack (SCT) were developed. Analyses in the greenhouse showed that the transgenic plants had higher tolerance to methyl viologen (MV) and salinity than WT plants. Interestingly, SCT plants suffered no damage under stress conditions. Based on analyses of enzyme activities, electrolyte leakage, chlorophyll content, photochemical yield (Fv/Fm), and biomass accumulation under stresses, the SCT plants that simultaneously overexpressed GhSOD1 and GhCAT1 appeared to benefit from synergistic effects of two genes and exhibited the highest tolerance to MV and salt stress among the transgenic lines, while the SAT plants simultaneously overexpressing GhSOD1 and GhAPX1 did not. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing antioxidant enzymes in their chloroplasts had higher tolerance to salt stress than those expressing the genes in their cytoplasms, although overall enzyme activities were almost the same. Therefore, the synergistic effects of GhSOD1 and GhCAT1 in chloroplasts provide a new strategy for enhancing stress tolerance to avoid yield loss. PMID:23335985

  5. De Novo Formation of Insulin-Producing “Neo-β Cell Islets” from Intestinal Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Weinblatt, Daniel; Emmett, Matthew J.; Tameire, Feven; Yousefi, Maryam; Yang, Chenghua; Maehr, Rene; Zhou, Qiao; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval; Li, Changhong; Spence, Jason R.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to interconvert terminally differentiated cells could serve as a powerful tool for cell-based treatment of degenerative diseases, including diabetes mellitus. To determine which, if any, adult tissues are competent to activate an islet β cell program, we performed an in vivo screen by expressing three β cell “reprogramming factors” in a wide spectrum of tissues. We report that transient intestinal expression of these factors—Pdx1, MafA, and Ngn3 (PMN)—promotes rapid conversion of intestinal crypt cells into endocrine cells, which coalesce into “neoislets” below the crypt base. Neoislet cells express insulin and show ultrastructural features of β cells. Importantly, intestinal neoislets are glucose-responsive and able to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Moreover, PMN expression in human intestinal “organoids” stimulates the conversion of intestinal epithelial cells into β-like cells. Our results thus demonstrate that the intestine is an accessible and abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells. PMID:24613355

  6. Differentiation of human labia minora dermis-derived fibroblasts into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bona; Yoon, Byung Sun; Moon, Jai Hee; Kim, Jonggun; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Jung Han; Kim, Jun Sung; Baik, Cheong Soon; Kim, Aeree; Whang, Kwang Youn; You, Seungkwon

    2012-01-31

    Recent evidence has suggested that human skin fibroblasts may represent a novel source of therapeutic stem cells. In this study, we report a 3-stage method to induce the differentiation of skin fibroblasts into insulin- producing cells (IPCs). In stage 1, we establish the isolation, expansion and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human labia minora dermis- derived fibroblasts (hLMDFs) (stage 1: MSC expansion). hLMDFs express the typical mesenchymal stem cell marker proteins and can differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or muscle cells. In stage 2, DMEM/F12 serum-free medium with ITS mix (insulin, transferrin, and selenite) is used to induce differentiation of hLMDFs into endoderm-like cells, as determined by the expression of the endoderm markers Sox17, Foxa2, and PDX1 (stage 2: mesenchymal-endoderm transition). In stage 3, cells in the mesenchymal- endoderm transition stage are treated with nicotinamide in order to further differentiate into self-assembled, 3-dimensional islet cell-like clusters that express multiple genes related to pancreatic β-cell development and function (stage 3: IPC). We also found that the transplantation of IPCs can normalize blood glucose levels and rescue glucose homeostasis in streptozotocin- induced diabetic mice. These results indicate that hLMDFs have the capacity to differentiate into functionally competent IPCs and represent a potential cell-based treatment for diabetes mellitus.

  7. Reversal of diabetes with insulin-producing cells derived in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Alireza; Bruin, Jennifer E; Arora, Payal; Rubin, Allison; Batushansky, Irina; Asadi, Ali; O'Dwyer, Shannon; Quiskamp, Nina; Mojibian, Majid; Albrecht, Tobias; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Johnson, James D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic progenitors or insulin-secreting cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has been proposed as a therapy for diabetes. We describe a seven-stage protocol that efficiently converts hESCs into insulin-producing cells. Stage (S) 7 cells expressed key markers of mature pancreatic beta cells, including MAFA, and displayed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion similar to that of human islets during static incubations in vitro. Additional characterization using single-cell imaging and dynamic glucose stimulation assays revealed similarities but also notable differences between S7 insulin-secreting cells and primary human beta cells. Nevertheless, S7 cells rapidly reversed diabetes in mice within 40 days, roughly four times faster than pancreatic progenitors. Therefore, although S7 cells are not fully equivalent to mature beta cells, their capacity for glucose-responsive insulin secretion and rapid reversal of diabetes in vivo makes them a promising alternative to pancreatic progenitor cells or cadaveric islets for the treatment of diabetes.

  8. Circadian and feeding cues integrate to drive rhythms of physiology in Drosophila insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Erion, Renske; Holmes, Todd C; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-12-01

    Circadian clocks regulate much of behavior and physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so remain poorly understood. While cyclic gene expression is thought to underlie metabolic rhythms, little is known about cycles in cellular physiology. We found that Drosophila insulin-producing cells (IPCs), which are located in the pars intercerebralis and lack an autonomous circadian clock, are functionally connected to the central circadian clock circuit via DN1 neurons. Insulin mediates circadian output by regulating the rhythmic expression of a metabolic gene (sxe2) in the fat body. Patch clamp electrophysiology reveals that IPCs display circadian clock-regulated daily rhythms in firing event frequency and bursting proportion under light:dark conditions. The activity of IPCs and the rhythmic expression of sxe2 are additionally regulated by feeding, as demonstrated by night feeding-induced changes in IPC firing characteristics and sxe2 levels in the fat body. These findings indicate circuit-level regulation of metabolism by clock cells in Drosophila and support a role for the pars intercerebralis in integrating circadian control of behavior and physiology.

  9. Reprogramming of Mice Primary Hepatocytes into Insulin-Producing Cells by Transfection with Multicistronic Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Haizhao; Chen, Rongping; Yang, Rui; Liu, Yan; Chen, Youping; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The neogenesis of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) from non-beta-cells has emerged as a potential method for treating diabetes mellitus (DM). Many groups have documented that activation of pancreatic transcription factor(s) in hepatocytes can improve the hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. In the present study, we explored a novel protocol that reprogrammed primary hepatocytes into functional IPCs by using multicistronic vectors carrying pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx1), neurogenin 3 (Ngn3), and v-musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA). These triple-transfected cells activated multiple beta-cell genes, synthesized and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner in vitro. Furthermore, when transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, the cells markedly ameliorated glucose tolerance. Our results indicated that ectopic expression of Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA facilitated hepatocytes-to-IPCs reprogramming. This approach may offer opportunities for treatment of DM. PMID:25006589

  10. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  11. Identification of miRNAs Involved in Reprogramming Acinar Cells into Insulin Producing Cells.

    PubMed

    Teichenne, Joan; Morró, Meritxell; Casellas, Alba; Jimenez, Veronica; Tellez, Noelia; Leger, Adrien; Bosch, Fatima; Ayuso, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming acinar cells into insulin producing cells using adenoviral (Ad)-mediated delivery of Pdx1, Ngn3 and MafA (PNM) is an innovative approach for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process and in particular, the role of microRNAs. To this end, we performed a comparative study of acinar-to-β cell reprogramming efficiency in the rat acinar cell line AR42J and its subclone B13 after transduction with Ad-PNM. B13 cells were more efficiently reprogrammed than AR42J cells, which was demonstrated by a strong activation of β cell markers (Ins1, Ins2, IAPP, NeuroD1 and Pax4). miRNome panels were used to analyze differentially expressed miRNAs in acinar cells under four experimental conditions (i) non-transduced AR42J cells, (ii) non-transduced B13 cells, (iii) B13 cells transduced with Ad-GFP vectors and (iv) B13 cells transduced with Ad-PNM vectors. A total of 59 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between non-transduced AR42J and B13 cells. Specifically, the miR-200 family was completely repressed in B13 cells, suggesting that these cells exist in a less differentiated state than AR42J cells and as a consequence they present a greater plasticity. Adenoviral transduction per se induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells and 11 miRNAs were putatively involved in this process, whereas 8 miRNAs were found to be associated with PNM expression. Of note, Ad-PNM reprogrammed B13 cells presented the same levels of miR-137-3p, miR-135a-5p, miR-204-5p and miR-210-3p of those detected in islets, highlighting their role in the process. In conclusion, this study led to the identification of miRNAs that might be of compelling importance to improve acinar-to-β cell conversion for the future treatment of diabetes.

  12. Identification of miRNAs Involved in Reprogramming Acinar Cells into Insulin Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Teichenne, Joan; Morró, Meritxell; Casellas, Alba; Jimenez, Veronica; Tellez, Noelia; Leger, Adrien; Bosch, Fatima; Ayuso, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming acinar cells into insulin producing cells using adenoviral (Ad)-mediated delivery of Pdx1, Ngn3 and MafA (PNM) is an innovative approach for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process and in particular, the role of microRNAs. To this end, we performed a comparative study of acinar-to-β cell reprogramming efficiency in the rat acinar cell line AR42J and its subclone B13 after transduction with Ad-PNM. B13 cells were more efficiently reprogrammed than AR42J cells, which was demonstrated by a strong activation of β cell markers (Ins1, Ins2, IAPP, NeuroD1 and Pax4). miRNome panels were used to analyze differentially expressed miRNAs in acinar cells under four experimental conditions (i) non-transduced AR42J cells, (ii) non-transduced B13 cells, (iii) B13 cells transduced with Ad-GFP vectors and (iv) B13 cells transduced with Ad-PNM vectors. A total of 59 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between non-transduced AR42J and B13 cells. Specifically, the miR-200 family was completely repressed in B13 cells, suggesting that these cells exist in a less differentiated state than AR42J cells and as a consequence they present a greater plasticity. Adenoviral transduction per se induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells and 11 miRNAs were putatively involved in this process, whereas 8 miRNAs were found to be associated with PNM expression. Of note, Ad-PNM reprogrammed B13 cells presented the same levels of miR-137-3p, miR-135a-5p, miR-204-5p and miR-210-3p of those detected in islets, highlighting their role in the process. In conclusion, this study led to the identification of miRNAs that might be of compelling importance to improve acinar-to-β cell conversion for the future treatment of diabetes. PMID:26690959

  13. GH deficiency status combined with GH receptor polymorphism affects response to GH in children.

    PubMed

    Valsesia, Armand; Chatelain, Pierre; Stevens, Adam; Peterkova, Valentina A; Belgorosky, Alicia; Maghnie, Mohamad; Antoniazzi, Franco; Koledova, Ekaterina; Wojcik, Jerome; Farmer, Pierre; Destenaves, Benoit; Clayton, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Meta-analysis has shown a modest improvement in first-year growth response to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) for carriers of the exon 3-deleted GH receptor (GHRd3) polymorphism but with significant interstudy variability. The associations between GHRd3 and growth response to r-hGH over 3 years in relation to severity of GH deficiency (GHD) were investigated in patients from 14 countries. Treatment-naïve pre-pubertal children with GHD were enrolled from the PREDICT studies (NCT00256126 and NCT00699855), categorized by peak GH level (peak GH) during provocation test: ≤4 μg/l (severe GHD; n=45) and >4 to <10 μg/l mild GHD; n=49) and genotyped for the GHRd3 polymorphism (full length (fl/fl, fl/d3, d3/d3). Gene expression (GE) profiles were characterized at baseline. Changes in growth (height (cm) and SDS) over 3 years were measured. There was a dichotomous influence of GHRd3 polymorphism on response to r-hGH, dependent on peak GH level. GH peak level (higher vs lower) and GHRd3 (fl/fl vs d3 carriers) combined status was associated with height change over 3 years (P<0.05). GHRd3 carriers with lower peak GH had lower growth than subjects with fl/fl (median difference after 3 years -3.3 cm; -0.3 SDS). Conversely, GHRd3 carriers with higher peak GH had better growth (+2.7 cm; +0.2 SDS). Similar patterns were observed for GH-dependent biomarkers. GE profiles were significantly different between the groups, indicating that the interaction between GH status and GHRd3 carriage can be identified at a transcriptomic level. This study demonstrates that responses to r-hGH depend on the interaction between GHD severity and GHRd3 carriage.

  14. In vitro evaluation of different protocols for the induction of mesenchymal stem cells to insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Seyedi, Fatemeh; Farsinejad, Alireza; Moshrefi, Mojgan; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin

    2015-09-01

    Stem cells therapy is a new promising approach for diabetes mellitus (DM) treatment, but the insulin secretion rate in differentiated cells is low when compared with pancreas beta cells embedded in Langerhans islets. In this study, we evaluated different protocols of insulin secretion to achieve the most appropriate protocol for in vitro insulin secretion. We differentiated human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells (hUCMs) into insulin-producing cell (IPC) by the aim of three previously reported protocols and a modified protocol. The insulin content was analyzed through gene expression and immunocytochemistry (IHC). Dithizone (DTZ) staining was done for identification of islet-like structures. Insulin and C peptide secretion was measured by chemiluminesence immunoassay (CLIA) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) as well. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) showed efficient expression of insulin genes in all the study groups. IHC analysis showed higher expression of insulin and proinsulin proteins in the modified protocol. DTZ staining exhibited variable islet-like clusters in the different protocols except control. This finding was confirmed by the higher response to glucose challenge test in this group. A modified protocol using an intermediate step that makes the cells vulnerable to nestin production in combination with inducing agent results in the higher differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells and more insulin secretion in vitro.

  15. The growth hormone (GH) gene is expressed in the lateral hypothalamus: enhancement by GH-releasing hormone and repression by restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Yoshizato, H; Fujikawa, T; Soya, H; Tanaka, M; Nakashima, K

    1998-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that GH may modulate emotion, behavior, or stress response by its direct actions on the brain, and possible expression of the GH gene in the brain has been predicted. In this study we have investigated whether and where the GH gene is expressed in the brain and how it is regulated. Ribonuclease protection assay and 5'-rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends-PCR analyses indicated that the GH gene was expressed in rat brain, initiating at the identical transcription start point as that for pituitary GH gene expression. The brain GH messenger RNA was predominantly detected in the lateral hypothalamus (lh) by in situ reverse transcription-PCR analysis. GH gene expression in the brain was significantly enhanced by GH-releasing hormone administration and was rapidly repressed by exposure to restraint stress in the water, whereas the changes in pituitary GH messenger RNA contents in these circumstances were relatively smaller. The results of the present study suggest that the brain GH is predominantly expressed in lh under the control of physiological conditions to play a role in the modulation of brain functions.

  16. Discovery of gene networks regulating cytokine-induced dysfunction and apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Burak; Cardozo, Alessandra K; Darville, Martine I; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Magnusson, Nils; Ørntoft, Torben; Eizirik, Décio L

    2003-11-01

    Locally released cytokines contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis in type 1 diabetes. In vitro exposure of insulin-producing INS-1E cells to the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta + interferon (IFN)-gamma leads to a significant increase in apoptosis. To characterize the genetic networks implicated in beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis and its dependence on nitric oxide (NO) production, we performed a time-course microarray analysis of cytokine-induced genes in insulin-producing INS-1E cells. INS-1E cells were exposed in duplicate to IL-1beta + IFN-gamma for six different time points (1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) with or without the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) blocker N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMA). The microarray analysis identified 698 genes as cytokine modified (>or=2.5-fold change compared with control) in at least one time point. Based on their temporal pattern of variation, the cytokine-regulated genes were classified into 15 clusters by the k-means method. These genes were further classified into 14 different groups according to their putative function. Changes in the expression of genes related to metabolism, signal transduction, and transcription factors at all time points studied indicate beta-cell attempts to adapt to the effects of continuous cytokine exposure. Notably, several apoptosis-related genes were modified at early time points (2-4 h) preceding iNOS expression. On the other hand, 46% of the genes modified by cytokines after 8-24 h were NO dependent, indicating the important role of this radical for the late effects of cytokines. The present results increase by more than twofold the number of known cytokine-modified genes in insulin-producing cells and yield comprehensive information on the role of NO for these modifications in gene expression. These data provide novel and detailed insights into the gene networks activated in beta-cells facing a prolonged immune assault.

  17. Vitamin D across growth hormone (GH) disorders: From GH deficiency to GH excess.

    PubMed

    Ciresi, A; Giordano, C

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between vitamin D and the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I system is very complex and to date it is not fully understood. GH directly regulates renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity, although the action of GH in modulating vitamin D metabolism may also be IGF-I mediated. On the other hand, vitamin D increases circulating IGF-I and the vitamin D deficiency should be normalized before measurement of IGF-I concentrations to obtain reliable and unbiased IGF-I values. Indeed, linear growth after treatment of nutritional vitamin D deficiency seems to be mediated through activation of the GH/IGF-I axis and it suggests an important role of vitamin D as a link between the proliferating cartilage cells of the growth plate and GH/IGF-I secretion. Vitamin D levels are commonly lower in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) than in controls, with a variable prevalence of insufficiency or deficiency, and this condition may worsen the already known cardiovascular and metabolic risk of GHD, although this finding is not common to all studies. In addition, data on the impact of GH treatment on vitamin D levels in GHD patients are quite conflicting. Conversely, in active acromegaly, a condition characterized by a chronic GH excess, both increased and decreased vitamin D levels have been highlighted, and the interplay between vitamin D and the GH/IGF-I axis becomes even more complicated when we consider the acromegaly treatment, both medical and surgical. The current review summarizes the available data on vitamin D in the main disorders of the GH/IGF-I axis, providing an overview of the current state of the art.

  18. Role of injured pancreatic extract promotes bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells efficiently differentiate into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongbin; Wang, Yunshuai; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Hui; Zhou, Hanxin; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be successfully induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) by a variety of small molecules and cytokines in vitro. However, problems remain, such as low transdifferentiation efficiency and poor maturity of trans-differentiated cells. The damaged pancreatic cells secreted a large amount of soluble proteins, which were able to promote pancreative islet regeneration and MSCs differentiation. In this study, we utilized the rat injured pancreatic tissue extract to modulate rat bone marrow-derived MSCs differentiation into IPCs by the traditional two-step induction. Our results showed that injured pancreatic tissue extract could effectively promote the trans-differentiation efficiency and maturity of IPCs by the traditional induction. Moreover, IPCs were able to release more insulin in a glucose-dependent manner and ameliorate better the diabetic conditions of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats. Our study provides a new strategy to induce an efficient and directional differentiation of MSCs into IPCs.

  19. Three-dimensional printed polymeric system to encapsulate human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates for diabetes treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabek, Omaima M; Farina, Marco; Fraga, Daniel W; Afshar, Solmaz; Ballerini, Andrea; Filgueira, Carly S; Thekkedath, Usha R; Grattoni, Alessandro; Gaber, A Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most prevalent, costly, and debilitating diseases in the world. Pancreas and islet transplants have shown success in re-establishing glucose control and reversing diabetic complications. However, both are limited by donor availability, need for continuous immunosuppression, loss of transplanted tissue due to dispersion, and lack of vascularization. To overcome the limitations of poor islet availability, here, we investigate the potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates. Islet-like insulin-producing aggregates, characterized by gene expression, are shown to be similar to pancreatic islets and display positive immunostaining for insulin and glucagon. To address the limits of current encapsulation systems, we developed a novel three-dimensional printed, scalable, and potentially refillable polymeric construct (nanogland) to support islet-like insulin-producing aggregates’ survival and function in the host body. In vitro studies showed that encapsulated islet-like insulin-producing aggregates maintained viability and function, producing steady levels of insulin for at least 4 weeks. Nanogland—islet-like insulin-producing aggregate technology here investigated as a proof of concept holds potential as an effective and innovative approach for diabetes cell therapy. PMID:27152147

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells derived in vitro transdifferentiated insulin-producing cells: A new approach to treat type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dave, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is largely related to an innate defect in the immune system culminating in a loss of self-tolerance and destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells. Currently, there is no definitive cure for T1DM. Insulin injection does not mimic the precise regulation of β-cells on glucose homeostasis, leading long term to the development of complications. Stem cell therapy is a promising approach and specifically mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer a promising possibility that deserves to be explored further. MSCs are multipotent, nonhematopoietic progenitors. They have been explored as an treatment option in tissue regeneration as well as potential of in vitro transdifferentiation into insulin-secreting cells. Thus, the major therapeutic goals for T1DM have been achieved in this way. The regenerative capabilities of MSCs have been a driving force to initiate studies testing their therapeutic effectiveness; their immunomodulatory properties have been equally exciting; which would appear capable of disabling immune dysregulation that leads to β-cell destruction in T1DM. Furthermore, MSCs can be cultured under specially defined conditions, their transdifferentiation can be directed toward the β-cell phenotype, and the formation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) can be targeted. To date, the role of MSCs-derived IPC in T1DM-a unique approach with some positive findings-have been unexplored, but it is still in its very early phase. In this study, a new approach of MSCs-derived IPCs, as a potential therapeutic benefit for T1DM in experimental animal models as well as in humans has been summarized.

  1. Modulation of Methuselah Expression Targeted to Drosophila Insulin-producing Cells Extends Life and Enhances Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E. D.; Ghildyal, Parakashtha; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Hu, Hongxiang; Ja, William W.; Eaton, Benjamin A.; Wu, Yimin; Austad, Steven N.; Ranjan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitously reduced signaling via Methuselah (MTH), a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) required for neurosecretion, has previously been reported to extend life and enhance stress resistance in flies. Whether these effects are due to reduced MTH signaling only in specific tissue(s) and through with signaling effects reduced MTH might produce these phenotypes remains unknown. We determined that reduced expression of mth targeted only to the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) of the fly brain was sufficient to extend life and enhance oxidative stress resistance. Paradoxically, we discovered that overexpression of mth targeted to the same cells has similar phenotypic effects to reduced expression due to MTH’s interaction with β-arrestin, which uncouples GPCRs from their G-proteins. We confirmed the functional relationship between MTH and β-arrestin by finding that IPC-targeted overexpression of β-arrestin alone mimics the longevity phenotype of reduced MTH signaling. As reduced MTH signaling also inhibits insulin secretion from the IPCs, the most parsimonious mechanistic explanation for its longevity and stress resistance enhancement might be through reduced insulin/IGF signaling (IIS). However, examination of phenotypic features of long-lived IPC-mth modulated flies as well as several downstream IIS targets implicates enhanced activity of the JNK stress resistance pathway more directly than insulin signaling in the longevity and stress resistance phenotypes. PMID:23121290

  2. Reversal of hyperglycemia in mice by using human expandable insulin-producing cells differentiated from fetal liver progenitor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalzman, Michal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Giri, Ranjit K.; Berkovich, Irina; Sappal, Baljit S.; Karnieli, Ohad; Zern, Mark A.; Fleischer, Norman; Efrat, Shimon

    2003-06-01

    Beta-cell replacement is considered to be the most promising approach for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Its application on a large scale is hindered by a shortage of cells for transplantation. Activation of insulin expression, storage, and regulated secretion in stem/progenitor cells offers novel ways to overcome this shortage. We explored whether fetal human progenitor liver cells (FH) could be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells after expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene, which is a key regulator of pancreatic development and insulin expression in beta cells. FH cells possess a considerable replication capacity, and this was further extended by introduction of the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase. Immortalized FH cells expressing Pdx1 activated multiple beta-cell genes, produced and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released insulin in a regulated manner in response to glucose. When transplanted into hyperglycemic immunodeficient mice, the cells restored and maintained euglycemia for prolonged periods. Quantitation of human C-peptide in the mouse serum confirmed that the glycemia was normalized by the transplanted human cells. This approach offers the potential of a novel source of cells for transplantation into patients with type 1 diabetes.

  3. Role of Injured Pancreatic Extract Promotes Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Differentiate into Insulin-Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongbin; Wang, Yunshuai; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Hui; Zhou, Hanxin; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be successfully induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) by a variety of small molecules and cytokines in vitro. However, problems remain, such as low transdifferentiation efficiency and poor maturity of trans-differentiated cells. The damaged pancreatic cells secreted a large amount of soluble proteins, which were able to promote pancreative islet regeneration and MSCs differentiation. In this study, we utilized the rat injured pancreatic tissue extract to modulate rat bone marrow-derived MSCs differentiation into IPCs by the traditional two-step induction. Our results showed that injured pancreatic tissue extract could effectively promote the trans-differentiation efficiency and maturity of IPCs by the traditional induction. Moreover, IPCs were able to release more insulin in a glucose-dependent manner and ameliorate better the diabetic conditions of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats. Our study provides a new strategy to induce an efficient and directional differentiation of MSCs into IPCs. PMID:24058711

  4. Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells by Using A Lentiviral Vector Carrying PDX1

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdi, Amir; Abroun, Saied; Jafarian, Arefeh; Soleimani, Masoud; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Eskandari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type I diabetes is an immunologically-mediated devastation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) in the pancreatic islet. Stem cells that produce β-cells are a new promising tool. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self renewing multi potent cells showing capabilities to differentiate into ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal tissues. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1) is a master regulator gene required for embryonic development of the pancreas and is crucial for normal pancreatic islets activities in adults. Materials and Methods We induced the over-expression of the PDX1 gene in human bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) by Lenti-PDX1 in order to generate IPCs. Next, we examine the ability of the cells by measuring insulin/c-peptide production and INSULIN and PDX1 gene expressions. Results After transduction, MSCs changed their morphology at day 5 and gradually differentiated into IPCs. INSULIN and PDX1 expressions were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining. IPC secreted insulin and C-peptide in the media that contained different glucose concentrations. Conclusion MSCs differentiated into IPCs by genetic manipulation. Our result showed that lentiviral vectors could deliver PDX1 gene to MSCs and induce pancreatic differentiation. PMID:26199902

  5. Insulin-producing cells regulate the sexual receptivity through the painless TRP channel in Drosophila virgin females.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takaomi; Watanabe, Kazuki; Ohashi, Hirono; Sato, Shoma; Inami, Show; Shimada, Naoto; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    In a variety of animal species, females hold a leading position in evaluating potential mating partners. The decision of virgin females to accept or reject a courting male is one of the most critical steps for mating success. In the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms underlying female receptivity are still poorly understood, particularly for virgin females. The Drosophila painless (pain) gene encodes a transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel. We previously demonstrated that mutations in pain significantly enhance the sexual receptivity of virgin females and that pain expression in pain(GAL4) -positive neurons is necessary and sufficient for pain-mediated regulation of the virgin receptivity. Among the pain(GAL4) -positive neurons in the adult female brain, here we have found that insulin-producing cells (IPCs), a neuronal subset in the pars intercerebralis, are essential in virgin females for the regulation of sexual receptivity through Pain TRP channels. IPC-specific knockdown of pain expression or IPC ablation strongly enhanced female sexual receptivity as was observed in pain mutant females. When pain expression or neuronal activity was conditionally suppressed in adult IPCs, female sexual receptivity was similarly enhanced. Furthermore, both pain mutations and the conditional knockdown of pain expression in IPCs depressed female rejection behaviors toward courting males. Taken together, our results indicate that the Pain TRP channel in IPCs plays an important role in controlling the sexual receptivity of Drosophila virgin females by positively regulating female rejection behaviors during courtship.

  6. Three-dimensional differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, Layasadat; Nejad-Dehbashi, Fereshteh; Ahangarpour, Akram; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Fibrin glue (FG) is used in a variety of clinical applications and in the laboratory for localized and sustained release of factors potentially important for tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to evaluate FG scaffold effect on differentiation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In this experimental study BM-MSCs were cultured and the cells characterized by analysis of cell surface markers using flow cytometry. BM-MSCs were seeded in FG scaffold (3D culture) and then treated with induction media. After induction, the presence of IPCs was demonstrated using gene expression profiles for pancreatic cell differentiation markers (PDX-1, GLUT-2 and insulin) and insulin detection in cytoplasm. Release of insulin by these cells was confirmed by radioimmunoassay. Expression of the islet-associated genes PDX-1, GLUT-2 and Insulin genes in 3D cultured cells was markedly higher than the 2D cultured cells exposure differentiation media. Compared to 2D culture of BM-MSCs-derived IPCs, the insulin release from 3D BM-MSCs-derived IPCs showed a nearly 3 fold (p<0.05) increase when exposed to a high glucose (25 mM) medium. Percentage of insulin positive cells in 3D experimental group showed an approximately 3.5-fold increase in compared to 2D experimental culture cells. The results of this study demonstrated that FG scaffold can enhance the differentiation of IPCs from rats BM-MSCs.

  7. Identification of microRNAs regulating Hlxb9 gene expression during the induction of insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changzheng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiaomei; Tian, He; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) with the capacity of self- renewal and multilineage differentiation are promising sources for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. Here, we developed an effective method with activin A, conophylline, and nicotinamide to induce mouse bMSCs to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). The homeobox gene Hlxb9 (encoding HB9) is prominently expressed in adult human pancreas, which can also play a key role during the induction of IPCs. To find the microRNAs (miRNAs) regulating Hlxb9 gene expression, we respectively used miRanda and TargetScan to predict and got the intersection, miR-200a and miR-141, further identified by the Dual-Luciferase assay. The results illustrated miR-200a and miR-141 could inhibit the expression of Hlxb9 by binding to its mRNA 3'UTR. Furthermore, the expression of miR-200a and miR-141 was almost reciprocal to that of Hlxb9. Overexpression of miR-200a and miR-141 downregulated the expression of pancreatic progenitor cell markers Hlxb9 and Pdx1. Therefore, miR-200a and miR-141 may directly or indirectly regulate the expression of pancreatic islet transcription factors to control the differentiation of IPCs.

  8. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  9. Elevated GH/IGF-I promotes mammary tumors in high-fat, but not low-fat, fed mice.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lantvit, Daniel D; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; Sanchez-Sanchez, Rafael; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; López-Miranda, José; Swanson, Steven M; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and/or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are thought to promote breast cancer based on reports showing circulating IGF-I levels correlate, in epidemiological studies, with breast cancer risk. Also, mouse models with developmental GH/IGF-I deficiency/resistance are less susceptible to genetic- or chemical-induced mammary tumorigenesis. However, given the metabolic properties of GH, medical strategies have been considered to raise GH to improve body composition and metabolic function in elderly and obese patients. Since hyperlipidemia, inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity increase breast cancer risk, elevating GH may serve to exacerbate cancer progression. To better understand the role GH/IGF-I plays in tumor formation, this study used unique mouse models to determine if reducing GH/IGF-I in adults protects against 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumor development, and if moderate elevations in endogenous GH/IGF-I alter DMBA-induced tumorigenesis in mice fed a standard-chow diet or in mice with altered metabolic function due to high-fat feeding. We observed that adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice, which also have reduced IGF-I levels, were less susceptible to DMBA-treatment. Specifically, fewer adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice developed mammary tumors compared with GH-replete controls. In contrast, chow-fed mice with elevated endogenous GH/IGF-I (HiGH mice) were not more susceptible to DMBA-treatment. However, high-fat-fed, HiGH mice showed reduced tumor latency and increased tumor incidence compared with diet-matched controls. These results further support a role of GH/IGF-I in regulating mammary tumorigenesis but suggest the ultimate consequences of GH/IGF-I on breast tumor development are dependent on the diet and/or metabolic status.

  10. Elevated GH/IGF-I promotes mammary tumors in high-fat, but not low-fat, fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; Sanchez-Sanchez, Rafael; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; López-Miranda, José; Swanson, Steven M.; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.; Kineman, Rhonda D.

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and/or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are thought to promote breast cancer based on reports showing circulating IGF-I levels correlate, in epidemiological studies, with breast cancer risk. Also, mouse models with developmental GH/IGF-I deficiency/resistance are less susceptible to genetic- or chemical-induced mammary tumorigenesis. However, given the metabolic properties of GH, medical strategies have been considered to raise GH to improve body composition and metabolic function in elderly and obese patients. Since hyperlipidemia, inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity increase breast cancer risk, elevating GH may serve to exacerbate cancer progression. To better understand the role GH/IGF-I plays in tumor formation, this study used unique mouse models to determine if reducing GH/IGF-I in adults protects against 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumor development, and if moderate elevations in endogenous GH/IGF-I alter DMBA-induced tumorigenesis in mice fed a standard-chow diet or in mice with altered metabolic function due to high-fat feeding. We observed that adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice, which also have reduced IGF-I levels, were less susceptible to DMBA-treatment. Specifically, fewer adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice developed mammary tumors compared with GH-replete controls. In contrast, chow-fed mice with elevated endogenous GH/IGF-I (HiGH mice) were not more susceptible to DMBA-treatment. However, high-fat-fed, HiGH mice showed reduced tumor latency and increased tumor incidence compared with diet-matched controls. These results further support a role of GH/IGF-I in regulating mammary tumorigenesis but suggest the ultimate consequences of GH/IGF-I on breast tumor development are dependent on the diet and/or metabolic status. PMID:25085903

  11. Reprogramming of Pancreatic Exocrine Cells AR42J Into Insulin-producing Cells Using mRNAs for Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Koblas, Tomas; Leontovyc, Ivan; Loukotova, Sarka; Kosinova, Lucie; Saudek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of pancreatic nonendocrine cells into insulin-producing β-cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. However, its clinical application is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis associated with the viral vectors currently used for cell reprogramming. With the aim of developing a nonintegrative reprogramming strategy for derivation of insulin-producing cells, here, we evaluated a new approach utilizing synthetic messenger RNAs encoding reprogramming transcription factors. Administration of synthetic mRNAs encoding three key transcription regulators of β-cell differentiation—Pdx1, Neurogenin3, and MafA—efficiently reprogrammed the pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. In addition to the insulin genes expression, the synthetic mRNAs also induced the expressions of genes important for proper pancreatic β-cell function, including Sur1, Kir6.2, Pcsk1, and Pcsk2. Pretreating cells with the chromatin-modifying agent 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine further enhanced reprogramming efficiency, increasing the proportion of insulin-producing cells from 3.5 ± 0.9 to 14.3 ± 1.9% (n = 4). Moreover, 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine pretreatment enabled the reprogrammed cells to respond to glucose challenge with increased insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support that the reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, induced by synthetic mRNAs encoding pancreatic transcription factors, represents a promising approach for cell-based diabetes therapy. PMID:27187823

  12. Mechanisms of hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling in differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Yu; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Lu, Chong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Xiao-Chen

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} A hypothesis that the differentiation of PDEC is through MAPKs or PI3K/AKT pathways. {yields} Determine if kinases (ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and AKT) are activated in these pathways. {yields} Determine signal pathway(s) that may effect on HGF-induced differentiation of PDEC. {yields} PI3K-AKT pathway is involved in the differentiation of PDECs induced by HGF. {yields} MEK-ERK pathway effect on the proliferation of PDECs but not the differentiation. -- Abstract: Pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs) were induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in our previous study, but the mechanism through which this induction occurs is still unknown. HGF is a ligand that activates a tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-Met proto-oncogene. This activation is followed by indirect activation of multiple downstream signal transduction pathways (including MAPKs and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathways) that initiate various biological effects. Therefore, we speculated that the differentiation of PDECs is through either the MAPK signaling pathway or the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. To test this hypothesis, isolated PDECs from adult rats were stimulated by adding HGF to their medium for 28 days. Then, the expression levels of several protein kinases, including MAPKs (ERK1/2, p38, and JNK) and AKT, were determined by Western blotting to determine if specific protein kinases are activated in these pathways. Subsequently, re-isolated from adult rats and cultured PDECs were pre-treated with specific inhibitors of proteins shown to be activated in these signaling pathways; these cells were then induced to differentiate by the addition of HGF. The expression levels of protein kinases were determined by Western blotting, and the differentiation rate of insulin-positive cells was determined by flow cytometry. The change of PDEC differentiation rates were compared between the groups in which cells with or without inhibitors

  13. Bone Marrow Homing Enriches Stem Cells Responsible for Neogenesis of Insulin-Producing Cells, While Radiation Decreases Homing Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Iskovich, Svetlana; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-10-01

    Small-sized adult bone marrow cells isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate into insulin-producing cells and stabilize glycemic control. This study assessed competitive migration of syngeneic stem cells to the bone marrow and islets in a murine model of chemical diabetes. VLA-4 is expressed in ∼ 25% of these cells, whereas CXCR4 is not detected, however, it is transcriptionally upregulated (6-fold). The possibility to enrich stem cells by a bone marrow homing (BM-H) functional assay was assessed in sequential transplants. Fr25lin(-) cells labeled with PKH26 were grafted into primary myeloablated recipients, and mitotically quiescent Fr25lin(-)PKH(bright) cells were sorted from the bone marrow after 2 days. The contribution of bone marrow-homed stem cells was remarkably higher in secondary recipients compared to freshly elutriated cells. The therapeutic efficacy was further increased by omission of irradiation in the secondary recipients, showing a 25-fold enrichment of islet-reconstituting cells by the bone marrow homing assay. Donor cells identified by the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a genomic marker in sex-mismatched transplants upregulated PDX-1 and produced proinsulin, affirming the capacity of BM-H cells to convert in the injured islets. There was no evidence of transcriptional priming of freshly elutriated subsets to express PDX-1, insulin, and other markers of endocrine progenitors, indicating that the bone marrow harbors stem cells with versatile differentiation capacity. Affinity to the bone marrow can be used to enrich stem cells for pancreatic regeneration, and reciprocally, conditioning reduces the competitive incorporation in the injured islets.

  14. Generation of insulin-producing cells from C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ruo-Lei; Mao, Li-Bin; Xu, Yao; Li, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Feng-Po; Luo, Xue-Gang; Zhou, Hao; He, Hong-Peng; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-05-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to be an attractive source for the generation of transplantable surrogate β cells. A murine embryonic mesenchymal progenitor cell line C3H10T1/2 has been recognized as a model for MSCs, because of its multi-lineage differentiation potential. The purpose of this study was to explore whether C3H/10T1/2 cells have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). Here, we investigated and compared the in vitro differentiation of rat MSCs and C3H10T1/2 cells into IPCs. After the cells underwent IPC differentiation, the expression of differentiation markers were detected by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. The insulin secretion was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, these differentiated cells were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and their biological functions were tested in vivo. This study reports a 2-stage method to generate IPCs from C3H10T1/2 cells. Under specific induction conditions for 7-8 days, C3H10T1/2 cells formed three-dimensional spheroid bodies (SBs) and secreted insulin, while generation of IPCs derived from rat MSCs required a long time (more than 2 weeks). Furthermore, these IPCs derived from C3H10T1/2 cells were injected into diabetic mice and improves basal glucose, body weight and exhibited normal glucose tolerance test. The present study provided a simple and faithful in vitro model for further investigating the mechanism underlying IPC differentiation of MSCs and cell replacement therapy for diabetes.

  15. Role of microRNA-21 in the formation of insulin-producing cells from pancreatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunyu; Li, Xiangchen; Gao, Yuhua; Wang, Kunfu; Fan, Yanan; Zhang, Shuang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate insulin secretion, pancreas development, and beta cell differentiation. In this study, to screen for miRNAs and their targets that function during insulin-producing cells (IPCs) formation, we examined the messenger RNA and microRNA expression profiles of pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) and IPCs using microarray and deep sequencing approaches, respectively. Combining our data with that from previous reports, we found that miR-21 and its targets play an important role in the formation of IPCs. However, the function of miR-21 in the formation of IPCs from PPCs is poorly understood. Therefore, we over-expressed or inhibited miR-21 and expressed small interfering RNAs of miR-21 targets in PPCs to investigate their functions in IPCs formation. We found that miR-21 acts as a bidirectional switch in the formation of IPCs by regulating the expression of target and downstream genes (SOX6, RPBJ and HES1). Small interfering RNAs were used to knock down these genes in PPCs to investigate their effects on IPCs formation. Single expression of si-RBPJ, si-SOX6 and si-HES1 in PPCs showed that si-RBPJ was an inhibitor, and that si-SOX6 and si-HES1 were promoters of IPCs formation, although si-HES1 induced formation of IPCs at higher rates than si-SOX6. These results suggest that endogenous miRNAs involved in the formation of IPCs from PPCs should be considered in the development of an effective cell transplant therapy for diabetes.

  16. The reversal of diabetes in rat model using mouse insulin producing cells - a combination approach of tissue engineering and macroencapsulation.

    PubMed

    Muthyala, Sudhakar; Raj, V R Rana; Mohanty, Mira; Mohanan, P V; Nair, Prabha D

    2011-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disorder resulting from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. In this study a tissue engineering approach was compared with a macroencapsulation approach to reverse type 1 diabetes in a rat model, using mouse pancreatic progenitor cell (PPC)-derived islet-like clusters and mouse islets. For the tissue engineering approach the cells were cultured on gelatin scaffolds cross-linked with EDC in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone in vitro (GPE scaffolds), while for the macroencapsulation approach the cells were encapsulated in polyurethane-polyvinylpyrrolidone semi-interpenetrating networks. In the combination approach the cells cultured on GPE scaffolds were further encapsulated in a polyurethane-polyvinylpyrrolidone capsule. Real time PCR studies and the glucose challenge assay have shown that cells on GPE scaffolds could express and secrete insulin and glucagon in vitro. However, under in vivo conditions the animals treated by the tissue engineering approach died within 15-20 days and showed no reversal of their diabetes, due to infiltration of immune cells such as CD4 and CD8 cells and macrophages. In the macroencapsulation approach the animals showed euglycemia within 25 days, which was maintained for further 20 days, but after that the animals died. Interestingly, in the combination approach the animals showed reversal of hyperglycemia, and remained euglycemic for up to 3 months. The time needed to achieve initial euglycemia was different with different cell types, i.e. the combination approach with mouse islets achieved euglycemia within 15 days, whereas with PPC-derived islet-like clusters euglycemia was achieved within 25 days. This study confirmed that a combination of tissue engineering and macroencapsulation with mouse islets could reverse diabetes and maintain euglycemia in an experimental diabetes rat model for 90 days.

  17. Hexarelin, a novel GHRP-6 analog, stimulates growth hormone (GH) release in a GH-secreting rat cell line (GH1) insensitive to GH-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Giustina, A; Bonfanti, C; Licini, M; Ragni, G; Stefana, B

    1997-05-14

    Previous studies demonstrated that GHRP-6 has modest GH-releasing activity in primary pituitary cell monolayer cultures. However, the effects of this peptide have always been tested on cells very sensitive to GHRH. We have previously reported that GHRH is unable to stimulate GH secretion in the GH1 rat tumor cell line. The aim of the study was to assess for the first time the effect on GH secretion of the GHRP-6 analog, hexarelin, in the GH1 cells; moreover, we investigated the potential involvement of GHRH in the effects of hexarelin in the GH1 rat cell line. The GHRP-6 analog hexarelin (0.01-1 microM) significantly stimulated GH release in both normal and GH1 rat cells. The greatest GH-releasing effect of hexarelin was observed with the 1 microM dose both in GH1 (155+/-25% vs. control wells) and in normal rat pituitary cells (185+/-23% vs. control wells). GHRH significantly stimulated GH secretion in normal rat somatotrophs (3-fold increase). In this latter cell model, GHRH and hexarelin were demonstrated to have additive stimulatory effects on GH secretion. Conversely, GHRH did not affect hexarelin-stimulated GH release in GH1 cells at any of the doses used. Finally, 8Br-cAMP significantly stimulated GH secretion in both normal rat and GH1 cells. These results provide in vitro evidence that non-GHRH-mediated pathways for GHRP action exist. Moreover, the observation that cells not sensitive to GHRH can be significantly stimulated by hexarelin strongly suggests that GHRPs and GHRH have two distinct sites and modes of action at the pituitary level.

  18. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  19. In vitro differentiation of human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stromal cells to insulin producing clusters

    PubMed Central

    Nekoei, Seideh Masoomeh; Azarpira, Negar; Sadeghi, Ladan; Kamalifar, Sulmaz

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differentiation of human Wharton’s jelly derived mesenchymal stromal cells (WJ-MSCs) to insulin producing clusters (IPC) this study was conducted. METHODS: The umbilical cords samples were collected from full term caesarian section mothers and the WJ-MSCS were cultured from tissue explants in High glucose-Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (H-DMEM); H-DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and antibiotics. The expression of CD90, CD44, CD105, CD34 and CD133 as well as osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of cells in appropriate medium were also evaluated. The cells were differentiated toward IPC with changing the culture medium and adding the small molecules such as nicotinic acid, epidermal growth factor, and exendin-4 during 3 wk period. The gene expression of PDX1, NGN3, Glut2, insulin was monitored by reveres transcription polymerase chain reaction method. The differentiated clusters were stained with Dithizone (DTZ) which confirms the presence of insulin granules. The insulin challenge test (low and high glucose concentration in Krebs-Ringer HEPES buffer) was also used to evaluate the functional properties of differentiated clusters. RESULTS: WJ-MSCS were positive for mesenchymal surface markers (CD90, CD44, CD105), and negative for CD34 and CD133. The accumulation of lipid vacuoles and deposition of calcium mineral in cells were considered as adipogenic and osteogenic potential of WJ-MSCS. The cells also expressed the transcriptional factors such as Nanog and OCT4. During this three step differentiation, the WJ-MSCS morphology was gradually changed from spindle shaped cells in to epithelioid cells and eventually to three dimensional clusters. The clusters expressed PDX1, NGN3, Glut2, and insulin. The cells became bright red color when stained with DTZ and the insulin secretion was also confirmed. In glucose challenge test a significant increase in insulin secretion from 0.91 ± 0.04 μIu/mL (2.8 mmol/L glucose) to

  20. Elutriated stem cells derived from the adult bone marrow differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vivo and reverse chemical diabetes.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Fabian, Ina; Askenasy, Nadir

    2012-01-01

    An ongoing debate surrounds the existence of stem cells in the adult endowed with capacity to differentiate into multiple lineages. We examined the possibility that adult bone marrow cells participate in recovery from chemical diabetes through neogenesis of insulin-producing cells. Small-sized cells negative for lineage markers derived by counterflow centrifugal elutriation from the bone marrow were transplanted into mice made diabetic with streptozotocin and sublethal irradiation. These cells homed efficiently to the injured islets and contributed to tissue revascularization. Islet-homed CD45-negative donor cells identified by sex chromosomes downregulated GFP, expressed PDX-1 and proinsulin, and converted the hormone precursor to insulin. An estimated 7.6% contribution of newly formed insulin-producing cells to islet cellularity increased serum insulin and stabilized glycemic control starting at 5 weeks post-transplant and persisting for 20 weeks. Newly differentiated cells displayed normal diploid genotype and there was no evidence of fusion between the grafted stem cells or their myeloid progeny and injured β-cells. Considering the extensive functional incorporation of insulin-producing donor cells in the injured islets, we conclude that the adult bone marrow contains a subset of small cells endowed with plastic developmental capacity.

  1. Functional characterization of GH-like homolog in amphioxus reveals an ancient origin of GH/GH receptor system.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengyang; Gao, Zhan; Ji, Dongrui; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-12-01

    Amphioxus belongs to the subphylum cephalochordata, an extant representative of the most basal chordates. Despite many studies on the endocrine system of amphioxus, no evidence showed the presence of pituitary hormones. In this study, we clearly demonstrated the existence of a functional GH-like hormone in amphioxus, which is able to bind purified GH receptors, stimulate IGF-I expression, promote growth rate of fish, and rescue embryonic defects caused by a shortage of GH. We also showed the presence of a GH/prolactin-like-binding protein containing the entire hormone binding domain of GH/prolactin receptors in amphioxus, which is widely expressed among tissues, and interacts with the GH-like hormone. It is clear from these results that the GH/GH receptor-like system is present in amphioxus and, hence, in all classes of chordates. Notably, the GH-like hormone appears to be the only member of the vertebrate pituitary hormones family in amphioxus, suggesting that the hormone is the ancestral peptide that originated first in the molecular evolution of the pituitary hormones family in chordates. These data collectively suggest that a vertebrate-like neuroendocrine axis setting has already emerged in amphioxus, which lays a foundation for subsequent formation of hypothalamic-pituitary system in vertebrates.

  2. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  3. Unwinding the Novel Genes Involved in the Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells: A Network-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Blessia, T Femlin; Singh, Sachidanand; Vennila, J Jannet

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes is one of the main causes of death in the world. Diabetes is marked by high blood glucose levels and develops when the body doesn't produce enough insulin or is not able to use insulin effectively, or both. Type I diabetes is a chronic sickness caused by lack of insulin due to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Research on permanent cure for diabetes is in progress with several remarkable findings in the past few decades among which stem cell therapy has turned out to be a promising way to cure diabetes. Stem cells have the remarkable potential to differentiate into glucose-responsive beta cells through controlled differentiation protocols. Discovering novel targets that could potentially influence the differentiation to specific cell type will help in disease therapy. The present work focuses on finding novel genes or transcription factors involved in the human embryonic stem cell differentiation into insulin-producing beta cells using network biology approach. The interactome of 321 genes and their associated molecules involved in human embryonic stem cell differentiation into beta cells was constructed, which includes 1937 nodes and 8105 edges with a scale-free topology. Pathway analysis for the hubs obtained through MCODE revealed that four highly interactive hubs were relevant to embryonic stem cell differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Their role in different pathways and stem cell differentiation was studied. Centrality parameters were applied to identify the potential controllers of the differentiation processes: BMP4, SALL4, ZIC1, NTS, RNF2, FOXO1, AKT1 and GATA4. This type of approach gives an insight to identify potential genes/transcription factors which may play influential role in many complex biological processes.

  4. In Vivo Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells on Electrospun Poly-L-Lactide Acid Scaffolds Coated with Matricaria chamomilla L. Oil

    PubMed Central

    Fazili, Afsaneh; Gholami, Soghra; Minaie Zangi, Bagher; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Gholami, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the in vivo differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into insulin producing cells (IPCs) on electrospun poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) scaffolds coated with Matricaria chammomila L. (chamomile) oil. Materials and Methods In this interventional, experimental study adipose MSCs (AMSCs) were isolated from 12 adult male New Zealand white rabbits and characterized by flow cytometry. AMSCs were subsequently differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic lines. Cells were seeded onto either a PLLA scaffold (control) or PLLA scaffold coated with chamomile oil (experimental). A total of 24 scaffolds were inserted into the pancreatic area of each rabbit and placement was confirmed by ultrasound. After 21 days, immunohistochemistry analysis of insulin-producing like cells on protein levels confirmed insulin expression of insulin producing cells (IPSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) determined the expressions of genes related to pancreatic endocrine development and function. Results Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results confirmed the existence of oil on the surface of the PLLA scaffold. The results showed a new peak at 2854 cm-1 for the aliphatic CH2 bond. Pdx1 expression was 0.051 ± 0.007 in the experimental group and 0.009 ± 0.002 in the control group. There was significantly increased insulin expression in the scaffold coated with chamomile oil (0.09 ± 0.001) compared to control group (0.063 ± 0.009, P≤0.05). Both groups expressed Ngn3 and Pdx1 specific markers and pancreatic tissue was observed at 21 days post transplantation. Conclusion The pancreatic region is an optimal site for differentiation of AMSCs to IPCs. Chamomile oil (as an antioxidant agent) can affect cell adhesion to the scaffold and increase cell differentiation. In addition, the oil may lead to increased blood glucose uptake in pathways in the muscles, liver and fatty tissue of a diabetic animal model by some probable molecular mechanisms

  5. Generation of insulin-producing β-like cells from human iPS cells in a defined and completely xeno-free culture system.

    PubMed

    Shahjalal, Hussain Md; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Sakano, Daisuke; Kikawa, Kazuhide; Ogaki, Soichiro; Baba, Hideo; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2014-10-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells are considered a potential source for the generation of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells because of their differentiation capacity. In this study, we have developed a five-step xeno-free culture system to efficiently differentiate hiPS cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. We found that a high NOGGIN concentration is crucial for specifically inducing the differentiation first into pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1)-positive pancreatic progenitors and then into neurogenin 3 (NGN3)-expressing pancreatic endocrine progenitors, while suppressing the differentiation into hepatic or intestinal cells. We also found that a combination of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), exendin-4, and nicotinamide was important for the differentiation into insulin single-positive cells that expressed various pancreatic β-cell markers. Most notably, the differentiated cells contained endogenous C-peptide pools that were released in response to various insulin secretagogues and high levels of glucose. Therefore, our results demonstrate the feasibility of generating hiPS-derived pancreatic β-cells under xeno-free conditions and highlight their potential to treat patients with type 1 diabetes.

  6. Models of GH deficiency in animal studies.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Luque, Raul M; Castaño, Justo P

    2016-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone released from pituitary somatotrope cells that promotes growth, cell division and regeneration by acting directly through the GH receptor (GHR), or indirectly via hepatic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) production. GH deficiency (GHD) can cause severe consequences, such as growth failure, changes in body composition and altered insulin sensitivity, depending of the origin, time of onset (childhood or adulthood) or duration of GHD. The highly variable clinical phenotypes of GHD can now be better understood through research on transgenic and naturally-occurring animal models, which are widely employed to investigate the origin, phenotype, and consequences of GHD, and particularly the underlying mechanisms of metabolic disorders associated to GHD. Here, we reviewed the most salient aspects of GH biology, from somatotrope development to GH actions, linked to certain GHD types, as well as the animal models employed to reproduce these GHD-associated alterations.

  7. Lymphocyte GH-axis hormones in immunity.

    PubMed

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    The production and utilization of common ligands and their receptors by cells of the immune and neuroendocrine systems constitutes a biochemical information circuit between and within the immune and neuroendocrine systems. The sharing of ligands and receptors allows the immune system to serve as the sixth sense notifying the nervous system of the presence of foreign entities. Within this framework, it is also clear that immune cell functions can be altered by neuroendocrine hormones and that cells of the immune system have the ability to produce neuroendocrine hormones. This review summarizes a part of this knowledge with particular emphasis on growth hormone (GH). The past two decades have uncovered a lot of detail about the actions of GH, acting through its receptor, at the molecular and cellular level and its influence on the immune system. The production and action of immune cell-derived GH is less well developed although its important role in immunity is also slowly emerging. Here we discuss the production of GH, GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their cognate receptors on cells of the immune system and their influence via endocrine/autocrine/paracrine and intracrine pathways on immune function. The intracellular mechanisms of action of immune cell-derived GH are still largely unexplored, and it is anticipated that further work in this particular area will establish an important role for this source of GH in normal physiology and in pathologic situations.

  8. Endogenous growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone is required for GH responses to pharmacological stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, C A; DeMott-Friberg, R; Barkan, A L

    1996-01-01

    The roles of hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and of somatostatin (SRIF) in pharmacologically stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion in humans are unclear. GH responses could result either from GHRH release or from acute decline in SRIF secretion. To assess directly the role of endogenous GHRH in human GH secretion, we have used a competitive GHRH antagonist, (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Arg2)GHRH(1-29)NH2 (GHRH-Ant), which we have previously shown is able to block the GH response to GHRH. We first tested whether an acute decline in SRIF, independent of GHRH action, would release GH. Pretreatment with GHRH-Ant abolished the GH response to exogenous GHRH (0.33 microgram/kg i.v.) but did not modify the GH rise after termination of an SRIF infusion. We then investigated the role of endogenous GHRH in the GH responses to pharmacologic stimuli of GH release. The GH responses to arginine (30 g i.v. over 30 min), L-dopa (0.5 g orally), insulin hypoglycemia (0.1 U/Kg i.v.), clonidine (0.25 mg orally), or pyridostigmine (60 mg orally) were measured in healthy young men after pretreatment with either saline of GHRH-Ant 400 microgram/kg i.v. In every case, GH release was significantly suppressed by GHRH-Ant. We conclude that endogenous GHRH is required for the GH response to each of these pharmacologic stimuli. Acute release of hypothalamic GHRH may be a common mechanism by which these compounds mediate GH secretion. PMID:8613546

  9. Knock-down of ZBED6 in insulin-producing cells promotes N-cadherin junctions between beta-cells and neural crest stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Xie, Beichen; Qi, Yu; Wallerman, Ola; Vasylovska, Svitlana; Andersson, Leif; Kozlova, Elena Nickolaevna; Welsh, Nils

    2016-01-01

    The role of the novel transcription factor ZBED6 for the adhesion/clustering of insulin-producing mouse MIN6 and βTC6 cells was investigated. Zbed6-silencing in the insulin producing cells resulted in increased three-dimensional cell-cell clustering and decreased adhesion to mouse laminin and human laminin 511. This was paralleled by a weaker focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at laminin binding sites. Zbed6-silenced cells expressed less E-cadherin and more N-cadherin at cell-to-cell junctions. A strong ZBED6-binding site close to the N-cadherin gene transcription start site was observed. Three-dimensional clustering in Zbed6-silenced cells was prevented by an N-cadherin neutralizing antibody and by N-cadherin knockdown. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) with Zbed6-silenced cells, but not with control cells, stimulated the outgrowth of NCSC processes. The cell-to-cell junctions between NCSCs and βTC6 cells stained more intensely for N-cadherin when Zbed6-silenced cells were co-cultured with NCSCs. We conclude that ZBED6 decreases the ratio between N- and E-cadherin. A lower N- to E-cadherin ratio may hamper the formation of three-dimensional beta-cell clusters and cell-to-cell junctions with NCSC, and instead promote efficient attachment to a laminin support and monolayer growth. Thus, by controlling beta-cell adhesion and cell-to-cell junctions, ZBED6 might play an important role in beta-cell differentiation, proliferation and survival. PMID:26750727

  10. Generation of functional insulin-producing cells from neonatal porcine liver-derived cells by PDX1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA.

    PubMed

    Ham, Dong-Sik; Shin, Juyoung; Kim, Ji-Won; Park, Heon-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Surrogate β-cells derived from stem cells are needed to cure type 1 diabetes, and neonatal liver cells may be an attractive alternative to stem cells for the generation of β-cells. In this study, we attempted to generate insulin-producing cells from neonatal porcine liver-derived cells using adenoviruses carrying three genes: pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor1 (PDX1)/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD and v-maf musculo aponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA), which are all known to play critical roles in pancreatic development. Isolated neonatal porcine liver-derived cells were sequentially transduced with triple adenoviruses and grown in induction medium containing a high concentration of glucose, epidermal growth factors, nicotinamide and a low concentration of serum following the induction of aggregation for further maturation. We noted that the cells displayed a number of molecular characteristics of pancreatic β-cells, including expressing several transcription factors necessary for β-cell development and function. In addition, these cells synthesized and physiologically secreted insulin. Transplanting these differentiated cells into streptozotocin-induced immunodeficient diabetic mice led to the reversal of hyperglycemia, and more than 18% of the cells in the grafts expressed insulin at 6 weeks after transplantation. These data suggested that neonatal porcine liver-derived cells can be differentiated into functional insulin-producing cells under the culture conditions presented in this report and indicated that neonatal porcine liver-derived cells (NPLCs) might be useful as a potential source of cells for β-cell replacement therapy in efforts to cure type I diabetes.

  11. Cytokine induction of Fas gene expression in insulin-producing cells requires the transcription factors NF-kappaB and C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Darville, M I; Eizirik, D L

    2001-08-01

    Fas-mediated cell death may play a role in the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta-cells in type 1 diabetes. beta-Cells do not express Fas under physiological conditions, but Fas mRNA and protein are induced in cytokine-exposed mouse and human islets, rendering the beta-cells susceptible to Fas ligand-induced apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular regulation of Fas by cytokines in rat beta-cells and in insulin-producing RINm5F cells. Fas mRNA expression was increased 15-fold in fluorescence-activated cell sorting-purified rat beta-cells exposed to interleukin (IL)-1beta, whereas gamma-interferon had no effect. Transfection experiments of rat Fas promoter-luciferase reporter constructs into purified rat beta-cells and RINm5F insulinoma cells identified an IL-1beta-responsive region between nucleotides -223 and -54. Inactivation of two adjacent NF-kappaB and C/EBP sites in this region abolished IL-1beta-induced Fas promoter activity in RINm5F cells. Binding of NF-kappaB and C/EBP factors to their respective sites was confirmed by gel shift assays. In cotransfection experiments, NF-kappaB p65 transactivated the Fas promoter. NF-kappaB p50 and C/EBPbeta overexpression had no effect by themselves on the Fas promoter activity, but when cotransfected with p65, each factor inhibited transactivation by p65. These results suggest a critical role for NF-kappaB and C/EBP factors in cytokine-regulation of Fas expression in insulin-producing cells.

  12. Correlation between GH and IGF-1 during treatment for acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Edward H; Jane, John A; Thorner, Michael O; Pledger, Carrie L; Sheehan, Jason P; Vance, Mary Lee

    2016-11-18

    OBJECTIVE The relationship between growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in patients with acromegaly as serial levels drop over time after treatment has not been examined previously. Knowledge of this relationship is important to correlate pretreatment levels that best predict response to treatment. To examine the correlation between GH and IGF-1 and IGF-1 z-scores over a wide range of GH levels, the authors examined serial GH and IGF-1 levels at intervals before and after surgery and radiosurgery for acromegaly. METHODS This retrospective analysis correlates 414 pairs of GH and IGF-1 values in 93 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS Absolute IGF-1 levels increase linearly with GH levels only up to a GH of 4 ng/ml, and with IGF-1 z-scores only to a GH level of 1 ng/ml. Between GH levels of 1 and 10 ng/ml, increases in IGF-1 z-scores relative to changes in GH diminish and then plateau at GH concentrations of about 10 ng/ml. From patient to patient there is a wide range of threshold GH levels beyond which IGF-1 increases are no longer linear, GH levels at which the IGF-1 response plateaus, IGF-1 levels at similar GH values after the IGF-1 response plateaus, and of IGF-1 levels at similar GH levels. CONCLUSIONS In acromegaly, although IGF-1 levels represent a combination of the integrated effects of GH secretion and GH action, the tumor produces GH, not IGF-1. Nonlinearity between GH and IGF-1 occurs at GH levels far below those previously recognized. To monitor tumor activity and tumor viability requires measurement of GH levels.

  13. GH3-Mediated Auxin Conjugation Can Result in Either Transient or Oscillatory Transcriptional Auxin Responses.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Nathan; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, John R

    2016-02-01

    The conjugation of the phytohormone auxin to amino acids via members of the gene family GH3 is an important component in the auxin-degradation pathway in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, as well as many other plant species. Since the GH3 genes are themselves up-regulated in response to auxin, providing a negative feedback on intracellular auxin levels, it is hypothesised that the GH3s have a role in auxin homoeostasis. To investigate this, we develop a mathematical model of auxin signalling and response that includes the auxin-inducible negative feedback from GH3 on the rate of auxin degradation. In addition, we include a positive feedback on the rate of auxin input via the auxin influx transporter LAX3, shown previously to be expressed in response to auxin and to have an important role during lateral root emergence. In the absence of the LAX3 positive feedback, we show that the GH3 negative feedback suffices to generate a transient transcriptional response to auxin in the shape of damped oscillations of the model system. When LAX3 positive feedback is present, sustained oscillations of the system are possible. Using steady-state analyses, we identify and discuss key parameters affecting the oscillatory behaviour of the model. The transient peak of auxin and subsequent transcriptional response caused by the up-regulation of GH3 represents a possible protective homoeostasis mechanism that may be used by plant cells in response to excess auxin.

