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Sample records for ghrelin mrna expression

  1. Gastrointestinal Spatiotemporal mRNA Expression of Ghrelin vs Growth Hormone Receptor and New Growth Yield Machine Learning Model Based on Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ran, Tao; Liu, Yong; Li, Hengzhi; Tang, Shaoxun; He, Zhixiong; Munteanu, Cristian R; González-Díaz, Humberto; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe

    2016-07-27

    The management of ruminant growth yield has economic importance. The current work presents a study of the spatiotemporal dynamic expression of Ghrelin and GHR at mRNA levels throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of kid goats under housing and grazing systems. The experiments show that the feeding system and age affected the expression of either Ghrelin or GHR with different mechanisms. Furthermore, the experimental data are used to build new Machine Learning models based on the Perturbation Theory, which can predict the effects of perturbations of Ghrelin and GHR mRNA expression on the growth yield. The models consider eight longitudinal GIT segments (rumen, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum), seven time points (0, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56 and 70 d) and two feeding systems (Supplemental and Grazing feeding) as perturbations from the expected values of the growth yield. The best regression model was obtained using Random Forest, with the coefficient of determination R(2) of 0.781 for the test subset. The current results indicate that the non-linear regression model can accurately predict the growth yield and the key nodes during gastrointestinal development, which is helpful to optimize the feeding management strategies in ruminant production system.

  2. Ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) in blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala): cDNA cloning, tissue distribution and mRNA expression changes responding to fasting and refeeding.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Ping, Hai-Chao; Wei, Kai-Jian; Zhang, Gui-Rong; Shi, Ze-Chao; Yang, Rui-Bin; Zou, Gui-Wei; Wang, Wei-Min

    2015-11-01

    Blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala Yih, 1955) is an endemic freshwater fish in China for which the endocrine mechanism of regulation of feeding has never been examined. Ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) play important roles in the regulation of fish feeding. In this study, full-length cDNAs of ghrelin, NPY and CCK were cloned and analyzed from blunt snout bream. Both the ghrelin and NPY genes of blunt snout bream had the same amino acid sequences as grass carp, and CCK also shared considerable similarity with that of grass carp. The three genes were expressed in a wide range of adult tissues, with the highest expression levels of ghrelin in the hindgut, NPY in the hypothalamus and CCK in the pituitary, respectively. Starvation challenge experiments showed that the expression levels of ghrelin and NPY mRNA increased in brain and intestine after starvation, and the expression levels of CCK decreased after starvation. Refeeding could bring the expression levels of the three genes back to the control levels. These results indicated that the feeding behavior of blunt snout bream was regulated by the potential correlative actions of ghrelin, NPY and CCK, which contributed to the defense against starvation. This study will further our understanding of the function of ghrelin, NPY and CCK and the molecular mechanism of feeding regulation in teleosts.

  3. Food restriction, ghrelin, its antagonist and obestatin control expression of ghrelin and its receptor in chicken hypothalamus and ovary.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Pavlova, Silvia; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Grossmann, Roland; Jiménez, Magdalena Romero; Rodriguez, Juan Manuel Castellano; Valenzuela, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the role of age, nutritional state and some metabolic hormones in control of avian hypothalamic and ovarian ghrelin/ghrelin receptor system. We examined the effect of food restriction, administration of ghrelin 1-18, ghrelin antagonistic analogue (D-Lys-3)-GHRP-6, obestatin and combinations of them on the expression of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a) in hypothalamus and ovary of old (23months of age) and young (7months of age) chickens. Expression of mRNAs for ghrelin and GHS-R1a in both hypothalamus and largest ovarian follicle was measured by RT-PCR. It was observed that food restriction could promote the expression of ghrelin and GHS-R1a in hypothalamus and ovary of the old chickens, but in the young chickens it reduced expression of ghrelin and did not affect expression of GHS-R1a in the ovary. Administration of ghrelin 1-18 did not affect hypothalamic or ovarian ghrelin mRNA, but significantly increased the expression of GHS-R1a in hypothalamus, but not in ovary. (D-Lys-3)-GHRP-6, significantly stimulated accumulation of ghrelin, but not GHS-R1a mRNA in hypothalamus or ghrelin or GHS-R1a in the ovary. Ghrelin 1-18 and (D-Lys-3)-GHRP-6, when given together, were able either to prevent or to induce effect of these hormones. Obestatin administration increased expression of ghrelin gene in the hypothalamus, but not expression of hypothalamic GHS-R1a, ovarian ghrelin and GHS-R1a. Furthermore, obestatin was able to modify effect of both ghrelin and fasting on hypothalamic and ovarian mRNA for ghrelin GHS-R1a. Our results (1) confirm the existence of ghrelin and its functional receptors GHS-R1a in the chicken hypothalamus and ovary (2) confirm the age-dependent control of ovarian ghrelin by feeding, (3) demonstrate, that nutritional status can influence the expression of both ghrelin and GHS-R1a in hypothalamus and in the ovary (3) demonstrates for the first time, that ghrelin can promote generation of its

  4. Differential effects of methamphetamine on expression of neuropeptide Y mRNA in hypothalamus and on serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in ad libitum-fed and schedule-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Crowley, W R; Ramoz, G; Keefe, K A; Torto, R; Kalra, S P; Hanson, G R

    2005-01-01

    Relatively little is known concerning the interaction of psychostimulants with hypothalamic neuropeptide systems or metabolic hormones implicated in regulation of energy balance. The present studies tested whether methamphetamine alters the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), two important orexigenic neuropeptides, or proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor for the anorexigenic peptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, or the secretion of leptin, insulin and ghrelin, concomitant with inhibition of food intake. Female rats were either fed ad libitum (AL) or placed on a scheduled feeding (SF) regimen, with access to food limited to 4 h/day. Administration of (+/-)-methamphetamine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 2 h prior to food presentation significantly inhibited food intake in SF animals, but did not affect intake in AL animals. In a separate study, AL and SF animals were killed just prior to expected food presentation, and expression of NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNAs in hypothalamus was determined using in situ hybridisation; concentrations of leptin, insulin and ghrelin in serum were determined with radioimmunoassays. In saline-treated, SF controls, NPY and AgRP mRNA expression in arcuate nucleus and serum ghrelin were significantly elevated, and serum leptin and insulin were significantly reduced. Methamphetamine reversed the up-regulation of NPY mRNA expression observed in the SF condition, without affecting AgRP mRNA or the serum concentrations of metabolic hormones. However, in AL animals, NPY mRNA expression in arcuate and dorsomedial nuclei was significantly increased by methamphetamine, which also reduced serum leptin and insulin and increased serum ghrelin concentrations. These findings suggest that the inhibition of NPY expression in SF animals may be a mechanism underlying the anorexigenic effect of methamphetamine seen in this condition. The increase in NPY expression produced by methamphetamine in AL animals may be mediated by the

  5. Evidence that endogenous SST inhibits ACTH and ghrelin expression by independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Gahete, Manuel D; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2006-08-01

    Corticosterone and total ghrelin levels are increased in somatostatin (SST) knockout mice (Sst-/-) compared with SST-intact controls (Sst+/+). Because exogenous ghrelin can increase glucocorticoids, the question arises whether elevated levels of ghrelin contribute to elevated corticosterone levels in Sst-/- mice. We report that Sst-/- mice had elevated mRNA levels for pituitary proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), whereas mRNA levels for hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) did not differ from Sst+/+ mice. Furthermore, SST suppressed pituitary POMC mRNA levels and ACTH release in vitro independently of CRH actions. In contrast, it has been reported that ghrelin increases glucocorticoids via a central effect on CRH secretion and that n-octanoyl ghrelin is the form of ghrelin that activates the GHS-R1a and modulates CRH neuronal activity. Consistent with elevations in total ghrelin levels, Sst-/- mice displayed an increase in stomach ghrelin mRNA levels, whereas hypothalamic and pituitary expression of ghrelin was not altered. Despite the increase in total ghrelin levels, circulating levels of n-octanoyl ghrelin were not altered in Sst-/- mice. Because glucocorticoids and ghrelin increase in response to fasting, we examined the impact of fasting on the adrenal axis and ghrelin in Sst+/+ and Sst-/- mice and found that endogenous SST does not significantly contribute to this adaptive response. We conclude that endogenous SST inhibits basal ghrelin gene expression in a tissue specific manner and independently and directly inhibits pituitary ACTH synthesis and release. Thus endogenous SST exerts an inhibitory effect on ghrelin synthesis and on the adrenal axis through independent pathways.

  6. Effects of development and delayed feed access on ghrelin expression in neonatal broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, H H; Tao, H; Ou, C B; Wang, Q X; Guo, F; Ma, J Y

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of development and delayed feed access on ghrelin expression in neonatal chickens. In experiment 1, ghrelin levels in ad libitum-fed chickens were assessed from hatching (0 h) to 120 h. Ghrelin mRNA expression increased after hatching and reached peak levels at 24 h; levels were 1.8-fold higher compared to those at 0 h. Afterward, ghrelin expression decreased consistently throughout the later experimental period, and at 120 h, it was only 16.0% of 0 h levels. The density of ghrelin immunopositive cells in the proventriculus and plasma ghrelin levels decreased slightly from hatching to 48 h and later increased slowly until the end of the experimental period. In a follow-up study, chickens were assigned randomly into 2 groups after hatching, a control group ( C: , fed ad libitum) and a delayed feeding group ( F+SF: , 72-h fast period, subsequently fed ad libitum). Delayed feed access for 72 h up-regulated ghrelin mRNA expression significantly in the proventriculus (P < 0.05) to 2.1-fold higher levels compared to the control, while the density of ghrelin immunopositive cells and the plasma ghrelin level decreased (P < 0.05) to 28.4% and 64.8% of the control, respectively. After the onset of feeding, the ghrelin mRNA expression in the delayed feeding group was decreased but still higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). The density of ghrelin immunopositive cells and the plasma ghrelin level climbed quickly and all returned to the control level with a supply of food for 48 h. These results suggest that the onset of feeding in neonatal chickens stimulated an increase in ghrelin peptide levels and that ghrelin peptide levels increased with age. Neonatal chickens respond to food deprivation in a different way than do young and adult chickens. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Age, sex, and lactating status regulate ghrelin secretion and GOAT mRNA levels from isolated rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Massadi, O; Crujeiras, A B; González, R C; Pardo, M; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Seoane, L M

    2010-09-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach derivate peptide involved in energy homeostasis regulation, and ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is the enzyme responsible for ghrelin acylation. Puberty is a period characterized by profound changes in the metabolic requirements and notable variations of sexual hormone levels. On the other hand, the weaning process is a fundamental modification of the diet, which implicates several adaptations of the gastrointestinal tract physiology. Until now the direct secretion of ghrelin by the stomach in these conditions, without interferences from other organs, has never been studied. The main objective of this article was to investigate how the stomach modulates ghrelin production and secretion as well as GOAT expression on these periods of life. Gastric ghrelin secretion is regulated through postnatal life in an independent way of gastric expression and circulating levels of this hormone. The present work shows a strong regulation of gastric ghrelin secretion by estrogens. The weaning strongly regulates gastric ghrelin secretion. Animals subjected to delayed weaning present a lower body weight than the corresponding controls. For the first time, it is shown that a noticeable decrease in circulating levels of testosterone and estrogens is associated with delay of weaning. GOAT mRNA levels in the stomach are strongly regulated by age, breastfeeding, and testosterone. In conclusion, the stomach itself regulates ghrelin and GOAT production to adapt the organism to the metabolic requirements demanded through each stage of life.

  8. Correlation of ghrelin concentration and ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a mRNAs expression in the proventriculus and brain of the growing chicken.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki; Yaosaka, Noriko; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    To determine mechanisms for age-related decrease of GHS-R1a expression in the chicken proventriculus, changes in mRNA expression of ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) as well as ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma were examined in growing chickens. Changes in expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a mRNAs were also examined in different brain regions (pituitary, hypothalamus, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, midbrain and medulla oblongata). Ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma increased with aging and reached plateaus at 30-50 days after hatching. High level of ghrelin mRNA decreased at 3 days after hatching, and it became stable at half of the initial level. Expression levels of GHS-R1a and GOAT decreased 3 or 5 days after hatching and became stable at low levels. Significant negative correlations were found between plasma ghrelin and mRNA levels of GOAT and GHS-R1a. Expression levels of ghrelin mRNA were different in the brain regions, but a significant change was not seen with aging. GHS-R1a expression was detected in all brain regions, and age-dependent changes were observed in the pituitary and cerebellum. Different from the proventriculus, the expression of GOAT in the brain increased or did not change with aging. These results suggest that decreased GHS-R1a and GOAT mRNA expression in the proventriculus is due to endogenous ghrelin-induced down-regulation. Expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a in the brain were independently regulated from that in the proventriculus, and age-related and region-dependent regulation pattern suggests a local effect of ghrelin system in chicken brain.

  9. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is expressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines and expression is differentially regulated in vitro by ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide hormone that is expressed in the stomach and a range of peripheral tissues, where it frequently acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. Ghrelin is modified by a unique acylation required for it to activate its cognate receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), which mediates many of the actions of ghrelin. Recently, the enzyme responsible for adding the fatty acid residue (octanoyl/acyl group) to the third amino acid of ghrelin, GOAT (ghrelin O-acyltransferase), was identified. Methods We used cell culture, quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate the expression of GOAT in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues from patients. Real-time RT-PCR was used to demonstrate the expression of prohormone convertase (PC)1/3, PC2 and furin in prostate cancer cell lines. Prostate-derived cell lines were treated with ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin and the effect on GOAT expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Results We have demonstrated that GOAT mRNA and protein are expressed in the normal prostate and human prostate cancer tissue samples. The RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 normal prostate-derived cell lines and the LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines express GOAT and at least one other enzyme that is necessary to produce mature, acylated ghrelin from proghrelin (PC1/3, PC2 or furin). Finally, ghrelin, but not desacyl ghrelin (unacylated ghrelin), can directly regulate the expression of GOAT in the RWPE-1 normal prostate derived cell line and the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. Ghrelin treatment (100nM) for 6 hours significantly decreased GOAT mRNA expression two-fold (P < 0.05) in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, however, ghrelin did not regulate GOAT expression in the DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions This study demonstrates that GOAT is expressed in prostate cancer specimens and cell lines. Ghrelin regulates GOAT

  10. Zebrafish ghrelin is expressed in pancreatic endocrine cells and regulated by metabolic state.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ji; Hong, Minsun; Cone, Roger D; Song, Youngsup

    2013-09-13

    Mammalian ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide that stimulates secretion of growth hormone and food intake. Zebrafish is an excellent model system for forward genetic studies, and many aspects of energy homeostasis characterized in mammals appear to be conserved in the zebrafish. In this study, we investigated the expression and regulation of zebrafish ghrelin by metabolic status. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that zebrafish ghrelin is highly enriched in anterior gut associated tissues. Using in situ hybridization with adult zebrafish tissues, we found that zebrafish ghrelin mRNA was not expressed in intestine tissue, but rather in clusters of endocrine pancreas cells distinct from insulin-expressing islets. Fasting specifically upregulated pancreatic ghrelin but not brain ghrelin expression by 3- to 4-fold and refeeding restored ghrelin transcript to control levels seen in the fed group within 5 h. These results demonstrate that although ghrelin is expressed in a different site in zebrafish, it is responsive to metabolic state in a similar manner as mammalian ghrelin, suggesting a role in the regulation of feeding in teleosts, and thus validate the utility of zebrafish as a genetic model system for the analysis of the ghrelin system and energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ontogeny expression of ghrelin, neuropeptide Y and cholecystokinin in blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Ping, H-C; Feng, K; Zhang, G-R; Wei, K-J; Zou, G-W; Wang, W-M

    2014-04-01

    Ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) all have important roles in the regulation of feeding in fish and mammals. To better understand the role of the three peptides in appetite regulation in the early developmental stages of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala), partial cDNA sequences of ghrelin, NPY and CCK genes were cloned. And then, real-time quantitative PCR and RT-PCR were used to detect and quantify the mRNA expressions of these genes from zygotes to larvae of 50 days after hatching (DAH). Ghrelin, NPY and CCK were all expressed throughout the embryonic and larval development stages, and the expression levels were higher in larval stages than in embryonic stages. Ghrelin and NPY mRNA expressions were upregulated at 1, 3, 5 DAH, while CCK mRNA expression was reduced significantly at 3 DAH. The mRNA expression levels of three genes in larvae varied significantly until 30 DAH. In adult fish, all three peptides were detected to be expressed in brain and several peripheral tissues. Ghrelin mRNA was mainly expressed in the intestine, whereas NPY and CCK mRNAs were mainly expressed in the brain. Taken together, these results indicate that ghrelin, NPY and CCK may have roles in early development and participate in the regulation of feeding of larvae in blunt snout bream and will be helpful for further investigation into feed intake regulation in adults of this species.

  12. Sequence, genomic organization and expression of two channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Small, Brian C; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    Two ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) genes were isolated from channel catfish tissue and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The two receptors were characterized by determining tissue distribution, ontogeny of receptor mRNA expression, and effects of exogenous homologous ghrelin administration on target tissue mRNA expression. Analysis of sequence similarities indicated two genes putatively encoding GHS-R1 and GHS-R2, respectively, which have been known to be present in zebrafish. Organization and tissue expression of the GHS-R1 gene was similar to that reported for other species, and likewise yielded two detectable mRNA products as a result of alternative splicing. Expression of both full-length, GHS-R1a, and splice variant, GHS-R1b, mRNA was highest in the pituitary. Gene organization of GHS-R2 was similar to GHS-R1, but no splice variant was identified. Expression of GHS-R2a mRNA was highest in the Brockmann bodies. GHS-R1a mRNA was detected in unfertilized eggs and throughout embryogenesis, whereas GHR-R2a mRNA was not expressed in unfertilized eggs or early developing embryos and was the highest at the time of hatching. Catfish intraperitoneally injected with catfish ghrelin-Gly had greater mRNA expression of GHS-R1a in pituitaries at 2 h and Brockmann bodies at 4 h, and of GHS-R2a in Brockmann bodies at 6 h post injection. Amidated catfish ghrelin (ghrelin-amide) had no observable effect on expression of either pituitary receptor; however, GHS-R1a and GHS-R2a mRNA expression levels were increased 4 h post injection of ghrelin-amide in Brockmann bodies. This is the first characterization of GHS-R2a and suggests regulatory and functional differences between the two catfish receptors.

  13. Triterpenes suppress octanoylated ghrelin production in ghrelin-expressing human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kensuke; Oiso, Shigeru; Uto, Takuhiro; Morinaga, Osamu; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating peptide hormone with an octanoyl modification at serine 3 that is essential for its orexigenic effect. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is the enzyme that catalyzes ghrelin acylation using fatty acyl-coenzyme A as a substrate. We previously developed an assay system based on the AGS-GHRL8 cell line that produces octanoylated ghrelin in the presence of octanoic acid, and demonstrated that some fatty acids suppressed octanoylated ghrelin production. Recent studies have reported that triterpenes have anti-obesity effect. Since such triterpenes, like fatty acids, have a carboxyl group, we speculated that they can suppress octanoylated ghrelin production. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of triterpenes on octanoylated ghrelin production. Asiatic acid, corosolic acid, glycyrrhetinic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid suppressed octanoylated ghrelin levels in AGS-GHRL8 cells without decreasing transcript expression of GOAT or furin, a protease required for ghrelin maturation. β-amyrin had no effect on octanoylated ghrelin level, which was only slightly inhibited by uvaol; the fact that both these triterpenes lack a carboxyl group indicates that this group is important for suppressing octanoylated ghrelin production. These results suggest that triterpenes may have the potential as obesity-preventing agents with suppressive effect on octanoylated ghrelin production.

  14. Metabolic regulation of ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) expression in the mouse hypothalamus, pituitary, and stomach.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, Jose; Salvatori, Roberto; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raul M

    2010-04-12

    Ghrelin acts as an endocrine link connecting physiological processes regulating food intake, body composition, growth, and energy balance. Ghrelin is the only peptide known to undergo octanoylation. The enzyme mediating this process, ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), is expressed in the gastrointestinal tract (GI; primary source of circulating ghrelin) as well as other tissues. The present study demonstrates that stomach GOAT mRNA levels correlate with circulating acylated-ghrelin levels in fasted and diet-induced obese mice. In addition, GOAT was found to be expressed in both the pituitary and hypothalamus (two target tissues of ghrelin's actions), and regulated in response to metabolic status. Using primary pituitary cell cultures as a model system to study the regulation of GOAT expression, we found that acylated-ghrelin, but not desacyl-ghrelin, increased GOAT expression. In addition, growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and leptin increased, while somatostatin (SST) decreased GOAT expression. The physiologic relevance of these later results is supported by the observation that pituitary GOAT expression in mice lacking GHRH, SST and leptin showed opposite changes to those observed after in vitro treatment with the corresponding peptides. Therefore, it seems plausible that these hormones directly contribute to the regulation of pituitary GOAT. Interestingly, in all the models studied, pituitary GOAT expression paralleled changes in the expression of a dominant spliced-variant of ghrelin (In2-ghrelin) and therefore this transcript may be a primary substrate for pituitary GOAT. Collectively, these observations support the notion that the GI tract is not the only source of acylated-ghrelin, but in fact locally produced des-acylated-ghrelin could be converted to acylated-ghrelin within target tissues by locally active GOAT, to mediate its tissue-specific effects.

  15. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primarily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in H pylori infected subjects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in association with atrophic gastritis induced by H pylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentration. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may result from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations before and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels. PMID:19009647

  16. Ghrelin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gut hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999. In the last 15 years, ample data have been generated on ghrelin. Bedsides its hallmark function as an appetite stimulator, ghrelin also has many other important functions. In this review, we discussed ghrelin's functions in learning and memory, gut mov...

  17. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHS-R1a) in various adrenal tumors and normal adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Ueberberg, B; Unger, N; Sheu, S Y; Walz, M K; Schmid, K W; Saeger, W; Mann, K; Petersenn, S

    2008-03-01

    Ghrelin is a newly characterized, widely distributed peptide thought to be involved in the regulation of appetite. Significant effects on the release of growth hormone (GH) and ACTH have been demonstrated. This study compares the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHS-R) in various adrenal tumors and normal adrenal gland. Normal adrenal tissue was obtained after autopsy. Tissue was obtained from 13 pheochromocytomas (PHEOs), 15 cortisol-secreting adenomas (CPAs), 12 aldosterone-secreting adenomas (APAs), and 16 nonfunctional adenomas (NFAs) following laparoscopic surgery. Expression of ghrelin and GHS-R1a was investigated on RNA levels by using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and on protein levels by using immunohistochemistry. In the seven normal adrenal glands analyzed, ghrelin mRNA levels were 12-fold lower than in stomach. Ghrelin protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In all adrenal tumors, relevant levels of ghrelin mRNA were observed, with significantly lower expression in PHEOs and APAs than in normal adrenal gland. Ghrelin protein was detected in 0% of PHEOs, 55% of APAs, 87% of CPAs, and 54% of NFAs. GHS-R1a mRNA expression was detectable in normal adrenal gland, but the receptor protein was absent. In adrenal tumors, detectable levels of receptor mRNA were found in 38% of PHEOs, 13% of CPAs, and 25% of NFAs. GHS-R1a protein was absent in the majority of adrenal tumors. Expression of ghrelin in normal adrenal gland and adrenal tumors may indicate some unknown physiological function. The pathophysiological relevance of ghrelin expression in adrenal tumors remains to be investigated.

  19. Cysteamine improves growth performance and gastric ghrelin expression in preweaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Du, G; Shi, Z; Xia, D; Wei, X; Zhang, L; Parvizi, N; Zhao, R

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of cysteamine on growth performance of preweaning piglets and gastric expression of ghrelin mRNA in vivo and in vitro. Twelve litters of newborn piglets were allocated randomly to control and treatment groups. From 15 d of age, piglets in the control group were fed basal creep diet, whereas the treatment group received basal diet supplemented with 120 mg cysteamine per kg of diet until weaning on 35 d of age. Body weight gain, creep feed consumption, and diarrhea rates were recorded, and gastric mucosal tissues were collected for quantifying mRNA expression. To evaluate the direct effect of cysteamine on gastric ghrelin expression, primary cultures of gastric mucosal cells isolated from 35-d-old piglets were exposed to cysteamine for 20 h at 0, 1, 10, and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Dietary cysteamine increased (P < 0.05) average daily creep feed consumption and BW gain in preweaning pigs, which was accompanied by reduction in diarrhea rates. At 35 d of age, piglets treated with cysteamine showed increased (P < 0.05) ghrelin and gastrin and decreased (P < 0.05) somatostatin mRNA expression in gastric mucosa. Moreover, dietary cysteamine treatment increased serum concentration of gastrin (P < 0.05). In vitro, cysteamine significantly increased ghrelin mRNA expression in gastric mucosal cells at the concentration of 10 μg/mL. In conclusion, dietary cysteamine is effective in improving the growth performance and health condition of preweaning piglets, which is associated with its stimulatory effects on gastric ghrelin mRNA expression both in vivo and in vitro.

  20. Role of endogenous cortistatin in the regulation of ghrelin system expression at pancreatic level under normal and obese conditions.

    PubMed

    Chanclón, Belén; Luque, Raúl M; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; Castaño, Justo P; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin-system components [native ghrelin, In1-ghrelin, Ghrelin-O-acyltransferase enzyme (GOAT) and receptors (GHS-Rs)] are expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the pancreas, where they exert different biological actions including regulation of neuroendocrine secretions, food intake and pancreatic function. The expression of ghrelin system is regulated by metabolic conditions (fasting/obesity) and is associated with the progression of obesity and insulin resistance. Cortistatin (CORT), a neuropeptide able to activate GHS-R, has emerged as an additional link in gut-brain interplay. Indeed, we recently reported that male CORT deficient mice (cort-/-) are insulin-resistant and present a clear dysregulation in the stomach ghrelin-system. The present work was focused at analyzing the expression pattern of ghrelin-system components at pancreas level in cort-/- mice and their control littermates (cort +/+) under low- or high-fat diet. Our data reveal that all the ghrelin-system components are expressed at the mouse pancreatic level, where, interestingly, In1-ghrelin was expressed at higher levels than native-ghrelin. Thus, GOAT mRNA levels were significantly lower in cort-/- mice compared with controls while native ghrelin, In1-ghrelin and GHS-R transcript levels remained unaltered under normal metabolic conditions. Moreover, under obese condition, a significant increase in pancreatic expression of native-ghrelin, In1-ghrelin and GHS-R was observed in obese cort+/+ but not in cort-/- mice. Interestingly, insulin expression and release was elevated in obese cort+/+, while these changes were not observed in obese cort-/- mice. Altogether, our results indicate that the ghrelin-system expression is clearly regulated in the pancreas of cort+/+ and cort -/- under normal and/or obesity conditions suggesting that this system may play relevant roles in the endocrine pancreas. Most importantly, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that endogenous CORT is essential

  1. Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Müller, T D; Nogueiras, R; Andermann, M L; Andrews, Z B; Anker, S D; Argente, J; Batterham, R L; Benoit, S C; Bowers, C Y; Broglio, F; Casanueva, F F; D'Alessio, D; Depoortere, I; Geliebter, A; Ghigo, E; Cole, P A; Cowley, M; Cummings, D E; Dagher, A; Diano, S; Dickson, S L; Diéguez, C; Granata, R; Grill, H J; Grove, K; Habegger, K M; Heppner, K; Heiman, M L; Holsen, L; Holst, B; Inui, A; Jansson, J O; Kirchner, H; Korbonits, M; Laferrère, B; LeRoux, C W; Lopez, M; Morin, S; Nakazato, M; Nass, R; Perez-Tilve, D; Pfluger, P T; Schwartz, T W; Seeley, R J; Sleeman, M; Sun, Y; Sussel, L; Tong, J; Thorner, M O; van der Lely, A J; van der Ploeg, L H T; Zigman, J M; Kojima, M; Kangawa, K; Smith, R G; Horvath, T; Tschöp, M H

    2015-06-01

    The gastrointestinal peptide hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Increasing evidence supports more complicated and nuanced roles for the hormone, which go beyond the regulation of systemic energy metabolism. In this review, we discuss the diverse biological functions of ghrelin, the regulation of its secretion, and address questions that still remain 15 years after its discovery. In recent years, ghrelin has been found to have a plethora of central and peripheral actions in distinct areas including learning and memory, gut motility and gastric acid secretion, sleep/wake rhythm, reward seeking behavior, taste sensation and glucose metabolism.

  2. Expression analysis of key somatotropic axis and liporegulatory genes in ghrelin- and obestatin-infused dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Grala, T M; Kay, J K; Walker, C G; Sheahan, A J; Littlejohn, M D; Lucy, M C; Roche, J R

    2010-07-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Obestatin is produced from the same precursor peptide as ghrelin, and although obestatin was initially thought to promote actions opposite to those of ghrelin, many studies have failed to confirm this hypothesis. In the current study, multiparous cows were continuously infused with ghrelin (n = 10) or obestatin (n = 10) for 8 wk and compared to an untreated group (n = 10) to examine the effects of these hormones on somatotropic and liporegulatory gene expression. The expression of key genes was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor mRNA expression was altered in ghrelin- and obestatin-infused cows in a similar manner, as expression was increased at 4 wk, however it had decreased by 8 wk. Obestatin-infused cows presented with a significant decrease in the expression of ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) in adipose tissue, suggesting changes in cholesterol transport. Liver insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 mRNA displayed a week-by-treatment interaction, as expression was increased in control and obestatin-infused cows; however, expression decreased in ghrelin-infused cows. Adipose expression of hormone sensitive lipase (LIPE) mRNA was not altered by treatment or time, suggesting hormone infusion is not initiating lipolysis. The expression of lipogenic genes in adipose tissue increased with time in all groups, consistent with the general lactational profile of lipogenesis in dairy cows. These data indicate that continuous infusion of ghrelin or obestatin does not alter the expression of key somatotropic or liporegulatory genes in the lactating dairy cow, although obestatin infusion may alter cholesterol transport.

  3. Fasting induces preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Amole, Navpreet; Unniappan, Suraj

    2009-03-01

    Ghrelin is a gut/brain hormone with a unique acyl modification and various biological functions in fish and mammals. In addition to its possible role as a circulating orexigenic factor, ghrelin has been shown to regulate several other physiological processes in fish in a species-specific manner. The objectives of this project were to identify the zebrafish ghrelin gene organization, study tissue specific preproghrelin mRNA expression and investigate the fasting induced changes in the expression of preproghrelin mRNA in zebrafish. Our reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed the predicted ghrelin sequence available in the GenBank and identified preproghrelin mRNA expression in several tissues including the brain, gut, ovary, testis, heart and gill. PCR using genomic DNA identified that the ghrelin gene in zebrafish is comprised of four exons and three introns. Quantitative (real-time) PCR studies indicate that there is a significant increase in preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut of zebrafish fasted for 3, 5 and 7 days when compared to the expression in ad libitum fed fish. Refeeding after a 7 day fast caused a significant and dramatic decrease in preproghrelin mRNA expression in the gut and brain of zebrafish. An increase in the expression of preproghrelin mRNA during fasting, and its decrease following refeeding suggests an orexigenic role for ghrelin in zebrafish. Overall, our results provide evidence for a highly conserved structure and biological actions of ghrelin in zebrafish. Further studies are required to identify the tissue specific functions of ghrelin in zebrafish.

  4. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression of cattle Ghrelin gene and biological activity detection of the expressed protein].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ailing; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Liangzhi; Lan, Xianyong; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhang, Cunfang; Zhu, Zeyi

    2009-01-01

    The cDNA of cattle Ghrelin gene was amplified from abomasum fundic gland mRNA of Qinchuan Cattle by RT-PCR. PCR product was cloned into the T vector pGM-T to construct pGh-T1 for sequencing. Then the cDNA was subcloned into the prokaryotic expressing plasmid vector pET32a (+) and transformed into host Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) for expression. The expression of pGh-32 mature Ghrelin protein was induced by IPTG and was identified by SDS-PAGE. The expression product was observed with soluble protein and inclusion body. Western blotting showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by his-antibody specifically. The protein was purified by Ni-NTA column and was used to inject rabbits to obtain polyclona antibody. ELISA result showed that the antibody titer was 1:12 800. The immunohistochemistry test between the hypothalamus arcuate nucleus and the antibody showed that fusion protein had biological activity. This will provide a basis for further study on the biological function of Ghrelin protein to growth and development and fat deposition of cattle.

  5. In Situ Localization and Rhythmic Expression of Ghrelin and ghs-r1 Ghrelin Receptor in the Brain and Gastrointestinal Tract of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Unniappan, Suraj; Kah, Olivier; Gueguen, Marie-M.; Bertucci, Juan I.; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L.; Valenciano, Ana I.; Isorna, Esther; Delgado, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gut-brain peptide hormone, which binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) to regulate a wide variety of biological processes in fish. Despite these prominent physiological roles, no studies have reported the anatomical distribution of preproghrelin transcripts using in situ hybridization in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and its mapping within the different encephalic areas remains unknown. Similarly, no information is available on the possible 24-h variations in the expression of preproghrelin and its receptor in any vertebrate species. The first aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical distribution of ghrelin and GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor subtype in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish (Carassius auratus) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our second aim was to characterize possible daily variations of preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNA expression in central and peripheral tissues using real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Results show ghrelin expression and immunoreactivity in the gastrointestinal tract, with the most abundant signal observed in the mucosal epithelium. These are in agreement with previous findings on mucosal cells as the primary synthesizing site of ghrelin in goldfish. Ghrelin receptor was observed mainly in the hypothalamus with low expression in telencephalon, pineal and cerebellum, and in the same gastrointestinal areas as ghrelin. Daily rhythms in mRNA expression were found for preproghrelin and ghs-r1 in hypothalamus and pituitary with the acrophase occurring at nighttime. Preproghrelin, but not ghs-r1a, displayed a similar daily expression rhythm in the gastrointestinal tract with an amplitude 3-fold higher than the rest of tissues. Together, these results described for the first time in fish the mapping of preproghrelin and ghrelin receptor ghs-r1a in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish, and provide the first evidence for a daily regulation of both genes

  6. Expression of obestatin and ghrelin in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karaoglu, Aziz; Aydin, Suleyman; Dagli, Adile F; Cummings, David E; Ozercan, Ibrahim H; Canatan, Halit; Ozkan, Yusuf

    2009-03-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are two peptide hormones with opposing roles in the control of appetite: orexigenic and anorexigenic, respectively. Loss of appetite is a common, serious complication of many forms of malignancy. The goals of this study were to investigate: (i) whether there are differences in ghrelin and obestatin peptide expression in thyroid tissues from a series of papillary carcinoma cases and normal controls, and (ii) whether there are correlations between tissue ghrelin and obestatin levels in series of papillary carcinoma cases and normal controls. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that in sections of benign human thyroid tissue, anti-ghrelin antibody reacted with intense staining in colloid-filled follicles. In benign thyroid tissues, colloids displayed plentiful dispersion in comparison with papillary microcarcinomas, whereas colloids in malignant thyroid tissues were uncommon. We found markedly lower tissue ghrelin levels in thyroid tissue of patients with papillary carcinomas, compared with normal thyroid tissues (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis also showed that obestatin in papillary carcinoma stained positively to various degrees. Obestatin tissue levels in papillary carcinomas tended to be slightly higher than those in normal thyroid tissue, but this was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). We also report that thyroid tissue of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis produced ghrelin and obestatin at similar levels as in normal thyroid tissue, even though colloid in Hashimoto's disease is scarce. We conclude that depressed expression of ghrelin, but not obestatin, is specific to papillary carcinoma, and this difference might constitute a diagnostic tool to differentiate papillary carcinoma from normal thyroid tissue. We currently do not know how these peptides are regulated and what factors are involved in papillary carcinoma, which inhibit the expression of ghrelin but not obestatin. This issue warrants further studies.

  7. Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Müller, T.D.; Nogueiras, R.; Andermann, M.L.; Andrews, Z.B.; Anker, S.D.; Argente, J.; Batterham, R.L.; Benoit, S.C.; Bowers, C.Y.; Broglio, F.; Casanueva, F.F.; D'Alessio, D.; Depoortere, I.; Geliebter, A.; Ghigo, E.; Cole, P.A.; Cowley, M.; Cummings, D.E.; Dagher, A.; Diano, S.; Dickson, S.L.; Diéguez, C.; Granata, R.; Grill, H.J.; Grove, K.; Habegger, K.M.; Heppner, K.; Heiman, M.L.; Holsen, L.; Holst, B.; Inui, A.; Jansson, J.O.; Kirchner, H.; Korbonits, M.; Laferrère, B.; LeRoux, C.W.; Lopez, M.; Morin, S.; Nakazato, M.; Nass, R.; Perez-Tilve, D.; Pfluger, P.T.; Schwartz, T.W.; Seeley, R.J.; Sleeman, M.; Sun, Y.; Sussel, L.; Tong, J.; Thorner, M.O.; van der Lely, A.J.; van der Ploeg, L.H.T.; Zigman, J.M.; Kojima, M.; Kangawa, K.; Smith, R.G.; Horvath, T.; Tschöp, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The gastrointestinal peptide hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Increasing evidence supports more complicated and nuanced roles for the hormone, which go beyond the regulation of systemic energy metabolism. Scope of review In this review, we discuss the diverse biological functions of ghrelin, the regulation of its secretion, and address questions that still remain 15 years after its discovery. Major conclusions In recent years, ghrelin has been found to have a plethora of central and peripheral actions in distinct areas including learning and memory, gut motility and gastric acid secretion, sleep/wake rhythm, reward seeking behavior, taste sensation and glucose metabolism. PMID:26042199

  8. Daily supplementation with ghrelin improves in vitro bovine blastocysts formation rate and alters gene expression related to embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, Eleni; Periquesta, Eva; Messinis, Ioannis E; Tsiligianni, Theodora; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Amiridis, Georgios S

    2014-03-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide having regulatory role in the reproductive system functionality, acting mainly at central level. Because the expression of ghrelin system (ghrelin and its receptor) has been detected in the bovine ovary, the objectives of the present study were to investigate whether ghrelin can affect the developmental potential of in vitro-produced embryos, and to test their quality in terms of relative abundance of various genes related to metabolism, apoptosis and oxidation. In the first experiment, in vitro-produced zygotes were cultured in the absence (control [C]) and in the presence of three concentrations of acylated ghrelin (200 pg/mL [Ghr200], 800 pg/mL [Ghr800]; and 2000 pg/mL [Ghr2000]); blastocyst formation rates were examined on Days 7, 8, and 9. In the second experiment, only the 800 pg/mL dose of ghrelin was used. Zygotes were produced as in experiment 1 and 24 hours post insemination they were divided into 4 groups; in two groups (C; without ghrelin; Ghr800 with ghrelin), embryos were cultured without medium replacement; in the remaining two groups (Control N and GhrN), the culture medium was daily renewed. A pool of Day-7 blastocysts were snap frozen for relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, implantation, and apoptosis. In experiment 3, embryos were produced as in experiment 2, but in the absence of serum (semi-defined culture medium). In experiment 1, no differences were detected between C, Ghr200, and Ghr2000, although fewer blastocysts were produced in group Ghr800 compared with C. In experiment 2, the lowest blastocysts yield was found in Ghr800, whereas daily renewal of ghrelin (Ghr800N) resulted to increased blastocysts formation rate, which on Day 7 was the highest among groups (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocysts yield. Significant differences were detected in various relative mRNA abundance, giving an overall final notion that embryos produced in the

  9. Gastric ghrelin, GOAT, leptin, and leptinR expression as well as peripheral serotonin are dysregulated in humans with obesity.

    PubMed

    Ritze, Y; Schollenberger, A; Hamze Sinno, M; Bühler, N; Böhle, M; Bárdos, G; Sauer, H; Mack, I; Enck, P; Zipfel, S; Meile, T; Königsrainer, A; Kramer, M; Bischoff, S C

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal hormone release and the regulation of appetite and body weight are thought to be dysbalanced in obesity. However, human data investigating the expression of gastrointestinal hormones in the obese are rare. We studied the expression of ghrelin, leptin, and the serotonergic system in stomach tissue and serum of obese and non-obese individuals. Gastric tissue and serum were collected from 29 adult obese (BMI 48.7 ± 10.6 kg/m(2) ; mean ± SD) who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Gastric biopsies, surgery specimen or serum was obtained from 35 adult non-obese humans (BMI 22.7 ± 1.9 kg/m(2) ). Ghrelin, ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT), leptin, leptin receptor, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) mRNA expression were measured by qRT-PCR. Serotonin (5HT) and leptin protein concentration were quantified in tissue extracts and serum; GOAT and ghrelin-positive cells were immunohistologically quantified in tissue. Additionally, 21 blood immune markers were analyzed. In gastric tissue, GOAT-positive cells were reduced (p < 0.01), but ghrelin-positive cells and mRNA were increased (both p < 0.05) in obese compared with non-obese individuals. Gastric leptin (p < 0.001) and leptin receptor (p < 0.001) mRNA expression, as well as leptin concentrations in serum (p < 0.001), were increased in obese compared with non-obese individuals. Serum 5HT was reduced (p < 0.05), while tissue 5HT and TPH1 mRNA were reduced only by trend. Interleukin 1 receptor a (IL1Ra), IL-8, IL-12, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (IL1Ra) were increased and IL1Ra correlated negatively with serum leptin. Our data indicate that obesity causes a dysregulation of gastrointestinal hormones at the tissue level and serum, including a negative correlation with an increased marker of subclinical inflammation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. β1-Adrenergic receptor deficiency in ghrelin-expressing cells causes hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Bharath K.; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Vijayaraghavan, Prasanna; Hepler, Chelsea; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic gastric peptide hormone secreted when caloric intake is limited. Ghrelin also regulates blood glucose, as emphasized by the hypoglycemia that is induced by caloric restriction in mouse models of deficient ghrelin signaling. Here, we hypothesized that activation of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) localized to ghrelin cells is required for caloric restriction–associated ghrelin release and the ensuing protective glucoregulatory response. In mice lacking the β1AR specifically in ghrelin-expressing cells, ghrelin secretion was markedly blunted, resulting in profound hypoglycemia and prevalent mortality upon severe caloric restriction. Replacement of ghrelin blocked the effects of caloric restriction in β1AR-deficient mice. We also determined that treating calorically restricted juvenile WT mice with beta blockers led to reduced plasma ghrelin and hypoglycemia, the latter of which is similar to the life-threatening, fasting-induced hypoglycemia observed in infants treated with beta blockers. These findings highlight the critical functions of ghrelin in preventing hypoglycemia and promoting survival during severe caloric restriction and the requirement for ghrelin cell–expressed β1ARs in these processes. Moreover, these results indicate a potential role for ghrelin in mediating beta blocker–associated hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals, such as young children. PMID:27548523

  11. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  12. Examination of the tissue ghrelin expression of rats with diet-induced obesity using radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman; Sahin, Ibrahim; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dag, Ersel; Gunay, Ahmet; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2012-06-01

    Currently, obesity is an important health problem in all countries, both developed and developing. Dietary habits and neurohormonal imbalances play a critical role in obesity. Circulating amounts of ghrelin, which is a neurohormonal hormone, decrease with obesity and increase with weight loss. Although it is known that both mRNA and peptide version of the ghrelin hormone are expressed in almost all tissues of both humans and animals, it is not known how obesity changes the expression of this hormone in the tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal system tissues. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to show how diet-induced obesity in rats changes ghrelin expression in all system tissues, and thus, to shed light on the etiopathology of obesity. The study included 12 male and 12 female 2-month-old Wistar albino species rats. The animals in the control group were fed on standard rat pellet, while those in the experiment group were fed ad libitum on a cafeteria-style diet for 2 months. When their body mass index reached 1 g/cm(2), diet-induced obese (DIO) rats were sacrificed in a sterile environment after one night fasting. Ghrelin localizations in the tissues were studied immunohistochemically using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method, while tissue ghrelin amounts were analyzed using radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. When the ghrelin amounts in the urogenital system (with the exception of kidney tissues), sensory organs, respiratory system, immune system, skeletal muscle system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, and adipose tissue of rats analyzed by RIA method were compared to those in the control group, tissue ghrelin amounts in the DIO group were found lower. Immunohistochemical findings which showed a similar fall in ghrelin concentrations in the tissues were parallel to RIA results. In addition, ghrelin was shown to be synthesized in the cardiovascular system, heart muscle cells, tails of the sperms, hair follicles, lacrimal

  13. Ghrelin promotes oral tumor cell proliferation by modifying GLUT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Stark, Helmut; Frentzen, Matthias; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Frede, Stilla; Götz, Werner; Probstmeier, Rainer; Meyer, Rainer; Winter, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    In our study, ghrelin was investigated with respect to its capacity on proliferative effects and molecular correlations on oral tumor cells. The presence of all molecular components of the ghrelin system, i.e., ghrelin and its receptors, was analyzed and could be detected using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. To examine cellular effects caused by ghrelin and to clarify downstream-regulatory mechanisms, two different oral tumor cell lines (BHY and HN) were used in cell culture experiments. Stimulation of either cell line with ghrelin led to a significantly increased proliferation. Signal transduction occurred through phosphorylation of GSK-3β and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. This effect could be inhibited by blocking protein kinase A. Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1), as an important factor for delivering sufficient amounts of glucose to tumor cells having high requirements for this carbohydrate (Warburg effect) was up-regulated by exogenous and endogenous ghrelin. Silencing intracellular ghrelin concentrations using siRNA led to a significant decreased expression of GLUT1 and proliferation. In conclusion, our study describes the role for the appetite-stimulating peptide hormone ghrelin in oral cancer proliferation under the particular aspect of glucose uptake: (1) tumor cells are a source of ghrelin. (2) Ghrelin affects tumor cell proliferation through autocrine and/or paracrine activity. (3) Ghrelin modulates GLUT1 expression and thus indirectly enhances tumor cell proliferation. These findings are of major relevance, because glucose uptake is assumed to be a promising target for cancer treatment.

  14. Expression and Possible Immune-regulatory Function of Ghrelin in Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, K.; Laborde, N.J.; Kajiya, M.; Shin, J.; Zhu, T.; Thondukolam, A.K.; Min, C.; Kamata, N.; Karimbux, N.Y.; Stashenko, P.; Kawai, T.

    2011-01-01

    Originally found in stomach mucosa, ghrelin is a peptide appetite hormone that has been implicated as an immuno-modulatory factor. Ghrelin has also been found in salivary glands and saliva; however, its expression patterns and biological properties in the oral cavity remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the expression patterns of ghrelin in saliva, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and gingival tissue, as well as its in vitro effects on IL-8 production by TNF-α or LPS-stimulated oral epithelial cells. In the clinical samples obtained from 12 healthy volunteers, the concentration of ghrelin in GCF remarkably exceeded that detected in saliva. The expression of ghrelin mRNAs and growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptors could be detected in human oral epithelial cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of ghrelin in gingival epithelium, as well as in fibroblasts in the lamina propria. Ghrelin increased intracellular calcium mobilization and cAMP levels in oral epithelial cells, suggesting that ghrelin acts on epithelial cells to induce cell signaling. Furthermore, synthetic ghrelin inhibited the production of IL-8 from TNF-α or LPS-stimulated oral epithelial cells. These results indicate that ghrelin produced in the oral cavity appears to play a regulatory role in innate immune responses to inflammatory infection. PMID:21865591

  15. Ghrelin and obestatin in thyroid gland - immunohistochemical expression in nodular goiter, papillary and medullary cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurgul, Edyta; Kasprzak, Aldona; Blaszczyk, Agata; Biczysko, Maciej; Surdyk-Zasada, Joanna; Seraszek-Jaros, Agnieszka; Ruchala, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies analyzing ghrelin and obestatin expression in thyroid gland tissue are not unanimous and are mostly related to ghrelin. The role of ghrelin and obestatin in the thyroid gland appears very interesting due to their probable involvement in cell proliferation. Furthermore, since the thyroid gland is associated with the maintenance of energy balance, the relationship between ghrelin, obestatin and thyroid function is worthy of consideration. The aim of the study was to assess ghrelin and obestatin immunocytochemical expression in nodular goiter (NG), papillary cancer (PTC) and medullary cancer (MTC). Analyzed samples included 9 cases of NG, 8 cases of PTC and 11 cases of MTC. The analysis of ghrelin and obestatin expression was performed by use of the immunohistochemical (IHC) EnVision system and evaluated with filter HSV software (quantitative morphometric analysis). Quantitative ghrelin expression in MTC cells was higher than in NG (p = 0.013) and correlated negatively with the size of the tumor (r= -0.829, p < 0.05). We did not observe any differences in ghrelin expression neither between MTC and PTC nor between NG and PTC. Obestatin immunoexpression pattern in all analyzed specimens was irregular and poorly accented. The strongest immunoreactivity for obestatin was demonstrated in NG. In MTC obestatin expression was significantly weaker than in NG and PTC (p < 0.05 in both cases). In NG the intensity of obestatin immunostaining was significantly higher than that of ghrelin (p = 0.03). Conversely, ghrelin expression in MTC was definitely more evident than obestatin immunoreactivity (p < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between ghrelin and obestatin expression in PTC. No correlations were detected between reciprocal tissue expressions of ghrelin and obestatin in the analyzed specimens of NG, PTC or MTC. The differences between ghrelin expression in NG and MTC suggest that ghrelin may be involved in thyroid cell proliferation

  16. Ghrelin and obestatin: different role in fetal lung development?

    PubMed

    Nunes, Susana; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Dias, Emanuel; Moura, Rute S; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2008-12-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are two proteins that originate from post-translational processing of the preproghrelin peptide. Various authors claim an opposed role of ghrelin and obestatin in several systems. Preproghrelin mRNA is significantly expressed in airway epithelium throughout lung development, predominantly during the earliest stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ghrelin and obestatin in fetal lung development in vitro. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed at different gestational ages in order to clarify the expression pattern of ghrelin, GHS-R1a, obestatin and GPR39 during fetal lung development. Fetal rat lung explants were harvested at 13.5 days post-conception (dpc) and cultured during 4 days with increasing doses of total ghrelin, acylated ghrelin, desacyl-ghrelin, ghrelin antagonist (D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6) or obestatin. Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that ghrelin, GHS-R1a, obestatin and GPR39 proteins were expressed in primitive rat lung epithelium throughout all studied gestational ages. Total and acylated ghrelin supplementation significantly increased the total number of peripheral airway buds, whereas desacyl-ghrelin induced no effect. Moreover, GHS-R1a antagonist significantly decreased lung branching. Finally, obestatin supplementation induced no significant effect in the measured parameters. The present study showed that ghrelin has a positive effect in fetal lung development through its GHS-R1a receptor, whereas obestatin has no effect on lung branching.

  17. Activation of c-fos expression in the rat inferior olivary nucleus by ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weizhen; Lin, Theodore R; Hu, Yuexian; Fan, Yongyi; Zhao, Lili; Mulholland, Michael W

    2003-12-26

    Ghrelin, a novel 28-amino-acid hormone secreted by gastric oxyntic glands, stimulates food intake and induces adiposity. We examined whether ghrelin activates the inferior olivary nucleus. Systemic administration of ghrelin (37 nmol/kg) induced the expression of c-fos immunoreactivity in inferior olive neurons (n=6 rats). The number of neurons containing c-fos staining was significantly increased in the ghrelin-treated rats (65+/-14 vs.11+/-6 positive neurons, n=5). No significant difference in c-fos-positive neurons was observed between left (32+/-5) and right (33+/-6) inferior olivary nuclei. The number of c-fos-positive neurons in rats with bilateral vagotomy was not significantly different from those with intact vagal nerves. The present study demonstrates that ghrelin induces c-fos expression in inferior olivary nucleus via a central mechanism.

  18. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate NPY/AgRP neurons.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Enriori, Pablo J; Lemus, Moyra B; Cowley, Michael A; Andrews, Zane B

    2010-10-01

    Circulating ghrelin is decreased in obesity, and peripheral ghrelin does not induce food intake in obese mice. We investigated whether ghrelin resistance was a centrally mediated phenomenon involving dysregulated neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) circuits. We show that diet-induced obesity (DIO) (12 wk) suppresses the neuroendocrine ghrelin system by decreasing acylated and total plasma ghrelin, decreasing ghrelin and Goat mRNA in the stomach, and decreasing expression of hypothalamic GHSR. Peripheral (ip) or central (intracerebroventricular) ghrelin injection was able to induce food intake and arcuate nucleus Fos immunoreactivity in chow-fed but not high-fat diet-fed mice. DIO decreased expression of Npy and Agrp mRNA, and central ghrelin was unable to promote expression of these genes. Ghrelin did not induce AgRP or NPY secretion in hypothalamic explants from DIO mice. Injection of NPY intracerebroventricularly increased food intake in both chow-fed and high-fat diet-fed mice, indicating that downstream NPY/AgRP neural targets are intact and that defective NPY/AgRP function is a primary cause of ghrelin resistance. Ghrelin resistance in DIO is not confined to the NPY/AgRP neurons, because ghrelin did not stimulate growth hormone secretion in DIO mice. Collectively, our data suggests that DIO causes ghrelin resistance by reducing NPY/AgRP responsiveness to plasma ghrelin and suppressing the neuroendocrine ghrelin axis to limit further food intake. Ghrelin has a number of functions in the brain aside from appetite control, including cognitive function, mood regulation, and protecting against neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, central ghrelin resistance may potentiate obesity-related cognitive decline, and restoring ghrelin sensitivity may provide therapeutic outcomes for maintaining healthy aging.

  19. Ghrelin expression in hyperplastic and neoplastic proliferations of the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amitabh; Kamath, Anitha; Barry, Shepard-Annette; Dayal, Yogeshwar

    2004-01-01

    Ghrelin, a recently discovered peptide isolated from the gastric corpus mucosa, is believed to be important in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and has been shown to increase appetite and food intake as well. It may also have other gastrointestinal and cardiac functions. Because a cell of origin for ghrelin has not been convincingly identified in the gastric mucosa thus far, we studied the immunohistochemical expression of ghrelin in proliferative lesions of the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells-a cell that is not only exclusively confined to the gastric corpus mucosa but is its dominant endocrine cell type as well. Formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissues from three cases of gastric ECL cell hyperplasia and five ECL carcinoids (three with coexisting foci of diffuse, linear, and micronodular hyperplasia) were immunohistochemically stained for ghrelin, using a commercially available antibody. The Sevier-Munger stain for ECL cells and immunohistochemical stains for chromogranin, gastrin, serotonin, somatostatin, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) were performed on parallel sections for correlation with the ghrelin staining results. All ECL cell carcinoids and hyperplastic lesions were positive for both the Sevier-Munger and the immunohistochemical stains for chromogranin and VMAT-2. Immunoreactivity for ghrelin was seen in 4/5 ECL carcinoids, all cases of ECL cell hyperplasia, as well as in all areas with linear and micronodular hyperplasia adjacent to the ECL cell carcinoids. In each instance, such staining was confined to the Sevier-Munger, and VMAT-2 positive cells only. Our findings indicate that the ECL cells are either the ghrelin-producing cells of the gastric mucosa or acquire the capability to synthesize ghrelin during proliferative states encompassing the entire hyperplasia to neoplasia spectrum. In view of the orexigenic and other known actions of ghrelin, the functional and/or biologic significance of ghrelin production in such ECL

  20. Expression of the ghrelin receptor gene in neurons of the medulla oblongata of the rat.

    PubMed

    Bron, Romke; Yin, Lei; Russo, Domenico; Furness, John B

    2013-08-15

    There is ambiguity concerning the distribution of neurons that express the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) in the medulla oblongata. In the current study we used a sensitive nonradioactive method to investigate GHSR mRNA distribution by in situ hybridization. Strong expression of the GHSR gene was confirmed in neurons of the facial nucleus (FacN, 7), the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), and the semicompact (but not compact) nucleus ambiguus (AmbSC and AmbC). In addition, expression of GHSR was found in other regions, where it had not been described before. GHSR-positive neurons were observed in the gustatory rostral nucleus tractus solitarius and in areas involved in vestibulo-ocular processing (such as the medial vestibular nucleus and the nucleus abducens). GHSR expression was also noted in ventral areas associated with cardiorespiratory control, including the gigantocellular reticular nucleus, the lateral paragigantocellular nucleus, the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla, the (pre)-Bötzinger complex, and the rostral and caudal ventrolateral respiratory group. However, GHSR-positive neurons in ventrolateral areas did not express markers for cardiovascular presympathetic vasomotor neurons, respiratory propriobulbar rhythmogenic neurons, or sensory interneurons. GHSR-positive cells were intermingled with catecholamine neurons in the dorsal vagal complex but these populations did not overlap. Thus, the ghrelin receptor occurs in the medulla oblongata in 1) second-order sensory neurons processing gustatory, vestibulo-ocular, and visceral sensation; 2) cholinergic somatomotor neurons of the FacN and autonomic preganglionic neurons of the DMNX and AmbSC; 3) cardiovascular neurons in the DVC, Gi, and LPGi; 4) neurons of as yet unknown function in the ventrolateral medulla.

  1. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis of the rat fetal spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Miho; Nakahara, Keiko; Goto, Shintaro; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya . E-mail: a0d201u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2006-11-24

    Expressions of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA and its protein were confirmed in rat fetal spinal cord tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, over 3 nM ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induced significant proliferation of primary cultured cells from the fetal spinal cord. The proliferating cells were then double-stained using antibodies against the neuronal precursor marker, nestin, and the cell proliferation marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and the nestin-positive cells were also found to be co-stained with antibody against GHS-R. Furthermore, binding studies using [{sup 125}I]des-acyl ghrelin indicated the presence of a specific binding site for des-acyl ghrelin, and confirmed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled des-acyl ghrelin or ghrelin. These results indicate that ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induce proliferation of neuronal precursor cells that is both dependent and independent of GHS-R, suggesting that both ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are involved in neurogenesis of the fetal spinal cord.

  2. Ghrelin induces leptin resistance by activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression in male rats: implications in satiety regulation.

    PubMed

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il; Owyang, Chung

    2014-10-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) -bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior.

  3. Ghrelin Induces Leptin Resistance by Activation of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 Expression in Male Rats: Implications in Satiety Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il

    2014-01-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) –bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior. PMID:25060362

  4. Ghrelin and obestatin expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Alnema, Manar M; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile F; Ozercan, Hanifi I; Yildirim, Nezahat; Sahin, Ibrahim; Karaoglu, Aziz; Kilic, Nermin; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Ozercan, Mehmet R; Donder, Emir

    2010-06-01

    The underlying molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is poorly understood and appears to be controlled on many genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. Obestatin and ghrelin, two recently discovered hormones, are co-expressed in endocrine cells. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the immunohistochemical features of OSCCs in relation to the tissue concentration of ghrelin and obestatin. The association between OSCC and Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) status was also explored. The expression of ghrelin and obestatin was examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoassay in oral biopsy specimens: 10 benign squamous epithelial cell samples, 10 microinvasive squamous cell carcinomas, and seven well-differentiated and seven poorly differentiated OSCCs. The presence of EBV was evaluated in these samples using immunohistochemistry. The concentrations of ghrelin and obestatin in tissue homogenates were measured by RIA and ELISA, respectively. Squamous cell carcinomas and benign tissue samples were positive for anti-EBV antibody, and obestatin and ghrelin were shown to be co-expressed in all stratified squamous epithelium samples. Expression of ghrelin and obestatin was decreased or absent in OSCCs in relation to the invasiveness of the carcinoma; ghrelin and obestatin levels in cancerous tissue homogenates were lower than in benign tissue homogenates. These results indicate that the concentrations and distribution of immunoreactive obestatin and ghrelin might be helpful in distinguishing OSCC from benign tumors. Maintaining normal levels of these hormones might be required for regulation of normal cell division. However, detailed studies will be required for better understanding of the complex mechanism of carcinogenesis relating to OSCCs.

  5. Voluntary exercise attenuates obesity-associated inflammation through ghrelin expressed in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Takako; Maegawa, Taketeru; Sakurai, Takuya; Ogasawara, Jun-etsu; Ookawara, Tomomi; Oh-ishi, Shuji; Izawa, Tetsuya; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki

    2011-09-30

    Chronic low-level inflammation is associated with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, causing metabolic disturbances such as insulin resistance. Exercise training has been shown to decrease chronic low-level systemic inflammation in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating its beneficial effects are not fully understood. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone predominantly produced in the stomach that stimulates appetite and induces growth hormone release. In addition to these well-known functions, recent studies suggest that ghrelin localizes to immune cells and exerts an anti-inflammatory effect. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of ghrelin expressed in macrophages in the anti-inflammatory effects of voluntary exercise training. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and F4/80 was increased in adipose tissue from mice fed a HFD (HFD mice) compared with mice fed a standard diet (SD mice), whereas the expression of these inflammatory cytokines was markedly decreased in mice performing voluntary wheel running during the feeding of a HFD (HFEx mice). The expression of TNF-α was also increased in peritoneal macrophages by a HFD and exercise training inhibited the increase of TNF-α expression. Interestingly, expression of ghrelin in peritoneal macrophages was decreased by a HFD and recovered by exercise training. Suppression of ghrelin expression by siRNA increased TNF-α expression and LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation in RAW264 cells, which is a macrophage cell line. TNF-α expression by stimulation with LPS was significantly suppressed in RAW264 cells cultured in the presence of ghrelin. These results suggest that ghrelin exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages and functions as a mediator of the beneficial effects of exercise training.

  6. Effect of ghrelin on aldolase gene expression in the heart of chronic hypoxic rat.

    PubMed

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, however, energy production by anaerobic glycolysis protects myocardium against hypoxia injuries. Aldolase A is a well-characterised key enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, synthesizes in the stomach and has protective roles in cardiovascular systems and also affects metabolic pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on aldolase A gene expression after chronic hypoxia in the rat hearts. Twenty four adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Hypoxic rats with saline or ghrelin treatment were placed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber (O2 11 %), for two weeks. Controls remained in room air. Aldolase A gene expression was measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. the transcriptiom rate of Aldolase A in hypoxic animals did not change significantly compared to negative control ones. During chronic hypoxia, ghrelin treatment increased the amount of heart Aldolase A gene expression compared to negative controls (P = 0.029). Hypoxic animals that were treated with ghrelin were significantly more polycythemic than the controls and even hypoxic with saline treated rats (P < 0.001). It seems that ghrelin interferes in the cardiac metabolism through upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. In other words, it may protect heart from possible hypoxia induced damages.

  7. Effect of Ghrelin on Aldolase Gene Expression in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic hypoxia causes apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, however, energy production by anaerobic glycolysis protects myocardium against hypoxia injuries. Aldolase A is a well-characterised key enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, synthesizes in the stomach and has protective roles in cardiovascular systems and also affects metabolic pathways. Objectives Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on aldolase A gene expression after chronic hypoxia in the rat hearts. Materials and Methods Twenty four adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Hypoxic rats with saline or ghrelin treatment were placed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber (O2 11 %), for two weeks. Controls remained in room air. Aldolase A gene expression was measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results the transcriptiom rate of Aldolase A in hypoxic animals did not change significantly compared to negative control ones. During chronic hypoxia, ghrelin treatment increased the amount of heart Aldolase A gene expression compared to negative controls (P = 0.029). Hypoxic animals that were treated with ghrelin were significantly more polycythemic than the controls and even hypoxic with saline treated rats (P < 0.001). Conclusions It seems that ghrelin interferes in the cardiac metabolism through upregulation of glycolytic enzymes. In other words, it may protect heart from possible hypoxia induced damages. PMID:23843819

  8. Effects of ghrelin on anorexia in tumor-bearing mice with eicosanoid-related cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhua; Andersson, Marianne; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Lönnroth, Christina; Lundholm, Kent

    2006-06-01

    Ghrelin is a novel brain-gut peptide that stimulates food intake and may secondarily increase body weight via a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Tumor-bearing mice (MCG101), characterized by anorexia, fat loss and muscle wasting due to increased concentration of PGE2 and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha), were provided ghrelin i.p. at a low (20 microg/day) and high dose (40 microg/day) to examine the ability of ghrelin to counteract tumor-induced anorexia. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analyses were used to identify GHS-R expression in the brain as well as its relationship to NPY expression in hypothalamic neurons. GHS-R mRNA in hypothalamus and ghrelin mRNA in gastric fundus were quantified by RT-PCR. Body composition was determined by carcass extractions. GHS-R expression in hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin levels were significantly increased in freely-fed tumor-bearing mice, while gastric fundus expression of ghrelin was unaltered compared to non-tumor-bearing mice (controls). Ghrelin treatment increased food intake, body weight and whole body fat at both low and high doses of ghrelin in normal controls, while tumor-bearing mice showed improved intake and body composition at the high dose of ghrelin only. Exogenous ghrelin normalized the GHS-R expression in hypothalamus from tumor-bearing mice without alterations in the gastric fundus expression of ghrelin. Tumor growth was not altered by exogenous ghrelin. Our results indicate that MCG 101-bearing mice became ghrelin resistant despite upregulation of hypothalamic GHS-R expression, which confirms similar indirect observations in cancer patients. Thus, other factors downstream of the ghrelin-GHS-R system appear to be more important than ghrelin to explain cancer-induced anorexia.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of ghrelin in capsaicin-treated rat ovaries during the different developmental periods

    PubMed Central

    Tütüncü, Ş.; İlhan, T.; Özfiliz, N.

    2016-01-01

    Red hot pepper is a plant that belongs to the Solanaceae family and is known as Capsicum annuum. Capsaicin is the active ingredient of cayenne pepper. Ghrelin is a hormone, which consists of polypeptide structure. Ghrelin also contributes to growth hormone secretion, energy balance, food intake and body weight regulator. The aim of this study was the localization and expression of ghrelin in the ovaries of rats treated with capsaicin during the postnatal development. Ninety female Sprague-Dawley rats (21 d) were used. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=30 each) as pubertal, post pubertal and adult. Each group was subdivided into three groups. The first subgroup (control) was given no injections. The second subgroup (vehicle) received only 0.3 cc solvent and the third subgroup (experiment) received subcutaneous injection of equal volume of capsaicin (1 mg/kg/d) for 42, 56, and 70 days. Ghrelin immunoreactivity was determined in ovarian follicular granulosa cells, interstitial cells and corpus luteal cells. A ghrelin immunopositive reaction located in the cytoplasm of cells in all groups. These results indicate that prolonged administration of low dose capsaicin does not affect ghrelin expression. However, follicular atresia was seen in lower rate in capsaicin treated group in comparison to other groups. PMID:27656230

  10. A novel human ghrelin variant (In1-ghrelin) and ghrelin-O-acyltransferase are overexpressed in breast cancer: potential pathophysiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Hergueta-Redondo, Marta; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Kineman, Rhonda D; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P

    2011-01-01

    The human ghrelin gene, which encodes the ghrelin and obestatin peptides, contains 5 exons (Ex), with Ex1-Ex4 encoding a 117 amino-acid (aa) preproprotein that is known to be processed to yield a 28-aa (ghrelin) and/or a 23-aa (obestatin) mature peptides, which possess biological activities in multiple tissues. However, the ghrelin gene also encodes additional peptides through alternative splicing or post-translational modifications. Indeed, we previously identified a spliced mRNA ghrelin variant in mouse (In2-ghrelin-variant), which is regulated in a tissue-dependent manner by metabolic status and may thus be of biological relevance. Here, we have characterized a new human ghrelin variant that contains Ex0-1, intron (In) 1, and Ex2 and lacks Ex3-4. This human In1-ghrelin variant would encode a new prepropeptide that conserves the first 12aa of native-ghrelin (including the Ser3-potential octanoylation site) but has a different C-terminal tail. Expression of In1-variant was detected in 22 human tissues and its levels were positively correlated with those of ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT; p = 0.0001) but not with native-ghrelin expression, suggesting that In1-ghrelin could be a primary substrate for GOAT in human tissues. Interestingly, levels of In1-ghrelin variant expression in breast cancer samples were 8-times higher than those of normal mammary tissue, and showed a strong correlation in breast tumors with GOAT (p = 0.0001), ghrelin receptor-type 1b (GHSR1b; p = 0.049) and cyclin-D3 (a cell-cycle inducer/proliferation marker; p = 0.009), but not with native-ghrelin or GHSR1a expression. Interestingly, In1-ghrelin variant overexpression increased basal proliferation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence that In1-ghrelin is a novel element of the ghrelin family with a potential pathophysiological role in breast cancer.

  11. Ghrelin Attenuates Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yijun; Wei, Yongxu; Yang, Wenlei; Cai, Yu; Chen, Bin; Yang, Guoyuan; Shang, Hanbing; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction remains a critical problem in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with poor prognosis. Ghrelin, a brain-gut peptide, has been shown to exert protection in animal models of gastrointestinal injury. However, the effect of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction post-ICH and its possible underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This study was designed to investigate whether ghrelin administration attenuates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental ICH using an intrastriatal autologous blood infusion mouse model. Our data showed that treatment with ghrelin markedly attenuated intestinal mucosal injury at both histomorphometric and ultrastructural levels post-ICH. Ghrelin reduced ICH-induced intestinal permeability according to fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FITC-D) and Evans blue extravasation assays. Concomitantly, the intestinal tight junction-related protein markers, Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 were upregulated by ghrelin post-ICH. Additionally, ghrelin reduced intestinal intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression at the mRNA and protein levels following ICH. Furthermore, ghrelin suppressed the translocation of intestinal endotoxin post-ICH. These changes were accompanied by improved survival rates and an attenuation of body weight loss post-ICH. In conclusion, our results suggest that ghrelin reduced intestinal barrier dysfunction, thereby reducing mortality and weight loss, indicating that ghrelin is a potential therapeutic agent in ICH-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction therapy. PMID:27929421

  12. Hypothalamic expression of NPY mRNA, vasopressin mRNA and CRF mRNA in response to food restriction and central administration of the orexigenic peptide GHRP-6.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Louise E; Srisawat, Rungrudee; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Leng, Gareth

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of restricted feeding and of central administration of an orexigenic ghrelin agonist GHRP-6 on peptide mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. We compared rats fed ad libitum with rats that were allowed food for only 2?h every day, and treated with a continuous chronic i.c.v. infusion of GHRP-6 or vehicle. Ad libitum fed rats exposed to GHRP-6 increased their food intake and body weight over 6 days, but, at the end of this period, neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus was not different to that in control rats. By contrast, expression of neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate nucleus was elevated in food-restricted rats, consistent with the interpretation that increased expression reflects increased hunger. However, neuropeptide Y mRNA expression was no greater in food-restricted rats infused with GHRP-6 than in food-restricted rats infused with vehicle; thus if the drive to eat was stronger in rats infused with GHRP-6, this was not reflected by higher levels of neuropeptide Y mRNA expression. Expression of vasopressin mRNA and corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was not changed by food restriction. GHRP-6 infusion increased CRF mRNA expression in ad libitum rats only.

  13. Ghrelin and obestatin in human neuroendocrine tumors: expression and effect on obestatin levels after food intake.

    PubMed

    Grönberg, Malin; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Holmbäck, Ulf; Stridsberg, Mats; Grimelius, Lars; Janson, Eva T

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are derived from the same peptide hormone precursor and are mainly produced by the gastric mucosa. Ghrelin is involved in many biological processes, whereas the physiological function of obestatin needs further investigation. The aims of the present study were to establish the incidence of ghrelin- and obestatin-immunoreactive cells in a comprehensive panel of human neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and to investigate if blood obestatin concentrations are influenced during a standardized meal stimulation test in healthy individuals and patients with NETs. The expression of ghrelin and obestatin was investigated in NETs (n = 149) and other endocrine-related disorders (n = 3) using immunohistochemistry with specific polyclonal antibodies. Coexpression of the peptides was evaluated by double immunofluorescence. Concentrations of obestatin in blood were measured during a meal test in 6 healthy individuals and 5 patients with pancreatic NETs. Ghrelin and obestatin were expressed in 14/152 and 19/152 tumor tissues, respectively, mainly representing NETs of foregut origin and in pancreatic tissue from a nesidioblastosis patient. Double immunofluorescence staining showed colocalization of the peptides. During the meal test, obestatin levels in blood were unchanged in all patients but decreased significantly in the healthy individuals. Only a minority of NETs express ghrelin and obestatin. However, analysis of patients with tumors originating from tissues that express the peptides in normal conditions could be of importance. The results from the meal test indicate that the hormone levels are affected by food intake in healthy individuals, whereas obestatin levels remained unchanged in pancreatic NET patients. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Molecular Cloning of Ghrelin and Characteristics of Ghrelin-Producing Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Takemi, Shota; Sakata, Ichiro; Apu, Auvijit Saha; Tsukahara, Shinji; Yahashi, Satowa; Katsuura, Goro; Iwashige, Fumihiro; Akune, Atsushi; Inui, Akio; Sakai, Takafumi

    2016-10-01

    Ghrelin was first isolated from human and rat as an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). In the present study, we determined the ghrelin cDNA sequence of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied New World monkey, and investigated the distribution of ghrelin-producing cells in the gastrointestinal tract and localization profiles with somatostatin-producing cells. The marmoset ghrelin cDNA coding region was 354 base pairs, and showed high homology to that in human, rhesus monkey, and mouse. Marmoset ghrelin consists of 28 amino acids, and the N-terminal region is highly conserved as found in other mammalian species. Marmoset preproghrelin and mature ghrelin have 86.3% and 92.9% homology, respectively, to their human counterparts. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that marmoset ghrelin mRNA is highly expressed in the stomach, but it is not detected in other tissues of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, a large number of ghrelin mRNA-expressing cells and ghrelin-immunopositive cells were detected in the mucosal layer of the stomach, but not in the myenteric plexus. Moreover, all the ghrelin cells examined in the stomach were observed to be closed-type. Double staining showed that somatostatin-immunopositive cells were not co-localized with ghrelin-producing cells; however, a subset of somatostatin-immunopositive cells is directly adjacent to ghrelin-immunopositive cells. These findings suggest that the distribution of ghrelin cells in marmoset differs from that in rodents, and thus the marmoset may be a more useful model for the translational study of ghrelin in primates. In conclusion, we have clarified the expression and cell distribution of ghrelin in marmoset, which may represent a useful model in translational study.

  15. Molecular forms of hypothalamic ghrelin and its regulation by fasting and 2-deoxy-d-glucose administration.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Fukue, Yoshihiko; Teranishi, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Yayoi; Kojima, Masayasu

    2005-06-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor, is a hormone expressed in stomach and other tissues, such as hypothalamus, testis, and placenta. This hormone acts at a central level to stimulate GH secretion and food intake. Little is known, however, about the molecular forms and physiological roles of ghrelin within the hypothalamus. In this report, we detail the molecular forms, mRNA expression patterns, and peptide contents of ghrelin within the rat hypothalamus. Using the combination of reverse-phase HPLC and ghrelin-specific RIA, we determined that the rat hypothalamus contains both n-octanoyl-modified and des-acyl ghrelins. Fasting for 24 and 48 h significantly decreased ghrelin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus to 24% and 28% of control values, respectively. Both n-octanoyl-modified and des-acyl ghrelin content in the hypothalamus decreased after 24 and 48 h of fasting. These results contrast the changes in gastric ghrelin after fasting, which decreased in content despite increased mRNA expression. Two hours after injection of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG), a selective blocker of carbohydrate metabolism, ghrelin peptide levels also decreased. Thus, induction of glucoprivic states, such as fasting and 2-DG treatment, decreased ghrelin gene expression and peptide content within the hypothalamus.

  16. Impact of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric and plasma ghrelin dynamics in humans.

    PubMed

    Isomoto, Hajime; Ueno, Hiroaki; Saenko, Vladimir A; Mondal, Muhtashan S; Nishi, Yoshito; Kawano, Naoko; Ohnita, Ken; Mizuta, Yohei; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yamashita, Shunichi; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2005-08-01

    There are contradictory reports on the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and circulating ghrelin. We sought to clarify the influence of H. pylori infection on gastric and plasma ghrelin dynamics in humans. Using endoscopic biopsies from the corpus of 56 H. pylori-infected patients and 25 uninfected subjects, ghrelin mRNA expression levels and gastric ghrelin peptide contents were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and radioimmunoassay, respectively. We also measured plasma ghrelin concentrations and analyzed the numbers of ghrelin immunoreactive cells in the fundic gland area. Fifty-one patients with H. pylori infection were treated with a 7-day triple therapy consisting of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin. The gastric ghrelin mRNA expression level of H. pylori-positive patients (1.64 +/- 1.27 in arbitrary units) was significantly lower than in H. pylori-negative subjects (4.87 +/- 4.1, p < 0.0001). A similar trend was noted for ghrelin peptide contents (31.2 +/- 27.5 vs 81.2 +/- 64.1 ng/mg protein, respectively, p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the number of ghrelin immunoreactive cells/mm(2) in terms of H. plyori status. Plasma ghrelin concentrations in H. pylori-infected patients (144.6 +/- 7.8.8 fmol/ml) were significantly lower than in uninfected subjects (196.1 +/- 97.2, p < 0.05) and increased following cure of the infection. Plasma ghrelin levels correlated positively with the expression levels of ghrelin mRNA (r = 0.583, p < 0.0001) and peptide products (r = 0.574, p < 0.0001). There was a significant stepwise decrease in gastric ghrelin mRNA expression (p < 0.05), peptide contents (p < 0.01) and density of ghrelin immunoreactive cells (p < 0.05) with progression of histological severity of glandular atrophy in the corpus. The histological severity of chronic inflammation also negatively influenced the ghrelin mRNA expression (p < 0.001) and peptide production (p < 0.005). H. pylori infection has a

  17. Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were re-evaluated at end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL group at end of study, No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under curve of IPGTT were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was two-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin mRNA levels of stomach in SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model as high fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  18. THE EFFECTS OF Syzygium aromaticum-DERIVED TRITERPENES ON GASTROINTESTINAL GHRELIN EXPRESSION IN STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETIC RATS.

    PubMed

    Luvuno, Mluleki; Mbongwa, Hlengiwe Prosperity; Khathi, Andile

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic polyphagia has been associated with elevated plasma ghrelin levels in experimental type 1 diabetes. This increase in food consumption contributes to chronic hyperglycaemia in diabetes thus contributing to the development of micro- and macrovascular complications. We have reported that plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and maslinic acid (MA) reduce blood glucose levels, in part, through the inhibition of intestinal carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes and glucose transporters. However, their effects on food intake and plasma ghrelin concentrations are unclear. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of these triterpenes on food intake and ghrelin expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The effects of OA and MA on blood glucose concentration; food and water intake were monitored over five weeks after which plasma ghrelin concentrations were measured. Additionally, the expression of ghrelin in the various sections of the GIT was determined using Western blot analysis. Ghrelin concentrations in untreated STZ-induced diabetic rats were significantly higher in comparison to the non-diabetic control. Interestingly, the administration of OA and MA reduced food intake, blood glucose levels and plasma ghrelin levels in STZ-induced diabetic rats. This was further complemented by significant reductions in the gastrointestinal expression of ghrelin suggesting that the anti-diabetic properties of these triterpenes are mediated, in part, through the reduction of food intake and the modulation of ghrelin expression. The findings of the study suggest that the control of food intake through the reduction of ghrelin expression by plant-derived OA and MA may constitute an avenue of glycaemic control in diabetes mellitus.

  19. Effects of Ghrelin on Sexual Behavior and Luteinizing Hormone Beta-subunit Gene Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Babaei-Balderlou, Farrin; Khazali, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have facilitative effects on reproductive behavior in mammals. Ghrelin as a starvation hormone has an inhibitory effect on HPG axis’ function. Hence, it is postulated that ghrelin may reduce the sexual behavior through inhibiting of HPG axis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin and its antagonist, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6, on sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 128 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Each group was further subdivided into eight subgroups (n=8 rats/subgroup) including the animals that received saline, ghrelin (2, 4 or 8 nmol), [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) or co-administration of ghrelin (4 nmol) and [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) through the stereotaxically implanted cannula into the third cerebral ventricle. The sexual behavior of male rats encountering with females and the hypo-physeal LH beta-subunit gene expression were evaluated at two different groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) significantly (p<0.01) increased the latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation as well as the post-ejaculatory interval. Also, 4 and 8 nmol ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) increased the number of mount and decreased the number of ejaculation. In co-administrated groups, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonized the effects of ghrelin. Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) reduced the LH beta-subunit gene expression while pretreatment with [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 improved the gene expression. Conclusion: Ghrelin decreased the sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats, whereas [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonizes these effects. PMID:27141463

  20. Reduced ghrelin secretion in the hypothalamus of rats due to cisplatin-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Yakabi, Koji; Sadakane, Chiharu; Noguchi, Masamichi; Ohno, Shino; Ro, Shoki; Chinen, Katsuya; Aoyama, Toru; Sakurada, Tomoya; Takabayashi, Hideaki; Hattori, Tomohisa

    2010-08-01

    Although chemotherapy with cisplatin is a widely used and effective cancer treatment, the undesirable gastrointestinal side effects associated with it, such as nausea, vomiting, and anorexia, markedly decrease patients' quality of life. To elucidate the mechanism underlying chemotherapy-induced anorexia, focusing on the hypothalamic ghrelin secretion-anorexia association, we measured hypothalamic ghrelin secretion in fasted and cisplatin-treated rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin secretion changes after vagotomy or administration of cisplatin. Cisplatin + rikkunshito, a serotonin 2C receptor antagonist or serotonin 3 receptor antagonist, was investigated. The effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of ghrelin or the serotonin 2C receptor antagonist SB242084 on food intake were also evaluated in cisplatin-treated rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin secretion significantly increased in 24-h-fasted rats compared to freely fed rats and was markedly reduced 24 and 48 h after cisplatin treatment in cisplatin-treated rats compared to saline-treated rats, although their plasma ghrelin levels were comparable. In cisplatin-treated rats, icv ghrelin administration reversed the decrease in food intake, vagotomy partially restored hypothalamic ghrelin secretion, and hypothalamic serotonin 2C receptor mRNA expression increased significantly. Administration of rikkunshito (an endogenous ghrelin enhancer) or a serotonin 2C receptor antagonist reversed the decrease in hypothalamic ghrelin secretion and food intake 24 h after cisplatin treatment. Cisplatin-induced anorexia is mediated through reduced hypothalamic ghrelin secretion. Cerebral serotonin 2C receptor activation partially induces decrease in hypothalamic ghrelin secretion, and rikkunshito suppresses cisplatin-induced anorexia by enhancing this secretion.

  1. Increased Ghrelin but Low Ghrelin-Reactive Immunoglobulins in a Rat Model of Methotrexate Chemotherapy-Induced Anorexia.