  14. Functional characterization of GhSOC1 and GhMADS42 homologs from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wei, Jianghui; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Chengshe; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis flowering pathway, MADS-box genes encode transcription factors, with their structures and functions highly conserved in many species. In our study, two MADS-box genes GhSOC1 and GhMADS42 (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were cloned from upland cotton CCRI36 and transformed into Arabidopsis. GhSOC1 was additionally transformed into upland cotton. Comparative analysis demonstrated sequence conservation between GhSOC1 and GhMADS42 and genes of other plant species. Tissue-specific expression analysis of GhSOC1 and GhMADS42 revealed spatiotemporal expression patterns involving high transcript levels in leaves, shoot apical buds, and flowers. In addition, overexpression of both GhSOC1 and GhMADS42 in Arabidopsis accelerated flowering, with GhMADS42 transgenic plants showing abnormal floral organ phenotypes. Overexpression of GhSOC1 in upland cotton also produced variations in floral organs. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that GhSOC1 could regulate GhMADS41 and GhMADS42, but not FLOWERING LOCUS T, by directly binding to the genes promoter. Finally, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation approaches were undertaken to better understand the interaction of GhSOC1 and other MADS-box factors. These experiments showed that GhSOC1 can interact with APETALA1/FRUITFULL-like proteins in cotton.

  15. Regulation of the growth hormone (GH) receptor and GH-binding protein mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kaji, Hidesuke; Ohashi, Shin-Ichirou; Abe, Hiromi; Chihara, Kazuo

    1994-12-31

    In fasting rats, a transient increase in growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) mRNA levels was observed after 1 day, in muscle, heart, and liver, but not in fat tissues. The liver GH receptor (GHR) mRNA level was significantly increased after 1 day (but not after 5 days) of bovine GH (bGH) treatment in fed rats. Both the liver GHR mRNA level and the net increment of plasma IGF-I markedly decreased after 5 days of bGH administration in fasting rats. These findings suggest that GHR and GHBP mRNAs in the liver are expressed in a different way and that the expression of GHBP mRNA is regulated differently between tissues, at least in rats. The results also suggest that refractoriness to GH in a sustained fasting state might be beneficial in preventing anabolic effects of GH. In humans, GHR mRNA in lymphocytes, from subjects with either GH-deficiency or acromegaly, could be detected by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. In one patient with partial GH insensitivity, a heterozygous missense mutation (P561T) was identified in the cytoplasmic domain of GHR. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Activities of Amphioxus GH-Like Protein in Osmoregulation: Insight into Origin of Vertebrate GH Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyang; Jiang, Chengyan

    2017-01-01

    GH is known to play an important role in both growth promotion and osmoregulation in vertebrates. We have shown that amphioxus possesses a single GH-like hormone (GHl) gene encoding a functional protein capable of promoting growth. However, if GHl can mediate osmoregulation remains open. Here, we demonstrated clearly that GHl increased not only the survival rate of amphioxus but also the muscle moisture under high salinity. Moreover, GHl induced the expression of both the ion transporter Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) in the gill as well as the mediator of GH action IGFl in the hepatic caecum, indicating that GHl fulfills this osmoregulatory activity through the same mechanisms of vertebrate GH. These results together suggest that the osmoregulatory activities of GH had emerged in the basal chordate amphioxus. We also proposed a new model depicting the origin of pituitary hormone family in vertebrates.

  17. Inflammatory cytokine signaling in insulin producing beta-cells enhances the colocalization correlation coefficient between L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jai

    2008-08-01

    The immunological processes in type 1 diabetes and metabolic/inflammatory disorder in type 2 diabetes converge on common signaling pathway(s) leading to beta-cell death in these two diseases. The cytokine-mediated beta-cell death seems to be dependent on voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-mediated Ca2+ entry. The Ca2+ handling molecular networks control the homeostasis of [Ca2+]i in the beta-cell. The activity and membrane density of VDCC are regulated by several mechanisms including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). CaR is a 123-kDa seven transmembrane extracellular Ca2+ sensing protein that belongs to GPCR family C. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), is a cytokine widely known to activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription in beta-cells. To obtain a better understanding of TNF-alpha-induced molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC, confocal fluorescence measurements were performed on insulin-producing beta-cells exposed to varying concentrations of TNF-alpha and the results are discussed in the light of increased colocalization correlation coefficient. The insulin producing beta-cells were exposed to 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 ng/ml TNF-alpha for 24 h at 37 degrees . The cells were then immunolabelled with antibodies directed against CaR, VDCC, and NF-kappaB. The confocal fluorescence imaging data showed enhancement in the colocalization correlation coefficient between CaR and VDCC in beta-cells exposed to TNF-alpha thereby indicating increased membrane delimited spatial interactions between these two membrane proteins. TNF-alpha-induced colocalization of VDCC with CaR was inhibited by nimodipine, an inhibitor of L-type VDCC thereby suggesting that VDCC activity is required for spatial interactions with CaR. The 3-D confocal fluorescence imaging data also demonstrated that addition of TNF-alpha to RIN cells led to the translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Such molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC in tissues

  18. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  19. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  20. Growth hormone and cancer: GH production and action in glioma?

    PubMed

    Lea, Robert W; Dawson, Timothy; Martinez-Moreno, Carlos G; El-Abry, Nasra; Harvey, Steve

    2015-09-01

    The hypersecretion of pituitary growth hormone (GH) is associated with an increased risk of cancer, while reducing pituitary GH signaling reduces this risk. Roles for pituitary GH in cancer are therefore well established. The expression of the GH gene is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland and it is now known to occur in many extrapituitary tissues, in which it has local autocrine or paracrine actions, rather than endocrine function. It is, for instance, expressed in cancers of the prostate, lung, skin, endometrium and colon. The oncogenicity of autocrine GH may also be greater than that induced by endocrine or exogenous GH, as higher concentrations of GHR antagonists are required to inhibit its actions. This may reflect the fact that autocrine GH is thought to act at intracellular receptors directly after synthesis, in compartments not readily accessible to endocrine (or exogenous) GH. The roles and actions of extrapituitary GH in cancer may therefore differ from those of pituitary GH. The possibility that GH may be expressed and act in glioma tumors was therefore examined by immunohistochemistry. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of abundant GH- and GH receptor (GHR-) immunoreactivity in glioma, in which they were co-localized in cytoplasmic but not nuclear compartments. These results demonstrate that glioma differs from most cancers in lacking nuclear GHRs, but GH is nevertheless likely to have autocrine or paracrine actions in the induction and progression of glioma.

  1. Effect of zinc binding residues in growth hormone (GH) and altered intracellular zinc content on regulated GH secretion.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Vibor; Miletta, Maria Consolata; Eblé, Andrée; Iliev, Daniel I; Binder, Gerhard; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus E

    2013-11-01

    Endocrine cells store hormones in concentrated forms (aggregates) in dense-core secretory granules that are released upon appropriate stimulation. Zn(2+) binding to GH through amino acid residues His18, His21, and Glu174 are essential for GH dimerization and might mediate its aggregation and storage in secretory granules. To investigate whether GH-1 gene mutations at these positions interfere with this process, GH secretion and intracellular production were analyzed in GC cells (rat pituitary cell line) transiently expressing wt-GH and/or GH Zn mutant (GH-H18A-H21A-E174A) in forskolin-stimulated vs nonstimulated conditions. Reduced secretion of the mutant variant (alone or coexpressed with wt-GH) compared with wt-GH after forskolin stimulation was observed, whereas an increased intracellular accumulation of GH Zn mutant vs wt-GH correlates with its altered extracellular secretion. Depleting Zn(2+) from culture medium using N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylemethyl)ethylenediamine, a high-affinity Zn(2+) chelator, led to a significant reduction of the stimulated wt-GH secretion. Furthermore, externally added Zn(2+) to culture medium increased intracellular free Zn(2+) levels and recovered wt-GH secretion, suggesting its direct dependence on free Zn(2+) levels after forskolin stimulation. Confocal microscopy analysis of the intracellular secretory pathway of wt-GH and GH Zn mutant indicated that both variants pass through the regulated secretory pathway in a similar manner. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that loss of affinity of GH to Zn(2+) as well as altering intracellular free Zn(2+) content may interfere with normal GH dimerization (aggregation) and storage of the mutant variant (alone or with wt-GH), which could possibly explain impaired GH secretion.

  2. The influence of growth hormone (GH) deficiency and GH replacement on quality of life in GH-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Deijen, J B; van der Veen, E A

    1999-01-01

    The total absence of hormones such as cortisol or thyroxine causes death within weeks. Lack of estrogen or testosterone is followed by infertility and impaired sexual functioning. Relative deficiencies of almost all classical hormones have a substantial impact on quality of life (QOL). However, in contrast to virtually all aspects of metabolism, QOL is difficult to measure. Only recently have tests been developed to assess general QOL, whereas specific tests address those aspects of QOL affected only in specific situations or disease states. For example, in rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic disabling diseases, the use of measures of QOL to assess treatment modalities is almost routine. In diseases with overt metabolic disturbances attention is generally focused on changes in metabolic parameters and the issue of QOL is neglected. Although very few practising endocrinologists will not support the idea that they specialize in improving QOL, its assessment in patients with endocrinological disorders began only recently--in patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency only 10 years ago. It became apparent that GH deficiency in adult life is unmistakably followed by changes in parameters that determine QOL. In adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency, the unemployment rate is higher and the marriage rate lower than in the general population. Another symbol of success in life, the possession of a driver's licence, is less frequently attained by these patients. Most patients with adult-onset GH deficiency score unfavourably in questionnaires such as the Nottingham Health Profile. GH substitution is now available on a scale large enough to enable studies to be made of the effects on QOL in adults. The first studies were reported in 1989. However, only in the last few years have studies appeared in which sufficient number of patients and sufficient length of treatment were reported to allow a more objective judgement of the effectiveness of GH substitution. Although

  3. Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells: Evidence for Further Maturation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Mahmoud M; Zakaria, Mahmoud M; Refaie, Ayman F; Khater, Sherry M; Ashamallah, Sylvia A; Ismail, Amani M; El-Halawani, Sawsan M; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide evidence for further in vivo maturation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) derived from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBM-MSCs). HBM-MSCs were obtained from three insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic volunteers. Following expansion, cells were differentiated according to a trichostatin-A/GLP protocol. One million cells were transplanted under the renal capsule of 29 diabetic nude mice. Blood glucose, serum human insulin and c-peptide levels, and glucose tolerance curves were determined. Mice were euthanized 1, 2, 4, or 12 weeks after transplantation. IPC-bearing kidneys were immunolabeled, number of IPCs was counted, and expression of relevant genes was determined. At the end of in vitro differentiation, all pancreatic endocrine genes were expressed, albeit at very low values. The percentage of IPCs among transplanted cells was small (≤3%). Diabetic animals became euglycemic 8 ± 3 days after transplantation. Thereafter, the percentage of IPCs reached a mean of ~18% at 4 weeks. Relative gene expression of insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin showed a parallel increase. The ability of the transplanted cells to induce euglycemia was due to their further maturation in the favorable in vivo microenvironment. Elucidation of the exact mechanism(s) involved requires further investigation.

  4. Two distinct mechanisms mediate the involvement of bone marrow cells in islet remodeling: neogenesis of insulin-producing cells and support of islet recovery.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Sadikov, Tamila; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that small-sized bone marrow cells (BMCs) isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate and contribute to regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we assess some of the characteristics of these cells compared to elutriated hematopoietic progenitors (R/O) and whole BMCs in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced chemical diabetes. The GFP(bright)CD45(+) progeny of whole BMCs and R/O progenitors progressively infiltrate the pancreas with evolution of donor chimerism; are found at islet perimeter, vascular, and ductal walls; and have a modest impact on islet recovery from injury. In contrast, Fr25lin(-) cells incorporate in the islets, convert to GFP(dim)CD45(-)PDX-1(+) phenotypes, produce proinsulin, and secrete insulin with significant contribution to stabilization of glucose homeostasis. The elutriated Fr25lin(-) cells express low levels of CD45 and are negative for SCA-1 and c-kit, as removal of cells expressing these markers did not impair conversion to produce insulin. BMCs mediate two synergistic mechanisms that contribute to islet recovery from injury: support of islet remodeling by hematopoietic cells and neogenesis of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

  5. Pdx1 and controlled culture conditions induced differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells to insulin-producing clusters.

    PubMed

    Chun, So Young; Mack, David L; Moorefield, Emily; Oh, Se Heang; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Pettenati, Mark J; Yoo, James J; Coppi, Paolo De; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs) into insulin-producing clusters in vitro. Adenovirally-delivered mouse Pdx1 (Ad-Pdx1) induced human Pdx1 expression in hAFSCs and enhanced the coordinated expression of downstream β-cell markers. When Ad-Pdx1-transduced hAFSCs were sequentially treated with activin A, bFGF and nicotinamide and the culture plate surface coated with poly-l-ornithine, the expression of islet-associated human mRNAs for Pdx1, Pax6, Ngn3 and insulin was increased. C-peptide ELISA confirmed that Ad-Pdx1-transduced hAFSCs processed and secreted insulin in a manner consistent with that pathway in pancreatic β-cells. To sustain the β-cell-like phenotype and investigate the effect of three-dimensional (3D) conformation on the differentiation of hAFSCs, Pdx1-transduced cells were encapsulated in alginate and cultured long-term under serum-free conditions. Over 2 weeks, partially differentiated hAFSC clusters increased in size and increased insulin secretion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that ectopic Pdx1 expression initiates pancreatic differentiation in hAFSCs and that a β-cell-like phenotype can be augmented by culture conditions that mimic the stromal components and 3D geometry associated with pancreatic islets.

  6. Association of expression levels of pluripotency/stem cell markers with the differentiation outcome of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells into insulin producing cells.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Dina H; Kamal, Mohamed M; El-Kholy, Abd El-Latif G; El-Mesallamy, Hala O

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there has been much attention towards generation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) from stem cells, especially from Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs). However, generation of mature IPCs remains a challenge. Assessment of generation of IPCs was usually done by examining β-cell markers, however, assessment of pluripotency/stem cell markers drew less attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of pluripotency/stem cell markers during differentiation of WJ-MSCs into IPCs and the association of these levels with differentiation outcomes. WJ-MSCs were isolated, characterized then induced to differentiate into IPCs using three different protocols namely A, B and C. Differentiated IPCs were assessed by the expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers, together with β-cell markers using qRT-PCR, and functionally by measuring glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Differentiated cells from protocol A showed lowest expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers and relatively best GSIS. However, protocol B showed concomitant expression of pluripotency/stem cell and β-cell markers with relatively less insulin secretion as compared to protocol A. Protocol C failed to generate glucose-responsive IPCs. In conclusion, sustained expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers could be associated with the incomplete differentiation of WJ-MSCs into IPCs. A novel finding for which further investigations are warranted.

  7. GH/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in livers of mice overexpressing GH.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2015-04-01

    GH/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in the liver in adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess whether the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in the liver in these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus, but displays higher basal phosphorylation in the livers of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and the positive modulators glucocorticoid receptor and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting the activity of STAT5. The negative modulators cytokine-induced suppressor and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. The suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, indicating that they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in the liver in GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in accelerated but controlled growth.

  8. Leptin is a potent stimulator of spontaneous pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion and the GH response to GH-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Gurd, W; Lapointe, M

    1998-09-01

    Pulsatile GH secretion is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations in nutritional status, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Leptin, a recently discovered adipose cell hormone, is thought to be a sensor of energy stores and to regulate body mass, appetite, and metabolism at the level of the brain. Receptors for leptin are abundantly expressed in hypothalamic nuclei known to be involved in GH regulation, suggesting that leptin may serve as an important hormonal signal to the GH neuroendocrine axis in normal animals. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular infusion of recombinant murine leptin, at a dose of 1.2 microg/day for 7 days, on both spontaneous and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-stimulated GH secretion in free-moving adult male rats. Concomitant with suppressive effects on food intake, body weight, and basal plasma insulin-like growth factor I, insulin, and glucose concentrations, central infusion of leptin resulted in a 2- to 3-fold augmentation of GH pulse amplitude, 5-fold higher GH nadir levels, and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the integrated area under the 6-h GH response curve compared with those in vehicle-infused controls (P < 0.001). The intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin also produced a 3- to 4-fold increase in GHRH-induced GH release at GH trough times (P < 0.01). These studies demonstrate a potent stimulatory action of leptin on both spontaneous pulsatile GH secretion and the GH response to GHRH. The results suggest that the GH-releasing activity of leptin is mediated, at least in part, by an inhibition of hypothalamic somatostatin release. Thus, leptin may be a critical hormonal signal of nutritional status in the neuroendocrine regulation of pulsatile GH secretion.

  9. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7...

  10. Estradiol Regulates GH Releasing-Peptide's Interactions with GH-Releasing Hormone and Somatostatin in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Catalina; Rollene, Nanette L.; Erickson, Dana; Miles, John M.; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Estrogen stimulates pulsatile secretion of growth hormone (GH), albeit via mechanisms that are largely unknown. An untested hypothesis is that estradiol (E2) drives GH secretion by amplifying interactions among GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SS) and GH-releasing peptide (GHRP). Design The design comprised double-blind randomized prospective administration of transdermal E2 vs placebo to healthy postmenopausal women (N=24) followed by pulsatile GHRH or SS infusions for 13 hr overnight with or without continuous GHRP-2 stimulation. Methods Endpoints were mean GH concentration, deconvolved GH secretion, and GH ApEn (a regularity measure). Results By generalized ANOVA models, E2 vs placebo supplementation: (1) augmented mean (13-hr) GH concentrations (P=0.023), GHRH-induced pulsatile GH secretion over the first 3.0 hr (P=0.0085) and pulsatile GH secretion over the next 10 hr (P=0.054); (2) increased GHRP- (P=0.022) and SS- (P<0.001) modulated GH ApEn; and (3) did not amplify GHRH/GHRP synergy on pulsatile GH secretion. By linear regression, E2 concentrations correlated positively with GH secretion during GHRP-2 infusion (P=0.022), whereas BMI correlated negatively with GH secretion during GHRH (P=0.006) and combined GHRH/GHRP (P=0.015) stimulation. E2 and BMI jointly determined triple (combined L-arginine, GHRH, GHRP-2) stimulation of GH secretion after saline (R2=0.44, P=0.003) and pulsatile GHRH (R2=0.39, P=0.013) infusions. Conclusion In summary, in postmenopausal individuals, E2 supplementation augments the amount (mass) and alters the pattern (regularity) of GH secretion via interactions among GHRH, SS, GHRP, and BMI. These outcomes introduce a more complex model of E2 supplementation in coordinating GH secretion in aging women. PMID:24114435

  11. Growth hormone (GH) and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH): Co-localization and action in the chicken testis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; López-Marín, Luz M; Carranza, Martha; Giterman, Daniel; Harvey, Steve; Arámburo, Carlos; Luna, Maricela

    2014-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) gene expression is not confined to the pituitary gland and occurs in many extrapituitary tissues, including the chicken testis. The regulation and function of GH in extrapituitary tissues is, however, largely unknown. The possibility that chicken testicular GH might be regulated by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), as in the avian pituitary gland, was investigated in the present study. GHRH co-localized with GH in the germinal epithelium and in interstitial zones within the chicken testes, particularly in the spermatogonia and spermatocytes. In testicular cell cultures, exogenous human GHRH1-44 induced (at 1, 10 and 100nM) a dose-related increase in GH release. Western blot analysis showed a heterogeneous pattern in the GH moieties released during GHRH stimulation. 26kDa monomer GH was the most abundant moiety under basal conditions, but 15 and 17kDa isoforms were more abundant after GHRH stimulation. GHRH treatment also increased the abundance of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) immunoreactivity in the testes. This may have been GH-mediated, since exogenous GH similarly increased the incorporation of ((3)H)-thymidine into cultured testicular cells and increased their metabolic activity, as determined by increased MTT reduction. Furthermore, GH and GHRH immunoneutralization blocked GHRH-stimulated proliferative activity. In summary, these results indicate that GHRH stimulates testicular GH secretion in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Data also demonstrate proliferative actions of GHRH on testicular cell number and suggest that this action is mediated by local GH production.

  12. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications.

    PubMed

    Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S; Berryman, Darlene E

    2014-04-05

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant's preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant's therapeutic value in selected types of cancer.

  13. Metabolomics: a tool for the diagnosis of GH deficiency and for monitoring GH replacement?

    PubMed

    Höybye, Charlotte; Wahlström, Erik; Tollet-Egnell, Petra; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic value of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) for GH deficiency (GHD) in adults is not optimal. Molecular profiling could be used for biomarker discovery. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the serum metabolome between GHD patients and healthy controls, and identification of potential markers for diagnosis and/or for individual GH dosing. A total of ten patients with GHD, median age of 55 years and BMI of 27 kg/m(2), were compared with ten healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The serum metabolic profiles were generated using gas chromatography-coupled mass spectroscopy on fasting samples taken in the morning from the controls and at baseline and during 6 months of GH replacement in the patients with GHD. The difference in low-molecular weight compounds (LMC) distinguished the healthy controls from GHD patients. Among 285 measured metabolites, 13 were identified as being most important in differentiating GHD patients from controls. Of these, 11 could not be structurally annotated but many were classified as lipids. The difference in the LMC pattern persisted despite normalisation of IGF1 following GH replacement. GH replacement increased the levels of specific fatty acid compounds and decreased the levels of certain amino acids. No metabolite changed in response to GH treatment, to the same extent as IGF1. The measurement of 285 metabolites resulted in a unique pattern in GHD, but changes in the metabolite patterns during GH treatment were limited. The utility of metabolomics to find new markers in GHD and GH replacement remains to be further elucidated.

  14. Improved differentiation of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells by PDX-1 mRNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc; Thi-My Nguyen, Phuoc; Thai-Quynh Nguyen, Anh; Minh Pham, Vuong; Nguyen-Tu Bui, Anh; Thi-Tung Dang, Loan; Gia Nguyen, Khue; Kim Phan, Ngoc

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies have sought to identify diabetes mellitus treatment strategies with fewer side effects. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy was previously considered as a promising therapy; however, it requires the cells to be trans-differentiated into cells of the pancreatic-endocrine lineage before transplantation. Previous studies have shown that PDX-1 expression can facilitate MSC differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs), but the methods employed to date use viral or DNA-based tools to express PDX-1, with the associated risks of insertional mutation and immunogenicity. Thus, this study aimed to establish a new method to induce PDX-1 expression in MSCs by mRNA transfection. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord blood and expanded in vitro, with stemness confirmed by surface markers and multipotentiality. MSCs were transfected with PDX-1 mRNA by nucleofection and chemically induced to differentiate into IPCs (combinatorial group). This IPC differentiation was then compared with that of untransfected chemically induced cells (inducer group) and uninduced cells (control group). We found that PDX-1 mRNA transfection significantly improved the differentiation of MSCs into IPCs, with 8.3±2.5% IPCs in the combinatorial group, 3.21±2.11% in the inducer group and 0% in the control. Cells in the combinatorial group also strongly expressed several genes related to beta cells (Pdx-1, Ngn3, Nkx6.1 and insulin) and could produce C-peptide in the cytoplasm and insulin in the supernatant, which was dependent on the extracellular glucose concentration. These results indicate that PDX-1 mRNA may offer a promising approach to produce safe IPCs for clinical diabetes mellitus treatment.

  15. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  16. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  17. GH and IGF1: Roles in Energy Metabolism of Long-Living GH Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartke, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Of the multiple theories to explain exceptional longevity, the most robust of these has centered on the reduction of three anabolic protein hormones, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor, and insulin. GH mutant mice live 50% longer and exhibit significant differences in several aspects of energy metabolism as compared with wild-type mice. Mitochondrial metabolism is upregulated in the absence of GH, whereas in GH transgenic mice and dwarf mice treated with GH, multiple aspects of these pathways are suppressed. Core body temperature is markedly lower in dwarf mice, yet whole-body metabolism, as measured by indirect calorimetry, is surprisingly higher in Ames dwarf and Ghr–/– mice compared with normal controls. Elevated adiponectin, a key antiinflammatory cytokine, is also very likely to contribute to longevity in these mice. Thus, several important components related to energy metabolism are altered in GH mutant mice, and these differences are likely critical in aging processes and life-span extension. PMID:22466316

  18. GH safety workshop position paper: A critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however, t...

  19. The robustness of diagnostic tests for GH deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Since the 1970s, GH treatment has been an important tool in paediatric endocrinology for the management of growth retardation. It is now accepted that adults with severe GH deficiency (GHD) demonstrate impaired physical and psychological well-being and may benefit from replacement therapy with recombinant human GH. There is, however, an ongoing debate on how to diagnose GHD, especially in adults. A GH response below the cut-off limit of a GH-stimulation test is required in most cases for establishing GHD in adults. No 'gold standard' GH-stimulation test exists, but some GH stimulation tests may be more robust to variations in patient characteristics such as age and gender, as well as to pre-test conditions like heat exposure due to a hot bath or bicycling. However, body mass index (BMI) is negatively associated with GH-responses to all available GH-stimulation tests and glucocorticoid treatment, including conventional substitution therapy, influences the GH-responses. Recently, the role of IGF-I measurements in the clinical decision making has been discussed. The aim of this review is to discuss the available GH-stimulation tests. In this author's opinion, tests which include growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) tend to be more potent and robust, especially the GHRH+arginine test which has been proven to be of clinical use. In contrast, the insulin tolerance test (ITT) and the glucagon test appear to have too many drawbacks.

  20. Orexins (hypocretins) actions on the GHRH/somatostatin-GH axis.

    PubMed

    López, M; Nogueiras, R; Tena-Sempere, M; Diéguez, C

    2010-03-01

    The secretion of growth hormone (GH) is regulated through a complex neuroendocrine control system that includes two major hypothalamic regulators, namely GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SST) that stimulate and inhibit, respectively, GH release. Classical experiments involving damage and electrical stimulation suggested that the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) modulated the somatotropic axis, but the responsible molecular mechanisms were unclear. Evidence obtained during the last decade has demonstrated that orexins/hypocretins, a family of peptides expressed in the LHA controlling feeding and sleep, play an important regulatory role on GH, by inhibiting its secretion modulating GHRH and SST neurones. Considering that GH release is closely linked to the sleep-wake cycle and feeding state, understanding orexin/hypocretin physiology could open new therapeutic possibilities in the treatment of sleep, energy homeostasis and GH-related pathologies, such as GH deficiency.

  1. Sequence polymorphisms at the growth hormone GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z gene copies and their relationship with dairy traits in domestic sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Vacca, G M; Dettori, M L; Balia, F; Luridiana, S; Mura, M C; Carcangiu, V; Pazzola, M

    2013-09-01

    The purpose was to analyze the growth hormone GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z gene copies and to assess their possible association with milk traits in Sarda sheep. Two hundred multiparous lactating ewes were monitored. The two gene copies were amplified separately and each was used as template for a nested PCR, to investigate single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of the 5'UTR, exon-1, exon-5 and 3'UTR DNA regions. SSCP analysis revealed marked differences in the number of polymorphic patterns between the two genes. Sequencing revealed five nucleotide changes at the GH1/GH2-N gene. Five nucleotide changes occurred at the GH2-Z gene: one was located in exon-5 (c.556G > A) and resulted in a putative amino acid substitution G186S. All the nucleotide changes were copy-specific, except c.*30delT, which was common to both GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z. Variability in the promoter regions of each gene might have consequences on the expression level, due to the involvement in potential transcription factor binding sites. Both gene copies influenced milk yield. A correlation with milk protein and casein content was also evidenced. These results may have implications that make them useful for future breeding strategies in dairy sheep breeding.

  2. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  3. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ian R; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days.

  4. A model of consumers' risk perceptions toward recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH): the impact of risk characteristics.

    PubMed

    Grobe, D; Douthitt, R; Zepeda, L

    1999-08-01

    This study estimates the effect risk characteristics, described as outrage factors by Hadden, have on consumers' risk perceptions toward the food-related biotechnology, recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH). The outrage factors applicable to milk from rbGH treated herds are involuntary risk exposure, unfamiliarity with the product's production process, unnatural product characteristics, lack of trust in regulator's ability to protect consumers in the marketplace, and consumers' inability to distinguish milk from rbGH treated herds compared to milk from untreated herds. An empirical analysis of data from a national survey of household food shoppers reveals that outrage factors mediate risk perceptions. The results support the inclusion of outrage factors into the risk perception model for the rbGH product, as they add significantly to the explanatory power of the model and therefore reduce bias compared to a simpler model of attitudinal and demographic factors. The study indicates that outrage factors which have a significant impact on risk perceptions are the lack of trust in the FDA as a food-related information source, and perceiving no consumer benefits from farmers' use of rbGH. Communication strategies to reduce consumer risk perceptions therefore could utilize agencies perceived as more trustworthy and emphasize the benefits of rbGH use to consumers.

  5. Marker vaccine potential of a foot-and-mouth disease virus with a partial VP1 G-H loop deletion.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V L; Knowles, N J; Paton, D J; Barnett, P V

    2010-04-26

    Previous work in cattle and pigs demonstrated that protection against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) could be achieved following vaccination with chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccines, in which the VP1 G-H loop had been substituted with that from another serotype. This indicated that the VP1 G-H loop may not be essential for the protection of natural hosts against FMDV. If this could be substantiated there would be potential to develop FMD marker vaccines, characterised by the absence of this region. Here, we investigate the serological responses to vaccination with a virus with a partial VP1 G-H loop deletion in order to determine the likelihood of achieving protection and the potential of this virus as a marker vaccine. Inactivated, oil adjuvanted, vaccines, consisting of chemically inactivated virus with or without a partially deleted VP1 G-H loop, were used to immunise cattle. Serum was collected on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and antibody titres calculated using the virus neutralisation test (VNT) to estimate the likelihood of protection. We predict a good likelihood that cattle vaccinated with a vaccine characterised by a partial VP1 G-H loop would be protected against challenge with the same virus containing the VP1 G-H loop. We also present evidence on the potential of such a construct to act as a marker vaccine, when used in conjunction with a novel serological test.

  6. Plasma GH, IGF-I, and conception rate in cattle treated with low doses of recombinant bovine GH.

    PubMed

    Bilby, C R; Bader, J F; Salfen, B E; Youngquist, R S; Murphy, C N; Garverick, H A; Crooker, B A; Lucy, M C

    1999-05-01

    Blood and uterine concentrations of GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I are correlated with improved fertility in cattle. We tested incremental doses of a 14-d sustained release recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) to increase blood GH and IGF-I (Experiments 1 and 2). Conception rate after administration of an optimized rbGH dose was also tested (Experiment 3). In Experiment 1, lactating Holstein cows (n = 18) were randomly assigned to receive 0 (n = 5), 100 (n = 5), 200 (n = 5), or 500 (n = 3) mg sc rbGH. Increasing the doses of rbGH was associated with increased serum concentrations of GH and IGF-I. The 100- and 200-mg doses caused an IGF-I release that was below and above, respectively, the perceived optimum response. Therefore, Experiment 2 was designed to test a rbGH dose (167 mg), which was intermediate to the doses tested in Experiment 1. Lactating and nonlactating postpartum beef cows were treated with 0 (n = 9) or 167 (n = 9) mg rbGH at insemination. Plasma concentrations of GH and IGF-I were greater in rbGH-treated cows than in controls. Lactating cows had initial IGF-I concentrations that were lower than nonlactating cows. The 167-mg dose of rbGH increased plasma IGF-I concentrations in lactating cows to the levels of those of nonlactating cows. In Experiment 3, cows and heifers were administered either 0 or 167 mg rbGH at insemination. The conception rate for rbGH-treated and control cows was 54.4 and 49.5% (n = 617), and 46.0 and 46.3% for heifers (n = 1123), respectively. Herd (P<0.01) and parity (P<0.01) affected conception rate, but conception rates for rbGH and control cattle were similar. In summary, low doses of rbGH increased blood GH and restored blood IGF-I concentrations in lactating cows to those of nonlactating cows, but the conception rate in cows and heifers was not affected by administration of 14-d sustained-release rbGH at insemination.

  7. Aip regulates cAMP signalling and GH secretion in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Formosa, R; Xuereb-Anastasi, A; Vassallo, J

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been linked to predisposition to pituitary adenomas. However, the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. AIP interacts with a number of interesting proteins, including members of the cAMP signalling pathway that has been shown to be consistently altered in pituitary tumours. The functional role of Aip was investigated using both over-expression and knock down of Aip in GH3 cells. cAMP signalling and its downstream effectors, including GH secretion, were then investigated. cAMP signalling was analysed using cAMP assays, cAMP-response element-promoter luciferase reporter assays, real-time PCR and finally secreted GH quantification. Over-expression of wild-type (WT)-Aip reduced forskolin-induced cAMP signalling at the total cAMP level, luciferase reporter activity and target gene expression, when compared with empty vector and the non-functional R304X mutant. Additionally, GH secretion was reduced in WT-Aip over-expressing GH3 cells treated with forskolin. Knock down of endogenous Aip resulted in increased cAMP signalling but a decrease in GH secretion was also noted. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity using general and selective inhibitors did not completely ablate the effect of Aip on forskolin-augmented cAMP signalling. A mechanism by which Aip acts as a tumour suppressor, by maintaining a low cAMP signalling and concentration, is suggested. Mutations of Aip render the protein incapable of such activity. This effect appears not to be mediated by the AIP-PDE interaction, suggesting the involvement of other interacting partners in mediating this outcome.

  8. Comparative analysis of three hyperthermophilic GH1 and GH3 family members with industrial potential.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Corrêa, Thamy L R; Damásio, André R L; Diogo, José A; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Garcia, Wanius; Oliveira, Leandro C; Prade, Rolf A; Squina, Fabio M

    2015-01-25

    Beta-glucosidases (BGLs) are enzymes of great potential for several industrial processes, since they catalyze the cleavage of glucosidic bonds in cellobiose and other short cellooligosaccharides. However, features such as good stability to temperature, pH, ions and chemicals are required characteristics for industrial applications. This work aimed to provide a comparative biochemical analysis of three thermostable BGLs from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermotoga petrophila. The genes PfBgl1 (GH1 from P. furiosus), TpBgl1 (GH1 from T. petrophila) and TpBgl3 (GH3 from T. petrophila) were cloned and proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes are hyperthermophilic, showing highest activity at temperatures above 80°C at acidic (TpBgl3 and PfBgl1) and neutral (TpBgl1) pHs. The BGLs showed greatest stability to temperature mainly at pH 6.0. Activities using a set of different substrates suggested that TpBgl3 (GH3) is more specific than GH1 family members. In addition, the influence of six monosaccharides on BGL catalysis was assayed. While PfBgl1 and TpBgl3 seemed to be weakly inhibited by monosaccharides, TpBgl1 was activated, with xylose showing the strongest activation. Under the conditions tested, TpBgl1 showed the highest inhibition constant (Ki=1100.00mM) when compared with several BGLs previously characterized. The BGLs studied have potential for industrial use, specifically the enzymes belonging to the GH1 family, due to its broad substrate specificity and weak inhibition by glucose and other saccharides.

  9. Development of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) sustained-release microspheres by a low temperature aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion method.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Wu, Fei; Cai, Yunpeng; Xu, Mingxin; He, Mu; Yuan, Weien

    2014-10-01

    A novel method has been developed to protect Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres using an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion and S/O/W multi-emulsion method. This method develops a novel rhGH sustained-release system, which is based on the combination of rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles and PLGA microspheres. The process to fabricate rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles involves an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion system formed at the reduced temperature. RhGH was first dissolved in water together with dextran and polyethylene glycol, followed by stirring at the speed of 2000 rpm for 20-30s at 0°C, and then a freezing process could enable the dextran phase to separate from the continuous PEG phase and rhGH could preferentially be loaded with dextran. The sample after freezing and phase separation was then lyophilized to powder and washed with dichloromethane to remove the PEG. Once loaded in the dextran microparticles (1-4 μm in diameter), rhGH gained resistance to interface tensions and was encapsulated into PLGA microspheres without aggregation thereafter. RhGH released from PLGA microspheres was in a sustained manner with minimal burst and maximally reduced incomplete release in vitro. Single subcutaneous injection of rhGH-loaded PLGA microspheres to rats resulted in a stable plasma concentration for 30 days avoiding the drug concentration fluctuations after multiple injections of protein solutions. In a hypophysectomized rat model, the IGF-1 and bodyweight results showed that there were higher than the levels obtained for the sustained release formulation by W/O/W for 40 days. These results suggest that the microsphere delivery system had the potential to be an injectable depot for sustained-release of the biocompatible protein of rhGH.

  10. GH1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Growth hormone, a secreted protein which exists as a monomer, dimer, trimer, tetramer and pentamer and is disulfide-linked or non-covalently associated in homopolymeric and heteropolymeric combinations, plays an important role in growth control. Its major role in stimulating body growth is to stimulate the liver and other tissues to secrete IGF-1. It stimulates both the differentiation and proliferation of myoblasts. It also stimulates amino acid uptake and protein synthesis in muscle and other tissues. GH belongs to the somatotropin/prolactin family.

  11. G.H. Mead's social behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Cook, G A

    1977-10-01

    This paper seeks to clarify those conceptual foundations of G.H. Mead's social behaviorism which are assumed, but not made explicit, in that writer's well-known volume Mind, Self and Society. These foundations are shown to be an outgrowth of Mead's early commitment to the organic conception of conduct underlying the psychological functionalism of the Chicago School. Further light is shed upon Mead's position by pointing out the fundamental differences between his model of conduct and that characteristic of the behaviorist tradition in American psychology.

  12. Differential inhibition of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) activity in vitro by in vivo enhancing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J; Phillips, K; Borromeo, V

    2001-04-01

    We have previously described the effects of complexing recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) with the in vivo enhancing monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) OA11 and OA15 and the non-enhancing Mab OA14 on the subsequent activity of GH in different tissue culture models. We reported that all of these Mabs caused the inhibition of GH-stimulated Jak-2 tyrosine kinase phosphorylation in the GH responsive pre-adipocyte cell line 3T3-F442A. However, using the mouse myeloid cell line FDC-P1 transfected with the full length ovine GH receptor (GHR), we subsequently found that OA11 and OA14 remained inhibitory with respect to the end point measurement of GH stimulated mitogenesis but that OA15 had no inhibitory effect on GH stimulated mitogenesis in this cell line. In order to correlate longer term mitogenic effects of Mab-GH complexes with signalling events in this transfected cell line model, we now report on the effects of complexing with Mab on the subsequent GH stimulated phosphorylation of Stat5b (signal transducer and activator of transcription). In agreement with our data for the mitogenic activity of GH-Mab complexes, we found that OA11 and OA14 inhibit GH activation of Stat5b but that OA15 is not inhibitory. Further to this, the dose-response effect of both OA11 and OA14 on the GH stimulation of Stat5b in the FDC-P1-oGHR transfected cells correlates with the previously described dose-response effects for both Mabs in the context of GH stimulation of mitogenic effects. We conclude that in this oGHR transfected cell line model, Mab effects on short and long term GH signalling events are tightly correlated. The observation that neither of the in vivo enhancing Mabs--OA11 or OA15--amplifies the response to GH in our transfected cell line model, coupled with the differential nature of Mab effects on GH activity (OA11--inhibition; OA15--no effect) may argue for an in vivo mechanism for enhancement of GH activity.

  13. Moss (Physcomitrella patens) GH3 proteins act in auxin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Jülke, Sabine; Bierfreund, Nicole M; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Auxins are hormones involved in many cellular, physiological and developmental processes in seed plants and in mosses such as Physcomitrella patens. Control of auxin levels is achieved in higher plants via synthesis of auxin conjugates by members of the GH3 family. The role of the two GH3-like proteins from P. patens for growth and auxin homeostasis was therefore analysed. The in vivo-function of the two P. patens GH3 genes was investigated using single and double knockout mutants. The two P. patens GH3 proteins were also heterologously expressed to determine their enzymatic activity. Both P. patens GH3 enzymes accepted the auxin indole acetic acid (IAA) as substrate, but with different preferences for the amino acid to which it is attached. Cytoplasmic localization was shown for PpGH3-1 tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Targeted knock-out of either gene exhibited an increased sensitivity to auxin, resulting in growth inhibition. On plain mineral media mutants had higher levels of free IAA and less conjugated IAA than the wild type, and this effect was enhanced when auxin was supplied. The DeltaPpGH3-1/DeltaPpGH3-2 double knockout had almost no IAA amide conjugates but still synthesized ester conjugates. Taken together, these data suggest a developmentally controlled involvement of P. patens GH3 proteins in auxin homeostasis by conjugating excess of physiologically active free auxin to inactive IAA-amide conjugates.

  14. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications

    PubMed Central

    Kopchick, John J.; List, Edward O.; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant’s preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant’s therapeutic value in selected types of cancer. PMID:24035867

  15. Successive attachment of electrons to protonated Guanine: (G+H)* radicals and (G+H)- anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun D; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2006-11-02

    The structures, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of nine hydrogenated 9H-keto-guanine radicals (G+H)(*) and closed-shell anions (G+H)(-) are predicted using the carefully calibrated (Chem. Rev. 2002, 102, 231) B3LYP density functional method in conjunction with a DZP++ basis set. These radical and anionic species come from consecutive electron attachment to the corresponding protonated (G+H)(+) cations in low pH environments. The (G+H)(+) cations are studied using the same level of theory. The proton affinity (PA) of guanine computed in this research (228.1 kcal/mol) is within 0.7 kcal/mol of the latest experiment value. The radicals range over 41 kcal/mol in relative energy, with radical r1, in which H is attached at the C8 site of guanine, having the lowest energy. The lowest energy anion is a2, derived by hydride ion attachment at the C2 site of guanine. No stable N2-site hydride should exist in the gas phase. Structure a9 was predicted to be dissociative in this research. The theoretical adiabatic electron affinities (AEA), vertical electron affinities, and vertical detachment energies were computed, with AEAs ranging from 0.07 to 3.12 eV for the nine radicals.

  16. Silencing GhNDR1 and GhMKK2 compromises cotton resistance to Verticillium wilt.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiquan; Wheeler, Terry; Li, Zhaohu; Kenerley, Charles M; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2011-04-01

    Cotton is an important cash crop worldwide, and is a significant source of fiber, feed, foodstuff, oil and biofuel products. Considerable effort has been expended to increase sustainable yield and quality through molecular breeding and genetic engineering of new cotton cultivars. Given the recent availability of the whole-genome sequence of cotton, it is necessary to develop molecular tools and resources for large-scale analysis of gene functions at the genome-wide level. We have successfully developed an Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay in several cotton cultivars with various genetic backgrounds. The genes of interest were potently and readily silenced within 2 weeks after inoculation at the seedling stage. Importantly, we showed that silencing GhNDR1 and GhMKK2 compromised cotton resistance to the infection by Verticillium dahliae, a fungal pathogen causing Verticillium wilt. Furthermore, we developed a cotton protoplast system for transient gene expression to study gene functions by a gain-of-function approach. The viable protoplasts were isolated from green cotyledons, etiolated cotyledons and true leaves, and responded to a wide range of pathogen elicitors and phytohormones. Remarkably, cotton plants possess conserved, but also distinct, MAP kinase activation with Arabidopsis upon bacterial elicitor flagellin perception. Thus, using gene silencing assays, we have shown that GhNDR1 and GhMKK2 are required for Verticillium resistance in cotton, and have developed high throughput loss-of-function and gain-of-function assays for functional genomic studies in cotton.

  17. Plasma lactate, GH and GH-binding protein levels in exercise following BCAA supplementation in athletes.

    PubMed

    De Palo, E F; Gatti, R; Cappellin, E; Schiraldi, C; De Palo, C B; Spinella, P

    2001-01-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) stimulate protein synthesis, and growth hormone (GH) is a mediator in this process. A pre-exercise BCAA ingestion increases muscle BCAA uptake and use. Therefore after one month of chronic BCAA treatment (0.2 gkg(-1) of body weight), the effects of a pre-exercise oral supplementation of BCAA (9.64 g) on the plasma lactate (La) were examined in triathletes, before and after 60 min of physical exercise (75% of VO2 max). The plasma levels of GH (pGH) and of growth hormone binding protein (pGHBP) were also studied. The end-exercise La of each athlete was higher than basal. Furthermore, after the chronic BCAA treatment, these end-exercise levels were lower than before this treatment (8.6+/-0.8 mmol L(-1) after vs 12.8+/-1.0 mmol L(-1) before treatment; p < 0.05 [mean +/- std. err.]). The end-exercise pGH of each athlete was higher than basal (p < 0.05). Furthermore, after the chronic treatment, this end-exercise pGH was higher (but not significantly, p = 0.08) than before this treatment (12.2+/-2.0 ng mL(-1) before vs 33.8+/-13.6 ngmL(-1) after treatment). The end-exercise pGHBP was higher than basal (p < 0.05); and after the BCAA chronic treatment, this end-exercise pGHBP was 738+/-85 pmol L(-1) before vs 1691+/-555 pmol L(-1) after. pGH/pGHBP ratio was unchanged in each athlete and between the groups, but a tendency to increase was observed at end-exercise. The lower La at the end of an intense muscular exercise may reflect an improvement of BCAA use, due to the BCAA chronic treatment. The chronic BCAA effects on pGH and pGHBP might suggest an improvement of muscle activity through protein synthesis.

  18. Impairment of GH responsiveness to GH-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grugni, G; Guzzaloni, G; Morabito, F

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the GH-releasing activity of a synthetic hexapeptide, GHRP-6, in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Sixteen PWS patients (7 males and 9 females, aged 12.7-38.3 yr), 15 with essential obesity (OB) (7 males and 8 females, aged 12.9-42.9 yr), and 8 short normal children (SN; 3 males and 5 females, aged 10.2-14.3 yr) underwent 2 tests on separate occasions, being challenged with GHRP-6 (1 microg/kg, iv) or GHRH (1 microg/kg, iv)+PD (60 or 120 mg for children or adults, po). Moreover, in 11 patients with PWS and in the group of SN, the GH response to at least 2 stimulation tests had been previously determined. GH was analyzed either as mean peak values (GHp, mcg/l), or as the area under the curve (AUC, mcg/l/h) and the net incremental area under the curve (nAUC, mcg/l/h). In the group of PWS subjects, GH responses to both GHRP-6 (GHp: 11.4+/-2.0; AUC: 588+/-113; nAUC: 483+/-108) and GHRH+PD (GHp: 7.3+/-1.8; AUC: 486+/-122; nAUC: 371+/-250) were significantly lower than those observed either in OB (GHRP-6: GHp: 25.7+/-3.2, p<0.003; AUC: 1833+/-305, p<0.005; nAUC: 1640+/-263, p<0.0001. GHRH+PD: GHp: 15.1+/-2.4, p<0.009; AUC: 1249+/-248, p<0.003; nAUC: 918+/-230, p<0.006) or in SN patients (GHRP-6: GHp: 39.1+/-3.1, p<0.0001; AUC: 2792+/-158, p<0.0001; nAUC: 2705+/-165, p<0.00005. GHRH+PD: GHp: 27.5+/-3.7, p<0.0001; AUC: 1873+/-251, p<0.0001; nAUC: 1692+/-219, p<0.0005). Unlike control groups, in PWS patients GH levels after GHRP-6 did not differ from those obtained after GHRH+PD. Interestingly, low IGF-I values were present in all PWS subjects. Furthermore, no patient with PWS showed normal GH response to the previously performed GH stimulation tests. As already reported, GH release after GHRP-6 or GHRH+PD was significantly lower in OB than in SN subjects. In conclusion, our data indicate that: 1) GH response to GHRP-6 is clearly impaired in PWS; 2) the blunted GH responses to the provocative stimuli in PWS are not an artifact of obesity

  19. Development of antibodies against growth hormone (GH) during rhGH therapy in a girl with idiopathic GH deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Meazza, Cristina; Schaab, Michael; Pagani, Sara; Calcaterra, Valeria; Bozzola, Elena; Kratzsch, Juergen; Bozzola, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    A 12.5-year-old Italian girl was referred to our institute for progressive growth failure from the age of 6 years, with a height of 128.2 cm (-3.37 SDS) and a bone age of 9 years. Endocrinological evaluation revealed a partial growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and GH therapy was started at a dosage of 0.25 mg/kg/week. During the first 3 years, she showed an increase in growth rate and experienced pubertal development onset. Then a poor growth rate (2 cm/year=0.43 SDS) was observed, notwithstanding an increase in GH dosage (0.35 mg/kg/week) and good compliance. We found a positive anti-GH antibody titre (1:1850, cutoff 1/100), confirmed 6 months later (1:2035); the antibodies had low binding capacity (0.63 μg/mL) and were only partially capable of inhibiting the GH effect. However, GH treatment was discontinued, and after 3 months the antibody titre decreased (1:950). In conclusion, we suggest evaluation of anti-GH antibodies in GH-treated idiopathic GHD children in whom growth response decreases after some years of therapy.

  20. Combination Therapy of LysGH15 and Apigenin as a New Strategy for Treating Pneumonia Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Feifei; Li, Xin; Wang, Bin; Gong, Pengjuan; Xiao, Feng; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Hu, Liyuan; Cheng, Mengjun; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Ouyang, Songying; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Li, Xinwei; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu

    2015-10-16

    Pneumonia is one of the most prevalent Staphylococcus aureus-mediated diseases, and the treatment of this infection is becoming challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. It has been reported that LysGH15, the lysin derived from phage GH15, displays high efficiency and a broad lytic spectrum against MRSA and that apigenin can markedly diminish the alpha-hemolysin of S. aureus. In this study, the combination therapy of LysGH15 and apigenin was evaluated in vitro and in a mouse S. aureus pneumonia model. No mutual adverse influence was detected between LysGH15 and apigenin in vitro. In animal experiments, the combination therapy showed a more effective treatment effect than LysGH15 or apigenin monotherapy (P < 0.05). The bacterial load in the lungs of mice administered the combination therapy was 1.5 log units within 24 h after challenge, whereas the loads in unprotected mice or mice treated with apigenin or LysGH15 alone were 10.2, 4.7, and 2.6 log units, respectively. The combination therapy group showed the best health status, the lowest ratio of wet tissue to dry tissue of the lungs, the smallest amount of total protein and cells in the lung, the fewest pathological manifestations, and the lowest cytokine level compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). With regard to its better protective efficacy, the combination therapy of LysGH15 and apigenin exhibits therapeutic potential for treating pneumonia caused by MRSA. This paper reports the combination therapy of lysin and natural products derived from traditional Chinese medicine.

  1. [A case of GH and TSH secreting pituitary macroadenoma].

    PubMed

    Gołkowski, Filip; Buziak-Bereza, Monika; Stefańska, Agnieszka; Trofimiuk, Małgorzata; Pantofliński, Jacek; Huszno, Bohdan; Czepko, Ryszard; Adamek, Dariusz

    2006-01-01

    A case of GH and TSH secreting pituitary macroadenoma is reported. A 45-year-old female presented clinical features of acromegaly (the abnormal growth of the hands and feet, with lower jaw protrusion), diabetes mellitus, hypertension, nodular goiter and hyperthyroidism of unclear origin. NMR pituitary imaging revealed intra and extrasellar tumor. The laboratory examinations showed very high plasma levels of GH and IGF-1 and normal level of TSH coexisting with high plasma levels of free thyroid hormones. Pharmacological pretreatment with somatostatin analogues caused the substantial reduction of GH and TSH plasma levels. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of the tissue obtained at transsphenoidal surgery showed GH and TSH secreting adenoma. The laboratory examinations after surgery showed normal GH and IGF-1 plasma levels and reduced insulin requirement, what indicates radical operation. The very low plasma levels of TSH and free thyroid hormones after surgery and immunohistochemical examination suggest central hyperthyroidism due to TSH secreting pituitary tumor (thyrotropinoma).

  2. The GH-IGF1 axis and longevity. The paradigm of IGF1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Primary or secondary IGF1 deficiency has been implicated in shortening of lifespan. This paper reviews available data on the influence of IGF1 deficiency on lifespan and longevity in animals and man. It has been shown that inactivation of the IGF1 gene or of the GH receptor in both invertebrates (C-elegans, flies-Drosphila) and rodents (mice and rats), leading to IGF1 deficiency, prolong life, particularly in females. In man, evaluation of the 2 largest cohorts of patients with Laron syndrome (inactive GH receptor resulting in IGF1 deficiency) in Israel and Ecuador revealed that despite their dwarfism and marked obesity, patients are alive at the ages of 75-78 years, with some having reached even more advanced ages. It is assumed that a major contributing factor is their protection from cancer, a major cause of death in the general population.

  3. Direct effects of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and GH-releasing factor (GRF) on GH secretion from cultured porcine somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hormigo, A; Castaño, J P; Torronteras, R; Malagón, M M; Ramírez, J L; Gracia-Navarro, F

    1998-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) belongs to the expanding family of synthetic GH secretagogues (GHSs). Previous studies have shown that non-peptidyl GHRP-6 analogues stimulate GH release in vivo in pigs, and interact synergistically with GH-releasing factor (GRF), but its direct effects on porcine somatotropes have not been addressed hitherto. In the present study, we have evaluated the response of cultured porcine pituitary cells to GHRP-6, and its interaction with GRF and somatostatin (SRIF). Secretory response of somatotropes was assessed by using two distinct techniques. GH released by monolayer cell cultures was evaluated by enzyme immunoassay, whereas that secreted by individual somatotropes was measured by immunodensitometry using a cell blotting assay. Our results demonstrate that both GHRP-6 and GRF stimulated GH release from monolayer cultures at doses equal to or above 10(-9) M. Use of cell immunoblot assay demonstrated that, like GRF, the hexapeptide acts directly upon porcine somatotropes to exert its action. Moreover, regardless of the technique applied, combined administration of GHRP-6 (10(-6) or 10(-9) M) and GRF (10(-8) M) resulted in an additive, but not synergistic, stimulatory GH response. Finally, SRIF (10(-7) M) inhibited the stimulatory effect of GHRP-6 alone or in combination with GRF. These results indicate that GHRP-6 directly and effectively stimulates GH secretion from porcine somatotropes in vitro, and acts additively when coadministered with GRF. Therefore, the synergistic stimulatory effect of GHSs and GRF reported in vivo in this species might require additional factors that are lacking in the in vitro situation.

  4. Endogenous ghrelin regulates episodic growth hormone (GH) secretion by amplifying GH Pulse amplitude: evidence from antagonism of the GH secretagogue-R1a receptor.

    PubMed

    Zizzari, P; Halem, H; Taylor, J; Dong, J Z; Datta, R; Culler, M D; Epelbaum, J; Bluet-Pajot, M T

    2005-09-01

    Ghrelin was purified from rat stomach as an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue (GHS) receptor. As a GHS, ghrelin stimulates GH release, but it also has additional activities, including stimulation of appetite and weight gain. Plasma GH and ghrelin secretory patterns appear unrelated, whereas many studies have correlated ghrelin variations with food intake episodes. To evaluate the role of endogenous ghrelin, GH secretion and food intake were monitored in male rats infused sc (6 mug/h during 10 h) or intracerebroventricularly (5 microg/h during 48 h) with BIM-28163, a full competitive antagonist of the GHS-R1a receptor. Subcutaneous BIM-28163 infusion significantly decreased GH area under the curve during a 6-h sampling period by 54% and peak amplitude by 46%. Twelve hours after the end of treatment these parameters returned to normal. Central treatment was similarly effective (-37 and -42% for area under the curve and -44 and -49% for peak amplitude on the first and second days of infusion, respectively). Neither peripheral nor central BIM-28163 injection modified GH peak number, GH nadir, or IGF-I levels. In this protocol, food intake is not strongly modified and water intake is unchanged. Subcutaneous infusion of BIM-28163 did not change plasma leptin and insulin levels evaluated at 1200 and 1600 h. On the contrary, central BIM-28163 infusion slightly increased leptin and significantly increased insulin concentrations. Thus, endogenous ghrelin, through GHS-R1a, acts as a strong endogenous amplifier of spontaneous GH peak amplitude. The mechanisms by which ghrelin modifies food intake remain to be defined and may involve a novel GHS receptor.

  5. Thyroid hormone modulation of the hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor-pituitary GH axis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, N; Ono, M; Hizuka, N; Aoki, T; Demura, H

    1992-01-01

    Both thyroid hormone and hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) facilitate pituitary somatotroph function. However, the pathophysiological role of thyroid hormone in GRF secretion is less well understood. Thyrotoxicosis, induced by administration of thyroxine (T4) in rats, inhibited both pituitary GH levels and immunoreactive GRF secretion from incubated hypothalamus. At the highest dose of T4 given for 12 d, GRF secretion and pituitary GH decreased by 50 and 39%, respectively. Hypothyroidism induced by thyroidectomy (Tx) enhanced GRF secretion approximately twofold while depleting pituitary GH by greater than 99%. Both of these hypothalamic and pituitary effects were reversed by replacement of T4 but not human GH for 7 or 14 d. Human GH was as potent as T4 in restoring decreased body weight gains or serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in Tx rats. These results indicate that at both physiological and pathological concentrations in serum, thyroid hormone acts as an inhibitory modulator of GRF secretion, probably not involving a feedback mechanism through GH. A biphasic effect of thyroid hormone on pituitary GH levels appears to derive from the difference in primary target tissues of hyper- and hypothyroidism, the hypothalamus and the pituitary, respectively. PMID:1634603

  6. Considering GH replacement for GH-deficient adults with a previous history of cancer: a conundrum for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kevin C J; Heaney, Anthony P; Popovic, Vera

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that GH and IGF-I may enhance tumorigenesis, metastasis, and cell proliferation in humans and animals. Evidence supporting this notion is derived from animal model studies, epidemiological studies, experience from patients with acromegaly, molecular therapeutic manipulation of GH and IGF-I actions, and individuals with GH receptor and congenital IGF-I deficiencies. Prior exposure to radiation therapy, aging, family history of cancer, and individual susceptibility may also contribute to increase this risk. Therefore, the use of GH replacement in patients with a history of cancer raises hypothetical safety concerns for patients, caregivers, and providers. Studies of GH therapy in GH-deficient adults with hypopituitarism and childhood cancer survivors have not convincingly demonstrated an increased cancer risk. Conversely, the risk of occurrence of a second neoplasm (SN) in childhood cancer survivors may be increased, with meningiomas being the most common tumor; however, this risk appears to decline over time. In light of these findings, if GH replacement is to be considered in patients with a previous history of cancer, we propose this consideration to be based on each individual circumstance and that such therapy should only be initiated at least 2 years after cancer remission is achieved with the understanding that in some patients (particularly those with childhood cancers), GH may potentially increase the risk of SNs. In addition, close surveillance should be undertaken working closely with the patient's oncologist. More long-term data are thus needed to determine if GH replacement in GH-deficient adults with a history of cancer is associated with the development of de novo tumors and tumor recurrence.

  7. Acute cardiovascular and hormonal effects of GH and hexarelin, a synthetic GH-releasing peptide, in humans.

    PubMed

    Bisi, G; Podio, V; Valetto, M R; Broglio, F; Bertuccio, G; Del Rio, G; Arvat, E; Boghen, M F; Deghenghi, R; Muccioli, G; Ong, H; Ghigo, E

    1999-04-01

    Reduced cardiac mass and performances are present in GH deficiency and are counteracted by rhGH replacement. GH and IGF-I possess specific myocardial receptors and have been reported able to exert an acute inotropic effect. Synthetic GH secretagogues (GHS) possess specific pituitary and hypothalamic but even myocardial receptors. In 7 male volunteers, we studied cardiac performance by radionuclide angiocardiography after iv administration of rhGH or hexarelin (HEX), a peptidyl GHS. The administration of rhGH or HEX increased circulating GH levels to the same extent (AUC: 1594.6+/-88.1 vs 1739.3+/-262.2 microg/l/min for 90 min) while aldosterone and catecholamine levels did not change; HEX, but not rhGH, significantly increased cortisol levels. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate (HR) were unaffected by rhGH (62.4+/-2.1 vs 62.1+/-2.3%, 90.6+/-3.4 vs 92.0+/-2.5 mm Hg, 62.3+/-1.8 vs 66.7+/-2.7 bpm). HEX increased LVEF (70.7+/-3.0 vs 64.0+/-1.5%, p<0.03) without significant changes in MBP and HR (92.8+/-4.7 vs 92.4+/-3.2 mm Hg, 63.1+/-2.1 vs 67.0+/-2.9 bpm). LVEF significantly raised at 15 min, peaked at 30 min and lasted up to 60 min after HEX. These findings suggest that in man, the acute administration of Hexarelin exerts a short-lasting, positive inotropic effect. This effect seems GH-independent and might be mediated by specific GHS myocardial receptors.

  8. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex’s action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles. PMID:26086773

  9. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  10. Effect of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) on plasma GH in relation to magnitude and duration of GH deficiency in 26 children and adults with isolated GH deficiency or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: evidence for hypothalamic GRH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schriock, E A; Lustig, R H; Rosenthal, S M; Kaplan, S L; Grumbach, M M

    1984-06-01

    Synthetic, amidated, 44 amino acid GH-releasing hormone ( GRH -44) was administered iv at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg to 20 patients with severe GH deficiency (GHD), 6 children and adolescents with partial GHD, and 6 non-GH deficient ( NGHD ) children and adolescents. The 17 patients with severe GHD that responded to GRH -44 had lower peak concentrations of plasma GH than the NGHD individuals (5.0 +/- 1.2 (SEM) vs. 27.2 +/- 3.5 ng/ml; P less than 0.0001). The children and adolescents with severe GHD tended to have higher peak GH responses to GRH -44 than the GHD adults (6.9 +/- 1.7 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) although the difference was not significant. The peak GH concentration was attained earlier in the GHD children and adolescents than in the GHD adults (28 +/- 4.7 vs. 69.3 +/- 13 min, P less than 0.004). There was a negative correlation between chronological age and peak plasma GH response to GRH in the children and adolescents with severe GHD (r = -0.758, P less than 0.02). Children and adolescents with partial GHD had a higher mean peak concentration of plasma GH (13. 1 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) than the children, adolescents, and adults with severe GHD (P less than 0.04), but one lower than the NGHD children and adolescents (P less than 0.05). In both severe and partial GHD the GH response to GRH was greater than that elicited by standard pharmacological tests. Serum somatomedin-C did not increase after a single pulse of GRH -44 in the 12 GHD patients studied. PRL increased minimally 30 min after 5 micrograms/kg iv GRH -44 in patients with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies but not in patients with isolated GHD or in NGHD individuals. The GH responses to GRH suggest that the majority of patients with isolated GHD as well as those with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies have deficiency of hypothalamic GRH . Lack of a GH response to a single pulse of GRH does not exclude GRH deficiency as priming of the somatotrope with multiple pulses of

  11. Growth hormone (GH)/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in liver of mice overexpressing GH

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in liver of adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess if the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in liver of these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus but presents higher basal phosphorylation in liver of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and positive modulators GR and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting STAT5 activity. Negative modulators CIS and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. Suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, suggesting they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in liver of GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in an accelerated but controlled growth. PMID:25691498

  12. Growth hormone (GH) activity is associated with increased serum oestradiol and reduced anti-Müllerian hormone in healthy male volunteers treated with GH and a GH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, M; Frystyk, J; Faber, J; Kristensen, L Ø; Juul, A

    2013-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors are present on pituitary gonadotrophs and on testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells. Thus, the GH/IGF-I system may modulate the pituitary-gonadal axis in males. This is a randomized cross-over study. Eight healthy male volunteers (mean age 35, range 29-46 years) were treated with GH for 3 weeks (1st week 0.01, 2nd week 0.02, 3rd week 0.03 mg/day/kg) or a GH receptor antagonist (Pegvisomant) (1st week 10, last 2 weeks 15 mg/day), separated by 8 weeks of washout. Before and after the two treatment periods, concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) were measured. During GH treatment, IGF-I increased [(median (IQR)] 166 (162-235) vs. 702 (572-875) μg/L, p < 0.001) together with oestradiol [(mean ± SD) 78 ± 23 vs. 111 ± 30 pm, p = 0.019], and the oestradiol/testosterone ratio (p = 0.003). By contrast, AMH (42 ± 14 vs. 32 ± 7 pm, p = 0.018), Inhibin B (211 (146-226) vs. 176 (129-204) ng/L, p = 0.059) and LH (3.8 ± 1.5 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2 U/L, p = 0.096) decreased. During pegvisomant treatment IGF-I (204 (160-290) vs. 106 (97-157) μg/L, p = 0.001) and oestradiol (86 ± 28 vs. 79 ± 25 pm, p = 0.060) decreased. No significant changes or trends in the other reproductive hormones occurred during the two treatment regimens. GH/IGF-I activity was positively associated with serum oestradiol, suggesting that GH/IGF-I stimulates aromatase activity in vivo. As a novel observation, we found that high GH activity was associated with reduced levels of the Sertoli cell marker AMH. Further studies are needed to evaluate possible effects of GH on Sertoli cell function and/or spermatogenesis.