    PubMed

    François, Marie; Takagi, Kuniko; Legrand, Romain; Lucas, Nicolas; Beutheu, Stephanie; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Cravezic, Aurore; Tennoune, Naouel; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Coëffier, Moïse; Inui, Akio; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is commonly accompanied by mucositis, anorexia, weight loss, and anxiety independently from cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia, further aggravating clinical outcome. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone produced in gastric mucosa that reaches the brain to stimulate appetite. In plasma, ghrelin is protected from degradation by ghrelin-reactive immunoglobulins (Ig). To analyze possible involvement of ghrelin in the chemotherapy-induced anorexia and anxiety, gastric ghrelin expression, plasma levels of ghrelin, and ghrelin-reactive IgG were studied in rats treated with methotrexate (MTX). Rats received MTX (2.5 mg/kg, subcutaneously) for three consecutive days and were killed 3 days later, at the peak of anorexia and weight loss. Control rats received phosphate-buffered saline. Preproghrelin mRNA expression in the stomach was analyzed by in situ hybridization. Plasma levels of ghrelin and ghrelin-reactive IgG were measured by immunoenzymatic assays and IgG affinity kinetics by surface plasmon resonance. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in MTX-treated anorectic and in control rats were evaluated in the elevated plus-maze and the forced-swim test, respectively. In MTX-treated anorectic rats, the number of preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells was found increased (by 51.3%, p < 0.001) as well were plasma concentrations of both ghrelin and des-acyl-ghrelin (by 70.4%, p < 0.05 and 98.3%, p < 0.01, respectively). In contrast, plasma levels of total IgG reactive with ghrelin and des-acyl-ghrelin were drastically decreased (by 87.2 and 88.4%, respectively, both p < 0.001), and affinity kinetics of these IgG were characterized by increased small and big Kd, respectively. MTX-treated rats displayed increased anxiety- but not depression-like behavior. MTX-induced anorexia, weight loss, and anxiety are accompanied by increased ghrelin production and by a decrease of ghrelin-reactive IgG levels and affinity binding properties. Such changes of

  2. Enhanced expressions of mRNA for neuropeptide Y and interleukin 1 beta in hypothalamic arcuate nuclei during adjuvant arthritis-induced anorexia in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Stofkova, Andrea; Haluzik, Martin; Zelezna, Blanka; Kiss, Alexander; Skurlova, Martina; Lacinova, Zdenka; Jurcovicova, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Food intake is activated by hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is mainly under the dual control of leptin and ghrelin. Rat adjuvant arthritis (AA), similarly as human rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with cachexia caused by yet unknown mechanisms. The aim of our study was to evaluate NPY expression in hypothalamic arcuate nuclei (nARC) under the conditions of AA-induced changes in leptin, ghrelin and adiponectin. Since IL-1beta is involved in the central induction of anorexia, we studied its expression in the nARC as well. AA was induced to Lewis rats using complete Freund's adjuvant. On days 12, 15 and 18 after complete Freund's adjuvant injection, the levels of leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin and IL-1beta were determined by RIA or ELISA. The mRNA expressions for NPY, leptin receptor (OB-R), ghrelin receptor (Ghsr) and IL-1beta were determined by TaqMan RT-PCR from isolated nARC. In AA rats, decreased appetite, body mass and epididymal fat stores positively correlated with reduced circulating and epididymal fat leptin and adiponectin. Ghrelin plasma levels were increased. In nARC, mRNA for OB-R, Ghsr and NPY were overexpressed in AA rats. AA rats showed overexpression of mRNA for IL-1beta in nARC while circulating, and spleen IL-1beta was unaltered. During AA, overexpression of orexigenic NPY mRNA in nARC along with enhanced plasma ghrelin and lowered leptin levels occur. Decreased food intake indicates a predominant effect of the anorexigenic pathway. Activated expression of IL-1beta in nARC suggests its role in keeping AA-induced anorexia in progress. The reduction in adiponectin may also contribute to AA-induced anorexia. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Ghrelin reduces rat myocardial calcification induced by nicotine and vitamin D3 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Jiang, Tao; Tang, Chaoshu; Su, Zijie; Zhang, Nong; Li, Guizhong

    2011-10-01

    Ghrelin, a newly discovered bioactive peptide, initially was identified as a strong stimulant for the release of growth hormone (GH) and that has improved cardiac function in patients suffering from end-stage chronic heart failure. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that ghrelin may have myocardial protective effects. However, the role of ghrelin in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases remains unclear. In this study, an in vivo model of rat myocardial calcification induced by vitamin D3 and nicotine was used to study the possible mechanism in the regulatory action of ghrelin on the calcified myocardium. Calcification increased total Ca2+ content and 45Ca2+ deposition in the myocardium and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activation in the plasma. Compared with the control group, ghrelin mRNA expression was up-regulated and the myocardium calcium content was significantly increased in vitamin D3 and nicotine-treated rats. Rats were subcutaneously injected with 1 or 10 nmol/kg ghrelin. Rats treated with both low- and high-dose ghrelin decreased total Ca2+ content and 45Ca2+ deposition in cardiac muscle and inhibited ALP activation in the myocardium and plasma, in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, osteopontin (OPN) mRNA expression significantly decreased and that of endothelin (ET-1) significantly increased with myocardial calcification. Ghrelin treatment increased OPN expression at the mRNA level and reduced ET-1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that exogenous administration with ghrelin attenuates myocardial calcification induced by nicotine and vitamin D3, and that the possible mechanism is via the ghrelin-induced increase in the OPN mRNA levels and decrease in the ET-1 mRNA expression in the myocardium.

  4. Ghrelin receptor expression and colocalization with anterior pituitary hormones using a GHSR-GFP mouse line.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Alex; Steyn, Frederik J; Sleeman, Mark W; Andrews, Zane B

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor (GHSR) and robustly stimulates GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. Ghrelin also regulates the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones including TSH, LH, prolactin (PRL), and ACTH. However, the relative contribution of a direct action at the GHSR in the anterior pituitary gland vs. an indirect action at the GHSR in the hypothalamus remains undefined. We used a novel GHSR-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter mouse to quantify GHSR coexpression with GH, TSH, LH, PRL, and ACTH anterior pituitary cells in males vs. females and in chow-fed or calorie-restricted (CR) mice. GHSR-eGFP-expressing cells were only observed in anterior pituitary. The number of GHSR-eGFP-expressing cells was higher in male compared with females, and CR did not affect the GHSR-eGFP cell number. Double staining revealed 77% of somatotrophs expressed GHSR-eGFP in both males and females. Nineteen percent and 12.6% of corticotrophs, 21% and 9% of lactotrophs, 18% and 19% of gonadotrophs, and 3% and 9% of males and females, respectively, expressed GHSR-eGFP. CR increased the number of TSH cells, but suppressed the number of lactotrophs and gonadotrophs, expressing GHSR-eGFP compared with controls. These studies support a robust stimulatory action of ghrelin via the GHSR on GH secretion and identify a previously unknown sexual dimorphism in the GHSR expression in the anterior pituitary. CR affects GHSR-eGFP expression on lactotrophs, gonadotrophs, and thyrotrophs, which may mediate reproductive function and energy metabolism during periods of negative energy balance. The low to moderate expression of GHSR-eGFP suggests that ghrelin plays a minor direct role on remaining anterior pituitary cells.

  5. Peripheral injection of ghrelin induces Fos expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kobelt, Peter; Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Inhoff, Tobias; Noetzel, Steffen; Veh, Rüdiger W.; Bannert, Norbert; van der Voort, Ivo; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Taché, Yvette; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral ghrelin has been shown to act as a gut–brain peptide exerting a potent orexigenic effect on food intake. The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) is innervated by projections from other brain areas being part of the network of nuclei controlling energy homeostasis, among others NPY/AgRP-positive fibers arising from the arcuate nucleus (ARC). The aim of the study was to determine if peripherally administered ghrelin affects neuronal activity in the DMH, as assessed by Fos expression. The number of Fos positive neurons was determined in the DMH, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), ARC, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and in the area postrema(AP) in non-fasted Sprague–Dawley rats in response to intraperitoneally (ip) injected ghrelin (3 nmol/rat) or vehicle (0.15 M NaCl). Peripheral ghrelin induced a significant increase in the number of Fos-ir positive neurons/section compared with vehicle in the ARC (mean±SEM: 49±2 vs. 23±2 neurons/section, p=0.001), PVN (69±5 vs. 34±3, p=0.001), and DMH (142±5 vs. 83±5, p<0.001). Fos-ir positive neurons were mainly localized within the ventral part of the DMH. No change in Fos expression was observed in the VMH (53±8 vs. 48±6, p=0.581), NTS (42±2 vs.40±3, p=0.603), and in the AP (7±1 vs. 5±1, p=0.096). Additional double-labelling with anti-Fos and anti-AgRP revealed that Fos positive neurons in the DMH were encircled by a network of AgRP-ir positive fibers. These data indicate that peripheral ghrelin activates DMH neurons and that NPY-/AgRP-positive fibers may be involved in the response. PMID:18329635

  6. Peptide purification, complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and genomic DNA cloning, and functional characterization of ghrelin in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Masayasu; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2003-12-01

    We have identified ghrelin from the stomach of rainbow trout. Four isoforms of ghrelin peptide were isolated: the C-terminal amidated type of rainbow trout ghrelin (rt ghrelin) composed of 24 amino acids (GSSFLSPSQKPQVRQGKGKPPRV-amide) is a basic form; des-VRQ-rt ghrelin, which deleted three amino acids (V13R14Q15) from rt ghrelin; and further two types of rt ghrelin that retained the glycine residue at the C terminus, rt ghrelin-Gly, and des-VRQ-rt ghrelin-Gly. The third serine residue was modified by octanoic acid, decanoic acid, or the unsaturated form of those fatty acids. In agreement with the isolated peptides, two cDNAs of different lengths were isolated. The rt ghrelin gene has five exons and four introns, and two different mRNA molecules are predicted to be produced by alternative splicing of the gene. A high level of ghrelin mRNA expression was detected in the stomach, and moderate levels were detected in the brain, hypothalamus, and intestinal tracts. Des-VRQ-rt ghrelin stimulated the release of GH in the rat in vivo. Furthermore, des-VRQ-rt ghrelin stimulated the release of GH, but not the release of prolactin and somatolactin in rainbow trout in vivo and in vitro. These results indicate that ghrelin is a novel GH secretagogue in rainbow trout that may affect somatic growth or osmoregulation through GH. Because ghrelin is expressed in various tissues other than stomach, it may play important role(s) in cellular function as a local regulator.

  7. Ghrelin Administration Increases the Bax/Bcl-2 Gene Expression Ratio in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rats.

    PubMed

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis, is a biochemical procedure that initiates due to some conditions, including hypoxia. Bax and Bcl-2 are among the agents that regulate apoptosis. The amplification of the first one triggers the initiation of apoptosis, and the second one prevents it. Ghrelin is an endogenous peptide that antiapoptosis is its new effect. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Twenty four wistar rats were divided randomly in three groups; control, hypoxic + saline and hypoxic + ghrelin. Hypoxic animals lived in O2 11% for 2 weeks and received either saline or ghrelin subcutaneously daily. The bax and Bcl-2 gene expression were measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Chronic hypoxia increased the Bax gene expression significantly compared with normal animals (P = 0.008), but the Bcl-2 was not affected by hypoxia. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio also amplified significantly (P=0.005). Ghrelin administration significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the hypoxic animals compared to the hypoxic + saline and normal groups (p=0.042 and P= 0.001, respectively). In the present study, animals' treatment with ghrelin leads to an increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which indicates a controversy related to cardioprotection of ghrelin.

  8. Ghrelin Administration Increases the Bax/Bcl-2 Gene Expression Ratio in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Programmed cell death or apoptosis, is a biochemical procedure that initiates due to some conditions, including hypoxia. Bax and Bcl-2 are among the agents that regulate apoptosis. The amplification of the first one triggers the initiation of apoptosis, and the second one prevents it. Ghrelin is an endogenous peptide that antiapoptosis is its new effect. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Methods: Twenty four wistar rats were divided randomly in three groups; control, hypoxic + saline and hypoxic + ghrelin. Hypoxic animals lived in O2 11% for 2 weeks and received either saline or ghrelin subcutaneously daily. The bax and Bcl-2 gene expression were measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results: Chronic hypoxia increased the Bax gene expression significantly compared with normal animals (P = 0.008), but the Bcl-2 was not affected by hypoxia. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio also amplified significantly (P=0.005). Ghrelin administration significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the hypoxic animals compared to the hypoxic + saline and normal groups (p=0.042 and P= 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: In the present study, animals’ treatment with ghrelin leads to an increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which indicates a controversy related to cardioprotection of ghrelin. PMID:26236657

  9. The effect of ghrelin on cell proliferation in small intestinal IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huafang; Xu, Guoxiong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that ghrelin, a short orexigenic peptide from the stomach, has dual effects on cell proliferation in different cell types via autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. The aim of this study is to investigate the proliferative role of ghrelin in intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells and explore underlying mechanism. RT-PCR was used for the detection of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a. Cell proliferation was measured using Cell Counting Kit-8. Protein expression of ERK 1/2 and Akt was examined using western blotting. Inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinases kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase were used to evaluate the role of these signalling pathways in ghrelin-induced proliferation of IEC-6 cells. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a mRNA was present in IEC-6 cells. Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin increased IEC-6 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin activated ERK1/2, but not Akt. U0126, a specific inhibitor of mitogen activated protein kinases kinase, blocked ghrelin- and des-acyl ghrelin-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation in IEC-6 cells. Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin stimulate the proliferation of IEC-6 cells via the ERK1/2 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts. PMID:26226634

  11. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts.

  12. Impact of changes in postnatal nutrition on puberty onset and the expression of hypothalamic GnRH and ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Cui, L-L; Li, P; Zhu, Z-Y

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone with multiple and diverse physiologic functions including an important role in energy homeostasis and reproduction. In this study, the adjustment effects of different postnatal nutritional status on puberty onset and the expression of hypothalamic ghrelin and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were examined in 1 day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were randomly assigned into four groups: overnutrition group (Group O), normal group (Group N, control group), and undernutrition groups (Group U and U2). Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the expression of hypothalamic ghrelin and GnRH. With a low level expression of hypothalamic ghrelin, the appearance of puberty onset and secretion peak of GnRH in Group O was earlier than the other groups. Undernutrition delayed puberty onset and the GnRH peak, at the same time, promoted the expression of hypothalamic ghrelin.While, the expression of hypothalamic ghrelin was suppressed at puberty onset.

  13. Ghrelin Increases Beta-Catenin Level through Protein Kinase A Activation and Regulates OPG Expression in Rat Primary Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mrak, Emanuela; Casati, Lavinia; Pagani, Francesca; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Zarattini, Guido; Sibilia, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, by binding growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), promotes osteoblast proliferation but the signaling mechanism of GHS-R on these cells remains unclear. Since canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critically associated with bone homeostasis, we investigated its involvement in mediating ghrelin effects in osteoblasts and in osteoblast-osteoclast cross talk. Ghrelin (10−10M) significantly increased β-catenin levels in rat osteoblasts (rOB). This stimulatory action on β-catenin involves a specific interaction with GHS-R1a, as it is prevented by the selective GHS-R1a antagonist, D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (10−7M). The effect of ghrelin on β-catenin involves the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β via protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of PKA activity reduces the facilitatory action of ghrelin on β-catenin stabilization. Ghrelin treatment of rOB significantly increases the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), which plays an important role in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis, and this effect is blocked by D-Lys3-GHRP-6. Furthermore, ghrelin reduced RANKL/OPG ratio thus contrasting osteoclastogenesis. Accordingly, conditioned media from rOB treated with ghrelin decreased the number of multinucleated TRAcP+ cells as compared with the conditioned media from untreated-control rOB. Our data suggest new roles for ghrelin in modulating bone homeostasis via a specific interaction with GHSR-1a in osteoblasts with subsequent enhancement of both β-catenin levels and OPG expression. PMID:25866509

  14. Postprandial inhibition of gastric ghrelin secretion by long-chain fatty acid through GPR120 in isolated gastric ghrelin cells and mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinping; Zhao, Xilin; Feng, Jianying; Liou, Alice P.; Anthony, Shari; Pechhold, Susanne; Sun, Yuxiang; Lu, Huiyan

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide hormone that controls appetite and energy homeostasis. Plasma ghrelin levels rise before a meal and fall quickly thereafter. Elucidation of the regulation of ghrelin secretion has been hampered by the difficulty of directly interrogating ghrelin cells diffusely scattered within the complex gastric mucosa. Therefore, we generated transgenic mice with ghrelin cell expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to enable characterization of ghrelin secretion in a pure population of isolated gastric ghrelin-expressing GFP (Ghr-GFP) cells. Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining, we detected a high level of expression of the long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) receptor GPR120, while the other LCFA receptor, GPR40, was undetectable. In short-term-cultured pure Ghr-GFP cells, the LCFAs docosadienoic acid, linolenic acid, and palmitoleic acid significantly suppressed ghrelin secretion. The physiological mechanism of LCFA inhibition on ghrelin secretion was studied in mice. Serum ghrelin levels were transiently suppressed after gastric gavage of LCFA-rich lipid in mice with pylorus ligation, indicating that the ghrelin cell may directly sense increased gastric LCFA derived from ingested intraluminal lipids. Meal-induced increase in gastric mucosal LCFA was assessed by measuring the transcripts of markers for tissue uptake of LCFA, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid translocase (CD36), glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HDL-binding protein 1, and nuclear fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Quantitative RT-PCR studies indicate significantly increased mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored HDL-binding protein 1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in postprandial gastric mucosa. These results suggest that meal-related increases in gastric mucosal LCFA interact with GPR120 on ghrelin cells to inhibit ghrelin secretion. PMID:22678998

  15. Different responses of circulating ghrelin, obestatin levels to fasting, re-feeding and different food compositions, and their local expressions in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Fu; Ren, An-Jing; Zheng, Xing; Qin, Yong-Wen; Cheng, Fang; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hong; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Zou, Lin

    2008-07-01

    Obestatin, a sibling of ghrelin derived from preproghrelin, opposes several physiological actions of ghrelin. Our previous study has demonstrated that both plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels were decreased significantly 2h after food intake in human. To further expand current knowledge, we investigated the temporal profiles of their levels in ad libitum fed rats, 48h fasted rats and 48h fasted rats refed 2h with a standard chow, crude fiber, 50% glucose or water, and their expressions in stomach, liver and pancreatic islets immunohistochemically. Plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels were measured by EIA. Plasma leptin, insulin and glucose levels were also evaluated. Both plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels increased significantly in fasted rats compared with ad libitum fed rats. The ingestion of standard chow produced a profound and sustained suppression of ghrelin levels, whereas plasma obestatin levels decreased significantly but recovered quickly. Intake of crude fiber or 50% glucose, however, produced a more profound and sustained suppression of obestatin levels, though they had relatively less impact on ghrelin levels. Plasma glucose was the only independent predictor of ghrelin levels, obestatin levels, and ghrelin to obestatin ratios. Obestatin immunoreactivity was detected in the fundus of stomach, liver and pancreatic islets, with roughly similar patterns of distribution to ghrelin. These data show quantitative and qualitative differences in circulating ghrelin and obestatin responses to the short-term feeding status and nutrient composition, and may support a role for obestatin in regulating metabolism and energy homeostasis.

  16. Transitional change in rat fetal cell proliferation in response to ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin during the last stage of pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Keiko; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2010-03-12

    Expression of mRNA for the ghrelin receptor, GHS-R1a, was detected in various peripheral and central tissues of fetal rats, including skin, bone, heart, liver, gut, brain and spinal cord, on embryonic day (ED)15 and ED17. However, its expression in skin, bone, heart and liver, but not in gut, brain and spinal cord, became relatively weak on ED19 and disappeared after birth (ND2). Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin facilitated the proliferation of cultured fetal (ED17, 19), but not neonatal (ND2), skin cells. On the other hand, with regard to cells from the spinal cord and hypothalamus, the proliferative effect of ghrelin continued after birth, whereas the effect of des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis in these tissues was lost at the ED19 fetal and ND2 neonatal stages. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cells in the hypothalamus induced to proliferate by ghrelin at the ND2 stage were positive for nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These results suggest that in the period immediately prior to, and after birth, rat fetal cells showing proliferation in response to ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are at a transitional stage characterized by alteration of the expression of GHS-R1a and an undefined des-acyl ghrelin receptor, their responsiveness varying among different tissues.

  17. Peripheral injections of cholecystokinin, apelin, ghrelin and orexin in cavefish (Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus): effects on feeding and on the brain expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, mechanistic target of rapamycin and appetite-related hormones.

    PubMed

    Penney, Carla C; Volkoff, Hélène

    2014-01-15

    The effects of intraperitoneal injections of cholecystokinin (CCK), apelin, ghrelin, and orexin on food intake were examined in the blind cavefish Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus. CCK (50ng/g) induced a decrease in food intake whereas apelin (100ng/g), orexin (100ng/g), and ghrelin (100ng/g) induced an increase in food intake as compared to saline-injected control fish. In order to better understand the central mechanism by which these hormones act, we examined the effects of injections on the brain mRNA expression of two metabolic enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and of appetite-regulating peptides, CCK, orexin, apelin and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). CCK injections induced a decrease in brain apelin injections, apelin injections induced an increase in TH, mTOR, and orexin brain expressions, orexin treatment increased brain TH expression and ghrelin injections induced an increase in mTOR and orexin brain expressions. CART expression was not affected by any of the injection treatments. Our results suggest that the enzymes TH and mTOR and the hormones CCK, apelin, orexin, and ghrelin all regulate food intake in cavefish through a complex network of interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ghrelin in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-03-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission.

  19. Ghrelin in Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission. PMID:19721816

  20. Effects of Intracerebroventricularly (ICV) Injected Ghrelin on Cardiac Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity/Expression in Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Sudar Milovanovic, E; Jovanovic, A; Misirkic-Marjanovic, M; Vucicevic, Lj; Janjetovic, K; Isenovic, E R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin on regulation of cardiac inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity/expression in high fat (HF), obese rats.For this study, male Wistar rats fed with HF diet (30% fat) for 4 weeks were injected every 24 h for 5 days intracerebroventricularly (ICV) with ghrelin (0.3 nmol/5 µl) or with an equal volume of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Control rats were ICV injected with an equal volume of PBS. Glucose, insulin and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were measured in serum, while arginase activity and citrulline concentrations were measured in heart lysate. Protein iNOS and regulatory subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB-p65), phosphorylation of enzymes protein kinase B (Akt) at Ser(473), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) at Tyr(202)/Tyr(204) were determined in heart lysate by Western blot. For gene expression of iNOS qRT-PCR was used.Results show significantly (p<0.01) higher serum NO production in ghrelin treated HF rats compared with HF rats. Ghrelin significantly reduced citrulline concentration (p<0.05) and arginase activity (p<0.01) in HF rats. In ghrelin treated HF rats, gene and protein expression of iNOS and NFκB-p65 levels were significantly (p<0.05) increased compared with HF rats. Increased phosphorylation of Akt (p<0.01) and decreased (p<0.05) ERK1/2 phosphorylation were detected in HF ghrelin treated rats compared with HF rats hearts.Results from this study indicate that exogenous ghrelin induces expression and activity of cardiac iNOS via Akt phosphorylation followed by NFκB activation in HF rats.

  1. Ghrelin induces abdominal obesity via GHS-R-dependent lipid retention.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jeffrey S; Kotokorpi, Pia; Eccles, Sinan R; Barnes, Sarah K; Tokarczuk, Pawel F; Allen, Sophie K; Whitworth, Hilary S; Guschina, Irina A; Evans, Bronwen A J; Mode, Agneta; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Wells, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Circulating ghrelin elevates abdominal adiposity by a mechanism independent of its central orexigenic activity. In this study we tested the hypothesis that peripheral ghrelin induces a depot-specific increase in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in vivo by GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R(1a))-mediated lipolysis. Chronic iv infusion of acylated ghrelin increased retroperitoneal and inguinal WAT volume in rats without elevating superficial sc fat, food intake, or circulating lipids and glucose. Increased retroperitoneal WAT mass resulted from adipocyte enlargement probably due to reduced lipid export (ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA expression and circulating free fatty acids were halved by ghrelin infusion). In contrast, ghrelin treatment did not up-regulate biomarkers of adipogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma2 or CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha) or substrate uptake (glucose transporter 4, lipoprotein lipase, or CD36) and although ghrelin elevated sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 1c expression, WAT-specific mediators of lipogenesis (liver X receptor-alpha and fatty acid synthase) were unchanged. Adiposity was unaffected by infusion of unacylated ghrelin, and the effects of acylated ghrelin were abolished by transcriptional blockade of GHS-R(1a), but GHS-R(1a) mRNA expression was similar in responsive and unresponsive WAT. Microarray analysis suggested that depot-specific sensitivity to ghrelin may arise from differential fine tuning of signal transduction and/or lipid-handling mechanisms. Acylated ghrelin also induced hepatic steatosis, increasing lipid droplet number and triacylglycerol content by a GHS-R(1a)-dependent mechanism. Our data imply that, during periods of energy insufficiency, exposure to acylated ghrelin may limit energy utilization in specific WAT depots by GHS-R(1a)-dependent lipid retention.

  2. Ghrelin receptor in Japanese fire belly newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2015-11-01

    We identified cDNA encoding a functional ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a)) in a urodele amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster). Two functional receptor proteins, composed of 378- and 362-amino acids, were deduced from the identified cDNA because two candidate initiation methionine sites were found. The long-chain receptor protein shared 80%, 69%, and 59% identities with the bullfrog GHS-R1a, human GHS-R1a and tilapia GHS-R1a-like receptor, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the newt receptor is grouped to the clade of the tetrapod homologs, and very closed to anuran amphibians. In functional analyses, homologous newt ghrelin, heterologous bullfrog and rat ghrelin, and a GHS-R1a agonist, GHRP-6 increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably expressed newt GHS-R1a. The responsiveness was much greater in the short-chain receptor than in the long-chain receptor. Both receptors preferred to bind Ser(3)-ghrelin including newt and rat ghrelin than Thr(3)-ghrelin with bullfrog ghrelin. GHRP-6 has a similar affinity to bullfrog ghrelin. GHS-R1a mRNA was expressed in the brain, pituitary, intestine, pancreas, testis and fat body with high level, and eyes, heart, stomach, liver, gall bladder, kidney and dorsal skin with low level. In a fasting experiment, gene expression of GHS-R1a in the brain and pituitary increased 4days after fasting, and the increased level decreased to the initial level 2weeks after fasting. These changes are consistent with the change in ghrelin mRNA. In contrast, expression of ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNA in the stomach decreased on day 4 after fasting, and increased 2weeks after fasting. These results indicate that ghrelin and its receptor system are present and altered by energy states in this newt.

  3. Diet-induced obesity causes peripheral and central ghrelin resistance by promoting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Toshinai, Koji; Waise, T M Zaved; NamKoong, Cherl; Md Moin, Abu Saleh; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-07-01

    Ghrelin, a stomach-derived orexigenic peptide, transmits starvation signals to the hypothalamus via the vagus afferent nerve. Peripheral administration of ghrelin does not induce food intake in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. We investigated whether this ghrelin resistance was caused by dysfunction of the vagus afferent pathway. Administration (s.c.) of ghrelin did not induce food intake, suppression of oxygen consumption, electrical activity of the vagal afferent nerve, phosphorylation of ERK2 and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha in the nodose ganglion, or Fos expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of mice fed a HFD for 12 weeks. Administration of anti-ghrelin IgG did not induce suppression of food intake in HFD-fed mice. Expression levels of ghrelin receptor mRNA in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of HFD-fed mice were reduced. Inflammatory responses, including upregulation of macrophage/microglia markers and inflammatory cytokines, occurred in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of HFD-fed mice. A HFD blunted ghrelin signaling in the nodose ganglion via a mechanism involving in situ activation of inflammation. These results indicate that ghrelin resistance in the obese state may be caused by dysregulation of ghrelin signaling via the vagal afferent. © 2015 The authors.

  4. Regulation of Pit-1 expression by ghrelin and GHRP-6 through the GH secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    García, A; Alvarez, C V; Smith, R G; Diéguez, C

    2001-09-01

    GH secretagogues are an expanding class of synthetic peptide and nonpeptide molecules that stimulate the pituitary gland to secrete GH through their own specific receptor, the GH-secretagogue receptor. The cloning of the receptor for these nonclassical GH releasing molecules, together with the more recent characterization of an endogenous ligand, named ghrelin, have unambiguously demonstrated the existence of a physiological system that regulates GH secretion. Somatotroph cell-specific expression of the GH gene is dependent on a pituitary-specific transcription factor (Pit-1). This factor is transcribed in a highly restricted manner in the anterior pituitary gland. The present experiments sought to determine whether the synthetic hexapeptide GHRP-6, a reference GH secretagogue compound, as well as an endogenous ligand, ghrelin, regulate pit-1 expression. By a combination of Northern and Western blot analysis we found that GHRP-6 elicits a time- and dose-dependent activation of pit-1 expression in monolayer cultures of infant rat anterior pituitary cells. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide, suggesting that this action was due to direct transcriptional activation of pit-1. Using an established cell line (HEK293-GHS-R) that overexpresses the GH secretagogue receptor, we showed a marked stimulatory effect of GHRP-6 on the pit-1 -2,500 bp 5'-region driving luciferase expression. We truncated the responsive region to -231 bp, a sequence that contains two CREs, and found that both CREs are needed for GHRP-6-induced transcriptional activation in both HEK293-GHS-R cells and infant rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. The effect was dependent on PKC, MAPK kinase, and PKA activation. Increasing Pit-1 by coexpression of pCMV-pit-1 potentiated the GHRP-6 effect on the pit-1 promoter. Similarly, we showed that the endogenous GH secretagogue receptor ligand ghrelin exerts a similar effect on the pit-1 promoter. These data

  5. A low-salt diet increases the expression of renal sirtuin 1 through activation of the ghrelin receptor in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shao-Yu; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Chen, Yung-Ming; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is renoprotective; however, details regarding its distribution and functions in the kidney remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that Sirt1 was mainly expressed in the tubulointerstitial cells of normal rat kidneys and was co-localized with aquaporin 2, indicating it may be involved in water/salt regulation. Renal Sirt1 expression increased in the non-glomerular cytoplasmic portion of the kidney after a 24-h fast, but no significant changes in Sirt1 expression occurred after water loading (50 mL/kg) or 24-h water deprivation. After consuming a low-salt (0.075%) or 60% calorie restriction diet for 7 days, Sirt1 expression in the rat kidney was significantly increased, whereas a high-salt (8%) diet did not change the level of Sirt1 expression. The low-salt diet also increased Sirt1 expression in the heart, muscle, brain, and fat tissues. The increased Sirt1 that was observed in rats on a low-salt diet was associated with increased ghrelin expression in the distal nephron, with both molecules exhibiting similar distribution patterns. An in vitro experiment suggested that ghrelin increases Sirt1 expression in cortical collecting duct cells by activating ghrelin receptors. Our study indicates that this ‘ghrelin-Sirt1 system’ may participate in regulating sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. PMID:27600292

  6. Obestatin partially suppresses ghrelin stimulation of appetite in "high-responders" grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Cai, Wenjing; Liang, Xu-Fang; Su, Hang; Yuan, Yongchao; Li, Aixuan; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2015-06-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are two gastrointestinal peptides obtained by post-translational processing of a common precursor, preproghrelin. The effect of obestatin on food intake is still controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ghrelin and obestatin on food intake in grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus. Fish received intraperitoneal (IP) injection of saline, ghrelin (100 ng g(-1)BW), obestatin-like (25 ng g(-1)BW) and ghrelin in combination with obestatin-like. Ghrelin stimulation of food intake varied considerably among individual fish with 70.8% eliciting a robust response. In these high-responders, food intake was significantly increased by IP ghrelin within 2 h. Co-administration of ghrelin and obestatin-like resulted in a decrease in food intake, indicating that obestatin was able to antagonize the effect of ghrelin. However, IP obestatin-like alone could not regulate food intake in grass carp. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that IP ghrelin peptide led to a significant increase in mRNA abundance of NPY, Y8a and Y8b genes compared to saline injected fish, while in combination with obestatin-like peptide decreased ghrelin-induced gene expressions of these three genes. IP sole obestatin-like peptide did not modify the expression levels of NPY, Y8a, Y8b, CART and POMC compared to the control group. Therefore, IP administration of obestatin-like peptide, partially blocking the ghrelin-induced appetite, investigated the possible involvement of obestatin as a mediator of the ghrelin stimulatory action on food intake, at least in "high-responders" grass carp.

  7. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL.

  8. Genetic selection for body weight in chickens has altered responses of the brain's AMPK system to food intake regulation effect of ghrelin, but not obestatin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingwen; Siegel, Paul B; Denbow, D Michael

    2011-08-01

    The effects of ghrelin and obestatin regulation of food intake are different in mammals and chickens. We investigated central effects of ghrelin and obestatin in lines of chickens selected 50 generations for high (HWS) or low (LWS) body weight. We hypothesized that the effect of ghrelin and obestatin on food intake in 5-day-old chicks is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) system and selection for body weight alters the brain's response to ghrelin and obestatin by changing the neuronal AMPK system. Although intracerebroventricular (ICV) ghrelin injection decreased food intake in both lines, the threshold for the anorexigenic effect of central ghrelin was lower in LWS than HWS chicks. Obestatin caused a linear dose-dependent increase in food intake in HWS but not LWS chicks. ICV injection of 0.4 nmol ghrelin inhibited hypothalamic AMPK related gene expression and phosphorylation of AMPK α and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) with the magnitude of inhibition different in the two lines. In contrast, ICV injection of 4 nmol obestatin did not affect mRNA expression of AMPK system or phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC in either line. These data support the premise of a lower threshold for anorexigenic effect of central ghrelin in LWS than HWS chicks, and this difference may be associated with differential hypothalamic AMPK signaling. Additionally, the hypothalamic mRNA level of ghrelin was significantly higher in LWS than HWS, which may have also contributed to the different threshold response to ghrelin in these two lines. The expression of the ghrelin receptor was also higher in the LWS line, but not until 56 days of age. In summary, selection for body weight has resulted in differences in the central ghrelin and obestatin system, and an altered brain AMPK system may contribute to the different neuronal response to ghrelin, but not obestatin.

  9. Neonatal overnutrition causes early alterations in the central response to peripheral ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Collden, Gustav; Balland, Eglantine; Parkash, Jyoti; Caron, Emilie; Langlet, Fanny; Prevot, Vincent; Bouret, Sebastien G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Excess nutrient supply and rapid weight gain during early life are risk factors for the development of obesity during adulthood. This metabolic malprogramming may be mediated by endocrine disturbances during critical periods of development. Ghrelin is a metabolic hormone secreted from the stomach that acts centrally to promote feeding behavior by binding to growth hormone secretagogue receptors in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Here, we examined whether neonatal overnutrition causes changes in the ghrelin system. Methods We used a well-described mouse model of divergent litter sizes to study the effects of postnatal overfeeding on the central and peripheral ghrelin systems during postnatal development. Results Mice raised in small litters became overweight during lactation and remained overweight with increased adiposity as adults. Neonatally overnourished mice showed attenuated levels of total and acyl ghrelin in serum and decreased levels of Ghrelin mRNA expression in the stomach during the third week of postnatal life. Normalization of hypoghrelinemia in overnourished pups was relatively ineffective at ameliorating metabolic outcomes, suggesting that small litter pups may present ghrelin resistance. Consistent with this idea, neonatally overnourished pups displayed an impaired central response to peripheral ghrelin. The mechanisms underlying this ghrelin resistance appear to include diminished ghrelin transport into the hypothalamus. Conclusions Early postnatal overnutrition results in central resistance to peripheral ghrelin during important periods of hypothalamic development. Because ghrelin signaling has recently been implicated in the neonatal programming of metabolism, these alterations in the ghrelin system may contribute to the metabolic defects observed in postnatally overnourished mice. PMID:25685686

  10. Methyl donor deficiency affects fetal programming of gastric ghrelin cell organization and function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Blaise, Sébastien; Pourié, Grégory; Tomasetto, Catherine; Audonnet, Sandra; Ortiou, Sandrine; Koziel, Violette; Rio, Marie-Christine; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Methyl donor deficiency (MDD) during pregnancy influences intrauterine development. Ghrelin is expressed in the stomach of fetuses and influences fetal growth, but MDD influence on gastric ghrelin is unknown. We examined the gastric ghrelin system in MDD-induced intrauterine growth retardation. By using specific markers and approaches (such as periodic acid-Schiff, bromodeoxyuridine, homocysteine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunostaining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), we studied the gastric oxyntic mucosa cellular organization and ghrelin gene expression in the mucosa in 20-day-old fetuses and weanling pups, and plasma ghrelin concentration in weanling rat pups of dams either normally fed or deprived of choline, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods. MDD fetuses weighed less than controls; the weight deficit reached 57% at weaning (P < 0.001). Both at the end of gestation and at weaning, they presented with an aberrant gastric oxyntic mucosa formation with loss of cell polarity, anarchic cell migration, abnormal progenitor differentiation, apoptosis, and signs of surface layer erosion. Ghrelin cells were abnormally located in the pit region of oxyntic glands. At weaning, plasma ghrelin levels were decreased (-28%; P < 0.001) despite unchanged mRNA expression in the stomach. This decrease was associated with lower body weight. Taken together, these data indicate that one mechanism through which MDD influences fetal programming is the remodeling of gastric cellular organization, leading to dysfunction of the ghrelin system and dramatic effects on growth.

  11. Ghrelin counteracts salt-induced hypertension via promoting diuresis and renal nitric oxide production in Dahl rats.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hirotaka; Nakata, Masanori; Dezaki, Katsuya; Lu, Ming; Gantulga, Darambazar; Yamamoto, Keiji; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone-secretagogue receptor expressed in various tissues including the heart, blood vessels and kidney. This study sought to determine the effects of long-term treatment with ghrelin (10 nmol/kg, twice a day, intraperitoneally) on the hypertension induced by high salt (8.0% NaCl) diet in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive (DS) rats. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured by a tail cuff method. During the treatment period for 3 weeks, high salt diet increased blood pressure compared to normal salt (0.3% NaCl) diet, and this hypertension was partly but significantly (P<0.01) attenuated by simultaneous treatment with ghrelin. Ghrelin significantly increased urine volume and tended to increase urine Na⁺ excretion. Furthermore, ghrelin increased urine nitric oxide (NO) excretion and tended to increase renal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA expression. Ghrelin did not alter the plasma angiotensin II level and renin activity, nor urine catecholamine levels. Furthermore, ghrelin prevented the high salt-induced increases in heart thickness and plasma ANP mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that long-term ghrelin treatment counteracts salt-induced hypertension in DS rats primarily through diuretic action associated with increased renal NO production, thereby exerting cardio-protective effects.

  12. Effects of long-term high-fat/high-energy and high-protein diets on insulin and ghrelin expression in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumin; Ni, Shaoqing; Xu, Yanping; Liang, Li; Du, Lizhong; Gu, Weizhong

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the long-term effects of high-fat/high-energy and high-protein diets on insulin secretion and ghrelin expression. Dams of Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard, high-fat/high-energy, or high-protein diet during pregnancy and lactation, and their pups were defined as control, high-fat and high-energy, and high-protein groups, respectively. The pups were fed the same diet as their dams after weaning. Plasma glucose, ghrelin, and insulin were analyzed on the first, third, seventh, and tenth postnatal days and at the end of second, third, fourth, eighth, and twelfth weeks. Ghrelin and insulin expression in the pancreas was measured using radioimmunoassay, double-staining immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy. Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin concentrations, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index increased with age. Total plasma ghrelin concentrations decreased with age. Plasma ghrelin concentrations were negatively correlated with glucose levels in all three groups. Plasma ghrelin was negatively correlated with plasma insulin only in the high-fat and high-energy group. Insulin secretion in the high-protein and high-fat and high-energy groups and pancreatic ghrelin content, pancreatic ghrelin-positive cells, and beta cells in all groups decreased with age. The percentage of ghrelin-positive cells correlated with the percentage of beta cells in all groups. Insulin and ghrelin expression in the plasma and pancreas was adversely affected by long-term high-fat/high-energy and high-protein diets.

  13. Impact of intracerebroventricular obestatin on plasma acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1 levels, and on gastric emptying in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Lee, Wei-Jei; Chong, Keong; Lee, Shou-Dong; Liao, You-Di

    2012-07-01

    Obestatin, which is a putative 23-amino-acid peptide, is derived from the C-terminal part of the mammalian preproghrelin gene. Nesfatin-1 mRNA is co-expressed with ghrelin in gastric endocrine X/A-like cells; therefore, nesfatin-1 may also interact with preproghrelin gene products in the stomach. In this study, we investigated the impact of obestatin on the plasma levels of acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1, and on the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal 2 h after an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection in conscious, fasted rats. The rats were implanted with ICV catheters. Plasma levels of acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1, expected to be co-expressed with obestatin, were measured, whereas the human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (h/rCRF) was applied as an inhibitor of gastric emptying. The ICV administration of obestatin (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 nmol/rat) did not modify the plasma acyl ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin levels, the acyl ghrelin/des-acyl ghrelin ratio and nesfatin-1 concentrations. The ICV acute administration of obestatin had no influence on the 2-h rate of gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal, but the ICV h/rCRF injection delayed it. The weight of food ingested 1 h before ICV injection significantly, but negatively correlated with the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal. Our study indicates that the ICV injection of obestatin does not change the 2-h rate of gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal and the relatively weak interrelationships between ghrelin gene products and nesfatin-1. However, the weight of the ingested food negatively affects the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal in conscious, fasted rats.

  14. Changes in mRNA expression of arcuate nucleus appetite-regulating peptides during lactation in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Nakahara, Keiko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Okame, Rieko; Ensho, Takuya; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Noboru

    2014-04-01

    The contribution of hypothalamic appetite-regulating peptides to further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation in rats was investigated by using PCR array and real-time PCR. Furthermore, changes in the mRNA expression for appetite-regulating peptides in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) were analyzed at all stages of pregnancy and lactation, and also after weaning. Food intake was significantly higher during pregnancy, lactation, and after weaning than during non-lactation periods. During lactation, ARC expression of mRNAs for agouti-related protein (AgRP) and peptide YY was increased, whereas that of mRNAs for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cholecystokinin (CCK) was decreased, in comparison with non-lactation periods. The increase in AgRP mRNA expression during lactation was especially marked. The plasma level of leptin was significantly decreased during the course of lactation, whereas that of acyl-ghrelin was unchanged. In addition, food intake was negatively correlated with the plasma leptin level during lactation. This study has clarified synchronous changes in the expression of many appetite-regulating peptides in ARC of rats during lactation. Our results suggest that hyperphagia during lactation in rats is caused by decreases in POMC and CCK expression and increases in AgRP expression in ARC, the latter being most notable. Together with the decrease in the blood leptin level, such changes in mRNA expression may explain the further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation.