  13. Expression and characterization of hyperthermostable exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in E. coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and detai...

  14. Aerosol Observing System Greenhouse Gas (AOS GhG) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S. C.; Reichl, K.

    2016-03-01

    The Greenhouse Gas (GhG) Measurement system is a combination of two systems in series: (1) the Tower Gas Processing (TGP) System, an instrument rack which pulls, pressurizes, and dries air streams from an atmospheric sampling tower through a series of control and monitoring components, and (2) the Picarro model G2301 cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS), which measures CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor; the primary measurements of the GhG system.

  15. Biomarker detection of rhGH doping: an excretion study.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Zhou, Xinmiao; He, Chunji; Zhang, Lisi; Yang, Sheng; Xu, Youxuan; Xie, Minhao; Yan, Yi; Su, Hao; Wu, Moutian

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to validate the biomarker-based approach for the detection of doping with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in sport. The GH-2000 project proposed an indirect method for the detection of exogenously administered growth hormone (GH) based on the measurement of the GH-dependent markers: insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and Type III pro-collagen (P-III-P). These markers rise in a dose-dependent manner after GH application. In this study, the concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-BP3, and P-III-P in serum were determined to provide further incentives for the implementation of this detection assay in modern anti-doping programmes. This paper reports on an administration study of rhGH involving 25 Chinese male volunteers at a dose of 0.1 IU /kg/day for a continuous 14-day period. We observed that the serum IGF-I concentration increased rapidly in the rhGH treatment group and showed significantly higher levels compared to baseline between days 4 and day 16 after administration. Although the response of P-III-P to rhGH administration was delayed compared to the IGF-I axis, the P-III-P concentration remained increased for a longer period (from day 4 to day 28). Statistical analysis was carried out to establish a discriminant formula with Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS) concluding that the biomarker methodology is valid and universally applicable.

  16. Systemic overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic FVB/N inbred mice: an optimized model for holistic studies of molecular mechanisms underlying GH-induced kidney pathology.

    PubMed

    von Waldthausen, Dagmar C; Schneider, Marlon R; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Rauleder, Dirk N; Herbach, Nadja; Aigner, Bernhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard

    2008-08-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) display a plethora of phenotypic alterations and provide unique models for studying and influencing consequences of chronic GH excess. Since the first report on GH transgenic mice was published in 1982, many different mouse models overexpressing GH from various species at different levels and with different tissue specificities were established, most of them on random-bred or hybrid genetic background. We have generated a new transgenic mouse model on FVB/N inbred background, expressing bovine (b) GH under the control of the chicken beta-actin promoter (cbetaa). cbetaa-bGH transgenic mice exhibit ubiquitous expression of bGH mRNA and protein and circulating bGH levels in the range of several microg/ml, resulting in markedly stimulated growth and the characteristic spectrum of pathological lesions which were described in previous GH overexpressing mouse models. Importantly, a consistent sequence of renal alterations is observed, mimicking progressive kidney disease in human patients. The novel, genetically standardized GH transgenic mouse model is ideal for holistic transcriptome and proteome studies aiming at the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying GH-induced pathological alterations especially in the kidney. Moreover, genetically defined cbetaa-bGH mice facilitate random mutagenesis screens for modifier genes which influence the effects of chronic GH excess and associated pathological lesions.

  17. The regulation of GH secretion by sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Chowen, Julie A; Frago, Laura M; Argente, Jesús

    2004-11-01

    Gonadal sex steroids modulate GH synthesis and secretion with effects on both the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary. In the post-pubertal animal, androgens and oestrogens modulate hypothalamic somatostatin (SS) and GHRH synthesis respectively. These effects may be direct as SS neurons express the androgen receptor and many GHRH neurons are oestrogen receptor positive. The neonatal steroid environment modulates the number of GHRH neurons in the adult hypothalamus, as well as their responsivity to post-pubertal steroids. Furthermore, both neonatal and post-pubertal steroids modulate hypothalamic synaptic organisation affecting the number of synaptic inputs and the morphology of glial cells. This in turn has important effects on the ability of the hypothalamus to drive the secretory pulsatility of anterior pituitary hormone release. At the level of the somatotroph, androgens and oestrogens have been reported to stimulate, inhibit or have no effect on GH synthesis. In primary cultures, we found no effect of either androgens or oestrogens on GH mRNA levels. However, the sex steroid environment significantly modified the response of somatotrophs to SS. Furthermore, males have more somatotrophs compared with female rats and this partially depends on the neonatal sex steroid environment. In conclusion, sex steroids have both organisational and activational effects on the GH axis. These effects range from modulating the number of hypothalamic neurons controlling GH secretion, their responsiveness to later steroids, and the synaptic connectivity and neuropeptide production, to modulation of somatotroph numbers in the anterior pituitary and their responsiveness to inputs controlling GH synthesis and secretion.

  18. Decreased ghrelin-induced GH release in thyrotoxicosis: comparison with GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH.

    PubMed

    Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Silva, Marcos Roberto; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2007-01-01

    In thyrotoxicosis GH response to several stimuli is impaired, but there is no data on ghrelin-induced GH release in these patients. Ghrelin is a potent GH secretagogue and it also increases glucose levels in men. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ghrelin (1 microg/kg), GHRP-6 (1 mug/kg) and GHRH (100 microg), i.v., on GH levels in 10 hyperthyroid patients and in 8 controls. Glucose levels were also measured during ghrelin and GHRP-6 administration. In control subjects and hyperthyroid patients peak GH (microg/l; mean +/- SE) values after ghrelin injection (controls: 66.7 +/- 13.6; hyper: 19.3 +/- 2.4) were significantly higher than those obtained after GHRP-6 (controls: 26.7 +/- 5.1; hyper: 12.6 +/- 1.3) and GHRH (controls: 13.5 +/- 4.3; hyper: 5.3 +/- 1.3). There was a significant decrease in GH responsiveness to ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH in the hyperthyroid group compared to controls. In control subjects and hyperthyroid patients basal glucose (mmol/l) values were 4.5 +/- 0.1 and 4.7 +/- 0.2, respectively. There was a significant increase in glucose levels 30 min after ghrelin injection (controls: 4.9 +/- 0.1; hyper: 5.2 +/- 0.2), which remained elevated up to 120 min. When the two groups were compared no differences in glucose values were observed. GHRP-6 administration was not able to increase glucose levels in both groups. Our data shows that GH release after ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH administration is decreased in thyrotoxicosis. This suggests that thyroid hormone excess interferes with GH-releasing pathways activated by these peptides. Our results also suggest that ghrelin's ability to increase glucose levels is not altered in thyrotoxicosis.

  19. [Influence of replacement growth hormone therapy (hGH) on pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-adrenal systems in prepubertal children with GH deficiency].

    PubMed

    Vyshnevs'ka, O A; Bol'shova, O V

    2013-06-01

    Today, the most pathogenic therapy of GH deficiency is hGH replacement therapy. Replacement hGH therapy a highly effective method of growth correction in children with GH deficiency, but further investigations are necessary for timely detection of disturbances of other organs and systems. The authors reported that hGH therapy supressed thyroid and adrenal functions. Besides, most patients with GH deficiency have multiple defficiency of pituitary hormones (both TSH and ACTH), so hGH therapy can enhances hypothyroidism and hypoadrenalism. In the Department of Pediatric Endocrinology of the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism a great experience was accumulated in the treatment of GH deficiency children and in the study of the efficacy and safety of this treatment.

  20. Purification, partial characterization, and heterologous radioimmunoassay of growth hormone (cGH) in red deer.

    PubMed

    Curlewis, J D; Loudon, A S; McNeilly, A S

    1992-10-01

    Red deer growth hormone (cGH; 3.3 mg) was purified from an aqueous extract of seven pituitary glands (4.01 g wet weight) by preparative gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 SF, and anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B. Purified cGH gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight under reducing conditions of 20,000 Da and gave a single peak on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. N-Terminal amino acid determination of 42 residues gave a sequence identical with those published for bovine and ovine GH. In a radioreceptor assay based on binding of iodinated recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) to liver microsomes prepared from a pregnant ewe, cGH was equipotent with an ovine GH (oGH) standard. In an oGH radioimmunoassay, cGH diluted in parallel with oGH and rbGH. Using this assay plasma GH concentrations were determined in adult nonpregnant red deer hinds over a 12-month period. There was a significant seasonality in plasma GH concentrations with concentrations consistently low between mid-May and mid-September. This is the period when voluntary food intake and liveweight gain are greatest. It is suggested that in the presence of low plasma GH concentrations nutrients may be diverted toward lipogenesis and hence promote fat deposition.

  1. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants.

  2. Tripeptide amide L-pyroglutamyl-histidyl-L-prolineamide (L-PHP-thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH) promotes insulin-producing cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Luo, LuGuang; Luo, John Z Q; Jackson, Ivor

    2013-02-01

    A very small tripeptide amide L-pyroglutamyl-L-histidyl-L-prolineamide (L-PHP, Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone, TRH), was first identified in the brain hypothalamus area. Further studies found that L-PHP was expressed in pancreas. The biological role of pancreatic L-PHP is still not clear. Growing evidence indicates that L-PHP expression in the pancreas may play a pivotal role for pancreatic development in the early prenatal period. However, the role of L-PHP in adult pancreas still needs to be explored. L-PHP activation of pancreatic β cell Ca2+ flow and stimulation of β-cell insulin synthesis and release suggest that L-PHP involved in glucose metabolism may directly act on the β cell separate from any effects via the central nervous system (CNS). Knockout L-PHP animal models have shown that loss of L-PHP expression causes hyperglycemia, which cannot be reversed by administration of thyroid hormone, suggesting that the absence of L-PHP itself is the cause. L-PHP receptor type-1 has been identified in pancreas which provides a possibility for L-PHP autocrine and paracrine regulation in pancreatic function. During pancreatic damage in adult pancreas, L-PHP may protect beta cell from apoptosis and initiate its regeneration through signal pathways of growth hormone in β cells. L-PHP has recently been discovered to affect a broad array of gene expression in the pancreas including growth factor genes. Signal pathways linked between L-PHP and EGF receptor phosphorylation suggest that L-PHP may be an important factor for adult β-cell regeneration, which could involve adult stem cell differentiation. These effects suggest that L-PHP may benefit pancreatic β cells and diabetic therapy in clinic.

  3. Soybean GH3 promoter contains multiple auxin-inducible elements.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z B; Ulmasov, T; Shi, X; Hagen, G; Guilfoyle, T J

    1994-01-01

    The soybean GH3 gene is transcriptionally induced in a wide variety of tissues and organs within minutes after auxin application. To determine the sequence elements that confer auxin inducibility to the GH3 promoter, we used gel mobility shift assays, methylation interference, deletion analysis, linker scanning, site-directed mutagenesis, and gain-of-function analysis with a minimal cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We identified at least three sequence elements within the GH3 promoter that are auxin inducible and can function independently of one another. Two of these elements are found in a 76-bp fragment, and these consist of two independent 25- and 32-bp auxin-inducible elements. Both of these 25- and 32-bp auxin-inducible elements contain the sequence TGTCTC just upstream of an AATAAG. An additional auxin-inducible element was found upstream of the 76-bp auxin-inducible fragment; this can function independently of the 76-bp fragment. Two TGA-box or Hex-like elements (TGACGTAA and TGACGTGGC) in the promoter, which are strong binding sites for proteins in plant nuclear extracts, may also elevate the level of auxin inducibility of the GH3 promoter. The multiple auxin-inducible elements within the GH3 promoter contribute incrementally to the overall level of auxin induction observed with this promoter. PMID:8038604

  4. Cloning and characterization of the first GH10 and GH11 xylanases from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhizhuang; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Lau, Peter C K

    2014-10-01

    The only available genome sequence for Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 was annotated to not encode any β-1,4-endoxylanase encoding genes of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 or 11. Here, we report the identification and cloning of two such members in R. oryzae strain NRRL 29086. Strain 29086 was one of several selected fungi grown on wheat or triticale bran and screened for xylanase activity among other hydrolytic actions. Its high activity (138 U/ml) in the culture supernatant led to the identification of two activity-stained proteins, designated Xyn-1 and Xyn-2 of respective molecular masses 32,000 and 22,000. These proteins were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. The specific activities of Xyn-1 and Xyn-2 towards birchwood xylan were 605 and 7,710 U/mg, respectively. Kinetic data showed that the lower molecular weight Xyn-2 had a higher affinity (K m=3.2 ± 0.2 g/l) towards birchwood xylan than Xyn-1 by about 4-fold. The melting temperature (T m) of the two proteins, estimated to be in the range of 49.5-53.7 °C indicated that they are rather thermostable proteins. N-terminal and internal peptide sequences were obtained by chemical digestion of the purified xylanases to facilitate cloning, expression in Escherichia coli, and sequencing of the respective gene. The cloned Rhizopus xylanases were used to demonstrate release of xylose from flax shives-derived hemicellulose as model feedstock. Overall, this study expands the catalytic toolbox of GH10 and 11 family proteins that have applications in various industrial and bioproducts settings.

  5. Increased Secretion of Endogenous GH after Treatment with an Intranasal GH-releasing Peptide-2 Spray Does Not Promote Growth in Short Children with GH Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Yokoya, Susumu; Nishi, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    We investigated whether treatment with an intranasal GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-2 spray, which acts as a potent GH secretagogue that stimulates endogenous GH secretion, promotes growth in patients with GH deficiency (GHD). This study involved 126 prepubertal short children (81 males, 45 females) with a height SD score of -2 SD or less, who had been diagnosed as having GHD based on GH stimulation tests, and in whom the serum GH concentrations increased up to 9 ng/ml after preliminary administration of an intranasal GHRP-2 spray. The subjects included in this study were divided into 3 groups by use of a double-blind method; that is 44 were placed into the placebo group (P group: 30 males, 14 females), 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 low dose group (L group: 25 males, 16 females), and 41 were placed into the GHRP-2 high dose group (H group: 26 males, 15 females). Those with a body wt of less than 20 kg were administered a placebo (P group), 50 μg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 100 μg of GHRP-2 (H group), and those with a body wt of 20 kg or more were administered a placebo (P group), 100 µg of GHRP-2 (L group) or 200 µg of GHRP-2 (H group) twice daily (morning and evening) for 48 continuous wk. Age and height SD scores at baseline were not significantly different among the three groups: 7.5 yr old and -2.26 SD in the P group, 7.3 yr old and -2.38 SD in the L group, and 7.5 yr old and -2.27 SD in the H group. Of the 126 subjects, 44, 40 and 40 subjects in the P, L and H groups, respectively, completed the 48 continuous wk of treatment. The changes in the mean height SD scores (mean growth rate) after 48 wk of treatment in the P, L and H groups were 0.07 SD, 0.03 SD, and 0.02 SD, respectively, and thus no significant differences was observed among the 3 groups. Also no significant changes in blood IGF-I levels at baseline or after 48 wk of treatment were observed among the 3 groups. This study revealed that in patients with GHD, an increase in endogenous GH secretion as a

  6. The obese growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat: body fat responses to patterned delivery of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Clark, R G; Mortensen, D L; Carlsson, L M; Carlsson, B; Carmignac, D; Robinson, I C

    1996-05-01

    We describe a new animal model of obesity and GH deficiency and report the effects on body fat of administering (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) in the model. Female GH-deficient dwarf rats fed a high-fat diet became obese and insulin-resistant compared with chow-fed controls. They were treated with recombinant human GH (rhGH 100-500 micrograms/day, s.c. for 14 days) by daily injection or minipump infusion with or without rhIGF-I (200 micrograms/day, sc infusion). Injections of rhGH increased body weight; infusions of rhGH caused weight loss. RhIGF-I by itself, or rhIGF-I plus GH injections had little effect, whereas rhGH infusions plus rhIGF-I caused a weight loss equivalent to the weight gained during the high-fat feeding and a decrease in fat pad weight. For some responses (serum IGF-1 and GHBP), the obese rats were GH resistant. Fat was lost from the internal fat pads when obese rats were returned to a chow diet, and injections of rhGH surprisingly attenuated this loss of fat. In obese dwarf rats, the lipolytic effects of rhGH are dose-regime dependent. By itself IGF-I is not insulin-like, but in the presence of GH it has antiinsulin actions causing a powerful net lipolysis. If GH plus IGF-I have similar effects in humans they may be useful for reducing body fat.

  7. An efficient expression of Human Growth Hormone (hGH) in the milk of transgenic mice using rat {beta}-casein/hGH fusion genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chul-Sang; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    1996-03-01

    In order to produce human growth hormone (hGH) in the milk of transgenic mice, two expression vectors for hGH differing in their 3{prime} flanking sequences were constructed by placing the genomic sequences of hGH gene under the control of the rat {beta}-casein gene promotor. The 3{prime} flanking sequences of the expression constructs were derived from either the hGH gene (pBCN1GH) or the rat {beta}-casein gene (pBCN2GH). Transgenic lines bearing pBCN1GH expressed hGH more efficiently than those bearing pBCN2GH in the milk (19-5500 {mu}g/mL vs 0.7-2 {mu}g/mL). In particular, one of the BCN1GH lines expressed hGH as much as 5500 {plus_minus} 620 {mu}g/mL. Northern blot analysis showed that the transgene expression was specifically confined to the mammary gland and developmentally regulated like the endogeneous mouse {beta}-casein gene in the mammary gland. However, a low level of nonmammary expression was also detected with more sensitive assay methods. In conclusion, the rat {beta}-casein/hGH fusion gene could direct an efficient production of hGH in a highly tissue- and stage-specific manner in the transgenic mice and the 3{prime} flanking sequences of hGH gene had an important role for the efficient expression. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Divergent responses of serum insulin-like growth factor-I and liver growth hormone (GH) receptors to exogenous GH in protein-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Thissen, J P; Triest, S; Underwood, L E; Maes, M; Ketelslegers, J M

    1990-02-01

    Protein deprivation in young rats retards growth and decreases serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations, neither of which is prevented by injections of GH once daily. Since four time daily injections of GH in hypophysectomized rats increase serum IGF-I concentrations more efficiently than single daily injections, we assessed whether this mode of GH delivery could overcome the GH resistance of protein malnutrition. Also, we evaluated whether continuous GH infusion could override this GH resistance. We fed 4-week-old female Wistar rats a low (5%) protein diet (P5) or a normal (15%) protein diet (P15) for 7 days. In a first experiment, rats fed a P5 diet received 40 or 400 micrograms/100 g BW.day rat GH (rGH) in four daily sc injections, while control P5 rats were injected at the same frequency with vehicle. In a second experiment, rats fed a P5 diet received 200 micrograms rGH/100 g BW.day by continuous infusion, while P5 sham-operated rats served as controls. IGF-I was measured by RIA on extracted serum, and free and total liver GH binding were determined by incubation of [125I]bovine GH with water- or MgCl2-treated homogenates, respectively. Neither continuous infusion nor repeated injections of rGH normalized the indices of growth or restored the serum IGF-I level to P15 control values. Injections of 400 micrograms rGH increased serum IGF-I 2-fold (P less than 0.01), but did not promote growth. Continuous GH infusion increased total and free liver GH binding to P15 control values, but had no effect on serum IGF-I. The discordance between liver GH binding and IGF-I confirms that a postreceptor defect is responsible for the GH resistance in protein restriction. These observations demonstrate that the consequences of protein restriction on growth are not overridden by intermittent or continuous administration of GH. The increase in IGF-I in response to 400 micrograms GH given intermittently in the absence of growth-promoting effects suggests that

  9. Comparison of continuation or cessation of growth hormone (GH) therapy on body composition and metabolic status in adolescents with severe GH deficiency at completion of linear growth.

    PubMed

    Carroll, P V; Drake, W M; Maher, K T; Metcalfe, K; Shaw, N J; Dunger, D B; Cheetham, T D; Camacho-Hübner, C; Savage, M O; Monson, J P

    2004-08-01

    Although GH replacement improves the features of GH deficiency (GHD) in adults, it has yet to be established whether cessation of GH at completion of childhood growth results in adverse consequences for the adolescent with GHD. Effects of continuation or cessation of GH on body composition, insulin sensitivity, and lipid levels were studied in 24 adolescents (13 males, 11 females, aged 17.0 +/- 0.3, yr, mean +/- se, puberty stage 4 or 5) in whom height velocity was less than 2 cm/yr. Provocative testing confirmed severe GHD [peak GH < 9 mU/liter (3 microg/liter)] in all cases and was followed by a lead-in period of 3 months during which the pediatric dose of GH continued unchanged. Baseline investigations were then performed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (body composition), lipid measurements, and assessment of insulin sensitivity by both homeostasis model assessment and a short insulin tolerance test. Twelve patients remained on GH (0.35 U/kg.wk), and 12 patients ceased GH treatment. The groups were followed up in parallel with repeat observations made after 6 and 12 months. No endocrine differences were evident between the groups at baseline. GH cessation resulted in a reduction of serum IGF-I Z score [-1.62 +/- 0.29, baseline vs. -2.52 +/- 0.12, 6 months (P < 0.05) vs. -2.52 +/- 0.10, 12 months (P < 0.01)] but values remained unchanged in those continuing GH replacement. Lean body mass increased by 2.5 +/- 0.5 kg ( approximately 6%) over 12 months in those receiving GH but was unchanged after GH discontinuation. Cessation of GH resulted in increased insulin sensitivity [short insulin tolerance test, 153 +/- 22 micromol/liter.min, baseline vs. 187 +/- 20, 6 months (P < 0.05) vs. 204 +/- 14, 12 months (P = 0.05)], but no significant change was seen during 12 months of GH continuation. Lipid levels remained unaltered in both groups. Continuation of GH at completion of linear growth resulted in ongoing accrual of lean body mass (LBM), whereas skeletal

  10. Expression of lymphocyte-derived growth hormone (GH) and GH-releasing hormone receptors in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we show that higher levels of lymphocyte GH are expressed in spleen cells from aging animals compared to young animals. Further, leukocytes from primary and secondary immune tissues and splenic T and B cells from aging rats all express higher levels of GHRH receptors compared to younger animals. Bone marrow and splenic T cells express the highest levels of GHRH receptor in aging animals. Spleen cells from aging animals showed no significant change in proliferation or GH induction after treatment with GHRH. Taken together, the data for the first time show alterations in GH synthesis and expression of the GHRH receptor on cells of the immune system that may play a role in the immune response in aging.

  11. Internalization and synaptogenic effect of GH in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Thomas; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Mora, Janeth; Aizouki, Miray; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    In the chicken embryo, GH gene expression occurs in the neural retina and retinal GH promotes cell survival and induces axonal growth of retinal ganglion cells. Neuroretinal GH is therefore of functional importance before the appearance of somatotrophs and the onset of pituitary GH secretion to the peripheral plasma (at ED15-17). Endocrine actions of pituitary GH in the development and function of the chicken embryo eye are, however, unknown. This possibility has therefore been investigated in ED15 embryos and using the quail neuroretinal derived cell line (QNR/D). During this research, we studied for the first time, the coexistence of exogenous (endocrine) and local GH (autocrine/paracrine) in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In ovo systemic injections of Cy3-labeled GH demonstrated that GH in the embryo bloodstream was translocated into the neural retina and internalized into RGC's. Pituitary GH may therefore be functionally involved in retinal development during late embryogenesis. Cy3-labelled GH was similarly internalized into QNR/D cells after its addition into incubation media. The uptake of exogenous GH was by a receptor-mediated mechanism and maximal after 30-60min. The exogenous (endocrine) GH induced STAT5 phosphorylation and increased growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity. Ex ovo intravitreal injections of Cy3-GH in ED12 embryos resulted in GH internalization and STAT5 activation. Interestingly, the CY3-labeled GH accumulated in perinuclear regions of the QNR/D cells, but was not found in the cytoplasm of neurite outgrowths, in which endogenous retinal GH is located. This suggests that exogenous (endocrine) and local (autocrine/paracrine) GH are both involved in retinal function in late embryogenesis but they co-exist in separate intracellular compartments within retinal ganglion cells.

  12. Effect of GH/IGF-1 on Bone Metabolism and Osteoporsosis

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Vittorio; Bianchi, Vittorio E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are fundamental in skeletal growth during puberty and bone health throughout life. GH increases tissue formation by acting directly and indirectly on target cells; IGF-1 is a critical mediator of bone growth. Clinical studies reporting the use of GH and IGF-1 in osteoporosis and fracture healing are outlined. Methods. A Pubmed search revealed 39 clinical studies reporting the effects of GH and IGF-1 administration on bone metabolism in osteopenic and osteoporotic human subjects and on bone healing in operated patients with normal GH secretion. Eighteen clinical studies considered the effect with GH treatment, fourteen studies reported the clinical effects with IGF-1 administration, and seven related to the GH/IGF-1 effect on bone healing. Results. Both GH and IGF-1 administration significantly increased bone resorption and bone formation in the most studies. GH/IGF-1 administration in patients with hip or tibial fractures resulted in increased bone healing, rapid clinical improvements. Some conflicting results were evidenced. Conclusions. GH and IGF-1 therapy has a significant anabolic effect. GH administration for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone fractures may greatly improve clinical outcome. GH interacts with sex steroids in the anabolic process. GH resistance process is considered. PMID:25147565

  13. Heat shock of cultured GC cells enhances the level of triiodothyronine induced growth hormone (GH) and GH messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L E; Katz, C P; DeFesi, C R; Surks, M I

    1989-07-01

    We have previously proposed that the effects of heat shock on thyroid hormone-responsive rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells may be a model relevant to the in vivo effects of nonthyroidal disease on thyroid hormone action. To determine the effects of heat shock on thyroid hormone responses, GC cells (normally cultured at 37 C) were studied after incubation at 41 C. After 18 h at 41 C there was enhanced synthesis of proteins (mol wt, 70,000 and 90,000) considered to be universal markers of the cellular response to heat shock. Incubation at 41 C also resulted in a significant decrease in GC cell viability and (after 24 h) arrest of GC cell growth. However, the induction of GH synthesis by T3 was significantly enhanced in GC cells stressed by incubation at 41 C. The addition of 5 nM T3 to thyroid hormone-depeleted GC cells resulted in a significantly greater (P less than 0.001) accumulation of GH (2642 +/- 280 ng/18 h) during 41 C incubation than during 37 C incubation (1223 +/- 175 ng/18 h). The enhanced T3-induced production of GH was coincident with a proportional increase (P less than 0.05) in cellular GH mRNA determined by dot hybridization analysis. Thus, the stress of 41 C incubation elicits a heat shock response in GC cells characterized by decreased viability and growth arrest, but enhanced accumulation of GH mRNA in response to T3. Our recent report on the identical effects due to the stress of implantation of the Walker 256 carcinoma on T3-induced rat pituitary GH mRNA in vivo suggests that heat shock of cultured GC cells is a valid in vitro model of nonthyroidal disease.

  14. Role of growth hormone (GH) in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Patricia A; Kopchick, John J; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; LeRoith, Derek; Yakar, Shoshana

    2004-10-01

    Liver regeneration is a fundamental mechanism by which the liver responds to injury. This process is regulated by endogenous growth factors and cytokines, and it involves proliferation of all mature cells that exist within the intact organ. To understand the role of the GH/IGF-I axis in liver regeneration, we performed partial hepatectomies in three groups of mice: GH antagonist (GHa) transgenic mice, in which the action of GH is blocked; liver IGF-I-deficient mice that lack IGF-I specifically in the liver and also lack the acid-labile subunit (ALS; LID+ALSKO mice), in which IGF-I levels are very low and GH secretion is increased; and control mice. Interestingly, the survival rate of GHa transgenic mice was dramatically reduced after partial hepatectomy (57%) compared with the survival rate of controls (100%) or LID+ALSKO mice (88%). In control mice, the liver was completely regenerated after 4 d, whereas liver regeneration required 7 d in LID+ALSKO mice. In contrast, in GHa mice, liver regeneration reached only 70% of the original liver mass after 4 d and did not improve thereafter. Strikingly, 36 and 48 h after hepatectomy, the livers of control and LID+ALSKO mice, respectively, exhibited intense 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining, whereas BrdU staining was dramatically decreased in the livers of GHa-treated mice. These results suggest that GH plays a critical role in liver regeneration, although whether it acts directly or indirectly remains to be determined.

  15. Blockade of the growth hormone (GH) receptor unmasks rapid GH-releasing peptide-6-mediated tissue-specific insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Muller, A F; Janssen, J A; Hofland, L J; Lamberts, S W; Bidlingmaier, M; Strasburger, C J; van der Lely, A J

    2001-02-01

    The roles of GH and its receptor (GHR) in metabolic control are not yet fully understood. We studied the roles of GH and the GHR using the GHR antagonist pegvisomant for metabolic control of healthy nonobese men in fasting and nonfasting conditions. Ten healthy subjects were enrolled in a double blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of pegvisomant on GHRH and GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6)-induced GH secretion before and after 3 days of fasting and under nonfasting conditions (n = 5). Under the condition of GHR blockade by pegvisomant in the nonfasting state, GHRP-6 (1 microg/kg) caused a increase in serum insulin (10.3 +/- 2.1 vs. 81.3 +/- 25.4 mU/L; P < 0.001) and glucose (4.2 +/- 0.3 vs. 6.0 +/- 0.6 mmol/L; P < 0.05) concentrations. In this group, a rapid decrease in serum free fatty acids levels was also observed. These changes were not observed under GHR blockade during fasting or in the absence of pegvisomant. We conclude that although these results were obtained from an acute study, and long-term administration of pegvisomant could render different results, blockade of the GHR in the nonfasting state induces tissue-specific changes in insulin sensitivity, resulting in an increase in glucose and insulin levels (indicating insulin resistance of liver/muscle), but probably also in an increase in lipogenesis (indicating normal insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue). These GHRP-6-mediated changes indicate that low GH bioactivity on the tissue level can induce changes in metabolic control, which are characterized by an increase in fat mass and a decrease in lean body mass. As a mechanism of these GHRP-6-mediated metabolic changes in the nonfasting state, direct nonpituitary-mediated GHRP-6 effects on the gastroentero-hepatic axis seem probable.

  16. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra α-helix (GH20b-GH20-α), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-α construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements.

  17. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases

    PubMed Central

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra α-helix (GH20b-GH20-α), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-α construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements. PMID:26024355

  18. Two degradation strategies for overcoming the recalcitrance of natural lignocellulosic xylan by polysaccharides-binding GH10 and GH11 xylanases of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Miao, Youzhi; Li, Pan; Li, Guangqi; Liu, Dongyang; Druzhinina, Irina S; Kubicek, Christian P; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2017-03-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose forms a strong barrier for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass in chemical or biofuel industries. Filamentous fungi are major plant biomass decomposer, and capable of forming all the required enzymes. Here, they characterized the GH10 and GH11 endo-xylanases and a CE1 acetyl-xylan esterase (Axe1) from a superior biomass-degrading strain, Aspergillus fumigatus Z5, and examined how they interact in xylan degradation. Cellulose-binding (CBM1) domain inhibited GH10 xylanase activities for pure xylan, but afforded them an ability to hydrolyze washed corncob particles (WCCP). CBM1-containing GH10 xylanases also showed synergism with CBM1-containing Axe1 in WCCP hydrolysis, and this synergy was strictly dependent on the presence of their CBM1 domains. In contrast, GH11 xylanases had no CBM1, but still could bind xylan and hydrolyzed WCCP; however, no synergism displayed with Axe1. GH10 xylanases and GH11 xylanases showed a pronounced synergism in WCCP hydrolysis, which was dependent on the presence of the CBM1 in GH10 xylanases and absence from GH11 xylanases. They exhibit different mechanisms to bind to cellulose and xylan, and act in synergy when these two structures are intact. These findings will be helpful for the further development of highly efficient enzyme mixtures for lignocellulosic biomass conversion.

  19. Structure-function relationships of family GH70 glucansucrase and 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes, and their evolutionary relationships with family GH13 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Gangoiti, Joana; Bai, Yuxiang; Pijning, Tjaard; Van Leeuwen, Sander S; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to produce large amounts of α-glucan exopolysaccharides. Family GH70 glucansucrase (GS) enzymes catalyze the synthesis of these α-glucans from sucrose. The elucidation of the crystal structures of representative GS enzymes has advanced our understanding of their reaction mechanism, especially structural features determining their linkage specificity. In addition, with the increase of genome sequencing, more and more GS enzymes are identified and characterized. Together, such knowledge may promote the synthesis of α-glucans with desired structures and properties from sucrose. In the meantime, two new GH70 subfamilies (GTFB- and GTFC-like) have been identified as 4,6-α-glucanotransferases (4,6-α-GTs) that represent novel evolutionary intermediates between the family GH13 and "classical GH70 enzymes". These enzymes are not active on sucrose; instead, they use (α1 → 4) glucans (i.e. malto-oligosaccharides and starch) as substrates to synthesize novel α-glucans by introducing linear chains of (α1 → 6) linkages. All these GH70 enzymes are very interesting biocatalysts and hold strong potential for applications in the food, medicine and cosmetic industries. In this review, we summarize the microbiological distribution and the structure-function relationships of family GH70 enzymes, introduce the two newly identified GH70 subfamilies, and discuss evolutionary relationships between family GH70 and GH13 enzymes.

  20. Increased adiposity and insulin correlates with the progressive suppression of pulsatile GH secretion during weight gain.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J; Xie, T Y; Huang, L; Ngo, S T; Veldhuis, J D; Waters, M J; Chen, C

    2013-01-01

    Pathological changes associated with obesity are thought to contribute to GH deficiency. However, recent observations suggest that impaired GH secretion relative to excess calorie consumption contributes to progressive weight gain and thus may contribute to the development of obesity. To clarify this association between adiposity and GH secretion, we investigated the relationship between pulsatile GH secretion and body weight; epididymal fat mass; and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFAs), and glucose. Data were obtained from male mice maintained on a standard or high-fat diet. We confirm the suppression of pulsatile GH secretion following dietary-induced weight gain. Correlation analyses reveal an inverse relationship between measures of pulsatile GH secretion, body weight, and epididymal fat mass. Moreover, we demonstrate an inverse relationship between measures of pulsatile GH secretion and circulating levels of leptin and insulin. The secretion of GH did not change relative to circulating levels of NEFAs or glucose. We conclude that impaired pulsatile GH secretion in the mouse occurs alongside progressive weight gain and thus precedes the development of obesity. Moreover, data illustrate key interactions between GH secretion and circulating levels of insulin and reflect the potential physiological role of GH in modulation of insulin-induced lipogenesis throughout positive energy balance.

  1. Early in vitro induction of rat pituitary GH mRNA by T31.

    PubMed

    Seo, H; Brocas, H; Vassart, G; Refetoff, S

    1978-10-01

    Previous work has shown that thyroid hormone stimulates rat pituitary GH synthesis and GH mRNA activity and concentration. However, the earliest demonstration of increase in GH mRNA activity was 24 hours following T3 addition whereas stimulation of GH synthesis has been observed 2 hours after treatment with T3. Thus, it is unknown whether increase in pituitary GH mRNA is a prerequisite for the stimulation of GH synthesis. In the present investigation in vitro addition of 1.5 x 10(-10) M T3 to pituitaries isolated from hypothyroid rats resulted in a slight but significant increase of GH mRNA activity within 2 hours. Further stimulation of GH mRNA activity was observed over the period of 12 hours. No increase of GH mRNA activity occurred in the absence of T3, and T3 had no effect on the PRL mRNA activity. These findings suggest that increase in GH mRNA may be responsible for the observed induction of GH synthesis, and that at least one of the primary actions of thyroid hormone is at the nuclear level.

  2. Muscle and skeletal health in children and adolescents with GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Improda, Nicola; Capalbo, Donatella; Esposito, Andrea; Salerno, Mariacarolina

    2016-12-01

    In addition to promoting linear growth, GH plays a key role in the regulation of bone and muscle development and metabolism. Although GH deficiency is frequently listed among the causes of secondary osteoporosis in children, its impact on bone and muscle health and on fracture risk is still not completely established. Current data suggest that childhood-onset GH deficiency can affect bone and muscle mass and strength, with GH replacement therapy exerting beneficial effects. Moreover, GH withdrawal at final height can result in reduced peak bone and muscle mass, potentially leading to increased fracture risk in adulthood. Thus, the muscle-bone unit in GH deficient subjects should be monitored during childhood and adolescence in order to prevent osteoporosis and increased fracture risk and GH replacement should be tailored to ensure an optimal bone and muscle health.

  3. Mode of GH administration and gene expression in the female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Walser, Marion; Schiöler, Linus; Oscarsson, Jan; Åberg, Maria A I; Wickelgren, Ruth; Svensson, Johan; Isgaard, Jörgen; Aberg, N David

    2017-03-08

    The endogenous secretion of growth hormone (GH) is sexually dimorphic in rats with females having a more even and males a more pulsatile secretion and low trough levels. The mode of GH administration, mimicking the sexually dimorphic secretion, has different systemic effects. In the brains of male rats, we have previously found that the mode of GH administration differently affects neuron haemoglobin beta (Hbb) expression whereas effects on other transcripts were moderate. The different modes of GH administration could have different effects on brain transcripts in female rats. Hypophysectomised female rats were given GH either as injections twice daily or as continuous infusion and GH-responsive transcripts were assessed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the hippocampus and parietal cortex (cortex). The different modes of GH-administration markedly increased Hbb and 5'-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (Alas2) in both brain regions. As other effects were relatively moderate, a mixed model analysis (MMA) was used to investigate general effects of the treatments. In the hippocampus, MMA showed that GH-infusion suppressed glia- and neuron-related transcript expression whereas GH-injections increased expression. In the cortex, GH-infusion instead increased neuron-related transcripts, whereas GH-injections had no significant effect. Interestingly, this contrasts to previous results from male rat cortex where GH-infusion generally decreased expression levels. In conclusion, the results indicate that there is a small but significant difference in response to mode of GH administration, in the hippocampus as compared to the cortex. For both modes of GH administration, there was a robust effect on Hbb and Alas2.

  4. Adults with Prader-Willi syndrome have weaker bones: effect of treatment with GH and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Silvia; Grugni, Graziano; Gatti, Davide; Spinozzi, Emiliano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Adami, Silvano; Fanolla, Antonio; Radetti, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has been considered to have a protective effect against the risk of fractures in adults. However, a high frequency of fracture is described in obese adults with Prader-Willi syndrome. To evaluate bone geometry, density and strength in a group of adult obese patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and to examine the modulating effect on bone of treatment with growth hormone (GH) and sex steroids. This was a cross-sectional study performed in 41 (17 males, 24 females) obese subjects with genetically confirmed PWS, aged 29.4 ± 8.6 years. Forty-six healthy subjects (22 males and 24 females) served as controls. Digitalized X-rays were evaluated at the level of the 2nd metacarpal bone to assess bone geometry, i.e. cross-sectional area (CSA), cortical area (CA), medullary area (MA), metacarpal index (MI) and bone strength evaluated as bending breaking resistance index (BBRI). DEXA was also used to evaluate body composition and bone mineral density (total body, lumbar spine and femoral neck). PWS subjects, after adjusting for height and bone size, had a reduced CSA, CA and BBRI, while bone density was not different. GH treatment had a positive effect and sex steroids a negative effect on bone size and strength. PWS subjects showed a reduced bone size at the metacarpus leading to a reduced strength, while bone density was appropriate for size. GH treatment improves bone geometry but not bone density. Bone strength was significantly reduced in PWS patients who did not receive GH and had been treated with sex steroids.

  5. Intranasal Human Growth Hormone (hGH) Induces IGF-1 Levels Comparable With Subcutaneous Injection With Lower Systemic Exposure to hGH in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Andrew L.; Patel, Tina; Jeffery, Kirk; King, Gareth; Savage, Martin; Shalet, Stephen; Illum, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Context: The development of an improved, efficacious human GH (hGH) product administered by a noninjectable route of delivery such as the nasal route is highly desirable. We have developed a novel nasal hGH product (CP024) that showed excellent nasal absorption in animal models; however, the translation of these results into the clinical setting is essential because past attempts to develop such formulations by other groups have been unable to induce IGF-1 in man. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of CP024 compared with a sc hGH injection. Design: This was a single-center, nonrandomized placebo-controlled, open-label, five-way crossover study in eight healthy volunteers. Setting: The study was carried out at a contract research organization, Quotient Bioresearch. Volunteers: Eight healthy male volunteers, given an iv infusion of octreotide to suppress the endogenous GH secretion during the study period, participated in the study. No volunteers were withdrawn due to side effects. Main Outcome Measures: Measurement of hGH and IGF-1 levels and tolerability of the drug product was performed. Results: No serious adverse events were reported and no subjects withdrawn from study due to the treatment. After the nasal administration of CP024, 3-fold higher hGH blood levels were obtained as compared with hGH nasal control. The relative bioavailability was about 3%. CP024 (given twice daily) induced a significant increase in IGF-1 levels up to 19 hours after administration, with no significant difference to those obtained after the sc injection of hGH. Conclusions: The study indicates that CP024 is a promising candidate for an efficacious nasal product for the treatment of GH deficiency due to induction of IGF-1 similar to that after a sc injection, despite the lower plasma hGH concentration obtained. A dose-response study is needed to evaluate the optimal nasal dose. PMID:26425883

  6. Stereotactic Irradiation of GH-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, G.; Scaringi, C.; Amelio, D.; Maurizi Enrici, R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is often employed in patients with acromegaly refractory to medical and/or surgical interventions in order to prevent tumour regrowth and normalize elevated GH and IGF-I levels. It achieves tumour control and hormone normalization up to 90% and 70% of patients at 10–15 years. Despite the excellent tumour control, conventional RT is associated with a potential risk of developing late toxicity, especially hypopituitarism, and its role in the management of patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas remains a matter of debate. Stereotactic techniques have been developed with the aim to deliver more localized irradiation and minimize the long-term consequences of treatment, while improving its efficacy. Stereotactic irradiation can be given in a single dose as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or in multiple doses as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). We have reviewed the recent published literature on stereotactic techniques for GH-secreting pituitary tumors with the aim to define the efficacy and potential adverse effects of each of these techniques. PMID:22518123

  7. Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH) replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD) children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Begoña; Casteleiro, Nerea; Couto, Paula; Castañón, Beatriz; Zas, Eva; Reimunde, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD). The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years) with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH) and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST) was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test (P < 0.01), and in fine motor skills and expressive communication (P < 0.02) were observed after the combined treatment period. Therefore, GH replacement together with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.

  8. TPA enhances growth hormone (GH) secretion effect of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) by human gsp-positive pituitary somatotrophinomas.

    PubMed

    Lei, T; Bai, X; Hu, W; Xue, D; Jiang, X

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, one of the most exciting advances in the researches of pituitary adenomas is the discovery that 30%-40% of human pituitary somatotrophinomas carry somatic mutations of the gene for the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory GTP-binding protein, Gs (Gs alpha). These mutations, termed gsp oncogenes, may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of pituitary adenomas. Of 10 somatotrophinomas examined, 3 (30%) were proved to be gsp positive, as determined by sequence analysis of DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). GHRH exerted a significant stimulatory effect on GH secretion in 2 of 3 gsp-positive and 4 of 7 gsp-negative tumors. Moreover, phorbol ester, 1, 2-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), enhanced stimulation of lated the GH secretion effect exerted by GHRH in gsp-positive somatotrophinomas, whereas this effect was not observed in gsp-negative tumors. This result suggests that the protein kinase C signal system as well as adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A intracellular signal transduction system plays a pivotal role in GH secretory control of GHRH, which may work together via a cross-talk mechanism.

  9. Enzymes for Pancreatic Islet Isolation Impact Chemokine-Production and Polarization of Insulin-Producing β-Cells with Reduced Functional Survival of Immunoisolated Rat Islet-Allografts as a Consequence

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Paul; Smink, Alexandra M.; Paredes, Genaro; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; de Haan, Bart J.; Faas, Marijke M.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether normal variations in enzyme-activities of collagenases applied for rat-islet isolation impact longevity of encapsulated islet grafts. Also we studied the functional and immunological properties of rat islets isolated with different enzyme preparations to determine whether this impacts these parameters. Rat-islets were isolated from the pancreas with two different collagenases with commonly accepted collagenase, neutral protease, and clostripain activities. Islets had a similar and acceptable glucose-induced insulin-release profile but a profound statistical significant difference in production of the chemokines IP-10 and Gro-α. The islets were studied with nanotomy which is an EM-based technology for unbiased study of ultrastructural features of islets such as cell-cell contacts, endocrine-cell condition, ER stress, mitochondrial conditions, and cell polarization. The islet-batch with higher chemokine-production had a lower amount of polarized insulin-producing β-cells. All islets had more intercellular spaces and less interconnected areas with tight cell-cell junctions when compared to islets in the pancreas. Islet-graft function was studied by implanting encapsulated and free islet grafts in rat recipients. Alginate-based encapsulated grafts isolated with the enzyme-lot inducing higher chemokine production and lower polarization survived for a two-fold shorter period of time. The lower survival-time of the encapsulated grafts was correlated with a higher influx of inflammatory cells at 7 days after implantation. Islets from the same two batches transplanted as free unencapsulated-graft, did not show any difference in survival or function in vivo. Lack of insight in factors contributing to the current lab-to-lab variation in longevity of encapsulated islet-grafts is considered to be a threat for clinical application. Our data suggest that seemingly minor variations in activity of enzymes applied for islet

  10. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (P<0.01) in the presence of exogenous recombinant chicken GH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (P<0.01) the number of glutamate-BSO-induced apoptotic cells and blocked the explant release of LDH. This neuroprotective action was likely mediated by increased STAT5 phosphorylation and increased bcl-2 production, as induced by exogenous rcGH treatment and the media from GH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation.

  11. Low doses of estradiol partly inhibit release of GH in sheep without affecting basal levels.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, A; Davenport, G; Coleman, E S; Sartin, J L

    2009-10-01

    Estradiol increases basal growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep and cattle. This study sought to determine the effects of estradiol on GH-releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH release in sheep. Growth hormone secretory characteristics, the GH response to GRH, and steady-state GH mRNA concentrations were determined in castrated male lambs treated with 2 different doses of estradiol 17-beta for a 28-d experimental period. Although no differences between treatments in mean GH, basal GH, or GH pulse number were observed after 28 d of estradiol treatment, GH pulse amplitude was greater (P < 0.05) in the 2.00-cm implant-treated animals than in the control and 0.75-cm implant group. The effect of estradiol treatment on GRH-stimulated GH release revealed differences between the control and estradiol-treated animals (P < 0.05). The 15-min GH responses to 0.075 microg/kg hGRH in the control, 0.75-cm, and 2.00-cm implant groups, respectively, were 76 +/- 10, 22.6 +/- 2.1, and 43.6 +/- 15.0 ng/mL. Growth hormone mRNA content was determined for pituitary glands from the different treatment groups, and no differences in steady-state GH mRNA levels were observed. There were no differences in the mean plasma concentrations of IGF-I, cortisol, T(3), or T(4) from weekly samples. Growth hormone release from cultured ovine pituitary cells from control sheep was not affected by estradiol after 72 h or in a subsequent 3-h incubation with estradiol combined with GRH. These data suggest that estradiol has differing actions on basal and GRH-stimulated GH concentrations in plasma, but the increase in pulse amplitude does not represent an increased pituitary sensitivity to GRH.

  12. Excessive growth hormone expression in male GH transgenic mice adversely alters bone architecture and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Lim, S V; Marenzana, M; Hopkinson, M; List, E O; Kopchick, J J; Pereira, M; Javaheri, B; Roux, J P; Chavassieux, P; Korbonits, M; Chenu, C

    2015-04-01

    Patients with acromegaly have a higher prevalence of vertebral fractures despite normal bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that GH overexpression has adverse effects on skeletal architecture and strength. We used giant bovine GH (bGH) transgenic mice to analyze the effects of high serum GH levels on BMD, architecture, and mechanical strength. Five-month-old hemizygous male bGH mice were compared with age- and sex-matched nontransgenic littermates controls (NT; n=16/group). Bone architecture and BMD were analyzed in tibia and lumbar vertebrae using microcomputed tomography. Femora were tested to failure using three-point bending and bone cellular activity determined by bone histomorphometry. bGH transgenic mice displayed significant increases in body weight and bone lengths. bGH tibia showed decreases in trabecular bone volume fraction, thickness, and number compared with NT ones, whereas trabecular pattern factor and structure model index were significantly increased, indicating deterioration in bone structure. Although cortical tissue perimeter was increased in transgenic mice, cortical thickness was reduced. bGH mice showed similar trabecular BMD but reduced trabecular thickness in lumbar vertebra relative to controls. Cortical BMD and thickness were significantly reduced in bGH lumbar vertebra. Mechanical testing of femora confirmed that bGH femora have decreased intrinsic mechanical properties compared with NT ones. Bone turnover is increased in favor of bone resorption in bGH tibia and vertebra compared with controls, and serum PTH levels is also enhanced in bGH mice. These data collectively suggest that high serum GH levels negatively affect bone architecture and quality at multiple skeletal sites.

  13. Antiproliferative and GH-inhibitory activity of chimeric peptides consisting of GHRP-6 and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, P; Singh, A T; Mukherjee, R

    1999-06-07

    Chimeric peptides consisting of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP-6) linked to somatostatin (6-11) via an amide bond to provide the effector parts of both the peptides were synthesized. The anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, and GH-inhibitory activities of these chimeric peptides were determined in vitro in the rat pituitary adenoma cell line GH3. One of the chimeric peptides, GSD, exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.001) anti-neoplastic and GH-inhibitory activity, as compared to RC-160. The hybrid peptides displayed high affinity binding to somatostatin receptors on GH3 cells. The bioactivity of GSD was found to be mediated by the stimulation of tyrosine phosphatase, involving a cGMP-dependent pathway, through pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. Such potent GH-inhibitory chimeric peptides may be of potential importance in the therapy of acromegaly, as well as provide novel tools to study the regulation of GH secretion by GHRP and somatostatin.

  14. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  15. The R3-MYB gene GhCPC negatively regulates cotton fiber elongation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingliang; Zhu, Yichao; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) fibers are single-cell trichomes that arise from the outer epidermal layer of seed coat. Here, we isolated a R3-MYB gene GhCPC, identified by cDNA microarray analysis. The only conserved R3 motif and different expression between TM-1 and fuzzless-lintless mutants suggested that it might be a negative regulator in fiber development. Transgenic evidence showed that GhCPC overexpression not only delayed fiber initiation but also led to significant decreases in fiber length. Interestingly, Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed an interaction complex, in which GhCPC and GhTTG1/4 separately interacted with GhMYC1. In transgenic plants, Q-PCR analysis showed that GhHOX3 (GL2) and GhRDL1 were significantly down regulated in -1-5 DPA ovules and fibers. In addition, Yeast one-hybrid analysis demonstrated that GhMYC1 could bind to the E-box cis-elements and the promoter of GhHOX3. These results suggested that GhHOX3 (GL2) might be downstream gene of the regulatory complex. Also, overexpression of GhCPC in tobacco led to differential loss of pigmentation. Taken together, the results suggested that GhCPC might negatively regulate cotton fiber initiation and early elongation by a potential CPC-MYC1-TTG1/4 complex. Although the fibers were shorter in transgenic cotton lines than in the wild type, no significant difference was detected in stem or leaf trichomes, even in cotton mutants (five naked seed or fuzzless), suggesting that fiber and trichome development might be regulated by two sets of genes sharing a similar model.

  16. Growth hormone (GH) differentially regulates NF-kB activity in preadipocytes and macrophages: implications for GH's role in adipose tissue homeostasis in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Anil; Chitra, P Swathi; Lu, Chunxia; Sobhanaditya, J; Menon, Ram

    2014-06-01

    Adipose tissue remodeling in obesity involves macrophage infiltration and chronic inflammation. NF-kB-mediated chronic inflammation of the adipose tissue is directly implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance. We have investigated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on NF-kB activity in preadipocytes (3T3-F442A) and macrophages (J774A.1). Our studies indicate that whereas GH increases NF-kB activity in preadipocytes, it decreases NF-kB activity in macrophages. This differential response of NF-kB activity to GH correlates with the GH-dependent expression of a cadre of NF-kB-activated cytokines in these two cell types. Activation of NF-kB by GH in preadipocytes heightens inflammatory response by stimulating production of multiple cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, the mediators of both local and systemic insulin resistance and chemokines that recruit macrophages. Our studies also suggest differential regulation of miR132 and SIRT1 expression as a mechanism underlying the observed variance in GH-dependent NF-kB activity and altered cytokine profile in preadipocytes and macrophages. These findings further our understanding of the complex actions of GH on adipocytes and insulin sensitivity.

  17. GH improves growth and clinical status in children with cystic fibrosis -- a review of published studies.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Dana S

    2004-08-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) have problems with poor linear growth and inadequate weight gain. Nutritional augmentation has been the mainstay of therapy for improving both weight and height in CF; however, inadequate growth continues to be a problem. Furthermore, protein catabolism has been documented even in non-acutely ill adults and children with CF, and could adversely affect longitudinal growth. Human recombinant GH has positive effects on nitrogen balance, and multiple studies have demonstrated improved height and weight in children treated with GH. The purpose of this article is to summarize studies evaluating GH use in children with CF. All published studies of GH use in children with CF have demonstrated significant improvement in height velocity and height Z score. All studies but one, in which subjects were treated only three times per week with GH, have demonstrated improvement in weight as reported by weight velocity and/or weight Z score, and one trial has demonstrated a substantial improvement when GH was used to augment nutritional therapy. Several reports suggest that GH treatment results in improved forced vital capacity, and multiple studies have found improved clinical status as measured by decreased hospitalizations and courses of intravenous antibiotics. Furthermore studies to date also suggest that GH results in improvement in exercise tolerance and bone accumulation. To date significant side effects, including glucose intolerance, have not been reported. Thus mounting evidence suggests that human recombinant GH provides safe and effective therapy in children with CF.

  18. Genetic and protein biomarkers in blood for the improved detection of GH abuse.

    PubMed

    Ferro, P; Ventura, R; Pérez-Mañá, C; Farré, M; Segura, J

    2016-09-05

    Human Growth Hormone (hGH, somatotropin) is one of the relevant forbidden substances to be detected in sport drug testing. Since the appearance of recombinant hGH (rhGH) in the 80's, its expansion and availability through the black market have increased, so the detection of its abuse continues to be a challenge at present. New techniques or biomarkers that are robust, reliable, sensitive and allowing a large detection time window are welcome. rhGH produces an increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). FN1 (fibronectin 1) and RAB31 (member of RAS oncogene family) genes have been suggested as two potential biomarkers for IGF-1 abuse. Following this line, in the present study some genetic and proteomic approaches have been performed with fourteen healthy male subjects treated with rhGH (which produces increase of IGF-1 concentrations) to study FN1 gene, FN1 protein, RAB31 gene and RAB31 protein as potential biomarkers for rhGH abuse. The results showed that both, RAB31 and FN1 genes and FN1 protein could be potential biomarkers for rhGH administration. Preliminary assessments of gender, age, acute sport activities and GHRP-2 (pralmorelin, a rhGH releasing peptide) influence suggest they are not relevant confounding factors. Thus, the selected markers present high sensitivity and a larger detection window for rhGH detection than IGF-1 itself.

  19. Functional rectification of the newly described African henipavirus fusion glycoprotein (Gh-M74a).

    PubMed

    Pernet, Olivier; Beaty, Shannon; Lee, Benhur

    2014-05-01

    Recent evidence identified multiple Henipavirus species in Africa distinct from those in Southeast Asia and Australia. The reported fusion glycoprotein (F) sequence of the African Gh-M74a strain (GhV-F) is likely incorrect: a single base pair deletion near the N terminus results in multiple aberrancies. Rectifying this by adding single nucleotide insertions results in a GhV-F that now possesses a signal peptide, is efficiently cell surface expressed, exhibits syncytium formation when coexpressed with GhV-G protein, and mediates pseudotyped viral particle entry.

  20. Osmoregulatory actions of the GH/IGF axis in non-salmonid teleosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancera, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonid fishes provided the first findings on the influence of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis on osmoregulation in teleost fishes. Recent studies on non-salmonid species, however, indicate that this physiological action of the GH/IGF-I axis is not restricted to salmonids or anadromous fishes. GH-producing cells in the pituitary of fish acclimated to different salinities show different degrees of activation depending on the species studied. Plasma GH levels either increase or do not change after transfer of fish from freshwater to seawater. Treatment with GH or IGF-I increases salinity tolerance and/or increases gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus and Oreochromis niloticus) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). As in salmonids, a positive interaction between GH and cortisol for improving hypoosmoregulatory capacity has been described in tilapia (O. mossambicus). Research on the osmoregulatory role of the GH/IGF-I axis is derived from a small number of teleost species. The study of more species with different osmoregulary patterns will be necessary to fully clarify the osmoregulatory role of GH/IGF-I axis in fish. The available data does suggest, however, that the influence of the GH/IGF-I axis on osmoregulation may be a common feature of euryhalinity in teleosts. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Inc.

  1. Growth hormone activity in mitochondria depends on GH receptor Box 1 and involves caveolar pathway targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Perret-Vivancos, Cecile; Abbate, Aude; Ardail, Dominique; Raccurt, Mireille; Usson, Yves; Lobie, Peter E.; Morel, Gerard . E-mail: gerard.morel@univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) binding to its receptor (GHR) initiates GH-dependent signal transduction and internalization pathways to generate the biological effects. The precise role and way of action of GH on mitochondrial function are not yet fully understood. We show here that GH can stimulate cellular oxygen consumption in CHO cells transfected with cDNA coding for the full-length GHR. By using different GHR cDNA constructs, we succeeded in determining the different parts of the GHR implicated in the mitochondrial response to GH. Polarography and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that the Box 1 of the GHR intracellular domain was required for an activation of the mitochondrial respiration in response to a GH exposure. However, confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that cells lacking the GHR Box 1 could efficiently internalize the hormone. We demonstrated that internalization mediated either by clathrin-coated pits or by caveolae was able to regulate GH mitochondrial effect: these two pathways are both essential to obtain the GH stimulatory action on mitochondrial function. Moreover, electron microscopic and biochemical approaches allowed us to identify the caveolar pathway as essential for targeting GH and GHR to mitochondria.

  2. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  3. Postprandial changes in plasma GH and insulin concentrations, and responses to stimulation with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and GHRP-6 in calves around weaning.

    PubMed

    Katoh, K; Furukawa, G; Kitade, K; Katsumata, N; Kobayashi, Y; Obara, Y

    2004-12-01

    Changes in plasma concentrations of GH and insulin in response to feeding and stimulation with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or GH-releasing peptide (GHRP-6, a ligand for endogenous GH secretagogue receptors) were compared between 3-week-old (milk-fed) and 12-week-old (concentrate and hay-fed) calves. Feeding of a milk-replacer diet in 3-week-old animals significantly increased the basal (prefeeding) concentrations of GH, insulin and glucose in plasma, whereas feeding of concentrate and hay in 12-week-old animals did not cause a significant change in these traits. However, in the animals maintained on a milk-replacer diet until 12 weeks of age, postprandial plasma GH concentrations and AUC (area under the curve) were not different from those in the age-matched weaned group. The venous injection of either GHRH (0.25 microg/kg) or GHRP-6 (2.5 microg/kg) significantly increased plasma GH concentrations in both 3- and 12-week-old animals, but GH AUC was significantly greater in 3-week-old than in 12-week-old animals. Insulin concentration was transiently but significantly increased by the injection of GHRP-6 only in 12-week-old animals, the AUC being greater in 12-week-old than 3-week-old animals. From these results, we conclude that postprandial levels of plasma GH and insulin concentrations are altered after weaning and by aging, and that the quality of diets or development of the neuroendocrine functions in the digestive-pituitary system may be involved in this alteration.