  15. Ghrelin and cancer.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Lisa; Walpole, Carina; Seim, Inge; Cunningham, Peter; Murray, Rachael; Whiteside, Eliza; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian

    2011-06-20

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that was originally isolated from the stomach as the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin has many functions, including the regulation of appetite and gut motility, growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary and roles in the cardiovascular and immune systems. Ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in a number of cancers and cancer cell lines and may play a role in processes associated with cancer progression, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell invasion and migration.

  16. Neutralizing circulating ghrelin by expressing a growth hormone secretagogue receptor-based protein protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, J; Zhu, L; Anini, Y; Wang, Q

    2015-09-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide hormone that stimulates appetite and promotes adiposity through binding to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a). Administration of ghrelin in rodents increases weight gain due to stimulating food intake and reducing fat utilization. Therefore, reducing circulating ghrelin levels holds the potential to reduce weight gain. We developed a GHS-R1a-fusion constructs of a decoy protein containing the ligand-binding domains of the ghrelin receptor. Intramuscular injection of the GHSR/Fc plasmid decreased circulating levels of acylated-ghrelin. When challenged with the high fat diet, treated mice displayed reduced weight gain compared with controls, which was associated with reduced fat accumulation in the peritoneum but not lean mass. Quantitative PCR with reverse transcription showed increased PPARγ and hormone sensitive lipase transcripts levels in adipose tissue of treated animals, illustrating a preference for increased fat utilization. Intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests showed improved glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity in GHSR/Fc treated animals. We suggest that in vivo expression of the GHSR-based fusion protein prevents diet-induced weight gain, altering adipose gene expression and improving glucose tolerance. These findings, while confirming the role of ghrelin in peripheral energy metabolism, suggest that a strategy involving neutralization of the circulation ghrelin by intramuscular injection of the GHSR1/Fc fusion construct may find clinical application in the treatment of obesity.

  17. Age-dependent reduction of ghrelin- and motilin-induced contractile activity in the chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Yoshida, Akiko; Tamano, Takuya; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) and stimulates gastrointestinal (GI) motility in the chicken. Since ghrelin stimulates GH release, which regulates growth, it might be interesting to compare ghrelin-induced responses in GI tract of different-aged chickens. Motilin is a ghrelin-related gut peptide that induces strong contraction in the small intestine. Aim of this study was to clarify age-dependent changes in ghrelin- and motilin-induced contractions of the chicken GI tract and expression of their receptor mRNAs. Chicken ghrelin caused contraction of the crop and proventriculus. Ghrelin-induced contraction in the proventriculus decreased gradually up to 100 days after hatching, but the responses to ghrelin in the crop were the same during the growth period. GHS-R1a mRNA expression in the crop tended to increase, but that in the proventriculus decreased depending on the age. Chicken motilin caused contraction of the chicken GI tract. Atropine decreased the responses to motilin in the proventriculus but not in the ileum. Motilin-induced contraction in the proventriculus but not that in the ileum decreased depending on post-hatching days. On the other hand, motilin receptor mRNA expression in every region of the GI tract decreased with age, but the decrease was more marked in the proventriculus than in the ileum. In conclusion, ghrelin- and motilin-induced GI contractions selectively decreased in the chicken proventriculus depending on post-hatching days, probably due to the age-related decrease in respective receptors expression. The results suggest an age-related contribution of ghrelin and motilin to the regulation of chicken GI motility.

  18. Calorie-restricted weight loss reverses high-fat diet-induced ghrelin resistance, which contributes to rebound weight gain in a ghrelin-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Lockie, Sarah H; Wu, Qunli; Lemus, Moyra B; Stark, Romana; Andrews, Zane B

    2013-02-01

    Twelve weeks of high-fat diet feeding causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons. In the current study, we investigated whether diet-induced weight loss could restore NPY/AgRP neuronal responsiveness to ghrelin and whether ghrelin mediates rebound weight gain after calorie-restricted (CR) weight loss. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were allocated to one of two dietary interventions until they reached the weight of age-matched lean controls. DIO mice received chow diet ad libitum or chow diet with 40% CR. Chow-fed and high-fat-fed mice served as controls. Both dietary interventions normalized body weight, glucose tolerance, and plasma insulin. We show that diet-induced weight loss with CR increases total plasma ghrelin, restores ghrelin sensitivity, and increases hypothalamic NPY and AgRP mRNA expression. We propose that long-term DIO creates a higher body weight set-point and that weight loss induced by CR, as seen in the high-fat CR group, provokes the brain to protect the new higher set-point. This adaptation to weight loss likely contributes to rebound weight gain by increasing peripheral ghrelin concentrations and restoring the function of ghrelin-responsive neuronal populations in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Indeed, we also show that DIO ghrelin-knockout mice exhibit reduced body weight regain after CR weight loss compared with ghrelin wild-type mice, suggesting ghrelin mediates rebound weight gain after CR weight loss.

  19. Ghrelin inhibits AngII -induced expression of TNF-α, IL-8, MCP-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Fang, Fang; Yang, Tianlu; Yu, Zaixin; Zhang, Bin; Xie, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Ghrelin, a gastric peptide, is involved in several metabolic and cardiovascular processes. Emerging evidence indicates the potential involvement of ghrelin in low-grade inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Cytokine-induced inflammation is critical in these pathological states. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) has been identified in blood vessels, so we predict that ghrelin might inhibit proinflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on angiotension II (AngII)-induced expression of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 in HUVECs. Method: HUVECs were pretreated with ghrelin, with or without the specific antagonist of GHSR [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, the selective inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) PDTC, and the selective inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) PD98059. The cells were finally treated with AngII. The expression of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of ERK1/2 and NF-κB was analyzed by Western blot. Result: our study showed that ghrelin inhibited AngII -induced expression of IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in the HUVECs via GHSR pathway in concentration- and time-dependent manners. We also found that ghrelin inhibited AngII -induced activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB. Conclusions: these results suggest that Ghrelin may play novel antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory roles in HUVECs. PMID:25785032

  20. The effect of ghrelin on Kiss-1 and KissR gene transcription and insulin secretion in rat islets of Langerhans and CRI-D2 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sagheb, Mandana Mahmoodzaeh; Azarpira, Negar; Mokhtary, Mokhtar

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that has been shown to have numerous central and peripheral effects. The central effects including GH secretion, food intake, and energy homeostasis are partly mediated by Kiss1- KissR signaling pathway. Ghrelin and its receptor are also expressed in the pancreatic islets. Ghrelin is one of the key metabolic factors controlling insulin secretion from the islets of Langerhans. We hypothesize that the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on KiSS-1 and KissR in the islet cells may be similar to the same inhibitory effect of ghrelin in the hypothalamus. Materials and Methods: To investigate the effect of ghrelin, we isolated the islets from adult male rats by collagenase and cultured CRI-D2 cell lines. Then, we incubated them with different concentrations of ghrelin for 24 hr. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis from both islets and CRI-D2 cells, the relative expression of KiSS-1 and KissR was evaluated by means of real-time PCR. Furthermore, we measured the amount of insulin secreted by the islets after incubation in different concentrations of ghrelin and glucose after 1 hr. Besides, we checked the viability of the cells after 24 hr cultivation. Results: Ghrelin significantly decreased the KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA transcription in rat islets and CRI-D2 cells. Besides, Ghrelin suppressed insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and CRI-D2 cells. Conclusion: These findings indicate the possibility that KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA expression is mediator of ghrelin function in the islets of Langerhans. PMID:28133522

  1. [Effect of electro-acupuncture at zusanli (ST36) on the expression of ghrelin and HMGB1 in the small intestine of sepsis rats].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Nong; Wu, Wan; Jiang, Rong-Lin; Zhu, Mei-Fei; Lei, Shu; Lu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    To explore the expression of Ghrelin and high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) in the serum and the intestinal tissue of sepsis model rats, and to evaluate the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) at Zusanli (ST36) on the expression of HMGB1 and Ghrelin. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, i.e., the sham-operation (sham), the cecal ligation and puncture group (CLP), the CLP + EA at Zusanli (ST36) group (EA), and the CLP + Ghrelin receptor blocking agent + EA group (GHSRA), 12 in each group. A sepsis rat model was prepared by CLP. The incision of the abdominal wall was immediately sutured along the ventral midline for rats in the Sham group. In the EA group EA at Zusanli (ST36) was performed 20 min after CLP surgery with the constant voltage (2 - 100 Hz, 2 mA) for 30 min. In the GHSRA group, Ghrelin receptor blocking agent, [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp79, Leu11]-substance P (700 nmol/kg), was administered through intravenous injection immediately after CLP, and 20 min later, EA at Zusanli (ST36) was performed in the same way as for rats in the EA group. Blood samples were withdrawn 12 h after CLP. The serum levels of Ghrelin and HMGB1 were detected using ELISA. Ghrelin expressions and the number of Ghrelin immunopositive cell in the jejunum were determined by immunohistochemistry. HMGB1 contents of the jejunum tissue were detected by Western blotting. Compared with the Sham group, the number of serum immunopositive cells and the expression of HMGB1 in the jejunum tissue significantly increased and levels of Ghrelin and the expression rate of immunopositive cells significantly decreased in the CLP group (P < 0.05). Compared with the CLP group, the number of serum immunopositive cells and the expression of HMGB1 in the jejunum tissue significantly decreased, but levels of Ghrelin and the expression rate of immunopositive cells significantly increased in the EA group (P < 0.05). Compared with the EA group, the number of serum immunopositive

  2. Effects of ghrelin and motilin on smooth muscle contractility of the isolated gastrointestinal tract from the bullfrog and Japanese fire belly newt.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Shimazaki, Misato; Kikuta, Ayumi; Yaosaka, Noriko; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin has been identified in some amphibians and is known to stimulate growth hormone release and food intake as seen in mammals. Ghrelin regulates gastrointestinal motility in mammals and birds. The aim of this study was to determine whether ghrelin affects gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility in bullfrogs (anuran) and Japanese fire belly newts (urodelian) in vitro. Neither bullfrog ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected longitudinal smooth muscle contractility of gastrointestinal strips from the bullfrog. Expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) mRNA was confirmed in the bullfrog gastrointestinal tract, and the expression level in the gastric mucosa was lower than that in the intestinal mucosa. In contrast, some gastrointestinal peptides, including substance P, neurotensin and motilin, and the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol showed marked contraction, indicating normality of the smooth muscle preparations. Similar results were obtained in another amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt. Newt ghrelin and rat ghrelin did not cause any contraction in gastrointestinal longitudinal muscle, whereas substance P and carbachol were effective causing contraction. In conclusion, ghrelin does not affect contractility of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle in anuran and urodelian amphibians, similar to results for rainbow trout and goldfish (fish) but different from results for rats and chickens. The results suggest diversity of ghrelin actions on the gastrointestinal tract across animals. This study also showed for the first time that motilin induces gastrointestinal contraction in amphibians.

  3. Hindbrain ghrelin receptor signaling is sufficient to maintain fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Perello, Mario; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Sakata, Ichiro; Gautron, Laurent; Lee, Charlotte E; Lauzon, Danielle; Elmquist, Joel K; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    The neuronal coordination of metabolic homeostasis requires the integration of hormonal signals with multiple interrelated central neuronal circuits to produce appropriate levels of food intake, energy expenditure and fuel availability. Ghrelin, a peripherally produced peptide hormone, circulates at high concentrations during nutrient scarcity. Ghrelin promotes food intake, an action lost in ghrelin receptor null mice and also helps maintain fasting blood glucose levels, ensuring an adequate supply of nutrients to the central nervous system. To better understand mechanisms of ghrelin action, we have examined the roles of ghrelin receptor (GHSR) expression in the mouse hindbrain. Notably, selective hindbrain ghrelin receptor expression was not sufficient to restore ghrelin-stimulated food intake. In contrast, the lowered fasting blood glucose levels observed in ghrelin receptor-deficient mice were returned to wild-type levels by selective re-expression of the ghrelin receptor in the hindbrain. Our results demonstrate the distributed nature of the neurons mediating ghrelin action.

  4. Effects of intracerebroventricular infusions of ghrelin on secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone in peripubertal female sheep.

    PubMed

    Wójcik-Gładysz, Anna; Wańkowska, Marta; Gajewska, Alina; Misztal, Tomasz; Zielińska-Górska, Marlena; Szlis, Michał; Polkowska, Jolanta

    2016-06-16

    Reproduction depends on mechanisms responsible for the regulation of energy homeostasis and puberty is a developmental period when reproductive and somatic maturity are achieved. Ghrelin affects the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis under conditions of energy insufficiency. An in vivo model based on intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions was used to determine whether centrally administered acyl ghrelin affects transcriptional and translational activity of FSH in peripubertal lambs and whether ghrelin administration mimics the effects of short-term fasting. Standard-fed lambs received either Ringer-Lock (R-L) solution (120 µL h-1) or ghrelin (120 µL h-1, 100 µg day-1). Animals experiencing a short-term (72 h) fast were treated only with R-L solution. In each experimental group, i.c.v. infusions occurred for 3 consecutive days. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridisation and real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that short-term fasting, as well as exogenous acyl ghrelin administration to standard-fed peripubertal lambs, augmented FSHβ mRNA expression and immunoreactive FSH accumulation. In addition to the effects of ghrelin on FSH synthesis in standard-fed animals, effects on gonadotrophin release were also observed. Acyl ghrelin increased the pulse amplitude for gonadotrophin release, which resulted in an elevation in mean serum FSH concentrations. In conclusion, the present data suggest that ghrelin participates in an endocrine network that modulates gonadotrophic activity in peripubertal female sheep.

  5. Ghrelin upregulates PepT1 activity in the small intestine epithelium of rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingquan; Shi, Bin; Shi, Kai; Ma, Guoguang; Zhang, Hongze; Lou, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongxiang; Wan, Shengxia; Liang, Dongyu

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis causes nutritional substrate malabsorption; hence, preventing gut barrier problems and improving the nutritional status in sepsis is a compelling issue. We tested whether ghrelin administration affects peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) activity in the intestinal epithelium of rats with sepsis. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated, sepsis, and ghrelin-treated groups. The cecum of sham-operated rats was separated after laparotomy without ligation and perforation. Sepsis group rats underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mucosal specimens were used for immunohistochemstry, real-time PCR, and western blotting to detect PepT1 distribution, and mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. TNF-α, IL-1β, and ghrelin levels were estimated in serum and intestinal mucosal tissue by ELISA. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure PepT1 uptake by the epithelial cells. Moreover, survival, body weight, and food intake of the rats were recorded during the 7-day treatment period. All rats in the sham-operated group survived, and 80% of rats in the sepsis group died within 7d of CLP. Treatment with ghrelin attenuated the CLP-induced body weight loss, intestine mucosa damage, and the survival rate was better. In addition, ghrelin attenuated increases in TNF-α and IL-1β production. The expressions of PepT1 mRNA and protein were higher in ghrelin-treated group rats than in sepsis rats. Moreover, the uptake function of PepT1 was better in ghrelin-treated group rats. Ghrelin treatment can reduce the inflammatory response and greatly upregulate the physiological function of PepT1 in intestinal epithelial cells of rats with sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Ghrelin increases growth hormone production and functional expression of NaV1.1 and Na V1.2 channels in pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Méndez, Adasue; Domínguez, Belisario; Rodríguez-Andrade, Araceli; Barrientos-Morales, Manuel; Cervantes-Acosta, Patricia; Hernández-Beltrán, Antonio; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    A variety of ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane of somatotropes within the anterior pituitary gland. Modification of these channels is linked to intracellular Ca2+ levels and therefore to hormone secretion. Previous investigations have shown that the gut-derived orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin and synthetic GH-releasing peptides (GHRPs) stimulate release of growth hormone (GH) and increase the number of functional voltage-gated Ca2+ and Na+ channels in the membrane of clonal GC somatotropes. Here, we reveal that chronic treatment with ghrelin and its synthetic analog GHRP-6 also increases GH release from bovine pituitary somatotropes in culture, and that this action is associated with a significant increase in Na+ macroscopic current. Consistent with this, Na+ current blockade with tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished the ghrelin- and GHRP-6-induced increase in GH release. Furthermore, semi-quantitative and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed an upregulation in the transcript levels of GH, as well as of NaV1.1 and NaV1.2, two isoforms of TTX-sensitive Na+ channels expressed in somatotropes, after treatment with ghrelin or GHRP-6. These findings improve our knowledge on (i) the cellular mechanisms involved in the control of GH secretion, (ii) the molecular diversity of Na+ channels in pituitary somatotropes, and (iii) the regulation of GH and Na+ channel gene expression by ghrelin and GHRPs.

  7. Tissue distribution and effects of fasting and obesity on the ghrelin axis in mice.

    PubMed

    Morash, Michael G; Gagnon, Jeffrey; Nelson, Stephanie; Anini, Younes

    2010-08-09

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide hormone derived from the 117 amino acid proghrelin, following cleavage by proprotein convertase 1 (PC1). In this study, we comprehensively assessed the tissue distribution and the effect of fasting and obesity on preproghrelin, Exon-4D, PC1 and GOAT expression and proghrelin-derived peptide (PGDP) secretion. The stomach was the major source of preproghrelin expression and PDGPs, followed by the small intestine. The remaining peripheral tissues (including the brain and pancreas) contained negligible expression levels. We detected obestatin in all stomach proghrelin cells, however, 22% of proghrelin cells in the small intestine did not express obestatin. There were strain differences in ghrelin secretion in response to fasting between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. After a 24 hour-fast, CD1 mice had increased plasma levels of total ghrelin and obestatin with no change in preproghrelin mRNA or PGDP tissues levels. C57BL/6 mice showed a different response to a 24 hour-fast having increased proghrelin mRNA expression, stomach acylated ghrelin peptide and no change in plasma obestatin in C57BL/6 mice. In obese mice (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity (DIO)) there was a significant increase in preproghrelin mRNA levels while tissue and plasma PGDP levels were significantly reduced. Fasting did not affect PGDP in obese mice. Obese models displayed differences in GOAT expression, which was elevated in DIO mice, but reduced in ob/ob mice. We did not find co-localization of the leptin receptor in ghrelin expressing stomach cells, ruling out a direct effect of leptin on stomach ghrelin synthesis and secretion.

  8. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs. PMID:28348480

  9. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  10. Effect of heat stress on performance and expression of selected amino acid and glucose transporters, HSP90, leptin and ghrelin in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Miguel; Cota, Margarita; Arce, Néstor; Castillo, Gilberto; Avelar, Ernesto; Espinoza, Salvador; Morales, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    Exposing animals to high ambient temperature provokes heat stress (HS) that may affect cellular function and reduced productive performance. The effect of chronic exposure (21d) of pigs to high ambient temperature on expression of amino acid (b(0,+)AT, CAT1) and glucose (SGLT1, GLUT4) transporters, ghrelin, leptin and HSP90 was evaluated. Eighteen pigs (32.6kg body weight) were distributed into 3 groups: (1) pigs housed under natural high ambient temperature conditions, and fed ad libitum (HS); (2) pigs housed in an air-conditioned room at 24°C (thermo-neutral) fed ad libitum (TNad); (3) pigs housed as in (2), but pair-fed with the HS pigs (TNpf). Body temperature, respiratory frequency, weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio were measured. At d-21 pigs were euthanized and samples from stomach, duodenum, jejunum, liver, longissimus and semitendinosus muscles, and white adipose tissue were collected for mRNA analysis. In the HS room ambient temperature fluctuated every day (23.6-37.6°C). Respiratory frequency and body temperature were higher in HS pigs (P<0.001). Weight gain and feed intake of TNad were higher (P<0.001) than TNpf and HS; gain: feed ratio was not affected by ambient temperature. Expression of HSP90 was higher in duodenum and longissimus (P≤0.038) of HS compared to TNpf. Expression of ghrelin, leptin and b(0,+)AT were not affected by ambient temperature (P>0.050). CAT1 expression in liver was higher (P=0.050) but in longissimus was lower (P=0.017) in HS than in TNpf pigs. Expression of SGLT1 was higher (P=0.045) in duodenum of HS than in TNpf but it was not different in jejunum (P=0.545); GLUT4 tended to be higher in liver and semitendinosus of HS pigs (P=0.063). In conclusion, feed intake remains low whereas respiratory frequency and body temperature remain higher; and expression of HSP90, CAT1, SGLT1 and GLUT4 increases in some tissues in pigs under chronic HS conditions.

  11. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis.

  12. High lib mRNA expression in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kazuki; Hata, Mitsumi; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2004-06-30

    Lib, first identified as a novel beta-amyloid responsive gene in rat astrocytes, has an extracellular domain of 15 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) followed by a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic region. It is a distinctly inducible gene and is thought to play a key role in inflammatory states via the LRR extracellular motif, an ideal structural framework for protein-protein and protein-matrix interactions. To evaluate potential roles of Lib, we screened various tumors for Lib expression. Lib mRNA expression was high and uniquely expressed in breast tumor tissues, compared to paired normal breast tissues. Lib mRNA was localized in the ductal carcinoma cells and Lib protein displayed a homophilic association on the surface of cultured cells. These data suggest that Lib may play a role in the progression of breast carcinomas and may be a diagnostic marker for breast tumors.

  13. Roles of leptin and ghrelin in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism of rainbow trout adipocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salmerón, Cristina; Johansson, Marcus; Asaad, Maryam; Angotzi, Anna R; Rønnestad, Ivar; Stefansson, Sigurd O; Jönsson, Elisabeth; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; Gutiérrez, Joaquim; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación

    2015-10-01

    Leptin and ghrelin are important regulators of energy homeostasis in mammals, whereas their physiological roles in fish have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the effects of leptin and ghrelin on adipogenesis, lipolysis and on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes were examined in rainbow trout adipocytes in vitro. Leptin expression and release increased from preadipocytes to mature adipocytes in culture, but did not affect the process of adipogenesis. While ghrelin and its receptor were identified in cultured differentiated adipocytes, ghrelin did not influence either preadipocyte proliferation or differentiation, indicating that it may have other adipose-related roles. Leptin and ghrelin increased lipolysis in mature freshly isolated adipocytes, but mRNA expression of lipolysis markers was not significantly modified. Leptin significantly suppressed the fatty acid transporter-1 expression, suggesting a decrease in fatty acid uptake and storage, but did not affect expression of any of the lipogenesis or β-oxidation genes studied. Ghrelin significantly increased the mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid synthase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β, and thus appears to stimulate synthesis of triglycerides as well as their mobilization. Overall, the study indicates that ghrelin, but not leptin seems to be an enhancer of lipid turn-over in adipose tissue of rainbow trout, and this regulation may at least partly be mediated through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. The mode of action of both hormones needs to be further explored to better understand their roles in regulating adiposity in fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mouse ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) plays a critical role in bile acid reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kihwa; Schmahl, Jennifer; Lee, Jong-Min; Garcia, Karen; Patil, Ketan; Chen, Amelia; Keene, Michelle; Murphy, Andrew; Sleeman, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a unique peptide gut hormone that requires post-translational modification to stimulate both feeding and growth hormone release. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) was identified as a specific acyl-transferase for ghrelin, and recent genetic deletion studies of the Goat gene (Goat(-/-)) uncovered the role of ghrelin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. To further understand the physiological functions of the GOAT/ghrelin system, we have conducted a metabolomic and microarray profile of Goat-null mice, as well as determined Goat expression in different tissues using the lacZ reporter gene. Serum metabolite profile analysis revealed that Goat(-/-) mice exhibited increased secondary bile acids >2.5-fold. This was attributed to increased mRNA and protein expression of the ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ISBT) in the intestinal and biliary tract. Increased expression of additional solute carrier proteins, including Slc5a12 (>10-fold) were also detected in the small intestine and bile duct. Goat staining was consistently observed in the pituitary glands, stomach, and intestines, and to a lesser extent in the gallbladder and pancreatic duct. This is the first report that the GOAT/ghrelin system regulates bile acid metabolism, and these findings suggest a novel function of GOAT in the regulation of intestinal bile acid reabsorption..

  15. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tjandrawinata, R R; Vincent, V L; Hughes-Fulford, M

    1997-05-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  16. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  17. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  18. Ghrelin increases food intake, swimming activity and growth in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Ana B; Näslund, Joacim; Delgado, María J; de Pedro, Nuria; Johnsson, Jörgen I; Jönsson, Elisabeth

    2014-01-30

    Several key functions of ghrelin are well conserved through vertebrate phylogeny. However, some of ghrelin's effects are contradictory and among teleosts only a limited number of species have been used in functional studies on food intake and foraging-related behaviors. Here we investigated the long-term effects of ghrelin on food intake, growth, swimming activity and aggressive contest behavior in one year old wild brown trout (Salmo trutta) using intraperitoneal implants. Food intake and swimming activity were individually recorded starting from day 1, and aggressive behavior was tested at day 11, after ghrelin implantation. Body weight and growth rate were measured from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Triglycerides and lipase activity in muscle and liver; monoaminergic activity in the telencephalon and brainstem; and neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus were analyzed. Ghrelin treatment was found to increase food intake and growth without modifying lipid deposition or lipid metabolism in liver and muscle. Ghrelin treatment led to an increased foraging activity and a trend towards a higher swimming activity. Moreover, ghrelin-treated fish showed a tendency to initiate more conflicts, but this motivation was not reflected in a higher ability to win the conflicts. No changes were observed in monoaminergic activity and NPY mRNA levels in the brain. Ghrelin is therefore suggested to act as an orexigenic hormone regulating behavior in juvenile wild brown trout. These actions are accompanied with an increased growth without the alteration of liver and muscle lipid metabolism and they do not seem to be mediated by changes in brain monoaminergic activity or hypothalamic expression of NPY. © 2013.

  19. Is there an effect of ghrelin/ghrelin analogs on cancer? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Sakine; White, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone with multiple physiologic functions, including promotion of growth hormone release, stimulation of appetite and regulation of energy homeostasis. Treatment with ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonists is a prospective therapy for disease-related cachexia and malnutrition. In vitro studies have shown high expression of ghrelin in cancer tissue, although its role including its impact in cancer risk and progression has not been established. We performed a systematic literature review to identify peer-reviewed human or animal in vivo original research studies of ghrelin, ghrelin-receptor agonists, or ghrelin genetic variants and the risk, presence, or growth of cancer using structured searches in PubMed database as well as secondary searches of article reference lists, additional reviews and meta-analyses. Overall, 45 (73.8%) of the 61 studies reviewed, including all 11 involving exogenous ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonist treatment, reported either a null (no statistically significant difference) or inverse association of ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonists or ghrelin genetic variants with cancer risk, presence or growth; 10 (16.7%) studies reported positive associations; and 6 (10.0%) reported both negative or null and positive associations. Differences in serum ghrelin levels in cancer cases vs controls (typically lower) were reported for some but not all cancers. The majority of in vivo studies showed a null or inverse association of ghrelin with risk and progression of most cancers, suggesting that ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonist treatment may have a favorable safety profile to use for cancer cachexia. Additional large-scale prospective clinical trials as well as basic bioscientific research are warranted to further evaluate the safety and benefits of ghrelin treatment in patients with cancer. PMID:27552970

  20. Obestatin and insulin in pancreas of newborn diabetic rats treated with exogenous ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Turk, Neslihan; Dağistanli, Fatma Kaya; Sacan, Ozlem; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sema

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin treatment on obestatin, insulin gene expression and biochemical parameters in the pancreas of newborn-streptozocin (STZ) diabetic rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups. Group I: control rats treated with physiological saline; group II: control rats treated with 100 μg/kg/day ghrelin; group III: two days after birth rats that received 100mg/kg STZ injected as a single dose to induce neonatal diabetes; group IV: neonatal-STZ-diabetic rats treated with ghrelin for four weeks. Sections of the pancreas were examined with immunohistochemistry for the expression of obestatin and insulin and in situ hybridization for the expression of insulin mRNA. The blood glucose levels were measured. Tissue homogenates were used for protein, glutathione, lipid peroxidation and non-enzymatic glycosylation levels and antioxidant enzyme analysis. There was a significant difference in blood glucose levels in newborn-STZ-diabetic rats compared to ghrelin treated diabetic rats at weeks 1, 2 and 4. In group IV, pancreatic non-enzymatic glycosylation and lipid peroxidation levels were decreased, however, glutathione levels and enzymatic activities were increased. Insulin peptide and mRNA (+) signals in islets of Langerhans and obestatin immunopositive cell numbers showed an increase in group IV compared to group III. These results suggest that administration of ghrelin to newborn rats may prevent effects of diabetes.

  1. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-06-21

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations.

  2. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  3. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain.

  4. Association of cord blood des-acyl ghrelin with birth weight, and placental GHS-R1 receptor expression in SGA, AGA, and LGA newborns.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Martha I; Lazo-de-la-Vega-Monroy, Maria-Luisa; Zaina, Silvio; Sabanero, Myrna; Daza-Benítez, Leonel; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Although ghrelin in cord blood has been associated to birth weight, its role in fetal and postnatal growth has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to analyze total ghrelin, acyl ghrelin (AG), and des-acyl ghrelin (DAG) in cord blood of newborns with idiopathic birth weight alterations, and to evaluate protein expression of placental GHS-R1, in order to investigate their correlation with birth weight and placental weight. We performed a cross-sectional comparative study in umbilical cord blood and placentas from healthy mothers of SGA, AGA, and LGA (small, adequate and large for gestational age) term newborns (n = 20 per group). Cord blood total ghrelin, AG, and DAG were measured by ELISA, and placental GHS-R1 expression was evaluated by Western blot. Cord blood DAG was higher in SGA compared to AGA newborns (902.1 ± 109.1 and 597.4 ± 58.2 pg/ml, respectively, p = 0.01) while LGA and AGA showed similar values (627.2 ± 76.4 pg/ml for LGA, p = 0.80). DAG negatively correlated with birthweight (r = -0.31, p = 0.02) and placental weight (r = -0.33, p = 0.02). No differences in AG or total ghrelin were found. GHS-R1 protein in placenta was not differentially expressed among SGA, AGA, and LGA. Our results suggest a role of DAG in intrauterine growth. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which DAG participates in fetal growth.

  5. Cytokine mRNA expression in postischemic/reperfused myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Herskowitz, A.; Choi, S.; Ansari, A. A.; Wesselingh, S.

    1995-01-01

    While the role of cytokines in mediating injury during hind limb skeletal muscle ischemia followed by reperfusion has recently been described, the role of cytokines in myocardial infarction and ischemia/reperfusion have remained relatively unexplored. We hypothesize that cytokines play an important role in the regulation of postischemic myocardial inflammation. This study reports the temporal sequence of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in postischemic/reperfused myocardium and localizes interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-protein by immunostaining. Rats were subjected to either permanent left anterior descending (LAD) occlusion or to 35 minutes of LAD occlusion followed by reperfusion and sacrificed up to 7 days later. Rat-specific oligonucleotide probes were used to semiquantitatively assess the relative expression of mRNA for TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) utilizing the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction amplification technique. Increased cardiac mRNA levels for all cytokines except IL-6 and IFN-gamma were measurable within 15 to 30 minutes of LAD occlusion and increased levels were generally sustained for 3 hours. During early reperfusion, mRNA levels for IL-6 and TGF-beta 1 were significantly reduced compared with permanent LAD occlusion. In both groups, cytokine mRNA levels all returned to baseline levels at 24 hours, while IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta 1 mRNA levels again rose significantly at 7 days only in animals with permanent LAD occlusion. Immunostaining for IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha protein revealed two patterns of reactivity: 1) microvascular staining for both IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha protein only in postischemic reperfused myocardium in early post-reperfusion time points; and 2) staining of infiltrating macrophages in healing infarct zones which was most prominent at 7 days after permanent LAD occlusion

  6. Is really endogenous ghrelin a hunger signal in chickens? Association of GHSR SNPs with increase appetite, growth traits, expression and serum level of GHRL, and GH.

    PubMed

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Saleh, Ayman A; Abdel-Hamid, Tamer M; Saleh, Rasha M; Afifi, Mohammed A

    2016-10-01

    Chicken growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is a receptor for ghrelin (GHRL), a peptide hormone produced by chicken proventriculus, which stimulates growth hormone (GH) release and food intake. The purpose of this study was to search for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in exon 2 of GHSR gene and to analyze their effect on the appetite, growth traits and expression levels of GHSR, GHRL, and GH genes as well as serum levels of GH and GHRL in Mandara chicken. Two adjacent SNPs, A239G and G244A, were detected in exon 2 of GHSR gene. G244A SNP was non-synonymous mutation and led to replacement of lysine amino acid (aa) by arginine aa, while A239G SNP was synonymous mutation. The combined genotypes of A239G and G244A SNPs produced three haplotypes; GG/GG, GG/AG, AG/AG, which associated significantly (P<0.05) with growth traits (body weight, average daily gain, shank length, keel length, chest circumference) at age from >4 to 16w. Chickens with the homozygous GG/GG haplotype showed higher growth performance than other chickens. The two SNPs were also correlated with mRNA levels of GHSR and GH (in pituitary gland), and GHRL (in proventriculus and hypothalamus) as well as with serum level of GH and GHRL. Also, chickens with GG/GG haplotype showed higher mRNA and serum levels. This is the first study to demonstrate that SNPs in GHSR can increase appetite, growth traits, expression and level of GHRL, suggesting a hunger signal role for endogenous GHRL.

  7. Ghrelin acylation and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, O; Tschöp, M H; Tong, J

    2011-11-01

    Since its discovery, many physiologic functions have been ascribed to ghrelin, a gut derived hormone. The presence of a median fatty acid side chain on the ghrelin peptide is required for the binding and activation of the classical ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) was recently discovered as the enzyme responsible for this acylation process. GOAT is expressed in all tissues that have been found to express ghrelin and has demonstrated actions on several complex endocrine organ systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal, insular and adrenal axis as well as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone and gustatory system. Ghrelin acylation is dependent on the function of GOAT and the availability of substrates such as proghrelin and short- to medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). This process is governed by GOAT activity and has been shown to be modified by dietary lipids. In this review, we provided evidence that support an important role of GOAT in the regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism by modulating acyl ghrelin (AG) production. The relevance of GOAT and AG during periods of starvation remains to be defined. In addition, we summarized the recent literature on the metabolic effects of GOAT specific inhibitors and shared our view on the potential of targeting GOAT for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  8. Ghrelin promotes thymopoiesis during aging

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Vishwa Deep; Yang, Hyunwon; Sun, Yuxiang; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Youm, Yun-Hee; Smith, Roy G.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2007-01-01

    The decline in adaptive immunity, T lymphocyte output, and the contraction of the TCR repertoire with age is largely attributable to thymic involution. The loss of thymic function with age may be due to diminished numbers of progenitors and the loss of critical cytokines and hormones from the thymic microenvironment. We have previously demonstrated that the orexigenic hormone ghrelin is expressed by immune cells and regulates T cell activation and inflammation. Here we report that ghrelin and ghrelin receptor expression within the thymus diminished with progressive aging. Infusion of ghrelin into 14-month-old mice significantly improved the age-associated changes in thymic architecture and thymocyte numbers, increasing recent thymic emigrants and improving TCR diversity of peripheral T cell subsets. Ghrelin-induced thymopoiesis during aging was associated with enhanced early thymocyte progenitors and bone marrow–derived Lin–Sca1+cKit+ cells, while ghrelin- and growth hormone secretagogue receptor–deficient (GHS-R–deficient) mice displayed enhanced age-associated thymic involution. Leptin also enhanced thymopoiesis in aged but not young mice. Our findings demonstrate what we believe to be a novel role for ghrelin and its receptor in thymic biology and suggest a possible therapeutic benefit of harnessing this pathway in the reconstitution of thymic function in immunocompromised subjects. PMID:17823656

  9. Involvement of stomach ghrelin and hypothalamic neuropeptides in tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced hypophagia in mice.

    PubMed

    Endo, Mizuki; Masaki, Takayuki; Seike, Masataka; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2007-04-05

    This study aimed to clarify the interaction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), an anorexigenic cytokine, with ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide secreted by the stomach lining, and hypothalamic neuropeptides in the regulation of food intake in mice. The peripheral administration of TNF-alpha dose-dependently decreased the 24-h cumulative food intake compared with the administration of saline. Reduced food intake was observed at 6 h and 24 h. The same TNF-alpha treatment significantly decreased the plasma level of ghrelin at 6 h and 24 h after treatment compared with the control levels. These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach at 24 h after treatment. TNF-alpha treatment also resulted in a significant increase in expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA and a significant decrease in expression of agouti-related protein (AGRP) mRNA in the hypothalamus at 6 h after treatment. Finally, the pre-administration of ghrelin, reversed the TNF-alpha-induced hypophagia in mice at 6 and 24 h. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypothalamic POMC and AGRP and stomach ghrelin may be involved in TNF-alpha-induced hypophagia in mice.

  10. Peptide YY directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reverses fasting-induced c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Bothe, Christine; Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) monitors and integrates hormonal and metabolic signals involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic peptide ghrelin is secreted from the stomach during negative status of energy intake and directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. In contrast to ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) is released postprandially from the gut and reduces food intake when applied peripherally. Neurons in the ArcM express ghrelin receptors and neuropeptide Y receptors. Thus, PYY may inhibit feeding by acting on ghrelin-sensitive Arc neurons. Using extracellular recordings, we (1) characterized the effects of PYY on the electrical activity of ghrelin-sensitive neurons in the ArcM of rats. In order to correlate the effect of PYY on neuronal activity with the energy status, we (2) investigated the ability of PYY to reverse fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. In addition, we (3) sought to confirm that PYY reduces food intake under our experimental conditions. Superfusion of PYY reversibly inhibited 94% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. The PYY-induced inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred at a threshold concentration of 10(-8)M. Consistent with the opposite effects of ghrelin and PYY on food intake, a high percentage (50%) of Arc neurons was activated by ghrelin and inhibited by PYY. In line with this inhibitory action, peripherally injected PYY partly reversed the fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. Similarly, refeeding of food-deprived mice reversed the fasting-induced activation in the Arc. Furthermore, peripherally injected PYY reduced food intake in 12-hour fasted mice. Thus the activity of Arc neurons correlated with the feeding status and was not only reduced by feeding but also by administration of PYY in non-refed mice. In conclusion, our current observations suggest that PYY may contribute to signaling a positive status of energy intake

  11. Ghrelin but not obestatin regulates insulin secretion from INS1 beta cell line via UCP2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, J; Szczepankiewicz, D; Skrzypski, M; Kregielska, D; Strowski, M Z; Nowak, K W

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial UCP2 mediates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by decreasing intracellular ATP/ADP ratio. Insulin secretion is a tightly regulated process. Ghrelin, as well as obestatin, were intensively studied to determine their ability to modify insulin secretion. Ghrelin is considered to be an inhibitor of insulin release from pancreatic islets, however little is known about the effects of obestatin. In our study we demonstrate the stimulating effects of both peptides on insulin secretion in INS1 cells. Furthermore, we investigate the potential role of UCP2 in mediating the effects of both peptides on insulin secretion. UCP2 mRNA expression was down-regulated by ghrelin in the presence of 26.4 mM glucose, however it was unchanged after obestatin treatment. Our results confirm that UCP2 could be involved in the stimulating effect of ghrelin on insulin release from INS1 cells.

  12. Sequence and expression of ferredoxin mRNA in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.; Funder, P.M.; Ling, V. )

    1990-05-01

    We have isolated and structurally characterized a full-length cDNA clone encoding ferredoxin from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library prepared from barley leaf mRNA. The ferredoxin clone (pBFD-1) was fused head-to-head with a partial-length cDNA clone encoding calmodulin, and was fortuitously isolated by screening the library with a calmodulin-specific oligonucleotide probe. The mRNA sequence from which pBFD-1 was derived is expressed exclusively in the leaf tissues of 7-d old barley seedlings. Barley pre-ferredoxin has a predicted size of 15.3 kDal, of which 4.6 kDal are accounted for by the transit peptide. The polypeptide encoded by pBFD-1 is identical to wheat ferredoxin, and shares slightly more amino acid sequence similarity with spinach ferredoxin I than with ferredoxin II. Ferredoxin mRNA levels are rapidly increased 10-fold by white light in etiolated barley leaves.

  13. Overexpression of intraislet ghrelin enhances β-cell proliferation after streptozotocin-induced β-cell injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bando, Mika; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Adachi, Souichi; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kangawa, Kenji; Akamizu, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Previously, we reported that exogenous administration of ghrelin ameliorates glucose metabolism in a neonate streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat model through enhancement of β-cell proliferation. However, it was not clear whether the observed β-cell proliferation was a direct or indirect effect (e.g., via orexigenic or growth hormone-stimulated pathways) of ghrelin activity. Here, we aimed to investigate whether ghrelin directly impacts β-cell proliferation after STZ-induced injury in mice. Seven-week-old male rat insulin II promoter-ghrelin internal ribosomal sequence ghrelin O-acyltransferase transgenic (RIP-GG Tg) mice, which have elevated pancreatic ghrelin levels, but only minor changes in plasma ghrelin levels when fed a medium-chain triglyceride-rich diet, were treated with STZ. Then, serum insulin, pancreatic insulin mRNA expression, and islet histology were evaluated. We found that the serum insulin levels, but not blood glucose levels, of RIP-GG Tg mice were significantly ameliorated 14 days post-STZ treatment. Pancreatic insulin mRNA expression was significantly elevated in RIP-GG Tg mice, and β-cell numbers in islets were increased. Furthermore, the number of phospho-histone H3⁺ or Ki67⁺ proliferating β-cells was significantly elevated in RIP-GG Tg mice, whereas the apoptotic indexes within the islets, as determined by TUNEL assay, were not changed. These results indicate that ghrelin can directly stimulate β-cell proliferation in vivo after β-cell injury even without its orexigenic or GH-stimulating activities, although it did not have enough impact to normalize the glucose tolerance in adult mice.