  4. Pulsatile characteristics of spontaneous growth hormone (GH) concentration profiles in boys evaluated by an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay: Evidence for ultradian periodicity of GH secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Goji, Katsumi )

    1993-03-01

    To investigate underlying ultradian periodicities in spontaneous circulating GH concentrations, blood samples were drawn from 15 normal short boys every 20 min over a 24-h period, and plasma GH concentrations were measured using an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay. The limit of detection for the GH assay was 0.01 [mu]g/L. The GH time series were analyzed using the Cluster program, Ultra program, cosinor analysis, and autocorrelation analysis. Plasma GH concentrations in 1,095 samples derived from 15 normal short boys were all within the detectable range of the assay and ranged from 0.07-52.2 [mu]g/L. Thirty-six percent of the GH values in the 1,095 samples from 15 normal short boys were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 82% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. Cluster analysis disclosed a total of 176 peaks in 15 normal short boys, with a mean [+-] SEM number of significant GH peaks of 12.1 [+-] 0.5/24 h. Twelve percent of the 176 peaks were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 95% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. In addition, Cluster analysis disclosed 161 interpulse intervals in total, with a mean [+-] SEM interval of 116.5 [+-] 4.3 min. The GH interpulse interval did not show a significant 24-h rhythm, whereas the GH peak height increased significantly at night. An independent discrete peak detection in program, Ultra, identified 12.6 [+-] 0.5 GH peaks/24 h. This result was in good agreement with that from analysis by the Cluster program (P = NS). Autocorrelation analysis revealed that GH time series were significantly autocorrelated in 9 of the 15 boys, with maximal autocorrelation coefficients at 115.5 min, on the average. The mean autocorrelation coefficient for a group of 15 normal short boys was significantly positive at a 100-min lag. These findings suggest that there could be a regularly occurring periodicity of approximately 100-120 min in the human GH time series. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Clinical challenges in the management of isolated GH deficiency type IA in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Casteràs, Anna; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Ferrández, Ángel; Zafón, Carles; Carrascosa, Antonio; Mesa, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolated GH deficiency type IA (IGHDIA) is an infrequent cause of severe congenital GHD, often managed by pediatric endocrinologists, and hence few cases in adulthood have been reported. Herein, we describe the clinical status of a 56-year-old male with IGHDIA due to a 6.7 kb deletion in GH1 gene that encodes GH, located on chromosome 17. We also describe phenotypic and biochemical parameters, as well as characterization of anti-GH antibodies after a new attempt made to treat with GH. The height of the adult patient was 123 cm. He presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, osteoporosis, and low physical and psychological performance, compatible with GHD symptomatology. Anti-GH antibodies in high titers and with binding activity (>101 IU/ml) were found 50 years after exposure to exogenous GH, and their levels increased significantly (>200 U/ml) after a 3-month course of 0.2 mg/day recombinant human GH (rhGH) treatment. Higher doses of rhGH (1 mg daily) did not overcome the blockade, and no change in undetectable IGF1 levels was observed (<25 ng/ml). IGHDIA patients need lifelong medical surveillance, focusing mainly on metabolic disturbances, bone status, cardiovascular disease, and psychological support. Multifactorial conventional therapy focusing on each issue is recommended, as anti-GH antibodies may inactivate specific treatment with exogenous GH. After consideration of potential adverse effects, rhIGF1 treatment, even theoretically indicated, has not been considered in our patient yet. Learning points Severe isolated GHD may be caused by mutations in GH1 gene, mainly a 6.7 kb deletion.Appearance of neutralizing anti-GH antibodies upon recombinant GH treatment is a characteristic feature of IGHDIA.Recombinant human IGF1 treatment has been tested in children with IGHDIA with variable results in height and secondary adverse effects, but any occurrence in adult patients has not been reported yet.Metabolic disturbances (diabetes

  6. Multipathway Modulation of Exercise and Glucose Stress Effects upon GH Secretion in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Olson, Thomas P.; Takahashi, Paul Y.; Miles, John M.; Joyner, Michael J.; Yang, Rebecca J.; Wigham, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exercise evokes pulsatile GH release followed by autonegative feedback, whereas glucose suppresses GH release followed by rebound-like GH release (feedforward escape). Here we test the hypothesis that age, sex steroids, insulin, body composition and physical power jointly determine these dynamic GH responses. Methods This was a prospectively randomized glucose-blinded study conducted in the Mayo Center for Advancing Translational Sciences in healthy men ages 19–77 yr (N = 23). Three conditions, fasting/rest/saline, fasting/exercise/saline and fasting/rest/iv glucose infusions, were used to drive GH dynamics during 10-min blood sampling for 6 hr. Linear correlation analysis was applied to relate peak/nadir GH dynamics to age, sex steroids, insulin, CT-estimated abdominal fat and physical power (work per unit time). Results Compared with the fasting/rest/saline (control) day, fasting/exercise/saline infusion evoked peak GH within 1 h, followed by negative feedback 3–5 h later. The dynamic GH excursion was strongly (R2 = 0.634) influenced by (i) insulin negatively (P = 0.011), (ii) power positively (P = 0.0008), and (iii) E2 positively (P = 0.001). Dynamic glucose-modulated GH release was determined by insulin negatively (P = 0.0039) and power positively (P = 0.0034) [R2 = 0.454]. Under rest/saline, power (P = 0.031) and total abdominal fat (P = 0.012) [R2 = 0.267] were the dominant correlates of GH excursions. Conclusion In healthy men, dynamic GH perturbations induced by exercise and glucose are strongly related to physical power, insulin, estradiol, and body composition, thus suggesting a network of regulatory pathways. PMID:26028283

  7. Targeting GH-1 splicing as a novel pharmacological strategy for growth hormone deficiency type II.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2017-01-15

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II) is a rare genetic splicing disorder characterized by reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion and short stature. It is mainly caused by autosomal dominant-negative mutations within the growth hormone gene (GH-1) which results in missplicing at the mRNA level and the subsequent loss of exon 3, producing the 17.5-kDa GH isoform: a mutant and inactive GH protein that reduces the stability and the secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform, the main biologically active GH form. At present, patients suffering from IGHD II are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent the toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa mutant on the pituitary gland, which may eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. As the severity of the disease inversely correlates with the 17.5-kDa/22-kDa ratio, increasing the inclusion of exon 3 is expected to ameliorate disease symptoms. This review focuses on the recent advances in experimental and therapeutic strategies applicable to treat IGHD II in clinical and preclinical contexts. Several avenues for alternative IGHD II therapy will be discussed including the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically target the exon 3-deleted transcripts as well as the application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to enhance full-length GH-1 transcription, correct GH-1 exon 3 splicing and manipulate GH pathway.

  8. Expression and functional characterization of intrafollicular GH-IGF system in the zebrafish ovary.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Yu, Susana Man Ying; Ge, Wei

    2016-06-01

    The somatotrophic axis plays important roles in influencing reproduction. All key members of this axis including growth hormone (GH, gh), GH receptors (ghra and ghrb), insulin-like growth factors (IGFs, igf1, igf2 and igf3) and IGF receptors (igf1ra and igf1rb) were detected in the zebrafish ovary. GH was exclusively expressed in the full-grown oocytes, while its receptors were detectable in both the follicle cells and oocytes. The IGFs and their receptors were all expressed in both compartments except igf3, which was expressed in the follicle cells only. During folliculogenesis, there was a sharp decrease of gh expression at follicle activation; however, the expression of its receptors increased significantly. The expression profiles of igf1, igf2a, and igf2b were similar to that of fshr, whereas igf3 expression was close to lhcgr, suggesting differential roles for different forms of IGFs in follicle development. To examine if the ovarian GH-IGF system is regulated by gonadotropins (e.g., hCG) and GH, we performed in vitro experiments using cultured zebrafish follicle cells. The expression of igf1 and igf1ra, but not others, was down-regulated by hCG (LH analog), whereas recombinant zebrafish GH stimulated igf1 expression. In addition, GH also increased the expression of activin βA subunit (inhbaa). In agreement with this, the stimulatory effect of GH but not IGF-I on oocyte maturation could be abolished by follistatin. In conclusion, the present study revealed an intrafollicular network involving GH-IGF mini-axis in the zebrafish ovary; however, it might not work in the same way as that of the systemic somatotrophic axis.

  9. Direct stimulation of bone mass by increased GH signalling in the osteoblasts of Socs2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Dobie, R; MacRae, V E; Huesa, C; van't Hof, R; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2014-10-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signalling (Socs2(-/-))-knockout mouse is characterised by an overgrowth phenotype due to enhanced GH signalling. The objective of this study was to define the Socs2(-/-) bone phenotype and determine whether GH promotes bone mass via IGF1-dependent mechanisms. Despite no elevation in systemic IGF1 levels, increased body weight in 4-week-old Socs2(-/-) mice following GH treatment was associated with increased cortical bone area (Ct.Ar) (P<0.01). Furthermore, detailed bone analysis of male and female juvenile and adult Socs2(-/-) mice revealed an altered cortical and trabecular phenotype consistent with the known anabolic effects of GH. Indeed, male Socs2(-/-) mice had increased Ct.Ar (P<0.05) and thickness associated with increased strength. Despite this, there was no elevation in hepatic Igf1 expression, suggesting that the anabolic bone phenotype was the result of increased local GH action. Mechanistic studies showed that in osteoblasts and bone of Socs2(-/-) mice, STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly increased in response to GH. Conversely, overexpression of SOCS2 decreased GH-induced STAT5 signalling. Although an increase in Igf1 expression was observed in Socs2(-/-) osteoblasts following GH, it was not evident in vivo. Igf1 expression levels were not elevated in response to GH in 4-week-old mice and no alterations in expression was observed in bone samples of 6-week-old Socs2(-/-) mice. These studies emphasise the critical role of SOCS2 in controlling the local GH anabolic bone effects. We provide compelling evidence implicating SOCS2 in the regulation of GH osteoblast signalling and ultimately bone accrual, which maybe via mechanisms that are independent of IGF1 production in vivo.

  10. New insights into the mechanism and actions of growth hormone (GH) in poultry.

    PubMed

    Vasilatos-Younken, R; Wang, X H; Zhou, Y; Day, J R; McMurtry, J P; Rosebrough, R W; Decuypere, E; Buys, N; Darras, V; Beard, J L; Tomas, F

    1999-10-01

    Despite well documented anabolic effects of GH in mammals, a clear demonstration of such responses in domestic poultry is lacking. Recently, comprehensive dose-response studies of GH have been conducted in broilers during late post-hatch development (8 to 9 weeks of age). GH reduced feed intake (FI) and body weight gain in a dose-dependent manner, whereas birds pair-fed to the level of voluntary FI of GH-infused birds did not differ from controls. The reduction in voluntary FI may involve centrally mediated mechanisms, as hypothalamic neuropeptide Y protein and mRNA were reduced with GH, coincident with the maximal depression in FI. Growth of breast muscle was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Circulating IGF-I was not enhanced by GH, despite evidence that early events in the GH signaling pathway were intact. A GH dose-dependent increase in circulating 3,3',5-triiodothyronine(T3) paralleled decreases in hepatic 5D-III monodeiodinase activity, whereas 5'D-I activity was not altered. This confirms that a marked hyperthyroid response to GH occurs in late posthatch chickens, resulting from a decrease in the degradative pathway of T3 metabolism. This secondary hyperthyroidism would account for the decreased skeletal muscle mass (52) and lack of enhanced IGF-I (53) in GH-treated birds. Based upon these studies, it is now evident that GH does in fact have significant effects in poultry, but metabolic responses may confound the anabolic potential of the hormone.

  11. Effect of growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy on physical work capacity and cardiac and pulmonary function in patients with hGH deficiency acquired in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nass, R; Huber, R M; Klauss, V; Müller, O A; Schopohl, J; Strasburger, C J

    1995-02-01

    The effects of 6 months of replacement therapy with recombinant human GH (hGH) on physical work capacity and cardiac structure and function were investigated in 20 patients with hGH deficiency of adult onset in a double blind, placebo-controlled trial. The GH dose of 12.5 micrograms/kg BW was self-administered daily sc. Oxygen consumption (VO2), CO2 production, and ventilatory volumes were measured during exercise on a bicycle spiroergometer. M-Mode echocardiography was performed using standard techniques. The VO2 max data, expressed per kg BW (mL/min.kg BW) showed a significant increase from 23.2 +/- 2.4 to 30.0 +/- 2.3 (P < 0.01) in the hGH-treated group, whereas the VO2 max data, expressed per lean body mass (milliliters per min/kg lean body mass) did not change significantly in either group. Maximal O2 pulse (milliliters per beat) increased significantly from 15.2 +/- 5.6 to 19.6 +/- 3.3 mL/beat (P < 0.01), but remained constant in the placebo group. The maximal power output (watts +/- SE) increased significantly (P < 0.01) from 192.5 +/- 13.5 to 227.5 +/- 11.5 in the hGH-treated group, but remained constant in the placebo group. Cardiac structure (left ventricular posterior wall, interventricular septum thickness, left ventricular mass, left ventricular end-systolic dimension, and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension) as well as echocardiographically assessed cardiac function did not change significantly after 6 months of treatment in either group. We conclude that hGH replacement in hGH-deficient adults improves oxygen uptake and exercise capacity. These improvements in pulmonary parameters might be due to an increase in respiratory muscle strength and partly to the changes in muscle volume per se observed during hGH replacement therapy. Furthermore, an increased cardiac output might contribute to the improvement in exercise performance during hGH treatment. According to our data, hGH replacement therapy leads to an improvement of exercise capacity and

  12. Autocrine/paracrine proliferative effect of ovarian GH and IGF-I in chicken granulosa cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ahumada-Solórzano, S Marisela; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Carranza, Martha; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Luna-Acosta, José Luis; Harvey, Steve; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    It is known that growth hormone (GH) and its receptor (GHR) are expressed in granulosa cells (GC) and thecal cells during the follicular development in the hen ovary, which suggests GH is involved in autocrine/paracrine actions in the female reproductive system. In this work, we show that the knockdown of local ovarian GH with a specific cGH siRNA in GC cultures significantly decreased both cGH mRNA expression and GH secretion to the media, and also reduced their proliferative rate. Thus, we analyzed the effect of ovarian GH and recombinant chicken GH (rcGH) on the proliferation of pre-hierarchical GCs in primary cultures. Incubation of GCs with either rcGH or conditioned media, containing predominantly a 15-kDa GH isoform, showed that both significantly increased proliferation as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) quantification and ((3)H)-thymidine incorporation ((3)H-T) assays in a dose response fashion. Both, locally produced GH and rcGH also induced the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in GC cultures. Furthermore, GH increased IGF-I synthesis and its release into the GC culture incubation media. These results suggest that GH may act through local IGF-I to induce GC proliferation, since IGF-I immunoneutralization completely abolished the GH-induced proliferative effect. These data suggest that GH and IGF-I may play a role as autocrine/paracrine regulators during the follicular development in the hen ovary at the pre-hierarchical stage.

  13. Metabolic co-morbidities revealed in patients with childhood-onset adult GH deficiency after cessation of GH replacement therapy for short stature.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Izumi; Hizuka, Naomi; Yasumoto, Kumiko; Morita, Junko; Kurimoto, Makiko; Takano, Kazue

    2008-12-01

    GH therapy was approved in 2006 for treatment of adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in Japan. Until then, GH was used only to treat short stature in children with GHD and the treatment was stopped when the final height was reached. In the present study, we investigated metabolic co-morbidities experienced by adults with childhood-onset (CO) GHD after the cessation of GH. Forty-two patients with COGHD (M/F 22/20, age at follow up when the retrospective analysis was carried out: 18-52 yr) treated with GH in childhood were studied. We reviewed the medical records of these patients to determine the metabolic co-morbidities that developed after cessation of GH. The median age was 19 yrs (range: 14-38) at cessation of GH, and the following co-morbidities were observed: hypertriglyceridemia in 15 (41%) patients, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in 11 (29%) patients, hypercholesterolemia in 10 (26%) patients, diabetes mellitus (DM) in 4 (10%) patients, and hypertension in 1 (2.4%) patient. The median BMI when these complications became overt was 23.5 kg/m(2) for those with hypertriglyceridemia, 26.0 kg/m(2) for those with NAFLD, 20.9 kg/m(2) for those with hypercholesterolemia, and 27.2 kg/m(2 ) for those with DM. More than two co-morbidities were experienced by 32% of men and 30% of women. In conclusion, adults with COGHD after the cessation of GH have multiple metabolic co-morbidities. Lifelong GH replacement might be important for improving the overall metabolic profiles in these patients.

  14. Decreased GH secretion and enhanced ACTH and cortisol release after ghrelin administration in Cushing's disease: comparison with GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH.

    PubMed

    Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Nascif, Sérgio Oliva; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2006-01-01

    GH responsiveness to GH secretagogues (GHS) is blunted in Cushing's disease (CD), while ACTH/cortisol responses are enhanced, by mechanisms still unclear. Ghrelin, the endogenous ligand for GHS-receptors (GHS-R), increases GH, ACTH, cortisol and glucose levels in humans. This study evaluated the GH, ACTH, cortisol and glucose-releasing effects of ghrelin in CD in comparison with GHRP-6. GHRH-induced GH release was also studied. Ten patients with CD (BMI 26.9+/-1.0 kg/m(2)) and ten controls (BMI 24.4+/-1.1 kg/m(2)) received ghrelin (1 microg/kg), GHRP-6 (1 microg/kg) and GHRH (100 microg) separately. GH, ACTH, cortisol and glucose levels were measured. In CD ghrelin-induced GH (microg/L; mean +/- SE) release (peak: 7.2+/-3.0) was higher than seen with GHRP-6 (2.7+/-1.0) and GHRH (0.7+/-0.2), but lower than in controls (ghrelin: 58.3+/-12.1; GHRP-6: 22.9+/-4.8; GHRH: 11.3+/-3.7). In controls ACTH (pg/mL) release after ghrelin (79.2+/-26.8) was higher than after GHRP-6 (23.6+/-5.7). In CD these responses (ghrelin: 192+/-43; GHRP-6: 185+/-56) were similar, and enhanced compared to controls. The same was observed with cortisol. Glucose levels failed to increase after ghrelin in CD, differently than in controls. Our data suggests that hypothalamic and pituitary pathways of GH release activated by ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH are deranged in chronic hypercortisolism. The increased ACTH/cortisol responses to ghrelin and GHRP-6 in CD could be mediated by overexpression of GHS-R in ACTH-secreting adenomas. Hypercortisolism apparently impairs the ability of ghrelin to increase glucose levels.

  15. Induction of chronic growth hormone deficiency by anti-GH serum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Smith, A. T.; Ellis, S.; Evans, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The observations reported indicate that the growth rate of neonatal rats can be specifically inhibited for at least 78 days following the administration of antisera against growth hormone (GH) for only four days after birth. The inhibition can be correlated with a marked deficit of tibial growth promoting activity in the pituitary but not with the plasma concentrations of immuno-reactive GH.

  16. Effects of GH on protein metabolism during dietary restriction in man.

    PubMed

    Nørrelund, Helene; Riis, Anne Lene; Møller, Niels

    2002-08-01

    The metabolic response to dietary restriction involves a series of hormonal and metabolic adaptations leading to protein conservation. An increase in the serum level of growth hormone (GH) during fasting has been well substantiated. GH has potent protein anabolic actions, as evidenced by a significant decrease in lean body mass and muscle mass in chronic GH deficiency, and vice versa in patients with acromegaly. The present review outlines current knowledge about the role of GH in the metabolic response to fasting, with particular reference to the effects on protein metabolism. Physiological bursts of GH secretion seem to be of seminal importance for the regulation of protein conservation during fasting. Apart from the possible direct effects of GH on protein dynamics, a number of additional anabolic agents, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and free fatty acids (FFAs), are activated. Taken together the effects of GH on protein metabolism seem to include both stimulation of protein synthesis and inhibition of breakdown, depending on the nature of GH administration, which tissues are being studied, and on the physiological conditions of the subjects.

  17. Expression and ontogeny of growth hormone (Gh) in the protogynous hermaphroditic ricefield eel (Monopterus albus).

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Jiang; Chen, Wanping; Shi, Shuxia; Zhang, Weimin; Zhang, Lihong

    2015-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a single-chain polypeptide hormone mainly secreted by somatotropes of the anterior pituitary gland and is an important regulator of somatic growth in vertebrates including teleosts. In this study, a polyclonal antiserum against ricefield eel Gh was generated and the expression of Gh at the mRNA and protein levels was analyzed. Both RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that Gh was predominantly expressed in the pituitary glands of ricefield eels. The immunoreactive Gh signals were localized to the multicellular layers of the adenohypophysis adjacent to the neurohypophysis in ricefield eels. Ontogenetic analysis showed that immunoreactive Gh signals could be detected in the pituitary glands of ricefield eel embryos as early as 3 days post-fertilization. During the sex change from female to male, the levels of the immunoreactive Gh signals in the pituitary glands of the ricefield eels peaked at the intersexual stage. These results suggest that Gh in the pituitary glands may be associated with embryonic development before hatching, as well as with the sex change in the adult ricefield eels, possibly via the classical endocrine manner.

  18. GH/IGF-I axis and matrix adaptation of the musculotendinous tissue to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, K M; Mackey, A L; Doessing, S; Hansen, M; Bayer, M L; Nielsen, R H; Herchenhan, A; Malmgaard-Clausen, N M; Kjaer, M

    2012-08-01

    Exercise is not only associated with adaptive responses within skeletal muscle fibers but also with induction of collagen synthesis both in muscle and adjacent connective tissue. Additionally, exercise and training leads to activation of the systemic growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis (GH/IGF-I), as well as increased local IGF-I expression. Studies in humans with pathologically high levels of GH/IGF-I, and in healthy humans who receive either weeks of GH administration or acute injection of IGF-I into connective tissue, demonstrate increased expression and synthesis of collagen in muscle and tendon. These observations support a stimulatory effect of GH/IGF-I on the connective tissue in muscle and tendon, which appears far more potent than the effect on contractile proteins of skeletal muscle. However, GH/IGF-I may play an additional role in skeletal muscle by regulation of stem cells (satellite cells), as increased satellite cell numbers are found in human muscle with increased GH/IGF-I levels, despite no change in myofibrillar protein synthesis. Although advanced age is associated with both a reduction in the GH/IGF-I axis activity, and in skeletal muscle mass (sarcopenia) as well as in tendon connective tissue, there is no direct proof linking age-related changes in the musculotendinous tissue to an impaired GH/IGF-I axis.

  19. The dopamine D2 receptor is expressed in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Wood, D F; Bolaji, E A; Johnston, D G

    1991-10-01

    Some pituitary tumours respond to dopamine by decreasing the release of prolactin and/or GH and by inhibition of tumour growth. Certain tumours are unresponsive. Dopamine D2 receptor high-affinity binding is impaired in these tumours, and the rat GH3 cell line behaves in a similar way. The hypothesis that the dopamine-binding defect results from impaired D2 receptor gene expression has been tested in the present study. On Northern blots, D2 receptor mRNA was present in both normal rat pituitary cells and in GH3 cells. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis identified a putative D2 receptor protein in normal and GH3 cell membranes. The lack of effect of dopamine in GH3 cells does not reflect the absence of D2 receptor gene expression.

  20. Natural history of the classical form of primary growth hormone (GH) resistance (Laron syndrome).

    PubMed

    Laron, Z

    1999-04-01

    A description of the clinical, biochemical and endocrinological features of the classical form of the syndrome of primary growth hormone (GH) resistance (Laron syndrome) is presented including the progressive changes during follow-up from infancy into adulthood. The main diagnostic features are: severe growth retardation, acromicria, small gonads and genitalia, and obesity. Serum GH levels are elevated and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) values are low and do not rise upon stimulation by exogenous hGH. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is due to various molecular defects from exon deletion to nonsense, frameshift, splice and missense mutations in the GH receptor (GH-R) gene or in its post-receptor pathways.

  1. Jointly amplified basal and pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion and increased process irregularity in women with anorexia nervosa: indirect evidence for disruption of feedback regulation within the GH-insulin-like growth factor I axis.

    PubMed

    Støving, R K; Veldhuis, J D; Flyvbjerg, A; Vinten, J; Hangaard, J; Koldkjaer, O G; Kristiansen, J; Hagen, C

    1999-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with multiple endocrine alterations. In the majority of AN patients, basal and GHRH-stimulated serum GH levels are increased. The metabolic effects of GH are known to be related to its pulsatile secretory pattern. The present study was performed to examine GH pulsatility in AN using the techniques of deconvolution analysis and approximate entropy, which quantify secretory activity and serial irregularity of underlying hormone release not reflected in peak occurrence or amplitudes. To this end, 24-h GH profiles were obtained by continuous blood sampling aliquoted at 20-min intervals in 8 nonfasting patients with AN [body mass index (BMI), 14.2 +/- 0.8 kg/m2; mean +/- SEM) and in 11 age-matched healthy women (BMI, 20.3 +/- 0.5 kg/m2). The deconvolution-estimated half-life of GH was not altered in the AN patients. The pituitary GH secretory burst frequency, burst mass, and burst duration were each significantly increased in women with AN compared to those in normal weight women. A 4-fold increase in daily pulsatile GH secretion was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion. There were significant negative correlations between BMI and the basal as well as pulsatile GH secretion rates. Moreover, AN patients exhibited significantly greater GH approximate entropy scores than the controls, denoting marked irregularity of the GH release process. In contrast to previous reports in healthy fasting subjects, cortisol levels in AN patients were positively correlated to GH secretion rates. Leptin levels were significantly inversely correlated to the pulsatile, but not the basal, GH secretion rate. The present data demonstrate augmented basal as well as pulsatile GH secretion with disruption of the orderliness of the GH release process in AN. Accordingly, GH secretion in AN probably reflects altered neuroendocrine feedback regulation, e.g. associated with increased hypothalamic GHRH discharge superimposed on reduced

  2. Effects of Double Transgenesis of Somatotrophic Axis (GH/GHR) on Skeletal Muscle Growth of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Cecilia Gomes; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Nornberg, Bruna Felix; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Romano, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transgenic fish for growth hormone (GH) has been considered as a potential technological improvement in aquaculture. In this study, a double-transgenic zebrafish was used to evaluate the effect of GH and its receptor (GHR) on muscle growth. Double transgenics reached the same length of GH transgenic, but with significantly less weight, featuring an unbalanced growth. The condition factor of GH/GHR-transgenic fish was lower than the other genotypes. Histological analysis showed a decrease in the percentage of thick muscle fibers in GH/GHR genotype of ∼80% in comparison to GH-transgenic line. The analysis of gene expression showed a significant decrease in genes related to muscle growth in GH/GHR genotype. It seems that concomitant overexpression of GH and GHR resulted in a strong decrease of the somatotrophic axis intracellular signaling by diminishing its principal transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5.1 (STAT5.1). PMID:26574627

  3. Effects of Double Transgenesis of Somatotrophic Axis (GH/GHR) on Skeletal Muscle Growth of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Cecilia Gomes; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Nornberg, Bruna Felix; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Romano, Luis Alberto; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic fish for growth hormone (GH) has been considered as a potential technological improvement in aquaculture. In this study, a double-transgenic zebrafish was used to evaluate the effect of GH and its receptor (GHR) on muscle growth. Double transgenics reached the same length of GH transgenic, but with significantly less weight, featuring an unbalanced growth. The condition factor of GH/GHR-transgenic fish was lower than the other genotypes. Histological analysis showed a decrease in the percentage of thick muscle fibers in GH/GHR genotype of ∼ 80% in comparison to GH-transgenic line. The analysis of gene expression showed a significant decrease in genes related to muscle growth in GH/GHR genotype. It seems that concomitant overexpression of GH and GHR resulted in a strong decrease of the somatotrophic axis intracellular signaling by diminishing its principal transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5.1 (STAT5.1).

  4. Combined growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment is more effective than GH or IGF-I alone at enhancing recovery from neonatal malnutrition in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Donovan, S M

    1995-11-01

    The effect of hormonal therapy on enhancing recovery from neonatal malnutrition was assessed in rats. Malnutrition was induced by maternal food restriction (60% control intake) during lactation. On d 16 postpartum, restricted pups were refed by cross-fostering to control dams and were subcutaneously administered growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), GH + IGF-I or saline. At d 21, pups were weaned and continued hormonal treatments until d 39 postpartum. By d 39, body weight of GH (96% control) and GH + IGF-I- (98%) treated animals were normal, whereas IGF-I (88%) and saline- (85%) treated animals were still stunted. Hormone effectiveness was age dependent, with growth rates of GH + IGF-I-, IGF-I- and GH-treated pups being greatest between d 16 and 30, d 16 and 21 and after d 30, respectively. Protein accretion by d 39 was higher (P < 0.01) in GH and GH + IGF-I groups than saline- or IGF-I-treated groups. On d 39, serum IGF-I concentrations were as follows: GH + IGF-I > IGF-I > GH = saline (placebo), indicating that an elevated serum IGF-I was not required for GH-stimulated growth. Of the three hormonal treatments, GH + IGF-I therapy was most efficacious at promoting rapid and complete body weight recovery and supporting lean body mass accretion.

  5. A bacterial GH6 cellobiohydrolase with a novel modular structure.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Mejía, Liliana; Valenzuela, Susana Valeria; Frías, Cristina; Diaz, Pilar; Pastor, F I Javier

    2017-04-01

    Cel6D from Paenibacillus barcinonensis is a modular cellobiohydrolase with a novel molecular architecture among glycosyl hydrolases of family 6. It contains an N-terminal catalytic domain (family 6 of glycosyl hydrolases (GH6)), followed by a fibronectin III-like domain repeat (Fn31,2) and a C-terminal family 3b cellulose-binding domain (CBM3b). The enzyme has been identified and purified showing catalytic activity on cellulosic substrates and cellodextrins, with a marked preference for phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC). Analysis of mode of action of Cel6D shows that it releases cellobiose as the only hydrolysis product from cellulose. Kinetic parameters were determined on PASC showing a K m of 68.73 mg/ml and a V max of 1.73 U/mg. A series of truncated derivatives of Cel6D have been constructed and characterized. Deletion of CBM3b caused a notable reduction in hydrolytic activity, while deletion of the Fn3 domain abolished activity, as the isolated GH6 domain was not active on any of the substrates tested. Mutant enzymes Cel6D-D146A and Cel6D-D97A were constructed in the residues corresponding to the putative acid catalyst and to the network for the nucleophilic attack. The lack of activity of the mutant enzymes indicates the important role of these residues in catalysis. Analysis of cooperative activity of Cel6D with cellulases from the same producing P. barcinonensis strain reveals high synergistic activity with processive endoglucanase Cel9B on hydrolysis of crystalline substrates. The characterized cellobiohydrolase can be a good contribution for depolymerization of cellulosic substrates and for the deconstruction of native cellulose.

  6. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95 years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI

  7. Differential effects of central and peripheral administration of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor on hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin gene expression in GH-deficient dwarf rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Frohman, L A

    1993-08-01

    The roles of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in the regulation of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) gene expression were investigated in the GH-deficient dwarf (dw) rat, in which endogenous feedback signals are lacking. Adult male and female dw rats were treated with GH or IGF-I by systemic (sc) administration or intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion, and hypothalamic GRH and SRIH mRNA were determined by Northern blotting and densitometric analysis. Systemic sc injection of rGH (75 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes. However, systemic sc injection of human IGF-I (150 micrograms every 12 h for 3 days) did not affect GRH mRNA levels in either sex despite significant stimulation of body weight gain. The use of a continuous sc infusion, which normalized serum IGF-I levels, and prolongation of the treatment period to 7 days also failed to change GRH mRNA levels. SRIH mRNA was unaffected by systemic administration of either GH or IGF-I. Continuous icv infusion of GH (1 microgram/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA levels in both sexes, but did not alter SRIH mRNA levels. Continuous icv infusion of IGF-I (100 ng/h for 7 days) decreased GRH mRNA in both sexes. In contrast, SRIH mRNA levels were increased in both sexes. IGF-I decreased GRH mRNA levels at icv infusion rates of 100 and 300 ng/h and stimulated SRIH mRNA levels at infusion rates of 30 and 100 ng/h. Food intake was unaffected at these infusion rates. Changes in GRH and SRIH mRNA levels in response to systemic or central GH and IGF-I administration were similar in both sexes, except that the decrease in GRH mRNA levels produced by the icv infusion of IGF-I was greater in female than in male rats. The results provide evidence for a direct inhibitory feedback effect of GH in the central nervous system on the regulation of hypothalamic GRH gene expression that is independent of peripheral IGF-I. IGF-I feedback, in contrast, appears to

  8. Molecular Engineering of Fungal GH5 and GH26 Beta-(1,4)-Mannanases toward Improvement of Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Marie; Féliu, Julia; Bozonnet, Sophie; Roussel, Alain; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2013-01-01

    Microbial mannanases are biotechnologically important enzymes since they target the hydrolysis of hemicellulosic polysaccharides of softwood biomass into simple molecules like manno-oligosaccharides and mannose. In this study, we have implemented a strategy of molecular engineering in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica to improve the specific activity of two fungal endo-mannanases, PaMan5A and PaMan26A, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH5 and GH26, respectively. Following random mutagenesis and two steps of high-throughput enzymatic screening, we identified several PaMan5A and PaMan26A mutants that displayed improved kinetic constants for the hydrolysis of galactomannan. Examination of the three-dimensional structures of PaMan5A and PaMan26A revealed which of the mutated residues are potentially important for enzyme function. Among them, the PaMan5A-G311S single mutant, which displayed an impressive 8.2-fold increase in kcat/KM due to a significant decrease of KM, is located within the core of the enzyme. The PaMan5A-K139R/Y223H double mutant revealed modification of hydrolysis products probably in relation to an amino-acid substitution located nearby one of the positive subsites. The PaMan26A-P140L/D416G double mutant yielded a 30% increase in kcat/KM compared to the parental enzyme. It displayed a mutation in the linker region (P140L) that may confer more flexibility to the linker and another mutation (D416G) located at the entrance of the catalytic cleft that may promote the entrance of the substrate into the active site. Taken together, these results show that the directed evolution strategy implemented in this study was very pertinent since a straightforward round of random mutagenesis yielded significantly improved variants, in terms of catalytic efiiciency (kcat/KM). PMID:24278180

  9. Serum leptin levels and leptin expression in growth hormone (GH)-deficient and healthy adults: influence of GH treatment, gender, and fasting.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, K; Pedersen, S B; Fisker, S; Nørrelund, H; Rosenfalck, A M; Jørgensen, J O; Richelsen, B

    1998-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is associated with a reduction in fat mass in healthy and GH-deficient (GHD) subjects. This is mainly mediated via a direct GH action on adipose cells and stimulation of lipolysis. Leptin is secreted from adipose tissue and may be involved in signaling information about adipose tissue stores to the brain. Hormonal regulation of leptin is still not fully elucidated, and in the present study, we investigated both the long-term (4-month) and short-term (28-hour) GH effects on serum leptin and leptin gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue. In GHD adults (n = 24), leptin correlated with most estimates of adiposity (r = .62 to .86), as previously found in healthy subjects. However, no correlation was observed with intraabdominal fat determined by computed tomographic (CT) scan (INTRA-CT). GH treatment for 4 months had no independent effect on either serum leptin or leptin gene expression. In a short-term study, we found that fasting gradually reduced leptin levels in both healthy men and GHD adults, with a maximum reduction of 58% to 60% (P < .01) after 31 hours. No independent effect of GH suppression or GH substitution on serum leptin was found during fasting. Adipose tissue leptin mRNA correlated with serum leptin (r = .51, P < .01) and the body mass index ([BMI] r = .55, P < .05). Serum leptin levels and gene expression were significantly higher in women compared with men (26.6 +/- 5.8 v 10.0 +/- 1.30 ng/mL, P < .05). However, in regression analysis accounting for the gender differences in subcutaneous femoral adipose tissue (FEM-CT), the difference in serum leptin disappeared, indicating that subcutaneous femoral fat or factors closely related to femoral fat (eg, sex hormones) may be causal factors for the gender difference in leptin.

  10. The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor is overexpressed amongst GNAS1 mutation-negative somatotropinomas and drives growth hormone (GH)-promoter activity in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Occhi, G; Losa, M; Albiger, N; Trivellin, G; Regazzo, D; Scanarini, M; Monteserin-Garcia, J L; Fröhlich, B; Ferasin, S; Terreni, M R; Fassina, A; Vitiello, L; Stalla, G; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2011-07-01

    Somatic mutations in the GNAS1 gene, encoding the α-subunit of the heterotrimeric stimulatory G protein (Gαs), occur in approximately 40% of growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumours. By altering the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, they unequivocally give somatotroph cells a growth advantage. Hence, the pathogenesis of somatotropinomas could be linked to anomalies in receptors coupled to the cAMP second-messenger cascade. Among them, the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR) is already known to play a primary role in the impaired cAMP-dependent cortisol secretion in patients affected by food-dependent Cushing's syndrome. In the present study, 43 somatotropinomas and 12 normal pituitary glands were investigated for GIPR expression by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Tumoural specimens were also evaluated for GNAS1 mutational status. The effect of GIPR overexpression on cAMP levels and GH transcription was evaluated in an in vitro model of somatotropinomas, the GH-secreting pituitary cell line GH3. GIPR was expressed at higher levels compared to normal pituitaries in 13 GNAS1 mutation-negative somatotropinomas. GIP stimulated adenylyl cyclase and GH-promoter activity in GIPR-transfected GH3 cells, confirming a correct coupling of GIPR to Gαs. In a proportion of acromegalic patients, GIPR overexpression appeared to be associated with a paradoxical increase in GH after an oral glucose tolerance test. Whether GIPR overexpression in acromegalic patients may be associated with this paradoxical response or more generally involved in the pathogenesis of acromegaly, as suggested by the mutually exclusive high GIPR levels and GNAS1 mutations, remains an open question.

  11. Examination of Growth Hormone (GH) Gene Polymorphism and its Association with Body Weight and Selected Body Dimensions in Ducks.

    PubMed

    Mazurowski, Artur; Frieske, Anna; Kokoszynski, Dariusz; Mroczkowski, Sławomir; Bernacki, Zenon; Wilkanowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess the polymorphism in intron 2 of the GH gene and its association with some morphological traits (body weight--BW, length of trunk with neck--LTN, length of trunk--LT, chest girth--CG, length of breast bone--LBB, length of shank--LS). Polymorphism in intron 2 of the GH gene was evaluated for four duck populations (Pekin ducks AF51, Muscovy ducks from a CK and CRAMMLCFF mother and Mulard ducks). Genetic polymorphism was determined with the PCR-RFLP method using the BsmFI restriction enzyme. In the studied duck sample two alleles (GH(C) and GH(T)) and three genotypes (GH/TT, GH/CT, GH/CC) were found at locus GH/BsmFI. In both groups of Muscovies and in Mulards the dominant allele was GH(T). On the contrary in Pekin ducks AF51, the frequency of both alleles was found to be similar. The most frequent genotype in the examined ducks was GH/TT. In Pekin ducks AF51 three genotypes were observed, while in Mulard ducks and in male Muscovy ducks from a mother marked as CK, two genotypes (GH/TT and GH/CT) were identified. Muscovy duck females from a CK mother and all males and females of Muscovy duck from a CRAMMLCFF mother were monomorphic with only the GH/TTgenotype detected. The results showed that males of Pekin duck AF51 with the GH/TT genotype were characterized by higher (P < 0.01) BW value than those with the GH/CC and GH/CTgenotype. In females of Pekin ducks AF51, this same trend was observed; individuals with GH/TT genotype were superior (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) to birds with two other detected genotypes in respect to BW, CG, LBB and LS. In the case of Mulards, ducks with the GH/TT genotype were distinguished by higher values of all evaluated traits compared to ducks with GH/CT and GH/CC genotypes, however most of the recorded differences were not significant. The only trait markedly impacted (P < 0.05) by the polymorphism of the GH gene intron 2 was the LS value in males.

  12. Growth hormone releasing hexapeptide-6 (GHRP-6) test in the diagnosis of GH-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pombo, M; Leal-Cerro, A; Barreiro, J; Peñalva, A; Peino, R; Mallo, F; Dieguez, C; Casanueva, F F

    1996-06-01

    Pituitary GH reserve can be assessed by substances that act directly at the somatotroph, such as GHRH, or by a variety of metabolic and neuropharmacological tests acting at the hypothalamic level, such as hypoglycemia, clonidine or L-Dopa. In order to evaluate GHRP-6 as a test of pituitary GH reserve, we studied GH responses of i.v. administered GHRP-6 in a group of short-statured children, as well as in a group of adults diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) by conventional GH testing. Although we found that the GH response to GHRP-6 was lower in patients with GHD than in normal children, on an individual basis a considerable degree of overlap was observed between the two groups. In contrast, we found an almost complete blockade of GH response to either GHRP-6 or GHRH plus GHRP-6 in patients with pituitary stalk transection, suggesting that this could be a cost-effective test for the diagnosis of this condition. A similar finding was also obtained in GH response to the combined administration of GHRH plus GHRP-6 in patients with GHD of adult onset; this test may well prove valuable in the diagnosis of this clinical entity.

  13. Human GH pulsatility: an ensemble property regulated by age and gender.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Bowers, C Y

    2003-09-01

    Age and gender impact the full repertoire of neurohormone systems, including most prominently the somatotropic, gonadotropic and lactotropic axes. For example, daily GH production is approximately 2-fold higher in young women than men and varies by 20-fold by sexual developmental status and age. Deconvolution estimates of 24-h GH secretion rates exceed 1200 microg/m2 in adolescents and fall below 60 microg/m2 in aged individuals. The present overview highlights plausible factors driving such lifetime variations in GH availability, i.e., estrogen, aromatizable androgen, hypothalamic peptides and negative feedback by GH and IGF-I. In view of the daunting complexity of potential neuromodulatory signals, we underline the utility of conceptualizing a simplified three-peptide regulatory ensemble of GHRH, GHRP (ghrelin) and somatostatin. The foregoing signals act as individual and conjoint mediators of adaptive GH control. Regulation is enforced at 3-fold complementary time scales, which embrace pulsatile (burst-like), entropic (orderly) and 24-h rhythmic (nycthemeral) modes of GH release. This unifying platform offers a convergent perspective of multivalent control of GH outflow.

  14. Effects of GH on immune and endocrine responses of channel catfish challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brian C; Small, Brian C; Bilodeau, Lanie

    2007-01-01

    The effects of GH on immune and endocrine responses to channel catfish challenged with the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri were examined. Catfish (11.7+/-1.0 g) treated with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) and challenged with E. ictaluri experienced similar mortality as control-exposed fish. Plasma activity of lysozyme was higher (P<0.01) in rbGH-exposed fish. Compared to day 0 controls (non-exposed fish), IGF-I levels decreased (P<0.05) in challenged fish while levels were similar (P>0.10) between treatments. Abundance of GH receptor (GHR) mRNA tended to decrease (P=0.055) in liver of challenged fish while toll like receptor 5 (TLR5) mRNA increased (P<0.05) in liver compared to d 0 controls. An increase in lysozyme may suggest GH enhances a nonspecific immune response. A decrease in GHR mRNA and plasma IGF-I suggests a downregulation of the somatotropic axis in response to disease. The increase in TLR5 mRNA suggests that TLR5 may play a role in host response to bacterial challenge. While exogenous rbGH may play a stimulatory role to increase lysozyme levels, there was no apparent effect of rbGH on mortality to E. ictaluri.

  15. Insulin and IGF-I inhibit GH synthesis and release in vitro and in vivo by separate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lin, Qing; Brüning, Jens C; Kahn, C Ronald; Castaño, Justo P; Christian, Helen; Luque, Raúl M; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2013-07-01

    IGF-I is considered a primary inhibitor of GH secretion. Insulin may also play an important role in regulating GH levels because insulin, like IGF-I, can suppress GH synthesis and release in primary pituitary cell cultures and insulin is negatively correlated with GH levels in vivo. However, understanding the relative contribution insulin and IGF-I exert on controlling GH secretion has been hampered by the fact that circulating insulin and IGF-I are regulated in parallel and insulin (INSR) and IGF-I (IGFIR) receptors are structurally/functionally related and ubiquitously expressed. To evaluate the separate roles of insulin and IGF-I in directly regulating GH secretion, we used the Cre/loxP system to knock down the INSR and IGFIR in primary mouse pituitary cell cultures and found insulin-mediated suppression of GH is independent of the IGFIR. In addition, pharmacological blockade of intracellular signals in both mouse and baboon cultures revealed insulin requires different pathways from IGF-I to exert a maximal inhibitory effect on GH expression/release. In vivo, somatotrope-specific knockout of INSR (SIRKO) or IGFIR (SIGFRKO) increased GH levels. However, comparison of the pattern of GH release, GH expression, somatotrope morphometry, and pituitary explant sensitivity to acute GHRH challenge in lean SIRKO and SIGFRKO mice strongly suggests the primary role of insulin in vivo is to suppress GH release, whereas IGF-I serves to regulate GH synthesis. Finally, SIRKO and/or SIGFRKO could not prevent high-fat, diet-induced suppression of pituitary GH expression, indicating other factors/tissues are involved in the decline of GH observed with weight gain.

  16. Does the GH/IGF-1 axis contribute to skeletal sexual dimorphism? Evidence from mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongbo; Mohan, Subburaman; Yakar, Shoshana

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of the gonadotropic axis to skeletal sexual dimorphism (SSD) was clarified in recent years. Studies with animal models of estrogen receptor (ER) or androgen receptor (AR) null mice, as well as mice with bone cell-specific ablation of ER or AR, revealed that both hormones play major roles in skeletal acquisition, and that estrogen regulates skeletal accrual in both sexes. The growth hormone (GH) and its downstream effector, the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are also major determinants of peak bone mass during puberty and young adulthood, and play important roles in maintaining bone integrity during aging. A few studies in both humans and animal models suggest that in addition to the differences in sex steroid actions on bone, sex-specific effects of GH and IGF-1 play essential roles in SSD. However, the contributions of the somatotropic (GH/IGF-1) axis to SSD are controversial and data is difficult to interpret. GH/IGF-1 are pleotropic hormones that act in an endocrine and autocrine/paracrine fashion on multiple tissues, affecting body composition as well as metabolism. Thus, understanding the contribution of the somatotropic axis to SSD requires the use of mouse models that will differentiate between these two modes of action. Elucidation of the relative contribution of GH/IGF-1 axis to SSD is significant because GH is approved for the treatment of normal children with short stature and children with congenital growth disorders. Thus, if the GH/IGF-1 axis determines SSD, treatment with GH may be tailored according to sex. In the following review, we give an overview of the roles of sex steroids in determining SSD and how they may interact with the GH/IGF-1 axis in bone. We summarize several mouse models with impaired somatotropic axis and speculate on the possible contribution of that axis to SSD.

  17. Mechanisms Involved in Glucocorticoid Induction of Pituitary GH Expression During Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Ellestad, Laura E.; Puckett, Stefanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones are involved in functional differentiation of GH-producing somatotrophs. Glucocorticoid treatment prematurely induces GH expression in mammals and birds in a process requiring protein synthesis and Rat sarcoma (Ras) signaling. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms through which glucocorticoids initiate GH expression during embryogenesis, taking advantage of the unique properties of chicken embryos as a developmental model. We determined that stimulation of GH expression occurred through transcriptional activation of GH, rather than enhancement of mRNA stability, and this process requires histone deacetylase activity. Through pharmacological inhibition, we identified the ERK1/2 pathway as a likely downstream Ras effector necessary for glucocorticoid stimulation of GH. However, we also found that chronic activation of ERK1/2 activity with a constitutively active mutant or stimulatory ligand reduced initiation of GH expression by glucocorticoid treatment. Corticosterone treatment of cultured embryonic pituitary cells increased ERK1/2 activity in an apparent cyclical manner, with a rapid increase within 5 minutes, followed by a reduction to near-basal levels at 3 hours, and a subsequent increase again at 6 hours. Therefore, we conclude that ERK1/2 signaling must be strictly controlled for maximal glucocorticoid induction of GH to occur. These results are the first in any species to demonstrate that Ras- and ERK1/2-mediated transcriptional events requiring histone deacetylase activity are involved in glucocorticoid induction of pituitary GH during embryonic development. This report increases our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid recruitment of somatotrophs during embryogenesis and should provide insight into glucocorticoid-induced developmental changes in other tissues and cell types. PMID:25560830

  18. Pharmacogenomics of insulin-like growth factor-I generation during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Clayton, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Rodriguez-Arnao, M D; Skorodok, J; Ambler, G R; Zignani, M; Zieschang, J; Della Corte, G; Destenaves, B; Champigneulle, A; Raelson, J; Chatelain, P

    2014-01-01

    Individual responses to growth hormone (GH) treatment are variable. Short-term generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is recognized as a potential marker of sensitivity to GH treatment. This prospective, phase IV study used an integrated genomic analysis to identify markers associated with 1-month change in IGF-I (ΔIGF-I) following initiation of recombinant human (r-h)GH therapy in treatment-naïve children with GH deficiency (GHD) (n=166) or Turner syndrome (TS) (n=147). In both GHD and TS, polymorphisms in the cell-cycle regulator CDK4 were associated with 1-month ΔIGF-I (P<0.05). Baseline gene expression was also correlated with 1-month ΔIGF-I in both GHD and TS (r=0.3; P<0.01). In patients with low IGF-I responses, carriage of specific CDK4 alleles was associated with MAPK and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in GHD, and with p53 and Wnt signaling pathways in TS. Understanding the relationship between genomic markers and early changes in IGF-I may allow development of strategies to rapidly individualize r-hGH dose. PMID:23567489

  19. Genetic dissection of IGF1-dependent and -independent effects of permanent GH excess on postnatal growth and organ pathology of mice.

    PubMed

    Blutke, A; Schneider, M R; Renner-Müller, I; Herbach, N; Wanke, R; Wolf, E

    2014-08-25

    To study insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)-independent effects of permanent growth hormone (GH) excess on body and organ growth and pathology in vivo, hemizygous bovine GH transgenic mice with homozygous disruption of the Igf1 gene (Igf1(-/-)/GH) were generated, and examined in comparison to Igf1(-/-), Igf1(+/-), wild-type (WT), Igf1(+/-)/GH, and GH mice. GH mice and Igf1(+/-)/GH mice showed increased serum IGF1 levels and the well-known giant-phenotype of GH transgenic mice. In contrast, the typical dwarf-phenotype of Igf1(-/-) mice was only slightly ameliorated in Igf1(-/-)/GH mice. Similar to GH mice, Igf1(-/-)/GH mice displayed hepatocellular hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, and reduced volumes of acidophilic cells in the pituitary gland. However, GH excess associated skin lesions of male GH mice were not observed in Igf1(-/-)/GH mice. Therefore, development of GH excess induced liver-, kidney-, and pituitary gland-alterations in GH transgenic mice is independent of IGF1 whereas GH stimulated body growth depends on IGF1.

  20. Regulation of Pit-1 expression by ghrelin and GHRP-6 through the GH secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    García, A; Alvarez, C V; Smith, R G; Diéguez, C

    2001-09-01

    GH secretagogues are an expanding class of synthetic peptide and nonpeptide molecules that stimulate the pituitary gland to secrete GH through their own specific receptor, the GH-secretagogue receptor. The cloning of the receptor for these nonclassical GH releasing molecules, together with the more recent characterization of an endogenous ligand, named ghrelin, have unambiguously demonstrated the existence of a physiological system that regulates GH secretion. Somatotroph cell-specific expression of the GH gene is dependent on a pituitary-specific transcription factor (Pit-1). This factor is transcribed in a highly restricted manner in the anterior pituitary gland. The present experiments sought to determine whether the synthetic hexapeptide GHRP-6, a reference GH secretagogue compound, as well as an endogenous ligand, ghrelin, regulate pit-1 expression. By a combination of Northern and Western blot analysis we found that GHRP-6 elicits a time- and dose-dependent activation of pit-1 expression in monolayer cultures of infant rat anterior pituitary cells. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide, suggesting that this action was due to direct transcriptional activation of pit-1. Using an established cell line (HEK293-GHS-R) that overexpresses the GH secretagogue receptor, we showed a marked stimulatory effect of GHRP-6 on the pit-1 -2,500 bp 5'-region driving luciferase expression. We truncated the responsive region to -231 bp, a sequence that contains two CREs, and found that both CREs are needed for GHRP-6-induced transcriptional activation in both HEK293-GHS-R cells and infant rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. The effect was dependent on PKC, MAPK kinase, and PKA activation. Increasing Pit-1 by coexpression of pCMV-pit-1 potentiated the GHRP-6 effect on the pit-1 promoter. Similarly, we showed that the endogenous GH secretagogue receptor ligand ghrelin exerts a similar effect on the pit-1 promoter. These data

  1. Lack of dietary carbohydrates induces hepatic growth hormone (GH) resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sawitzky, Mandy; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stock, Peggy; Menhofer, Dominik; Ebensing, Sabine; Bjerre, Mette; Frystyk, Jan; Binder, Gerhard; Strasburger, Christian; Wu, Zida; Christ, Bruno; Hoeflich, Andreas; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2011-05-01

    GH is a well established regulator of growth, lipid, and glucose metabolism and therefore important for fuel utilization. However, little is known about the effects of macronutrients on the GH/IGF system. We used low-carbohydrate/high-fat diets (LC-HFD) as a model to study the impact of fat, protein, and carbohydrates on the GH/IGF-axis; 12-wk-old Wistar rats were fed either regular chow, a moderate, protein-matched LC-HFD, or a ketogenic LC-HFD (percentage of fat/protein/carbohydrates: chow, 16.7/19/64.3; LC-HF-1, 78.7/19.1/2.2; LC-HF-2, 92.8/5.5/1.7). After 4 wk, body and tibia length, lean body mass, and fat pad weights were measured. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of LC-HFD on 1) secretion of GH and GH-dependent factors, 2) expression and signaling of components of the GH/IGF system in liver and muscle, and 3) hypothalamic and pituitary regulation of GH release. Serum concentrations of IGF-I, IGF binding protein-1, and IGF binding protein-3 were lower with LC-HF-1 and LC-HF-2 (P < 0.01). Both LC-HFD-reduced hepatic GH receptor mRNA and protein expression, decreased basal levels of total and phosphorylated Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling proteins and reduced hepatic IGF-I gene expression. Hypothalamic somatostatin expression was reduced only with LC-HF-1, leading to increased pituitary GH secretion, higher IGF-I gene expression, and activation of IGF-dependent signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. In contrast, despite severely reduced IGF-I concentrations, GH secretion did not increase with LC-HF-2 diet. In conclusion, lack of carbohydrates in LC-HFD induces hepatic GH resistance. Furthermore, central feedback mechanisms of the GH/IGF system are impaired with extreme, ketogenic LC-HFD.

  2. A novel soluble supramolecular system for sustained rh-GH delivery.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Stefano; Bersani, Sara; Scomparin, Anna; Balasso, Anna; Brazzale, Chiara; Barattin, Michela; Caliceti, Paolo

    2014-11-28

    Methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)s bearing a terminal cholanic moiety (mPEG(5kDa)-cholane, mPEG(10kDa)-cholane and mPEG(20kDa)-cholane) were physically combined with recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH) to obtain supramolecular assemblies for sustained hormone delivery. The association constants (Ka) calculated by Scatchard analysis of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) data were in the order of 10(5)M(-1). The complete rh-GH association with mPEG(5kDa)-cholane, mPEG(10kDa)-cholane and mPEG(20kDa)-cholane was achieved with 7.5 ± 1.1, 3.9 ± 0.4 and 2.6 ± 0.4 w/w% rh-GH/mPEG-cholane, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) yielded association constants similar to that calculated by SEC and showed that rh-GH has 21-25 binding sites for mPEG-cholane, regardless the polymer molecular weight. Dialysis studies showed that the mPEG-cholane association strongly delays the protein release; 80-90% of the associated rh-GH was released in 200 h. However, during the first 8h the protein formulations obtained with mPEG(10kDa)-cholane and mPEG(20kDa)-cholane showed a burst release of 8 and 28%, respectively. Circular dichroism (CD) analyses showed that the mPEG(5kDa)-cholane association does not alter the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, mPEG(5kDa)-cholane was found to enhance both the enzymatic and physical stability of rh-GH. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies were performed by subcutaneous administration of rh-GH and rh-GH/mPEG(5kDa)-cholane to normal and hypophysectomised rats. The study showed that mPEG(5kDa)-cholane decreases the maximal concentration in the blood but prolongs the body exposure of the protein, which resulted in 55% bioavailability increase. Finally, rh-GH formulated with mPEG(5kDa)-cholane yielded prolonged weight increase of hypophysectomised rats as compared to rh-GH in buffer or formulated with mPEG(5kDa)-OH. After the second administration the weight of the animals treated with rh-GH formulated with m

  3. Preweaning GH Treatment Normalizes Body Growth Trajectory and Reverses Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Offspring After Maternal Undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Li, Minglan; Reynolds, Clare M; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-09-01

    Maternal undernutrition (UN) results in growth disorders and metabolic dysfunction in offspring. Although dysregulation of the GH-IGF axis in offspring is a known consequence of maternal UN, little is known about the efficacy of GH treatment during the period of developmental plasticity on later growth and metabolic outcomes. The present study investigated the effect of preweaning GH treatment on growth, glucose metabolism, and the GH-IGF axis in adult male and female offspring after maternal UN. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a chow diet ad libitum (control [CON]) or 50% of ad libitum (UN) throughout pregnancy. From postnatal day 3, CON and UN pups received either saline (CON-S and UN-S) or GH (2.5 μg/g·d CON-GH and UN-GH) daily throughout lactation. At weaning, male and female offspring were randomly selected from each litter and fed a standard chow diet for the remainder of the study. Preweaning GH treatment normalized maternal UN-induced alterations in postweaning growth trajectory and concomitant adiposity in offspring. Plasma leptin concentrations were increased in UN-S offspring and normalized in the UN-GH group. Hepatic GH receptor expression was significantly elevated in UN-S offspring and normalized with GH treatment. Hepatic IGF binding protein-2 gene expression and plasma IGF-1 to IGF binding protein-3 ratio was reduced in UN-S offspring and elevated with GH treatment. GH treatment during a critical developmental window prevented maternal UN-induced changes in postnatal growth patterns and related adiposity, suggesting that manipulation of the GH-IGF-1 axis in early development may represent a promising avenue to prevent adverse developmental programming effects in adulthood.

  4. A postweaning reduction in circulating ghrelin temporarily alters growth hormone (GH) responsiveness to GH-releasing hormone in male mice but does not affect somatic growth.

    PubMed

    Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Go; Kanamoto, Naotetsu; Bando, Mika; Kohno, Kenji; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kangawa, Kenji; Akamizu, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Ghrelin was initially identified as an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor. When administrated exogenously, ghrelin stimulates GH release and food intake. Previous reports in ghrelin-null mice, which do not exhibit impaired growth nor appetite, question the physiologic role of ghrelin in the regulation of the GH/IGF-I axis. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse that expresses human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor (DTR) cDNA in ghrelin-secretion cells [ghrelin-promoter DTR-transgenic (GPDTR-Tg) mice]. Administration of DT to this mouse ablates ghrelin-secretion cells in a controlled manner. After injection of DT into GPDTR-Tg mice, ghrelin-secreting cells were ablated, and plasma levels of ghrelin were markedly decreased [nontransgenic littermates, 70.6 +/- 10.2 fmol/ml vs. GPDTR-Tg, 5.3 +/- 2.3 fmol/ml]. To elucidate the physiological roles of circulating ghrelin on GH secretion and somatic growth, 3-wk-old GPDTR-Tg mice were treated with DT twice a week for 5 wk. The GH responses to GHRH in male GPDTR-Tg mice were significantly lower than those in wild-type mice at 5 wk of age. However, those were normalized at 8 wk of age. In contrast, in female mice, there was no difference in GH response to GHRH between GPDTR-Tg mice and controls at 5 or 8 wk of age. The gender-dependent differences in response to GHRH were observed in ghrelin-ablated mice. However, GPDTR-Tg mice did not display any decreases in IGF-I levels or any growth retardation. Our results strongly suggest that circulating ghrelin does not play a crucial role in somatic growth.

  5. Structural Basis for Prereceptor Modulation of Plant Hormones by GH3 Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Corey S.; Zubieta, Chloe; Herrmann, Jonathan; Kapp, Ulrike; Nanao, Max H.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2013-04-08

    Acyl acid amido synthetases of the GH3 family act as critical prereceptor modulators of plant hormone action; however, the molecular basis for their hormone selectivity is unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of benzoate-specific Arabidopsis thaliana AtGH3.12/PBS3 and jasmonic acid-specific AtGH3.11/JAR1. These structures, combined with biochemical analysis, define features for the conjugation of amino acids to diverse acyl acid substrates and highlight the importance of conformational changes in the carboxyl-terminal domain for catalysis. We also identify residues forming the acyl acid binding site across the GH3 family and residues critical for amino acid recognition. Our results demonstrate how a highly adaptable three-dimensional scaffold is used for the evolution of promiscuous activity across an enzyme family for modulation of plant signaling molecules.

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of growth hormone (GH) in canine hepatoid gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Petterino, Claudio; Martini, Marco; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to detect immunohistochemically means growth hormone (GH) in 24 hepatoid gland adenomas and 5 hepatoid gland carcinomas and to compare the difference of immunoreactivity between types of tumors. The tumors were classified according to the WHO standards. Tissue sections which were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues from 25 male and 4 female dogs were carried out immunostaining using polyclonal primary anti-hGH and EnVision method. Of 24 hepatoid gland adenomas (perianal gland adenomas) 23 (95.8%) were positive. All 5 hepatoid gland carcinomas (perianal gland carcinomas) were positive. No statistically significant differences in percentage of labelled cells between malignant and benign tumors were seen. The present demonstration of GH in hepatoid gland tumors adds new data on GH in extra-pituitary tissues and hormon-dependent tumors.

  7. Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Resource List Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH ... People lacking this hormone are at risk of death from adrenal crisis, but adrenal crisis can be ...

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of GH deficiency in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grugni, Graziano; Marzullo, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results from under-expression of the paternally-derived chromosomal region 15q11-13. Growth failure is a recognized feature of PWS, and both quantitative and qualitative defects of the GH/IGF-I axis revealing GH deficiency (GHD) have been demonstrated in most children with PWS. In PWS adults, criteria for GHD are biochemically fulfilled in 8-38% of the studied cohorts. Published data support benefits of early institution of GH therapy (GHT) in PWS children, with positive effects on statural growth, body composition, metabolic homeostasis, and neurocognitive function. Like in pediatric PWS, GHT also yields beneficial effects on lean and body fat, exercise capacity, and quality of life of PWS adults. Although GHT has been generally administered safely in PWS children and adults, careful surveillance of risks is mandatory during prolonged GH replacement for all PWS individuals.

  9. Impact of estradiol supplementation on dual peptidyl drive of GH secretion in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Bowers, C Y

    2002-02-01

    As an indirect probe of estrogen-regulated hypothalamic somatostatin restraint, the present study monitors the ability of short-term oral E2 supplementation to modulate GH secretion during combined continuous stimulation by recombinant human GHRH [GHRH-(1-44)-amide] and the potent and selective synthetic GH-releasing peptide, GHRP-2. According to a simplified tripeptidyl model of GH neuroregulation, the effects of estrogen in this dual secretagogue paradigm should mirror alterations in endogenous somatostatinergic signaling. To this end, seven healthy postmenopausal women underwent frequent (10-min) blood sampling for 24 h during simultaneous i.v. infusion of GHRH and GHRP-2 each at a rate of 1 microg/kg x h on d 10 of randomly ordered placebo or 17beta-estradiol (E2) (1 mg orally twice daily) replacement. Serum GH concentrations (n = 280/subject) were assayed by chemiluminescence. The resultant GH time series was evaluated by deconvolution analysis, the approximate entropy statistic, and cosine regression to quantitate pulsatile, entropic (feedback-sensitive), and 24-h rhythmic GH release, respectively. Statistical comparisons revealed that E2 repletion increased the mean (+/- SEM) serum E2 concentration to 222 +/- 26 pg/ml from 16 +/- 1.7 pg/ml during placebo (P < 0.001) and suppressed the serum LH by 48% (P = 0.0033), serum FSH by 64% (P < 0.001), and serum IGF-I by 44% (P = 0.021). Double peptidyl secretagogue stimulation elevated mean 24-h serum GH concentrations to 8.1 +/- 1.0 microg/liter (placebo) and 7.7 +/- 0.89 microg/liter (E2; P = NS) and evoked prominently pulsatile patterns of GH secretion. No primary measure of pulsatile or basal GH release was altered by the disparate sex steroid milieu, i.e. GH secretory burst amplitudes of 0.62 +/- 0.93 (placebo) and 0.72 +/- 0.16 (E2) microg/liter x min, GH pulse frequencies of 27 +/- 1.8 (placebo) and 23 +/- 1.9 (E2) events/24 h, GH half-lives of 12 +/- 0.74 (placebo) and 15 +/- 4.5 (E2) min, and basal

  10. [Cloning and functional analysis of the cotton Trihelix transcription factor GhGT29].

    PubMed

    Yue, Li; Xiaodong, Liu; Yongmei, Dong; Zongming, Xie; Shouyi, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Trihelix transcription factors are important proteins involved in response to abiotic stresses in plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of Trihelix in cottons will lay the foundation to improve stress tolerance by gene engineering. In this study, a gene encoding Trihelix transcription factor was isolated in upland cottons using reverse transcription PCR according to bioinformatic analysis. The gene was named as GhGT29 (GenBank accession No. JQ013097), which was 1 092 bp, contained a 1 089 bp open reading frame and encoded a protein of 363 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 40.9 kDa and a isoelectric point of 5.45. SMART analysis showed GhGT29 contained one typical SANT motif. Phylogenetic analysis showed that GhGT29 belonged to the SH4 subfamily of the Trihelix family and was most closely related to AtSH4-like1 and AtSH4-like2. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that GhGT29 was induced by high salt, drought, cold and abscisic acid. The expression profile also revealed that GhGT29 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, such as roots, stems, leaves, flowers, ovules (0 DPA) and fibers (12 DPA). The expression level of GhGT29 was the highest in flowers and the lowest in stems. Using the Arabidopsis protoplasts assay system, we found that the GhGT29 protein was located in cell nuclei and had trans-activation activity. These results revealed that GhGT29 might be involved in the regulation of stress resistance-related genes in stress signaling pathways in upland cottons.

  11. Effects of dietary genistein on GH/IGF-I axis of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2016-09-01

    There is considerable concern that isoflavones, such as genistein in fish feed composed of soybean protein, aff ects somatic growth in fish. Our previous works demonstrated that 30 and 300 μg/g dietary genistein had no significant eff ect on growth performance in Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus), but the higher level of genistein (3 000 μg/g) significantly depressed growth. This study was conducted to further examine the eff ects of dietary genistein on the endocrine disruption on growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis in Nile tilapia ( O. niloticus). Juvenile fish were fed by hand twice daily to satiation with one of four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets, each containing either 0, 30, 300 or 3 000 μg/g genistein. Following an 8-week feeding period, plasma GH and IGF-I levels were investigated by radioimmunoassay and gene expression levels of gh, ghrelin, gnrhs, ghr, npy, npyrs, pacap, ghrs, i gf-I, igf-Ir, and igfbp3 were examined by real-time PCR. The results show that no significant change in plasma GH and IGF-I levels in fish fed with diets containing 30 μg/g and 300 μg/g genistein. mRNA expression of genes along the GH/IGF-I axis remained unaff ected, except for igf-Ir, which was stimulated by the 300 μg/g genistein diet. While in fish fed the 3 000 μg/g genistein diet, the plasma GH and IGF-I levels decreased, and mRNA expression of gh, ghr2, npyr1, igf-I, and igf-Ir were also significantly depressed. In contrast, npy and igfbp3 mRNA expression were enhanced. This study provides convincing evidence for growth impediment by genistein by disturbing the GH/IGF-I axis in Nile tilapia O. niloticus.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of the mammary gland from GH transgenic goats during involution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Bao, Ze Kun; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Wei Wei; Yu, Qing Hua; Yang, Qian

    2015-07-10

    Mammary glands are organs for milk production in female mammals. Growth hormone (GH) is known to affect the growth and development of the mammary gland, as well as to increase milk production in dairy goats. This study performed a comprehensive expression profiling of genes expressed in the mammary gland of early involution GH transgenic (n=4) and non-transgenic goats (n=4) by RNA sequencing. RNA was extracted from mammary gland tissues collected at day 3 of involution. Gene expression analysis was conducted by Illumina RNA sequencing and sequence reads were assembled and analyzed using TopHat. FPKM (fragments per kilobase of exon per million) values were analyzed for differentially expressed genes using the Cufflinks package. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes was categorized using agriGO, while KEGG pathway analysis was performed with the online KEGG automatic annotation server. Our results revealed that 75% of NCBI goat annotated genes were expressed during early involution. A total of 18,323 genes were expressed during early involution in GH transgenic goats, compared with 18,196 expressed genes during early involution of non-transgenic goats. In these expressed genes, the majority (17,589) were ubiquitously expressed in GH transgenic and non-transgenic goats. However, there were 745 differentially expressed genes, 421 of which were upregulated and 324 were downregulated in GH transgenic goats. GO and KEGG pathway analysis showed that these genes were involved in mammary gland physiology, including cell adhesion molecules, ECM-receptor interaction, Jak-STAT signaling pathway, and fat metabolism. Our results demonstrated that the GH receptor was strongly affected in GH transgenic goats, which may activate the IGF-1/Stat3 signaling pathway. Overall, our study provided a global view of the transcriptome during involution of GH transgenic and non-transgenic goats, which increases our understanding of the biology of involution in the goat.

  13. Adiponectin in mice with altered GH action: links to insulin sensitivity and longevity?

    PubMed

    Lubbers, Ellen R; List, Edward O; Jara, Adam; Sackman-Sala, Lucila; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D; Kineman, Rhonda D; Boparai, Ravneet; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2013-03-01

    Adiponectin is positively correlated with longevity and negatively correlated with many obesity-related diseases. While there are several circulating forms of adiponectin, the high-molecular-weight (HMW) version has been suggested to have the predominant bioactivity. Adiponectin gene expression and cognate serum protein levels are of particular interest in mice with altered GH signaling as these mice exhibit extremes in obesity that are positively associated with insulin sensitivity and lifespan as opposed to the typical negative association of these factors. While a few studies have reported total adiponectin levels in young adult mice with altered GH signaling, much remains unresolved, including changes in adiponectin levels with advancing age, proportion of total adiponectin in the HMW form, adipose depot of origin, and differential effects of GH vs IGF1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to address these issues using assorted mouse lines with altered GH signaling. Our results show that adiponectin is generally negatively associated with GH activity, regardless of age. Further, the amount of HMW adiponectin is consistently linked with the level of total adiponectin and not necessarily with previously reported lifespan or insulin sensitivity of these mice. Interestingly, circulating adiponectin levels correlated strongly with inguinal fat mass, implying that the effects of GH on adiponectin are depot specific. Interestingly, rbGH, but not IGF1, decreased circulating total and HMW adiponectin levels. Taken together, these results fill important gaps in the literature related to GH and adiponectin and question the frequently reported associations of total and HMW adiponectin with insulin sensitivity and longevity.

  14. Hb Beograd [beta121(GH4)Glu-->Val, GAA-->GTA] in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Ayfer; Koyuncu, Hasan; Köseler, Aylin; Ozkan, Anzel; Atalay, Erol O

    2007-01-01

    Hb Beograd [beta121(GH4)Glu-->Val, GAA-->GTA] is a rare variant first reported in Yugoslavia and then in Turkey, Australia and New Zealand. We report two further unrelated cases from Turkey. The importance of identifying Hb Beograd at the molecular level, especially in regions where Hb D-Los Angeles [beta121(GH4)Glu-->Gln, GAA-->CAA] is prevalent, is emphasized.

  15. GhWRKY68 Reduces Resistance to Salt and Drought in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haihong; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fang; Liu, Shuchang; Li, Guilin; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factors modulate numerous physiological processes, including plant growth, development and responses to various environmental stresses. Currently, our understanding of the functions of the majority of the WRKY family members and their possible roles in signalling crosstalk is limited. In particular, very few WRKYs have been identified and characterised from an economically important crop, cotton. In this study, we characterised a novel group IIc WRKY gene, GhWRKY68, which is induced by different abiotic stresses and multiple defence-related signalling molecules. The β-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhWRKY68 promoter was enhanced after exposure to drought, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. The overexpression of GhWRKY68 in Nicotiana benthamiana reduced resistance to drought and salt and affected several physiological indices. GhWRKY68 may mediate salt and drought responses by modulating ABA content and enhancing the transcript levels of ABA-responsive genes. GhWRKY68-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced tolerance to oxidative stress after drought and salt stress treatments, which correlated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced enzyme activities, elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content and altered ROS-related gene expression. These results indicate that GhWRKY68 is a transcription factor that responds to drought and salt stresses by regulating ABA signalling and modulating cellular ROS. PMID:25793865

  16. Dwarfism and increased adiposity in the gh1 mutant zebrafish vizzini.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, Sarah K; Minchin, James E N; Gordon, Tiffany N; Rawls, John F; Parichy, David M

    2013-04-01

    Somatic growth and adipogenesis are closely associated with the development of obesity in humans. In this study, we identify a zebrafish mutant, vizzini, that exhibits both a severe defect in somatic growth and increased accumulation of adipose tissue. Positional cloning of vizzini revealed a premature stop codon in gh1. Although the effects of GH are largely through igfs in mammals, we found no decrease in the expression of igf transcripts in gh1 mutants during larval development. As development progressed, however, we found overall growth to be progressively retarded and the attainment of specific developmental stages to occur at abnormally small body sizes relative to wild type. Moreover, both subcutaneous (sc) and visceral adipose tissues underwent precocious development in vizzini mutants, and at maturity, the sizes of different fat deposits were greatly expanded relative to wild type. In vivo confocal imaging of sc adipose tissue (SAT) expansion revealed that vizzini mutants exhibit extreme enlargement of adipocyte lipid droplets without a corresponding increase in lipid droplet number. These findings suggest that GH1 signaling restricts SAT hypertrophy in zebrafish. Finally, nutrient deprivation of vizzini mutants revealed that SAT mobilization was greatly diminished during caloric restriction, further implicating GH1 signaling in adipose tissue homeostasis. Overall, the zebrafish gh1 mutant, vizzini, exhibits decreased somatic growth, increased adipose tissue accumulation, and disrupted adipose plasticity after nutrient deprivation and represents a novel model to investigate the in vivo dynamics of vertebrate obesity.

  17. A Phylogenetically Informed Comparison of GH1 Hydrolases between Arabidopsis and Rice Response to Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yun-Ying; Yang, Jing-Fang; Liu, Tie-Yuan; Su, Zhen-Feng; Zhu, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Fan, Tao; Ye, Neng-Hui; Feng, Zhen; Wang, Ling-Juan; Hao, Ge-Fei; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Ying-Gao

    2017-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases Family 1 (GH1) comprises enzymes that can hydrolyze β-O-glycosidic bond from a carbohydrate moiety. The plant GH1 hydrolases participate in a number of developmental processes and stress responses, including cell wall modification, plant hormone activation or deactivation and herbivore resistance. A large number of members has been observed in this family, suggesting their potential redundant functions in various biological processes. In this study, we have used 304 sequences of plant GH1 hydrolases to study the evolution of this gene family in plant lineage. Gene duplication was found to be a common phenomenon in this gene family. Although many members of GH1 hydrolases showed a high degree of similarity in Arabidopsis and rice, they showed substantial tissue specificity and differential responses to various stress treatments. This differential regulation implies each enzyme may play a distinct role in plants. Furthermore, some of salt-responsive Arabidopsis GH1 hydrolases were selected to test their genetic involvement in salt responses. The knockout mutants of AtBGLU1 and AtBGLU19 were observed to be less-sensitive during NaCl treatment in comparison to the wild type seedlings, indicating their participation in salt stress response. In summary, Arabidopsis and rice GH1 glycoside hydrolases showed distinct features in their evolutionary path, transcriptional regulation and genetic functions. PMID:28392792

  18. Identification and characterization of the GhHsp20 gene family in Gossypium hirsutum

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ting; Li, Jie; Liu, Bingliang; Fang, Lei; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, Heat Shock Protein 20 (Hsp20) plays crucial roles in growth, development and responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, 94 GhHsp20 genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and these genes were phylogenetically clustered into 14 subfamilies. Out of these, 73 paralogous gene pairs remained in conserved positions on segmental duplicated blocks and only 14 genes clustered into seven tandem duplication event regions. Transcriptome analysis showed that 82 GhHsp20 genes were expressed in at least one tested tissues, indicating that the GhHsp20 genes were involved in physiological and developmental processes of cotton. Further, expression profiles under abiotic stress exhibited that two-thirds of the GhHsp20 genes were responsive to heat stress, while 15 genes were induced by multiple stresses. In addition, qRT-PCR confirmed that 16 GhHsp20 genes were hot-induced, and eight genes were up-regulated under multiple abiotic stresses and stress-related phytohormone treatments. Taken together, our results presented here would be helpful in laying the foundation for understanding the complex mechanisms of GhHsp20 mediated developmental processes and abiotic stress signaling transduction pathways in cotton. PMID:27580529

  19. Development of a Transnasal Delivery System for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH): Effects of the Concentration and Molecular Weight of Poly-L-arginine on the Nasal Absorption of rhGH in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Ryo; Uchida, Masaki; Yamaki, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Kazuo; Hatanaka, Tomomi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hideo; Kobayashi, Jun; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    A novel system for delivering recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) that is noninvasive and has a simple method of administration is strongly desired to improve the compliance of children. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for the intranasal (i.n.) co-administration of rhGH with poly-L-arginine (PLA) as a novel delivery system by evaluating the effects of the concentration and molecular weight of PLA on the nasal absorption of rhGH. The influence of the formation of insoluble aggregates and a soluble complex in the dosage formulation on nasal rhGH absorption was also evaluated by size-exclusion chromatography and ultrafiltration. PLA enhanced the nasal absorption of rhGH at each concentration and molecular weight examined. Nasal rhGH absorption increased dramatically when the PLA concentration was 1.0 % (w/v) due to the improved solubility of rhGH in the formulation. A delay in rhGH absorption was observed when the molecular weight of PLA was increased. This appeared to be because the increase in molecular weight caused the formation of a soluble complex. It seems that the PLA concentration affects the absorption-enhancing effect on rhGH, while the molecular weight of PLA affects the time when the maximum plasma rhGH concentration was reached (Tmax) of rhGH after i.n. administration, mainly because of the interactions among rhGH, PLA, and additives. Therefore, the transnasal rhGH delivery system using PLA is considered to be a promising alternative to subcutaneous (s.c.) injection if these interactions are sufficiently controlled.

  20. GH responses to GHRH and GHRP-6 in Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Diz Chaves, Yolanda; Spuch Calvar, Carlos; Pérez Tilve, Diégo; Mallo Ferrer, Federico

    2003-11-14

    GH responses to GHRH, the physiologic hypothalamic stimulus, and GHRP-6, a synthetic hexapeptide that binds the Ghrelin receptor, were studied in rats treated with streptozotocin (STZ), an experimental model of diabetes. Sprague-Dawley male rats received a single injection either of STZ (70 mg/Kg in 0.01 M SSC, i.p.) or of the vehicle (0.01 M SSC). GH responses were challenged with two different doses of GHRH (1 and 10 microg/kg) or GHRP-6 (3 and 30 microg/kg) and with a combination of both at low (1 + 3 microg/kg) or high (10 + 30 microg/kg) doses, respectively. We observed a dose-dependent effect for GH responses to GHRH both in STZ-treated rats and in controls. However, we could not find significant differences between STZ-rats and controls. GH responses to GHRP-6 occurred in a dose-dependent manner in STZ-rats, but not in controls. GH responses to GHRP-6 in both groups were clearly lower than those elicited by GHRH. GH responses to 30 microg/Kg of GHRP-6 were significantly greater in STZ-rats than in controls (AUC: 3549.9 +/- 1001.4 vs. 2046.4 +/- 711.7; p<0.05). The combined administration of GHRH plus GHRP-6 was the most potent stimuli for GH in both groups. The administration of doses in the lower range (1 + 3 microg/Kg, GHRH + GHRP-6 respectively) induced a great peak of GH in STZ-rats and in control rats, revealing a synergistic effect of GHRH and GHRP-6 in both groups. When the higher doses were administered (10 + 30 microg/kg), GH levels in time 5, and AUC were significantly higher in control rats. In addition, a negative correlation between WT (weight tendency) values and GH responses, represented as AUC, could be established in STZ-rats (r2=-0.566, p=0.004 for GHRH; r2=-0.412, p=0.028 for GHRP-6). Thus, the more negative the values of WT were, the more severe the metabolic alteration and, therefore, the higher the GH response to GHRH and GHRHP-6. In conclusion, our results do not support the existence of a functional hypothalamic hypertone of SS in

  1. Glycoside Hydrolase (GH) 45 and 5 Candidate Cellulases in Aphelenchoides besseyi Isolated from Bird’s-Nest Fern

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Tung-Tsuan; Tsai, Isheng J.; Chen, Peichen J.

    2016-01-01

    Five Aphelenchoides besseyi isolates collected from bird’s-nest ferns or rice possess different parasitic capacities in bird’s-nest fern. Two different glycoside hydrolase (GH) 45 genes were identified in the fern isolates, and only one was found in the rice isolates. A Abe GH5-1 gene containing an SCP-like family domain was found only in the fern isolates. Abe GH5-1 gene has five introns suggesting a eukaryotic origin. A maximum likelihood phylogeny revealed that Abe GH5-1 is part of the nematode monophyletic group that can be clearly distinguished from those of other eukaryotic and bacterial GH5 sequences with high bootstrap support values. The fern A. besseyi isolates were the first parasitic plant nematode found to possess both GH5 and GH45 genes. Surveying the genome of the five A. besseyi isolates by Southern blotting using an 834 bp probe targeting the GH5 domain suggests the presence of at least two copies in the fern-origin isolates but none in the rice-origin isolates. The in situ hybridization shows that the Abe GH5-1 gene is expressed in the nematode ovary and testis. Our study provides insights into the diversity of GH in isolates of plant parasitic nematodes of different host origins. PMID:27391812

  2. Optimization of a GO2/GH2 Impinging Injector Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. Kevin; Shyy, Wei; Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar

    2001-01-01

    An injector optimization methodology, method i, is used to investigate optimal design points for a gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) impinging injector element. The unlike impinging element, a fuel-oxidizer- fuel (F-O-F) triplet, is optimized in terms of design variables such as fuel pressure drop, (Delta)P(sub f), oxidizer pressure drop, (Delta)P(sub o), combustor length, L(sub comb), and impingement half-angle, alpha, for a given mixture ratio and chamber pressure. Dependent variables such as energy release efficiency, ERE, wall heat flux, Q(sub w), injector heat flux, Q(sub inj), relative combustor weight, W(sub rel), and relative injector cost, C(sub rel), are calculated and then correlated with the design variables. An empirical design methodology is used to generate these responses for 163 combinations of input variables. Method i is then used to generate response surfaces for each dependent variable. Desirability functions based on dependent variable constraints are created and used to facilitate development of composite response surfaces representing some, or all, of the five dependent variables in terms of the input variables. Three examples illustrating the utility and flexibility of method i are discussed in detail. First, joint response surfaces are constructed by sequentially adding dependent variables. Optimum designs are identified after addition of each variable and the effect each variable has on the design is shown. This stepwise demonstration also highlights the importance of including variables such as weight and cost early in the design process. Secondly, using the composite response surface which includes all five dependent variables, unequal weights are assigned to emphasize certain variables relative to others. Here, method i is used to enable objective trade studies on design issues such as component life and thrust to weight ratio. Finally, specific variable weights are further increased to illustrate the high marginal cost of

  3. Immunocytochemical study of the GH cells in the anterior pituitary gland of human fetus II. Anencephalic fetus.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Toshiaki; Ito, Takayasu

    2003-12-01

    In order to elucidate the effects of hypothalamic regulation on the morphology of GH cells, light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical examinations were carried out comparing GH cells in the anterior pituitary gland of anencephalic fetus with those of normal fetuses. Three types of GH cells were identified in the anterior pituitary gland of anencephalic fetus as well as in the normal fetus. Type-I is a small, round cell containing a few small secretory granules. Type-III is a large, polygonal cell with numerous large secretory granules. Type-II is a polygonal cell with medium-sized secretory granules. The Type-II GH cell was predominant in both anencephalic and normal fetuses. The most striking difference between anencephalic and normal fetuses was the presence of atypical forms of the Type II cell. These were polygonal cells containing secretory granules, which were either immunopositive or immunonegative to anti-human GH (anti-hGH) serum. Furthermore, two other types of GH cells were identified. The somatomammotroph (SM cell) contained GH and PRL in different granules within the same cell. Also, a different type of the GH cell was noted containing two varieties of secretory granules; one was immunolabeled only with anti-hGH and the other was not immunolabeled to either anti-hGH or anti-human PRL (anti-hPRL). From these results, we suggest that an absence of hypothalamic regulation in the anencehpalic does not seriously modify GH cell morphology but induces an altered GH storage pattern in some of the cells.

  4. Macimorelin (AEZS-130)-Stimulated Growth Hormone (GH) Test: Validation of a Novel Oral Stimulation Test for the Diagnosis of Adult GH Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Swerdloff, R.; Wang, C.; Kyle, M.; Kipnes, M.; Biller, B. M. K.; Cook, D.; Yuen, K. C. J.; Bonert, V.; Dobs, A.; Molitch, M. E.; Merriam, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: In the absence of panhypopituitarism and low serum IGF-I levels, the diagnosis of adult GH deficiency (AGHD) requires confirmation with a GH stimulation test. Macimorelin is a novel, orally active ghrelin mimetic that stimulates GH secretion. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the diagnostic efficacy and safety of macimorelin in AGHD. Design: This was a multicenter open-label study comparing the diagnostic accuracy of oral macimorelin with that of arginine+GHRH in AGHD patients and healthy, matched controls. After 43 AGHD patients and 10 controls were tested, the GHRH analog Geref Diagnostic [GHRH(1–29)NH2] became unavailable in the United States. The study was completed by testing 10 additional AGHD patients and 38 controls with macimorelin alone. Main Outcome Measure: Peak GH area under the receiver operating characteristic curve after macimorelin was measured. Results: Fifty AGHD subjects and 48 controls were evaluated. Peak GH levels in AGHD patients and controls after macimorelin were 2.36 ± 5.69 and 17.71 ± 19.11 ng/mL, respectively (P < .0001). With macimorelin, the receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded an optimal GH cut point of 2.7 ng/mL, with 82% sensitivity, 92% specificity, and 13% misclassification rate. For subjects receiving both tests, macimorelin showed discrimination comparable with arginine+GHRH (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.99 vs 0.94, respectively, P = .29). Obesity (body mass index > 30 kg/m2) was present in 58% of subjects, and peak GH levels were inversely associated with body mass index in controls (r = −0.37, P = .01). Using the separate cut points of 6.8 ng/mL for nonobese and 2.7 for obese subjects reduced the misclassification rate to 11%. Only 1 drug-related serious adverse event, an asymptomatic QT interval prolongation on the electrocardiogram, was reported. Conclusion: Oral macimorelin is safe, convenient, and effective in diagnosing AGHD with accuracy

  5. Growth Hormone Mediates Its Protective Effect in Hepatic Apoptosis through Hnf6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kewei; Wang, Minhua; Gannon, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Growth hormone (GH) not only supports hepatic metabolism but also protects against hepatocyte cell death. Hnf6 (or Oc1) belonging to the Onecut family of hepatocyte transcription factors known to regulate differentiated hepatic function, is a GH-responsive gene. We evaluate if GH mediates Hnf6 activity to attenuate hepatic apoptotic injury. Methods We used an animal model of hepatic apoptosis by bile duct ligation (BDL) with Hnf6 -/- (KO) mice in which hepatic Hnf6 was conditionally inactivated. GH was administered to adult wild type WT and KO mice for the 7 days of BDL to enhance Hnf6 expression. In vitro, primary hepatocytes derived from KO and WT liver were treated with LPS and hepatocyte apoptosis was assessed with and without GH treatment. Results In WT mice, GH treatment enhanced Hnf6 expression during BDL, inhibited Caspase -3, -8 and -9 responses and diminished hepatic apoptotic and fibrotic injury. GH-mediated upregulation of Hnf6 expression and parallel suppression of apoptosis and fibrosis in WT BDL liver were abrogated in KO mice. LPS activated apoptosis and suppressed Hnf6 expression in primary hepatocytes. GH/LPS co-treatment enhanced Hnf6 expression with corresponding attenuation of apoptosis in WT-derived hepatocytes, but not in KO hepatocytes. ChiP-on-ChiP and electromobility shift assays of KO and WT liver nuclear extracts identified Ciap1 (or Birc2) as an Hnf6-bound target gene. Ciap1 expression patterns closely follow Hnf6 expression in the liver and in hepatocytes. Conclusion GH broad protective actions on hepatocytes during liver injury are effected through Hnf6, with Hnf6 transcriptional activation of Ciap1 as an underlying molecular mediator. PMID:27936029

  6. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Evolution, substrate specificity and subfamily classification of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The large Glycoside Hydrolase family 5 (GH5) groups together a wide range of enzymes acting on β-linked oligo- and polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates from a large spectrum of organisms. The long and complex evolution of this family of enzymes and its broad sequence diversity limits functional prediction. With the objective of improving the differentiation of enzyme specificities in a knowledge-based context, and to obtain new evolutionary insights, we present here a new, robust subfamily classification of family GH5. Results About 80% of the current sequences were assigned into 51 subfamilies in a global analysis of all publicly available GH5 sequences and associated biochemical data. Examination of subfamilies with catalytically-active members revealed that one third are monospecific (containing a single enzyme activity), although new functions may be discovered with biochemical characterization in the future. Furthermore, twenty subfamilies presently have no characterization whatsoever and many others have only limited structural and biochemical data. Mapping of functional knowledge onto the GH5 phylogenetic tree revealed that the sequence space of this historical and industrially important family is far from well dispersed, highlighting targets in need of further study. The analysis also uncovered a number of GH5 proteins which have lost their catalytic machinery, indicating evolution towards novel functions. Conclusion Overall, the subfamily division of GH5 provides an actively curated resource for large-scale protein sequence annotation for glycogenomics; the subfamily assignments are openly accessible via the Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme database at http://www.cazy.org/GH5.html. PMID:22992189

  8. Effects of sustained exercise on GH-IGFs axis in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Vélez, Emilio J; Azizi, Sheida; Millán-Cubillo, Antonio; Fernández-Borràs, Jaume; Blasco, Josefina; Chan, Shu Jin; Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-02-15

    The endocrine system regulates growth mainly through the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) axis and, although exercise promotes growth, little is known about its modulation of these factors. The aim of this work was to characterize the effects of 5 wk of moderate sustained swimming on the GH-IGFs axis in gilthead sea bream fingerlings. Plasma IGF-I/GH ratio and tissue gene expression of total IGF-I and three splice variants, IGF-II, three IGF binding proteins, two GH receptors, two IGF-I receptors, and the downstream molecules were analyzed. Fish under exercise (EX) grew more than control fish (CT), had a higher plasma IGF-I/GH ratio, and showed increased hepatic IGF-I expression (mainly IGF-Ia). Total IGF-I expression levels were similar in the anterior and caudal muscles; however, IGF-Ic expression increased with exercise, suggesting that this splice variant may be the most sensitive to mechanical action. Moreover, IGFBP-5b and IGF-II increased in the anterior and caudal muscles, respectively, supporting enhanced muscle growth. Furthermore, in EX fish, hepatic IGF-IRb was reduced together with both GHRs; GHR-II was also reduced in anterior muscle, while GHR-I showed higher expression in the two muscle regions, indicating tissue-dependent differences and responses to exercise. Exercise also increased gene and protein expression of target of rapamycin (TOR), suggesting enhanced muscle protein synthesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that moderate sustained activity may be used to increase the plasma IGF-I/GH ratio and to potentiate growth in farmed gilthead sea bream, modulating the gene expression of different members of the GH-IGFs axis (i.e., IGF-Ic, IGF-II, IGFBP-5b, GHR-I, and TOR).

  9. Growth Hormone (GH) and Rehabilitation Promoted Distal Innervation in a Child Affected by Caudal Regression Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Alba; López, Natalia; García, José; Puell, Carlos I.; Pablos, Tamara; Devesa, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a malformation occurring during the fetal period and mainly characterized by an incomplete development of the spinal cord (SC), which is often accompanied by other developmental anomalies. We studied a 9-month old child with CRS who presented interruption of the SC at the L2–L3 level, sacral agenesis, a lack of innervation of the inferior limbs (flaccid paraplegia), and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Given the known positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated him with GH and rehabilitation, trying to induce recovery from the aforementioned sequelae. The Gross Motor Function Test (GMFM)-88 test score was 12.31%. After a blood analysis, GH treatment (0.3 mg/day, 5 days/week, during 3 months and then 15 days without GH) and rehabilitation commenced. This protocol was followed for 5 years, the last GH dose being 1 mg/day. Blood analysis and physical exams were performed every 3 months initially and then every 6 months. Six months after commencing the treatment the GMFM-88 score increased to 39.48%. Responses to sensitive stimuli appeared in most of the territories explored; 18 months later sensitive innervation was complete and the patient moved all muscles over the knees and controlled his sphincters. Three years later he began to walk with crutches, there was plantar flexion, and the GMFM-88 score was 78.48%. In summary, GH plus rehabilitation may be useful for innervating distal areas below the level of the incomplete spinal cord in CRS. It is likely that GH acted on the ependymal SC NSCs, as the hormone does in the neurogenic niches of the brain, and rehabilitation helped to achieve practically full functionality. PMID:28124993

  10. Growth Hormone (GH) and Rehabilitation Promoted Distal Innervation in a Child Affected by Caudal Regression Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Alba; López, Natalia; García, José; Puell, Carlos I; Pablos, Tamara; Devesa, Pablo

    2017-01-23

    Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a malformation occurring during the fetal period and mainly characterized by an incomplete development of the spinal cord (SC), which is often accompanied by other developmental anomalies. We studied a 9-month old child with CRS who presented interruption of the SC at the L2-L3 level, sacral agenesis, a lack of innervation of the inferior limbs (flaccid paraplegia), and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Given the known positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated him with GH and rehabilitation, trying to induce recovery from the aforementioned sequelae. The Gross Motor Function Test (GMFM)-88 test score was 12.31%. After a blood analysis, GH treatment (0.3 mg/day, 5 days/week, during 3 months and then 15 days without GH) and rehabilitation commenced. This protocol was followed for 5 years, the last GH dose being 1 mg/day. Blood analysis and physical exams were performed every 3 months initially and then every 6 months. Six months after commencing the treatment the GMFM-88 score increased to 39.48%. Responses to sensitive stimuli appeared in most of the territories explored; 18 months later sensitive innervation was complete and the patient moved all muscles over the knees and controlled his sphincters. Three years later he began to walk with crutches, there was plantar flexion, and the GMFM-88 score was 78.48%. In summary, GH plus rehabilitation may be useful for innervating distal areas below the level of the incomplete spinal cord in CRS. It is likely that GH acted on the ependymal SC NSCs, as the hormone does in the neurogenic niches of the brain, and rehabilitation helped to achieve practically full functionality.

  11. Detection of doping with rhGH: excretion study with WADA-approved kits.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Xinmiao; He, Chunji; Zhang, Lisi; Xu, Youxuan; Xie, Minhao; Yan, Yi; Su, Hao; Wu, Moutian

    2011-01-01

    The detection of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) doping using the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) approved kits is reported in this research. Twenty-five young male students were selected and divided randomly into two groups with six belonging to the placebo and nineteen to the administration group. Thirteen volunteers in one group were administered with a Chinese preparation of rhGH while six volunteers included in the other group were given rhGH made in Switzerland. Both preparations were administered at a dose of 0.1 IU/kg body weight, one injection per day for 14 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected using WADA guidelines and all blood samples were analyzed with WADA-approved Kits 1 and 2. The time window for detection of rhGH doping using WADA-approved kits and criteria are discussed. Based on the comparison of the data obtained from this excretion study and from our routine (Chinese population as reference), consideration of the recent WADA criteria for rhGH AAF (Analytical Adverse Findings) is reported statistically. A comparison of data obtained from the two sample groups administered with pharmaceutical preparations, one Chinese rhGH (GenHeal®, S19990019, 1.6 mg (4 IU), Shanghai, China) obtained from prokaryotic cells and the other (Saizen®, S20080036, 1.33 mg (4 IU), Laboratoires Serone S.A., Switzerland) from eukaryotic cells is reported and did not show any significant difference for the detection of doping with rhGH.

  12. Effects of short- and long-term dexamethasone treatment on growth and growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH)-GH-insulin-like growth factor-I axis in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, T; Sato, M; Niimi, M; Hizuka, N; Takahara, J

    1997-12-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of a chronic excess of glucocorticoids (GC) on body growth and GH secretion are well established, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we examined the chronic effects of a high dose of dexamethasone (DEX) on spontaneous GH secretion and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in conscious rats. The animals were given daily i.p. injections of DEX (200 microg/day) for either one or four weeks. Body growth assessed by tibia length and serum IGF-I levels was significantly inhibited 1 week after treatment. By contrast, spontaneous GH secretion was not altered 1 week after the treatment. Neither hypothalamic GRH and somtatostain mRNA levels nor GH responses to GRH from single somatotropes were affected 1 week after the treatment. Four weeks after DEX treatment, body growth of the rats was noticeably suppressed. Interestingly, spontaneous GH secretion, hypothalamic GRH mRNA levels and GH responses to GRH were all inhibited 4 weeks after treatment. Pituitary GRH receptor mRNA levels were not altered 1 week after treatment, but increased after 4 weeks. These results indicate that a high dose of DEX initially impairs IGF-I production and subsequently inhibits spontaneous GH secretion in rats. Inhibition of spontaneous GH secretion resulting from chronic GC excess is due, at least in part, to the impairment of hypothalamic GRH synthesis and pituitary GH responsiveness. An increase in the pituitary GRH receptor may be caused by decreased GRH secretion.

  13. GhAGL15s, preferentially expressed during somatic embryogenesis, promote embryogenic callus formation in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuoren; Li, Changfeng; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Chaojun; Wu, Zhixia; Zhang, Xueyan; Liu, Chuanliang; Li, Fuguang

    2014-10-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a useful tool for gene transfer and propagation of plants. AGAMOUS-LIKE15 (AGL15) promotes somatic embryogenesis in many plant species. In this study, three homologous AGL15 genes were isolated from Gossypium hirsutum L., namely GhAGL15-1, GhAGL15-3, and GhAGL15-4. Their putative proteins contained a highly conserved MADS-box DNA-binding domain and a less conserved K domain. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the three GhAGL15s clustered most closely with AGL15 proteins in other plants. Subcellular location analyses revealed that three GhAGL15s were localized in the nucleus. Furthermore, their expression levels increased following embryogenic callus induction, but sharply decreased during the embryoid stage. GhAGL15-1 and GhAGL15-3 were significantly induced by 2,4-D and kinetin, whereas GhAGL15-4 was only responsive to 2,4-D treatment. Over-expression of the three GhAGL15s in cotton callus improved callus quality and significantly increased the embryogenic callus formation rate, while GhAGL15-4 had the highest positive effect on the embryogenic callus formation rate (an increase from 38.1 to 65.2%). These results suggest that over-expression of GhAGL15s enhances embryogenic potential of transgenic calli. Therefore, spatiotemporal manipulation of GhAGL15s expression may prove valuable in improving cotton transformation efficiency.

  14. Effects of somatotrophic axis (GH/GHR) double transgenesis on structural and molecular aspects of the zebrafish immune system.

    PubMed

    Batista, Carolina Reyes; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Romano, Luis Alberto; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The development of growth hormone (GH) transgenic fish has been shown to be a promising method to improve growth rates. However, the role of GH is not restricted only to processes involved in growth. Several others physiological processes, including immune function, are impaired due to GH imbalances. Given the importance of generating GH transgenic organisms for aquaculture purposes, it is necessary to develop strategies to reduce or compensate for the collateral effects of GH. We hypothesized that the generation of double transgenic fish that overexpress GH and growth hormone receptor (GHR) in the skeletal muscle could be a possible alternative to compensate for the deleterious effects of GH on the immune system. Specifically, we hypothesized that increased GHR amounts in the skeletal muscle would be able to reduce the level of circulating GH, attenuating the GH signaling on the immune cells while still increasing the growth rate. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the size of the immune organs, T cell content in the thymus and head kidney, and expression of immune-related genes in double-transgenic fish. Contrary to our expectations, we found that the overexpression of GHR does not decrease the deleterious effect of GH excess on the size of the thymus and head kidney, and in the content of CD3(+) and CD4(+) cells in the thymus and head kidney. Unexpectedly, the control GHR transgenic group showed similar impairments in immune system parameters. These results indicate that GHR overexpression does not reverse the impairments caused by GH and, in addition, could reinforce the damage to the immune functions in GH transgenic zebrafish.

  15. Type II SOCS as a feedback repressor for GH-induced Igf1 expression in carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Xiao, Jia; He, Mulan; Ma, Ani; Wong, Anderson O L

    2016-05-01

    Type II suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) serve as feedback repressors for cytokines and are known to inhibit growth hormone (GH) actions. However, direct evidence for SOCS modulation of GH-induced insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression is lacking, and the post-receptor signaling for SOCS expression at the hepatic level is still unclear. To shed light on the comparative aspects of SOCS in GH functions, grass carp was used as a model to study the role of type II SOCS in GH-induced Igf1 expression. Structural identity of type II SOCS, Socs1-3 and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (Cish), was established in grass carp by 5'/3'-RACE, and their expression at both transcript and protein levels were confirmed in the liver by RT-PCR and LC/MS/MS respectively. In carp hepatocytes, GH treatment induced rapid phosphorylation of JAK2, STATs, MAPK, PI3K, and protein kinase B (Akt) with parallel rises in socs1-3 and cish mRNA levels, and these stimulatory effects on type II SOCS were shown to occur before the gradual loss of igf1 gene expression caused by prolonged exposure of GH. Furthermore, GH-induced type II SOCS gene expression could be negated by inhibiting JAK2, STATs, MEK1/2, P38 (MAPK), PI3K, and/or Akt respectively. In CHO cells transfected with carp GH receptor, over-expression of these newly cloned type II SOCS not only suppressed JAK2/STAT5 signaling with GH treatment but also inhibited GH-induced grass carp Igf1 promoter activity. These results, taken together, suggest that type II SOCS could be induced by GH in the carp liver via JAK2/STATs, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt cascades and serve as feedback repressors for GH signaling and induction of igf1 gene expression.

  16. Arginine induces GH gene expression by activating NOS/NO signaling in rat isolated hemi-pituitaries

    PubMed Central

    Olinto, S.C.F.; Adrião, M.G.; Castro-Barbosa, T.; Goulart-Silva, F.; Nunes, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid arginine (Arg) is a recognized secretagogue of growth hormone (GH), and has been shown to induce GH gene expression. Arg is the natural precursor of nitric oxide (NO), which is known to mediate many of the effects of Arg, such as GH secretion. Arg was also shown to increase calcium influx in pituitary cells, which might contribute to its effects on GH secretion. Although the mechanisms involved in the effects of Arg on GH secretion are well established, little is known about them regarding the control of GH gene expression. We investigated whether the NO pathway and/or calcium are involved in the effects of Arg on GH gene expression in rat isolated pituitaries. To this end, pituitaries from approximately 170 male Wistar rats (∼250 g) were removed, divided into two halves, pooled (three hemi-pituitaries) and incubated or not with Arg, as well as with different pharmacological agents. Arg (71 mM), the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 1 and 0.1 mM) and a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue (8-Br-cGMP, 1 mM) increased GH mRNA expression 60 min later. The NO acceptor hemoglobin (0.3 µM) blunted the effect of SNP, and the combined treatment with Arg and L-NAME (an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 55 mM) abolished the stimulatory effect of Arg on GH gene expression. The calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine (3 µM) also abolished Arg-induced GH gene expression. The present study shows that Arg directly induces GH gene expression in hemi-pituitaries isolated from rats, excluding interference from somatostatinergic neurons, which are supposed to be inhibited by Arg. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the NOS/NO signaling pathway and calcium mediate the Arg effects on GH gene expression. PMID:22641416

  17. Brain Recovery after a Plane Crash: Treatment with Growth Hormone (GH) and Neurorehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Devesa, Jesús; Díaz-Getino, Gustavo; Rey, Pablo; García-Cancela, José; Loures, Iria; Nogueiras, Sonia; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alba; Salgado, Lucía; González, Mónica; Pablos, Tamara; Devesa, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the results obtained after growth hormone (GH) treatment and neurorehabilitation in a young man that suffered a very grave traumatic brain injury (TBI) after a plane crash. Methods: Fifteen months after the accident, the patient was treated with GH, 1 mg/day, at three-month intervals, followed by one-month resting, together with daily neurorehabilitation. Blood analysis at admission showed that no pituitary deficits existed. At admission, the patient presented: spastic tetraplegia, dysarthria, dysphagia, very severe cognitive deficits and joint deformities. Computerized tomography scanners (CT-Scans) revealed the practical loss of the right brain hemisphere and important injuries in the left one. Clinical and blood analysis assessments were performed every three months for three years. Feet surgery was needed because of irreducible equinovarus. Results: Clinical and kinesitherapy assessments revealed a prompt improvement in cognitive functions, dysarthria and dysphagia disappeared and three years later the patient was able to live a practically normal life, walking alone and coming back to his studies. No adverse effects were observed during and after GH administration. Conclusions: These results, together with previous results from our group, indicate that GH treatment is safe and effective for helping neurorehabilitation in TBI patients, once the acute phase is resolved, regardless of whether or not they have GH-deficiency (GHD). PMID:26703581

  18. In silico Identification and Taxonomic Distribution of Plant Class C GH9 Endoglucanases

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Siddhartha; Sharma, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The glycoside hydrolase 9 superfamily, mainly comprising the endoglucanases, is represented in all three domains of life. The current division of GH9 enzymes, into three subclasses, namely A, B, and C, is centered on parameters derived from sequence information alone. However, this classification is ambiguous, and is limited by the paralogous ancestry of classes B and C endoglucanases, and paucity of biochemical and structural data. Here, we extend this classification schema to putative GH9 endoglucanases present in green plants, with an emphasis on identifying novel members of the class C subset. These enzymes cleave the β(1 → 4) linkage between non-terminal adjacent D-glucopyranose residues, in both, amorphous and crystalline regions of cellulose. We utilized non redundant plant GH9 enzymes with characterized molecular data, as the training set to construct Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and train an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The parameters that were used for predicting dominant enzyme function, were derived from this training set, and subsequently refined on 147 sequences with available expression data. Our knowledge-based approach, can ascribe differential endoglucanase activity (A, B, or C) to a query sequence with high confidence, and was used to construct a local repository of class C GH9 endoglucanases (GH9C = 241) from 32 sequenced green plants. PMID:27570528

  19. Growth Hormone and Treatment Controversy; Long Term Safety of rGH

    PubMed Central

    DiVall, Sara A.; Radovick, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The availability of recombinant human growth hormone (rGH) for treatment of growth disorders has provided an unlimited supply for replacement in patients with growth hormone insufficiency but also for short stature due to Turner syndrome, renal failure, Prader-Willi syndrome, small for gestational age and idiopathic short stature. Considering the potential for side effects in the use of a growth promoting agent, the community of physicians and pharmaceutical manufacturers developed systematic methods to survey for short and long term effects. Recently published data from the National Cooperative Growth Study (NCGS), managed by Genentech, concluded that GH has a ‘favorable profile’. In 2012, results from the European Union’s Safety and Appropriateness of GH treatment in Europe (EU SAGhE) study about the long term mortality in GH treated patients were published in two separate manuscripts. This review will examine the issue of safety of rGH in order that practitioners are informed as they consider initiation of therapy with patients. PMID:23772352

  20. Steep-Spectrum Radio Emission from the Low-Mass Active Galactic Nucleus GH 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    GH 10 is a broad-lined active galactic nucleus (AGN) energized by a black hole of mass 800,000 M⊙. It was the only object detected by Greene et al. in their Very Large Array (VLA) survey of 19 low-mass AGNs discovered by Greene & Ho. New VLA imaging at 1.4, 4.9, and 8.5 GHz reveals that GH 10's emission has an extent of less than 320 pc, has an optically thin synchrotron spectrum with a spectral index α = - 0.76 +/- 0.05 (Sν propto ν+ α), is less than 11% linearly polarized, and is steady—although poorly sampled—on timescales of weeks and years. Circumnuclear star formation cannot dominate the radio emission, because the high inferred star formation rate, 18 M⊙ yr-1, is inconsistent with the rate of less than 2 M⊙ yr-1 derived from narrow Hα and [O II] λ3727 emission. Instead, the radio emission must be mainly energized by the low-mass black hole. GH 10's radio properties match those of the steep-spectrum cores of Palomar Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that, like those galaxies, the emission is outflow-driven. Because GH 10 is radiating close to its Eddington limit, it may be a local analog of the starting conditions, or seeds, for supermassive black holes. Future imaging of GH 10 at higher linear resolution thus offers an opportunity to study the relative roles of radiative versus kinetic feedback during black hole growth.

  1. Cotton AnnGh3 encoding an annexin protein is preferentially expressed in fibers and promotes initiation and elongation of leaf trichomes in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Li, Deng-Di; Zhang, Jie; Xia, Hui; Wang, Xiu-Lan; Li, Ying; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-10-01

    The annexins are a multifamily of calcium-regulated phospholipid-binding proteins. To investigate the roles of annexins in fiber development, four genes encoding putative annexin proteins were isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated AnnGh3, AnnGh4, AnnGh5, and AnnGh6. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results indicated that AnnGh3, AnnGh4, and AnnGh5 were preferentially expressed in fibers, while the transcripts of AnnGh6 were predominantly accumulated in roots. During fiber development, the transcripts of AnnGh3/4/5 genes were mainly accumulated in rapidly elongating fibers. With fiber cells further developed, their expression activity was dramatically declined to a relatively low level. In situ hybridization results indicated that AnnGh3 and AnnGh5 were expressed in initiating fiber cells (0-2 DPA). Additionally, their expression in fibers was also regulated by phytohormones and [Ca(2+)]. Subcellular localization analysis discovered that AnnGh3 protein was localized in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of AnnGh3 in Arabidopsis resulted in a significant increase in trichome density and length on leaves of the transgenic plants, suggesting that AnnGh3 may be involved in fiber cell initiation and elongation of cotton.

  2. Effects of ghrelin, GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH on GH, ACTH and cortisol release in hyperthyroidism before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Molica, Patricia; Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; de Sá, Larissa Bianca Paiva Cunha; Vieira, José Gilberto Henriques; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2010-12-01

    In thyrotoxicosis GH responses to stimuli are diminished and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is hyperactive. There are no data on ghrelin or GHRP-6-induced GH, ACTH and cortisol release in treated hyperthyroidism. We, therefore, evaluated these responses in 10 thyrotoxic patients before treatment and in 7 of them after treatment. GHRH-induced GH release was also studied. Peak GH (μg/L; mean ± SE) values after ghrelin (22.6 ± 3.9), GHRP-6 (13.8 ± 2.3) and GHRH (4.9 ± 0.9) were lower in hyperthyroidism before treatment compared to controls (ghrelin: 67.6 ± 19.3; GHRP-6: 25.4 ± 2.7; GHRH: 12.2 ± 2.8) and did not change after 6 months of euthyroidism (ghrelin: 32.7 ± 4.7; GHRP-6: 15.6 ± 3.6; GHRH: 7.4 ± 2.3), although GH responses to all peptides increased in ~50% of the patients. In thyrotoxicosis before treatment ACTH response to ghrelin was two fold higher (107.4 ± 26.3) than those of controls (54.9 ± 10.3), although not significantly. ACTH response to GHRP-6 was similar in both groups (hyperthyroid: 44.7 ± 9.0; controls: 31.3 ± 7.9). There was a trend to a decreased ACTH response to ghrelin after 3 months of euthyroidism (35.6 ± 5.3; P = 0.052), but after 6 months this decrease was non-significant (50.7 ± 14.0). After 3 months ACTH response to GHRP-6 decreased significantly (20.4 ± 4.2), with no further changes. In hyperthyroidism before treatment, peak cortisol (μg/dL) responses to ghrelin (18.2 ± 1.2) and GHRP-6 (15.9 ± 1.4) were comparable to controls (ghrelin: 16.4 ± 1.6; GHRP-6: 13.5 ± 0.9) and no changes were seen after treatment. Our results suggest that the pathways of GH release after ghrelin/GHRP-6 and GHRH are similarly affected by thyroid hormone excess and hypothalamic mechanisms of ACTH release modulated by ghrelin/GHSs may be activated in this situation.

  3. Long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on hematopoiesis in a large cohort of children with GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Andrea; Capalbo, Donatella; De Martino, Lucia; Rezzuto, Martina; Di Mase, Raffaella; Pignata, Claudio; Salerno, Mariacarolina

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our prospective case-control study was to evaluate long-term effects of GH replacement therapy on erythrocytes parameters, leukocytes, and platelets numbers in a large cohort of children with isolated GH deficiency (GHD). Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, red cell distribution width, number of erythrocytes, leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and platelets, ferritin, and C-reactive protein were evaluated in 85 children with isolated GHD (10.20 ± 3.50 years) before and annually during the first 5 years of GH replacement therapy and in 85 healthy children age and sex comparable to patients during 5 years of follow-up. Compared with controls, GHD children at study entry showed lower Hb (-1.18 ± 0.87 vs. -0.40 ± 0.90 SDS, p < 0.0001), red cells number (-0.24 ± 0.81 vs. 0.25 ± 1.14 SDS, p < 0.0001), and Hct (-1.18 ± 0.86 vs. -0.68 ± 0.99 SDS, p < 0.0001). Twelve GHD patients (14 %) showed a normocytic anemia. GH therapy was associated with a significant increase in Hb, Hct, and red cells number which became all comparable to controls within the first 2 years of treatment. Moreover, hemoglobin levels normalized in all anemic GHD patients after 5 years of therapy. No difference between patients and controls was found in leukocytes and platelets numbers neither at baseline nor during the study. GHD in childhood is associated with an impairment of erythropoiesis which causes a normocytic anemia in a considerable percentage of patients. GH replacement therapy exerts a beneficial effect leading to a significant increase of erythrocytes parameters and recovery from anemia. Neither GHD nor GH replacement treatment exerts effects on leukocytes or platelets numbers.

  4. Growth hormone (GH) therapy markedly increases the motility of spermatozoa and the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I in seminal vesicle fluid in the male GH-deficient dwarf rat.

    PubMed

    Breier, B H; Vickers, M H; Gravance, C G; Casey, P J

    1996-09-01

    There is increasing evidence for an important role of the somatotropic axis in male reproductive function. We investigated the effect of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) treatment for 21 days on semen characteristics in post-pubertal GH-deficient dwarf (dw/dw) rats. Male dw/dw rats at an age of 75-80 days were divided into two groups (n = 10 per group) and injected twice per day with either rbGH (2 micrograms/g/day) or saline. While the concentration (96.4 +/- 51.3 x 10(6) per ml) and morphology of spermatozoa (spermatozoa with normal morphology 73.5 +/- 6.3%) in the dw/dw rat were within the normal range, the motility of spermatozoa was very low (27.5 +/- 11.7%), establishing a state of sub-fertility. The rbGH treatment markedly increased (p < 0.01) motility of spermatozoa (44.5 +/- 10.7%) but did not change the concentration (144 +/- 80.3 x 10(6) per ml) and morphology (spermatozoa with normal morphology 79.5 +/- 6.0%). The rbGH treatment also significantly increased the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in blood plasma (control 389.1 +/- 65 ng/ml, rbGH 813.9 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and in seminal vesicle fluid (control 11.3 +/- 3.0 ng/ml, rbGH 16.1 +/- 5.4 ng/ml, p < 0.05). We conclude that rbGH therapy markedly increases motility of spermatozoa in sub-fertile male GH-deficient dw/dw rats. Thus, GH therapy may offer considerable potential for the treatment of impaired male reproductive performance.

  5. [Growth Hormone-Insulin Growth Factor I (GH-IGF-I) axis and growth].

    PubMed

    Castell, A-L; Sadoul, J-L; Bouvattier, C

    2013-10-01

    Normal human linear growth results from an evolutionary process expressing the sum effect of multiple genes. The growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I axis is one of the main actors in the growth process. Defects in this axis can be responsible for short or tall stature. Short stature is defined as smaller than - 2 standard deviations (SD). It is a very common reason for consultation in pediatrics; indeed, 2.5 % of children are concerned. Multiple causes make diagnosis difficult. In this article, we detail the most common constitutional causes of small size, including those related to a defect in the GH-IGF-I axis. Then, we report, the first results of the clinical and genetic study conducted on 213 patients with gigantism. Tall stature is defined by a height superior to 2 SD. Finally, recent work linking epigenetics and growth - via signaling pathways of GH-IGF-I axis - will be presented.

  6. McCune-Albright syndrome: surgical and therapeutic challenges in GH-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Helen; Borges, Manuel Thomas; Kerr, Janice M; Lillehei, Kevin O; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, B K

    2011-08-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a postzygotic (non-germline) disorder characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cafe-au-lait macules and hypersecretory endocrinopathies. A significant percentage of MAS patients have pituitary adenomas that are either growth hormone (GH) or mixed GH/prolactin (PRL)-producing. Surgical excision may be challenging-or even impossible-due to the associated severe fibrous dysplasia of the skull base. Treatment relies on an interdisciplinary, multi-modal approach from endocrinologists, neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists. We present two cases of women with MAS and GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, encountered in our 30-year experience with pituitary diseases. The first patient successfully underwent transsphenoidal surgical resection for a pituitary microadenoma in 1997 (at age 18) and again in 2009 for recurrent disease, with a significant reduction in IGF-1 level. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and electron microscopy (EM), performed on both specimens, showed a mammosomatotroph adenoma with GH, PRL, alpha subunit (+) IHC, with increased fibrous bodies developing over the 13-year interval. Focal hyperplasia could be discerned. EM in 1997 showed an admixture of mammosomatotrophs, mature lactotrophs and somatotrophs, with a bimodal population identified in 2009. The second MAS patient had long-standing polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, but was only recently diagnosed with GH excess and a pituitary adenoma, at the age of 29 years. Surgical resection was not advised in this patient because of the massive obstructive skull-base fibrous dysplasia. Medical therapy was initiated with somatostatin analogues, although responses in both patients have been suboptimal to date. We review the literature on GH excess in MAS to highlight its surgical and medical challenges.

  7. Characterization of African bat henipavirus GH-M74a glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weis, Michael; Behner, Laura; Hoffmann, Markus; Krüger, Nadine; Herrler, Georg; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix; Dietzel, Erik; Maisner, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, novel henipavirus-related sequences have been identified in bats in Africa. To evaluate the potential of African bat henipaviruses to spread in non-bat mammalian cells, we compared the biological functions of the surface glycoproteins G and F of the prototype African henipavirus GH-M74a with those of the glycoproteins of Nipah virus (NiV), a well-characterized pathogenic member of the henipavirus genus. Glycoproteins are central determinants for virus tropism, as efficient binding of henipavirus G proteins to cellular ephrin receptors and functional expression of fusion-competent F proteins are indispensable prerequisites for virus entry and cell-to-cell spread. In this study, we analysed the ability of the GH-M74a G and F proteins to cause cell-to-cell fusion in mammalian cell types readily permissive to NiV or Hendra virus infections. Except for limited syncytium formation in a bat cell line derived from Hypsignathus monstrosus, HypNi/1.1 cells, we did not observe any fusion. The highly restricted fusion activity was predominantly due to the F protein. Whilst GH-M74a G protein was found to interact with the main henipavirus receptor ephrin-B2 and induced syncytia upon co-expression with heterotypic NiV F protein, GH-M74a F protein did not cause evident fusion in the presence of heterotypic NiV G protein. Pulse-chase and surface biotinylation analyses revealed delayed F cleavage kinetics with a reduced expression of cleaved and fusion-active GH-M74a F protein on the cell surface. Thus, the F protein of GH-M74a showed a functional defect that is most likely caused by impaired trafficking leading to less efficient proteolytic activation and surface expression.

  8. Attenuation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling by growth hormone (GH).

    PubMed

    González, Lorena; Miquet, Johanna G; Irene, Pablo E; Díaz, M Eugenia; Rossi, Soledad P; Sotelo, Ana I; Frungieri, Mónica B; Hill, Cristal M; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) show increased hepatic protein content of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is broadly associated with cell proliferation and oncogenesis. However, chronically elevated levels of GH result in desensitization of STAT-mediated EGF signal and similar response of ERK1/2 and AKT signaling to EGF compared to normal mice. To ascertain the mechanisms involved in GH attenuation of EGF signaling and the consequences on cell cycle promotion, phosphorylation of signaling mediators was studied at different time points after EGF stimulation, and induction of proteins involved in cell cycle progression was assessed in normal and GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Results from kinetic studies confirmed the absence of STAT3 and 5 activation and comparable levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon EGF stimulation, which was associated with diminished or similar induction of c-MYC, c-FOS, c-JUN, CYCLIN D1 and CYCLIN E in transgenic compared to normal mice. Accordingly, kinetics of EGF-induced c-SRC and EGFR phosphorylation at activating residues demonstrated that activation of these proteins was lower in the transgenic mice with respect to normal animals. In turn, EGFR phosphorylation at serine 1046/1047, which is implicated in the negative regulation of the receptor, was increased in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice both in basal conditions and upon EGF stimulus. Increased basal phosphorylation and activation of the p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase might account for increased Ser 1046/1047 EGFR. Hyperphosphorylation of EGFR at serine residues would represent a compensatory mechanism triggered by chronically elevated levels of GH to mitigate the proliferative response induced by EGF.

  9. Insulin and GH secretion in adolescent girls with irregular cycles: polycystic vs multifollicular ovaries.

    PubMed

    Villa, P; Rossodivita, A; Fulghesu, A M; Cucinelli, F; Barini, A; Apa, R; Belosi, C; Lanzone, A

    2003-04-01

    In the present study insulin (I) and GH secretion was studied in a group of twenty-five young adolescent girls (mean age: 15 +/- 0.23 yr) with cycle irregularity associated to clinical signs of hyperandrogenism in comparison with that observed in eleven normal matched subjects with regular menses. All patients underwent basal hormone measurements and, on two consecutive days, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a GHRH iv test. Therefore, all subjects had a transabdominal US scan for the measurement of ovarian volume and the characterization of ovarian morphology. On the basis of the US examination we found patients with polycystic ovaries (PCO-like group) and subjects with multifollicular ovaries (MFO group). PCO-like group exhibited T (p<0.01) and LH (p<0.05) plasma levels higher than control group and the highest free androgen index (FAI) values (13 +/- 0.87). All patients with irregular menses showed plasma concentrations of AUC for I (AUC-I) significantly higher in respect to control group (7359.4 +/- 709 vs 5447 +/- 431 microIU/ml x 180 min, p<0.01) as well as both PCO-like group and MFO group did (p<0.001 and p<0.01) respectively. MFO group showed higher values of the AUC for GH (AUC-GH) (2809 +/- 432 ng/ml x 120 min) in respect to controls (1708 +/- 208 ng/ml x 120 min, p<0.05) and PCO-like subjects (p<0.001), who on the contrary showed the lowest AUC-GH values (618 +/- 119 ng/ml x 120 min). In conclusion, PCO-like patients associated hyperinsulinemia with a blunted GH secretion while MFO patients had higher GH secretion associated with higher AUC-I values in a way suggesting an immature and still developing reproductive system.

  10. Growth hormone response to long-term GH-RH administration in lambs.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Romero, A; Rol De Lama, M A; Granados, B; Vara, E; Vázquez González, I; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A

    2000-06-01

    The pattern of long-term GHRH administration capable of stimulating GH release without depleting pituitary GH content has been investigated using two experimental approaches. In experiment 1, recently weaned male lambs were treated for 3 weeks as follows: Group A) control; B) subcutaneous (sc) continuous infusion of GHRH (1200 mg/day) using a slow release pellet; C) the same as B plus 1 daily sc injection of long acting somatostatin (SS) (octreotide, 20 mg) ; D) 3 daily sc GHRH (250 mg) injections ; E) 2 daily sc injections of GHRH (250 mg) and 2 of natural SS (250 mg). In experiment 2, recently weaned male lambs were continuously GHRH-treated using sc osmotic minipumps (900 mg/day) alone or combined with a daily sc injection of octreotide (20 mg) for 4 weeks. Basal plasma GH levels were increased after chronic pulsatile GHRH treatment but not after any kind of continuous GHRH administration. This increment was maintained during the 3 weeks of experimentation and appeared accompanied by a pituitary GH content similar to controls. A marked GH response to the iv GHRH challenge was observed in controls and in lambs receiving both types of continuous sc GHRH infusions, whereas pulsatile sc GHRH-treated animals did not respond to the iv GHRH challenge in the first and second weeks of the study but did so in the third week of treatment. These data demonstrate that long-term pulsatile GHRH administration is capable of stimulating GH release in growing male lambs, without producing pituitary desensitization.

  11. Effects of Hypergravity Rearing on Growth Hormone (GH) Secretion In Preweanling Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, L. A.; Chowdhury, J. H.; Wade, C. E.; Ronca, A. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We previously reported that rat pups reared at 1.5-g, 1.75 or 2.0-g hypergravity weigh 6-15% less than 1.0-g controls. To account for these findings. we measured the lactational hormones, prolaction (Prl) and oxytocin (OT), in the pups' mothers. Gravity related differences in Prl were not observed whereas OT of lactating dams was significantly reduced relative to controls. Milk transfer from dam to pup was not impaired in hypergravity-reared litters tested at 1-g. Together, these findings suggest that impaired lactation and milk transfer do not account for reduced body masses of postnatal rats reared in hypergravity. In the present study, we analyzed growth hormone (GH) secretion and maternal licking in pups reared in hypergravity and in 1.0-g controls. Recent reports using dwarfing phenotypes in mouse mutants have provided evidence for postnatal dependence on GH and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). Beginning on Gestational day (G)11 of the rats' 22 day pregnancy, rat dams and their litters were exposed to either 1.5-g, 1.75-g or 2.0-g. On Postnatal day (P)10, we measured plasma GH using enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Contrary to our hypothesis, GH was significantly elevated in pups reared at 2.0-g relative to 1.0-g controls. Pup-oriented behaviors of the hypergravity dams were also changed, possibly accounting for the increase in pup GH. GH alone does not appear to play a role in reduced body weights of hypergravity-reared pups.