  14. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 activity in the therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the course of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Cieszkowski, J; Ginter, G; Ptak-Belowska, A; Dembinski, A

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that treatment with ghrelin exhibits protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. Aim of our present investigation was to examine the influence of ghrelin administration on the healing of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers and determine the role of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in this effect. Our studies were performed on male Wistar rats. Gastric ulcers were induced by intragastric administration of 75% ethanol. Ghrelin alone or in combination with cyclooxygenase inhibitors was administered twice, 1 and 13 hours after ethanol application. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitor (SC-560, 10 mg/kg/dose) or COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib, 10 mg/kg/dose) were given 30 min prior to ghrelin. Twelve or 24 hours after administration of ethanol, rats were anesthetized and experiments were terminated. The study revealed that administration of ethanol induced gastric ulcers in all animals and this effect was accompanied by the reduction in gastric blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover induction of gastric ulcer by ethanol significantly increased mucosal expression of mRNA for COX-2, IL-1β and TNF-α. Treatment with ghrelin significantly accelerated gastric ulcer healing. Therapeutic effect of ghrelin was associated with significant reversion of the ulcer-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Ghrelin administration also caused the reduction in mucosal expression of mRNA for IL-1β and TNF-α. Addition of SC-560 slightly reduced the therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the healing of ethanol-induced ulcer and the ulcer area in rats treated SC-560 plus ghrelin was significantly smaller than that observed in rats treated with saline or SC-560 alone. Pretreatment with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, abolished therapeutic effect of ghrelin. We concluded that treatment with ghrelin increases healing rate of gastric ulcers evoked by ethanol and this effect is related to improvement in mucosal blood flow, an increase in mucosal cell

  15. T1R3 is expressed in brush cells and ghrelin-producing cells of murine stomach.

    PubMed

    Hass, Nicole; Schwarzenbacher, Karin; Breer, Heinz

    2010-03-01

    Various digestive and enteroendocrine signaling processes are constantly being adapted to the chemical composition and quantity of the chyme contained in the diverse compartments of the gastrointestinal tract. The chemosensory monitoring that underlies the adaptive capacity of the gut is thought to be performed by so called brush cells that share morphological and molecular features with gustatory sensory cells. A substantial population of brush cells is localized in the gastric mucosa. However, no chemosensory receptors have been found to be expressed in these cells so far, challenging the concept that they serve a chemosensory function. The canonical chemoreceptors for the detection of macronutrients are taste receptors belonging to the T1R family; these have been identified in several tissues in addition to the gustatory system including the small intestine. We demonstrate the expression of the T1R subtype T1R3, which is essential for the detection of both sugars and amino acids in the gustatory system, in two distinct cell populations of the gastric mucosa. One population corresponds to open-type brush cells, emphasizing the notion that they are a chemosensory cell type; T1R3 immunoreactivity in these cells is restricted to the apical cell pole, which might provide the basis for the detection of luminal macronutrient compounds. The second gastric T1R3-positive population consists of closed-type endocrine cells that produce ghrelin. This finding suggests that ghrelin-releasing cells, which lack access to the stomach lumen, might receive chemosensory input from macronutrients in the circulation via T1R3.

  16. Changes in ghrelin, CCK, GLP-1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in a hypoxia-induced anorexia rat model.

    PubMed

    Duraisamy, Arul Joseph; Bayen, Susovan; Saini, Supriya; Sharma, Alpesh Kumar; Vats, Praveen; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2015-01-01

    A high-altitude environment causes appetite loss in unacclimatised humans, leading to weight reduction. Ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are gut hormones involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The liver is an important site of metabolic regulation, and together with the gut it plays a role in food intake regulation. This study intends to study the time-dependent changes occurring in plasma gut hormones, PPARα, PPARδ, and PGC1α, in the stomach and liver during hypoxia. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia in a decompression chamber at 7620 m for different durations up to seven days. Hypoxia increased circulating ghrelin from the third day onwards while CCK and GLP-1 decreased immediately. An increase in ghrelin, ghrelin receptor protein levels, and GOAT mRNA levels in the stomach was observed. Stomach cholecystokinin receptor (CCKAR), PPARα, and PPARδ decreased. Liver CCKAR decreased during the first day of hypoxia and returned to normal levels from the third day onwards. PPARα and PGC1α expression increased while PPARδ protein levels reduced in the liver on third day. Hypoxia alters the expression of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor in the stomach, CCKAR in the liver, and PPAR and its cofactors, which might be possible role players in the contribution of gut and liver to anorexia at high altitude.

  17. The different satiating capacity of CHO and fats can be mediated by different effects on leptin and ghrelin systems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Juana; Cladera, María Magdalena; Llopis, Marina; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2010-12-01

    Leptin and ghrelin are known to be the main hormones involved in the control of food intake, with opposite effects. Here we aimed to assess whether changes in leptin and ghrelin systems can be involved in the different satiating capacities of carbohydrates (CHO) and fat. Adult male Wistar rats were studied under 24h fasting conditions and after 24h fasting followed by a 12h re-feeding period with 64 kcal of CHO or fat, consisting of a mixture of wheat starch and sucrose or bacon, respectively. Serum levels of leptin and ghrelin, and mRNA levels of leptin and ObRb in the retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissue and of NPY, POMC, ObRb and GSHR in the hypothalamus were measured. CHO re-feeding resulted in higher leptin mRNA expression levels in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue and in higher circulating leptin levels compared with those after fat re-feeding. Moreover, circulating ghrelin levels and ghrelin/leptin ratio were significantly higher after fat re-feeding compared with CHO re-feeding, and hypothalamic expression levels of ghrelin receptor increased after fat, but not after CHO, re-feeding. Hence, expression levels of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in food intake control and regulated by these hormones, particularly the orexigenic NPY and the anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, were also differently affected by CHO and fat re-feeding, resulting in a significantly lower NPY/POMC ratio after CHO re-feeding than after fat re-feeding. In conclusion, different effects on the leptin and ghrelin systems can account, at least in part, for the lower satiating capacity of fat compared to CHO.

  18. Uremia-caused changes of ghrelin system in hippocampus may be associated with impaired cognitive function of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhian; Gao, Jie; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhao; Yuan, Haozheng; Ma, Xiaoqin; Lu, Jiamei; Lv, Jianrui; Wu, Xili; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Linting; Xue, Rongliang; Fu, Rongguo; Ma, Liqun

    2016-05-01

    Hippocampus plays an important role in spatial learning and memory. Ghrelin, a brain-gut peptide, participates in the mnestic functions of hippocampus through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) distributed in hippocampus. This study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between the changes of ghrelin system in hippocampus and the spatial cognitive impairment caused by chronic renal failure (CRF). Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 180 ± 10 g, 7-8 weeks old) were randomly classified into CRF group and control group (n = 18 per group). The CRF model was constructed by 5/6 nephrectomy and the controls treated with sham operation. By the 8th week after the surgery, the spatial cognitive function of rats was assessed by Morris water-maze test (MWM), the protein expression of ghrelin and GHS-R in the hippocampus by immunohistochemistry, and the mRNA expression by real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls-q test and Pearson correlation analysis, and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Compared with the controls, the time spent in "platform" quadrant (TSPQ) of rats with CRF was decreased, but the escape latency (EL) was increased significantly in MWM, and meanwhile the protein and mRNA expression of ghrelin and GHS-R in hippocampus was also increased significantly (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Correlation analysis suggested that the TSPQ was negatively but the EL was positively correlated with the mRNA expression of ghrelin and GHS-R (P < 0.01). The CRF-caused changes of ghrelin system in hippocampus might be correlated with the CRF-caused cognitive function impairment.

  19. Development of ghrelin resistance in a cancer cachexia rat model using human gastric cancer-derived 85As2 cells and the palliative effects of the Kampo medicine rikkunshito on the model

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yumi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Sudo, Yuka; Suzuki, Masami; Miyano, Kanako; Shiraishi, Seiji; Higami, Yoshikazu; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio; Ueta, Yoichi; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cachexia (CC) is a multifactorial disease characterized by decreased food intake and loss of body weight due to reduced musculature with or without loss of fat mass. Patients with gastric cancer have a high incidence of cachexia. We previously established a novel CC rat model induced by human gastric cancer-derived 85As2 cells in order to examine the pathophysiology of CC and identify potential therapeutics. In patients with CC, anorexia is often observed, despite elevation of ghrelin, suggesting that ghrelin resistance may develop in these patients. In this study, we aimed to clarify the occurrence of ghrelin resistance in CC rats accompanied by anorexia and we investigated whether rikkunshito (RKT), a traditional Japanese Kampo medicine that potentiates ghrelin signaling, ameliorated CC-related anorexia through alleviation of ghrelin resistance. 85As2-tumor-bearing rats developed severe CC symptoms, including anorexia and loss of body weight/musculature, with the latter symptoms being greater in cachectic rats than in non-tumor-bearing or pair-fed rats. CC rats showed poor responses to intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin. In CC rats, plasma ghrelin levels were elevated and hypothalamic anorexigenic peptide mRNA levels were decreased, whereas hypothalamic growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA was not affected. In vitro, RKT directly enhanced ghrelin-induced GHS-R activation. RKT administrated orally for 7 days partly alleviated the poor response to ghrelin and ameliorated anorexia without affecting the elevation of plasma ghrelin levels in CC rats. The expression of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide Y mRNA but not hypothalamic GHS-R mRNA was increased by RKT. Thus, the 85As2 cell-induced CC rat model developed ghrelin resistance, possibly contributing to anorexia and body weight loss. The mechanism through which RKT ameliorated anorexia in the CC rat model may involve alleviation of ghrelin resistance by enhancement of ghrelin signaling

  20. Increase in plasma acyl ghrelin levels is associated with abatement of dyspepsia following Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin has been indicated as one of the etiological factors in functional dyspepsia (FD). We analyzed 179 patients with FD (based on the Rome III criteria) and 103 asymptomatic healthy individuals (controls) who had undergone endoscopy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from February 2011 to June 2014. FD patients were classified into three groups by means of a self-reported questionnaire: patients with postprandial distress syndrome (PDS; n = 49), patients with epigastric pain syndrome (EPS; n = 45), and patients with a combination of these two types (mixed group; n = 85). The fasting blood levels of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of preproghrelin in the fundic mucosa were measured by ELISAs and reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. One year after participant enrollment, they were measured again in 79 participants and the changes in the values were compared according to Helicobacter pylori eradication or symptom response. Plasma acyl ghrelin level was lower in the PDS group than in the control and EPS groups (control group 14.1 fmol/mL, PDS group 8.9 fmol/mL, EPS group 13.8 fmol/mL, mixed group 11.3 fmol/mL; P = 0.003 and P = 0.012, respectively). One year after the eradication of H. pylori, plasma acyl ghrelin level was increased and gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression was upregulated (P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively). Patients with abatement of symptoms demonstrated an increase in plasma acyl ghrelin level (from 11.51 to 21.00 fmol/L, P = 0.040). Our results suggest that plasma acyl ghrelin plays a role in the development of PDS. H. pylori eradication upregulates preproghrelin mRNA expression and increases plasma acyl ghrelin level, contributing to the abatement of PDS symptoms.

  1. Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Bahry, Mohammad A; Hui, Yang; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S

    2015-09-01

    Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40±1 °C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30±1 °C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake.

  2. Highest trkB mRNA expression in the entorhinal cortex among hippocampal subregions in the adult rat: contrasting pattern with BDNF mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, W; Hashimoto, T; Li, Y X; Okuno, H; Miyashita, Y

    1998-11-20

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, regulate synaptic functions in the hippocampus of the adult rodent. In previous studies, in situ hybridization methods have been used to evaluate regional differences in BDNF and trkB mRNA expression levels in hippocampal subregions. However, these studies have failed to reach consensus regarding the regional differences in the mRNA expression levels. In the present study, we quantitated mRNA expression levels using two different methods, ribonuclease protection assays and a quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction technique, in four hippocampal subregions: the entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus (DG), CA3 and CA1. These two methods yielded the same results. We found that BDNF and trkB mRNA expression levels did not covary in the four subregions. BDNF and full length trkB (trkB FL) mRNA in the entorhinal cortex and the DG show contrasting expression patterns. The expression level of BDNF mRNA was highest in the DG among the hippocampal subregions and low in the entorhinal cortex and the CA1, whereas the trkB FL mRNA expression level was highest in the entorhinal cortex, low in the DG and lowest in the CA3. These results suggest regional differences in BDNF/TrkB signaling for maintenance and modifiability of neuronal connections in the hippocampal formation.

  3. Endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor mRNA expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries.

    PubMed

    Winkles, J A; Alberts, G F; Brogi, E; Libby, P

    1993-03-31

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide implicated in a number of human diseases including atherosclerosis. ET-1 binds to two distinct G protein-coupled receptors, known as the ETA and ETB receptor subtypes. In this study, we have examined ET-1, ETA and ETB mRNA expression levels in human vascular cells cultured in vitro and in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries. The results indicate that (a) ET-1 mRNA is constitutively expressed by endothelial cells but not by smooth muscle cells, (b) endothelial cells express only ETB mRNA but smooth muscle cells co-express ETA and ETB mRNA, and (c) in comparison to normal aorta, ET-1 mRNA expression is elevated and endothelin receptor mRNA expression is repressed in atherosclerotic lesions.

  4. Dietary Caprylic Acid (C8:0) Does Not Increase Plasma Acylated Ghrelin but Decreases Plasma Unacylated Ghrelin in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lemarié, Fanny; Beauchamp, Erwan; Dayot, Stéphanie; Duby, Cécile; Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the caprylic acid (C8:0), this study aimed at investigating the discrepancy between the formerly described beneficial effects of dietary medium chain fatty acids on body weight loss and the C8:0 newly reported effect on food intake via ghrelin octanoylation. During 6 weeks, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with three dietary C8:0 levels (0, 8 and 21% of fatty acids) in three experimental conditions (moderate fat, caloric restriction and high fat). A specific dose-response enrichment of the stomach tissue C8:0 was observed as a function of dietary C8:0, supporting the hypothesis of an early preduodenal hydrolysis of medium chain triglycerides and a direct absorption at the gastric level. However, the octanoylated ghrelin concentration in the plasma was unchanged in spite of the increased C8:0 availability. A reproducible decrease in the plasma concentration of unacylated ghrelin was observed, which was consistent with a decrease in the stomach preproghrelin mRNA and stomach ghrelin expression. The concomitant decrease of the plasma unacylated ghrelin and the stability of its acylated form resulted in a significant increase in the acylated/total ghrelin ratio which had no effect on body weight gain or total dietary consumption. This enhanced ratio measured in rats consuming C8:0 was however suspected to increase (i) growth hormone (GH) secretion as an increase in the GH-dependent mRNA expression of the insulin like growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured (ii) adipocyte diameters in subcutaneous adipose tissue without an increase in the fat pad mass. Altogether, these results show that daily feeding with diets containing C8:0 increased the C8:0 level in the stomach more than all the other tissues, affecting the acylated/total ghrelin plasma ratio by decreasing the concentration of circulating unacylated ghrelin. However, these modifications were not associated with increased body weight or food consumption. PMID:26196391

  5. The effects of fever on hormone ghrelins, immunoglobulins, and heat shock protein 70 expression after swine flu vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman; Guven, Tumer; Sahin, İbrahim; Aksoy, Aziz; Kendir, Yalçın; İlhan, Mustafa N; Citil, Cihan; Catak, Zekiye; Ustun, Cemal

    2012-10-01

    For analyzing the changes in immunoglobulins, HSP70, ghrelin levels in blood samples were collected from volunteers vaccinated against swine flu before the vaccinations and on days 3, and 15, and 1 and 2 months after the vaccination in the presence or absence of fever associated with the it. The study included 11 subjects having developed a fever, and 13 subjects not having a fever, and 20 control subjects. Immunoglobulins were measured by nephelometry, and HSP70 and ghrelins by appropriate ELISA tests. The level of ghrelin was reduced, while the level of HSP70 was significantly increased in subjects who developed fevers. When temperatures were normalized, both levels were found similar to the control group. These results indicate that the increase in serum immunoglobulins levels associated with vaccinations, along with, elevations in HSP70 and reduced ghrelin levels associated with fever, may be the important parameters in the clinical evaluation and follow-up of treatments with vaccines.

  6. Immunomodulatory actions of central ghrelin in diet-induced energy imbalance.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Darko; Starcevic, Vesna; Vilimanovich, Urosh; Nesic, Dejan; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Misirkic, Maja; Janjetovic, Kristina; Savic, Emina; Popadic, Dusan; Sudar, Emina; Micic, Dragan; Sumarac-Dumanovic, Mirjana; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of centrally administered orexigenic hormone ghrelin on energy imbalance-induced inflammation. Rats were subjected for four weeks to three different dietary regimes: normal (standard food), high-fat (standard food with 30% lard) or food-restricted (70%, 50%, 40% and 40% of the expected food intake in 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th week, respectively). Compared to normal-weight controls, starved, but not obese rats had significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in the blood. When compared to normally fed animals, the hearts of starved and obese animals expressed higher levels of mRNAs encoding proinflammatory mediators (TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-12, iNOS), while mRNA levels of the anti-inflammatory TGF-β remained unchanged. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ghrelin (1 μg/day) for five consecutive days significantly reduced TNF, IL-1β and IFN-γ levels in the blood of starved rats, as well as TNF, IL-17 and IL-12p40 mRNA expression in the hearts of obese rats. Conversely, ICV ghrelin increased the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 mRNA in the heart tissue of food-restricted animals. This was associated with an increase of immunosuppressive ACTH/corticosterone production in starved animals and a decrease of the immunostimulatory adipokine leptin both in food-restricted and high-fat groups. Ghrelin activated the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus and inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the hearts of obese, but not starved rats. Therefore, central ghrelin may play a complex role in energy imbalance-induced inflammation by modulating HPA axis, leptin and AMPK/ERK signaling pathways.

  7. Involvement of Astrocytes in Mediating the Central Effects of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A

    2017-03-02

    Although astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned about their molecular and functional features. Astrocytes express receptors for numerous hormones and metabolic factors, including the appetite-promoting hormone ghrelin. The metabolic effects of ghrelin are largely opposite to those of leptin, as it stimulates food intake and decreases energy expenditure. Ghrelin is also involved in glucose-sensing and glucose homeostasis. The widespread expression of the ghrelin receptor in the central nervous system suggests that this hormone is not only involved in metabolism, but also in other essential functions in the brain. In fact, ghrelin has been shown to promote cell survival and neuroprotection, with some studies exploring the use of ghrelin as a therapeutic agent against metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we highlight the possible role of glial cells as mediators of ghrelin's actions within the brain.

  8. Exercise and adrenaline increase PGC-1α mRNA expression in rat adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Lindsey N; Bomhof, Marc R; Capozzi, Lauren C; Basaraba, Susan A U; Wright, David C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to explore the effects of exercise and adrenaline on the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, in rat abdominal adipose tissue. We hypothesized that (1) exercise training would increase PGC-1α mRNA expression in association with increases in mitochondrial marker enzymes, (2) adrenaline would increase PGC-1α mRNA expression and (3) the effect of exercise on PGC-1α mRNA expression in white adipose tissue would be attenuated by a β-blocker. Two hours of daily swim training for 4 weeks led to increases in mitochondrial marker proteins and PGC-1α mRNA expression in epididymal and retroperitoneal fat depots. Additionally, a single 2 h bout of exercise led to increases in PGC-1α mRNA expression immediately following exercise cessation. Adrenaline treatment of adipose tissue organ cultures led to dose-dependent increases in PGC-1α mRNA expression. A supra-physiological concentration of adrenaline increased PGC-1α mRNA expression in epididymal but not retroperitoneal adipose tissue. β-Blockade attenuated the effects of an acute bout of exercise on PGC-1α mRNA expression in epididymal but not retroperitoneal fat pads. In summary, this is the first investigation to demonstrate that exercise training, an acute bout of exercise and adrenaline all increase PGC-1α mRNA expression in rat white adipose tissue. Furthermore it would appear that increases in circulating catecholamine levels may be one potential mechanism mediating exercise induced increases in PGC-1α mRNA expression in rat abdominal adipose tissue. PMID:19221126

  9. Ghrelin in Female and Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Joëlle; Maillard, Virginie; Coyral-Castel, Stéphanie; Ramé, Christelle; Froment, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin and one of its functional receptors, GHS-R1a (Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor 1a), were firstly studied about 15 years. Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide hormone that affects several biological functions including food intake, glucose release, cell proliferation… Ghrelin and GHS-R1a are expressed in key cells of both male and female reproductive organs in several species including fishes, birds, and mammals suggesting a well-conserved signal through the evolution and a role in the control of fertility. Ghrelin could be a component of the complex series of nutrient sensors such as adipokines, and nuclear receptors, which regulate reproduction in function of the energy stores. The objective of this paper was to report the available information about the ghrelin system and its role at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both sexes. PMID:20700403

  10. Transfection efficiency and transgene expression kinetics of mRNA delivered in naked and nanoparticle format.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kyle K L; Leong, Kam W; Nair, Smita K

    2013-03-28

    Transfection efficiencies and transgene expression kinetics of messenger RNA (mRNA), an emerging class of nucleic acid-based therapeutics, have been poorly characterized. In this study, we evaluated transfection efficiencies of mRNA delivered in naked and nanoparticle format in vitro and in vivo using GFP and luciferase as reporters. While mRNA nanoparticles transfect primary human and mouse dendritic cells (DCs) efficiently in vitro, naked mRNA could not produce any detectable gene product. The protein expression of nanoparticle-mediated transfection in vitro peaks rapidly within 5-7h and decays in a biphasic manner. In vivo, naked mRNA is more efficient than mRNA nanoparticles when administered subcutaneously. In contrast, mRNA nanoparticle performs better when administered intranasally and intravenously. Gene expression is most transient when delivered intravenously in nanoparticle format with an apparent half-life of 1.4h and lasts less than 24h, and most sustained when delivered in the naked format subcutaneously at the base of tail with an apparent half-life of 18h and persists for at least 6days. Notably, exponential decreases in protein expression are consistently observed post-delivery of mRNA in vivo regardless of the mode of delivery (naked or nanoparticle) or the site of administration. This study elucidates the performance of mRNA transfection and suggests a niche for mRNA therapeutics when predictable in vivo transgene expression kinetics is imperative.

  11. [Expression and significance of ERalpha mRNA of residents exposed to arsenic via drinking water].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhiwei; Yang, Weihong; Wu, Kegong; Li, Yanhong; Xia, Yajuan

    2014-05-01

    To detect ERbeta mRNA expression of subjects exposed to different arsenic drinking water, and to analyze the potential relationship between their abnormal expression and heart injury caused by arsenic in order to study the endocrine disturbing effect of arsenic. Molecular epidemiological method was used. The study subjects included a total of 273 residents exposed to arsenic via drinking water,and they were divided into four groups according to arsenic concentration, and their blood ERbeta mRNA expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR. The level of ERbeta mRNA expression rose with increasing of water As and urine As (r = 0.159, 0.21, P < 0.05). The prevalence of Q-Tc interval prolongation aggravated with increasing of water As(chi2 = 4.35, P = 0.037), while according with the variation of ERbeta mRNA expression. Tp-Te interval prolonged with increasing of water As (r = 0.199, P = 0.023), as well prolonged with increasing of ERbeta mRNA expression (r = 0.205, P = 0.019). The prevalence of arrhythmia was almost according with the variation of ERbeta mRNA expression. chronic arsenic exposure can potentially disturb ERbeta mRNA expression, as well as there are possible relationship between ERbeta mRNA abnormal expression and Q-Tc interval prolongation and Tp-Te interval prolonged caused by arsenic.

  12. Ghrelin's second life: from appetite stimulator to glucose regulator.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Depoortere, Inge

    2012-07-07

    Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide hormone produced by the stomach, was the first orexigenic hormone to be discovered from the periphery. The octanoyl modification at Ser³, mediated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), is essential for ghrelin's biological activity. Ghrelin stimulates food intake through binding to its receptor (GRLN-R) on neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is widely expressed throughout the body; accordingly, it is implicated in several other physiological functions, which include growth hormone release, gastric emptying, and body weight regulation. Ghrelin and GRLN-R expression are also found in the pancreas, suggesting a local physiological role. Accordingly, several recent studies now point towards an important role for ghrelin and its receptor in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis, which is the main focus of this review. Several mechanisms of this regulation by ghrelin have been proposed, and one possibility is through the regulation of insulin secretion. Despite some controversy, most studies suggest that ghrelin exerts an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion, resulting in increased circulating glucose levels. Ghrelin may thus be a diabetogenic factor. Obesity-related type 2 diabetes has become an increasingly important health problem, almost reaching epidemic proportions in the world; therefore, antagonists of the ghrelin-GOAT signaling pathway, which will tackle both energy- and glucose homeostasis, may be considered as promising new therapies for this disease.

  13. Fed and fasted chicks from lines divergently selected for low or high body weight have differential hypothalamic appetite-associated factor mRNA expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiaqing; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Siegel, Paul B; Cline, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    We have demonstrated that chicken lines which have undergone intense divergent selection for either low (LWS) or high (HWS) body weight (anorexic and obese containing, respectively) have differential food intake threshold responses to a range of intracerebroventricular injected neurotransmitters. The study reported herein was designed to measure endogenous appetite-associated factor mRNA profiles between these lines in an effort to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in their differential eating patterns. Whole hypothalamus was collected from 5 day-old chicks that had been fasted for 180 min or had free access to food. Total RNA was isolated, reverse transcribed, and real-time PCR performed. Although mRNAs encoding orexigenic neuropeptides including agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), prolactin-releasing peptide, and visfatin did not differ in expression between the lines, NPY receptor 5 mRNA was greater in fed LWS than HWS chicks, but fasting decreased the magnitude of difference. Anorexigenic factors including amylin, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and ghrelin were not differentially expressed between lines, while mRNA abundance of calcitonin, CRF receptor 1, leptin receptor, neuropeptide S, melanocortin receptor 3, and oxytocin were greater in LWS than HWS chicks. Pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA was lower in LWS than HWS chicks, while fasting decreased its expression in both lines. These results suggest that there are differences in gene expression of appetite-associated factors between LWS and HWS lines that might be associated with their differential food intake and thus contribute to differences in severity of anorexia, body weight, adiposity, and development of obesity.

  14. Expression of APOBEC3B mRNA in Primary Breast Cancer of Japanese Women

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Tanaka, Kimihiro; Inoue, Yuka; Akiyoshi, Sayuri; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have identified the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3B (APOBEC3B) as a source of mutations in various malignancies. APOBEC3B is overexpressed in several human cancer types, including breast cancer. In this study, we analyzed APOBEC3B mRNA expression in 305 primary breast cancers of Japanese women using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and investigated the relationships between the APOBEC3B mRNA expression and clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis, and TP53 mutations. The expression of APOBEC3B mRNA was detected in 277 tumors and not detected in 28 tumors. High APOBEC3B mRNA expression was significantly correlated with ER- and PR-negativity, high grade and high Ki67 index. The APOBEC3B mRNA expression was highest in the triple-negative and lowest in the hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative subtypes. The TP53 gene was more frequently mutated in the tumors with high APOBEC3B mRNA expression. High APOBEC3B mRNA expression was significantly associated with poor recurrence-free survival in all cases and the ER-positive cases. These findings were almost consistent with the previous reports from the Western countries. In conclusion, high APOBEC3B mRNA expression was related to the aggressive phenotypes of breast cancer, high frequency of TP53 mutation and poor prognosis, especially in ER-positive tumors. PMID:27977754

  15. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  16. Bioinspired Nanocomplex for Spatiotemporal Imaging of Sequential mRNA Expression in Differentiating Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular activities. The expression dynamics of specific mRNA contains substantial information on the intracellular milieu. Unlike the imaging of stationary mRNAs, real-time intracellular imaging of the dynamics of mRNA expression is of great value for investigating mRNA biology and exploring specific cellular cascades. In addition to advanced imaging methods, timely extracellular stimulation is another key factor in regulating the mRNA expression repertoire. The integration of effective stimulation and imaging into a single robust system would significantly improve stimulation efficiency and imaging accuracy, producing fewer unwanted artifacts. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomplex to enable self-activating and spatiotemporal imaging of the dynamics of mRNA sequential expression during the neural stem cell differentiation process. This nanocomplex showed improved enzymatic stability, fast recognition kinetics, and high specificity. With a mechanism regulated by endogenous cell machinery, this nanocomplex realized the successive stimulating motif release and the dynamic imaging of chronological mRNA expression during neural stem cell differentiation without the use of transgenetic manipulation. The dynamic imaging montage of mRNA expression ultimately facilitated genetic heterogeneity analysis. In vivo lateral ventricle injection of this nanocomplex enabled endogenous neural stem cell activation and labeling at their specific differentiation stages. This nanocomplex is highly amenable as an alternative tool to explore the dynamics of intricate mRNA activities in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25494492

  17. Bioinspired nanocomplex for spatiotemporal imaging of sequential mRNA expression in differentiating neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Ruili; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, He-Fang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Fu; Li, Weitao; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-12-23

    Messenger RNA plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular activities. The expression dynamics of specific mRNA contains substantial information on the intracellular milieu. Unlike the imaging of stationary mRNAs, real-time intracellular imaging of the dynamics of mRNA expression is of great value for investigating mRNA biology and exploring specific cellular cascades. In addition to advanced imaging methods, timely extracellular stimulation is another key factor in regulating the mRNA expression repertoire. The integration of effective stimulation and imaging into a single robust system would significantly improve stimulation efficiency and imaging accuracy, producing fewer unwanted artifacts. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomplex to enable self-activating and spatiotemporal imaging of the dynamics of mRNA sequential expression during the neural stem cell differentiation process. This nanocomplex showed improved enzymatic stability, fast recognition kinetics, and high specificity. With a mechanism regulated by endogenous cell machinery, this nanocomplex realized the successive stimulating motif release and the dynamic imaging of chronological mRNA expression during neural stem cell differentiation without the use of transgenetic manipulation. The dynamic imaging montage of mRNA expression ultimately facilitated genetic heterogeneity analysis. In vivo lateral ventricle injection of this nanocomplex enabled endogenous neural stem cell activation and labeling at their specific differentiation stages. This nanocomplex is highly amenable as an alternative tool to explore the dynamics of intricate mRNA activities in various physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. Propionate induces mRNA expression of gluconeogenic genes in bovine calf hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocytes monolayers from neonatal calves were used to determine the responses of the cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) mRNA expression to propionate and direct hormonal cues including cyclic AMP (cAMP), dexamethasone, and insulin. The responses of other key gluconeogenic genes, including mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK2), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and glucose-6-phosphotase (G6PC), were also measured. Expression of PCK1 was linearly induced with increasing propionate concentrations in media and 2.5 mM propionate increased PCK1 mRNA at 3 and 6h of incubation; however, the induction disappeared at 12 and 24 h. The induction of PCK1 mRNA by propionate was mimicked by 1 mM cAMP, or in combination with 5 µM dexamethasone, but not by dexamethasone alone. The induction of PCK1 mRNA by propionate or cAMP was eliminated by addition of 100 nM insulin. Additionally, expression of PCK2 and PC mRNA was also induced by propionate in a concentration-dependent manner. Consistent with PCK1, propionate-stimulated PCK2 and PC mRNA expression was inhibited by insulin. Expression of G6PC mRNA was neither affected by propionate nor cAMP, dexamethasone, insulin, or their combinations. These findings demonstrate that propionate can directly regulate its own metabolism in bovine calf hepatocytes through upregulation of PCK1, PCK2, and PC mRNA expression.

  19. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  20. Translational research of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroaki; Shiiya, Tomomi; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2010-07-01

    Gastrointestinal peptides play important roles regulating feeding and energy homeostasis. Most gastrointestinal peptides including glucagon like peptide-1, peptide YY, amylin, and oxytomodulin are anorectic, and only ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide. Ghrelin increases appetite, modulates energy balance, suppresses inflammation, and enhances growth hormone secretion. Given its diversity of functions, ghrelin is expected be an effective therapy for lean patients with cachexia caused by chronic heart failure, chronic respiratory disease, anorexia nervosa, functional dyspepsia, and cancer. Clinical trials have demonstrated that ghrelin effectively increases lean body mass and activity in cachectic patients. Ghrelin interrupts the vicious cycle of the cachectic paradigm through its orexigenic, anabolic, and anti-inflammatory effects, and ghrelin administration may improve the quality of life of cachectic patients. We discuss the significant roles of ghrelin in the pathophysiology of cachectic diseases and the possible clinical applications of ghrelin.

  1. High level of ezrin mRNA expression in an osteosarcoma biopsy sample with lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Wakako; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Mori, Takeshi; Yanai, Tomoko; Hayakawa, Akira; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2007-07-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) remains a life-threatening malignancy and its molecular character is not fully understood. Ezrin is a cytoskeleton linker protein involved in regulating the growth and metastatic capacity of cancer cells. However, the correlation between ezrin mRNA expression and clinical severity has not yet been examined in OS biopsy samples. Furthermore, recent evidence has demonstrated that the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) expression is increased in human cancers of various origins, but this has not yet been examined in OS cells. To clarify the correlation between the clinical severity and the levels of ezrin and GAPDH mRNA expression, we quantified these mRNA levels in 4 pediatric OS biopsy samples using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Among these 4 samples, ezrin mRNA expression was approximately 5-fold higher in a case with lung metastasis compared with the other cases without metastasis, suggesting an association between the ezrin mRNA expression level and metastasis. On the other hand, the GAPDH mRNA expression level was not related to the clinical severity. This is the first report to demonstrate a high level of ezrin mRNA expression in an OS biopsy sample with lung metastasis.

  2. Oscillatory kinetics of gene expression: Protein conversion and slow mRNA transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2009-06-15

    The negative feedback between mRNA and regulatory-protein production may result in oscillations in the kinetics of gene expression if the mRNA-protein interplay includes protein conversion. Using a mean-field kinetic model, we show that such oscillations can be amplified due to limitations of the mRNA transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This effect may be dramatic for the mRNA population in the nucleus.

  3. Capsaicin-Sensitive Sensory Nerves Are Necessary for the Protective Effect of Ghrelin in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bonior, Joanna; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Gajdosz, Ryszard; Pierzchalski, Piotr; Kot, Michalina; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Nawrot-Porąbka, Katarzyna; Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Olszanecki, Rafał; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Trąbka, Rafał; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Dembiński, Artur; Jaworek, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin was shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Aim of the study was to investigate the role of sensory nerves (SN) in the protective effect of ghrelin in acute pancreatitis (AP). Studies were performed on male Wistar rats or isolated pancreatic acinar cells. After capsaicin deactivation of sensory nerves (CDSN) or treatment with saline, rats were pretreated intraperitoneally with ghrelin or saline. In those rats, AP was induced by cerulein or pancreases were used for isolation of pancreatic acinar cells. Pancreatic acinar cells were incubated in cerulein-free or cerulein containing solution. In rats with intact SN, pretreatment with ghrelin led to a reversal of the cerulein-induced increase in pancreatic weight, plasma activity of lipase and plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). These effects were associated with an increase in plasma interleukin-4 concentration and reduction in histological signs of pancreatic damage. CDSN tended to increase the severity of AP and abolished the protective effect of ghrelin. Exposure of pancreatic acinar cells to cerulein led to increase in cellular expression of mRNA for TNF-α and cellular synthesis of this cytokine. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced this alteration, but this effect was only observed in acinar cells obtained from rats with intact SN. Moreover, CDSN inhibited the cerulein- and ghrelin-induced increase in gene expression and synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in those cells. Ghrelin exhibits the protective effect in cerulein-induced AP on the organ and pancreatic acinar cell level. Sensory nerves ablation abolishes this effect. PMID:28665321

  4. COX-2 mRNA expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and effect by NSAID.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Li, P; Zhang, S-T; You, H; Jia, J-D; Yu, Z-L

    2008-01-01

    To investigate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) on it, in order to explore the mechanism of COX-2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) carcinogenesis and the ability of NSAID to prevent or treat ESCC. Frozen specimens of human ESCC and adjacent normal esophageal squamous epithelium pairs (n = 22) were examined for COX-2 mRNA expression by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After incubation with aspirin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or Nimesulide (a selective COX-2 inhibitor), the proliferation status of two human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines, EC-9706 and EC-109, was quantified by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The expression of COX-2 mRNA in these cells was detected by RT-PCR. COX-2 mRNA was expressed in 12 of 22 (54.5%) ESCC tissue samples, but it was undetectable in all the specimens of adjacent normal esophageal squamous epithelium COX-2 mRNA expression. Both aspirin (5-20 mmol/L) and Nimesulide (0.1-0.8 mmol/L) inhibited EC-9706 cell line proliferation and suppressed its COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently. However, only aspirin (5-20 mmol/L) could inhibit proliferation in the EC-109 cell line and suppress COX-2 mRNA expression. Nimesulide (0.1-0.8 mmol/L) could neither inhibit EC-109 cell growth nor suppress COX-2 mRNA expression. COX-2 mRNA expression is a frequent phenomenon in human ESCC tissue samples and plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. NSAID may be useful in the chemoprevention and therapy of human ESCC and its effects are likely to be mediated by modulating COX-2 activity.

  5. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Oleic Acid on Octanoylated Ghrelin Production.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Shigeru; Nobe, Miyuki; Iwasaki, Syuhei; Nii, Wakana; Goto, Natsumi; Seki, Yukari; Nakajima, Kensuke; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone-releasing peptide that also displays orexigenic activity. Since serine-3 acylation with octanoylate (octanoylation) is essential for the orexigenic activity of ghrelin, suppression of octanoylation could lead to amelioration or prevention of obesity. To enable the exploration of inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production, we developed a cell-based assay system using AGS-GHRL8 cells, in which octanoylated ghrelin concentration increases in the presence of octanoic acid. Using this assay system, we investigated whether fatty acids contained in foods or oils, such as acetic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid, have inhibitory effects on octanoylated ghrelin production. Acetic acid did not suppress the increase in octanoylated ghrelin production in AGS-GHRL8 cells, which was induced by the addition of octanoic acid. However, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and α-linolenic acid significantly suppressed octanoylated ghrelin production, with the effect of oleic acid being the strongest. Additionally, oleic acid decreased the serum concentration of octanoylated ghrelin in mice. The serum concentration of des-acyl ghrelin (without acyl modification) was also decreased, but the decrease was smaller than that of octanoylated ghrelin. Decreased octanoylated ghrelin production likely resulted from post-translational ghrelin processing, as there were no significant differences in gene expression in the stomach between oleic acid-treated mice and controls. These results suggest that oleic acid is a potential inhibitor of octanoylated ghrelin production and that our assay system is a valuable tool for screening compounds with suppressive effects on octanoylated ghrelin production.

  7. Ghrelin and Breast Cancer: Emerging Roles in Obesity, Estrogen Regulation, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Au, CheukMan Cherie; Furness, John B.; Brown, Kristy A.

    2017-01-01

    Local and systemic factors have been shown to drive the growth of breast cancer cells in postmenopausal obese women, who have increased risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Estrogens, produced locally in the breast fat by the enzyme aromatase, have an important role in promoting cancer cell proliferation. Ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone, may also influence cancer growth. This peptide is produced in the stomach and acts centrally to regulate appetite and growth hormone release. Circulating levels of ghrelin, and its unacylated form, des-acyl ghrelin, are almost always inversely correlated with obesity, and these peptide hormones have recently been shown to inhibit adipose tissue aromatase expression. Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin have also been shown to be produced by some tumor cells and influence tumor growth. The ghrelin/des-acyl ghrelin–cancer axis is complex, one reason being that tumor cells have been shown to express splice variants of ghrelin, and ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin might act at receptors other than the cognate ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, in tumors. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on energy homeostasis may also affect tumor development and growth. This review will summarize our current understanding of the role of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin in hormone-dependent cancers, breast cancer in particular. PMID:28119851

  8. Control of mammalian gene expression by selective mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O; Laskey, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear export of mRNAs is a crucial step in the regulation of gene expression, linking transcription in the nucleus to translation in the cytoplasm. Although important components of the mRNA export machinery are well characterized, such as transcription-export complexes TREX and TREX-2, recent work has shown that, in some instances, mammalian mRNA export can be selective and can regulate crucial biological processes such as DNA repair, gene expression, maintenance of pluripotency, haematopoiesis, proliferation and cell survival. Such findings show that mRNA export is an unexpected, yet potentially important, mechanism for the control of gene expression and of the mammalian transcriptome.

  9. Central ghrelin regulates peripheral lipid metabolism in a growth hormone-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Vázquez, María J; Varela, Luis; Nogueiras, Rubén; Saha, Asish K; Cordido, Fernando; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    GH plays a major role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and alterations in GH axis elicit major changes in fat distribution and mobilization. For example, in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) or in mice lacking the GH receptor, the percentage of fat is increased. In addition to the direct actions of GH on lipid metabolism, current evidence indicates that ghrelin, a stomach-derived peptide hormone with potent GH secretagogue action, increases lipogenesis in white adipose tissue (WAT) through a hypothalamic-mediated mechanism. Still, the mechanism by which GH tone modulates ghrelin actions on WAT remains unclear. Here we investigated the effect of central ghrelin administration on lipid metabolism in lipogenic tissues (liver and WAT) in the absence of GH, by using a model for the study of GHD, namely the spontaneous dwarf rat, which shows increased body fat. Our data demonstrate that central chronic ghrelin administration regulates adipose lipid metabolism, mainly in a GH-independent fashion, as a result of increased mRNA, protein expression, and activity levels of fatty acid metabolism enzymes. On the contrary, central ghrelin regulates hepatic lipogenesis de novo in a GH-independent fashion but lipid mobilization in a GH-dependent fashion because carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 was decreased only in wild-type Lewis rats. These findings suggest the existence of a new central nervous system-based neuroendocrine circuit, regulating metabolic homeostasis of adipose tissue. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the interplay between GH and ghrelin and their effects on lipid metabolism will provide new strategies for the design and development of suitable drugs for the treatment of GHD, obesity, and its comorbidities.