  12. Low insulin resistance after surgery predicts poor GH suppression one year after complete resection for acromegaly: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Edo, Naoki; Morita, Koji; Suzuki, Hisanori; Takeshita, Akira; Miyakawa, Megumi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shozo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-31

    Remission of acromegaly is defined as a nadir in GH <1.0 ng/mL during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (75gOGTT) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) normalization. Recently, a lower cut-off value for GH nadir (<0.4 ng/mL) has been proposed. We retrospectively evaluated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of postoperative cases with normalized IGF-1 levels and a GH nadir of 0.4-1.0 ng/mL one year after complete resection of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma (GHoma). We included 110 cases of acromegaly with complete adenoma resection, no preoperative treatment, preoperative glycosylated hemoglobin <6.5%, preoperative basal plasma glucose <126 mg/dL, GH nadir <1.0 ng/mL during a 75gOGTT, and normalized IGF-1 at the first postoperative year evaluation, whereupon patients were divided into two groups: control (GH nadir <0.4 ng/mL) and high GH (GH nadir >0.4 ng/mL). Clinical parameters, including measures of insulin secretion and resistance, were compared between groups. The high GH group included 10 patients (9.1%) and had a lesser level of insulin resistance immediately following surgery and at the first postoperative year evaluation. On single regression analysis, insulin resistance immediately following surgery was predictive of and correlated with the GH nadir at the first postoperative year evaluation. The GH nadir at the first postoperative year evaluation may be insufficient in patients with normalized IGF-1 with low insulin resistance immediately following complete resection of GHoma. Careful evaluation is needed to assess remission in such patients.

  13. Increased linear bone growth by GH in the absence of SOCS2 is independent of IGF-1.

    PubMed

    Dobie, Ross; Ahmed, Syed F; Staines, Katherine A; Pass, Chloe; Jasim, Seema; MacRae, Vicky E; Farquharson, Colin

    2015-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) signaling is essential for postnatal linear bone growth, but the relative importance of GHs actions on the liver and/or growth plate cartilage remains unclear. The importance of liver derived insulin like-growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for endochondral growth has recently been challenged. Here, we investigate linear growth in Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-2 (SOCS2) knockout mice, which have enhanced growth despite normal systemic GH/IGF-1 levels. Wild-type embryonic ex vivo metatarsals failed to exhibit increased linear growth in response to GH, but displayed increased Socs2 transcript levels (P < 0.01). In the absence of SOCS2, GH treatment enhanced metatarsal linear growth over a 12 day period. Despite this increase, IGF-1 transcript and protein levels were not increased in response to GH. In accordance with these data, IGF-1 levels were unchanged in GH-challenged postnatal Socs2(-/-) conditioned medium despite metatarsals showing enhanced linear growth. Growth-plate Igf1 mRNA levels were not elevated in juvenile Socs2(-/-) mice. GH did however elevate IGF-binding protein 3 levels in conditioned medium from GH challenged metatarsals and this was more apparent in Socs2(-/-) metatarsals. GH did not enhance the growth of Socs2(-/-) metatarsals when the IGF receptor was inhibited, suggesting that IGF receptor mediated mechanisms are required. IGF-2 may be responsible as IGF-2 promoted metatarsal growth and Igf2 expression was elevated in Socs2(-/-) (but not WT) metatarsals in response to GH. These studies emphasise the critical importance of SOCS2 in regulating GHs ability to promote bone growth. Also, GH appears to act directly on the metatarsals of Socs2(-/-) mice, promoting growth via a mechanism that is independent of IGF-1.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of β-xylanase SRXL1 of Sporisorium reilianum and its relationship with families (GH10 and GH11) of Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Cervantes, Jorge; Díaz-Godínez, Gerardo; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the amino acid sequence of the β-xylanase SRXL1 of Sporisorium reilianum, which is a pathogenic fungus of maize was used as a model protein to find its phylogenetic relationship with other xylanases of Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes and the information obtained allowed to establish a hypothesis of monophyly and of biological role. 84 amino acid sequences of β-xylanase obtained from the GenBank database was used. Groupings analysis of higher-level in the Pfam database allowed to determine that the proteins under study were classified into the GH10 and GH11 families, based on the regions of highly conserved amino acids, 233–318 and 180–193 respectively, where glutamate residues are responsible for the catalysis. PMID:27040368

  15. Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)-deficient mice allow dissociation of excess GH and IGF1 effects on glomerular and tubular growth.

    PubMed

    Blutke, Andreas; Schneider, Marlon R; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic mice with permanently elevated systemic levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) reproducibly develop renal and glomerular hypertrophy and subsequent progressive glomerulosclerosis, finally leading to terminal renal failure. To dissociate IGF1-dependent and -independent effects of GH excess on renal growth and lesion development in vivo, the kidneys of 75 days old IGF1-deficient (I(-/-)) and of IGF1-deficient GH-transgenic mice (I(-/-)/G), as well as of GH-transgenic (G) and nontransgenic wild-type control mice (I(+/+)) were examined by quantitative stereological and functional analyses. Both G and I(-/-)/G mice developed glomerular hypertrophy, hyperplasia of glomerular mesangial and endothelial cells, podocyte hypertrophy and foot process effacement, albuminuria, and glomerulosclerosis. However, I(-/-)/G mice exhibited less severe glomerular alterations, as compared to G mice. Compared to I(+/+) mice, G mice exhibited renal hypertrophy with a significant increase in the number without a change in the size of proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells. In contrast, I(-/-)/G mice did not display significant PTE cell hyperplasia, as compared to I(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that GH excess stimulates glomerular growth and induces lesions progressing to glomerulosclerosis in the absence of IGF1. In contrast, IGF1 represents an important mediator of GH-dependent proximal tubular growth in GH-transgenic mice.

  16. Effects of GH on Body Composition and Cardiovascular Risk Markers in Young Men With Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gerweck, Anu V.; Lin, Eleanor; Landa, Melissa G.; Torriani, Martin; Schoenfeld, David A.; Hemphill, Linda C.; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Visceral adiposity is associated with increased cardiometabolic risk and decreased GH secretion. Objective: Our objective was to determine the effects of GH administration in abdominally obese young men on body composition, including liver fat, mitochondrial function, and cardiovascular (CV) risk markers. Design and Participants: This was a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with 62 abdominally obese men (IGF-1 below the mean, no exclusion based on GH level), 21 to 45 years of age. Main Outcome Measures: We evaluated abdominal fat depots, thigh muscle and fat (computed tomography), fat and lean mass (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), intramyocellular and intrahepatic lipids (proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy), mitochondrial function (dynamic phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy), CV risk markers, carotid intimal-medial thickness, and endothelial function. Results: GH administration resulted in a mean IGF-1 SD score increase from −1.9 ± 0.08 to −0.2 ± 0.3 in the GH group and a decrease in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), VAT/sc adipose tissue, trunk/extremity fat, intrahepatic lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and apolipoprotein B/low-density lipoprotein vs placebo after controlling for the increase in weight observed in both groups. There were inverse associations between change in IGF-1 levels and change in VAT, VAT/sc adipose tissue, trunk fat, trunk/extremity fat, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and apolipoprotein B. Mitochondrial function improved in the GH group compared with placebo after controlling for change in glucose. There was no change in thigh fat, muscle mass, intramyocellular lipids, cholesterol, fibrinogen, intimal-medial thickness, or endothelial function. There was no increase in fasting glucose or hemoglobin A1c in the GH vs placebo group, although glucose during the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test increased slightly. Conclusion: GH replacement in abdominally obese men improves

  17. [Advances in studying microbial GH13 starch debranching enzyme--a review].

    PubMed

    Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2013-07-04

    Pullulanase and isoamylase belong to the GH13 family (glycoside hydrolase family 13) with similar sequence, catalytic mechanism and three-dimensional fold ((beta/alpha)8-barrel structure). Starch debranching enzymes can hydrolyze the alpha-1,6-glucosidic bonds at the branch sites of starch, and improve raw material utilization and production efficiency in the starch industry. In this review, the substrate specificity, protein structure, advances and new trends in the study of microbial GH13 starch debranching enzyme were systematically introduced. In addition, some opinions on the research status and prospect for starch debranching enzyme were discussed.

  18. GH, IGF-I and GH receptors mRNA expression in response to growth impairment following a food deprivation period in individually housed cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus.

    PubMed

    Delgadin, Tomás Horacio; Pérez Sirkin, Daniela Irina; Di Yorio, María Paula; Arranz, Silvia Eda; Vissio, Paula Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Cichlasoma dimerus is a social cichlid fish capable of growing at high rates under laboratory conditions, but knowledge on somatic growth regulation is still unclear. Growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis is the key regulator of somatic growth in vertebrates. Two types of growth hormone receptors have been described in teleost fish, named GH receptor type 1 (GHR1) and type 2 (GHR2). In addition, isoforms of these receptors lacking part of the intracellular region have been described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the somatic growth, liver histology and changes in the GH/IGF-I axis after 4 weeks of food deprivation in C. dimerus. Four-week fasted fish showed reductions in specific growth rates in body weight (p < 0.001) and standard length (p < 0.001). Additionally, the hepatosomatic index (p < 0.001) and hepatocyte area (p < 0.001) decreased in fasted fish, while no changes in glucose levels were detected in plasma. The starvation protocol failed to induce changes in GH mRNA levels in the pituitary and IGF-I mRNA levels in liver. In contrast, IGF-I mRNA levels in muscle decreased in fasted fish (p = 0.002). On the other hand, GHR2 (detected with primer sets designed over the extracellular and intracellular region) was upregulated by starvation both in liver and muscle (p < 0.05), while GHR1 remained unchanged. These results show that a fasting period reduced somatic growth both in length and body weight concomitantly with alterations on liver and muscle GHR2 and muscle IGF-I mRNA expression.

  19. Distinct Roles for Carbohydrate-Binding Modules of Glycoside Hydrolase 10 (GH10) and GH11 Xylanases from Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain F32 in Thermostability and Catalytic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Dong-Dong; Ying, Yu; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Lu, Ming; Ning, Kang; Wang, Lu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Xylanases are crucial for lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction and generally contain noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) accessing recalcitrant polymers. Understanding how multimodular enzymes assemble can benefit protein engineering by aiming at accommodating various environmental conditions. Two multimodular xylanases, XynA and XynB, which belong to glycoside hydrolase families 11 (GH11) and GH10, respectively, have been identified from Caldicellulosiruptor sp. strain F32. In this study, both xylanases and their truncated mutants were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. GH11 XynATM1 lacking CBM exhibited a considerable improvement in specific activity (215.8 U nmol−1 versus 94.7 U nmol−1) and thermal stability (half-life of 48 h versus 5.5 h at 75°C) compared with those of XynA. However, GH10 XynB showed higher enzyme activity and thermostability than its truncated mutant without CBM. Site-directed mutagenesis of N-terminal amino acids resulted in a mutant, XynATM1-M, with 50% residual activity improvement at 75°C for 48 h, revealing that the disordered region influenced protein thermostability negatively. The thermal stability of both xylanases and their truncated mutants were consistent with their melting temperature (Tm), which was determined by using differential scanning calorimetry. Through homology modeling and cross-linking analysis, we demonstrated that for XynB, the resistance against thermoinactivation generally was enhanced through improving both domain properties and interdomain interactions, whereas for XynA, no interdomain interactions were observed. Optimized intramolecular interactions can accelerate thermostability, which provided microbes a powerful evolutionary strategy to assemble catalysts that are adapted to various ecological conditions. PMID:25576604

  20. Haplotype C of growth hormone (GH) gene in Japanese Black cattle: structure of GH protein and a novel method for detection of the gene.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Abolfazl; Ardiyanti, Astrid; Tonosaki, Kaoru; Suzuki, Keiichi; Tanida, Nanako; Hirayama, Takuji; Roh, Sang-Gun; Nishio, Takeshi; Katoh, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    From a series of studies on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the bovine growth hormone (GH) gene of Japanese Black cattle, the type-C (127(Val) and 172(Met) ) that is specific for this breed has been intensively focused upon because of the economic importance for carcass traits, such as intramuscular oleic acid contents. In the present study, we intended to analyze the 3-D structure of GH of haplotype C, and developed a novel method to detect the type C gene. Three-D analysis of the type C protein showed that the amino acid residues (127(Val) and 172(Met) ), which are present in the third and fourth helixes, respectively, and are important for binding with GH receptors, are shifted to deeper positions in the molecule compared with that for type A (127(Leu) and 172(Thr) ), implying the alteration of binding interaction with receptors. A novel, efficient and cost-effective method (Dot-blot-SNP technique) for type C genotyping was successfully established, of which the basal method was a reported genotyping of SNPs for a large number of plants, reducing the cost to 10% or less of direct sequencing.

  1. Lack of association of progestin-induced cystic endometrial hyperplasia with GH gene expression in the canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, H S; Okkens, A C; Mol, J A; van Garderen, E; Kirpensteijn, J; Rijnberk, A

    1997-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is produced in progestin-induced hyperplastic ductular mammary epithelia in dogs. Progestins also induce the development of cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH) in this species. The study reported here investigated whether GH gene expression could also be demonstrated in progestin-induced hyperplastic epithelium in the canine uterus. Eight beagle bitches were treated with 10 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) kg-1 body mass s.c. at intervals of 3 weeks, for a total of five times in four dogs (group I) and for a total of 13 times in the other four dogs (group II). Blood samples were collected twice during each 3 week period for measurement of plasma concentrations of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-II. At the end of the series of injections uterine tissue was obtained by ovario-hysterectomy. Histological examination confirmed that CEH was present in all uteri after MPA treatment; the changes in the dogs of group I were less marked than those in group II. Immunohistochemical examination of the uterine tissues showed that immunoreactive(i) GH was present in a number of uteri with CEH. iGH was usually located in the cytoplasm of glandular epithelial cells. However, reverse transcriptase PCR using GH-specific primers failed to demonstrate mRNA encoding GH in the uterine tissue of all dogs. It is concluded that local production of GH is not involved in progestin-induced hyperplasia of uterine epithelial cells in dogs.

  2. GhABF2, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought and salinity tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengzhen; Meng, Zhaohong; Meng, Zhigang; Malik, Waqas; Yan, Rong; Lwin, Khin Myat; Lin, Fazhuang; Wang, Yuan; Sun, Guoqing; Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Li, Jianying; Jin, Shuangxia; Guo, Sandui; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The bZIP transcription factor (TF) act as an important regulator for the abscisic acid (ABA) mediated abiotic stresses signaling pathways in plants. Here, we reported the cloning and characterization of GhABF2, encoding for typical cotton bZIP TF. Overexpression of GhABF2 significantly improved drought and salt stress tolerance both in Arabidopsis and cotton. However, silencing of GhABF2 made transgenic cotton sensitive to PEG osmotic and salt stress. Expression of GhABF2 was induced by drought and ABA treatments but repressed by high salinity. Transcriptome analysis indicated that GhABF2 increases drought and salt tolerance by regulating genes related to ABA, drought and salt response. The proline contents, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also significantly increased in GhABF2-overexpression cottons in comparison to wild type after drought and salt treatment. Further, an increase in fiber yield under drought and saline-alkali wetland exhibited the important role of GhABF2 in enhancing the drought and salt tolerance in transgenic lines. In conclusion, manipulation of GhABF2 by biotechnological tools could be a sustainable strategy to deploy drought and salt tolerance in cotton. PMID:27713524

  3. High purity recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) expression in Escherichia coli under phoA promoter.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Jiang, Jingxin; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-07-26

    ABSTACT Recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) is an important protein for human growth and is in high demand in clinics. Hence, it is necessary to develop an efficient fermentation process to produce highly pure rhGH. In this study, rhGH was expressed in Escherichia coli under alkaline phosphatase (phoA) promoter. The cultivation conditions for high expression level and purity of rhGH were investigated. The best initial phosphate concentration for rhGH expression, out of the 4 levels of initial phosphate concentration tests performed, was 12.6 mmol/L. Subsequently, 2 fed-batch cultivations under low dissolved oxygen (DO) (0% - 10%) and high DO (20% - 30%) conditions were carried out. High purity rhGH (92%) was obtained from 20% - 30% DO-stat cultivation, although the biomass did not show any significant difference. In summary, this research provided an efficient fermentation process for high purity rhGH production from E. coli under phoA promoter, which can lower the production and purification costs for large-scale production of rhGH.

  4. Preparation and in vivo evaluation of PCADK/PLGA microspheres for improving stability and efficacy of rhGH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Yu, Changhui; Liu, Jiaxin; Teng, Lesheng; Sun, Fengying; Li, Youxin

    2015-11-30

    The goal of this research is to prepare poly(cyclohexane-1,4 diyl acetone dimethylene ketal) (PCADK)/poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) blend microspheres loaded with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). The effect of PCADK degradation products on the structural integrity, secondary and tertiary structure and pharmacodynamics of rhGH was evaluated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE), size-exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and in hypophysectomized rat models. Compared with PLGA degradation products, rhGH was found to be more stable in the presence of PCADK degradation products. PCADK/PLGA blend microspheres were then prepared and the morphology, encapsulation efficiency, release behavior and rhGH stability were investigated. PCADK/PLGA microspheres had regular shapes and smooth surfaces when the proportion of PCADK was less than 50%. The late-releasable amount of rhGH in PCADK/PLGA microspheres was greater than that in PLGA microspheres. In addition, the PCADK/PLGA microspheres showed larger AUC and improved therapeutic effects on rats than PLGA microspheres. Furthermore, the pH inside the microspheres was detected by CLSM to explain the improved rhGH stability in the PCADK/PLGA microspheres. In conclusion, PCADK/PLGA blend microspheres showed potential to improve rhGH stability and the efficacy of sustained-release of rhGH compared with PLGA microspheres.

  5. GH indirectly enhances the regeneration of transgenic zebrafish fins through IGF2a and IGF2b.

    PubMed

    Nornberg, Bruna Félix; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Figueiredo, Márcio Azevedo; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    The somatotropic axis, composed essentially of the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), is the main regulator of somatic growth in vertebrates. However, these protein hormones are also involved in various other major physiological processes. Although the importance of IGFs in mechanisms involving tissue regeneration has already been established, little is known regarding the direct effects of GH in these processes. In this study, we used a transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model, which overexpresses GH from the beta-actin constitutive promoter. The regenerative ability of the caudal fin was assessed after repeated amputations, as well as the expression of genes related to the GH/IGF axis. The results revealed that GH overexpression increased the regenerated area of the caudal fin in transgenic fish after the second amputation. Transgenic fish also presented a decrease in gene expression of the GH receptor (ghrb), in opposition to the increased expression of the IGF1 receptors (igf1ra and igf1rb). These results suggest that transgenic fish have a higher sensitivity to IGFs than to GH during fin regeneration. With respect to the different IGFs produced locally, a decrease in igf1a expression and a significant increase in both igf2a and igf2b expression was observed, suggesting that igf1a is not directly involved in fin regeneration. Overall, the results revealed that excess GH enhances fin regeneration in zebrafish through igf2a and igf2b expression, acting indirectly on this major physiological process.

  6. Quality of Life and Psychological Well-Being in GH-Treated, Adult PWS Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertella, L.; Mori, I.; Grugni, G.; Pignatti, R.; Ceriani, F.; Molinari, E.; Ceccarelli, A.; Sartorio, A.; Vettor, R.; Semenza, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a congenital alteration of chromosome pair 15. It is characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, behavioural and emotional disturbances, hypogonadism and partial Growth Hormone (GH) deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of GH treatment on the…

  7. Physcomitrella patens auxin conjugate synthetase (GH3) double knockout mutants are more resistant to Pythium infection than wild type.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jennifer; Šola, Ivana; Rusak, Gordana; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Auxin homeostasis is involved in many different plant developmental and stress responses. The auxin amino acid conjugate synthetases belonging to the GH3 family play major roles in the regulation of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels and the moss Physcomitrella patens has two GH3 genes in its genome. A role for IAA in several angiosperm--pathogen interactions was reported, however, in a moss--oomycete pathosystem it had not been published so far. Using GH3 double knockout lines we have investigated the role of auxin homeostasis during the infection of P. patens with the two oomycete species, Pythium debaryanum and Pythium irregulare. We show that infection with P. debaryanum caused stronger disease symptoms than with P. irregulare. Also, P. patens lines harboring fusion constructs of an auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) with a reporter (ß-glucuronidase) showed higher promoter induction after P. debaryanum infection than after P. irregulare, indicating a differential induction of the auxin response. Free IAA was induced upon P. debaryanum infection in wild type by 1.6-fold and in two GH3 double knockout (GH3-doKO) mutants by 4- to 5-fold. All GH3-doKO lines showed a reduced disease symptom progression compared to wild type. Since P. debaryanum can be inhibited in growth on medium containing IAA, these data might indicate that endogenous high auxin levels in P. patens GH3-doKO mutants lead to higher resistance against the oomycete.

  8. Up-regulation of hepatic receptor for growth hormone in the flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) after oral administration with exogenous GH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zong-Zhu; Wang, Jin-Bao; Xu, Yong-Li; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Pei-Jun

    2001-06-01

    The iodination efficiency of salmon GH(sGH) was 38.82%, using a modification of the chloramine-T method. The specific activity of the125I-sGH was about 40 μCi/μg protein. The results of binding assay showed a single class of high affinity and low-capacity binding site in flounder liver. Long-term administration with exogenous GH can induce the up-regulation of hepatic GH receptor in total binding capacity though there was no significant difference in capacity of free binding sites of livers from control and experimental fish, this result also indicated that the liver from experimental fish, compared to that from control fish, had more occupied binding sites.

  9. Increased linear bone growth by GH in the absence of SOCS2 is independent of IGF‐1

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, Ross; Ahmed, Syed F.; Staines, Katherine A.; Pass, Chloe; Jasim, Seema; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) signaling is essential for postnatal linear bone growth, but the relative importance of GHs actions on the liver and/or growth plate cartilage remains unclear. The importance of liver derived insulin like‐growth factor‐1 (IGF‐1) for endochondral growth has recently been challenged. Here, we investigate linear growth in Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling‐2 (SOCS2) knockout mice, which have enhanced growth despite normal systemic GH/IGF‐1 levels. Wild‐type embryonic ex vivo metatarsals failed to exhibit increased linear growth in response to GH, but displayed increased Socs2 transcript levels (P < 0.01). In the absence of SOCS2, GH treatment enhanced metatarsal linear growth over a 12 day period. Despite this increase, IGF‐1 transcript and protein levels were not increased in response to GH. In accordance with these data, IGF‐1 levels were unchanged in GH‐challenged postnatal Socs2‐/‐ conditioned medium despite metatarsals showing enhanced linear growth. Growth‐plate Igf1 mRNA levels were not elevated in juvenile Socs2‐/‐ mice. GH did however elevate IGF‐binding protein 3 levels in conditioned medium from GH challenged metatarsals and this was more apparent in Socs2‐/‐ metatarsals. GH did not enhance the growth of Socs2‐/‐ metatarsals when the IGF receptor was inhibited, suggesting that IGF receptor mediated mechanisms are required. IGF‐2 may be responsible as IGF‐2 promoted metatarsal growth and Igf2 expression was elevated in Socs2‐/‐ (but not WT) metatarsals in response to GH. These studies emphasise the critical importance of SOCS2 in regulating GHs ability to promote bone growth. Also, GH appears to act directly on the metatarsals of Socs2‐/‐ mice, promoting growth via a mechanism that is independent of IGF‐1. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 2796–2806, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25833299

  10. Spatially Resolved Species Measurements in a GO2/GH2 Propellant Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foust, M. J.; Ni, T.; Santoro, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the current work is to develop an non-intrusive technique to experimentally determine the major species and temperature field in the combustion chamber of a uni-element rocket for a GO2/GH2 propellant combination.

  11. Acyl Ghrelin Induces Insulin Resistance Independently of GH, Cortisol, and Free Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Esben T.; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin produced in the gut stimulates GH and ACTH secretion from the pituitary and also stimulates appetite and gastric emptying. We have shown that ghrelin also induces insulin resistance via GH-independent mechanisms, but it is unknown if this effect depends on ambient fatty acid (FFA) levels. We investigated the impact of ghrelin and pharmacological antilipolysis (acipimox) on insulin sensitivity and substrate metabolism in 8 adult hypopituitary patients on stable replacement with GH and hydrocortisone using a 2 × 2 factorial design: Ghrelin infusion, saline infusion, ghrelin plus short-term acipimox, and acipimox alone. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was determined with a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp in combination with a glucose tracer infusion. Insulin signaling was assayed in muscle biopsies. Peripheral insulin sensitivity was reduced by ghrelin independently of ambient FFA concentrations and was increased by acipimox independently of ghrelin. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was increased by acipimox. Insulin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle were not consistently regulated by ghrelin. Our data demonstrate that ghrelin induces peripheral insulin resistance independently of GH, cortisol, and FFA. The molecular mechanisms remain elusive, but we speculate that ghrelin is a hitherto unrecognized direct regulator of substrate metabolism. We also suggest that acipimox per se improves hepatic insulin sensitivity. PMID:28198428

  12. The kidneys play a central role in the clearance of rhGH in rats.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Bill; Thygesen, Peter; Kreilgaard, Mads; Fels, Johannes Josef; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Agersø, Henrik

    2016-04-30

    The kidneys are thought to play an important role in the clearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), but the relative importance is not clear. Obtaining knowledge of clearance pathway is an important prerequisite for the development of new long acting growth hormone analogues targeted at treatment of patients with growth hormone disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative importance of the kidneys in the clearance of rhGH. The study employed a newly validated nephrectomy rat model and a population based pharmacokinetic approach to assess renal clearance of rhGH in non-anesthetized rats, anesthetized rats and in nephrectomized anesthetized rats. Clearance in non-anesthetized rats was 290 ml/h/kg. This was reduced to 185 ml/h/kg by anesthesia and further reduced to 18 ml/h/kg by nephrectomy. As nephrectomy was able to reduce clearance with 90%, we conclude that renal clearance plays a pivotal role in the elimination of rhGH in rats.

  13. Genome Sequence of a Spontaneous Nonhemolytic Mutant of Mannheimia haemolytica 16041065 GH

    PubMed Central

    Ayalew, Sahlu; Confer, Anthony W.; Hansen, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequence of a spontaneous nonhemolytic mutant of Mannheimia haemolytica 16041065 GH. This mutant arose during routine passage and was devoid of hemolytic activity on standard blood agars. This genome sequence had a total size of 2.7 Mb with an N50 of 117 kb. PMID:28385858

  14. Mechanism of Prostate Cancer Prevention by Down-Regulation of the GH/IGF Axis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    inhibiting death in prostate cancer cells. The first aim was to determine which of the multiple signaling pathways stimulated by GH receptor are required to...each representing one fourth of the offspring ; i.e., approximately half of the total offspring were available for the study). Mice were housed singly

  15. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of five GhRAXs in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Dai, T C; Wang, Z M

    2015-10-05

    The formation of axillary meristems in leaf axils is a prerequisite for the development of lateral shoots, which largely contribute to plant architecture. Several transcription factor-encoding genes, including CUC3, RAX, LAS, LOF1, and ROX, have been cloned by screening for axillary meristem mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. These genes will facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms underlying axillary meristem development. In this study, we report the cloning of five genes from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) that are orthologous to A. thaliana REGULATORS OFAXILLARY MERISTEMS (RAX) and tomato Blind (Bl), and they are designated GhRAX1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Sequence analyses indicated that all five genes shared conserved protein domains with RAX and Bl. Phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences revealed that GhRAX2/3/4 were close to RAX1, whereas GhRAX1 and GhRAX5 were close to RAX3. Expression patterns of these genes in different tissues were also analyzed using real-time PCR.

  16. Cotton GhBAK1 Mediates Verticillium Wilt Resistance and Cell DeathF

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiquan; Li, Fangjun; Li, Maoying; Kianinejad, Ali S.; Dever, Jane K.; Wheeler, Terry A.; Li, Zhaohu; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) offers a powerful approach for functional analysis of individual genes by knocking down their expression. We have adopted this approach to dissect gene functions in cotton resistant to Verticillium wilt, one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. We showed here that highly efficient VIGS was obtained in a cotton breeding line (CA4002) with partial resistance to Verticillium wilt, and GhMKK2 and GhVe1 are required for its resistance to Verticillium wilt. Arabidopsis AtBAK1/SERK3, a central regulator in plant disease resistance, belongs to a subfamily of somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) with five members, AtSERK1 to AtSERK5. Two BAK1 orthologs and one SERK1 ortholog were identified in the cotton genome. Importantly, GhBAK1 is required for CA4002 resistance to Verticillium wilt. Surprisingly, silencing of GhBAK1 is sufficient to trigger cell death accompanied with production of reactive oxygen species in cotton. This result is distinct from Arabidopsis in which AtBAK1 and AtSERK4 play redundant functions in cell death control. Apparently, cotton has only evolved SERK1 and BAK1 whereas AtSERK4/5 are newly evolved genes in Arabidopsis. Our studies indicate the functional importance of BAK1 in Verticillium wilt resistance and suggest the dynamic evolution of SERK family members in different plant species. PMID:23675706

  17. IGF-I modulation of GH and LH secretion in the pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three experiments (EXP) were conducted to determine the role of IGF-I in modulating GH and LH secretion. In EXP I, prepuberal gilts, 65 ± 6 kg body weight (BW) and 140 days of age received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of saline (n = 4), 25µg (n = 4) or 75µg (n = 4) IGF-I and jugular blo...

  18. Cotton GhBAK1 mediates Verticillium wilt resistance and cell death.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiquan; Li, Fangjun; Li, Maoying; Kianinejad, Ali S; Dever, Jane K; Wheeler, Terry A; Li, Zhaohu; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2013-07-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) offers a powerful approach for functional analysis of individual genes by knocking down their expression. We have adopted this approach to dissect gene functions in cotton resistant to Verticillium wilt, one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. We showed here that highly efficient VIGS was obtained in a cotton breeding line (CA4002) with partial resistance to Verticillium wilt, and GhMKK2 and GhVe1 are required for its resistance to Verticillium wilt. Arabidopsis AtBAK1/SERK3, a central regulator in plant disease resistance, belongs to a subfamily of somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) with five members, AtSERK1 to AtSERK5. Two BAK1 orthologs and one SERK1 ortholog were identified in the cotton genome. Importantly, GhBAK1 is required for CA4002 resistance to Verticillium wilt. Surprisingly, silencing of GhBAK1 is sufficient to trigger cell death accompanied with production of reactive oxygen species in cotton. This result is distinct from Arabidopsis in which AtBAK1 and AtSERK4 play redundant functions in cell death control. Apparently, cotton has only evolved SERK1 and BAK1 whereas AtSERK4/5 are newly evolved genes in Arabidopsis. Our studies indicate the functional importance of BAK1 in Verticillium wilt resistance and suggest the dynamic evolution of SERK family members in different plant species.

  19. Mechanism of Prostate Cancer Prevention by Down-Regulation of the GH/IGF Axis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that growth hormone (GH) stimulates specific pathways, some of which are independent of IGF-I...IGF-I is the major driver of carcinogenesis. We also planned to propagate human prostate cancer cells in vitro and expose them to a human growth hormone antagonist

  20. GH1-family 6-P-β-glucosidases from human microbiome lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Karolina; Tan, Kemin; Li, Hui; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    In lactic acid bacteria and other bacteria, carbohydrate uptake is mostly governed by phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs). PTS-dependent translocation through the cell membrane is coupled with phosphorylation of the incoming sugar. After translocation through the bacterial membrane, the β-glycosidic bond in 6′-­P-­β-glucoside is cleaved, releasing 6-P-β-glucose and the respective aglycon. This reaction is catalyzed by 6-P-β-glucosidases, which belong to two glycoside hydrolase (GH) families: GH1 and GH4. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of GH1 6-P-β-glucosidases from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPbg1) and Streptococcus mutans (SmBgl) and their complexes with ligands are reported. Both enzymes show hydrolytic activity towards 6′-P-β-glucosides. The LpPbg1 structure has been determined in an apo form as well as in a complex with phosphate and a glucose molecule corresponding to the aglycon molecule. The S. mutans homolog contains a sulfate ion in the phosphate-dedicated subcavity. SmBgl was also crystallized in the presence of the reaction product 6-P-β-glucose. For a mutated variant of the S. mutans enzyme (E375Q), the structure of a 6′-P-salicin complex has also been determined. The presence of natural ligands enabled the definition of the structural elements that are responsible for substrate recognition during catalysis. PMID:23519420

  1. Biochemical characterization of a GH43 ß-xylosidase from Bacteroides ovatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Divalent-metal-activated, glycoside hydrolase (GH43) ß-xylosidases have been found to have high kcat/Km for xylooligosaccharides and may demonstrate high efficacy in industrial reactors digesting hemicellulose. By searching an amino acid database, we found an enzyme that is 81% identical in amino ac...

  2. Food intake and appetite control in a GH-transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dalmolin, Camila; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The biological actions of growth hormone (GH) are pleiotropic, including growth promotion, energy mobilization, gonadal development, appetite, and social behavior. The regulatory network for GH is complex and includes many central and peripheral endocrine factors as well as that from the environment. It is known that GH transgenesis results in increased growth, food intake, and consequent metabolic rates in fishes. However, the manner in which GH transgenesis alters the energetic metabolism in fishes has not been well explored. In order to elucidate these consequences, we examined the effect of GH overexpression on appetite control mechanisms in a transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. To this, we analyzed feeding behavior and the expression of the main appetite-related genes in two different feeding periods (fed and fasting) in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic (T) zebrafish as well as glycaemic parameters of them. Our initial results have shown that NT males and females present the same feeding behavior and expression of main appetite-controlling genes; therefore, the data of both sexes were properly grouped. Following grouped data analyses, we compared the same parameters in NT and T animals. Feeding behavior results have shown that T animals eat significantly more and faster than NT siblings. Gene expression results pointed out that gastrointestinal (GT) cholecystokinin has a substantial contribution to the communication between peripheral and central control of food intake. Brain genes expression analyses revealed that T animals have a down-regulation of two strong and opposite peptides related to food intake: the anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (pomc) and the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (npy). The down-regulation of pomc in T when compared with NT is an expected result, since the decrease in an anorexigenic factor might keep the transgenic fish hungry. The down-regulation of npy seemed to be contradictory at first, but if we consider the GH's capacity to

  3. A study of the mechanism of laser welding defects in low thermal expansion superalloy GH909

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Fei; Wang, Chunming Wang, Yajun; Hu, Xiyuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Li, Jianmin; Li, Guozhu

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we describe experimental laser welding of low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909. The main welding defects of GH909 by laser in the weld are liquation cracks and porosities, including hydrogen and carbon monoxide porosity. The forming mechanism of laser welding defects was investigated. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum, X-ray diffractometer and other methodologies. The results demonstrated that porosities appearing in the central weld were related to incomplete removal of oxide film on the surface of the welding samples. The porosities produced by these bubbles were formed as a result of residual hydrogen or oxygenium in the weld. These elements failed to escape from the weld since laser welding has both a rapid welding speed and cooling rate. The emerging crack in the heat affected zone is a liquation crack and extends along the grain boundary as a result of composition segregation. Laves–Ni{sub 2}Ti phase with low melting point is a harmful phase, and the stress causes grain boundaries to liquefy, migrate and even crack. Removing the oxides on the surface of the samples before welding and carefully controlling technological parameters can reduce welding defects and improve formation of the GH909 alloy weld. - Highlights: ► It is a new process for the forming of GH909 alloy via laser welding. ► The forming mechanism of laser welding defects in GH909 has been studied. ► It may be a means to improve the efficiency of aircraft engine production.

  4. Computational Design of Experiment Unveils the Conformational Reaction Coordinate of GH125 α-Mannosidases.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Gil, Santiago; Males, Alexandra; Fernandes, Pearl Z; Williams, Spencer J; Davies, Gideon J; Rovira, Carme

    2017-01-25

    Conformational analysis of enzyme-catalyzed mannoside hydrolysis has revealed two predominant conformational itineraries through B2,5 or (3)H4 transition-state (TS) conformations. A prominent unassigned catalytic itinerary is that of exo-1,6-α-mannosidases belonging to CAZy family 125. A published complex of Clostridium perfringens GH125 enzyme with a nonhydrolyzable 1,6-α-thiomannoside substrate mimic bound across the active site revealed an undistorted (4)C1 conformation and provided no insight into the catalytic pathway of this enzyme. We show through a purely computational approach (QM/MM metadynamics) that sulfur-for-oxygen substitution in the glycosidic linkage fundamentally alters the energetically accessible conformational space of a thiomannoside when bound within the GH125 active site. Modeling of the conformational free energy landscape (FEL) of a thioglycoside strongly favors a mechanistically uninformative (4)C1 conformation within the GH125 enzyme active site, but the FEL of corresponding O-glycoside substrate reveals a preference for a Michaelis complex in an (O)S2 conformation (consistent with catalysis through a B2,5 TS). This prediction was tested experimentally by determination of the 3D X-ray structure of the pseudo-Michaelis complex of an inactive (D220N) variant of C. perfringens GH125 enzyme in complex with 1,6-α-mannobiose. This complex revealed unambiguous distortion of the -1 subsite mannoside to an (O)S2 conformation, matching that predicted by theory and supporting an (O)S2 → B2,5 → (1)S5 conformational itinerary for GH125 α-mannosidases. This work highlights the power of the QM/MM approach and identified shortcomings in the use of nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues for conformational analysis of enzyme-bound species.

  5. Clinical and morphological features of undifferentiated monomorphous GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Skorić, T; Korsić, M; Zarković, K; Plavsić, V; Besenski, N; Breskovac, L; Giljević, Z; Paladino, J

    1999-06-01

    A 41-year-old male presented with progressive visual defects, acromegaly and hyperthyroidism. After clinical evaluation a giant GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma was diagnosed. Administration of the somatostatin analog octreotide at doses of 150 microg s.c. per day inhibited the secretion of both GH and TSH. A three-week treatment with octreotide prior to surgery led to slight visual improvement and CT scan showed some new necrotic areas within the tumor mass. Transcranial surgery was performed. By immunohistochemical analyses of the adenoma tissue GH, prolactin and beta-chorionic gonadotropin were detected; TSH was negative. Electron microscopy revealed an undifferentiated, monomorphous adenoma with morphological features of an acidophil stem cell adenoma such as the presence of misplaced exocytoses, fibrous bodies and mitochondrial gigantism. However, the tumor cells contained small secretory granules (up to 250 nm) accumulated along the cell membrane characteristic of thyrotrope cells. Furthermore, some adenoma cells were fusiform with long cytoplasmic processes resembling thyrotropes. Two months after the operation CT scan revealed a large residual tumor. Serum GH and TSH levels had increased again and the TSH level was even higher than before the treatment. The patient died suddenly, most probably of lethal arrhythmia. Specimens of the adenoma tissue obtained at autopsy confirmed the previous findings with the exception of positive immunostaining for TSH which was found in less than 1% of the adenoma cells. This undifferentiated, monomorphous GH/TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma represents an entity that is unusual both in its ultrastructural features and clinical manifestations suggesting a cytogenesis from an early, undifferentiated stem cell.

  6. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706) of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain. PMID:27935841

  7. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2016-11-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706) of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain.

  8. Thyroliberin (TRH) induced growth hormone (GH) release: test of maturation of hypothalamo-pituitary axis in postnatal rat.

    PubMed

    Strbák, V; Jurcovicová, J; Vigas, M

    1981-12-01

    Small doses of TRH elicit GH release from rat pituitary provided the pituitary lacks CNS influences (e.g. in vitro or in ectopic pituitaries). We have found previously that hypothalamic regulation of TSH secretion matures between the 5th and 12th postnatal day. Therefore the possibility of TRH induced GH release was investigated in neonatal rats. GH concentration was measured by RIA at 10 min after s.c. TRH administration (4.1 pmol g-1 BW) into female Wistar rats at the age 3, 9, 12, 15, 21, 30 and 100 days. Control animals were injected the same volume (1 microliter g-1 BW) of saline. Serum GH in saline treated animals gradually decreased during postnatal ontogenesis. The TRH induced increase of serum GH level decreased during maturation: the most marked response was found at 3 days, it was somewhat lessened but still significant at 9 days and was absent in 12, 15, 30 days old and adult animals. Surprisingly, in 21 days old animals the increase of GH after TRH administration was again present. We conclude that the ability of TRH to elicit GH release in newborn rats may depend on the maturity of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. The effect of hypothalamic somatostatin is likely to inhibit such a response at the pituitary level in older rats.

  9. A novel GH secretagogue, A233, exhibits enhanced growth activity and innate immune system stimulation in teleosts fish.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Rebeca; Ubieta, Kenia; Herrera, Fidel; Forellat, Alina; Morales, Reynold; de la Nuez, Ania; Rodriguez, Rolando; Reyes, Osvaldo; Oliva, Ayme; Estrada, Mario P

    2012-09-01

    In teleosts fish, secretion of GH is regulated by several hypothalamic factors that are influenced by the physiological state of the animal. There is an interaction between immune and endocrine systems through hormones and cytokines. GH in fish is involved in many physiological processes that are not overtly growth related, such as saltwater osmoregulation, antifreeze synthesis, and the regulation of sexual maturation and immune functions. This study was conducted to characterize a decapeptide compound A233 (GKFDLSPEHQ) designed by molecular modeling to evaluate its function as a GH secretagogue (GHS). In pituitary cell culture, the peptide A233 induces GH secretion and it is also able to increase superoxide production in tilapia head-kidney leukocyte cultures. This effect is blocked by preincubation with the GHS receptor antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP6. Immunoneutralization of GH by addition of anti-tilapia GH monoclonal antibody blocked the stimulatory effect of A233 on superoxide production. These experiments propose a GH-mediated mechanism for the action of A233. The in vivo biological action of the decapeptide was also demonstrated for growth stimulation in goldfish and tilapia larvae (P<0.001). Superoxide dismutase levels, antiprotease activity, and lectin titer were enhanced in tilapia larvae treated with this novel molecule. The decapeptide A233 designed by molecular modeling is able to function as a GHS in teleosts and enhance parameters of the innate immune system in the fish larvae.

  10. GH51 Arabinofuranosidase and Its Role in the Methylglucuronoarabinoxylan Utilization System in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Methylglucuronoarabinoxylan (MeGAXn) from agricultural residues and energy crops is a significant yet underutilized biomass resource for production of biofuels and chemicals. Mild thermochemical pretreatment of bagasse yields MeGAXn requiring saccharifying enzymes for conversion to fermentable sugars. A xylanolytic bacterium, Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, produces an extracellular cell-associated GH10 endoxylanse (XynA1) which efficiently depolymerizes methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) from hardwoods coupled with assimilation of oligosaccharides for further processing by intracellular GH67 α-glucuronidase, GH10 endoxylanase, and GH43 β-xylosidase. This process has been ascribed to genes that comprise a xylan utilization regulon that encodes XynA1 and includes a gene cluster encoding transcriptional regulators, ABC transporters, and intracellular enzymes that convert assimilated oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. Here we show that Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 utilized MeGAXn without accumulation of oligosaccharides in the medium. The Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 growth rate on MeGAXn was 3.1-fold greater than that on oligosaccharides generated from MeGAXn by XynA1. Candidate genes encoding GH51 arabinofuranosidases with potential roles were identified. Following growth on MeGAXn, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR identified a cluster of genes encoding a GH51 arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and transcriptional regulators which were coordinately expressed along with the genes comprising the xylan utilization regulon. The action of XynA1 on MeGAXn generated arabinoxylobiose, arabinoxylotriose, xylobiose, xylotriose, and methylglucuronoxylotriose. Recombinant AbfB processed arabinoxylooligosaccharides to xylooligosaccharides and arabinose. MeGAXn processing by Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 may be achieved by extracellular depolymerization by XynA1 coupled to assimilation of oligosaccharides and further processing by intracellular enzymes, including AbfB. Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2

  11. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  12. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Gilfoyle, David; Christoffersen, Eva Dam; Mortensen, Eva; Leff, Jonathan A; Beckert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose) to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week) or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses) for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  13. The GIP/GIPR axis is functionally linked to GH-secretion increase in a significant proportion of gsp(-) somatotropinomas.

    PubMed

    Regazzo, Daniela; Losa, Marco; Albiger, Nora; Terreni, Maria Rosa; Vazza, Giovanni; Ceccato, Filippo; Emanuelli, Enzo; Denaro, Luca; Scaroni, Carla; Occhi, Gianluca

    2017-02-08

    Objective: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPR) overexpression has been recently described in a proportion of gsp(-) somatotropinomas and suggested to be associated with the paradoxical increase of GH (GH-PI) during an oral glucose load. Design and Methods: This study was aimed at linking the GIP/GIPR pathway to GH secretion in 25 somatotropinomas-derived primary cultures and correlating molecular with clinical features in acromegalic patients. Given the impairment of the GIPR/GIPR axis in acromegaly, an additional aim was to assess the effect of GH/IGF-1 stimulation on GIP expression in the enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. Results: nearly 80% of GIPR-expressing somatotropinomas, all of them negative for gsp mutations, show increased GH secretion upon GIP stimulation, higher sensitivity to forskolin but not to somatostatin analogues. Beside increased frequency of GH-PI, GIPR overexpression does not appear to affect acromegalic patients' clinical features. In STC-1 cells transfected with GIP promoter-driven luciferase vector, IGF-1 but not GH induced dose-dependent increase in luciferase activity. Conclusions: we demonstrate that GIPR mediates the GH-PI in a significant proportion of gsp(-) acromegalic patients. In these cases the stimulatory effect of IGF-I on GIP promoter support the hypothesis of a functional GH-IGF1-GIP axis. Further studies based on larger cohorts and the development of a stable transgenic model with inducible GIPR overexpression targeted to pituitary somatotroph lineage will be mandatory to establish the real role of GIPR in the pathogenesis of somatotropinomas.

  14. A microarray gene analysis of peripheral whole blood in normal adult male rats after long-term GH gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Tian, Ya-Ping

    2010-06-01

    The main aims of this study were to determine the effects of GH gene abuse/misuse in normal animals and to discover genes that could be used as candidate biomarkers for the detection of GH gene therapy abuse/misuse in humans. We determined the global gene expression profile of peripheral whole blood from normal adult male rats after long-term GH gene therapy using CapitalBio 27 K Rat Genome Oligo Arrays. Sixty one genes were found to be differentially expressed in GH gene-treated rats 24 weeks after receiving GH gene therapy, at a two-fold higher or lower level compared to the empty vector group (p < 0.05). These genes were mainly associated with angiogenesis, oncogenesis, apoptosis, immune networks, signaling pathways, general metabolism, type I diabetes mellitus, carbon fixation, cell adhesion molecules, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. The results imply that exogenous GH gene expression in normal subjects is likely to induce cellular changes in the metabolism, signal pathways and immunity. A real-time qRT-PCR analysis of a selection of the genes confirmed the microarray data. Eight differently expressed genes were selected as candidate biomarkers from among these 61 genes. These 8 showed five-fold higher or lower expression levels after the GH gene transduction (p < 0.05). They were then validated in real-time PCR experiments using 15 single-treated blood samples and 10 control blood samples. In summary, we detected the gene expression profiles of rat peripheral whole blood after long-term GH gene therapy and screened eight genes as candidate biomarkers based on the microarray data. This will contribute to an increased mechanistic understanding of the effects of chronic GH gene therapy abuse/misuse in normal subjects.

  15. Alström Syndrome is associated with short stature and reduced GH reserve

    PubMed Central

    Romano, S.; Maffei, P.; Bettini, V.; Milan, G.; Favaretto, F.; Gardiman, M.; Marshall, J.D.; Greggio, N.A.; Pozzan, G.B.; Collin, G.B.; Naggert, J.K.; Bronson, R.; Vettor, R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Alström Syndrome (ALMS) is a rare autosomal recessive monogenic disease included in an emerging class of genetic disorders called ‘ciliopathies’ and is likely to impact the central nervous system as well as metabolic and endocrine function. Individuals with ALMS present clinical features resembling a growth hormone deficiency (GHD) condition, but thusfar no study has specifically investigated this aspect in a large population. Material and Methods Twenty-three ALMS patients (age 1-52 years, 11 M, 12 F) were evaluated for anthropometric parameters (growth charts and Standard Deviation Score (SDS) of height, weight, BMI), GH secretion by growth-hormone-releasing-hormone + arginine test (GHRH-arg), bone age, and hypothalamic-pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A group of 17 healthy subjects served as controls in the GH secretion study. Longitudinal retrospective and prospective data were utilized. Results The length-for-age measurements from birth to 36 months showed normal growth with most values falling within -0,67 SDS to +1.28 SDS. A progressive decrease of stature-for-age was observed after 10 years of age, with a low final height in almost all ALMS subjects (> 16-20 years: mean SDS -2.22±1.16). The subset of 12 ALMS patients tested for GHRH-arg showed a significantly shorter stature than age-matched controls (154.7±10.6 cm vs 162.9±4.8 cm, p= 0.009), and a mild increase of BMI (Kg/m2) (27.8±4.8 vs 24.1±2.5, p=0.007). Peak GH after GHRH-arg was significantly lower in ALMS patients in comparison to controls (11.9±6.9 ug/L vs 86.1±33.2 ug/L, p <0,0001). Severe GHD was evident biochemically in 50% of ALMS patients. The 10 adult ALMS patients with GHD showed a reduced height in comparison to those without GHD (149.7±6.2 cm vs 161.9±9.2 cm, p= 0.04). MRIs of the diencephalic and pituitary regions were normal in 11 of 12 patients. Bone age was advanced in 43% of cases. Conclusions Our study shows that 50% of non-obese ALMS patients

  16. Human growth hormone (GH1) gene polymorphism map in a normal-statured adult population

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cristina; Audí, Laura; Carrascosa, Antonio; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Pérez-Arroyo, Annalisa; Ulied, Angels; Andaluz, Pilar; Arjona, Rosa; Albisu, Marian; Clemente, María; Gussinyé, Miquel; Yeste, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Objective GH1 gene presents a complex map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the entire promoter, coding and noncoding regions. The aim of the study was to establish the complete map of GH1 gene SNPs in our control normal population and to analyse its association with adult height. Design, subjects and measurements A systematic GH1 gene analysis was designed in a control population of 307 adults of both sexes with height normally distributed within normal range for the same population: −2 standard deviation scores (SDS) to +2 SDS. An analysis was performed on individual and combined genotype associations with adult height. Results Twenty-five SNPs presented a frequency over 1%: 11 in the promoter (P1 to P11), three in the 5′UTR region (P12 to P14), one in exon 1 (P15), three in intron 1 (P16 to P18), two in intron 2 (P19 and P20), two in exon 4 (P21 and P22) and three in intron 4 (P23 to P25). Twenty-nine additional changes with frequencies under 1% were found in 29 subjects. P8, P19, P20 and P25 had not been previously described. P6, P12, P17 and P25 accounted for 6·2% of the variation in adult height (P = 0·0007) in this population with genotypes A/G at P6, G/G at P6 and A/G at P12 decreasing height SDS (−0·063 ± 0·031, −0·693 ± 0·350 and −0·489 ± 0·265, Mean ± SE) and genotypes A/T at P17 and T/G at P25 increasing height SDS (+1·094 ± 0·456 and +1·184 ± 0·432). Conclusions This study established the GH1 gene sequence variation map in a normal adult height control population confirming the high density of SNPs in a relatively small gene. Our study shows that the more frequent SNPs did not significantly contribute to height determination, while only one promoter and two intronic SNPs contributed significantly to it. Studies in larger populations will have to confirm the associations and in vitro functional studies will elucidate the mechanisms involved. Systematic GH1 gene analysis in patients with growth delay and suspected

  17. Identification and characterization of polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region, first exon and part of first intron of bovine GH gene.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, A L J; Bortolossi, J C; Curi, R A; Ferro, M I T; Ferro, J A; Furlan, L R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify and characterize polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region, first exon and part of first intron of the bovine growth hormone gene among different beef cattle breeds: Nelore (n = 25), Simmental (n = 39), Simbrasil (n = 24), Simmental x Nelore (n = 30), Canchim x Nelore (n = 30) and Angus x Nelore (n = 30). Two DNA fragments (GH1, 464 bp and GH2, 453 bp) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and then used for polymorphism identification by SSCP. Within the GH1 fragment, five polymorphisms were identified, corresponding to three different alleles: GH1.1, GH1.2 and GH1.3 (GenBank: AY662648, AY662649 and AY662650, respectively). These allele sequences were aligned and compared with bovine GH gene nucleotide sequence (GenBank: M57764 and AF118837), resulting in the identification of five insertion/deletions (INDELs) and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the GH2 fragment two alleles were identified, GH2.1 and GH2.2 (GenBank: AY662651 and AY662652, respectively). The allele sequences were compared with GenBank sequences (M57764, AF007750 and AH009106) and three INDELs and four SNPs were identified. In conclusion, we were able to identify six new polymorphisms of the bovine GH gene (one INDEL and five SNPs), which can be used as molecular markers in genetic studies.

  18. The Effects of GH Transgenic Goats on the Microflora of the Intestine, Feces and Surrounding Soil.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zekun; Gao, Xue; Zhang, Qiang; Lin, Jian; Hu, Weiwei; Yu, Huiqing; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    The development of genetically engineered animals has brought with it increasing concerns about biosafety issues. We therefore evaluated the risks of growth hormone from transgenic goats, including the probability of horizontal gene transfer and the impact on the microbial community of the goats' gastrointestinal tracts, feces and the surrounding soil. The results showed that neither the GH nor the neoR gene could be detected in the samples. Moreover, there was no significant change in the microbial community of the gastrointestinal tracts, feces and soil, as tested with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rDNA sequencing. Finally, phylogenetic analysis showed that the intestinal content, feces and soil samples all contained the same dominant group of bacteria. These results demonstrated that expression of goat growth hormone in the mammary of GH transgenic goat does not influence the microflora of the intestine, feces and surrounding soil.

  19. GH Lib: A multi-periodic Mira, not an eclipsing binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviero, Alessandro; Munari, Ulisse; Righetti, Gian Luigi; Graziani, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    Over the period 2012-2016 we have obtained accurate V and R band photometry and 3400-8000 Ang spectroscopy which show the poorly studied variable GH Lib to be a multi-periodic Mira and not an Algol-type eclipsing binary. The main pulsation periods are 157 and 1180 days, with amplitudes of 3.5 and 1.0 mag, respectively. The spectral type change from M2III at maximum to M7III at minimum. The intensity of Halpha and Hbeta emission lines in GH Lib is much larger than in normal Miras, suggesting that the region of Balmer line formation is located at a larger radius (more external atmospheric layers) as if mixed with and not deeply below the region where absorption by TiO molecules occurs.

  20. Brazilian adult individuals with untreated isolated GH deficiency do not have accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ursula M M; Oliveira, Carla R P; Salvatori, Roberto; Barreto-Filho, José A S; Campos, Viviane C; Oliveira, Francielle T; Rocha, Ivina E S; Oliveira, Joselina L M; Silva, Wersley A; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2016-01-01

    GH and its principal mediator IGF1 have important effects on metabolic and cardiovascular (CV) status. While acquired GH deficiency (GHD) is often associated with increased CV risk, the consequences of congenital GHD are not known. We have described a large group of patients with isolated GHD (IGHD) due to a homozygous mutation (c.57+1G>A) in the GH releasing hormone receptor gene, and shown that adult GH-naïve individuals have no evidence of clinically evident premature atherosclerosis. To test whether subclinical atherosclerosis is anticipated in untreated IGHD, we performed a cross-sectional study of 25 IGHD and 27 adult controls matched for age and gender. A comprehensive clinical and biochemical panel and coronary artery calcium scores were evaluated by multi-detector tomography. Height, weight, IGF1, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, creatinine and creatininekinase were lower in the IGHD group. Median and interquartile range of calcium scores distribution was similar in the two groups: IGHD 0(0) and control 0(4.9). The vast majority of the calcium scores (20 of 25 IGHD (80%) and 18 of 27 controls (66.6%)) were equal to zero (difference not significant). There was no difference in the calcium scores classification. None of IGHD subjects had minimal calcification, which were present in four controls. Three IGHD and four controls had mild calcification. There were two IGHD individuals with moderate calcification and one control with severe calcification. Our study provides evidence that subjects with congenital isolated lifetime and untreated severe IGHD do not have accelerated subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:26811426

  1. Differences in the GH-IGF-I axis in children of different weight and fitness status

    PubMed Central

    Hosick, Peter A.; McMurray, Robert G.; Hackney, A.C.; Battaglini, Claudio L.; Combs, Terry P.; Harrell, Joanne S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if differences in the GH-IGF-I axis exist between children of high and low aerobic fitness who are obese or of normal weight. Design 124 children (ages 8–11) divided into four groups based on BMI and VO2max (mL O2/kg fat free mass(FFM)/min): normal weight — high-fit (NH), normal weight — low-fit (NL), obese — high-fit (OH), and obese — low-fit (OL). Height, weight, skinfolds, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage and predicted VO2max (both ml/kg/min and ml/kgFFM/min) were assessed. Resting growth hormone (GH), total insulin-like growth factor 1 (total IGF-I), free insulin-like growth factor 1(free IGF-I), and insulin were measured using morning fasting blood samples. Results GH was greater in the NH group compared to the OL group only (p<0.01). No group differences existed for either total IGF-I (p=0.53) or free IGF-I (p=0.189). Insulin was greater in the OH and OL groups than the NH and NL groups (p<0.01). With groups combined (or overall), insulin and free IGF-I were related to fitness (insulin — ml/kg/min: r=−0.226, p<0.05 and ml/kgFFM/min: r= −0.212, p < 0.05; free IGF-I — ml/kg/min: r=−0.219, p<0.01 and ml/kgFFM/min: r= −0.272, p < 0.05). Conclusions Fitness may contribute to the obesity related reduction of GH that may be involved with weight gain. PMID:22436514

  2. [Polymorphisms of bGH, RORC, and DGAT1 genes in Russian beef cattle breeds].

    PubMed

    Gorlov, I F; Fedunin, A A; Randelin, D A; Sulimova, G E

    2014-12-01

    We examined the allelic and genotypic polymorphisms of genes of the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (RORC), diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1), and growth hormone (bGH) in Russian beef cattle breeds in two populations of Kazakh white-headed cattle (of Kazakh and Russian selection) and in the Kalmyk cattle breed and Mongolian hogorogo breed, which is related to Kalmyk breed. The studied genes are associated with parameters of meat quality: marbleness (bGH and RORC) and tenderness (DGAT1). They are also associated with an increase in carcass weight (bGH). We found that Russian and Kazakh populations of the Kazakh white-headed.breed were characterized by a high content of the AA genotype of RORC (0.713 and 0.608, respectively) and of the AA genotype of DGAT1 (0.913 and 0.975), both of which are preferable for meat quality. The total frequencies for the combined genotypes for the bGH and RORC genes, which provide for superior meat quality and carcass weight, in the populations of Kazakh white-headed cattle (GG/AA and GC/AA-68.8% and 57% in the Russian and Kazakh populations, respectively) exceeded the frequencies in the two other studied breeds by two times. Overall, the obtained results point to the high genetic potential of both populations of Kazakh white-headed cattle breeds in beef production. Results of this study can be used to improve the selection of meat traits in industrial livestock.

  3. Microgravity associated changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) cells prepared from rats flown on Space Lab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Hayes, C.; Grindeland, R.; Fast, T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on the release of pituitary growth hormone (GH) in rats is studied. The pituitary glands from six adult rats exposed to microgravity are analyzed for in vitro and in vivo changes in pituitary growth hormone cells. The GH cell functions in the somatotrophs of flight rats are compared to a control group. The two assay procedures employed in the experiment are described. It is observed that intracellular levels of GH are two to three times greater in the flight rats than in the control group; however, the amount of GH released from the somatotrophs is 1.11 + or - 0.4 micrograms for the flight rats and 1.85 + or - 1.3 micrograms for the control rats.

  4. Effect of adrenergic receptor blockade on cortisol and GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in man.

    PubMed

    Jezová-Repceková, D; Klimes, I; Jurcovicová, J; Vigas, M

    1979-02-01

    The effect of several drugs presumably influencing central catecholaminergic receptors on plasma cortisol and GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia was studied in healthy adult males. The intravenous infusion of alpha-adrenergic blocking agents tolazoline or phentolamine supressed plasma cortisol and GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. After an infusion of beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol both hypoglycemia and rise in plasma cortisol and GH were prolonged. Finally, the administration of dopaminergic blocker pimozide failed to affect the plasma cortisol response, but slightly suppressed the enhancement of GH release during hypoglycemia. Caution is recommended before making suggestions about neuroendocrine regulations from the data obtained after systemic administration of drugs. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the hypothesis on the inhibitory role of the central alpha-adrenergic system on ACTH secretion suggested in rats and dogs was not confirmed by our results obtained in man.

  5. Analysis of Domain Architecture and Phylogenetics of Family 2 Glycoside Hydrolases (GH2).

    PubMed

    Talens-Perales, David; Górska, Anna; Huson, Daniel H; Polaina, Julio; Marín-Navarro, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report a detailed analysis of the topology and phylogenetics of family 2 glycoside hydrolases (GH2). We distinguish five topologies or domain architectures based on the presence and distribution of protein domains defined in Pfam and Interpro databases. All of them share a central TIM barrel (catalytic module) with two β-sandwich domains (non-catalytic) at the N-terminal end, but differ in the occurrence and nature of additional non-catalytic modules at the C-terminal region. Phylogenetic analysis was based on the sequence of the Pfam Glyco_hydro_2_C catalytic module present in most GH2 proteins. Our results led us to propose a model in which evolutionary diversity of GH2 enzymes is driven by the addition of different non-catalytic domains at the C-terminal region. This model accounts for the divergence of β-galactosidases from β-glucuronidases, the diversification of β-galactosidases with different transglycosylation specificities, and the emergence of bicistronic β-galactosidases. This study also allows the identification of groups of functionally uncharacterized protein sequences with potential biotechnological interest.