  10. Induced Ablation of Ghrelin Cells in Adult Mice Does Not Decrease Food Intake, Body Weight, or Response to High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Zhao, Tong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Injection of the peptide hormone ghrelin stimulates food intake in mice and humans. However, mice born without ghrelin demonstrate no significant loss of appetite. This paradox suggests either that compensation develops in mice born without ghrelin or that ghrelin is not essential for appetite control. To distinguish these possibilities, we generated transgenic mice (Ghrl-DTR) that express the diphtheria toxin receptor in ghrelin-secreting cells. Injection of diphtheria toxin in adulthood ablated ghrelin cells and reduced plasma ghrelin by 80-95%. Ghrelin cell-ablated mice exhibited no loss of appetite or body weight and no resistance to a high fat diet. To stimulate food intake in mice by ghrelin injection, we had to raise plasma levels many-fold above normal. Like germline ghrelin-deficient mice, the ghrelin cell-ablated mice developed profound hypoglycemia when subjected to prolonged calorie restriction, confirming that ghrelin acts to maintain blood glucose under famine conditions. PMID:24836560

  11. Ghrelin's second life: From appetite stimulator to glucose regulator

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Depoortere, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide hormone produced by the stomach, was the first orexigenic hormone to be discovered from the periphery. The octanoyl modification at Ser3, mediated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), is essential for ghrelin’s biological activity. Ghrelin stimulates food intake through binding to its receptor (GRLN-R) on neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is widely expressed throughout the body; accordingly, it is implicated in several other physiological functions, which include growth hormone release, gastric emptying, and body weight regulation. Ghrelin and GRLN-R expression are also found in the pancreas, suggesting a local physiological role. Accordingly, several recent studies now point towards an important role for ghrelin and its receptor in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis, which is the main focus of this review. Several mechanisms of this regulation by ghrelin have been proposed, and one possibility is through the regulation of insulin secretion. Despite some controversy, most studies suggest that ghrelin exerts an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion, resulting in increased circulating glucose levels. Ghrelin may thus be a diabetogenic factor. Obesity-related type 2 diabetes has become an increasingly important health problem, almost reaching epidemic proportions in the world; therefore, antagonists of the ghrelin-GOAT signaling pathway, which will tackle both energy- and glucose homeostasis, may be considered as promising new therapies for this disease. PMID:22783041

  12. Desacyl-ghrelin and synthetic GH-secretagogues modulate the production of inflammatory cytokines in mouse microglia cells stimulated by beta-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Bulgarelli, Ilaria; Tamiazzo, Laura; Bresciani, Elena; Rapetti, Daniela; Caporali, Simona; Lattuada, Donatella; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    Data from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and AD animal models demonstrate the accumulation of inflammatory microglia at sites of insoluble fibrillar beta-amyloid protein (fAbeta) deposition. It is known that fAbeta binds to CD36, a type B scavenger receptor also involved in internalization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and initiate a signaling cascade that regulates microglial recruitment, activation, and secretion of inflammatory mediators leading to neuronal dysfunction and death. The recent demonstration of a binding site for the growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) on CD36 prompted us to ascertain whether ghrelin and synthetic GHS could modulate the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines in fAbeta-activated microglia cells. We demonstrate that N9 microglia cells express the CD36 and are a suitable model to study the activation of inflammatory cytokines synthesis. In fact, in N9 cells exposed to fAbeta(25-35) for 24 hr, the expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 mRNA significantly increased. Interestingly, 10(-7) M desacyl-ghrelin, hexarelin, and EP80317 in the nanomolar range effectively counteracted fAbeta(25-35) stimulation of IL-6 mRNA levels, whereas ghrelin was ineffective. Similarly, the effects of fAbeta(25-35) on IL-1beta mRNA levels were attenuated by desacyl-ghrelin, hexarelin, and EP80317, but not ghrelin. Because we have observed that the specific GHS receptor GHS-R1a is not expressed in N9 cells, the actions of GHS should be mediated by different receptors. Reportedly, hexarelin and EP80317 are capable of binding the CD36 in mouse macrophages and reducing atherosclerotic plaque deposition in mice. We conclude that desacyl-ghrelin, hexarelin, and EP80317 might interfere with fAbeta activation of CD36 in microglia cells.

  13. Dietary glycerol for quail: association between productive performance and COX III mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Silva, S C C; Gasparino, E; Batista, E; Tanamati, F; Vesco, A P D; Lala, B; de Oliveira, D P

    2016-05-25

    This study was carry out to evaluate mRNA expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase III in the Pectoralis superficialis muscle of 28-day-old quails fed diets containing 0, 8, and 12% glycerol. Total RNA was extracted (N = 10) and cDNA was amplified using specifics primers for qRT-PCR. Feed efficiency and feed intake were evaluated. COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle was higher in the group fed with 12% glycerol (0.863 AU); no differences were observed in the expression of this gene between the muscle of animals fed diets without glycerol (0.357 AU) and 8% glycerol (0.415 AU). Quails that showed greater COX III mRNA expression also showed the lowest feed efficiency. These results show that there is a difference in COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle of 28-day-old quail fed diets different concentrations of glycerol.

  14. Transcription Expression and Clinical Significance of Dishevelled-3 mRNA and δ-Catenin mRNA in Pleural Effusions from Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Shu-Li; Cha, Na; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Wang, Shao-Cheng; Li, Wei-Nan; Wang, En-Hua; Wu, Guang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate diagnostic utility of Dishevelled-3 (DVL-3) mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA expression in pleural effusions of patients with lung cancer. Methods. DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA levels were assessed by performing RT-PCR on pleural effusion specimens from patients with lung cancer (n = 75) and with lung benign disease (n = 51). Results. The expressions of DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA were significantly higher in malignant than in benign lung disease (P < 0.01) and were obviously higher than cytology in adenocarcinoma (P < 0.01). In single use, DVL-3 mRNA had the highest specificity (94.1%) and PPV (95.7%), whereas δ-catenin mRNA had the highest sensitivity (92.0%) and NPV (88.5%). When combinations of markers were evaluated together, DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA gave a high-diagnostic performance: sensitivity of 100.0%, NPV of 100.0%, and accuracy of 96.0%, respectively. Conclusion. As molecular markers of detecting pleural micrometastasis, DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA are helpful to diagnose the cancer cells in pleural effusions of patients with lung cancer. PMID:22461838

  15. Involvement of Astrocytes in Mediating the Central Effects of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Laura M.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    Although astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned about their molecular and functional features. Astrocytes express receptors for numerous hormones and metabolic factors, including the appetite-promoting hormone ghrelin. The metabolic effects of ghrelin are largely opposite to those of leptin, as it stimulates food intake and decreases energy expenditure. Ghrelin is also involved in glucose-sensing and glucose homeostasis. The widespread expression of the ghrelin receptor in the central nervous system suggests that this hormone is not only involved in metabolism, but also in other essential functions in the brain. In fact, ghrelin has been shown to promote cell survival and neuroprotection, with some studies exploring the use of ghrelin as a therapeutic agent against metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we highlight the possible role of glial cells as mediators of ghrelin’s actions within the brain. PMID:28257088

  16. Reduced beta 2-microglobulin mRNA levels in transgenic mice expressing a designed hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, S; Hotchkiss, G; Andäng, M; Nyholm, T; Inzunza, J; Jansson, I; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    1994-01-01

    We have generated three artificial hammerhead ribozymes, denoted 'Rz-b', 'Rz-c' and 'Rz-d', with different specificities for exon II of the mouse beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2M) mRNA. In this study we tested for ribozyme mediated reduction of beta 2M mRNA in a cell line and in transgenic mice. Transfections of either of the Rz-b, Rz-c or Rz-d plasmids into a mouse cell-line (NIH/3T3) revealed reductions of beta 2M mRNA substrate in each case. Ribozyme expression in individual transfected clones was accompanied with an up to 80% reduction of beta 2M mRNA levels. Rz-c was selected for a transgenic study. Seven Rz-c transgenic founder animals were identified from which three ribozyme expressing families were established and analysed. Expression of the ribozyme transgene was tested for and detected in lung, kidney and spleen. Expression was accompanied with reduction of the beta 2M mRNA levels of heterozygous (Rz+/-) animals compared to non-transgenic litter mates. The effect was most pronounced in lung with more than 90% beta 2M mRNA reduction in individual mice. In summary, expression of our ribozymes in a cell free system, in a cell-line and in transgenic mice were all accompanied with reductions of beta 2M mRNA levels. Images PMID:8036151

  17. Reduced beta 2-microglobulin mRNA levels in transgenic mice expressing a designed hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Larsson, S; Hotchkiss, G; Andäng, M; Nyholm, T; Inzunza, J; Jansson, I; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    1994-06-25

    We have generated three artificial hammerhead ribozymes, denoted 'Rz-b', 'Rz-c' and 'Rz-d', with different specificities for exon II of the mouse beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2M) mRNA. In this study we tested for ribozyme mediated reduction of beta 2M mRNA in a cell line and in transgenic mice. Transfections of either of the Rz-b, Rz-c or Rz-d plasmids into a mouse cell-line (NIH/3T3) revealed reductions of beta 2M mRNA substrate in each case. Ribozyme expression in individual transfected clones was accompanied with an up to 80% reduction of beta 2M mRNA levels. Rz-c was selected for a transgenic study. Seven Rz-c transgenic founder animals were identified from which three ribozyme expressing families were established and analysed. Expression of the ribozyme transgene was tested for and detected in lung, kidney and spleen. Expression was accompanied with reduction of the beta 2M mRNA levels of heterozygous (Rz+/-) animals compared to non-transgenic litter mates. The effect was most pronounced in lung with more than 90% beta 2M mRNA reduction in individual mice. In summary, expression of our ribozymes in a cell free system, in a cell-line and in transgenic mice were all accompanied with reductions of beta 2M mRNA levels.

  18. The number of preproghrelin mRNA expressing cells is increased in mice with activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    François, Marie; Barde, Swapnali; Achamrah, Najate; Breton, Jonathan; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Coëffier, Moïse; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2015-06-01

    Plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, are increased during conditions of chronic starvation, such as in patients with anorexia nervosa. However, it is not known whether such increase can be related to the number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach, and if chronic starvation may activate a tentative central ghrelin production. In this work, in situ hybridization technique was used to analyze the presence and number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach and the hypothalamus of mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by the combination of running wheel activity with progressive, during 10 days, feeding-time restriction (FTR) and compared with sedentary FTR, ABA pair-fed (PF) and ad libitum-fed control mice. All food-restricted mice lost more than 20% of body weight. Body weight loss was similar in ABA and PF mice, but it was more pronounced than in FTR mice. Food intake was also lower in ABA than in FTR mice. Preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach were increased proportionally to the body weight loss in all food-restricted groups with the highest number in ABA mice. No preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells were detectable in the hypothalamus of either control or food-restricted mice. Thus, the increased number of gastric preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells during chronic starvation proportionally to the body weight loss and reduced food intake may underlie increased plasma ghrelin. Hyperactivity-induced anorexia appears to further increase the number of preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells in the stomach. No evidence was found for ghrelin expression in the hypothalamus, not even in any of the present experimental models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Milsted, A.; Barna, B.P.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Brosnihan, K.B.; Ferrario, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures.

  20. Differential expression of IGF-1 mRNA isoforms in colorectal carcinoma and normal colon tissue.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Aldona; Szaflarski, Witold; Szmeja, Jacek; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Przybyszewska, Wiesława; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Koczorowska, Maria; Kościński, Tomasz; Zabel, Maciej; Drews, Michał

    2013-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 gene consists of 6 exons resulting in the expression of 6 variant forms of mRNA (IA, IB, IC, IIA, IIB and IIC) due to an alternative splicing. The mechanisms of IGF-1 gene splicing and the role of local expression manifested by IGF-1 mRNA variants in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyse the expression of IGF-1 mRNA isoforms [A, B, C, P1 (class I) and P2 (class II)], as well as the protein expression in CRC and control samples isolated from 28 patients. The expression of Ki-67 was also analysed and clinical data were obtained. For this purpose, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunocytochemistry. The expression of mRNAs coding for all splicing isoforms of IGF-1 was observed in every tissue sample studied, with a significantly lower expression noted in the CRC as compared to the control samples. The cytoplasmic expression of IGF-1 protein was found in 50% of the CRC and in ~40% of the non-tumor tissues; however, no significant quantitative inter-group differences were observed. The expression of the IGF-1 gene in the 2 groups of tissues was controlled by the P1 and P2 promoters in a similar manner. No significant differences were detected in the expression of the IGF-1 A and B isoforms; however, their expression was significantly higher compared to that of isoform C. No significant differences were observed between the expression of Ki-67 mRNA in the CRC and control tissue even though the expression of the Ki-67 protein was higher in the CRC compared to the control samples. Ki-67 protein expression was associated with the macroscopic and microscopic aspects of CRC. A significant positive correlation was found between the local production of total mRNA and isoform A and the expression of Ki-67 mRNA, although only in the non-tumor tissues. In CRC samples, the local expression of the total IGF-1 mRNA and all splicing isoforms of IGF-1 mRNA

  1. Regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in rat brain after sertraline treatment.

    PubMed

    Giardino, L; Zanni, M; Bettelli, C; Savina, M A; Calzà, L

    1996-09-26

    We now investigated the effect of chronic treatment with sertraline on glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in different rat brain areas by means of in situ hybridization. We found a reduced glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex, accumbens nucleus, olfactory tubercle and reticular nucleus of the thalamus. The involvement of presynaptic modulation of gamma-amino-butyric acid transmission in the anxiolytic effect of sertraline is discussed.

  2. Early onset of ghrelin production in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoff; Fletcher, Terry P; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-27

    Ghrelin regulates appetite in mammals and can stimulate growth hormone (GH) release from the pituitary. In rats and humans, ghrelin cells appear in the stomach during late fetal life. Nevertheless, the role of ghrelin in early mammalian development is not well understood. Marsupials deliver highly altricial young that weigh less than 1g so they must feed and digest milk at a comparatively immature stage of development. Since they complete their growth and differentiation while in the pouch, they are accessible models in which to determine the time course of ghrelin production during development. We examined the distribution of gastric ghrelin cells, plasma ghrelin concentrations and pituitary expression of the ghrelin receptor (ghsr-1alpha) and GH in the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. There were ghrelin immunopositive cells in the developing mesenchyme of the stomach from day 10 post partum (pp) to day 150pp. Subsequently ghrelin protein in the fore-stomach declined and was absent by day 250pp but remained in the gastric cells of the hind-stomach. Ghrelin was detected in the developing pancreas from day 10pp but was absent by day 150pp and in the adult. Pituitary ghsr-1alpha expression and plasma concentrations of ghrelin increased significantly up to day 70-120pp while GH expression was also elevated, declining with GH to reach adult levels by day 180pp. These results demonstrate an early onset of gastric ghrelin expression in the tammar in concert with a functional stomach at a relatively earlier stage than that of developmentally more mature eutherian young.

  3. Molecular identification of ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a) and its functional role in the gastrointestinal tract of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Saeki, Atsuki; Teraoka, Hiroki; Hiraga, Takeo; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Ghrelin stimulates gastric motility in vivo in the guinea-pig through activation of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). In this study, we identified GHS-R1a in the guinea-pig, and examined its distribution and cellular function and compared them with those in the rat. Effects of ghrelin in different regions of gastrointestinal tract were also examined. GHS-R1a was identified in guinea-pig brain cDNA. Amino acid identities of guinea-pig GHS-R1a were 93% to horses and 85% to dogs. Expression levels of GHS-R1a mRNA were high in the pituitary and hypothalamus, moderate in the thalamus, cerebral cortex, pons, medulla oblongata and olfactory bulb, and low in the cerebellum and peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract. Comparison of GHS-R1a expression patterns showed that those in the brain were similar but the expression level in the gastrointestinal tract was higher in rats than in guinea-pigs. Guinea-pig GHS-R1a expressed in HEK 293 cells responded to rat ghrelin and GHS-R agonists. Rat ghrelin was ineffective in inducing mechanical changes in the stomach and colon but caused a slight contraction in the small intestine. 1,1-Dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium and electrical field stimulation (EFS) caused cholinergic contraction in the intestine, and these contractions were not affected by ghrelin. Ghrelin did not change spontaneous and EFS-evoked [(3)H]-efflux from [(3)H]-choline-loaded ileal strips. In summary, guinea-pig GHS-R1a was identified and its functions in isolated gastrointestinal strips were characterized. The distribution of GHS-R1a in peripheral tissues was different from that in rats, suggesting that the functional role of ghrelin in the guinea-pig is different from that in other animal species.

  4. Expression and clinicopathological significance of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 mRNA in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, You-Wei; Li, Jin; Guo, Wei-Jian

    2010-11-08

    The Polycomb group (PcG) genes are a class of regulators responsible for maintaining homeotic gene expression throughout cell division. PcG expression is deregulated in some types of human cancer. Both Bmi-1 and Mel-18 are of the key PcG proteins. We investigate the expression and clinicopathological roles of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 mRNA in gastric cancer. The expression of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 in a series of 71 gastric cancer tissues and paired normal mucosal tissues distant from the tumorous lesion was assayed by quantitative real time RT-PCR. The correlation between Mel-18 and Bmi-1 mRNA expression, and between Mel-18 or Bmi-1 mRNA level and clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. Expression of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 genes was variably detected, but overexpression of Bmi-1 mRNA and decreased expression of Mel-18 mRNA were the most frequent alteration. In addition, the expression of Bmi-1 and Mel-18 mRNA inversely correlates in gastric tumors. Moreover, a significant positive correlation between Bmi-1 overexpression and tumor size, depth of invasion, or lymph node metastasis, and a significant negative correlation between Mel-18 low-expression with lymph node metastasis or the clinical stage were observed. Our data suggest that Mel-18 and Bmi-1 may play crucial but opposite roles in gastric cancer. Decreased Mel-18 and increased Bmi-1 mRNA expression was associated with the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. It is possible to list Bmi-1 and Mel-18 as biomarkers for predicting the prognosis of gastric cancer.

  5. Expression and clinicopathological significance of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 mRNA in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Polycomb group (PcG) genes are a class of regulators responsible for maintaining homeotic gene expression throughout cell division. PcG expression is deregulated in some types of human cancer. Both Bmi-1 and Mel-18 are of the key PcG proteins. We investigate the expression and clinicopathological roles of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 mRNA in gastric cancer. Methods The expression of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 in a series of 71 gastric cancer tissues and paired normal mucosal tissues distant from the tumorous lesion was assayed by quantitative real time RT-PCR. The correlation between Mel-18 and Bmi-1 mRNA expression, and between Mel-18 or Bmi-1 mRNA level and clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. Results Expression of Mel-18 and Bmi-1 genes was variably detected, but overexpression of Bmi-1 mRNA and decreased expression of Mel-18 mRNA were the most frequent alteration. In addition, the expression of Bmi-1 and Mel-18 mRNA inversely correlates in gastric tumors. Moreover, a significant positive correlation between Bmi-1 overexpression and tumor size, depth of invasion, or lymph node metastasis, and a significant negative correlation between Mel-18 low-expression with lymph node metastasis or the clinical stage were observed. Conclusion Our data suggest that Mel-18 and Bmi-1 may play crucial but opposite roles in gastric cancer. Decreased Mel-18 and increased Bmi-1 mRNA expression was associated with the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. It is possible to list Bmi-1 and Mel-18 as biomarkers for predicting the prognosis of gastric cancer. PMID:21059209

  6. Induction of cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 mRNA expression in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-08-22

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is expressed in vascular endothelial cells and plays a crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the expression of CRIM1 mRNA in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CRIM1 mRNA levels were not altered in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated monolayer HUVECs or in cells in collagen gels without VEGF. In contrast, the expression of CRIM1 mRNA was elevated in VEGF-stimulated cells in collagen gels. The increase in CRIM1 mRNA expression was observed even at 2h when HUVECs did not form tubular structures in collagen gels. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2, Akt and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were activated by VEGF in HUVECs. The VEGF-induced expression of CRIM1 mRNA was significantly abrogated by PD98059 or PF562271, but was not affected by LY294002. These results demonstrate that CRIM1 is an early response gene in the presence of both angiogenic stimulation (VEGF) and environmental (extracellular matrix) factors, and Erk and FAK might be involved in the upregulation of CRIM1 mRNA expression in vascular endothelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification, tissue distribution and functional characterization of the ghrelin receptor in West African lungfish, Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Norifumi; Kangawa, Kenji; Uchiyama, Minoru; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-12-01

    We identified two ghrelin receptor isoforms, the ghrelin receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) and its alternative splice form (GHS-R1b) for West African lungfish, Protopterus annectens. Lungfish GHS-R1a and 1b comprised 361 and 281 amino acids, respectively. Lungfish GHS-R1a showed the highest identity to coelacanth GHS-R1a (80.4%). The highest expression of GHS-R1a mRNAs was seen in the brain, liver, ovary, heart, intestine, and gills. GHS-R1b mRNAs were also detected in the same tissues with GHS-R1a, but their expression level was 1/20 that of GHS-R1a. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells transiently expressing lungfish GHS-R1a, rat and bullfrog ghrelin, and two GHS-R1a agonists, GHRP-6 and hexarelin, increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. The intensity of the Ca(2+) increases induced by GHS-R1a agonists was twice when compared to that induced by ghrelin, although the median effective doses (ED50) were similar, suggesting a long-lasting effect of GHS-R1a agonists with similar affinity. We also examined changes in the GHS-R gene expression during an eight-week estivation. Body weight was slightly lowered, but plasma sodium and glucose concentrations decreased; plasma urea concentration increased significantly 4weeks after the start of estivation. Overall, expression of GHS-R1a mRNA decreased, but changes in GHS-R1b mRNA expression were inconsistent with those of GHS-R1a during estivation, suggesting an involvement of GHS-R in energy homeostasis, as seen in mammals. Our results suggest that the ghrelin-GHS-R1a system is present in this lungfish although ghrelin has not yet been found. The structure of GHS-R1a is closer to that of tetrapods than Actinopterygian fish, indicating a process of evolution that follows the Crossopterygii such as coelacanth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral ‘hydrogen water' induces neuroprotective ghrelin secretion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Akio; Yamafuji, Megumi; Tachibana, Tomoko; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Noda, Mami; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of molecular hydrogen (H2) is emerging in a number of human diseases and in their animal models, including in particular Parkinson's disease (PD). H2 supplementation of drinking water has been shown to exert disease-modifying effects in PD patients and neuroprotective effects in experimental PD model mice. However, H2 supplementation does not result in detectable changes in striatal H2 levels, indicating an indirect effect. Here we show that H2 supplementation increases gastric expression of mRNA encoding ghrelin, a growth hormone secretagogue, and ghrelin secretion, which are antagonized by the β1-adrenoceptor blocker, atenolol. Strikingly, the neuroprotective effect of H2 water was abolished by either administration of the ghrelin receptor-antagonist, D-Lys3 GHRP-6, or atenolol. Thus, the neuroprotective effect of H2 in PD is mediated by enhanced production of ghrelin. Our findings point to potential, novel strategies for ameliorating pathophysiology in which a protective effect of H2 supplementation has been demonstrated. PMID:24253616

  9. Localization and differential regulation of angiotensinogen mRNA expression in the vessel wall.

    PubMed Central

    Naftilan, A J; Zuo, W M; Inglefinger, J; Ryan, T J; Pratt, R E; Dzau, V J

    1991-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate the existence of a vascular renin angiotensin system. In this study we examine the localization of angiotensinogen mRNA in the blood vessel wall of two rat strains, the Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY), as well as the regulation of vascular angiotensinogen mRNA expression by dietary sodium. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry demonstrate that in both strains angiotensinogen mRNA is detected in the aortic medial smooth muscle layer as well as the periaortic fat. In WKY rats fed a 1.6% sodium diet, angiotensinogen mRNA concentration is 2.6-fold higher in the periaortic fat than in the smooth muscle, as analyzed by quantitative slot blot hybridization. Angiotensinogen mRNA expression in the medial smooth muscle layer is sodium regulated. After 5 d of a low (0.02%) sodium diet, smooth muscle angiotensinogen mRNA levels increase 3.2-fold (P less than 0.005) as compared with the 1.6% sodium diet. In contrast, angiotensinogen mRNA level in the periaortic fat is not influenced by sodium diet. In summary, our data demonstrate regional (smooth muscle vs. periaortic fat) differential regulation of angiotensinogen mRNA levels in the blood vessel wall by sodium. This regional differential regulation by sodium may have important physiological implications. Images PMID:2010543

  10. TGF beta 2 mRNA expression and pregnancy failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Gorivodsky, M; Torchinsky, A; Zemliak, I; Savion, S; Fein, A; Toder, V

    1999-08-01

    We describe here a pattern of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta2 mRNA expression at the fetomaternal interface in mice with high rate of resorptions as well as its expression following maternal immunopotentiation. TGF beta 2 mRNA expression was evaluated in the uteroplacental units of mice with spontaneous (CBA/J x DBA/2J mouse combination) or cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced pregnancy loss. The effect of immunopotentiation on TGF beta 2 mRNA expression was determined in CP-treated females who underwent nonspecific immunostimulation with xenogeneic (rat) leukocytes. A quantitative analysis of TGF beta 2 mRNA level was performed using RNase protection assay. Distribution of TGF beta 2 mRNA transcripts at the fetomaternal interface was studied by in situ hybridization analysis. RNase protection analysis revealed four TGF beta 2 specific mRNA forms (330, 270, 230, and 170 bp) in the uteroplacental units of mice with either normal or decreased reproductive performance. A significant decrease (about 50%) in the level of TGF beta 2 mRNA was registered in the uteroplacental unit of mice with pregnancy loss as compared to the control mice. TGF beta 2 transcripts were abundant in the uterine epithelium and stroma. A specific hybridization signal was detected also in metrial gland cells and it was found to be substantially lower in CP-treated as compared to intact mice. In the resorbing uteroplacental unit, the expression of TGF beta 2 mRNA was completely lost in the uterine epithelium, and the number of TGF beta 2 mRNA-positive metrial gland cells was lower as compared to the control. Immunopotentiation decreased the resorption rate in mice with CP-induced pregnancy loss and caused a dramatic increase in TGF beta 2 mRNA expression: the level of TGF beta 2 mRNA was found to be higher by 2.0-3.2 fold in the uteroplacental unit of immunized as compared to nonimmunized CP-treated mice. These data suggest that distortion of TGF beta 2 expression at the fetomaternal interface

  11. Hypothalamic κ-Opioid Receptor Modulates the Orexigenic Effect of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Picó, Amparo; Vázquez, Maria J; González-Touceda, David; Folgueira, Cintia; Skibicka, Karolina P; Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Van Gestel, Margriet A; Velásquez, Douglas A; Schwarzer, Christoph; Herzog, Herbert; López, Miguel; Adan, Roger A; Dickson, Suzanne L; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    The opioid system is well recognized as an important regulator of appetite and energy balance. We now hypothesized that the hypothalamic opioid system might modulate the orexigenic effect of ghrelin. Using pharmacological and gene silencing approaches, we demonstrate that ghrelin utilizes a hypothalamic κ-opioid receptor (KOR) pathway to increase food intake in rats. Pharmacological blockade of KOR decreases the acute orexigenic effect of ghrelin. Inhibition of KOR expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is sufficient to blunt ghrelin-induced food intake. By contrast, the specific inhibition of KOR expression in the ventral tegmental area does not affect central ghrelin-induced feeding. This new pathway is independent of ghrelin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation, but modulates the levels of the transcription factors and orexigenic neuropeptides triggered by ghrelin to finally stimulate feeding. Our novel data implicate hypothalamic KOR signaling in the orexigenic action of ghrelin. PMID:23348063

  12. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-03-01

    Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  13. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland. PMID:28484746

  14. Histone gene expression and histone mRNA 3' end structure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Keall, Rebecca; Whitelaw, Sandra; Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt

    2007-06-14

    Histone protein synthesis is essential for cell proliferation and required for the packaging of DNA into chromatin. In animals, histone proteins are provided by the expression of multicopy replication-dependent histone genes. Histone mRNAs that are processed by a histone-specific mechanism to end after a highly conserved RNA hairpin element, and lack a poly(A) tail. In vertebrates and Drosophila, their expression is dependent on HBP/SLBP that binds to the RNA hairpin element. We showed previously that these cis and trans acting regulators of histone gene expression are conserved in C. elegans. Here we report the results of an investigation of the histone mRNA 3' end structure and of histone gene expression during C. elegans development. Sequence analysis of replication-dependent histone genes revealed the presence of several highly conserved sequence elements in the 3' untranslated region of histone pre-mRNAs, including an RNA hairpin element and a polyadenylation signal. To determine whether in C. elegans histone mRNA 3' end formation occurs at this polyadenylation signal and results in polyadenylated histone mRNA, we investigated the mRNA 3' end structure of histone mRNA. Using poly(A) selection, RNAse protection and sequencing of histone mRNA ends, we determined that a majority of C. elegans histone mRNAs lack a poly(A) tail and end three to six nucleotides after the hairpin structure, after an A or a U, and have a 3' OH group. RNAi knock down of CDL-1, the C. elegans HBP/SLBP, does not significantly affect histone mRNA levels but severely depletes histone protein levels. Histone gene expression varies during development and is reduced in L3 animals compared to L1 animals and adults. In adults, histone gene expression is restricted to the germ line, where cell division occurs. Our findings indicate that the expression of C. elegans histone genes is subject to control mechanisms similar to the ones in other animals: the structure of C. elegans histone mRNA 3

  15. Neuronal deletion of ghrelin receptor almost completely prevents diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy- and glucose-homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues...

  16. Effect of taurine on mRNA expression of thioredoxin interacting protein in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Yusuke; Satsu, Hideo; Ishimoto, Yoko; Iwamoto, Taku; Shimizu, Makoto

    2012-09-28

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a sulfur-containing β-amino acid, plays an important role in several essential biological processes; although, the underlying mechanisms for these regulatory functions remain to be elucidated, especially at the genetic level. We investigated the effects of taurine on the gene expression profile in Caco-2 cells using DNA microarray. Taurine increased the mRNA expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), which is involved in various metabolisms and diseases. β-Alanine or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which are structurally or functionally related to taurine, did not increase TXNIP mRNA expression. These suggest the expression of TXNIP mRNA is induced specifically by taurine. β-Alanine is also known to be a substrate of taurine transporter (TAUT) and competitively inhibits taurine uptake. Inhibition of taurine uptake by β-alanine eliminated the up-regulation of TXNIP, which suggests TAUT is involved in inducing TXNIP mRNA expression. The up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA expression by taurine was also observed at the protein level. Furthermore, taurine significantly increased TXNIP promoter activity. Our present study demonstrated the taurine-specific phenomenon of TXNIP up-regulation, which sheds light on the physiological function of taurine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ghrelin, reward and motivation.

    PubMed

    Menzies, John R W; Skibicka, Karolina P; Leng, Gareth; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2013-01-01

    Almost all circulating gut peptides contribute to the control of food intake by signalling satiety. One important exception is ghrelin, the only orexigenic peptide hormone thus far described. Ghrelin secretion increases before meals and behavioural and electrophysiological evidence shows that ghrelin acts in the hypothalamus via homeostatic pathways to signal hunger and increase food intake and adiposity. These findings strongly suggest that ghrelin is a dynamically regulated peripheral hunger signal. However, ghrelin also interacts with the brain reward pathways to increase food intake, alter food preference and enhance food reward. Here we discuss ghrelin's role as an endocrine gut-brain reward signal in relation to homeostatic and hedonic feeding control. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Uremic anorexia and gastrointestinal motility dysfunction correlate with the changes of ghrelin system in hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong-Guo; Ge, Heng; Yao, Gang-Lian; Wang, Li; Ren, Shu-Ting; Ma, Li-Qun; Gui, Bao-Song; Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Dan; Xue, Rong-Liang

    2013-02-01

    Ghrelin can act as a signal for meal initiation and play a role in the regulation of gastrointestinal (GI) motility via hypothalamic circuit. This study investigated the correlation between changes of hypothalamic ghrelin system and GI motility dysfunction and anorexia in rats with chronic renal failure (CRF). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (male/female 1:1, 180 ± 20 g) were randomly classified into a CRF group and control group (n = 8 per group). 5/6 nephrectomy was used to construct the CRF model. When plasma creatinine concentration (PCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in the CRF group were twice higher than the normal, food intake (g/24 h) and gastrointestinal interdigestive myoelectric complex (IMC) were detected. Then all rats were killed for assessment of the mRNA expression of ghrelin and growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) in hypothalamus using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Analysis of variance, Student-Newman-Keuls-q-test and Correlation Analysis were used to do statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Compared to the control group, the CRF group was obviously decreased in the food intake (g/24 h), the phase III duration and amplitude and the ghrelin and GHS-R expression in the hypothalamus (P < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between them (P < 0.05). Changes of ghrelin and GHS-R in the hypothalamus correlate with gastrointestinal motility dysfunction and anorexia in rats with CRF. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  19. Sodium regulation of angiotensinogen mRNA expression in rat kidney cortex and medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, J R; Pratt, R E; Ellison, K; Dzau, V J

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver angiotensinogen cDNA (pRang 3) and mouse renin cDNA (pDD-1D2) were used to identify angiotensinogen and renin mRNA sequences in rat kidney cortex and medulla in rats on high and low salt diet. Angiotensinogen mRNA sequences were present in renal cortex and medulla in apparently equal proportions, whereas renin mRNA sequences were found primarily in renal cortex. Average relative signal of rat liver to whole kidney angiotensinogen mRNA was 100:3. Densitometric analysis of Northern blots demonstrated that renal cortical angiotensinogen mRNA concentrations increased 3.5-fold (P less than 0.001) and medulla, 1.5-fold (P less than 0.005) on low sodium compared with high sodium diet, whereas renal cortex renin mRNA levels increased 6.8-fold (P less than 0.0005). Dietary sodium did not significantly influence liver angiotensinogen mRNA levels. These findings provide evidence for sodium regulation of renal renin and angiotensinogen mRNA expressions, which supports potential existence of an intrarenally regulated RAS and suggest that different factors regulate renal and hepatic angiotensinogen. Images PMID:3533999

  20. [The expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA and its significance in acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiao-Li; Lin, Mao-Fang; Jin, Jie

    2003-02-01

    To investigate the expression of hTERT mRNA in bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs) from acute leukemia patients, the method of semi-quntitative RT-PCR was used to examine the expression of hTERT mRNA in marrow MNCs, and the telomerase activity of marrow MNCs was determined with the method of TRAP-PCR-ELISA by using a commercial kit. The results indicated that the expression of hTERT mRNA of marrow MNCs in 30 untreated AL patients was markedly higher than that in 12 CR cases (0.71 +/- 0.34 vs 0.43 +/- 0.25, P < 0.05) and 6 normal volunteers (0.71 +/- 0.34 vs 0.22 +/- 0.21, P < 0.01), respectively. Telomerase activity of marrow MNCs in 30 untreated AL patients was significantly higher than that in 12 CR cases (0.235 +/- 0.395 vs 0.012 +/- 0.015, P = 0.007). Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the hTERT mRNA synthesis and telomerase activity in AL cells (r = 0.421, P < 0.01). The pencentage of blast cells in marrow smear of the untreated AL patients was positively correlated with both the expression of hTERT mRNA and the telomerase activity of bone marrow MNCs (r = 0.457, P < 0.05 and r = 0.411, P < 0.05), respectively. It is concluded that the expression of hTERT mRNA in bone marrow MNCs from untreated AL patients was correlated with their telomerase activity. It is suggested that the expression of hTERT mRNA leukemic cells indicates their higher proliferation ability.

  1. Expression of a streptomycete leaderless mRNA encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C J; Janssen, G R

    1997-01-01

    The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene from Streptomyces acrimycini encodes a leaderless mRNA. Expression of the cat coding sequence as a leaderless mRNA from a modified lac promoter resulted in chloramphenicol resistance in Escherichia coli. Transcript mapping with nuclease S1 confirmed that the 5' end of the cat message initiated at the A of the AUG translational start codon. Site-directed mutagenesis of the lac promoter or the cat start codon abolished chloramphenicol resistance, indicating that E. coli initiated translation at the 5' terminal AUG of the cat leaderless mRNA. Addition of 5'-AUGC-3' to the 5' end of the cat mRNA resulted in translation occurring also from the reading frame defined by the added AUG triplet, suggesting that a 5'-terminal start codon is an important recognition feature for initiation and establishing reading frame during translation of leaderless mRNA. Addition of an untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno sequence to the cat coding sequence increased cat expression in a cat:lacZ fusion; however, the level of expression was significantly lower than when a fragment of the bacteriophage lambda cI gene, also encoding a leaderless mRNA, was fused to lacZ. These results indicate that in the absence of an untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, the streptomycete cat mRNA is translated by E. coli; however, the cat translation signals, or other features of the cat mRNA, provide for only a low level of expression in E. coli. PMID:9352935

  2. Neuropeptide Y mRNA expression levels following chronic olanzapine, clozapine and haloperidol administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, X-F; Deng, Chao; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2006-06-01

    Using quantitative in situ hybridization, this study examined regional changes in rat brain mRNA levels encoding neuropeptide Y (NPY) following olanzapine, clozapine and haloperidol administration (1.2, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, oral) for 36 days. The NPY mRNA expression levels and patterns were examined after the last drug administration at both time points enabling the measurement of immediate effect at 2h and the effects after 48 h of drug administration. It was found that all these drugs had an immediate effect on NPY mRNA expression, while virtually all these changes normalized 48 h after the drug treatments. A similarity in altered NPY mRNA expression patterns was seen between the olanzapine and clozapine groups; however, haloperidol was very different. Olanzapine and clozapine administration decreased NPY mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (from -60% to -77%, p<0.05). Haloperidol decreased NPY mRNA expression in the amygdala and hippocampus (-69%, -64%, p<0.05). In the lateral septal nucleus, NPY mRNA levels significantly decreased in the olanzapine group (-66%, p<0.05), a trend toward a decrease was observed in the clozapine group, and no change was found in the haloperidol treated group. These results suggest that the different effects of atypical and typical antipsychotics on NPY systems may reflect the neural chemical mechanisms responsible for the differences between these drugs in their effects in treating positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The immediate decrease of NPY mRNA levels suggests an immediate reduction of NPY biosynthesis in response to these drugs.

  3. Cell-type-specific signatures of microRNAs on target mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sood, Pranidhi; Krek, Azra; Zavolan, Mihaela; Macino, Giuseppe; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2006-02-21

    Although it is known that the human genome contains hundreds of microRNA (miRNA) genes and that each miRNA can regulate a large number of mRNA targets, the overall effect of miRNAs on mRNA tissue profiles has not been systematically elucidated. Here, we show that predicted human mRNA targets of several highly tissue-specific miRNAs are typically expressed in the same tissue as the miRNA but at significantly lower levels than in tissues where the miRNA is not present. Conversely, highly expressed genes are often enriched in mRNAs that do not have the recognition motifs for the miRNAs expressed in these tissues. Together, our data support the hypothesis that miRNA expression broadly contributes to tissue specificity of mRNA expression in many human tissues. Based on these insights, we apply a computational tool to directly correlate 3' UTR motifs with changes in mRNA levels upon miRNA overexpression or knockdown. We show that this tool can identify functionally important 3' UTR motifs without cross-species comparison.

  4. Eosinophil cationic protein mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, H Y; Li, X Y; Cai, Z F; Li, L; Shi, X Z; Song, H X; Liu, X J

    2015-11-13

    Studies have shown that eosinophils are closely related to pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Eosinophils release eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which plays an important role in infection and allergic reactions. Serum ECP mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma has not been adequately investigated. We analyzed serum ECP mRNA expression in 63 children with bronchial asthma and 21 healthy children by using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to understand the role of ECP in children with bronchial asthma. The children with bronchial asthma were segregated into acute-phase and stable-phase groups, based on the severity of the illness. Serum ECP mRNA expression in children with bronchial asthma (0.375 ± 0.04) was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). Additionally, children in the acute-phase group showed higher ECP mRNA expression level (0.44 ± 0.06) than those in the stable-phase (0.31 ± 0.03) and healthy control groups (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05), while the level in the stable-phase (0.31 ± 0.03) was markedly higher than that in the healthy control group (0.20 ± 0.02; P < 0.05). Detection of serum ECP mRNA expression level has possible applications in the diagnosis and treatment of children with bronchial asthma.