  6. Antagonist of GH-releasing hormone receptors alleviates experimental ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yong Jie; Chan, Sun On; Chong, Kelvin Kam Lung; Li, Benjamin Fuk Loi; Ng, Tsz Kin; Yip, Yolanda Wong Ying; Chen, Haoyu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Block, Norman L.; Cheung, Herman S.; Schally, Andrew V.; Pang, Chi Pui

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in immunity and occurrence of inflammation cause many eye diseases. The growth hormone-releasing hormone–growth hormone–insulin-like growth factor-1 (GHRH–GH–IGF1) axis exerts regulatory effects on the immune system. Its involvement in ocular inflammation remains to be investigated. Here we studied this signaling in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) generated by LPS. The increase in GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) protein levels was parallel to the increase in mRNA levels of pituitary-specific transcription factor-1, GHRH-R splice variant 1, GHRH, and GH following LPS insult. Elevation of GHRH-R and GH receptor was localized on the epithelium of the iris and ciliary body, and GHRH-R was confined to the infiltrating macrophages and leukocytes in aqueous humor but not to those in stroma. Treatment with GHRH-R antagonist decreased LPS-stimulated surges of GH and IGF1 in aqueous humor and alleviated inflammation by reducing the infiltration of macrophages and leukocytes and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Our results indicate that inflammation in the iris and ciliary body involves the activation of GHRH signaling, which affects the recruitment of immune cells and the production of proinflammatory mediators that contribute to EIU pathogenesis. Moreover, the results suggest that GHRH-R antagonists are potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of acute ocular inflammation. PMID:25489106

  7. Analysis of Domain Architecture and Phylogenetics of Family 2 Glycoside Hydrolases (GH2)

    PubMed Central

    Talens-Perales, David; Górska, Anna; Huson, Daniel H.; Polaina, Julio

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report a detailed analysis of the topology and phylogenetics of family 2 glycoside hydrolases (GH2). We distinguish five topologies or domain architectures based on the presence and distribution of protein domains defined in Pfam and Interpro databases. All of them share a central TIM barrel (catalytic module) with two β-sandwich domains (non-catalytic) at the N-terminal end, but differ in the occurrence and nature of additional non-catalytic modules at the C-terminal region. Phylogenetic analysis was based on the sequence of the Pfam Glyco_hydro_2_C catalytic module present in most GH2 proteins. Our results led us to propose a model in which evolutionary diversity of GH2 enzymes is driven by the addition of different non-catalytic domains at the C-terminal region. This model accounts for the divergence of β-galactosidases from β-glucuronidases, the diversification of β-galactosidases with different transglycosylation specificities, and the emergence of bicistronic β-galactosidases. This study also allows the identification of groups of functionally uncharacterized protein sequences with potential biotechnological interest. PMID:27930742

  8. GH-releasing peptide-2 does not stimulate arginine vasopressin secretion in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Minagawa, Shinichi; Kimura, Keita; Ishizawa, Masahiro; Ohara, Nobumasa; Uemura, Yasuyuki; Tsuchiya, Junpei

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin has a stimulating effect on arginine vasopressin (AVP). However, it is not known whether GHRP-2, a synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, also has a stimulating effect on AVP release in men. To determine whether the GHRP-2 test is useful for assessing AVP secretion, blood ACTH, GH, FSH, LH, PRL, TSH and AVP levels, as well as glucose, osmolality, sodium and hematocrit, were measured before and 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after an intravenous bolus of 100 microg GHRP-2 in 10 healthy men with and without fasting. Blood pressure was measured at 15-min intervals. AVP secretion was not stimulated by the GHRP-2 test with and without fasting. There were no significant differences in hematocrit, blood pressure and plasma osmolality before and after GFRP-2 injection, although significant (p<0.001) peak blood GH, and ACTH and PRL levels were observed 30 and 15 min after GHRP-2 injection with and without fasting, respectively, and the maximal peaks were significantly (p<0.05) higher with fasting than without fasting. These results suggest that AVP secretion is not stimulated by the GHRP-2 test both with and without fasting, though GH, ACTH and PRL levels were higher with than without fasting.

  9. Down-regulation of GhADF1 gene expression affects cotton fibre properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yun; Wang, Juan; Gao, Peng; Jiao, Gai-Li; Zhao, Pi-Ming; Li, Yan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2009-01-01

    Cotton fibre is the most important natural fibres for textile industry. To date, the mechanism that governs the development of fibre traits is largely unknown. In this study, we have characterized the function of a member of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) family in Gossypium hirsutum by down-regulation of the gene (designated as GhADF1) expression in the transgenic cotton plants. We observed that both the fibre length and strength of the GhADF1-underexpressing plants increased as compared to the wild-type fibre, and transgenic fibres contained more abundant F-actin filaments in the cortical region of the cells. Moreover, the secondary cell wall of the transgenic fibre appeared thicker and the cellulose content was higher than that of the control fibre. Our results suggest that organization of actin cytoskeleton regulated by actin-associated proteins such as GhADF1 plays a critical role in the processes of elongation and secondary cell wall formation during fibre development. Additionally, our study provided a candidate intrinsic gene for the improvement of fibre traits via genetic engineering.

  10. Structural and biochemical studies of GH family 12 cellulases: improved thermal stability, and ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Mitchinson, Colin

    2005-11-01

    In this review we will describe how we have gathered structural and biochemical information from several homologous cellulases from one class of glycoside hydrolases (GH family 12), and used this information within the framework of a protein-engineering program for the design of new variants of these enzymes. These variants have been characterized to identify some of the positions and the types of mutations in the enzymes that are responsible for some of the biochemical differences in thermal stability and activity between the homologous enzymes. In this process we have solved the three-dimensional structure of four of these homologous GH 12 cellulases: Three fungal enzymes, Humicola grisea Cel12A, Hypocrea jecorina Cel12A and Hypocrea schweinitzii Cel12A, and one bacterial, Streptomyces sp. 11AG8 Cel12A. We have also determined the three-dimensional structures of the two most stable H. jecorina Cel12A variants. In addition, four ligand-complex structures of the wild-type H. grisea Cel12A enzyme have been solved and have made it possible to characterize some of the interactions between substrate and enzyme. The structural and biochemical studies of these related GH 12 enzymes, and their variants, have provided insight on how specific residues contribute to protein thermal stability and enzyme activity. This knowledge can serve as a structural toolbox for the design of Cel12A enzymes with specific properties and features suited to existing or new applications.

  11. Novel Role for the yceGH Tellurite Resistance Genes in the Pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Sarah E.; Ebrahimi, Celia; Hollands, Andrew; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Aroian, Raffi V.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, relies on multiple virulence factors to subvert the host immune defense. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as an infection model, we screened approximately 5,000 transposon mutants of B. anthracis Sterne for decreased virulence. One of the attenuated mutants resulted in loss of expression of yceG and yceH, the last two genes in a six-gene cluster of tellurite resistance genes. We generated an analogous insertional mutant to confirm the phenotype and characterize the role of yceGH in resistance to host defenses. Loss of yceGH rendered the mutants more sensitive to tellurite toxicity as well as to host defenses such as reactive oxygen species and the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides. Additionally, we see decreased survival in mammalian models of infection, including human whole blood and in mice. We identify a novel role for the yceGH genes in B. anthracis Sterne virulence and suggest that C. elegans is a useful infection model to study anthrax pathogenesis. PMID:24366250

  12. Leptin, GH, PRL, insulin and metabolic parameters throughout the dry period and lactation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, P A; Govoni, N; Gaiani, R; Pezzi, C; Seren, E; Tamanini, C

    2005-06-01

    Leptin may play a role in the endocrine-metabolic processes that guarantee the physiological course of lactation in dairy cattle. This study was aimed at determining the changes in plasma concentrations of leptin and some of the main hormones and metabolites involved in the lactogenetic process in high-yielding dairy cows throughout lactation; we also wanted to assess whether leptin secretion is subjected to seasonal influences. Blood samples were collected from 23 Italian Friesian dairy cows from the end of a lactation to the ninth month of the subsequent one; in addition, blood was sampled from 47 dairy cows in different phases of lactation during February and July. Plasma concentrations of leptin, growth hormone (GH), insulin, prolactin (PRL), glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and urea were quantified by either validated radioimmunoassay (RIA) or enzymatic colorimetric methods. At the beginning of lactation, GH concentrations significantly increased, while a significant reduction occurred in leptin and insulin. This endocrine condition, such as the significant increase in NEFA plasma concentrations, is indicative of a marked lipid mobilization. In the more advanced stages of lactation, when both energy and protein balances become positive, leptin plasma concentrations increased, whereas GH and NEFA concentrations declined. During the summer months, a significant increase in leptin plasma concentrations, irrespective of the phase of lactation, was observed. Collectively, our findings suggest that, in dairy cows, leptin may represent a 'metabolic signal' of animal's status of fattening and nutritional level; in addition, leptin seems to be influenced by photoperiod and environmental temperature.

  13. Structural analysis of the GH43 enzyme Xsa43E from Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus.

    PubMed

    Till, M; Goldstone, D; Card, G; Attwood, G T; Moon, C D; Arcus, V L

    2014-09-01

    The rumen of dairy cattle can be thought of as a large, stable fermentation vat and as such it houses a large and diverse community of microorganisms. The bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus is a representative of a significant component of this microbial community. It is a xylan-degrading organism whose genome encodes a large number of open reading frames annotated as fibre-degrading enzymes. This suite of enzymes is essential for the organism to utilize the plant material within the rumen as a fuel source, facilitating its survival in this competitive environment. Xsa43E, a GH43 enzyme from B. proteoclasticus, has been structurally and functionally characterized. Here, the structure of selenomethionine-derived Xsa43E determined to 1.3 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction is reported. Xsa43E possesses the characteristic five-bladed β-propeller domain seen in all GH43 enzymes. GH43 enzymes can have a range of functions, and the functional characterization of Xsa43E shows it to be an arabinofuranosidase capable of cleaving arabinose side chains from short segments of xylan. Full functional and structural characterization of xylan-degrading enzymes will aid in creating an enzyme cocktail that can be used to completely degrade plant material into simple sugars. These molecules have a range of applications as starting materials for many industrial processes, including renewable alternatives to fossil fuels.

  14. IGF-1R modulation of acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling: role of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yujun; Zhang, Yue; Buckels, Ashiya; Paterson, Andrew J; Jiang, Jing; Clemens, Thomas L; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Du, Keyong; Chang, Yingzi; Frank, Stuart J

    2013-11-01

    GH is a potent anabolic and metabolic factor that binds its cell surface receptor (GHR), activating the GHR-associated tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2, which phosphorylates and activates the latent transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Some GH actions are mediated by the elaboration of IGF-1, which exerts effects by binding and activating the heterotetrameric tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, IGF-1R. In addition to this GH-GHR-IGF-1-IGF-1R scheme, we have demonstrated in primary osteoblasts and in islet β-cells that then deletion or silencing of IGF-1R results in diminished GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting that the presence of IGF-1R may facilitate GH signaling. In this study, we explore potential roles for protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in modulating GH-induced signaling, comparing conditions in which IGF-1R is present or diminished. We confirm that in mouse primary osteoblasts harboring loxP sites flanking the IGF-1R gene, infection with an adenovirus that expresses the Cre recombinase results in IGF-1R deletion and diminished acute GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we present a new model of IGF-1R silencing, in which expression of short hairpin RNA directed at IGF-1R greatly reduces IGF-1R abundance in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. In both models, treatment with a chemical inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B), but not one of src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphotase-1 (SHP-1) and SHP-2, reverses the loss of GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in cells lacking IGF-1R but has no effect in cells with intact IGF-1R. Furthermore, expression of either a dominant-negative PTP-1B or the PTP-1B-interacting inhibitory protein, constitutive photomorphogenesis 1, also rescues acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling in IGF-1R-deficient cells but has no effect in IGF-1R replete cells. By expressing a substrate-trapping mutant PTP-1B, we demonstrate that tyrosine

  15. Cotton GhMYB7 is predominantly expressed in developing fibers and regulates secondary cell wall biosynthesis in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junfeng; Chen, Feng; Wu, Siyu; Li, Juan; Xu, Wenliang

    2016-02-01

    The secondary cell wall in mature cotton fibers contains over 90% cellulose with low quantities of xylan and lignin. However, little is known regarding the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis in cotton fibers. In this study, we characterized an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GhMYB7, in cotton. GhMYB7 is expressed at a high level in developing fibers and encodes a MYB protein that is targeted to the cell nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of GhMYB7 in Arabidopsis resulted in small, curled, dark green leaves and also led to shorter inflorescence stems. A cross-sectional assay of basal stems revealed that cell wall thickness of vessels and interfascicular fibers was higher in transgenic lines overexpressing GhMYB7 than in the wild type. Constitutive expression of GhMYB7 in Arabidopsis activated the expression of a suite of secondary cell wall biosynthesis-related genes (including some secondary cell wall-associated transcription factors), leading to the ectopic deposition of cellulose and lignin. The ectopic deposition of secondary cell walls may have been initiated before the cessation of cell expansion. Moreover, GhMYB7 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of AtSND1 and AtCesA4, suggesting that GhMYB7 may function upstream of NAC transcription factors. Collectively, these findings suggest that GhMYB7 is a potential transcriptional activator, which may participate in regulating secondary cell wall biosynthesis of cotton fibers.

  16. GhPSY, a phytoene synthase gene, is related to the red plant phenotype in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Cai, Caiping; Zhang, Xueying; Niu, Erli; Zhao, Liang; Li, Nina; Wang, Liman; Ding, Linyun; Guo, Wangzhen

    2014-08-01

    Carotenoids are important accessory pigments in plants that are essential for photosynthesis. Phytoene synthase (PSY), a rate-controlling enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, has been widely characterized in rice, maize, and sorghum, but at present there are no reports describing this enzyme in cotton. In this study, GhPSY was identified as a candidate gene for the red plant phenotype via a combined strategy using: (1) molecular marker data for loci closely linked to R1; (2) the whole-genome scaffold sequence from Gossypium raimondii; (3) gene expression patterns in cotton accessions expressing the red plant and green plant phenotypes; and (4) the significant correlation between a single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in GhPSY and leaf phenotypes of progeny in the (Sub16 × T586) F2 segregating population. GhPSY was relatively highly expressed in leaves, and the protein was localized to the plastid where it appeared to be mostly attached to the surface of thylakoid membranes. GhPSY mRNA was expressed at a significantly higher level in T586 and SL1-7-1 red plants than TM-1 and Hai7124 green plants. SNP analysis in the GhPSY locus showed co-segregation with the red and green plant phenotypes in the (Sub16 × T586) F2 segregating population. A phylogenetic analysis showed that GhPSY belongs to the PSY2 subfamily, which is related to photosynthesis in photosynthetic tissues. Using a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing, we showed that the knockdown of GhPSY caused a highly uniform bleaching of the red color in newly-emerged leaves in both T586 and SL1-7-1 plants with a red plant phenotype. These findings indicate that GhPSY is important for engineering the carotenoid metabolic pathway in pigment production.

  17. The GH-IGF-SST system in hepatocellular carcinoma: biological and molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Claudia; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Negri, Mariarosaria; Cuomo, Gaia; Cariati, Federica; Izzo, Francesco; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Different signalling pathways have been identified to be implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC; among these, GH, IGF and somatostatin (SST) pathways have emerged as some of the major pathways implicated in the development of HCC. Physiologically, GH-IGF-SST system plays a crucial role in liver growth and development since GH induces IGF1 and IGF2 secretion and the expression of their receptors, involved in hepatocytes cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. On the other hand, somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are exclusively present on the biliary tract. Importantly, the GH-IGF-SST system components have been indicated as regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis. Reduction of GH binding affinity to GH receptor, decreased serum IGF1 and increased serum IGF2 production, overexpression of IGF1 receptor, loss of function of IGF2 receptor and appearance of SSTRs are frequently observed in human HCC. In particular, recently, many studies have evaluated the correlation between increased levels of IGF1 receptors and liver diseases and the oncogenic role of IGF2 and its involvement in angiogenesis, migration and, consequently, in tumour progression. SST directly or indirectly influences tumour growth and development through the inhibition of cell proliferation and secretion and induction of apoptosis, even though SST role in hepatocarcinogenesis is still opened to argument. This review addresses the present evidences suggesting a role of the GH-IGF-SST system in the development and progression of HCC, and describes the therapeutic perspectives, based on the targeting of GH-IGF-SST system, which have been hypothesised and experimented in HCC.

  18. GhNAC12, a neutral candidate gene, leads to early aging in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fengli; Ma, Jianhui; Li, Libei; Fan, Shuli; Guo, Yaning; Song, Meizhen; Wei, Hengling; Pang, Chaoyou; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-15

    NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) is one of the largest transcription factor families in plants, and its members play various roles in plant growth, development, and the response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Currently, 77 NAC genes have been reported in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). And GhNAC12 showed up-regulation during leaf senescence, but its role in this process is poorly understood. In the present study, a preliminary function analysis of GhNAC12 was performed during leaf senescence. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that GhNAC12 expression increased during the early-aging process and the aging of cotyledons. Additionally, we observed that overexpression of GhNAC12 in Arabidopsis led to early senescence (early aging). Our findings suggest that GhNAC12 is a candidate gene for early aging in upland cotton cultivars. Neutrality tests suggested that there was no selection pressure imposed on GhNAC12 during the domestication of upland cotton.

  19. Statement by the Growth Hormone Research Society on the GH/IGF-I axis in extending health span.

    PubMed

    Thorner, Michael O

    2009-10-01

    Despite the fact that growth hormone (GH) has not been approved for antiaging purposes, its use for this indication is widespread and increasing. The Growth Hormone Research Society (GRS) convened an international workshop to critically review and debate the available evidence related to the use of GH in the older adults and the relationship between the GH/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis and the aging process. This statement presents the conclusions reached and gives recommendations for future studies in this research field regarding the use of GH and growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) for promoting health span. The participants concluded that, until future clinical research in this area is conducted, in particular carefully designed, long-term studies, using validated outcome parameters, the clinical use of GH or GHS in older adults, alone or in combination with testosterone, cannot be recommended. In addition, future basic studies in model systems, to continue to unravel GH/IGF-I effects related to human life span and health span, were advocated.

  20. Regulation of skeletal growth and mineral acquisition by the GH/IGF-1 axis: Lessons from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yakar, Shoshana; Isaksson, Olle

    2016-06-01

    The growth hormone (GH) and its downstream mediator, the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), construct a pleotropic axis affecting growth, metabolism, and organ function. Serum levels of GH/IGF-1 rise during pubertal growth and associate with peak bone acquisition, while during aging their levels decline and associate with bone loss. The GH/IGF-1 axis was extensively studied in numerous biological systems including rodent models and cell cultures. Both hormones act in an endocrine and autocrine/paracrine fashion and understanding their distinct and overlapping contributions to skeletal acquisition is still a matter of debate. GH and IGF-1 exert their effects on osteogenic cells via binding to their cognate receptor, leading to activation of an array of genes that mediate cellular differentiation and function. Both hormones interact with other skeletal regulators, such as sex-steroids, thyroid hormone, and parathyroid hormone, to facilitate skeletal growth and metabolism. In this review we summarized several rodent models of the GH/IGF-1 axis and described key experiments that shed new light on the regulation of skeletal growth by the GH/IGF-1 axis.

  1. Effect of CRF injected into the median eminence on GH secretion in female rats under different steroid status.

    PubMed

    Puertas, A; Frias, J; Ruiz, E; Ortega, E

    1996-08-01

    To evaluate whether the median eminence (ME) is a site of action of CRF (corticotropin releasing factor) on GH secretion and to determine the possible role of estradiol and progesterone in modifying theses secretion, we injected CRF (0.25, 0.75, 1, and 1.5 nmol of peptide dissolved in 1 microliter of water) directly into the ME in three experimental groups of rats: Long-term ovariectomized (OVX); OVX primed by estradiol (OVX +/- E) and OVX primed by estradiol plus progesterone (OVX +/- EP). Blood was collected to determine GH (30, 60, 90, and 120 min postinjection). Serum T3, T4, and glucose levels were measured in OVX +/- E rats 30 min postinjection. CRF at all doses studied significantly decreased serum GH levels in the three experimental groups. Serum T3, T4, and glucose levels were unchanged after CRF administration. The results suggest that: CRF inhibits "per se" GH secretion, at least in part, by a central action in the ME. The inhibitory effect of CRF on GH is independent of the estrogen/progesterone status of the animal. CRF at ME levels may participate in a variety of stress-related responses, including growth inhibition, through GH suppression.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a novel Gladiolus hybridus AFP family gene (GhAFP-like) related to corm dormancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Seng, Shanshan; Carianopol, Carina; Sui, Juanjuan; Yang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Fengqin; Jiang, Huiru; He, Junna; Yi, Mingfang

    2016-02-26

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone controlling seed dormancy. AFPs (ABA INSENSITIVE FIVE BINDING PROTEINS) are reported to be negative regulators of the ABA signaling pathway. The involvement of AFPs in dormant vegetative organs remains poorly understood. Here, we isolated and characterized a novel AFP family member from Gladiolus dormant cormels, GhAFP-like, containing three conserved domains of the AFP family. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that GhAFP-like was expressed in dormant organs and its expression was down-regulated along with corm storage. GhAFP-like was verified to be a nuclear-localized protein. Overexpressing GhAFP-like in Arabidopsis thaliana not only showed weaker seed dormancy with insensitivity to ABA, but also changed the expression of some ABA related genes. In addition, a primary root elongation assay showed GhAFP-like may involve in auxin signaling response. The results in this study indicate that GhAFP-like acts as a negative regulator in ABA signaling and is related to dormancy.

  3. GH Receptor Deficiency in Ecuadorian Adults Is Associated With Obesity and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L.; Balasubramanian, Priya; Teran, Enrique; Guevara-Aguirre, Marco; Guevara, Carolina; Procel, Patricio; Alfaras, Irene; De Cabo, Rafael; Di Biase, Stefano; Narvaez, Luis; Saavedra, Jannette

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ecuadorian subjects with GH receptor deficiency (GHRD) have not developed diabetes, despite obesity. Objective: We sought to determine the metabolic associations for this phenomenon. Design: Four studies were carried out: 1) glucose, lipid, adipocytokine concentrations; 2) metabolomics evaluation; 3) metabolic responses to a high-calorie meal; and 4) oral glucose tolerance tests. Setting: Clinical Research Institute in Quito, Ecuador. Subjects: Adults homozygous for the E180 splice mutation of the GH receptor (GHRD) were matched for age, gender, and body mass index with unaffected control relatives (C) as follows: study 1, 27 GHRD and 35 C; study 2, 10 GHRD and 10 C; study 3, seven GHRD and 11 C; and study 4, seven GHRD and seven C. Results: Although GHRD subjects had greater mean percentage body fat than controls, their fasting insulin, 2-hour blood glucose, and triglyceride levels were lower. The indicator of insulin sensitivity, homeostasis model of assessment 2%S, was greater (P < .0001), and the indicator of insulin resistance, homeostasis model of assessment 2-IR, was lower (P = .0025). Metabolomic differences between GHRD and control subjects were consistent with their differing insulin sensitivity, including postprandial decreases of branched-chain amino acids that were more pronounced in controls. High molecular weight and total adiponectin concentrations were greater in GHRD (P = .0004 and P = .0128, respectively), and leptin levels were lower (P = .02). Although approximately 65% the weight of controls, GHRD subjects consumed an identical high-calorie meal; nonetheless, their mean glucose concentrations were lower, with mean insulin levels one-third those of controls. Results of the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test were similar. Main Outcome Measures: Measures of insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines, and energy metabolites. Conclusions: Without GH counter-regulation, GHRD is associated with insulin efficiency and obesity. Lower leptin levels

  4. Unaltered ratio of circulating levels of growth hormone/GH isoforms in adults with Prader-Willi syndrome after GHRH plus arginine administration.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, A E; Grugni, G; Marazzi, N; Bini, S; Bidlingmaier, M; Sartorio, A

    2015-08-01

    Human growth hormone (GH) is a heterogeneous protein hormone consisting of several isoforms, the most abundant being 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH. The availability of analytical methods to measure these GH isoforms might represent a valuable diagnostic tool to investigate GH hyposecretory states, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), one of the most common causes of syndromic obesity. The aim of the present study was to measure circulating levels of 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH in PWS adults (n=14; M/F: 5/9; genotype DEL15/UPD15: 12/2; age: 19.0±3.7 years; BMI: 29.9±8.7 kg/m2) after combined GH releasing hormone (GHRH) plus arginine (ARG) administration. The results were analysed subdividing the study population in obese vs. nonobese (6/8) and GH deficient vs. nonGH deficient (GHD) (6/8) subjects, according to appropriate BMI-related diagnostic cut-off limits of GH peak response to the provocative test. Circulating levels of 22 kDa-GH were measured by a chemiluminescent method based on a detection monoclonal antibody targeting an epitope in the loop connecting helix 1 and 2 of GH, which is missing in 20 kDa-GH; the 20 kDa-GH was measured using a time resolved fluorescence assay based on two monoclonal antibodies with no cross-reactivity to 22-kDa GH. GHRH plus ARG significantly stimulated the secretions of 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH in nonobese (at 30, 45, 60 and 90 min and at 45, 60, 90 and 120 min vs. 0 min, p<0.05, with GH peaks of 15.8±10.3 ng/ml and 2.7±1.2 ng/ml, respectively) and in nonGHD PWS (at 30, 45 and 60 min and at 45, 60 and 90 min vs 0 min, p<0.05, with GH peaks of 12.5±9.0 ng/ml and 2.0±1.8 ng/ml, respectively). No significant GHRH plus ARG-induced changes in 22 kDa- and 20 kDa-GH were observed in obese or GHD PWS patients, the only exception being the increase of 22 kDa-GH (p<0.05) 60 min after the stimulus administration in GHD group (with GH peaks of 6.9±4.7 ng/ml and 0.8±0.6 ng/ml in obese subjects and 8.5±6.0 ng/ml and 1.2±1.0 ng/ml in GHD subjects

  5. Transmission ratio distortion at the growth hormone gene (GH1) in bovine preimplantation embryos: An in vitro culture-induced phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Angela M; Meade, Kieran G; Hayes, Patricia A; Park, Stephen D E; Evans, Alex C O; Lonergan, Patrick; MacHugh, David E

    2008-05-01

    The growth hormone gene (GH1) and its polypeptide product (GH) have a crucial role in reproduction, embryogenesis and general development. A polymorphism present in the fifth exon of the bovine GH1 gene (GH1 p.Leu127Val) has been associated with GH release and milk production in cattle. The objective of the present study was to examine the genotype frequencies of the GH1 p.Leu127Val polymorphism in bovine blastocysts produced in vitro and in vivo to determine if allelic variation of the GH1 gene affects embryo development and survival. A heterozygous (p.Leu127/Val127) sire was used for in vitro fertilization of oocytes of unknown maternal genotype (n = 104) and known maternal genotype (n = 115). PCR amplification and genotyping of the GH1 gene from Day 8 blastocysts derived from these fertilized oocytes demonstrated that there was significant over-representation from the expected Mendelian ratio of GH1 p.Leu127/Leu127 homozygotes from oocytes of known maternal genotype (P = 0.006). Contrary to this, analysis of in vivo-produced bovine blastocysts of known parental GH1 genotype (n = 69) did not reveal an overrepresentation of GH1 p.Leu127/Leu127 homozygotes. These results suggest that developing in vitro-produced embryos are exposed to a selection process, probably due to a less favorable culture environment, that acts to increase the number of GH1 p.Leu127/Leu127 homozygotes, thereby giving rise to the observed transmission ratio distortion (TRD) of GH1 genotypes when compared to in vivo produced embryos.

  6. Long-term (up to 18 years) effects on GH/IGF-1 hypersecretion and tumour size of primary somatostatin analogue (SSTa) therapy in patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenoma responsive to SSTa

    PubMed Central

    Maiza, Jean Christophe; Vezzosi, Delphine; Matta, Maria; Donadille, Florence; Loubes-Lacroix, Florence; Cournot, Maxime; Bennet, Antoine; Caron, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Context The role of somatostatin analogues (SSTa) in the treatment of acromegaly. Objective To evaluate the antihormonal and antitumour efficacy of long-term (up to 18 years) primary treatment with SSTa in patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenoma responsive to SSTa. Design An open, prospective, single-centre, clinical study. Patients Thirty-six acromegalic patients, aged 17–75 years (postoral glucose tolerance test GH > 1 µg/l, increased IGF-1 for age and sex), were monitored in a single centre and treated with SSTa as first-line therapy. The mean pretreatment GH level was 13·5 ±3·1 µg/l, and IGF-1 (as a percentage of the value over the normal range) was 302 ± 26%. The patients had macroadenoma (n = 25), microadenoma (n = 8) or empty sella turcica (n = 3). The mean duration of treatment was 8 years (range 3–18 years). Hormonal and morphological monitoring was undertaken after 6 months, and then the patients were followed annually. Results After 1 year, the mean GH and IGF-1 levels had reduced considerably (GH: 2·4 ± 0·3 µg/l; IGF-1; 174 ± 14%, P < 0·01), and they continued to decrease over 10 years, with a mean GH level of 1·6 ± 0·1 µg/l and IGF-1 of 123 ± 18% (P = 0·02). GH < 2 µg/l, normal IGF-1, or both were observed in 25 (70%), 24 (67%) and 21 (58%) patients, respectively. The mean reduction in tumour volume was 43% (range 13–97%) and shrinkage > 20% was obtained in 21 patients (72%). SSTa treatment was well tolerated with few digestive or metabolic side-effects. Conclusion Long-term (up to 18 years) treatment with SSTa used as first-line therapy is effective from both an antihormonal and antitumour perspective, and is well tolerated in acromegalic patients. PMID:17524029

  7. Radiation Protection

    MedlinePlus

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View ...

  8. The sweating apparatus in growth hormone deficiency, following treatment with r-hGH and in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hasan, W; Cowen, T; Barnett, P S; Elliot, E; Coskeran, P; Bouloux, P M

    2001-06-20

    Adult growth hormone deficient patients are known to exhibit reduced sweating and their ability to thermoregulate is diminished. Treatment of these patients with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) is claimed to reverse these abnormalities. We have investigated this claim, as well as the mechanism underlying these altered sweating responses in GH-deficient patients as part of a placebo-controlled study on the effects of 6-12 months r-hGH therapy. Skin biopsies were obtained from these subjects and changes in morphology and innervation parameters for the eccrine sweat glands were examined. These included histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and immunohistochemistry for the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and for PGP9.5, a general neuronal marker. Sweat gland acinar size and periacinar innervation were measured by computerised image analysis. The patients underwent pilocarpine iontophoresis sweat rate tests and their serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were assessed. Since active acromegaly involves excess GH secretion and hyperhidrosis, skin biopsies and sweat tests were also carried out on a group of these patients, as well as on control subjects. We have demonstrated a sweating defect in adult GH-deficiency which is accompanied by a reduction in AChE and VIP levels in the nerve supply to sweat glands. Following r-hGH therapy, an increase in AChE and VIP staining is seen in the sudomotor nerves accompanied by restoration of sweat rates and serum IGF-1 levels. Hence, normalization of sweat gland function includes recovery of sudomotor synapse constituents. A trophic effect of GH on sweat gland epithelium and/or on the associated nerves is proposed, supported by the observation that in acromegaly the size of sweat gland acini and the density of innervation to the sweat glands was greater than in controls.

  9. 4,3-α-Glucanotransferase, a novel reaction specificity in glycoside hydrolase family 70 and clan GH-H

    PubMed Central

    Gangoiti, Joana; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Duboux, Stéphane; Vafiadi, Christina; Pijning, Tjaard; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria possess a diversity of glucansucrase (GS) enzymes that belong to glycoside hydrolase family 70 (GH70) and convert sucrose into α-glucan polysaccharides with (α1 → 2)-, (α1 → 3)-, (α1 → 4)- and/or (α1 → 6)-glycosidic bonds. In recent years 3 novel subfamilies of GH70 enzymes, inactive on sucrose but using maltodextrins/starch as substrates, have been established (e.g. GtfB of Lactobacillus reuteri 121). Compared to the broad linkage specificity found in GSs, all GH70 starch-acting enzymes characterized so far possess 4,6-α-glucanotransferase activity, cleaving (α1 → 4)-linkages and synthesizing new (α1 → 6)-linkages. In this work a gene encoding a putative GH70 family enzyme was identified in the genome of Lactobacillus fermentum NCC 2970, displaying high sequence identity with L. reuteri 121 GtfB 4,6-α-glucanotransferase, but also with unique variations in some substrate-binding residues of GSs. Characterization of this L. fermentum GtfB and its products revealed that it acts as a 4,3-α-glucanotransferase, converting amylose into a new type of α-glucan with alternating (α1 → 3)/(α 1 → 4)-linkages and with (α1 → 3,4) branching points. The discovery of this novel reaction specificity in GH70 family and clan GH-H expands the range of α-glucans that can be synthesized and allows the identification of key positions governing the linkage specificity within the active site of the GtfB-like GH70 subfamily of enzymes. PMID:28059108

  10. The absence of GH signaling affects the susceptibility to high-fat diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Eva; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Sustarsic, Elahu G; Herpy, James; List, Edward O; Chowen, Julie A; Frago, Laura M; Kopchick, John J; Argente, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    GH is important in metabolic control, and mice with disruption of the gene encoding the GH receptor (GHR) and GH binding protein (GHR-/- mice) are dwarf with low serum IGF-1 and insulin levels, high GH levels, and increased longevity, despite their obesity and altered lipid and metabolic profiles. Secondary complications of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity are reported to be associated with hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis. Because GH and IGF-1 can modulate inflammatory processes, our objective was to evaluate the effect of HFD on hypothalamic inflammation/gliosis in the absence of GH signaling and determine how this correlates with changes in systemic metabolism. On normal chow, GHR-/- mice had a higher percentage of fat mass and increased circulating nonesterified free fatty acids levels compared with wild type (WT), and this was associated with increased hypothalamic TNF-α and phospho-JNK levels. After 7 weeks on a HFD, both WT and GHR-/- mice had increased weight gain, with GHR-/- mice having a greater rise in their percentage of body fat. In WT mice, HFD-induced weight gain was associated with increased hypothalamic levels of phospho-JNK and the microglial marker Iba-1 (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1) but decreased cytokine production. Moreover, in GHR-/- mice, the HFD decreased hypothalamic inflammatory markers to WT levels with no indication of gliosis. Thus, the GH/IGF-1 axis is important in determining not only adipose tissue accrual but also the inflammatory response to HFD. However, how hypothalamic inflammation/gliosis is defined will determine whether it can be considered a common feature of HFD-induced obesity.

  11. Reproductive parameters of double transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) males overexpressing both the growth hormone (GH) and its receptor (GHR).

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Cecilia Gomes; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Nornberg, Bruna Felix; Pereira, Jessica Ribeiro; Pires, Diego Martins; Corcini, Carine Dahl; Junior, Antonio Sergio Varela; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenesis presents a high potential application in aquaculture. However, excess GH may have serious consequences due to pleiotropic actions. In order to study these effects in zebrafish (Danio rerio), two transgenic lines were developed. The first expresses GH ubiquitously and constitutively (F0104 line), while the second expresses the GH receptor in a muscle-specific manner (Myo-GHR line). Results from the F0104 line showed accelerated growth but increased reproductive difficulties, while Myo-GHR did not show the expected increase in muscle mass. Since the two lines appeared to display complementary characteristics, a double transgenic (GH/GHR) was created via crossing between them. This double transgenic displayed accelerated growth, however reproductive parameters remained uncertain. The objective of the present study was to determine the reproductive capacity of males of this new line, by evaluating sperm parameters, expression of spermatogenesis-related genes, and reproductive tests. Double transgenics showed a strong recovery in almost all sperm parameters analyzed when compared to the F0104 line. Gene expression analyses revealed that Anti-Müllerian Hormone gene (amh) appeared to be primarily responsible for this recovery. Reproductive tests showed that double transgenic males did not differ from non-transgenics. It is possible that GHR excess in the muscle tissues of double transgenics may have contributed to lower circulating GH levels and thus reduced the negative effects of this hormone with respect to reproduction. Therefore, it is clear that GH-transgenesis technology should take into account the need to obtain adequate levels of circulating hormone in order to achieve maximum growth with minimal negative side effects.

  12. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study.

    PubMed

    Caz, Victor; Elvira, Marcos; Tabernero, Maria; Grande, Antonio G; Lopez-Plaza, Bricia; de Miguel, Enrique; Largo, Carlota; Santamaria, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH) treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors.

  13. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Caz, Victor; Elvira, Marcos; Tabernero, Maria; Grande, Antonio G.; Lopez-Plaza, Bricia; de Miguel, Enrique; Largo, Carlota; Santamaria, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH) treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors. PMID:26670463

  14. High-quality draft genome sequence of Flavobacterium suncheonense GH29-5(T) (DSM 17707(T)) isolated from greenhouse soil in South Korea, and emended description of Flavobacterium suncheonense GH29-5(T).

    PubMed

    Tashkandy, Nisreen; Sabban, Sari; Fakieh, Mohammad; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Huang, Sixing; Tindall, Brian J; Rohde, Manfred; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Baeshen, Nabih A; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Pillay, Manoj; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Hahnke, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Flavobacterium suncheonense is a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Strain GH29-5(T) (DSM 17707(T)) was isolated from greenhouse soil in Suncheon, South Korea. F. suncheonense GH29-5(T) is part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of B acteria and A rchaea project. The 2,880,663 bp long draft genome consists of 54 scaffolds with 2739 protein-coding genes and 82 RNA genes. The genome of strain GH29-5(T) has 117 genes encoding peptidases but a small number of genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes (51 CAZymes). Metallo and serine peptidases were found most frequently. Among CAZymes, eight glycoside hydrolase families, nine glycosyl transferase families, two carbohydrate binding module families and four carbohydrate esterase families were identified. Suprisingly, polysaccharides utilization loci (PULs) were not found in strain GH29-5(T). Based on the coherent physiological and genomic characteristics we suggest that F. suncheonense GH29-5(T) feeds rather on proteins than saccharides and lipids.

  15. Involvement of insulin and growth hormone (GH) during follicular development in the bovine ovary.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi; Murayama, Chiaki; Sudo, Natsuko; Kawashima, Chiho; Tetsuka, Masa; Miyamoto, Akio

    2008-06-01

    Insulin and growth hormone (GH) play critical roles in the process of follicular development and maturation. However, the involvement of insulin receptor (IR) and GH receptor (GHR) during follicular development is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of IR and GHR mRNAs in the granulosa cells (GCs) and theca tissues (TCs) of the follicle at different developmental stages (preovulatory dominant follicles, POFs; estrogen-active dominant follicles, EADs; estrogen-inactive dominant follicles, EIDs; and small follicles, SFs), and second, to examine the effects of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2) on the expression of IR and GHR genes in cultured bovine GCs. Although the concentration of insulin in follicular fluid (FF) was constant at all developmental stages, the GH concentration in FF was significantly increased in the EAD and POF compared with the EID. IR mRNA in GCs and TCs was significantly increased in the POF compared with other follicles. Regarding GHR expression, significant increases of mRNA expression were observed in GCs of EAD compared to those of SF, EID and POF. GHR mRNA in TCs was significantly decreased in the SF compared with other follicles. In cultured GCs, FSH, but not E2, stimulated the expression of IR and GHR genes. Our results suggest that the increase in the expression of GHR may be a turning point for follicles to enter the ovulatory phase during final follicular development and that the insulin system may support the maturation of preovulatory follicles.

  16. Histological changes of testes in growth hormone transgenic mice with high plasma level of GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Słuczanowska-Głąbowska, Sylwia; Kucia, Magda; Bartke, Andrzej; Laszczyńska, Maria; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) leads to increase in Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) plasma level, stimulation of growth and increase in body size, organomegaly and reduced body fat. The action of GH affects all the organs and transgenic mice that overexpress bovine GH (bGH mice) serve as convenient model to study somatotrophic axis. Male mice overexpressing GH are fertile, however, they show reduced overall lifespan as well as reproductive life span. The aim of the study was to evaluate the morphology and expression of androgen receptor (AR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) of bGH mice testes. Material and methods The experiment was performed on 6 and 12 month-old bGH male mice and 6 and 12 month-old wild type (WT) littermates (8 animals in each group). The morphology of testes was evaluated on deparaffinized sections stained by the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) method. Expression of AR and LHR was investigated by immunohistochemistry and diameters of seminiferous tubules (ST) were measured on round cross sections of ST. Results We noted larger testes in 6-month bGH mice as compared to normal WT littermates. The morphological observations revealed essentially normal structure of Leydig cells, seminiferous epithelium and other morphological structures. However, some changes like tubules containing only Sertoli cells, tubules with arrested spermatogenesis or vacuoles in seminiferous epithelium could be attributed to the overexpression of GH. In contrast to WT mice, 12 month-old bGH mice displayed first symptoms of testicular aging. The immunoexpression of AR and LHR was decreased in 12 month-old bGH males as compared to 12 month-old WT mice and younger animals. Conclusion Chronic exposure to elevated GH level accelerates testicular aging and thus potentially may change response of Leydig cells to LH and Sertoli and germ cells to testosterone. PMID:26348370

  17. Cortistatin Is a Key Factor Regulating the Sex-Dependent Response of the GH and Stress Axes to Fasting in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; de Lecea, Luis; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2016-07-01

    Cortistatin (CORT) shares high structural and functional similarities with somatostatin (SST) but displays unique sex-dependent pituitary actions. Indeed, although female CORT-knockout (CORT-KO) mice exhibit enhanced GH expression/secretion, Proopiomelanocortin expression, and circulating ACTH/corticosterone/ghrelin levels, male CORT-KO mice only display increased plasma GH/corticosterone levels. Changes in peripheral ghrelin and SST (rather than hypothalamic levels) seem to regulate GH/ACTH axes in CORT-KOs under fed conditions. Because changes in GH/ACTH axes during fasting provide important adaptive mechanisms, we sought to determine whether CORT absence influences GH/ACTH axes during fasting. Accordingly, fed and fasted male/female CORT-KO were compared with littermate controls. Fasting increased circulating GH levels in male/female controls but not in CORT-KO, suggesting that CORT can be a relevant regulator of GH secretion during fasting. However, GH levels were already higher in CORT-KO than in controls in fed state, which might preclude a further elevation in GH levels. Interestingly, although fasting-induced pituitary GH expression was elevated in both male/female controls, GH expression only increased in fasted female CORT-KOs, likely owing to specific changes observed in key factors controlling somatotrope responsiveness (ie, circulating ghrelin and IGF-1, and pituitary GHRH and ghrelin receptor expression). Fasting increased corticosterone levels in control and, most prominently, in CORT-KO mice, which might be associated with a desensitization to SST signaling and to an augmentation in CRH and ghrelin-signaling regulating corticotrope function. Altogether, these results provide compelling evidence that CORT plays a key, sex-dependent role in the regulation of the GH/ACTH axes in response to fasting.

  18. Upper airway loading induces growth retardation and change in local chondrocyte IGF-I expression is reversed by stimulation of GH release in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Segev, Yael; Berdugo-Boura, Nilly; Porati, Orit; Tarasiuk, Ariel

    2008-11-01

    Chronic resistive airway loading (CAL) impairs growth in juvenile rats. The effects of CAL on epiphyseal growth plate (EGP) structure and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene expression have not been explored. Little is known about whether stimulants of endogenous growth hormone (GH) secretion can normalize this growth impairment. This study explored the effect of CAL on circulating and EGP GH/IGF-I pathway GH and the effect of ritanserin (endogenous GH stimulant) on somatic growth and the GH/IGF-I axis. We hypothesized that CAL would lead to a decrease in body temperature (Tb) and alterations of GH/IGF-I pathways, consequently leading to growth retardation. The tracheae of 22-day-old male rats were obstructed by tracheal banding (38 sham-operated control, 42 CAL). Tibial EGP morphometry, liver and EGP IGF mRNA, and serum GH and IGF-I levels were analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA. Tb and locomotion activity (MA) were measured with telemetric transmitters inserted into the abdominal cavity. CAL animals had lower Tb and MA despite preserved food consumption. CAL impaired both tibial and tail length gains. Tail and tibial length gains inversely correlated with tracheal resistance. Circulating GH and IGF-I, liver and EGP IGF-I mRNA, and EGP width were decreased in the CAL group. Ritanserin administration to CAL animals normalized circulating and local EGP GH and IGF-I levels and minimized the longitudinal growth impairment. We conclude that CAL causes growth delay associated with alterations in the GH/IGF-I axis. Stimulation of GH release by ritanserin restored both global and local GH/IGF-I pathways, yet growth parameters were only partially restored.

  19. Growth hormone-like factor produced by the tapeworm, Spirometra mansonoides, displaces human growth hormone (hGH) from its receptors on cultured human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, D.J.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    An analogue of hGH isolated from plerocercoids of the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides displaces (/sup 125/I)hGH from its receptors in rabbit, rat, and hamster liver membranes. Biologically, plerocercoid growth factor (PGF) is more similar to hGH than to other mammalian GH's but has not been shown to bond human cells. Receptors specific for hGH have been described on cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9). In this study, the authors compared the binding of PGF and hGH in IM-9 cells and in rabbit hepatic membranes. IM-9 lymphocytes (12 x 10/sup 6/ cells/tube) were incubated with (/sup 125/I)hGH and increasing concentrations of hGH (ng/ml) or PGF (serial dilutions) for 90 min at 30/sup 0/ C. Specific binding (B/sub 0/ - NSB) was determined for each dose of hGH or PGF and the binding curves were analyzed by logit-log regression. The results show that PGF displaced (/sup 125/I)hGH from human cells in a dose dependent manner (r = 0.98). Based on the IM-9 assay, 1 ml of the PGF had an activity equivalent to 625 ng of the hGH standard (ngE). However, the binding activity of the PGF in the rabbit liver RRA was 1653 ngE/ml, indicating that the binding potency of PGF in IM-9 cells was only 38% of that in the rabbit liver. These results clearly demonstrate that PGF binds hGH receptors in cells of human origin, suggesting that PGF will be effective in humans.

  20. Design and Activation of a LOX/GH Chemical Steam Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, G. P.; Mulkey, C. A.; Taylor, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a detailed description of the design and activation of the LOX/GH fueled chemical steam generator installed in Cell 2 of the E3 test facility at Stennis Space Center, MS (SSC). The steam generator uses a liquid oxygen oxidizer with gaseous hydrogen fuel. The combustion products are then quenched with water to create steam at pressures from 150 to 450 psig at temperatures from 350 to 750 deg F (from saturation to piping temperature limits).

  1. Replacement therapy: arginine vasopressin (AVP), growth hormone (GH), cortisol, thyroxine, testosterone and estrogen.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D H; Owens, B

    1996-06-01

    Replacement therapy is routinely used to treat hormone deficiencies of patients who have had surgery or radiation therapy that damages the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. Hormones commonly replaced include: arginine vasopressin (AVP), growth hormone (GH), cortisol, thyroxine (T4), testosterone and estrogen. AVP, synthesized in the hypothalamus, is stored in and released by the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. GH is synthesized and released by the anterior pituitary gland. The other hormones are produced and released by target glands each of which is stimulated by a specific anterior pituitary hormone, which in turn is controlled by release of a specific hypothalamic hormone. Feedback control by a high circulating concentration of the target gland's hormone regulates hypothalamic hormone release. Deficiency of AVP, important for water balance in the body, is restored with the synthetic analogue, 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP); it is given as a nasal spray or by injection. GH is required for normal growth in the developing child; recombinant GH, produced in bacteria, is injected subcutaneously. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) controls release of cortisol which is produced by the adrenal cortex and enables the body to cope with stress; cortisol is replaced with prednisolone given orally. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) controls release of the thyroid hormones, T4 and triiodothyronine (T3), which promote growth and development, and regulate energy metabolism; for replacement of T4, oral synthetic L-thyroxine is given. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) control release of testosterone, which promotes maturation of sperm and development of male sexual characteristics; replacement testosterone is administered intramuscularly. In females, FSH and LH control release of estrogens and progesterone which prepare the reproductive tract for release of the ovum, fertilization, implantation and development of the embryo

  2. Correlation between exon 3 polymorphism of growth hormone receptor gene and the responses to rhGH therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Zheng, Rongxiu; Zhou, Yuhui; Wang, Jing; Bao, Pengli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the exon 3 polymorphism of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene and the responses to the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in children with short stature. Methods: Forty-five growth hormone deficiency (GHD) children (male: 30, female: 15, aged 10.39±2.73 yrs) and twenty-five idiopathic short stature (ISS) children (male: 15, female: 10, aged 10.58±2.56 yrs) admitted to our hospital were included. The polymorphism of exon 3 of GHR gene was determined using multiple PCR amplification. Treatment duration for each subject was at least 12 months. On this basis, we evaluated the correlation between treatment efficiency of rhGH therapy and GHR exon 3 polymorphism, GHD, and treatment duration. Results: Significant difference was noted in the growth velocity (GV) of GHD children with a genotype of GHRfl compared with those with a genotype of GHRd3 (9.44±2.35 vs. 11.36±2.49, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the GV of ISS patients with a genotype of GHRfl were remarkably decreased compared with those with a genotype of GHRd3 (8.74±2.36 vs. 11.18±2.44, P < 0.05). For the children with peak GH response of less than 5 ng/ml, statistical difference was noted in the GV of children with a genotype of GHRfl compared with those with a genotype of GHRd3 (9.55±2.76 vs. 10.84±1.53, P < 0.05). For the patients with peak GH response to clonidine or pyridostigmine bromide of > 5 ng/ml, a satisfactory response to rhGH therapy was noted in children with a genotype of GHRd3 compared with those of GHRfl (P < 0.05). Conclusions: GHRd3 was correlated with the response to rhGH therapy in children with short stature. For the patients with the same genotype, GHD caused no obvious effects on the final height. However, for the patients with peak GH response of > 5 ng/ml, a satisfactory response to rhGH therapy was noted in children with a genotype of GHRd3 compared with those of GHRfl (P < 0.05). A higher treatment efficiency was obtained in

  3. Homozygous and heterozygous GH transgenesis alters fatty acid composition and content in the liver of Amago salmon (Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae)

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Manabu; Takenaga, Fumio; Kitani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Goshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Araki, Kazuo; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tsukasa

    2012-01-01

    Summary Growth hormone (GH) transgenic Amago (Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae), containing the sockeye GH1 gene fused with metallothionein-B promoter from the same species, were generated and the physiological condition through lipid metabolism compared among homozygous (Tg/Tg) and heterozygous GH transgenic (Tg/+) Amago and the wild type control (+/+). Previously, we have reported that the adipose tissue was generally smaller in GH transgenic fish compared to the control, and that the Δ-6 fatty acyl desaturase gene was down-regulated in the Tg/+ fish. However, fatty acid (FA) compositions have not been measured previously in these fish. In this study we compared the FAs composition and content in the liver using gas chromatography. Eleven kinds of FA were detected. The composition of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (SFA and MUFA) such as myristic acid (14:0), palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7), and cis-vaccenic acid (cis-18:1n-7) was significantly (P<0.05) decreased in GH transgenic Amago. On the other hand, the composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) was significantly (P<0.05) increased. Levels of serum glucose and triacylglycerol were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in the GH transgenics compared with +/+ fish. Furthermore, 3′-tag digital gene expression profiling was performed using liver tissues from Tg/Tg and +/+ fish, and showed that Mid1 interacting protein 1 (Mid1ip1), which is an important factor to activate Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), was down-regulated in Tg/Tg fish, while genes involved in FA catabolism were up-regulated, including long-chain-fatty-acid–CoA ligase 1 (ACSL1) and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 3 (ACOX3). These data suggest that liver tissue from GH transgenic Amago showed starvation by alteration in glucose and lipid metabolism due to GH overexpression. The decrease of serum glucose suppressed Mid1ip1, and caused a decrease of de

  4. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas J; Hernandez, Rosmel E; Noriega, Vanessa M; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-03-30

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV.

  5. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Thomas J.; Hernandez, Rosmel E.; Noriega, Vanessa M.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV. PMID:27026399

  6. A peptide hormone gene, GhPSK promotes fibre elongation and contributes to longer and finer cotton fibre.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Tan, Jiafu; Tu, Lili; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-09-01

    Cotton fibres, the single-celled trichomes derived from the ovule epidermis, provide the most important natural material for the global textile industry. A number of studies have demonstrated that regulating endogenous hormone levels through transgenic approaches can improve cotton fibre qualities. Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α) is a novel peptide hormone in plants that is involved in regulating cell proliferation and elongation. However, its potential applications in crop genetic improvement have not been evaluated. In this study, we describe how exogenous PSK-α application promotes cotton fibre cell elongation in vitro. Chlorate, an effective inhibitor of peptide sulfation, suppressed fibre elongation in ovule culture. Exogenously applied PSK-α partly restored the chlorate-induced suppression. A putative PSK gene (GhPSK) was cloned from Gossypium hirsutum. Expression pattern analysis revealed that GhPSK is preferentially expressed in rapidly elongating fibre cells (5-20 days postanthesis). Overexpression of GhPSK in cotton increased the endogenous PSK-α level and promoted cotton fibre cell elongation, resulting in longer and finer fibres. Further results from electrophysiological and physiological analyses suggest that GhPSK affects fibre development through regulation of K(+) efflux. Digital gene expression (DGE) profile analysis of GhPSK overexpression lines indicates that PSK signalling may regulate the respiratory electron-transport chain and reactive oxygen species to affect cotton fibre development. These results imply that peptide hormones are involved in cotton fibre growth and suggest a new strategy for the biotechnological improvement of cotton fibre quality.

  7. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the CH domain of the cotton kinesin GhKCH2

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Xinghua; Chen, Ziwei; Li, Ping; Liu, Guoqin

    2016-02-19

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the CH domain of the plant-specific kinesin GhKCH2 is reported. GhKCH2 belongs to a group of plant-specific kinesins (KCHs) containing an actin-binding calponin homology (CH) domain in the N-terminus. Previous studies revealed that the GhKCH2 CH domain (GhKCH2-CH) had a higher affinity for F-actin (K{sub d} = 0.42 ± 0.02 µM) than most other CH-domain-containing proteins. To understand the underlying mechanism, prokaryotically expressed GhKCH2-CH (amino acids 30–166) was purified and crystallized. Crystals were grown by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.0, 20%(w/v) PEG 8000 as a precipitant. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.57, b = 81.92, c = 83.00 Å, α = 90.00, β = 97.31, γ = 90.00°. Four molecules were found in the asymmetric unit with a Matthews coefficient of 2.22 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a solvent content of 44.8%.

  8. Overexpression of Cotton GhMPK11 Decreases Disease Resistance through the Gibberellin Signaling Pathway in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Chen; Yan, Yan; Jia, Haihong; Guo, Xingqi

    2016-01-01

    Many changes in development, growth, hormone activity and environmental stimuli responses are mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. However, in plants, studies on MAPKs have mainly focused on MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. Here, a novel group B MAPK gene, GhMPK11, was isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and characterized. Both promoter and expression pattern analyses revealed that GhMPK11 is involved in defense responses and signaling pathways. GhMPK11 overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants could increase gibberellin 3 (GA3) content through the regulation of GA-related genes. Interestingly, either GhMPK11 overexpression or exogenous GA3 treatment in N. benthamiana plants could enhance the susceptibility of these plants to the infectious pathogens Ralstonia solanacearum and Rhizoctonia solani. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was increased after pathogen infiltration due to the increased expression of ROS-related gene respiratory burst oxidative homologs (RbohB) and the decreased expression or activity of ROS detoxification enzymes regulated by GA3, such as superoxide dismutases (SODs), peroxidases (PODs), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Taken together, these results suggest that GhMPK11 overexpression could enhance the susceptibility of tobacco to pathogen infection through the GA3 signaling pathway via down-regulation of ROS detoxification enzymes. PMID:27242882

  9. Benzimidazole derivatives protect against cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Nik Khairunissa Nik Abdullah; Rajput, Sajid Ali; Taha, Muhammad; Ahmat, Norizan; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Abdullah, Noraishah; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2015-10-15

    Apoptotic cell death is the cause of the loss of insulin-producing β-cells in all forms of diabetes mellitus. The identification of small molecules capable of protecting cytokine-induced apoptosis could form the basis of useful therapeutic interventions. Here in, we present the discovery and synthesis of new benzimidazole derivatives, capable of rescuing pancreatic β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis. Three hydrazone derivatives of benzimidazole significantly increased the cellular ATP levels, reduced caspase-3 activity, reduced nitrite production and increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that these compounds may protect β-cells from the harmful effects of cytokines and may serve as candidates for therapeutic intervention for diabetes.

  10. Plerocercoid growth factor (PGF), a human growth hormone (hGH) analogue produced by the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides, has direct insulin-like action in adipose tissue of normal rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, M.A.M.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    The metabolic actions of GH can be divided into acute (insulin-like) and chronic (lipolytic/anti-insulin). The insulin-like actions of GH are most readily elicited in GH-deficient animals as GH induces resistance to its own insulin-like action. Like GH, PGF stimulates growth and cross-reacts with anti-hGH antibodies. Independent experiments were conducted comparing the direct actions of PGF to insulin or hGH in vitro. Insulin-like effects were determined by the ability of PGF, insulin or hGH to stimulate (U-/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism in epidydimal fat pads from normal rats and by inhibition of epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. Direct stimulation of lipolysis was used as anti-insulin activity. To determine if PGF competes for insulin or GH receptors, adipocytes (3 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml) were incubated with either (/sup 125/I)insulin or (/sup 125/I)hGH +/- PGF, +/- insulin or +/- hGH. PGF stimulated glucose oxidation and /sup 14/C-incorporation into lipids. Insulin, hGH and PGF inhibited lipolysis (33%, 29% and 34%, respectively). Adipose tissue was very sensitive to the lipolytic effect of hGH but PGF was neither lipolytic nor did it confer refractoriness to its insulin-like action. PGF bound to GH but not to insulin receptors. Therefore, PGF had direct insulin-like effects but did not stimulate lipolysis in tissue from normal rats in vitro.

  11. Protective actions of melatonin and growth hormone on the aged cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Sergio D; Forman, Katherine A; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Escames, Germaine; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that certain aspects of lifestyle and genetics act as risk factors for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary disease, hypertension, heart failure and stroke. Aging, however, appears to be the major contributor for morbidity and mortality of the impaired cardiovascular system. Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin seem to prevent cardiac aging, as they contribute to the recovery of several physiological parameters affected by age. These hormones exhibit antioxidant properties and decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis. This paper summarizes a set of studies related to the potential role that therapy with GH and melatonin may play in the protection of the altered cardiac function due to aging, with a focus on experiments performed in our laboratory using the senescence-accelerated mouse as an aging model. In general, we observed significantly increased inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers in hearts from senescence-accelerated prone 10-month-old animals compared to 2-month-old controls, while anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic markers as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase were decreased. Senescence-accelerated resistant animals showed no significant changes with age. GH or melatonin treatment prevented the age-dependent cardiac alterations observed in the senescence-accelerated prone group. Combined administration of GH plus melatonin reduced the age-related changes in senescence-accelerated prone hearts in an additive fashion that was different to that displayed when administered alone. GH and melatonin may be potential agents for counteracting oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation in the aging heart.

  12. Newly derived GH43 gene from compost metagenome showing dual xylanase and cellulase activities.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lee, Ritthironk; Boonmee, Atcha

    2014-09-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library was constructed from compost microbial communities that were collected from various farms throughout the Khon Kaen province, Thailand. The library was enriched in carboxymethylcellulose (CM-cellulose)--containing media prior to the screening of clones capable of degrading cellulosic materials. Two clones were selected for further subcloning and sequencing based on different patterns from restriction analysis. Deduced amino acid analysis of possible ORFs revealed one novel gene encoding an enzyme belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 43 (GH43), which is a GH family rarely found in metagenomic studies. The most notable finding is that this enzyme, designated as Biof1_09, shows dual activities, namely endocellulase and endoxylanase activities. Biof1_09 showed greater than 50% of its activity under acidic conditions ranging from pH 3.5 to 5.5 with a pH optimum of 4.5. The optimum temperature of this enzyme was between 45 and 55 °C with an optimum of 50 °C. The properties of Biof1_09 make this enzyme an attractive candidate for large-scale expression for use in lignocellulose degradation for various bioprocess applications, including bioethanol fermentation.

  13. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the GH72 family of cell wall transglycosylases in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jie; Free, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    The Neurospora crassa genome encodes five GH72 family transglycosylases, and four of these enzymes (GEL-1, GEL-2, GEL-3 and GEL-5) have been found to be present in the cell wall proteome. We carried out an extensive genetic analysis on the role of these four transglycosylases in cell wall biogenesis and demonstrated that the transglycosylases are required for the formation of a normal cell wall. As suggested by the proteomic analysis, we found that multiple transglycosylases were being expressed in N. crassa cells and that different combinations of the enzymes are required in different cell types. The combination of GEL-1, GEL-2 and GEL-5 is required for the growth of vegetative hyphae, while the GEL-1, GEL-2, GEL-3 combination is needed for the production of aerial hyphae and conidia. Our data demonstrates that the enzymes are redundant with partially overlapping enzymatic activities, which provides the fungus with a robust cell wall biosynthetic system. Characterization of the transglycosylase-deficient mutants demonstrated that the incorporation of cell wall proteins was severely compromised. Interestingly, we found that the transglycosylase-deficient mutant cell walls contained more β-1,3-glucan than the wild type cell wall. Our results demonstrate that the GH72 transglycosylases are not needed for the incorporation of β-1,3-glucan into the cell wall, but they are required for the incorporation of cell wall glycoprotein into the cell wall.

  14. The Role of GH/IGF-I Axis in Muscle Homeostasis During Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to reduced gravity during space travel profoundly alters the loads placed on bone and muscle. Astronauts suffer significant losses of muscle and bone strength during weightlessness. Exercise as a countermeasure is only partially effective in remedying severe muscle atrophy and bone demineralization. Similar wasting of muscles and bones affects people on Earth during prolonged bed rest or immobilization due to injury. In the absence of weight bearing activity, atrophy occurs primarily in the muscles that act in low power, routine movements and in maintaining posture. Hormonal disfunction could contribute in part to the loss of muscle and bone during spaceflight. Reduced levels of human Growth Hormone (hGH) were found in astronauts during space flight, as well as reduced GH secretory activity was observed from the anterior pituitary in 7-day space flight rats. Growth hormone has been shown to be required for maintenance of muscle mass and bone mineralization, in part by mediating the biosynthesis IGF-I, a small polypeptide growth factor. IGF biosynthesis and secretion plays an important role in potentiating muscle cell differentiation and has been shown to drive the expression of myogenin, a myogenic specific basic helix-loop-helix factor. IGF-I has also been shown to have an important role in potentiating muscle regeneration, repair and adult muscle hypertrophy.

  15. Calcium-dependent inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The inactivation of calcium channels in mammalian pituitary tumor cells (GH3) was studied with patch electrodes under voltage clamp in cell- free membrane patches and in dialyzed cells. The calcium current elicited by depolarization from a holding potential of -40 mV passed predominantly through one class of channels previously shown to be modulated by dihydropyridines and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation (Armstrong and Eckert, 1987). When exogenous calcium buffers were omitted from the pipette solution, the macroscopic calcium current through those channels inactivated with a half time of approximately 10 ms to a steady state level 40-75% smaller than the peak. Inactivation was also measured as the reduction in peak current during a test pulse that closely followed a prepulse. Inactivation was largely reduced or eliminated by (a) buffering free calcium in the pipette solution to less than 10(-8) M; (b) replacing extracellular calcium with barium; (c) increasing the prepulse voltage from +10 to +60 mV; or (d) increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, either 'directly' with dibutyryl-cAMP or indirectly by activating adenylate cyclase with forskolin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Thus, inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells only occurs when membrane depolarization leads to calcium ion entry and intracellular accumulation. PMID:2849631

  16. Density and mixture fraction measurements in a GO2/GH2 uni-element rocket chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, M. D.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in gas/gas injectors for rocket combustion. Specifically, the proposed new concept of full-flow oxygen rich preburner systems calls for the injection of both oxygen and hydrogen into the main chamber as gaseous propellants. The technology base for gas/gas injection must mature before actual booster class systems can be designed and fabricated. Since the data base for gas/gas injection is limited to studies focusing on the global parameters of small reaction engines, there is a critical need for experiment programs that emphasize studying the mixing and combustion characteristics of GO2 and GH2 propellants from a uni-element injector point of view. The experimental study of the combusting GO2/GH2 propellant combination in a uni-element rocket chamber also provides a simplified environment, in terms of both geometry and chemistry, that can be used to verify and validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models.

  17. Backbone chemical shifts assignments, secondary structure, and ligand binding of a family GH-19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Shoko; Nagata, Takuya; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Taira, Toki; Nishimura, Shigenori; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2012-10-01

    Family GH19 chitinases have been recognized as important in the plant defense against fungal pathogens. However, their substrate-recognition mechanism is still unknown. We report here the first resonance assignment of NMR spectrum of a GH19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum (BcChi-A). The backbone signals were nearly completely assigned, and the secondary structure was estimated based on the chemical shift values. The addition of the chitin dimer to the enzyme solution perturbed the chemical shifts of HSQC resonances of the amino acid residues forming the putative substrate-binding cleft. Further NMR analysis of the ligand binding to BcChi-A will improve understanding of the substrate-recognition mechanism of GH-19 enzymes.

  18. Lack of association of GH1 and POU1F1 gene variants with meat production traits in Piemontese cattle.

    PubMed

    Di Stasio, L; Sartore, S; Albera, A

    2002-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and the Pit-1 transcription factor have been shown to be involved in the physiological mechanisms related to growth. The present study was carried out to investigate the possible association of the polymorphism at GH1 and POU1F1 loci with meat production traits in Piemontese cattle. Fourteen traits were considered, expressing growth (weight at 5, 7 and 11 months, daily gain), size [withers height (WH), trunk length (TL), chest girth (CG) at 12 months] and meat conformation [withers width (WW), shoulder muscularity (SM), loin width (LW), loin thickness (LT), thigh muscularity (TM), thigh profile (TP), bone thinness (BT)]. Data were analysed with a mixed model procedure to estimate the allele substitution and the dominance effects. The results did not provide evidence of association of GH1 and POU1F1 polymorphisms with the evaluated traits.

  19. Overexpression of GhSusA1 increases plant biomass and improves cotton fiber yield and quality.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjie; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhu, Huayu; Ruan, Yong-Ling; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2012-04-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important economic crop and the largest source of textile fiber in the world. However, to date, only a few genes have been identified that exhibit critical roles in fiber development, and few has shown positive effects on fiber yield and quality in transgenic cotton. Here, we report the characterization of a novel sucrose synthase (SusA1) gene from a superior quality fiber germplasm line 7235 in Gossypium hirsutum. By association analysis, GhSusA1 was highly correlated with fiber qualities in (7235× TM-1) recombinant inbred lines based on polymorphism of GhSusA1 between 7235 and TM-1. Subsequently, based on an interspecific population of 141 BC₁ individuals generated from the cross between TM-1 and Gossypium barbadense line, Hai7124, we further mapped GhSusA1 genes on homeologous chromosomes A8 (chro.8) and D8 (chro.24). Suppression of GhSusA1 in transgenic cotton reduced fiber quality and decreased the boll size and seed weight. Importantly, overexpression of this gene increased fiber length and strength, with the latter indicated by the enhanced thickening of cell wall during secondary wall formation stage. Moreover, increasing GhSusA1 transcript abundance in vegetative tissues led to elevated seedling biomass. Together, these findings identified GhSusA1 as a key regulator of sink strength in cotton, which is tightly associated with productivity, and hence a promising candidate gene that can be developed to increase cotton fiber yield and quality.

  20. Mitogenic signaling pathways in the liver of growth hormone (GH)-overexpressing mice during the growth period

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Carolina S.; Piazza, Verónica G.; González, Lorena; Fang, Yimin; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G.; Sotelo, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Growth hormone (GH) is a pleiotropic hormone that triggers STATs, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling, related to cell growth and proliferation. Transgenic mice overexpressing GH present increased body size, with a disproportionate liver enlargement due to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the hepatocytes. We had described enhanced mitogenic signaling in liver of young adult transgenic mice. We now evaluate the activation of these signaling cascades during the growth period and relate them to the morphological alterations found. Signaling mediators, cell cycle regulators and transcription factors involved in cellular growth in the liver of GH-overexpressing growing mice were assessed by immunoblotting, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Hepatocyte enlargement can be seen as early as 2-weeks of age in GH-overexpressing animals, although it is more pronounced in young adults. Levels of cell cycle mediators PCNA and cyclin D1, and transcription factor c-Jun increase with age in transgenic mice with no changes in normal mice, whereas c-Myc levels are higher in 2-week-old transgenic animals and cyclin E levels decline with age for both genotypes. STAT3, Akt and GSK3 present higher activation in the adult transgenic mice than in the growing animals, while for c-Src and mTOR, phosphorylation in GH-overexpressing mice is higher than in control siblings at 4 and 9 weeks of age. No significant changes are observed for ERK1/2, neither by age or genotype. Thus, the majority of the mitogenic signaling pathways are gradually up-regulated in the liver of GH-transgenic mice, giving rise to the hepatic morphological changes these mice exhibit. PMID:27028000

  1. Mitogenic signaling pathways in the liver of growth hormone (GH)-overexpressing mice during the growth period.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; González, Lorena; Fang, Yimin; Bartke, Andrzej; Turynl, Danie; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a pleiotropic hormone that triggers STATs, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling, related to cell growth and proliferation. Transgenic mice overexpressing GH present increased body size, with a disproportionate liver enlargement due to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the hepatocytes. We had described enhanced mitogenic signaling in liver of young adult transgenic mice. We now evaluate the activation of these signaling cascades during the growth period and relate them to the morphological alterations found. Signaling mediators, cell cycle regulators and transcription factors involved in cellular growth in the liver of GH-overexpressing growing mice were assessed by immunoblotting, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Hepatocyte enlargement can be seen as early as 2-weeks of age in GH-overexpressing animals, although it is more pronounced in young adults. Levels of cell cycle mediators PCNA and cyclin D1, and transcription factor c-Jun increase with age in transgenic mice with no changes in normal mice, whereas c-Myc levels are higher in 2-week-old transgenic animals and cyclin E levels decline with age for both genotypes. STAT3, Akt and GSK3 present higher activation in the adult transgenic mice than in the growing animals, while for c-Src and mTOR, phosphorylation in GH-overexpressing mice is higher than in control siblings at 4 and 9 weeks of age. No significant changes are observed for ERK1/2, neither by age or genotype. Thus, the majority of the mitogenic signaling pathways are gradually up-regulated in the liver of GH-transgenic mice, giving rise to the hepatic morphological changes these mice exhibit.

  2. Phylogenomically Guided Identification of Industrially Relevant GH1 β-Glucosidases through DNA Synthesis and Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the biotechnological potential of the large number of proteins available in sequence databases requires scalable methods for functional characterization. Here we propose a workflow to address this challenge by combining phylogenomic guided DNA synthesis with high-throughput mass spectrometry and apply it to the systematic characterization of GH1 β-glucosidases, a family of enzymes necessary for biomass hydrolysis, an important step in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuels and chemicals. We synthesized and expressed 175 GH1s, selected from over 2000 candidate sequences to cover maximum sequence diversity. These enzymes were functionally characterized over a range of temperatures and pHs using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS), generating over 10,000 data points. When combined with HPLC-based sugar profiling, we observed GH1 enzymes active over a broad temperature range and toward many different β-linked disaccharides. For some GH1s we also observed activity toward laminarin, a more complex oligosaccharide present as a major component of macroalgae. An area of particular interest was the identification of GH1 enzymes compatible with the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), a next-generation biomass pretreatment technology. We thus searched for GH1 enzymes active at 70 °C and 20% (v/v) [C2mim][OAc] over the course of a 24-h saccharification reaction. Using our unbiased approach, we identified multiple enzymes of different phylogentic origin with such activities. Our approach of characterizing sequence diversity through targeted gene synthesis coupled to high-throughput screening technologies is a broadly applicable paradigm for a wide range of biological problems. PMID:24984213

  3. Evaluation of the Role of the opgGH Operon in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Its Deletion during the Emergence of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Kévin; Dewitte, Amélie; Reboul, Angéline; Madec, Edwige; Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Marceau, Michaël; Simonet, Michel; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Sebbane, Florent

    2015-09-01

    The opgGH operon encodes glucosyltransferases that synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from UDP-glucose, using acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a cofactor. OPGs are required for motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in various bacteria. OpgH also sequesters FtsZ in order to regulate cell size according to nutrient availability. Yersinia pestis (the agent of flea-borne plague) lost the opgGH operon during its emergence from the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. When expressed in OPG-negative strains of Escherichia coli and Dickeya dadantii, opgGH from Y. pseudotuberculosis restored OPGs synthesis, motility, and virulence. However, Y. pseudotuberculosis did not produce OPGs (i) under various growth conditions or (ii) when overexpressing its opgGH operon, its galUF operon (governing UDP-glucose), or the opgGH operon or Acp from E. coli. A ΔopgGH Y. pseudotuberculosis strain showed normal motility, biofilm formation, resistance to polymyxin and macrophages, and virulence but was smaller. Consistently, Y. pestis was smaller than Y. pseudotuberculosis when cultured at ≥ 37°C, except when the plague bacillus expressed opgGH. Y. pestis expressing opgGH grew normally in serum and within macrophages and was fully virulent in mice, suggesting that small cell size was not advantageous in the mammalian host. Lastly, Y. pestis expressing opgGH was able to infect Xenopsylla cheopis fleas normally. Our results suggest an evolutionary scenario whereby an ancestral Yersinia strain lost a factor required for OPG biosynthesis but kept opgGH (to regulate cell size). The opgGH operon was presumably then lost because OpgH-dependent cell size control became unnecessary.

  4. Evaluation of the Role of the opgGH Operon in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Its Deletion during the Emergence of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Quintard, Kévin; Dewitte, Amélie; Reboul, Angéline; Madec, Edwige; Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Marceau, Michaël; Simonet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The opgGH operon encodes glucosyltransferases that synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) from UDP-glucose, using acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a cofactor. OPGs are required for motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in various bacteria. OpgH also sequesters FtsZ in order to regulate cell size according to nutrient availability. Yersinia pestis (the agent of flea-borne plague) lost the opgGH operon during its emergence from the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. When expressed in OPG-negative strains of Escherichia coli and Dickeya dadantii, opgGH from Y. pseudotuberculosis restored OPGs synthesis, motility, and virulence. However, Y. pseudotuberculosis did not produce OPGs (i) under various growth conditions or (ii) when overexpressing its opgGH operon, its galUF operon (governing UDP-glucose), or the opgGH operon or Acp from E. coli. A ΔopgGH Y. pseudotuberculosis strain showed normal motility, biofilm formation, resistance to polymyxin and macrophages, and virulence but was smaller. Consistently, Y. pestis was smaller than Y. pseudotuberculosis when cultured at ≥37°C, except when the plague bacillus expressed opgGH. Y. pestis expressing opgGH grew normally in serum and within macrophages and was fully virulent in mice, suggesting that small cell size was not advantageous in the mammalian host. Lastly, Y. pestis expressing opgGH was able to infect Xenopsylla cheopis fleas normally. Our results suggest an evolutionary scenario whereby an ancestral Yersinia strain lost a factor required for OPG biosynthesis but kept opgGH (to regulate cell size). The opgGH operon was presumably then lost because OpgH-dependent cell size control became unnecessary. PMID:26150539

  5. Combined treatment with GH and IGF-I: additive effect on cortical bone mass but not on linear bone growth in female rats.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Katja; Cedervall, Therese; Ohlsson, Claes; Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia; Sävendahl, Lars

    2014-12-01

    The growth-promoting effect of combined therapy with GH and IGF-I in normal rats is not known. We therefore investigated the efficacy of treatment with recombinant human (rh)GH and/or rhIGF-I on longitudinal bone growth and bone mass in intact, prepubertal, female Sprague-Dawley rats. rhGH was injected twice daily sc (5 mg/kg·d) and rhIGF-I continuously infused sc (2.2 or 4.4 mg/kg·d) for 28 days. Longitudinal bone growth was monitored by weekly x-rays of tibiae and nose-anus length measurements, and tibial growth plate histomorphology was analyzed. Bone mass was evaluated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. In addition, serum levels of IGF-I, rat GH, acid labile subunit, IGF binding protein-3, 150-kDa ternary complex formation, and markers of bone formation and degradation were measured. Monotherapy with rhGH was more effective than rhIGF-I (4.4 mg/kg·d) to increase tibia and nose-anus length, whereas combined therapy did not further increase tibia, or nose-anus, lengths or growth plate height. In contrast, combined rhGH and rhIGF-I (4.4 mg/kg·d) therapy had an additive stimulatory effect on cortical bone mass vs rhGH alone. Combined treatment with rhGH and rhIGF-I resulted in markedly higher serum IGF-I concentrations vs rhGH alone but did not compromise the endogenous secretion of GH. We conclude that rhIGF-I treatment augments cortical bone mass but does not further improve bone growth in rhGH-treated young, intact, female rats.

  6. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sustarsic, Elahu G.; Junnila, Riia K.; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  7. Crystal structure of a novel two domain GH78 family α-rhamnosidase from Klebsiella oxytoca with rhamnose bound.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Stevenson, Clare E M; Paterson, Michael J; Rejzek, Martin; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Lawson, David M; Field, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of the GH78 family α-rhamnosidase from Klebsiella oxytoca (KoRha) has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution with rhamnose bound in the active site of the catalytic domain. Curiously, the putative catalytic acid, Asp 222, is preceded by an unusual non-proline cis-peptide bond which helps to project the carboxyl group into the active centre. This KoRha homodimeric structure is significantly smaller than those of the other previously determined GH78 structures. Nevertheless, the enzyme displays α-rhamnosidase activity when assayed in vitro, suggesting that the additional structural domains found in the related enzymes are dispensible for function.

  8. The Highly Conserved Proline at Position 438 in Pseudorabies Virus gH Is Important for Regulation of Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Schröter, Christina; Klupp, Barbara G.; Fuchs, Walter; Gerhard, Marika; Backovic, Marija; Rey, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane fusion in herpesviruses requires viral glycoproteins (g) gB and gH/gL. While gB is considered the actual fusion protein but is nonfusogenic per se, the function of gH/gL remains enigmatic. Crystal structures for different gH homologs are strikingly similar despite only moderate amino acid sequence conservation. A highly conserved sequence motif comprises the residues serine-proline-cysteine corresponding to positions 437 to 439 in pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH. The PrV-gH structure shows that proline438 induces bending at the end of an alpha-helix, thereby placing cysteine404 and cysteine439 in juxtaposition to allow formation of a strictly conserved disulfide bond. However, PrV vaccine strain Bartha unexpectedly carries a serine at this conserved position. To test the influence of this substitution, we constructed different gH chimeras carrying proline or serine at position 438 in gH derived from either PrV strain Kaplan or strain Bartha. Mutants expressing gH with serine438 showed reduced fusion activity in transient-fusion assays and during infection, with delayed penetration kinetics and a small-plaque phenotype which indicates that proline438 is important for efficient fusion. A more drastic effect was observed when disulfide bond formation was completely blocked by mutation of cysteine404 to serine. Although PrV expressing gHC404S was viable, plaque size and penetration kinetics were drastically reduced. Alteration of serine438 to proline in gH of strain Bartha enhanced cell-to-cell spread and penetration kinetics, but restoration of full activity required additional alteration of aspartic acid to valine at position 59. IMPORTANCE The role of the gH/gL complex in herpesvirus membrane fusion is still unclear. Structural studies predicted a critical role for proline438 in PrV gH to allow the formation of a conserved disulfide bond and correct protein folding. Functional analyses within this study corroborated these structural predictions

  9. GhCFE1A, a dynamic linker between the ER network and actin cytoskeleton, plays an important role in cotton fibre cell initiation and elongation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fenni; Wang, Haihai; Wang, Xinyu; Han, Libo; Ma, Yinping; Wang, Sen; Feng, Zhidi; Niu, Xiaowei; Cai, Caiping; Kong, Zhaosheng; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-04-01

    Fibre cell initiation and elongation is critical for cotton fibre development. However, little is known about the regulation of initiation and elongation during fibre cell development. Here, the regulatory role of a novel protein GhCFE1A was uncovered. GhCFE1A is preferentially expressed at initiation and rapid elongation stages during fibre development; in addition, much higher expression of GhCFE1A was detected at the fibre initiation stage in fibreless cotton mutants than in the fibre-bearing TM-1 wild-type. Importantly, overexpression of GhCFE1A in cotton not only delayed fibre cell elongation but also significantly reduced the density of lint and fuzz fibre initials and stem trichomes. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that GhCFE1A interacted with several actin proteins, and the interaction was further confirmed by co-sedimentation assay. Interestingly, a subcellular localization assay showed that GhCFE1A resided on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network and co-localized with actin cables. Moreover, the density of F-actin filaments was shown to be reduced in GhCFE1A-overexpressing fibres at the rapid elongation stage compared with the wild-type control. Taken together, the results demonstrate that GhCFE1A probably functions as a dynamic linker between the actin cytoskeleton and the ER network, and plays an important role in fibre cell initiation and elongation during cotton fibre development.

  10. The activation and differential signalling of the growth hormone receptor induced by pGH or anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lan, Hainan; Liu, Huimin; Fu, Zhiling; Yang, Yanhong; Han, Weiwei; Guo, Feng; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jingsheng; Zheng, Xin

    2013-08-25

    In this report, we have developed a panel of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies to pGH by immunising BALB/c mice with a purified monoclonal anti-pGH antibody (1A3), among which one mAb, termed CG-8F, was selected for further characterisation. We found that CG-8F behaved as a typical Ab2β, not only conformationally competing with pGH for 1A3 but also exhibiting recognition for GHR in a rat hepatocyte model. We next examined the resulting signal transduction pathways triggered by this antibody in rat hepatocytes and found that both pGH and CG-8F could trigger the JAK2-STAT1/3/5-mediated signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, the phosphorylation kinetics of pSTAT1/3/5 induced by either pGH or CG-8F were remarkably similar in the dose-response and time course rat hepatocyte experiments. In contrast, only pGH, but not CG-8F, was capable of inducing ERK phosphorylation. Further experimental studies indicated that the two functional binding sites on CG-8F are required for GHR activation. This study partially reveals the mechanism of action of GH anti-idiotypic antibodies and also indicates that monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies represent an effective way to produce GH mimics, suggesting that it is possible to produce signal-specific cytokine agonists using an anti-idiotypic antibody approach.

  11. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood-brain barrier in rats.

    PubMed

    Valiante, Salvatore; Falanga, Annarita; Cigliano, Luisa; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Busiello, Rosa Anna; La Marca, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Assunta; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases.

  12. Isolation and expression profiling of GhNAC transcription factor genes in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) during leaf senescence and in response to stresses.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Tariq; Pang, Chaoyou; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Arain, Saima; Yu, Shuxun

    2013-12-01

    NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) is a plant-specific transcription factor family with diverse roles in plant development and stress regulation. In this report, stress-responsive NAC genes (GhNAC8-GhNAC17) isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were characterised in the context of leaf senescence and stress tolerance. The characterisation of NAC genes during leaf senescence has not yet been reported for cotton. Based on the sequence characterisation, these GhNACs could be classified into three groups belonging to three known NAC sub-families. Their predicted amino acid sequences exhibited similarities to NAC genes from other plant species. Senescent leaves were the sites of maximum expression for all GhNAC genes except GhNAC10 and GhNAC13, which showed maximum expression in fibres, collected from 25 days post anthesis (DPA) plants. The ten GhNAC genes displayed differential expression patterns and levels during natural and induced leaf senescence. Quantitative RT-PCR and promoter analyses suggest that these genes are induced by ABA, ethylene, drought, salinity, cold, heat, and other hormonal treatments. These results support a role for cotton GhNAC genes in transcriptional regulation of leaf senescence, stress tolerance and other developmental stages of cotton.

  13. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on hemoglobin concentration in children with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency-related anemia.

    PubMed

    Miniero, Roberto; Altomare, Federica; Rubino, Mario; Matarazzo, Patrizia; Montanari, Claudio; Petri, Antonella; Raiola, Giuseppe; Bona, Gianni

    2012-08-01

    Normocytic-normochromic anemia (NC/NC) has been attributed to impaired bone marrow erythropoiesis in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients. Moreover, the GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis has been implicated in erythropoiesis regulation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we evaluated the incidence of NC/NC anemia in 279 children (196 boys), median age 10.52 years, with isolated idiopathic GH deficiency, and the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on hemoglobin levels. At 6-month intervals, we recorded the Hb standard deviation score (Hb-SDS), the IGF-1-SDS, weight, height, and pubertal stage. Forty-one boys and 7 girls had NC/NC anemia before starting substitutive therapy (-2.59 SD). The Hb-SDS was significantly increased (P<0.05) after 12 months of rhGH therapy. The effect of rhGH continued up to 48 months (-0.39 SD), at which point all children had normal hemoglobin values. In conclusion, rhGH therapy resulted in normal hemoglobin values in all children enrolled in the study. These data support the concept that the GH/IGF-1 axis promotes erythropoiesis in vivo.

  14. Growth and maturational changes in dense fibrous connective tissue following 14 days of rhGH supplementation in the dwarf rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyparos, Antonios; Orth, Michael W.; Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on patella tendon (PT), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) on collagen growth and maturational changes in dwarf GH-deficient rats. Twenty male Lewis mutant dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to Dwarf + rhGH (n = 10) and Dwarf + vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt twice daily for 14 days. rhGH administration stimulated dense fibrous connective tissue growth, as demonstrated by significant increases in hydroxyproline specific activity and significant decreases in the non-reducible hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) collagen cross-link contents. The increase in the accumulation of newly accreted collagen was 114, 67, and 117% for PT, MCL, and LCL, respectively, in 72 h. These findings suggest that a short course rhGH treatment can affect the rate of new collagen production. However, the maturation of the tendon and ligament tissues decreased 18-25% during the rapid accumulation of de novo collagen. We conclude that acute rhGH administration in a dwarf rat can up-regulate new collagen accretion in dense fibrous connective tissues, while causing a reduction in collagen maturation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  16. Genome-wide identification, expression analysis of auxin-responsive GH3 family genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; Yue, Runqing; Tao, Sun; Yang, Yanjun; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Mingfeng; Wang, Huizhong; Shen, Chenjia

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is involved in different aspects of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of auxin-responsive family genes. As one of the three major auxin-responsive families, GH3 (Gretchen Hagen3) genes participate in auxin homeostasis by catalyzing auxin conjugation and bounding free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids. However, how GH3 genes function in responses to abiotic stresses and various hormones in maize is largely unknown. Here, the latest updated maize (Zea mays L.) reference genome sequence was used to characterize and analyze the ZmGH3 family genes from maize. The results showed that 13 ZmGH3 genes were mapped on five maize chromosomes (total 10 chromosomes). Highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns suggested the possibility of function diversification for these genes in response to environmental stresses and hormone stimuli. The expression patterns of ZmGH3 genes are responsive to several abiotic stresses (salt, drought and cadmium) and major stress-related hormones (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid). Various environmental factors suppress auxin free IAA contents in maize roots suggesting that these abiotic stresses and hormones might alter GH3-mediated auxin levels. The responsiveness of ZmGH3 genes to a wide range of abiotic stresses and stress-related hormones suggested that ZmGH3s are involved in maize tolerance to environmental stresses.

  17. Dissociation of HSV gL from gH by αvβ6- or αvβ8-integrin promotes gH activation and virus entry.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Tatiana; Massaro, Raffaele; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2015-07-21

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an important human pathogen. It enters cells through an orchestrated process that requires four essential glycoproteins, gD, gH/gL, and gB, activated in cascade fashion by receptor-binding and signaling. gH/gL heterodimer is conserved across the Herpesviridae family. HSV entry is enabled by gH/gL interaction with αvβ6- or αvβ8-integrin receptors. We report that the interaction of virion gH/gL with integrins resulted in gL dissociation and its release in the medium. gL dissociation occurred if all components of the entry apparatus-receptor-bound gD and gB-were present and was prevented if entry was blocked by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to gH or by a mutation in gH. We propose that (i) gL dissociation from gH/gL is part of the activation of HSV glycoproteins, critical for HSV entry; and (ii) gL is a functional inhibitor of gH and maintains gH in an inhibited form until receptor-bound gD and integrins signal to gH/gL.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a novel α-L-arabinofuranosidase (CtGH43) from Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Arun; Ahmed, Shadab; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Najmudin, Shabir

    2014-05-01

    The truncated carbohydrate-active enzyme belonging to family 43 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium thermocellum (CtGH43) is an α-L-arabinofuranosidase that in combination with endoxylanase leads to complete breakdown of L-arabinosyl-substituted xylans. The recombinant enzyme CtGH43 from C. thermocellum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography. The recombinant CtGH43 has a molecular mass of 35.86 kDa. Preliminary structural characterization was carried out on CtGH43 crystallized from different conditions, which gave either cube-shaped or brick-shaped crystals. These diffracted to a resolution of 1.65 Å for the cubic form and 1.1 Å for the monoclinic form. Molecular replacement was used to solve the CtGH43 structure.

  19. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway.

  20. Identification of the nucleophile catalytic residue of GH51 α-l-arabinofuranosidase from Pleurotus ostreatus

    DOE PAGES

    Amore, Antonella; Iadonisi, Alfonso; Vincent, Florence; ...

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, the recombinant α-l-arabinofuranosidase from the fungus Pleurotus ostreatus (rPoAbf) was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in order to identify the catalytic nucleophile residue. Based on bioinformatics and homology modelling analyses, E449 was revealed to be the potential nucleophilic residue. Thus, the mutant E449G of PoAbf was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris and its recombinant expression level and reactivity were investigated in comparison to the wild-type. The design of a suitable set of hydrolysis experiments in the presence or absence of alcoholic arabinosyl acceptors and/or formate salts allowed to unambiguously identify the residue E449 as the nucleophile residue involvedmore » in the retaining mechanism of this GH51 arabinofuranosidase. 1H NMR analysis was applied for the identification of the products and the assignement of their anomeric configuration.« less

  1. Elucidation of the Interaction Mechanism with Liposomes of gH625-Peptide Functionalized Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Carberry, Thomas; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Weck, Marcus; Galdiero, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that amide-based dendrimers functionalized with the membrane-interacting peptide gH625 derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein H enter cells mainly through a non-active translocation mechanism. Herein, we investigate the interaction between the peptide-functionalized dendrimer and liposomes composed of PC/Chol using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance to get insights into the mechanism of internalization. The affinity for the membrane bilayer is very high and the interaction between the peptide-dendrimer and liposomes took place without evidence of pore formation. These results suggest that the presented peptidodendrimeric scaffold may be a promising material for efficient drug delivery. PMID:25423477

  2. Muscle expressions of MGF, IGF-IEa, and myostatin in intact and hypophysectomized rats: effects of rhGH and testosterone alone or combined.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, A E; Locatelli, L; Cella, S G; Bonomo, S M; Giunta, M; Molinari, F; Sartorio, A; Müller, E E

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin and mechano-growth factor (MGF), an isoform of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), are two important regulators of muscle hypertrophy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and/or testosterone on muscle MGF/IGF-IEa/myostatin expression in intact and hypophysectomized rats treated for 15 d with 1) saline or rhGH, 2) sesame oil or testosterone, 3) saline+sesame oil, or rhGH+testosterone (first experiment) or for 7 d with saline or rhGH (second experiment). Animals were killed by decapitation 24 h or 4 d after the last injection (first or second experiment, respectively). Muscle expressions of MGF, IGF-IEa, and myostatin were determined by RT-PCR. A significant increase in the weight of gastrocnemius muscle was observed only in hypophysectomized rats treated with rhGH alone or in combination with testosterone. Administration of rhGH to hypophysectomized rats caused a marked increase in both MGF and IGF-IEa muscle mRNA levels (without any change in the muscle expression of myostatin), an effect that was abolished when testosterone was combined with rhGH. Conversely, in intact rats rhGH increased myostatin muscle mRNA levels without affecting those of MGF and IGF-IEa. Testosterone, alone or combined with rhGH, induced an inhibition of myostatin expression in the muscle of intact rats, but did not change muscle paradigms of hypophysectomized rats. In conclusion, rhGH and/or testosterone anabolic effects in the muscle are mediated by a different expression of MGF/IGF-IEa/myostatin, which is related to the pituitary function.

  3. Enzymology and structure of the GH13_31 glucan 1,6-α-glucosidase that confers isomaltooligosaccharide utilization in the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Møller, Marie S; Fredslund, Folmer; Majumder, Avishek; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Lo Leggio, Leila; Svensson, Birte; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-08-01

    Isomaltooligosaccharides (IMO) have been suggested as promising prebiotics that stimulate the growth of probiotic bacteria. Genomes of probiotic lactobacilli from the acidophilus group, as represented by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, encode α-1,6 glucosidases of the family GH13_31 (glycoside hydrolase family 13 subfamily 31) that confer degradation of IMO. These genes reside frequently within maltooligosaccharide utilization operons, which include an ATP-binding cassette transporter and α-glucan active enzymes, e.g., maltogenic amylases and maltose phosphorylases, and they also occur separated from any carbohydrate transport or catabolism genes on the genomes of some acidophilus complex members, as in L. acidophilus NCFM. Besides the isolated locus encoding a GH13_31 enzyme, the ABC transporter and another GH13 in the maltooligosaccharide operon were induced in response to IMO or maltotetraose, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) transcriptional analysis, suggesting coregulation of α-1,6- and α-1,4-glucooligosaccharide utilization loci in L. acidophilus NCFM. The L. acidophilus NCFM GH13_31 (LaGH13_31) was produced recombinantly and shown to be a glucan 1,6-α-glucosidase active on IMO and dextran and product-inhibited by glucose. The catalytic efficiency of LaGH13_31 on dextran and the dextran/panose (trisaccharide) efficiency ratio were the highest reported for this class of enzymes, suggesting higher affinity at distal substrate binding sites. The crystal structure of LaGH13_31 was determined to a resolution of 2.05 Å and revealed additional substrate contacts at the +2 subsite in LaGH13_31 compared to the GH13_31 from Streptococcus mutans (SmGH13_31), providing a possible structural rationale to the relatively high affinity for dextran. A comprehensive phylogenetic and activity motif analysis mapped IMO utilization enzymes from gut microbiota to rationalize preferential utilization of IMO by gut residents.

  4. Molecular cloning, expression profile and promoter analysis of a novel ethylene responsive transcription factor gene GhERF4 from cotton (Gossypium hirstum).

    PubMed

    Jin, Long-Guo; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors, many of which have been linked to stress responses. A novel ERF gene, designated GhERF4, was isolated by RACE-PCR from Gossypium hirsutum. The GhERF4 cDNA has a total length of 1061bp with an open reading frame of 669bp, encoding a protein of 222 amino acids with a molecular weight of 23.5kDa and a calculated pI of 9.03. Sequence alignment shows that GhERF4 contains a 58 amino acid long AP2/ERF domain and a RKRP nuclear localization signal, and belongs to a group II protein in the ERF subfamily as typified by the C-terminal ERF-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif. Southern blot analysis indicates that GhERF4 is a single copy gene in cotton genome. Using green fluorescent protein fusion, we demonstrate that GhERF4 accumulates specifically in the nucleus of onion epidermis cells. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR reveals that GhERF4 is constitutively expressed in true leaves, roots, seeds and stems. The transcripts of GhERF4 accumulate highly and rapidly when plants are treated with exogenous ethylene, salt, cold, drought stresses and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, suggesting that GhERF4 is regulated by certain components of the stress signaling pathway. Promoter analysis indicates that the 5' upstream region of GhERF4 possesses some elements induced by physiological and environmental factors. These results indicate that GhERF4 may play an important role in response to ethylene, ABA and environmental stresses.

  5. Context matters: The importance of dimerization-induced conformation of the LukGH leukocidin of Staphylococcus aureus for the generation of neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Badarau, Adriana; Rouha, Harald; Malafa, Stefan; Battles, Michael B.; Walker, Laura; Nielson, Nels; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Banerjee, Srijib; Maierhofer, Barbara; Weber, Susanne; Stulik, Lukas; Logan, Derek T.; Welin, Martin; Mirkina, Irina; Pleban, Clara; Zauner, Gerhild; Gross, Karin; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT LukGH (LukAB) is a potent leukocidin of Staphylococcus aureus that lyses human phagocytic cells and is thought to contribute to immune evasion. Unlike the other bi-component leukocidins of S. aureus, LukGH forms a heterodimer before binding to its receptor, CD11b expressed on professional phagocytic cells, and displays significant sequence variation. We employed a high diversity human IgG1 library presented on yeast cells to discover monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) neutralizing the cytolytic activity of LukGH. Recombinant LukG and LukH monomers or a LukGH dimer were used as capture antigens in the library selections. We found that mAbs identified with LukG or LukH as bait had no or very low toxin neutralization potency. In contrast, LukGH dimer-selected antibodies proved to be highly potent, and several mAbs were able to neutralize even the most divergent LukGH variants. Based on biolayer interferometry and mesoscale discovery, the high affinity antibody binding site on the LukGH complex was absent on the individual monomers, suggesting that it was generated upon formation of the LukG-LukH dimer. X-ray crystallography analysis of the complex between the LukGH dimer and the antigen-binding fragment of a very potent mAb (PDB code 5K59) indicated that the epitope is located in the predicted cell binding region (rim domain) of LukGH. The corresponding IgG inhibited the binding of LukGH dimer to target cells. Our data suggest that knowledge of the native conformation of target molecules is essential to generate high affinity and functional mAbs. PMID:27467113

  6. Structural basis for the transglycosylase activity of a GH57-type glycogen branching enzyme from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Na, Soohui; Park, Minjeong; Jo, Inseong; Cha, Jaeho; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2017-03-18

    Glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) catalyzes the formation of α-1,6-branching points during glycogenesis by cleaving α-1,4 bonds and making new α-1,6 bonds. Most GBEs belong to the glycoside hydrolase 13 family (GH13), but new GBEs in the GH57 family have been isolated from Archaea. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a GH57 GBE from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhGBE) at a resolution of 2.3 Å. PhGBE exhibits both α-1,6-branching activity and endo-α-1,4 hydrolytic activity. PhGBE has a central (β/α)7-barrel domain that contains an embedded helix domain and an α-helix-rich C-terminal domain. The active-site cleft is located at the interface of the central and C-terminal domains. Amino acid substitution at Trp22, which is separate from the catalytic nucleophilic residue, abolished both enzymatic activities, indicating that Trp22 might be responsible for substrate recognition. We also observed that shortening of the flexible loop near the catalytic residue changed branched chain lengths of the reaction products with increased hydrolytic activity. Taken together, our findings propose a molecular mechanism for how GH57 GBEs exhibit the two activities and where the substrate binds the enzyme.

  7. Evaluation of fibronectin 1 in one dried blood spot and in urine after rhGH treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferro, P; Ventura, R; Pérez-Mañá, C; Farré, M; Segura, J

    2016-10-07

    Since the appearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in the 1980s, its expansion and acquisition through the black market has increased, so the detection of its abuse continues to be a challenge. New biomarkers that are more reliable and sensitive, allowing a larger detection window, are still needed. In this line, Fibronectin 1 (FN1) has been proposed as a potential genetic and protein biomarker of rhGH abuse in peripheral blood lymphocytes, serum, and plasma. However, logistic problems associated with current blood collection in sports drug testing point towards potential new alternative matrices that could be good candidates to be evaluated. Results obtained in this study showed high ELISA FN1 levels in one dried blood spot and in urine samples in ten healthy male volunteers treated with rhGH. Results showed that especially dried blood spots appear as a potential good matrix to detect rhGH abuse by means of FN1 biomarker. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Dramatic volume reduction of a large GH/TSH secreting pituitary tumor with short term Octreotide therapy.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John L D; Abboud, Charles F; Lane, John I

    2005-01-01

    A case is presented of a huge GH/TSH secreting tumor and marked volumetric reduction in size with only one week of Octreotide therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of such a dramatic volumetric response to short-term Octreotide therapy.

  9. Endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of a GH-PRL-secreting pituitary macroadenoma in a patient with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Manikandan S; Prabhu, Krishna; Chacko, Geeta; Rajaratnam, Simon; Chacko, Ari G

    2012-02-01

    We describe an endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of a GH-PRL-secreting pituitary adenoma and remodeling of frontotemporal fibrous dysplasia in a patient with McCune-Albright syndrome. Sphenoid dysplasia rendered transsphenoidal surgery challenging, but a study of the radiological anatomy and good surgical planning made this feasible. Medical therapy and radiation was required for persistent acromegaly after surgery.

  10. Effect of polymorphic variants of GH, Pit-1, and beta-LG genes on milk production of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Heidari, M; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Zerehdaran, S

    2012-04-01

    Effect of polymorphic variants of growth hormone (GH), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and Pit-1 genes on milk yield was analyzed in a Holstein herd. Genotypes of the cows for these genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Allele frequencies were 0.884 and 0.116 for L and V variants of GH, 0.170 and 0.830 for A and B variants of Pit-1, and 0.529 and 0.471 for A and B variants of beta-LG, respectively. GLM procedure of SAS software was used to test the effects of these genes on milk yield. Results indicated significant effects of these genes on milk yield (P < 0.05). Cows with LL genotype of GH produced more milk than cows with LVgenotype (P < 0.05). Also, for Pit-1 gene, animals with AB genotype produced more milk than BB genotype (P < 0.05). In the case of beta-LG gene, milk yield of animals with AA genotype was more than BB genotype (P < 0.01). Therefore, it might be concluded that homozygote genotypes of GH (LL) and beta-LG (AA) were superior compared to heterozygote genotypes, whereas, the heterozygote genotype of Pit-1 gene (AB) was desirable.

  11. Effects of GH, prolactin and cortisol on hepatic heat shock protein 70 expression in a marine teleost Sparus sarba.

    PubMed

    Deane, E E; Kelly, S P; Lo, C K; Woo, N Y

    1999-06-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression was assessed in hepatic tissue of a marine teleost Sparus sarba after exogenous hormone administration. Using a PCR-amplified, homologous HSP70 cDNA clone, as a probe in Northern analysis, we detected a 2.3 kb transcript which was elevated after exposure to a temperature 7 degrees C above the ambient. For our studies on hormonal effects on HSP70 expression, groups of fish were administered recombinant bream GH (rbGH), ovine prolactin (oPRL) or cortisol daily over a 7-day period. Quantification of hepatic HSP70 transcript revealed that the administration of GH and PRL significantly reduced HSP70 mRNA abundance by 42% and 54% from saline-injected fish respectively. Also hepatic HSP70 levels were reduced by 76% and 64% as determined by immunoblotting after rbGH and oPRL treatment respectively. The administration of exogenous cortisol did not alter hepatic HSP70 mRNA or protein levels in S. sarba. The results obtained in this study are the first evidence for hormonal modulation of heat shock protein expression in fish. The significance of these results is discussed within the context of current knowledge on the roles of these hormones in teleostean stress response.

  12. Engineering increased thermostability in the GH-10 endo-1,4-ß-xylanase from Thermoascus aurantiacus CBMAI 756

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GH10 endo-xylanase from Thermoascus aurantiacus CBMAI 756 (XynA) is industrially attractive due to its considerable thermostability and high specific activity. Considering the possibility of a further improvement in thermostability, eleven mutants were created in the present study via site-direc...

  13. Dexamethasone increases growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor mRNA levels in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, M; Sato, M; Matsubara, S; Wada, Y; Takahara, J

    1996-06-01

    To examine the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor gene expression, a highly-sensitive and quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was used in this study. Rat anterior pituitary cells were isolated and cultured for 4 days. The cultured cells were treated with dexamethasone for 2, 6, and 24 h. GRH receptor mRNA levels were determined by competitive RT-PCR using a recombinant RNA as the competitor. Dexamethasone significantly increased GRH receptor mRNA levels at 5 nM after 6- and 24 h-incubations, and the maximal effect was found at 25 nM. The GC receptor-specific antagonist, RU 38486 completely eliminated the dexamethasone-induced enhancement of GRH receptor mRNA levels. Dexamethasone did not alter the mRNA levels of beta-actin and prolactin at 5 nM for 24 h, whereas GH mRNA levels were significantly increased by the same treatment. The GH response to GRH was significantly enhanced by the 24-h incubation with 5 nM dexamethasone. These findings suggest that GC stimulates GRH receptor gene expression through the ligand-activated GC receptors in the rat somatotrophs. The direct effects of GC on the GRH receptor gene could explain the enhancement of GRH-induced GH secretion.

  14. Characterization of a novel RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase GhRING2 differentially expressed in cotton fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis pathway is responsible for the degradation of abnormal and short-lived proteins to regulate many important biochemical activities in eukaryotes. By employing affymetrix microarray analysis, we have identified a novel ubiquitin ligase E3 gene GhRING2 that is diffe...

  15. Effect of long-term GHRH and somatostatin administration on GH release and body weight in prepubertal female rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Romero, A; Rol de Lama, M A; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A

    1999-12-01

    In order to find a chronic GHRH administration capable of stimulating growth rate without depleting pituitary GH content, prepubertal female rats were subcutaneously (sc) treated with GHRH (1-29)-NH2 and somatostatin (SS). In experiment 1, the rats received sc injections of GHRH and cyclic natural SS for 19 days. In the second study, female rats were continuously treated during 21 days with GHRH, using a slow release pellet, alone or combined with one daily injection of long acting SS (octreotide). In experiment 1, body weight was significantly increased when GHRH was administered at the highest daily dosage (1200 microg/day), accompanied by an slight increment in pituitary GH content. Hypothalamic SS concentrations decreased when GHRH or SS were administered alone whereas the combined treatment with both peptides did not modify this parameter, which suggests the existence of a balance between the chronic actions of both peptides on hypothalamus. In experiment 2, the continuous infusion of GHRH increased plasma GH levels and tended to enhance pituitary GH content. Nevertheless, GHRH effect was not effective enough to increase body weight. By adding one daily injection of SS both GHRH effects on the pituitary gland were abolished. Our study indicates that female rats retain responsiveness to chronic GHRH and SS treatments at both pituitary and hypothalamic levels.

  16. Contribution of Shape and Charge to the Inhibition of a Family GH99 endo-α-1,2-Mannanase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor design incorporating features of the reaction coordinate and transition-state structure has emerged as a powerful approach for the development of enzyme inhibitors. Such inhibitors find use as mechanistic probes, chemical biology tools, and therapeutics. Endo-α-1,2-mannosidases and endo-α-1,2-mannanases, members of glycoside hydrolase family 99 (GH99), are interesting targets for inhibitor development as they play key roles in N-glycan maturation and microbiotal yeast mannan degradation, respectively. These enzymes are proposed to act via a 1,2-anhydrosugar “epoxide” mechanism that proceeds through an unusual conformational itinerary. Here, we explore how shape and charge contribute to binding of diverse inhibitors of these enzymes. We report the synthesis of neutral dideoxy, glucal and cyclohexenyl disaccharide inhibitors, their binding to GH99 endo-α-1,2-mannanases, and their structural analysis by X-ray crystallography. Quantum mechanical calculations of the free energy landscapes reveal how the neutral inhibitors provide shape but not charge mimicry of the proposed intermediate and transition state structures. Building upon the knowledge of shape and charge contributions to inhibition of family GH99 enzymes, we design and synthesize α-Man-1,3-noeuromycin, which is revealed to be the most potent inhibitor (KD 13 nM for Bacteroides xylanisolvens GH99 enzyme) of these enzymes yet reported. This work reveals how shape and charge mimicry of transition state features can enable the rational design of potent inhibitors. PMID:27992199

  17. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase by Chemical Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Meekrathok, Piyanat; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase) is a chitinolytic enzyme responsible for the successive degradation of chitin fragments to GlcNAc monomers, activating the onset of the chitin catabolic cascade in marine Vibrios. Methods Two invariant acidic pairs (Asp303-Asp304 and Asp437-Glu438) of VhGlcNAcase were mutated using a site-directed mutagenesis strategy. The effects of these mutations were examined and the catalytic roles of these active-site residues were elucidated using a chemical rescue approach. Enhancement of the enzymic activity of the VhGlcNAcase mutants was evaluated by a colorimetric assay using pNP-GlcNAc as substrate. Results Substitution of Asp303, Asp304, Asp437 or Glu438 with Ala/Asn/Gln produced a dramatic loss of the GlcNAcase activity. However, the activity of the inactive D437A mutant was recovered in the presence of sodium formate. Our kinetic data suggest that formate ion plays a nucleophilic role by mimicking the β-COO-side chain of Asp437, thereby stabilizing the reaction intermediate during both the glycosylation and the deglycosylation steps. Conclusions Chemical rescue of the inactive D437A mutant of VhGlcNAcase by an added nucleophile helped to identify Asp437 as the catalytic nucleophile/base, and hence its acidic partner Glu438 as the catalytic proton donor/acceptor. General Significance Identification of the catalytic nucleophile of VhGlcNAcases supports the proposal of a substrate-assisted mechanism of GH20 GlcNAcases, requiring the catalytic pair Asp437-Glu438 for catalysis. The results suggest the mechanistic basis of the participation of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase in the chitin catabolic pathway of marine Vibrios. PMID:26870945

  18. Regulation of mTOR activity in Snell dwarf and GH receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Graham; Berryman, Darlene E; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in lifespan control in invertebrates, calorie-restricted rodents, and extension of mouse lifespan by rapamycin have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR function may contribute to mammalian longevity in several settings. We show here that mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) activity is indeed lower in liver, muscle, heart, and kidney tissue of Snell dwarf and global GH receptor (GHR) gene-disrupted mice (GHR-/-), consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, activity of mTORC2 is higher in fasted Snell and GHR-/- than in littermate controls in all 4 tissues tested. Resupply of food enhanced mTORC1 activity in both controls and long-lived mutant mice but diminished mTORC2 activity only in the long-lived mice. Mice in which GHR has been disrupted only in the liver do not show extended lifespan and also fail to show the decline in mTORC1 and increase in mTORC2 seen in mice with global loss of GHR. The data suggest that the antiaging effects in the Snell dwarf and GHR-/- mice are accompanied by both a decline in mTORC1 in multiple organs and an increase in fasting levels of mTORC2. Neither the lifespan nor mTOR effects appear to be mediated by direct GH effects on liver or by the decline in plasma IGF-I, a shared trait in both global and liver-specific GHR-/- mice. Our data suggest that a more complex pattern of hormonal effects and intertissue interactions may be responsible for regulating both lifespan and mTORC2 function in these mouse models of delayed aging.

  19. Functional characterization of Penicillium occitanis Pol6 and Penicillium funiculosum GH11 xylanases.

    PubMed

    Driss, Dorra; Berrin, Jean Guy; Juge, Nathalie; Bhiri, Fatma; Ghorbel, Raoudha; Chaabouni, Semia Ellouz

    2013-08-01

    Xylanases are hemicellulolytic enzymes, which are responsible for the degradation of heteroxylans constituting the lignocellulosic plant cell wall. Xylanases from the GH11 family are considered as true xylanases because of their high substrate specificity. In order to study in depth a crucial difference in the thumb region between two closely related xylanases from Penicillium in terms of kinetic parameters and inhibition sensitivity, the GH11 xylanases from Penicillium occitanis Pol6 (PoXyn3) and from Penicillium funiculosum (PfXynC) were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The PoXyn3 and PfXynC cDNAs encoding mature xylanases were cloned into pGAPZαA vectors and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris X-33 under the control of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase constitutive promoter. PfXynC was expressed as a His-tagged recombinant protein and purified from the supernatant homogeneity by a one-step purification protocol using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The recombinant PoXyn3 was purified using a single anion-exchange chromatography. The purified recombinant enzymes were optimally active at 45°C and pH 4.0 for PoXyn3 and 40°C and pH 3.0 for PfXynC. The measured kinetic parameters (k(cat) and Vmax) showed that PfXynC was five times more active than PoXyn3 irrespective of the substrate whereas the apparent affinity (K(m)) was similar. The recombinant enzymes showed distinct sensitivity to the Triticum aestivum xylanase inhibitor TAXI-I.

  20. Effects of exogenous cortisol on the GH/IGF-I/IGFBP network in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brian C; Small, Brian C

    2005-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to hinder somatic growth in a number of vertebrate species. In order to better understand the mechanisms through which they may act in channel catfish, we examined the effects of feeding cortisol on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) network. Fish (30.6+/-3.0 g) were fed once daily for 4 weeks and treatments included: (1) High-cortisol (dietary cortisol provided at 400 mg/kg feed), (2) Low-cortisol (dietary cortisol provided at 200 mg/kg feed), and (3) Control (commercial catfish feed). Fish fed diets with cortisol weighed approximately 50% less than Controls. Feed intake was reduced by approximately 30% in both treatments of cortisol fed fish compared to Controls. A approximately 20-kDa IGFBP was observed in plasma from High- and Low-treated fish while it was not detected in Control fish plasma. High-cortisol treatment increased pituitary GH mRNA expression approximately 10-fold while liver IGF-I mRNA expression was not different between cortisol-treated fish and Controls. Cortisol treatments decreased plasma levels of IGF-I. These data indicate that feeding cortisol for 4 weeks reduces weight gain, feed intake, and plasma levels of IGF-I and induces a approximately 20-kDa IGFBP. One mechanism through which cortisol may impede growth of catfish is through an increase in a low molecular weight IGFBP which may lead to inhibitory effects on the action of IGF-I.

  1. Structural analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 glycoside hydrolase from CAZy family GH105

    PubMed Central

    Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Sund, Christian J.; Hurley, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 gene CA_C0359 encodes a putative unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase (URH) with distant amino-acid sequence homology to YteR of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. YteR, like other URHs, has core structural homology to unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolases, but hydrolyzes the unsaturated disaccharide derivative of rhamnogalacturonan I. The crystal structure of the recombinant CA_C0359 protein was solved to 1.6 Å resolution by molecular replacement using the phase information of the previously reported structure of YteR (PDB entry 1nc5) from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The YteR-like protein is a six-α-hairpin barrel with two β-sheet strands and a small helix overlaying the end of the hairpins next to the active site. The protein has low primary protein sequence identity to YteR but is structurally similar. The two tertiary structures align with a root-mean-square deviation of 1.4 Å and contain a highly conserved active pocket. There is a conserved aspartic acid residue in both structures, which has been shown to be important for hydration of the C=C bond during the release of unsaturated galacturonic acid by YteR. A surface electrostatic potential comparison of CA_C0359 and proteins from CAZy families GH88 and GH105 reveals the make-up of the active site to be a combination of the unsaturated rhamnogalacturonyl hydrolase and the unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase from Bacillus subtilis strain 168. Structural and electrostatic comparisons suggests that the protein may have a slightly different substrate specificity from that of YteR. PMID:26249707

  2. Effects of leptin on basal and GHRH-stimulated GH secretion from the bovine adenohypophysis are dependent upon nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Zieba, D A; Amstalden, M; Morton, S; Gallino, J L; Edwards, J F; Harms, P G; Williams, G L

    2003-07-01

    We have shown recently that leptin modulates at least two aspects of anterior pituitary LH release in ruminants: basal and GnRH-mediated release. To test the hypothesis that leptin directly affects basal and GHRH-mediated GH secretion from the adenohypophysis, we examined the effects of various doses of recombinant ovine leptin (oleptin) on perifused adenohypophyseal (AP) explants and compared responses of tIssues from control and fasted cows. Ten mature, ovariectomized and estradiol-implanted cows were assigned to one of two dietary groups: (1) normal-fed (n=5) and (2) fasted for 72 h (n=5). At the end of the fasting period, cows were euthanized and pituitaries were collected. Adenohypophyseal explants were perifused for a total of 6.5 h, including a 2-h treatment at 2.5 h with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 0, 5, 10, 50, or 100 ng/ml oleptin, and a challenge with GHRH at 4.5 h. All doses of oleptin greater than 5 ng/ml decreased (P<0.01) basal GH secretion compared with controls in tIssues collected from normal-fed cows. In contrast, GH release from AP explants from fasted cows treated with the lowest dose of oleptin was 28% (P<0.002) higher than control explants, but larger doses had no effect. Leptin caused an inversely related, dose-dependent increase in GHRH-mediated GH release in tIssues from normal-fed cows. Marked increases (P<0.01-P<0.001) in GH release were observed for the 5 and 10 ng/ml oleptin, with lesser (P<0.08) and no effects observed at the 50 and 100 ng/ml doses respectively. In fasted cows, oleptin had no stimulatory effect on GHRH-induced GH release. Results show that leptin can act directly at the anterior pituitary level to modulate GH release, and this effect is dependent upon nutritional history.

  3. Differential effects of GH stimulation on fasting and prandial metabolism and plasma IGFs and IGF-binding proteins in lean and obese sheep.

    PubMed

    McCann, J P; Loo, S C; Aalseth, D L; Abribat, T

    1997-08-01

    The effect of body condition per se on plasma IGFs and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the whole-body metabolic responses to recombinant DNA-derived bovine GH (rbGH) in both the fed and the fasted state were determined in lean and dietary obese sheep (n = 6/group). Sheep at zero-energy balance and equilibrium body weight were injected s.c. for 12 days with 100 micrograms/kg rbGH immediately before their morning feeding. Before GH treatment, fasting plasma concentrations of insulin (17.0 +/- 1.9 vs 7.5 +/- 0.7 microU/ml), IGF-I (345 +/- 25 vs 248 +/- 10 ng/ml), glucose (52.6 +/- 1.1 vs 48.3 +/- 0.7 mg/dl), and free fatty acid (FFA) (355 +/- 45 vs 229 +/- 24 nmol/ml) were greater (P < 0.05) and those of GH (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs 2.6 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) were lower (P < 0.05) in obese than in lean sheep. Fasting concentrations of IGF-II and glucagon were not affected (P > 0.05) by obesity. GH concentrations were increased equivalently by 6-9 ng/ml in lean and obese sheep during GH treatment. GH caused an immediate and a marked fivefold increase in the fasting insulin level in obese sheep but only minimally affected insulin concentration in lean sheep. The increment in fasting glucose during GH treatment was greater (P < 0.05) in obese (8-12 mg/dl) than in lean (2-5 mg/dl) sheep. Frequent measurements in the first 8 h after feeding and injection of excipient (day 0) or the first (day 1) sixth (day 6) and twelfth (day 12) daily injection of GH showed that prandial metabolism in both groups of sheep was affected minimally by GH. However, GH treatment on day 1 (not days 6 or 12) acutely attenuated the feeding-induced suppression of plasma FFA in both groups of sheep and this effect was significantly greater in obese than in lean sheep. Although obese sheep were hyposomatotropic, the basal and GH-induced increases in plasma IGF-I concentrations were greater (P < 0.05) in obese than in lean sheep. Plasma IGF-II was unaffected by obesity and was not increased by GH stimulation. Western

  4. AIP mutations impair AhR signaling in pituitary adenoma patients fibroblasts and in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Viengchareun, Say; Hage, Mirella; Bouligand, Jérôme; Young, Jacques; Boutron, Audrey; Zizzari, Philippe; Lombès, Marc; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas through unknown molecular mechanisms. The best-known interacting partner of AIP is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of xenobiotics implicated in carcinogenesis. As 75% of AIP mutations disrupt the physical and/or functional interaction with AhR, we postulated that the tumorigenic potential of AIP mutations might result from altered AhR signaling. We evaluated the impact of AIP mutations on the AhR signaling pathway, first in fibroblasts from AIP-mutated patients with pituitary adenomas, by comparison with fibroblasts from healthy subjects, then in transfected pituitary GH3 cells. The AIP protein level in mutated fibroblasts was about half of that in cells from healthy subjects, but AhR expression was unaffected. Gene expression analyses showed significant modifications in the expression of the AhR target genes CYP1B1 and AHRR in AIP-mutated fibroblasts, both before and after stimulation with the endogenous AhR ligand kynurenine. Kynurenine increased Cyp1b1 expression to a greater extent in GH3 cells overexpressing wild type compared with cells expressing mutant AIP Knockdown of endogenous Aip in these cells attenuated Cyp1b1 induction by the AhR ligand. Both mutant AIP expression and knockdown of endogenous Aip affected the kynurenine-dependent GH secretion of GH3 cells. This study of human fibroblasts bearing endogenous heterozygous AIP mutations and transfected pituitary GH3 cells shows that AIP mutations affect the AIP protein level and alter AhR transcriptional activity in a gene- and tissue-dependent manner.

  5. Neurocognitive Function in Acromegaly after Surgical Resection of GH-Secreting Adenoma versus Naïve Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Madrazo-Atutxa, Ainara; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Benito-López, Pedro; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Cano, David A.; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Torres-Vela, Elena; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Patients with active untreated acromegaly show mild to moderate neurocognitive disorders that are associated to chronic exposure to growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) hypersecretion. However, it is unknown whether these disorders improve after controlling GH/IGF-I hypersecretion. The aim of this study was to compare neurocognitive functions of patients who successfully underwent GH-secreting adenoma transsphenoidal surgery (cured patients) with patients with naive acromegaly. In addition, we wanted to determine the impact of different clinical and biochemical variables on neurocognitive status in patients with active disease and after long-term cure. A battery of six standardized neuropsychological tests assessed attention, memory and executive functioning. In addition, a quantitative electroencephalography with Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) solution was performed to obtain information about the neurophysiological state of the patients. Neurocognitive data was compared to that of a healthy control group. Multiple linear regression analysis was also conducted using clinical and hormonal parameters to obtain a set of independent predictors of neurocognitive state before and after cure. Both groups of patients scored significantly poorer than the healthy controls on memory tests, especially those assessing visual and verbal recall. Patients with cured acromegaly did not obtain better cognitive measures than naïve patients. Furthermore memory deficits were associated with decreased beta activity in left medial temporal cortex in both groups of patients. Regression analysis showed longer duration of untreated acromegaly was associated with more severe neurocognitive complications, regardless of the diagnostic group, whereas GH levels at the time of assessment was related to neurocognitive outcome only in naïve patients. Longer duration of post-operative biochemical remission of acromegaly was associated with better

  6. Intronic mutation in the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene from a girl with Laron syndrome and extremely high serum GH binding protein: extended phenotypic study in a very large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, A; Dastot, F; Klinger, B; Kanety, H; Eshet, R; Amselem, S; Laron, Z

    1997-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a hereditary form of GH resistance due to molecular defects in the GH receptor (GHR). Most of the identified mutations are located in the extracellular domain of the receptor, resulting in a lack of serum GHBP in the majority of LS patients. We present an LS patient with supranormal levels of serum GHBP, in addition to 35 of her relatives. The proband is a 3.5 year-old Druse girl with severe short stature (height SDS -5.1), high GH (250 micrograms/l), low IGF-I (2.7 nmol/l) and IGFBP-3 (410 micrograms/l), both unresponsive to exogenous GH. The binding capacity of the serum GHBP was 22 nM (adult reference serum, 0.7 nM), with an affinity constant Ka = 1.9 x 10(9) M-1 comparable to that of normal sera (Ka = 1.7-2.1 x 10(9) M-1). The apparent MW of the GHBP was approximately 60-80 kDa, similar to that of control sera. In the proband's sister, parents, grandparents and uncles, extremely high GHBP values were observed (43.0 +/- 4.8 RSB, n = 10) compared with normal adults (0.81 +/- 0.06 RSB) (p < 0.001). The remaining subjects had normal or moderately elevated GHBP levels. Serum GH in adults with high GHBP was significantly elevated above control values (6.0 +/- 0.9 micrograms/l vs 0.76 +/- 0.13 microgram/l, p < 0.001). Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were normal in all the subjects, with the exception of an aunt (IGF-I 3.9 nmol/l) and the proband's sister (IGFBP-3 460 micrograms/l). All the subjects' heights were within the normal range. Analysis of the GHR gene performed in the proband revealed an as yet undescribed homozygous intronic point mutation. It consists of a G-->T substitution at nucleotide 785-1 preceding exon 8, a sequence that encodes the transmembrane domain. This mutation, which destroys the invariant dinucleotide of the splice acceptor site, is expected to alter GHR mRNA splicing and to be responsible for skipping exon 8. The resulting truncated protein that retains GH binding activity is probably no longer anchored in the cell

  7. Sequence-structural features and evolutionary relationships of family GH57 α-amylases and their putative α-amylase-like homologues.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Stefan; Blesák, Karol

    2011-08-01

    The glycoside hydrolase family 57 (GH57) contains α-amylase and a few other amylolytic specificities. It counts ~400 members from Archaea (1/4) and Bacteria (3/4), mostly of extremophilic prokaryotes. Only 17 GH57 enzymes have been biochemically characterized. The main goal of the present bioinformatics study was to analyze sequences having the clear GH57 α-amylase features. Of the 107 GH57 sequences, 59 were evaluated as α-amylases (containing both GH57 catalytic residues), whereas 48 were assigned as GH57 α-amylase-like proteins (having a substitution in one or both catalytic residues). Forty-eight of 59 α-amylases were from Archaea, but 42 of 48 α-amylase-like proteins were of bacterial origin. The catalytic residues were substituted in most cases in Bacteroides and Prevotella by serine (instead of catalytic nucleophile glutamate) and glutamate (instead of proton donor aspartate). The GH57 α-amylase specificity has thus been evolved and kept enzymatically active mainly in Archaea.

  8. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves’ Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves’ turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle’s GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves’ turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression. PMID:27077853

  9. Overexpression of GhWRKY27a reduces tolerance to drought stress and resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Jia, Haihong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Chen; Liu, Shuchang; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins constitute transcriptional regulators involved in various biological processes, especially in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. However, in contrast to other well-characterized WRKY groups, the functions of group III WRKY transcription factors are poorly understood in the economically important crop cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). In this study, a group III WRKY gene from cotton, GhWRKY27a, was isolated and characterized. Our data indicated that GhWRKY27a localized to the nucleus and that GhWRKY27a expression could be strongly induced by abiotic stresses, pathogen infection, and multiple defense-related signaling molecules. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of GhWRKY27a enhanced tolerance to drought stress in cotton. In contrast, GhWRKY27a overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana markedly reduced plant tolerance to drought stress, as determined through physiological analyses of leaf water loss, survival rates, and the stomatal aperture. This susceptibility was coupled with reduced stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid and decreased expression of stress-related genes. In addition, GhWRKY27a-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection, mainly demonstrated by the transgenic lines exhibiting more severe disease symptoms, accompanied by attenuated expression of defense-related genes in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings indicated that GhWRKY27a functions in negative responses to drought tolerance and in resistance to R. solani infection. PMID:26483697

  10. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves' Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-04-12

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves' turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle's GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves' turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression.

  11. Gladiolus hybridus ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 (GhABI5) is an important transcription factor in ABA signaling that can enhance Gladiolus corm dormancy and Arabidopsis seed dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Seng, Shanshan; Sui, Juanjuan; Vonapartis, Eliana; Luo, Xian; Gong, Benhe; Liu, Chen; Wu, Chenyu; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Fengqin; He, Junna; Yi, Mingfang

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant development and is crucial for abiotic stress response. In this study, cold storage contributes to reducing endogenous ABA content, resulting in dormancy breaking of Gladiolus. The ABA inhibitor fluridone also promotes germination, suggesting that ABA is an important hormone that regulates corm dormancy. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the Gladiolus ABI5 homolog (GhABI5), which is a basic leucine zipper motif transcriptional factor (TF). GhABI5 is expr