  5. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Kreamer, G.L.; Squibb, K.; Gioeli, D.; Garte, S.J.; Wirgin, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, they found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of {beta}-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  7. Chemokines mRNA expression in relation to the Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) mRNA and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) mRNA expression in the microenvironment of endometrial cancer tissue and normal endometrium: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Giannice, Raffaella; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Buscaglia, Mauro; Tozzi, Roberto

    2013-11-01

    Tumor microenvironment inflammatory cells play a major role in cancer progression. Among these, the Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs) infiltration depends on the kind of chemokine, cytokines and growth factors secreted by the tumor cells and by the stroma in response to the cancer invasion. TAMs have been found to promote anti-tumor response in early stages and to stimulate neovascularization and metastases in advanced disease. In the microenvironment chemo-attractants of many human cancers, MIF and VEGF correlate with an increased TAMs recruitment. In addition, MIF enhances tumor cells metastases by modulating the immune responses and by promoting the angiogenesis related to VEGF. On the contrary the inhibition of MIF can lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Some chemokines (e.g. CXCL12, CXCL11, CXCL8) and their receptors, thanks to their ability to modulate migration and proliferation, are involved in the angiogenetic process. In this study we compared the expression of MIF mRNA with VEGF mRNA expression and with mRNA expression of other chemokines related to neo-angiogenesis, such as CXCL12, CXCL11, CXCL8 and CXCR4, in human endometrial cancer tissue (EC) and normal endometrium (NE). Fresh samples of EC tissue and NE were extracted from 15 patients with FIGO stage I-III undergoing primary surgery. Some of the tissue was sent for histology and part of it was treated with RNA later and stored at -80°C. Four patients dropped out. A significant up-regulation of MIF mRNA in EC tissue versus NE samples (P=0.01) was observed in all 11 patients. The MIF mRNA over-expression was coincident with a VEGF mRNA overexpression in 54% of patients (P=NS). MIF mRNA was inversely related to CXCL12 mRNA expression (P=0.01). MIF over-expression was significantly related to low grading G1-2 (P=0.01), endometrial type I (P=0.05), no lymphovascular spaces invasion (P=0.01) and 3years DFS (P=0.01). As reported in previous studies on patients with breast cancer, our data suggest

  8. Myxovirus Resistance Protein A mRNA Expression Kinetics in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with IFNβ

    PubMed Central

    Libertinova, Jana; Meluzinova, Eva; Tomek, Ales; Horakova, Dana; Kovarova, Ivana; Matoska, Vaclav; Kumstyrova, Simona; Zajac, Miroslav; Hyncicova, Eva; Liskova, Petra; Houzvickova, Eva; Martinkovic, Lukas; Bojar, Martin; Havrdova, Eva; Marusic, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Interferon-β (IFNß) is the first-line treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) is a marker of IFNß bioactivity, which may be reduced by neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against IFNß. The aim of the study was to analyze the kinetics of MxA mRNA expression during long-term IFNβ treatment and assess its predictive value. Methods A prospective, observational, open-label, non-randomized study was designed in multiple sclerosis patients starting IFNß treatment. MxA mRNA was assessed prior to initiation of IFNß therapy and every three months subsequently. NAbs were assessed every six months. Assessment of relapses was scheduled every three months during 24 months of follow up. The disease activity was correlated to the pretreatment baseline MxA mRNA value. In NAb negative patients, clinical status was correlated to MxA mRNA values. Results 119 patients were consecutively enrolled and 107 were included in the final analysis. There was no correlation of MxA mRNA expression levels between baseline and month three. Using survival analysis, none of the selected baseline MxA mRNA cut off points allowed prediction of time to first relapse on the treatment. In NAb negative patients, mean MxA mRNA levels did not significantly differ in patients irrespective of relapse status. Conclusion Baseline MxA mRNA does not predict the response to IFNß treatment or the clinical status of the disease and the level of MxA mRNA does not correlate with disease activity in NAb negative patients. PMID:28081207

  9. Developmental expression of parvalbumin mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    de Lecea, L; del Río, J A; Soriano, E

    1995-08-01

    Parvalbumin (PARV) belongs to the family of calcium-binding proteins bearing the EF hand domain. Immunocytochemical studies in the cerebral cortex have demonstrated that neurons containing PARV include two types of GABAergic interneurons, namely, basket and axo-axonic chandelier cells. The present study examines the onset and pattern of PARV mRNA expression during the development of rat neocortex and hippocampus by means of 'in situ' hybridization with an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to rat PARV cDNA. In animals aged P0-P6 no signal was detected above background in neocortex or hippocampus. At P8, a few cortical cells displayed a number of silver grains just above background levels. By P10 PARV mRNA-expressing cells in the neocortex were detected almost exclusively in layer V of somatosensory, frontal and cingulate cortices. At P12 PARV mRNA was mainly detected in layers IV, V and VIa. By P14 there was a marked overall increase in the entire neocortex, including layer II-III, both in the number of cells and in their intensity of labelling. Further maturation in the pattern of PARV mRNA concentration was observed between P16 and P21. In the hippocampus low hybridization was observed at P10-P12. In subsequent stages both the number of positive cells and the intensity of labelling increased steadily. No clear-cut radial gradients for the expression of PARV mRNA were observed in the hippocampal region. Our results show that the developmental radial gradient followed by PARV mRNA expression in the neocortex does not follow an 'inside-out' gradient, consistent with previous immunocytochemical findings. Taken together, these data indicate that the developmental sequence followed by the PARV protein directly reflects mRNA abundance and suggest that PARV mRNA expression correlates with the functional maturation of cortical interneurons.

  10. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth ho...

  11. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  12. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  13. Unacylated Ghrelin Promotes Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Following Hindlimb Ischemia via SOD‐2–Mediated miR‐221/222 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Togliatto, Gabriele; Trombetta, Antonella; Dentelli, Patrizia; Cotogni, Paolo; Rosso, Arturo; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Granata, Riccarda; Ghigo, Ezio; Brizzi, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of peripheral artery disease, even if successful, does not prevent reoccurrence. Under these conditions, increased oxidative stress is a crucial determinant of tissue damage. Given its reported antioxidant effects, we investigated the potential of unacylated‐ghrelin (UnAG) to reduce ischemia‐induced tissue damage in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Methods and Results We show that UnAG but not acylated ghrelin (AG) induces skeletal muscle regeneration in response to ischemia via canonical p38/mitogen‐actived protein kinase signaling UnAG protected against reactive oxygen species–induced cell injuries by inducing the expression of superoxide dismutase‐2 (SOD‐2) in satellite cells. This led to a reduced number of infiltrating CD68+ cells and was followed by induction of the myogenic process and a reduction in functional impairment. Moreover, we found that miR‐221/222, previously linked to muscle regeneration processes, was up‐regulated and negatively correlated with p57Kip2 expression in UnAG‐treated mice. UnAG, unlike AG, promoted cell‐cycle entry in satellite cells of mice lacking the genes for ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1a). UnAG‐induced p38/mitogen‐actived protein kinase phosphorylation, leading to activation of the myogenic process, was prevented in SOD‐2–depleted SCs. By siRNA technology, we also demonstrated that SOD‐2 is the antioxidant enzyme involved in the control of miR‐221/222–driven posttranscriptional p57Kip2 regulation. Loss‐of‐function experiments targeting miR‐221/222 and local pre–miR‐221/222 injection in vivo confirmed a role for miR‐221/222 in driving skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemia. Conclusions These results indicate that UnAG‐induced skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemia depends on SOD‐2–induced miR‐221/222 expression and highlight its clinical potential for the treatment of reactive oxygen species–mediated skeletal muscle

  14. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  15. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  16. mRNA expression profiling of neonatal rats after 16-day spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Ijiri, K.

    Some studies pointed out that postnatal development is the key to realize generation change of mammalians in space. For example, functional changes and hypoplasia in some organs after spaceflight during postnatal development were reported. Though profiling mRNA expression is useful to evaluate what happened in animals, these studies after spaceflight are limited to specific organs for understanding the relationship between phenotype and gene. The organ-wide analysis of mRNA expression is important to evaluate the condition of each animal, and it can find new phenomenon and help precise understanding for effect induced by spaceflight. In this experiment, we analyzed mRNA expression of liver, spleen and intestine in neonatal rats after 16-day spaceflight by Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-90).

  17. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  18. Acute digoxin loading reduces ABCA8A mRNA expression in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Wakaumi, Michi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Ando, Hitoshi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Tsuruoka, Shuichi

    2005-12-01

    Human ABCA8, a new member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, transports certain lipophilic drugs, such as digoxin. To investigate the roles of this transporter, we cloned a mouse homologue of ABCA8, from a mouse heart cDNA library, named ABCA8a. The deduced mouse ABCA8a protein is 66% identical with that of human ABCA8 and possesses features common to the ABC superfamily. It was found that ABCA8a was mainly expressed in the liver and heart, similar to human ABCA8. We further evaluated the effect of acute digoxin (a substrate for ABCA8) intoxication on the mRNA expression of ABCA8 using northern blotting with a 3' non-coding region as a probe to avoid cross-hybridization with other ABCA genes. Following acute digoxin infusion, the mRNA expression of ABCA8 was significantly reduced in the liver 12-24 h after injection (14.7% of vehicle treatment), but not in the heart and kidney. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the reduction in ABCA8a mRNA. Similar reductions in ABCA5, ABCA7, ABCA8b and ABCA9 mRNA were also observed. A comparable amount of digitoxin did not affect ABCA8a mRNA expression in the liver. The results suggest that ABCA8 may play a role in digoxin metabolism in the liver.

  19. Clinical application of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin as a human natural hormone is involved in fundamental regulatory processes of eating and energy balance. Ghrelin signals the nutrient availability from the gastrointestinal tract to the central nervous system, up-regulates food intake and lowers energy expenditure mainly through hypothalamic mediators acting both centrally and peripherally including the gastrointestinal tract (motility, epithelium), promotes both neuro-endocrine and inflammatory signals to increase skeletal muscle growth and decrease protein breakdown, and increases lipolysis while body fat utilization is reduced. Ghrelin does more to exert its probably sentinel role around "human energy": it influences through mainly extra-hypothalamic actions the hedonic and incentive value of food, mood and anxiety, sleep-wake regulation, learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Recently numerous ghrelin gene-derived peptides were discovered, demonstrating the complexity within the ghrelin/ghrelin receptor axis. For clinical applications, not only the natural ghrelin and its slice variants, but also several modified or artificial molecules acting at ghrelin-associated receptors were and are developed. Current clinical applications are limited to clinical studies, focusing mainly on cachexia in chronic heart failure, COPD, cancer, endstage- renal-disease or cystic fibrosis, but also on frailty in elderly, gastrointestinal motility (e.g., gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, postoperative ileus), after curative gastrectomy, anorexia nervosa, growth hormone deficient patients, alcohol craving, sleep-wake regulation (e.g. major depression), or sympathetic nervous activity in obesity. The results of completed, preliminary studies support the clinical potential of ghrelin, ghrelin gene-derived peptides, and artificial analogues, suggesting that larger clinical trials are demanded to move ghrelin towards an available and reimbursed pharmaceutical intervention.

  20. MRNA expression of genes regulating lipid metabolism in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from differently polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Martina Galatea; Rusten, Marte; Goksøyr, Anders; Routti, Heli

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the ability of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to influence lipid metabolism. Although POPs are found at high concentrations in some populations of marine mammals, for example in the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) from the Baltic Sea, little is known about the effects of POPs on their lipid metabolism. An optimal regulation of lipid metabolism is crucial for ringed seals during the fasting/molting season. This is a physiologically stressful period, during which they rely on the energy stored in their fat reserves. The mRNA expression levels for seven genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed in liver and/or blubber tissue from molting ringed seals from the polluted Baltic Sea and a less polluted reference location, Svalbard (Norway). mRNA expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) α and γ and their target genes acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) were analyzed in liver. mRNA expression level of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ and their target genes encoding fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and adiponectin (ADIPOQ) were measured in inner and middle blubber layers. In addition, we evaluated the influence of molting status on hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARs and their target genes in ringed seals from Svalbard. Our results show higher mRNA expression of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ and adipose PPARβ, FABP4, and ADIPOQ in the Baltic seals compared to the Svalbard seals. A positive relationship between mRNA expressions of genes encoding hepatic PPARγ, adipose FABP4, adipose ADIPOQ and ΣPOP concentrations was observed. These findings suggest that lipid metabolism may be affected by contaminant exposure in the Baltic population. mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARβ, PPARγ, FABP4 and ADIPOQ were similar between the mid and inner adipose layer. Hepatic mRNA expression of genes encoding PPARα and PPARγ was higher in the pre

  1. Effects of Ginseng and Echinacea on Cytokine mRNA Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uluışık, Deniz; Keskin, Ercan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of ginseng and echinacea on the mRNA expression of IL-10, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 in healthy rats. Six-week-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 48) were used. The animals were divided into three equal groups, as follows: control (C); ginseng (G); echinacea (E). While the C group was fed a standard rat diet (Purina) ad libitum for a period of 40 days, the G and E groups animals received the same diet containing 0.5 g/kg of Panax ginseng root powder and 0.75 g/kg of Echinacea purpurea root powder, respectively. Blood samples were obtained from 8 rats in each group after 20 and 40 days of treatment, and the mRNA expression of IL-10, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 was determined. After 20 days of treatment, the expression of IL-10 mRNA in the G group was different from the C group (P < 0.05); however, after 40 days of treatment, there was no difference between the groups. There was no difference after 20 and 40 days of treatment between the groups with respect to the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA. After 20 days of treatment, the expression of TNF-α mRNA in the E group was higher (P < 0.05) than the C group. After 40 days of treatment, the expression of TNF-α mRNA was similar in all of the groups. Based on the current study, the increase in expression of IL-10 mRNA in the G group and the increase in expression of TNF-α mRNA in the E group support the use of these plants for purposes of modulating the immune system. However, a more detailed study regarding the effects of ginseng and echinacea on these cytokines and other cytokines is needed. PMID:22666172

  2. TLRs and NODs mRNA expression pattern in healthy mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, S; Cancino-Díaz, M E; Jiménez-Zamudio, L; García-Latorre, E; Cancino-Díaz, J C

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To look for TLR and NOD mRNA expression in the healthy eye and in other immune privileged and non-immune privileged mouse organs. Methods: Semiquantitative RT-PCR was performed to look for TLR1–9 and NOD1 and NOD2 mRNA expressions in the whole eye, in the anterior (AP) and posterior (PP) portions of the eye, in corneal fibroblasts (CF) and in ovary, brain, testis, heart, lung, and spleen. Results: All the TLR mRNAs were expressed in the whole eye of Balb/c mice. NIH and C57BL/6 did not express TLR9 and TLR8, respectively. NIH expressed higher levels of TLR1, 2, 3, and 6 than the other strains. C57BL/6 expressed the lowest levels of all TLRs. TLR9, 5, and 4 were the less expressed in all strains. All TLRs were expressed in Balb/c PP and TLR1 was not expressed in AP. In NIH and Balb/c CF the majority of TLRs were overexpressed with LPS. In testis, expression of most TLRs was absent. Non-immune privileged organs expressed most of the TLRs. All the organs expressed NOD1 and NOD2. In PP NOD2 was not expressed. Conclusion: TLRs and NODs are expressed in the eye, and could have an important role in the innate immunity. PMID:15965176

  3. Fibronectin 1 mRNA expression correlates with advanced disease in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibronectin 1 (FN1) is a glycoprotein involved in cellular adhesion and migration processes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of FN1 in development of renal cell cancer (RCC) and to determine a prognostic relevance for optimal clinical management. Methods 212 renal tissue samples (109 RCC, 86 corresponding tissues from adjacent normal renal tissue and 17 oncocytomas) were collected from patients undergoing surgery for renal tumors and subjected to total RNA extraction. Detection of FN1 mRNA expression was performed using quantitative real time PCR, three endogenous controls, renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) as biological control and the ΔΔCt method for calculation of relative quantities. Results Mean tissue specific FN1 mRNA expression was found to be increased approximately seven fold comparing RCC and corresponding kidney control tissues (p < 0.001; ANOVA). Furthermore, tissue specific mean FN1 expression was increased approx. 11 fold in clear cell compared to papillary RCC (p = 9×10-5; Wilcoxon rank sum test). Patients with advanced disease had higher FN1 expression when compared to organ-confined disease (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon rank sum test). Applying subgroup analysis we found a significantly higher FN1 mRNA expression between organ-confined and advanced disease in the papillary and not in the clear cell RCC group (p = 0.02 vs. p = 0.2; Wilcoxon rank sum test). There was an increased expression in RCC compared to oncocytoma (p = 0.016; ANOVA). Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that FN1 mRNA expression is higher in RCC compared to normal renal tissue. FN1 mRNA expression might serve as a marker for RCC aggressiveness, indicating early systemic progression particularly for patients with papillary RCC. PMID:20860816

  4. Fibronectin 1 mRNA expression correlates with advanced disease in renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, Sandra; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Kramer, Mario W; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Vetter, Gesa; Becker, Jan U; Stenzl, Arnulf; Merseburger, Axel S; Schrader, Andres J; Kuczyk, Markus A; Serth, Jürgen

    2010-09-22

    Fibronectin 1 (FN1) is a glycoprotein involved in cellular adhesion and migration processes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of FN1 in development of renal cell cancer (RCC) and to determine a prognostic relevance for optimal clinical management. 212 renal tissue samples (109 RCC, 86 corresponding tissues from adjacent normal renal tissue and 17 oncocytomas) were collected from patients undergoing surgery for renal tumors and subjected to total RNA extraction. Detection of FN1 mRNA expression was performed using quantitative real time PCR, three endogenous controls, renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) as biological control and the ΔΔCt method for calculation of relative quantities. Mean tissue specific FN1 mRNA expression was found to be increased approximately seven fold comparing RCC and corresponding kidney control tissues (p < 0.001; ANOVA). Furthermore, tissue specific mean FN1 expression was increased approx. 11 fold in clear cell compared to papillary RCC (p = 9×10-5; Wilcoxon rank sum test). Patients with advanced disease had higher FN1 expression when compared to organ-confined disease (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon rank sum test). Applying subgroup analysis we found a significantly higher FN1 mRNA expression between organ-confined and advanced disease in the papillary and not in the clear cell RCC group (p = 0.02 vs. p = 0.2; Wilcoxon rank sum test). There was an increased expression in RCC compared to oncocytoma (p = 0.016; ANOVA). To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that FN1 mRNA expression is higher in RCC compared to normal renal tissue. FN1 mRNA expression might serve as a marker for RCC aggressiveness, indicating early systemic progression particularly for patients with papillary RCC.

  5. mRNA Distribution and Heterologous Expression of Orphan Cytochrome P450 20A1

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Katarina; Wu, Zhong-Liu; Bartleson, Cheryl J.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 20A1 is one of the so-called “orphan” P450s without assigned biological function. mRNA expression was detected in human liver and extrahepatic expression was noted in several human brain regions, including substantia nigra, hippocampus, and amygdala, using conventional polymerase chain reaction and RNA dot blot analysis. Adult human liver contained 3-fold higher overall mRNA levels than whole brain, although specific regions (i.e., hippocampus and substantia nigra) exhibited higher mRNA expression levels than liver. Orthologous full-length and truncated transcripts of P450 20A1 were transcribed and sequenced from rat liver, heart, and brain. In rat, the concentrations of full-length transcripts were 3–4 fold higher in brain and heart than liver. In situ hybridization of rat whole brain sections showed a similar mRNA expression pattern as observed for human P450 20A1, indicating expression in substantia nigra, hippocampus, and amygdala. A number of N-terminal modifications of the codon-optimized human P450 20A1 sequence were prepared and expressed in Escherichia coli, and two of the truncated derivatives showed characteristic P450 spectra (200–280 nmol P450/l). Although the recombinant enzyme system oxidized NADPH, no catalytic activity was observed with the heterologously expressed protein when a number of potential steroids and biogenic amines were surveyed as potential substrates. The function of P450 20A1 remains unknown; however, the sites of mRNA expression in human brain and the conservation among species may suggest possible neurophysiological function. PMID:18541694

  6. Tissue-specific mRNA expression profiling in grape berry tissues

    PubMed Central

    Grimplet, Jerome; Deluc, Laurent G; Tillett, Richard L; Wheatley, Matthew D; Schlauch, Karen A; Cramer, Grant R; Cushman, John C

    2007-01-01

    Background Berries of grape (Vitis vinifera) contain three major tissue types (skin, pulp and seed) all of which contribute to the aroma, color, and flavor characters of wine. The pericarp, which is composed of the exocarp (skin) and mesocarp (pulp), not only functions to protect and feed the developing seed, but also to assist in the dispersal of the mature seed by avian and mammalian vectors. The skin provides volatile and nonvolatile aroma and color compounds, the pulp contributes organic acids and sugars, and the seeds provide condensed tannins, all of which are important to the formation of organoleptic characteristics of wine. In order to understand the transcriptional network responsible for controlling tissue-specific mRNA expression patterns, mRNA expression profiling was conducted on each tissue of mature berries of V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Vitis oligonucleotide microarray ver. 1.0. In order to monitor the influence of water-deficit stress on tissue-specific expression patterns, mRNA expression profiles were also compared from mature berries harvested from vines subjected to well-watered or water-deficit conditions. Results Overall, berry tissues were found to express approximately 76% of genes represented on the Vitis microarray. Approximately 60% of these genes exhibited significant differential expression in one or more of the three major tissue types with more than 28% of genes showing pronounced (2-fold or greater) differences in mRNA expression. The largest difference in tissue-specific expression was observed between the seed and pulp/skin. Exocarp tissue, which is involved in pathogen defense and pigment production, showed higher mRNA abundance relative to other berry tissues for genes involved with flavonoid biosynthesis, pathogen resistance, and cell wall modification. Mesocarp tissue, which is considered a nutritive tissue, exhibited a higher mRNA abundance of genes involved in cell wall function and

  7. Deregulated expression of VHL mRNA variants in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Enke; Tuccilli, Chiara; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Chesnel, Frank; Sorrenti, Salvatore; De Vito, Corrado; Catania, Antonio; D'Armiento, Eleonora; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Tartaglia, Francesco; Barollo, Susi; Mian, Caterina; Bononi, Marco; Arceri, Stefano; Mascagni, Domenico; Vergine, Massimo; Pironi, Daniele; Monti, Massimo; Filippini, Angelo; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2017-03-05

    Recent findings demonstrated that a subset of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) is characterized by reduced expression of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene, and that lowest levels associated with more aggressive PTCs. In the present study, the levels of the two VHL mRNA splicing variants, VHL-213 (V1) and VHL-172 (V2), were measured in a series of 96 PTC and corresponding normal matched tissues by means of quantitative RT-PCR. Variations in the mRNA levels were correlated with patients' clinicopathological parameters and disease-free interval (DFI). The analysis of VHL mRNA in tumor tissues, compared to normal matched tissues, revealed that its expression was either up- or down-regulated in the majority of PTC. In particular, V1 and V2 mRNA levels were altered, respectively, in 78 (81.3%) and 65 (67.7%) out of the 96 PTCs analyzed. A significant positive correlation between the two mRNA variants was observed (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis documented the lack of association between each variant and clinicopathological parameters such as age, tumor size, histology, TNM stage, lymph node metastases, and BRAF mutational status. However, a strong correlation was found between altered V1 or V2 mRNA levels and DFI. Multivariate regression analysis indicated higher V1 mRNA values, along with lymph node metastases at diagnosis, as independent prognostic factors predicting DFI. In conclusion, the data reported demonstrate that VHL gene expression is deregulated in the majority of PTC tissues. Of particular interest is the apparent protective role exerted by VHL transcripts against PTC recurrences.

  8. TDP-43 suppresses tau expression via promoting its mRNA instability.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianlan; Wu, Feng; Xu, Wen; Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Wen; Jin, Nana; Qian, Wei; Wang, Xinglong; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2017-06-02

    In the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, tau pathology is accompanied usually by intracellular aggregation of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). However, the role of TDP-43 in tau pathogenesis is not understood. Here, we investigated the role of TDP-43 in tau expression in vitro and in vivo. We found that TDP-43 suppressed tau expression by promoting its mRNA instability through the UG repeats of its 3΄-untranslated region (3΄-UTR). The C-terminal region of TDP-43 was required for this function. Neurodegenerative diseases-causing TDP-43 mutations affected tau mRNA instability differentially, in that some promoted and others did not significantly affect tau mRNA instability. The expression levels of tau and TDP-43 were inverse in the frontal cortex and the cerebellum. Accompanied with cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, tau expression was elevated in TDP-43M337V transgenic mouse brains. The level of TDP-43, which is decreased in AD brains, was found to correlate negatively with the tau level in human brain. Our findings indicate that TDP-43 suppresses tau expression by promoting the instability of its mRNA. Down-regulation of TDP-43 may be involved in the tau pathology in AD and related neurodegenerative disorders. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. TDP-43 suppresses tau expression via promoting its mRNA instability

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianlan; Wu, Feng; Xu, Wen; Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Wen; Jin, Nana; Qian, Wei; Wang, Xinglong; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, tau pathology is accompanied usually by intracellular aggregation of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). However, the role of TDP-43 in tau pathogenesis is not understood. Here, we investigated the role of TDP-43 in tau expression in vitro and in vivo. We found that TDP-43 suppressed tau expression by promoting its mRNA instability through the UG repeats of its 3΄-untranslated region (3΄-UTR). The C-terminal region of TDP-43 was required for this function. Neurodegenerative diseases-causing TDP-43 mutations affected tau mRNA instability differentially, in that some promoted and others did not significantly affect tau mRNA instability. The expression levels of tau and TDP-43 were inverse in the frontal cortex and the cerebellum. Accompanied with cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, tau expression was elevated in TDP-43M337V transgenic mouse brains. The level of TDP-43, which is decreased in AD brains, was found to correlate negatively with the tau level in human brain. Our findings indicate that TDP-43 suppresses tau expression by promoting the instability of its mRNA. Down-regulation of TDP-43 may be involved in the tau pathology in AD and related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28335005

  10. mRNA Expression of Ovine Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Gene in Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Jia, Xia-Li; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is involved in a variety of functions, including lipoprotein metabolism and angiogenesis. To reveal the role of ANGPTL4 in fat metabolism of sheep, ovine ANGPTL4 mRNA expression was analyzed in seven adipose tissues from two breeds with distinct tail types. Forty-eight animals with the gender ratio of 1:1 for both Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) sheep were slaughtered at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from greater and lesser omental, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, perirenal, mesenteric, and tail fats. Ontogenetic mRNA expression of ANGPTL4 in these adipose tissues from GTL and STH was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ANGPTL4 mRNA expressed in all adipose tissues studied with the highest in subcutaneous and the lowest in mesenteric fat depots. Months of age, tissue and breed are the main factors that significantly influence the mRNA expression. These results provide new insights into ovine ANGPTL4 gene expression and clues for its function mechanism.

  11. mRNA Expression of Ovine Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Gene in Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Jia, Xia-Li; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is involved in a variety of functions, including lipoprotein metabolism and angiogenesis. To reveal the role of ANGPTL4 in fat metabolism of sheep, ovine ANGPTL4 mRNA expression was analyzed in seven adipose tissues from two breeds with distinct tail types. Forty-eight animals with the gender ratio of 1:1 for both Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) sheep were slaughtered at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from greater and lesser omental, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, perirenal, mesenteric, and tail fats. Ontogenetic mRNA expression of ANGPTL4 in these adipose tissues from GTL and STH was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ANGPTL4 mRNA expressed in all adipose tissues studied with the highest in subcutaneous and the lowest in mesenteric fat depots. Months of age, tissue and breed are the main factors that significantly influence the mRNA expression. These results provide new insights into ovine ANGPTL4 gene expression and clues for its function mechanism. PMID:26954186

  12. Treatment with either obestatin or ghrelin attenuates mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion-induced oxidative injury of the ileum and the remote organ lung.

    PubMed

    Şen, Leyla Semiha; Karakoyun, Berna; Yeğen, Cumhur; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Yüksel, Meral; Ercan, Feriha; Özer, Ayşe; Yeğen, Berrak Ç

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of exogenous ghrelin or obestatin on intestinal injury and accompanying pulmonary injury, intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) was induced in rats by obstructing the superior mesenteric artery for 60min, whereas laparotomy was performed in the sham group. At the beginning of the 90-min reperfusion period, the rats were injected with obestatin (100μg/kg), ghrelin (10ng/kg), or saline intravenously (iv). At the end of reperfusion, the blood, ileum, and lung samples were taken for the histological and biochemical assays. In the saline-treated I/R group, the increased serum interleukin (IL)-1β level, high damage scores, and elevated tissue malondialdehyde level and collagen content in both tissues were significantly reduced by obestatin or ghrelin. Increased ileal myeloperoxidase activity of the saline-treated I/R group was reduced by treatment with obestatin or ghrelin, whereas increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity was reduced with administration of obestatin. Increased DNA fragmentation in the ileum of the saline-treated I/R group was reduced by both peptides. Elevated luminol-lucigenin chemiluminescence levels and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the ileum of the saline-treated-I/R group were significantly decreased by obestatin or ghrelin treatment. I/R-induced depletion of the antioxidant glutathione in both ileal and pulmonary tissues was prevented with either obestatin or ghrelin treatment. Administration of either obestatin or ghrelin exerts similar protective effects against I/R-induced ileal and pulmonary injury, thus warranting further investigation for their possible use against ischemic intestinal injury.

  13. Soya phytoestrogens change cortical and hippocampal expression of BDNF mRNA in male rats.

    PubMed

    File, Sandra E; Hartley, David E; Alom, Nazmul; Rattray, Marcus

    2003-02-27

    Adult male hooded Lister rats were either fed a diet containing 150 microg/g soya phytoestrogens or a soya-free diet for 18 days. This concentration of phytoestrogens should have been sufficient to occupy the oestrogen-beta, but not the oestrogen-alpha, receptors. Using in situ hybridisation, significant reductions were found in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the CA3 and CA4 region of the hippocampus and in the cerebral cortex in the rats fed the diet containing phytoestrogens, compared with those on the soya-free diet. No changes in glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 or glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA were found. This suggests a role for oestrogen-beta receptors in regulating BDNF mRNA expression.

  14. CYP1A mRNA expression in redeye mullets (Liza haematocheila) from Bohai Bay, China.

    PubMed

    An, Lihui; Hu, Jianying; Yang, Min; Zheng, Binghui; Wei, An; Shang, Jingjing; Zhao, Xingru

    2011-04-01

    Induction of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) has been used as a biomarker in fish for monitoring aromatic and organic contaminants. In this study, a partial of CYP1A gene in redeye mullet (Liza haematocheila) was isolated and sequenced, and then a real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for quantification of CYP1A mRNA normalized to β-actin. The developed method was applied to detect CYP1A mRNA expression in redeye mullets collected from Nandaihe (reference site) and Dashentang (impacted site) in Bohai Bay, China. CYP1A mRNA expression values were significantly elevated in redeye mullets from Dashentang compared to a reference site--Nandaihe, which was correlated with the contents of different environmentally relevant pollutants in tissues, particularly with PCBs and PBDEs.

  15. Altered lipid and salt taste responsivity in ghrelin and GOAT null mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M; Wang, Rui; Tschöp, Matthias H; Sévigny, Jean; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT), ghrelin knockout (ghrelin(-/-)), and GOAT knockout (GOAT(-/-)) mice. Ghrelin(-/-) mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT(-/-) mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin(-/-) mice, yet potentiated in GOAT(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities.

  16. ERCC1 mRNA expression as a postoperative prognostic marker in extrahepatic bile duct cancer.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Shuichiro; Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Higuchi, Ryota; Nakajima, Go; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2014-12-01

    No reliable biomarker for biliary tract cancer has yet been identified because of the varying composition of the cancer type, differences in tumor location, a mixture of curative and non-curative operations, and differences in operative methods. Fifty extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients, pathologically diagnosed with papillary or tubular adenocarcinoma who underwent a pancreatoduodenectomy with R0 resection, were included in the study. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels were measured from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The preliminary analysis selected ten patients who have survived more than 5 years (LS group) and ten who had a relapse within 2 years (SS group). mRNA expression of seven target genes was examined, but only excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1) mRNA levels showed a significant difference between the LS and SS groups (median ERCC1: LS 26.5 vs. SS 9.7; p = 0.0073). The median survival time of patients with high ERCC1 levels was significantly longer than in patients with low ERCC1 levels (p = 0.0105). Thirty more patients with identical backgrounds were added to the study, and ERCC1 mRNA levels were measured in all 50 patients. Those with high ERCC1 mRNA levels had a significantly greater overall survival (OS) time compared with those with low ERCC1 levels (MST: 174 vs. 86 M; p = 0.048). Multivariate analysis found that an absence of lymph node metastases and high ERCC1 expression were significantly associated with improved OS. ERCC1 mRNA expression appears to be a useful prognostic biomarker for extrahepatic bile duct cancer with R0 resection.

  17. Altered distribution of Ghrelin protein in mice molar development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Han, Xiuchun; Feng, Wei; Cui, Jian; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Xu, Xin; Li, Minqi

    2016-05-01

    Ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone, plays diverse regulatory functions in cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis during mammalian development. There is limited information currently available regarding Ghrelin expression during mammalian tooth development, thus we aimed to establish the spatiotemporal expression of Ghrelin during murine molar odontogenesis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression pattern of Ghrelin in mandible molar from E15.5 to PN7 during murine tooth development. The results showed that Ghrelin initially expressed in the inner enamel epithelium and the adjacent mesenchymal cells below, further with persistent expression in the ameloblasts and odontoblasts throughout the following developmental stages. In addition, Ghrelin was also present in Hertwig's epithelial root sheath at the beginning of tooth root formation. These results suggest that Ghrelin was present in tooth organs throughout the stages of tooth development, especially in ameloblasts and odontoblasts with little spatiotemporal expression differences. However, the potential regulatory roles of this hormone in tooth development still need to be validated by functional studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An integrated analysis of differential miRNA and mRNA expressions in human gallstones.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Bin; Bi, Pinduan; Wu, Tao; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Gallstone disease, including cholesterol precipitation in bile, increased bile salt hydrophobicity and gallbladder inflammation. Here, we investigated miRNA and mRNA involved in the formation of gallstones, and explored the molecular mechanisms in the development of gallstones. Differentially expressed 17 miRNAs and 525 mRNA were identified based on Illumina sequencing from gallbladder mucosa of patients with or without gallstones, and were validated by randomly selected 6 miRNAs and 8 genes using quantitative RT-PCR. 114 miRNA target genes were identified, whose functions and regulating pathways were related to gallstones. The differentially expressed genes were enriched upon lipoprotein binding and some metabolic pathways, and differentially expressed miRNAs enriched upon ABC transportation and cancer related pathways. A molecular regulatory network consisting of 17 differentially expressed miRNAs, inclusive of their target genes, was constructed. miR-210 and its potential target gene ATP11A were found to be differentially expressed in both miRNA and mRNA profiles. ATP11A was a direct target of miR-210, which was predicted to regulate the ABC-transporters pathway. The expression levels of ATP11A in the gallstone showed inverse correlation with miR-210 expression, and up-regulation of miR-210 could reduce ATP11A expression in HGBEC. This is the first report that indicates the existence of differences in miRNA and mRNA expression in patients with or without gallstones. Our data shed light on further investigating the mechanisms of gallstone formation.

  19. The influence of eccentric exercise on mRNA expression of skeletal muscle regulators.

    PubMed

    Jensky, Nicole E; Sims, Jennifer K; Rice, Judd C; Dreyer, Hans C; Schroeder, E Todd

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate change in myostatin, follistatin, MyoD and SGT mRNA gene expression using eccentric exercise to study mechanisms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Young (28+/-5 years) and older (68+/-6 years) men participated in a bout of maximal single-leg eccentric knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60 degrees /s: six sets, 12-16 maximal eccentric repetitions. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained from the dominant leg before exercise and 24 h after exercise. Paired t tests were used to compare change (pre versus post-exercise) for normalized gene expression in all variables. Independent t tests were performed to test group differences (young vs. older). A probability level of PmRNA expression in young subjects 24 h after eccentric exercise. Similarly, we did not observe significant change in myostatin (-3.83+/-8.8; P=0.23), follistatin (-2.66+/-5.2; P=0.17), MyoD (-0.13+/-3.1; P=0.90), or SGT (-1.6+/-3.5; P=0.19) mRNA expression in older subjects. Furthermore, the non-significant changes in mRNA expression were not different between young and older subjects, P>0.23 for all variables. Our data suggests that a single bout of maximal eccentric exercise does not alter myostatin, follistatin, MyoD or SGT mRNA gene expression in young or older subjects.

  20. Differences in expression of retinal pigment epithelium mRNA between normal canines

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A reference database of differences in mRNA expression in normal healthy canine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been established. This database identifies non-informative differences in mRNA expression that can be used in screening canine RPE for mutations associated with clinical effects on vision. Complementary DNA (cDNA) pools were prepared from mRNA harvested from RPE, amplified by PCR, and used in a subtractive hybridization protocol (representational differential analysis) to identify differences in RPE mRNA expression between canines. The effect of relatedness of the test canines on the frequency of occurrence of differences was evaluated by using 2 unrelated canines for comparison with 2 female sibling canines of blue heeler/bull terrier lineage. Differentially expressed cDNA species were cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison to public database entries. The most frequently observed differentially expressed sequence from the unrelated canine comparison was cDNA with 21 base pairs (bp) identical to the human epithelial membrane protein 1 gene (present in 8 of 20 clones). Different clones from the same-sex sibling RPE contained repetitions of several short sequence motifs including the human epithelial membrane protein 1 (4 of 25 clones). Other prevalent differences between sibling RPE included sequences similar to a chicken genetic marker sequence motif (5 of 25), and 6 clones with homology to porcine major histocompatibility loci. In addition to identifying several repetitively occurring, noninformative, differentially expressed RPE mRNA species, the findings confirm that fewer differences occurred between siblings, highlighting the importance of using closely related subjects in representational difference analysis studies. PMID:15352545

  1. Reduction in circulating ghrelin concentration after maturation does not affect food intake.

    PubMed

    Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Go; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Sigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa; Akamizu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin has a potent orexigenic effect and induces adiposity when administered exogenously. Since plasma ghrelin levels rise before meals, ghrelin was thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of appetite. In contrast, mice deficient in the production of ghrelin or the corresponding receptor, GHS-R, do not eat less, throwing the role of ghrelin in the regulation of energy homeostasis into question. Since these mice lack ghrelin or GHS-R from the time of conception, the possibility that compensatory mechanisms may have arisen during development cannot be ruled out. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse model that expresses human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor cDNA under the control of the ghrelin promoter (GPDTR-Tg mice). As previously reported, an injection of DT into this mouse model ablates ghrelin-secreting cells in the stomach but not in the hypothalamus, resulting in a reduction in circulating ghrelin levels. We used this model system to evaluate the physiological roles of circulating ghrelin in the regulation of food intake. Meal patterns, diurnal and nocturnal meal sizes, and cumulative food intake of DT-treated GPDTR-Tg mice were not affected, although circulating ghrelin levels markedly decreased even after fasting. These mice also displayed normal responses to starvation; however, the use of fat increased and slower weight gain when maintained on a high fat diet was observed. Together, these data suggest that circulating ghrelin does not play a crucial role in feeding behavior, but rather is involved in maintaining body weight.

  2. Postprandial Total Ghrelin Suppression Is Modulated by Melanocortin Signaling in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van der Klaauw, Agatha A.; Keogh, Julia M.; Henning, Elana; Blackwood, Anthea; Haqq, Andrea M.; Purnell, Jonathan Q.

    2013-01-01

    Contents: Ghrelin is implicated in meal initiation because circulating levels increase before and fall after meal consumption. In rodents, ghrelin stimulates food intake via hypothalamic circuits expressing the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R). Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of central melanocortinergic tone on ghrelin secretion in humans. Design/Setting/Patients/Main Outcome Measure: We measured plasma total ghrelin before and after 3 standardized meals in patients with MC4R mutations and obese and lean controls. Fasting total ghrelin, area under the curve, and early (30-min) and intermeal postprandial total ghrelin suppression (the percentage difference between the premeal and the 30-min postprandial or intermeal nadir total ghrelin concentration) were calculated. Results: Fasting total ghrelin concentrations and area under the curve for total ghrelin concentrations were significantly decreased in both obese groups compared to lean controls (fasting total ghrelin: lean controls, 1083 ± 203 pg/ml; and obese controls, 696 ± 81 pg/ml; MC4R: 609 ± 99 pg/ml, P < .05). Early and intermeal postprandial total ghrelin suppression was attenuated in MC4R-deficient patients compared to lean controls (P < .05); a similar pattern was observed for early postprandial suppression in comparison with obese controls, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = .09). Conclusions: These findings are consistent with a role for central melanocortinergic signaling in modulating meal-related total ghrelin suppression. PMID:23316086

  3. Selecting Reliable mRNA Expression Measurements Across Platforms Improves Downstream Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Shen, Li; Li, Lerong; Heymach, John Victor; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Coombes, Kevin R; Byers, Lauren Averett; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    With increasing use of publicly available gene expression data sets, the quality of the expression data is a critical issue for downstream analysis, gene signature development, and cross-validation of data sets. Thus, identifying reliable expression measurements by leveraging multiple mRNA expression platforms is an important analytical task. In this study, we propose a statistical framework for selecting reliable measurements between platforms by modeling the correlations of mRNA expression levels using a beta-mixture model. The model-based selection provides an effective and objective way to separate good probes from probes with low quality, thereby improving the efficiency and accuracy of the analysis. The proposed method can be used to compare two microarray technologies or microarray and RNA sequencing measurements. We tested the approach in two matched profiling data sets, using microarray gene expression measurements from the same samples profiled on both Affymetrix and Illumina platforms. We also applied the algorithm to mRNA expression data to compare Affymetrix microarray data with RNA sequencing measurements. The algorithm successfully identified probes/genes with reliable measurements. Removing the unreliable measurements resulted in significant improvements for gene signature development and functional annotations.

  4. Selecting Reliable mRNA Expression Measurements Across Platforms Improves Downstream Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Shen, Li; Li, Lerong; Heymach, John Victor; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Byers, Lauren Averett; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    With increasing use of publicly available gene expression data sets, the quality of the expression data is a critical issue for downstream analysis, gene signature development, and cross-validation of data sets. Thus, identifying reliable expression measurements by leveraging multiple mRNA expression platforms is an important analytical task. In this study, we propose a statistical framework for selecting reliable measurements between platforms by modeling the correlations of mRNA expression levels using a beta-mixture model. The model-based selection provides an effective and objective way to separate good probes from probes with low quality, thereby improving the efficiency and accuracy of the analysis. The proposed method can be used to compare two microarray technologies or microarray and RNA sequencing measurements. We tested the approach in two matched profiling data sets, using microarray gene expression measurements from the same samples profiled on both Affymetrix and Illumina platforms. We also applied the algorithm to mRNA expression data to compare Affymetrix microarray data with RNA sequencing measurements. The algorithm successfully identified probes/genes with reliable measurements. Removing the unreliable measurements resulted in significant improvements for gene signature development and functional annotations. PMID:27199546

  5. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.

    Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    Endom...

  6. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.

    Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    Endom...

  7. Use of mRNA expression signatures to discover small molecule inhibitors of skeletal muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Christopher M.; Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Here, we discuss a recently developed experimental strategy for discovering small molecules with potential to prevent and treat skeletal muscle atrophy. Recent findings Muscle atrophy involves and requires widespread changes in skeletal muscle gene expression, which generate complex but measurable patterns of positive and negative changes in skeletal muscle mRNA levels (a.k.a. mRNA expression signatures of muscle atrophy). Many bioactive small molecules generate their own characteristic mRNA expression signatures, and by identifying small molecules whose signatures approximate mirror images of muscle atrophy signatures, one may identify small molecules with potential to prevent and/or reverse muscle atrophy. Unlike a conventional drug discovery approach, this strategy does not rely on a predefined molecular target but rather exploits the complexity of muscle atrophy to identify small molecules that counter the entire spectrum of pathological changes in atrophic muscle. We discuss how this strategy has been used to identify two natural compounds, ursolic acid and tomatidine, that reduce muscle atrophy and improve skeletal muscle function. Summary Discovery strategies based on mRNA expression signatures can elucidate new approaches for preserving and restoring muscle mass and function. PMID:25807353

  8. Increased plasma ghrelin suppresses insulin release in wethers fed with a high-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Sato, K; Kato, S; Yonezawa, T; Kobayashi, Y; Ohtani, Y; Ohwada, S; Aso, H; Yamaguchi, T; Roh, S G; Katoh, K

    2014-06-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide that promotes an increase of food intake and stimulates GH secretion. Ghrelin secretion is regulated by nutritional status and nutrients. Although a high-protein (HP) diet increases plasma ghrelin secretion in mammals, the mechanisms and the roles of the elevated ghrelin concentrations due to a HP diet have not been fully established. To clarify the roles of elevated acylated ghrelin upon intake of a HP diet, we investigated the regulation of ghrelin concentrations in plasma and tissues in wethers fed with either the HP diet or the control (CNT) diet for 14 days, and examined the action of the elevated plasma ghrelin by using a ghrelin-receptor antagonist. The HP diet gradually increased the plasma acylated-ghrelin concentrations, but the CNT diet did not. Although the GH concentrations did not vary significantly across the groups, an injection of ghrelin-receptor antagonist enhanced insulin levels in circulation in the HP diet group. In the fundus region of the stomach, the ghrelin levels did not differ between the HP and CNT diet groups, whereas ghrelin O-acyltransferase mRNA levels were higher in the group fed with HP diet than those of the CNT diet group were. These results indicate that the HP diet elevated the plasma ghrelin levels by increasing its synthesis; this elevation strongly suppresses the appearance of insulin in the circulation of wethers, but it is not involved in GH secretion. Overall, our findings indicate a role of endogenous ghrelin action in secretion of insulin, which acts as a regulator after the consumption of a HP diet. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. Cistanches Herba aqueous extract affecting serum BGP and TRAP and bone marrow Smad1 mRNA, Smad5 mRNA, TGF-β1 mRNA and TIEG1 mRNA expression levels in osteoporosis disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Dong; Yu, Fang; Tong, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Quan; Liang, Wu

    2013-02-01

    We studied molecular mechanism of Cistanches Herba aqueous extract (CHAE) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats, as an experimental model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Female rats were either sham-operated or bilaterally OVX; and at 60 days postoperatively. The OVX group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy and treatment with normal saline for 90 days commencing from 20th post ovariectomy day. The ovariectomized +CHAE (OVX + CHAE) group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy and were treated with Cistanches Herba aqueous extract of 100 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days commencing from 22nd post ovariectomy day. The ovariectomy +CHAE (OVX + CHAE) group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy, and were treated with the of 200 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days commencing from 20th post ovariectomy day. Serum BGP and TRAP, E2, FSH and LH level, bone marrow Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA expression levels were examined. Results showed that serum BGP and TRAP, FSH and LH levels were significantly increased, whereas E2, Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA and proteins expression levels were significantly decreased in OVX rats compared to sham rats. 90 days of CHAE treatment could significantly decrease serum BGP and TRAP, FSH and LH levels, and increase E2, Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA and proteins expression levels in OVX rats. It can be concluded that CHAE play its protective effect against OVX-induced bone degeneration partly by regulating some bone metabolism related genes, e.g. Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1.

  10. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA levels are decreased in islets of Langerhans from glucokinase deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA up-regulation by glucose is dependent on glucokinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of UCP2 increases GSIS of glucokinase heterozygous pancreatic islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may protect glucokinase deficient mice from hyperglycemic damages. -- Abstract: Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic {beta}-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism for UCP2 up-regulation in response to increased glucose is unknown. The aim was to examine the effects of glucokinase (GK) deficiency on UCP2 mRNA levels and to characterize the interaction between UCP2 and GK with regard to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. UCP2 mRNA expression was reduced in GK+/- islets and GK heterozygosity prevented glucose-induced up-regulation of islet UCP2 mRNA. In contrast to UCP2 protein function UCP2 mRNA regulation was not dependent on superoxide generation, but rather on products of glucose metabolism, because MnTBAP, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, did not prevent the glucose-induced up-regulation of UCP2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was increased in UCP2-/- and GK+/- islets compared with GK+/- islets and UCP2 deficiency improved glucose tolerance of GK+/- mice. Accordingly, UCP2 deficiency increased ATP-levels of GK+/- mice. Thus, the compensatory down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients.

  11. Expression and regulation of Icer mRNA in the Syrian hamster pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Elena; Garidou, Marie-Laure; Dardente, Hugues; Salingre, Anthony; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2003-04-10

    Inducible-cAMP early repressor (ICER) is a potent inhibitor of CRE (cAMP-related element)-driven gene transcription. In the rat pineal gland, it has been proposed to be part of the mechanisms involved in the shutting down of the transcription of the gene coding for arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT, the melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme). In this study, we report that ICER is expressed in the pineal gland of the photoperiodic rodent Syrian hamster although with some difference compared to the rat. In the Syrian hamster pineal, Icer mRNA levels, low at daytime, displayed a 20-fold increase during the night. Nighttime administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol, significantly reduced Icer mRNA levels although daytime administration of a beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, was unable to raise the low amount of Icer mRNA. These observations indicate that Icer mRNA expression is induced by the clock-driven norepinephrine release and further suggest that this stimulation is restricted to nighttime, as already observed for Aa-nat gene transcription. Furthermore, we found that the daily profile of Icer mRNA displayed photoperiodic variation with a lengthening of the nocturnal peak in short versus long photoperiod. These data indicate that ICER may be involved in both daily and seasonal regulation of melatonin synthesis in the Syrian hamster.

  12. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  13. Ghrelin-induced adiposity is independent of orexigenic effects

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Tilve, Diego; Heppner, Kristy; Kirchner, Henriette; Lockie, Sarah H.; Woods, Stephen C.; Smiley, David L.; Tschöp, Matthias; Pfluger, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone produced predominantly by the stomach that targets a number of specific areas in the central nervous system to promote a positive energy balance by increasing food intake and energy storage. In that respect, similarities exist with the effects of consuming a high-fat diet (HFD), which also increases caloric intake and the amount of stored calories. We determined whether the effects of ghrelin on feeding and adiposity are influenced by the exposure to an HFD. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin (2.5 nmol/d) increased feeding in lean rats fed a low-fat control diet (CD) [192±5 g (ghrelin+CD) vs. 152±5 g (control i.c.v. saline+CD), P<0.001], but the combination of ghrelin plus HFD did not result in significantly greater hyperphagia [150±7 g (ghrelin+HFD) vs. 136±4 g (saline+HFD)]. Despite failing to increase food intake in rats fed the HFD, ghrelin nonetheless increased adiposity [fat mass increase of 14±2 g (ghrelin+HFD) vs. 1±1 g (saline+HFD), P<0.001] up-regulating the gene expression of lipogenic enzymes in white adipose tissue. Our findings demonstrate that factors associated with high-fat feeding functionally interact with pathways regulating the effect of ghrelin on food intake. We conclude that ghrelin's central effects on nutrient intake and nutrient partitioning can be separated and suggest an opportunity to identify respective independent neuronal pathways.—Perez-Tilve, D., Heppner, K., Kirchner, H., Lockie, S. H., Woods, S. C., Smiley, D. L., Tschöp, M., and Pfluger, P. Ghrelin-induced adiposity is independent of orexigenic effects. PMID:21543764

  14. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ligen; Sun, Yuxiang

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Old GHS-R null mice exhibit a healthy phenotype-lean and insulin sensitive. Interestingly, the GHS-R null mice have increased energy expenditure, yet exhibit no difference in food intake or locomotor activity compared to wild-type mice. We have found that GHS-R is expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of old mice. Ablation of GHS-R attenuates age-associated decline in thermogenesis, exhibiting a higher core body temperature. Indeed, the BAT of old GHS-R null mice reveals enhanced thermogenic capacity, which is consistent with the gene expression profile of increases in glucose/lipid uptake, lipogenesis, and lipolysis in BAT. The data collectively suggest that ghrelin/GHS-R signaling has important roles in thermogenesis. The recent discovery that BAT also regulates energy homeostasis in adult humans makes the BAT a new antiobesity target. Understanding the roles and molecular mechanisms of ghrelin/GHS-R in thermogenesis is of great significance. GHS-R antagonists might be a novel means of combating obesity by shifting adiposity balance from obesogenesis to thermogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BAY11 enhances OCT4 synthetic mRNA expression in adult human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Awe, Jason P; Crespo, Agustin Vega; Li, You; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Byrne, James A

    2013-02-06

    The OCT4 transcription factor is involved in many cellular processes, including development, reprogramming, maintaining pluripotency and differentiation. Synthetic OCT4 mRNA was recently used (in conjunction with other reprogramming factors) to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discovered that BAY 11-7082 (BAY11), at least partially through an NF-κB-inhibition based mechanism, could significantly increase the expression of OCT4 following transfection of synthetic mRNA (synRNA) into adult human skin cells. We tested various chemical and molecular small molecules on their ability to suppress the innate immune response seen upon synthetic mRNA transfection. Three molecules - B18R, BX795, and BAY11 - were used in immunocytochemical and proliferation-based assays. We also utilized global transcriptional meta-analysis coupled with quantitative PCR to identify relative gene expression downstream of OCT4. We found that human skin cells cultured in the presence of BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of OCT4 that did not inhibit normal cell proliferation. The increased levels of OCT4 resulted in significantly increased expression of genes downstream of OCT4, including the previously identified SPP1, DUSP4 and GADD45G, suggesting the expressed OCT4 was functional. We also discovered a novel OCT4 putative downstream target gene SLC16A9 which demonstrated significantly increased expression following elevation of OCT4 levels. For the first time we have shown that small molecule-based stabilization of synthetic mRNA expression can be achieved with use of BAY11. This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics.

  16. mRNA Blood Expression Patterns In New Onset Idiopathic Pediatric Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Hansel M; Horn, Paul S; Holland, Katherine; Collins, James; Hershey, Andrew D; Glauser, Tracy A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Determine if blood mRNA expression patterns in children with newly diagnosed untreated idiopathic epilepsy are different than those in healthy controls. Determine the differential expression patterns between epilepsy subjects with generalized onset or partial onset seizures compared to healthy controls. Methods Whole blood was obtained from otherwise healthy pediatric subjects with newly diagnosed untreated idiopathic epilepsy along with healthy pediatric controls. mRNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix HGU 133 2.0+ microarrays. Analysis was performed using Genespring. Differentially expressed gene lists resulted from comparison of i) epilepsy and control groups and ii) seizure type subgroups with controls.. Tissue expression and gene ontology analysis was performed using DAVID. Key findings Thirty-seven epilepsy patients and 28 controls were included. Overall, 575 genes were differentially expressed in subjects with epilepsy compared to controls. The generalized seizure subgroup versus control (GvC) gene list and the partial seizure subgroup versus control (PvC) gene list were different (p < 0.05). Tissue expression analysis identified almost half of the genes in GvC and PvC as brain based. Functional group analysis identified several biologically relevant pathways. In GvC, these included mitochondria and lymphocyte activation. In PvC, apoptosis, inflammatory defense and cell motion pathways were identified. Significance A unique, biologically meaningful mRNA expression pattern is detectable in whole blood of pediatric subjects with new onset and untreated epilepsy. This analysis finds many similar pathways to those identified in brain studies examining lesional intractable epilepsy. Blood mRNA expression patterns show promise as a target for biomarker development in pediatric epilepsy. PMID:23167847

  17. BAY11 enhances OCT4 synthetic mRNA expression in adult human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The OCT4 transcription factor is involved in many cellular processes, including development, reprogramming, maintaining pluripotency and differentiation. Synthetic OCT4 mRNA was recently used (in conjunction with other reprogramming factors) to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discovered that BAY 11-7082 (BAY11), at least partially through an NF-κB-inhibition based mechanism, could significantly increase the expression of OCT4 following transfection of synthetic mRNA (synRNA) into adult human skin cells. Methods We tested various chemical and molecular small molecules on their ability to suppress the innate immune response seen upon synthetic mRNA transfection. Three molecules - B18R, BX795, and BAY11 - were used in immunocytochemical and proliferation-based assays. We also utilized global transcriptional meta-analysis coupled with quantitative PCR to identify relative gene expression downstream of OCT4. Results We found that human skin cells cultured in the presence of BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of OCT4 that did not inhibit normal cell proliferation. The increased levels of OCT4 resulted in significantly increased expression of genes downstream of OCT4, including the previously identified SPP1, DUSP4 and GADD45G, suggesting the expressed OCT4 was functional. We also discovered a novel OCT4 putative downstream target gene SLC16A9 which demonstrated significantly increased expression following elevation of OCT4 levels. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that small molecule-based stabilization of synthetic mRNA expression can be achieved with use of BAY11. This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. PMID:23388106

  18. A circulating ghrelin mimetic attenuates light-induced phase delay of mice and light-induced Fos expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Kalsbeek, Andries; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2008-04-01

    Anatomical evidence suggests that the ventromedial arcuate nucleus (vmARC) is a route for circulating hormonal communications to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Whether this vmARC-SCN connection is involved in the modulation of circadian activity of the SCN is not yet known. We recently demonstrated, in rats, that intravenous (i.v.) injection of a ghrelin mimetic, GHRP-6, during the daytime activated neurons in the vmARC and reduced the normal endogenous daytime Fos expression in the SCN. In the present study we show that i.v. administration of GHRP-6 decreases light-induced Fos expression at ZT13 in the rat SCN by 50%, indicating that light-induced changes in the SCN Fos expression can also be reduced by GHRP-6. Because it is difficult to study light-induced phase changes in rats, we examined the functional effects of GHRP-6 on light-induced phase shifts in mice and demonstrated that peripherally injected GHRP-6 attenuates light-induced phase delays at ZT13 by 45%. However, light-induced Fos expression in the mice SCN was not blocked by GHRP-6. These results illustrate that acute stimulation of the ghrelinergic system may modulate SCN activity, but that its effect on light-induced phase shifts and Fos expression in the SCN might be species related.

  19. Expression of statherin mRNA and protein in nasal and vaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Koichi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Watanabe, Ken; Fujinami, Yoshihito; Yoshino, Mineo

    2011-11-01

    Nasal secretion has been regarded as one of the most difficult body fluids to identify and is especially difficult to discriminate from vaginal secretions and saliva. At present, few specific markers are known for nasal secretions. The aim of this study is to find a new approach for the identification of nasal secretions. We examined expression levels of statherin and histatin, peptides which are commonly found in saliva, in nasal and vaginal secretions by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Statherin mRNA was highly expressed in all nasal samples (dCt value=-1.49±1.10, n=8) and was detected even in 1-day-old 0.1-μL stains. However, the stability of mRNA in nasal stains was significantly (P<0.01) lower than in saliva. Low levels of statherin mRNA were detected in 4 of the 17 vaginal samples (dCt value=11.65-14.72). Histatin mRNA was not detected in any nasal or vaginal samples, although it was highly expressed in all saliva samples. ELISA assays with anti-statherin goat polyclonal antibody showed that statherin peptide was detected in all nasal and saliva samples even after dilution of more than 1000-fold. The statherin peptide was not detected in any vaginal samples, including samples that expressed low levels of statherin mRNA. The amount of statherin peptide in vaginal samples might be less than the limit of detection of this assay. In the present study, statherin was highly expressed in nasal secretions, but histatin was not. These markers may be useful for discriminating nasal secretions from vaginal secretions and saliva. However, the usefulness of these markers in practical forensic case samples has not yet been examined. Therefore, further research is required to establish the utility of these assays for identification of nasal secretions.

  20. Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Increased Ghrelin Receptor Signaling in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten; Ratner, Cecilia; Rudenko, Olga; Christiansen, Søren H.; Skov, Louise J.; Hundahl, Cecilie; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Besides the well-known effects of ghrelin on adiposity and food intake regulation, the ghrelin system has been shown to regulate aspects of behavior including anxiety and stress. However, the effect of virus-mediated overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala has not previously been addressed directly. Methods: First, we examined the acute effect of peripheral ghrelin administration on anxiety- and depression-like behavior using the open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim, and tail suspension tests. Next, we examined the effect of peripheral ghrelin administration and ghrelin receptor deficiency on stress in a familiar and social environment using the Intellicage system. Importantly, we also used a novel approach to study ghrelin receptor signaling in the brain by overexpressing the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala. We examined the effect of ghrelin receptor overexpression on anxiety-related behavior before and after acute stress and measured the modulation of serotonin receptor expression. Results: We found that ghrelin caused an anxiolytic-like effect in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Additionally, it attenuated air-puff–induced stress in the social environment, while the opposite was shown in ghrelin receptor deficient mice. Finally, we found that overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the basolateral division of the amygdala caused an anxiolytic-like effect and decreased the 5HT1a receptor expression. Conclusions: Ghrelin administration and overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala induces anxiolytic-like behavior. Since the ghrelin receptor has high constitutive activity, ligand-independent signaling in vivo may be important for the observed anxiolytic-like effects. The anxiolytic effects seem to be mediated independently from the HPA axis, potentially engaging the central serotonin system. PMID:26578081

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. CD44 in canine leukemia: analysis of mRNA and protein expression in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Gelain, M E; Martini, V; Giantin, M; Aricò, A; Poggi, A; Aresu, L; Riondato, F; Dacasto, M; Comazzi, S

    2014-05-15

    Hyaluronan receptor CD44 mediates interaction between cells and extracellular matrix. The expression of standard form and its variants is dysregulated in human leukemias and is associated with metastasis and prognosis. The aim of this work is the evaluation of CD44 mRNA and protein expression in canine leukemia. Peripheral blood from 20 acute leukemias (AL) (10 acute lymphoblastic, 6 acute myeloid and 4 acute undifferentiated leukemias), 21 chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) and thirteen healthy dogs were collected. The mRNA expression of all CD44 variants presenting exons 1-5 and/or 16-20 (CD44_ex1-5 and CD44_ex16-20) and CD44 protein were determined by real-time RT-PCR and flow cytometry, using the mean fluorescent index (MFI), respectively. CD44 MFI was significantly higher in leukemic samples compared to controls and a higher expression was found in AL in respect with CLL. No significant differences were found when considering different phenotypic subtypes of AL and CLL. CD44_ex1-5 mRNA expression was significantly higher in AL compared to controls, whereas there was no difference in CLL compared to controls and AL. CD44_es16-20 showed the same trend, but without differences among groups. The high CD44 expression found in canine leukemias could be considered a step toward the definition of their molecular features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastrointestinal hormone mRNA expression in human colonic adenocarcinomas, hepatic metastases and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; De Micco, P; Parriaux, D; Seitz, J F; Delpero, J R; Hassoun, J

    1996-01-01

    Aims—(1) To investigate the expression of the four main hormones of the digestive tract by performing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on a series of samples, comprising tumoral and healthy colonic tissues, hepatic metastases and colonic cell line samples; and (2) to study the patterns of labelling obtained with serological and morphological markers. Methods—After extraction and reverse transcription, gastrin, somatostatin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNAs were detected by PCR and nested PCR using specific primers. The corresponding proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results—The cell lines expressed all four mRNAs. Gastrin mRNA was present in most tumoral and metastatic samples, while the somatostatin transcript was detected in all samples and was frequently overexpressed in the normal colon. TGFα mRNA was expressed systematically in tumours of the right and transverse colon, but not in those located in the left colon; the expression of CCK mRNA was systematically absent in the left colon. Conclusions—The data presented here shed some light on the transcriptional events involved in the production of the various hormones present in the gastrointestinal tract, in both healthy and tumoral tissues. The various mRNAs expressed in cell lines are therefore not systematically expressed in the human pathology. Images PMID:16696065

  4. Moisturizers change the mRNA expression of enzymes synthesizing skin barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Buraczewska, Izabela; Berne, Berit; Lindberg, Magnus; Lodén, Marie; Törmä, Hans

    2009-09-01

    In a previous study, 7-week treatment of normal human skin with two test moisturizers, Complex cream and Hydrocarbon cream, was shown to affect mRNA expression of certain genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Moreover, the treatment altered transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in opposite directions. In the present study, the mRNA expression of genes important for formation of barrier lipids, i.e., cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides, was examined. Treatment with Hydrocarbon cream, which increased TEWL, also elevated the gene expression of GBA, SPTLC2, SMPD1, ALOX12B, ALOXE3, and HMGCS1. In addition, the expression of PPARG was decreased. On the other hand, Complex cream, which decreased TEWL, induced only the expression of PPARG, although not confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, in the untreated skin, a correlation between the mRNA expression of PPARG and ACACB, and TEWL was found, suggesting that these genes are important for the skin barrier homeostasis. The observed changes further demonstrate that long-term treatment with certain moisturizers may induce dysfunctional skin barrier, and as a consequence several signaling pathways are altered.

  5. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  6. Change of dopamine receptor mRNA expression in lymphocyte of schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yong T; Koo, Min-Seong; Choi, Chul-Hee; Sunwoo, IN

    2001-01-01

    Background Though the dysfunction of central dopaminergic system has been proposed, the etiology or pathogenesis of schizophrenia is still uncertain partly due to limited accessibility to dopamine receptor. The purpose of this study was to define whether or not the easily accessible dopamine receptors of peripheral lymphocytes can be the peripheral markers of schizophrenia. Results 44 drug-medicated schizophrenics for more than 3 years, 28 drug-free schizophrenics for more than 3 months, 15 drug-naïve schizophrenic patients, and 31 healthy persons were enrolled. Sequential reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the mRNA were used to investigate the expression of D3 and D5 dopamine receptors in peripheral lymphocytes. The gene expression of dopamine receptors was compared in each group. After taking antipsychotics in drug-free and drug-naïve patients, the dopamine receptors of peripheral lymphocytes were sequentially studied 2nd week and 8th week after medication. In drug-free schizophrenics, D3 dopamine receptor mRNA expression of peripheral lymphocytes significantly increased compared to that of controls and drug-medicated schizophrenics, and D5 dopamine receptor mRNA expression increased compared to that of drug-medicated schizophrenics. After taking antipsychotics, mRNA of dopamine receptors peaked at 2nd week, after which it decreases but the level was above baseline one at 8th week. Drug-free and drug-naïve patients were divided into two groups according to dopamine receptor expression before medications, and the group of patients with increased dopamine receptor expression had more severe psychiatric symptoms. Conclusions These results reveal that the molecular biologically-determined dopamine receptors of peripheral lymphocytes are reactive, and that increased expression of dopamine receptor in peripheral lymphocyte has possible clinical significance for subgrouping of schizophrenis. PMID:11252158

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Dopamine Transporter mRNA Expression in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Green, Ashley L.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Tee, Siew C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Guo, Grace L.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission. As such, proper regulation of DAT expression is important to maintain homeostasis, and disruption of DAT expression can lead to neurobehavioral dysfunction. Based on genomic features within the promoter of the DAT gene, there is potential for DAT expression to be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation and histone acetylation. However, the relative contribution of these mechanisms to DAT expression has not been empirically determined. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity increased DAT mRNA approximately 1.5–2 fold. This effect was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of DNMT1. Likewise, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors valproate and butyrate also increased DAT mRNA expression, but the response was much more robust with expression increasing over tenfold. Genetic knockdown of HDAC1 by siRNA also increased DAT expression, but not to the extent seen with pharmacological inhibition, suggesting additional isoforms of HDAC or other targets may contribute to the observed effect. Together, these data identify the relative contribution of DNMTs and HDACs in regulating expression. These finding may aid in understanding the mechanistic basis for changes in DAT expression in normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:25963949

  8. Expression of SART-1 mRNA in canine squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Yumi; Yoshida, Yukari; Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Fujita, Michio; Taniguchi, Akiko; Orima, Hiromitsu

    2008-12-01

    SART-1, a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, has been useful in human cancer therapy. The SART-1(259) peptide is a potential candidate for vaccine. The present study examined an orthologue of the mRNA coding this peptide in canine SCCs. Specimens were obtained from seven canine patients with SCC, and the mRNA was isolated from the samples. The SART-1 and beta-actin genes were amplified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, using the isolated mRNA as a template. Canine SART-1 was amplified in six of the seven specimens, while beta-actin was detected in all the samples. In dogs, carcinomas expressing SART-1 could be a target for cytotoxic T lymphocyte mediated immunotherapy.

  9. Continuous antagonism of the ghrelin receptor results in early induction of salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Nakashima, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yuki; Ida, Takanori; Kojima, Masayasu

    2011-02-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone that mediates a variety of physiological roles, such as stimulating appetite, initiating food intake, and modulating energy metabolism. Although it has been reported that a bolus injection of ghrelin decreases blood pressure, the effect of continuous ghrelin administration on vasoregulation has yet to be determined. We examined the longitudinal effect of ghrelin on vasoregulation using Dahl-Iwai salt-sensitive rats. In this model, a high-salt diet induced high blood pressure and increased ghrelin levels but reduced food intake. In salt-sensitive hypertension, cumulative food intake decreased, while both ghrelin messenger RNA levels and plasma ghrelin content increased. Continuous administration of a ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), for 2 weeks by mini-osmotic pump did not change blood pressure values although the cumulative food intake recovered. In contrast, continuous administration of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-Lys³]-GHRP-6, induced early elevations in blood pressure without changes in heart rate. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed high expression levels of genes involved in the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-β-hydroxylase, after continuous [D-Lys³]-GHRP-6 administration. These results indicate that continuous antagonism of the ghrelin receptor results in early induction of salt-sensitive hypertension in this animal model and suggests that increases in autonomic nervous activity induced by ghrelin receptor antagonism are responsible, as indicated by the high expression levels of genes in the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway.

  10. Adrenocorticotropin receptors: Functional expression from rat adrenal mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, L.M.; Catt, K.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) receptor, which binds corticotropin and stimulates adenylate cyclase and steroidogenesis in adrenocortical cells, was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with rat adrenal poly(A){sup +} RNA. Expression of the ACTH receptor in individual stage 5 and 6 oocytes was monitored by radioimmunoassay of ligand-stimulated cAMP production. Injection of 5-40 ng of adrenal mRNA caused dose-dependent increases in ACTH-responsive cAMP production. Size fractionation of rat adrenal poly(A){sup +}RNA by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation revealed that mRNA encoding the ACTH receptor was present in the 1.1-to 2.0-kilobase fraction. These data indicate that ACTH receptors can be expressed from adrenal mRNA in Xenopus oocytes and are fully functional in terms of ligand specificity and signal generation. The extracellular cAMP response to ACTH is a sensitive and convenient index of receptor expression. This system should permit more complete characterization and expression cloning of the ACTH receptor.

  11. Sprouty4 mRNA variants and protein expressions in breast and lung-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Doriguzzi, Angelina; Salhi, Jihen; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Sprouty proteins are modulators of mitogen-induced signalling processes and are therefore hypothesized to affect malignant diseases. As a member of the Sprouty family, Sprouty4 has been previously shown to function as a tumour suppressor in lung and breast cancer. The present study analysed the expression of two known Sprouty4 splice variants in cells established from malignant and normal lung and breast tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. The results indicated that the expression of the two messenger RNA (mRNA) variants was reduced in the cells derived from malignant tissue in comparison to the normal counterparts. Although the expression of the two splice variants were associated in both tissue types, on average, the relative expression of the longer variant was slightly increased in malignant cells compared with normal tissues. Notably, the protein levels reflected the expression observed at the mRNA level only in breast-derived cells. Contrarily, with regards to the measured mRNA levels, Sprouty4 protein was disproportional augmented in lung cells known to harbour the mutated K-Ras gene. PMID:27895786

  12. Gallium nitrate regulates rat osteoblast expression of osteocalcin protein and mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Salvatori, R; Bockman, R S

    1993-01-01

    Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, has been found to be clinically effective for the treatment of accelerated bone resorption in cancer-related hypercalcemia and Paget's disease. Here we report the effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein levels on the rat osteoblast-like cell line ROS 17/2.8. Gallium nitrate reduced both constitutive and vitamin D3-stimulated osteocalcin protein levels in culture medium by one-half and osteocalcin mRNA levels to one-third to one-tenth of control. Gallium nitrate also inhibited vitamin D3 stimulation of osteocalcin and osteopontin mRNA levels but did not affect constitutive osteopontin mRNA levels. Among several different metals examined, gallium was unique in its ability to reduce osteocalcin mRNA levels without decreasing levels of other mRNAs synthesized by ROS 17/2.8 cells. The effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein synthesis mimic those seen when ROS 17/2.8 cells are exposed to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1); however, TGF-beta 1 was not detected in gallium nitrate-treated ROS 17/2.8 cell media. Use of the RNA polymerase II inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that gallium nitrate did not alter the stability of osteocalcin mRNA. Transient transfection assays using the rat osteocalcin promoter linked to the bacterial reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase indicated that gallium nitrate blocked reporter gene expression stimulated by the osteocalcin promoter. This is the first reported effect of gallium nitrate on isolated osteoblast cells.

  13. Maternal mRNA expression levels of H19 are inversely associated with risk of macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yu, Yang; Xun, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jun; Luo, Guanghua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the associations between the mRNA levels of H19 in term placenta and risk of macrosomia. Material and methods Term placentas were collected from 37 macrosomia and 37 matched neonates with normal birth weight (controls) born in Changzhou Women and Children Health Hospital, Jiangsu province, P. R. China from March 1 to June 30, 2008. The mRNA levels of H19 in those placentas were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Simple and multiple logistic regression models were used to explore the risk factors in the development of macrosomia. All analyses were performed using Stata 10.0 (StataCorp, College Station, Texas, USA). Results The average H19 mRNA level of the macrosomia group was 1.450 ±0.456 while in the control group it was 2.080 ±1.296. Based on the result of Student's t test, there was a significant difference in H19 mRNA level between the macrosomia group and the control group (p = 0.008). After controlling for potential confounders, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) of macrosomia for those in the highest tertile of H19 mRNA level was 0.12 (95% CI: 0.02–0.59) when compared to those in the lowest tertile (p for linear trend = 0.009). Conclusions The term placental H19 mRNA levels were inversely related to the occurrence of macrosomia. Our findings suggest that the low expression of H19 mRNA may contribute to the development of macrosomia. PMID:25097584

  14. Maternal mRNA expression levels of H19 are inversely associated with risk of macrosomia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Yu, Yang; Xun, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jun; Luo, Guanghua; Wang, Qiuwei

    2014-06-29

    To investigate the associations between the mRNA levels of H19 in term placenta and risk of macrosomia. Term placentas were collected from 37 macrosomia and 37 matched neonates with normal birth weight (controls) born in Changzhou Women and Children Health Hospital, Jiangsu province, P. R. China from March 1 to June 30, 2008. The mRNA levels of H19 in those placentas were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Simple and multiple logistic regression models were used to explore the risk factors in the development of macrosomia. All analyses were performed using Stata 10.0 (StataCorp, College Station, Texas, USA). The average H19 mRNA level of the macrosomia group was 1.450 ±0.456 while in the control group it was 2.080 ±1.296. Based on the result of Student's t test, there was a significant difference in H19 mRNA level between the macrosomia group and the control group (p = 0.008). After controlling for potential confounders, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) of macrosomia for those in the highest tertile of H19 mRNA level was 0.12 (95% CI: 0.02-0.59) when compared to those in the lowest tertile (p for linear trend = 0.009). The term placental H19 mRNA levels were inversely related to the occurrence of macrosomia. Our findings suggest that the low expression of H19 mRNA may contribute to the development of macrosomia.

  15. Characterization of Ghrelin O-Acyltransferase (GOAT) in goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Gómez-Boronat, Miguel; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel Luis; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin is the only known hormone posttranslationally modified with an acylation. This modification is crucial for most of ghrelin’s physiological effects and is catalyzed by the polytopic enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT). The aim of this study was to characterize GOAT in a teleost model, goldfish (Carassius auratus). First, the full-length cDNA sequence was obtained by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. Two highly homologous cDNAs of 1491 and 1413 bp, respectively, named goat-V1 and goat-V2 were identified. Deduced protein sequences (393 and 367 amino acids, respectively) are predicted to present 11 and 9 transmembrane regions, respectively, and both contain two conserved key residues proposed to be involved in catalysis: asparagine 273 and histidine 304. RT-qPCR revealed that both forms of goat mRNAs show a similar widespread tissue distribution, with the highest expression in the gastrointestinal tract and gonads and less but considerable expression in brain, pituitary, liver and adipose tissue. Immunostaining of intestinal sections showed the presence of GOAT immunoreactive cells in the intestinal mucosa, some of which colocalize with ghrelin. Using an in vitro approach, we observed that acylated ghrelin downregulates GOAT gene and protein levels in cultured intestine in a time-dependent manner. Finally, we found a rhythmic oscillation of goat mRNA expression in the hypothalamus, pituitary and intestinal bulb of goldfish fed at midday, but not at midnight. Together, these findings report novel data characterizing GOAT, and offer new information about the ghrelinergic system in fish. PMID:28178327

  16. A link between FTO, ghrelin, and impaired brain food-cue responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Karra, Efthimia; O’Daly, Owen G.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Yousseif, Ahmed; Millership, Steven; Neary, Marianne T.; Scott, William R.; Chandarana, Keval; Manning, Sean; Hess, Martin E.; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Akamizu, Takashi; Millet, Queensta; Gelegen, Cigdem; Drew, Megan E.; Rahman, Sofia; Emmanuel, Julian J.; Williams, Steven C.R.; Rüther, Ulrich U.; Brüning, Jens C.; Withers, Dominic J.; Zelaya, Fernando O.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) are associated with human obesity and obesity-prone behaviors, including increased food intake and a preference for energy-dense foods. FTO demethylates N6-methyladenosine, a potential regulatory RNA modification, but the mechanisms by which FTO predisposes humans to obesity remain unclear. In adiposity-matched, normal-weight humans, we showed that subjects homozygous for the FTO “obesity-risk” rs9939609 A allele have dysregulated circulating levels of the orexigenic hormone acyl-ghrelin and attenuated postprandial appetite reduction. Using functional MRI (fMRI) in normal-weight AA and TT humans, we found that the FTO genotype modulates the neural responses to food images in homeostatic and brain reward regions. Furthermore, AA and TT subjects exhibited divergent neural responsiveness to circulating acyl-ghrelin within brain regions that regulate appetite, reward processing, and incentive motivation. In cell models, FTO overexpression reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, concomitantly increasing ghrelin mRNA and peptide levels. Furthermore, peripheral blood cells from AA human subjects exhibited increased FTO mRNA, reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, and increased ghrelin mRNA abundance compared with TT subjects. Our findings show that FTO regulates ghrelin, a key mediator of ingestive behavior, and offer insight into how FTO obesity-risk alleles predispose to increased energy intake and obesity in humans. PMID:23867619

  17. A link between FTO, ghrelin, and impaired brain food-cue responsivity.

    PubMed

    Karra, Efthimia; O'Daly, Owen G; Choudhury, Agharul I; Yousseif, Ahmed; Millership, Steven; Neary, Marianne T; Scott, William R; Chandarana, Keval; Manning, Sean; Hess, Martin E; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Akamizu, Takashi; Millet, Queensta; Gelegen, Cigdem; Drew, Megan E; Rahman, Sofia; Emmanuel, Julian J; Williams, Steven C R; Rüther, Ulrich U; Brüning, Jens C; Withers, Dominic J; Zelaya, Fernando O; Batterham, Rachel L

    2013-08-01

    Polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) are associated with human obesity and obesity-prone behaviors, including increased food intake and a preference for energy-dense foods. FTO demethylates N6-methyladenosine, a potential regulatory RNA modification, but the mechanisms by which FTO predisposes humans to obesity remain unclear. In adiposity-matched, normal-weight humans, we showed that subjects homozygous for the FTO "obesity-risk" rs9939609 A allele have dysregulated circulating levels of the orexigenic hormone acyl-ghrelin and attenuated postprandial appetite reduction. Using functional MRI (fMRI) in normal-weight AA and TT humans, we found that the FTO genotype modulates the neural responses to food images in homeostatic and brain reward regions. Furthermore, AA and TT subjects exhibited divergent neural responsiveness to circulating acyl-ghrelin within brain regions that regulate appetite, reward processing, and incentive motivation. In cell models, FTO overexpression reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, concomitantly increasing ghrelin mRNA and peptide levels. Furthermore, peripheral blood cells from AA human subjects exhibited increased FTO mRNA, reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, and increased ghrelin mRNA abundance compared with TT subjects. Our findings show that FTO regulates ghrelin, a key mediator of ingestive behavior, and offer insight into how FTO obesity-risk alleles predispose to increased energy intake and obesity in humans.

  18. Mediation of oxidative stress in hypothalamic ghrelin-associated appetite control in rats treated with phenylpropanolamine.

    PubMed

    Yu, C-H; Chu, S-C; Chen, P-N; Hsieh, Y-S; Kuo, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA)-induced appetite control is associated with oxidative stress in the hypothalamus. This study explored whether hypothalamic antioxidants participated in hypothalamic ghrelin system-associated appetite control in PPA-treated rats. Rats were given PPA daily for 4 days, and changes in food intake and the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), superoxide dismutase, catalase, ghrelin, acyl ghrelin (AG), ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) and the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) were examined and compared. Results showed that both food intake and the expression of NPY and ghrelin/AG/GOAT/GHSR1a decreased in response to PPA treatment with maximum decrease on Day 2 of the treatment. In contrast, the expression of antioxidants and CART increased, with the maximum increase on Day 2, with the expression opposite to that of NPY and ghrelin. A cerebral infusion of either a GHSR1a antagonist or reactive oxygen species scavenger modulated feeding behavior and NPY, CART, antioxidants and ghrelin system expression, showing the involvement of ghrelin signaling and oxidative stress in regulating PPA-mediated appetite control. We suggest that hypothalamic ghrelin signaling system, with the help of antioxidants, may participate in NPY/CART-mediated appetite control in PPA-treated rats.

  19. Embryonic and Postnatal Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor mRNA in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eiki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2017-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a member of the basic helix-loop-helix-Per-Arnt-Sim transcription factor family, plays a critical role in the developing nervous system of invertebrates and vertebrates. Dioxin, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, avidly binds to this receptor, and maternal exposure to dioxin has been shown to impair higher brain functions and dendritic morphogenesis, possibly via an AhR-dependent mechanism. However, there is little information on AhR expression in the developing mammalian brain. To address this issue, the present study analyzed AhR mRNA expression in the brains of embryonic, juvenile, and adult mice by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and in situ hybridization. In early brain development (embryonic day 12.5), AhR transcript was detected in the innermost cortical layer. The mRNA was also expressed in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, olfactory bulb, and rostral migratory stream on embryonic day 18.5, postnatal days 3, 7, and 14, and in 12-week-old (adult) mice. Hippocampal expression was abundant in the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cell layers, where expression level of AhR mRNA in 12-week old is higher than that in 7-day old. These results reveal temporal and spatial patterns of AhR mRNA expression in the mouse brain, providing the information that may contribute to the elucidation of the physiologic and toxicologic significance of AhR in the developing brain. PMID:28223923

  20. Molecular evolution of GPCRs: Ghrelin/ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-06-01

    After the discovery in 1996 of the GH secretagogue-receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) as an orphan G-protein coupled receptor, many research groups attempted to identify the endogenous ligand. Finally, Kojima and colleagues successfully isolated the peptide ligand from rat stomach extracts, determined its structure, and named it ghrelin. The GHS-R1a is now accepted to be the ghrelin receptor. The existence of the ghrelin system has been demonstrated in many animal classes through biochemical and molecular biological strategies as well as through genome projects. Our work, focused on identifying the ghrelin receptor and its ligand ghrelin in laboratory animals, particularly nonmammalian vertebrates, has provided new insights into the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor. In mammals, it is assumed that the ghrelin receptor evolution is in line with the plate tectonics theory. In contrast, the evolution of the ghrelin receptor in nonmammalian vertebrates differs from that of mammals: multiplicity of the ghrelin receptor isoforms is observed in nonmammalian vertebrates only. This multiplicity is due to genome duplication and polyploidization events that particularly occurred in Teleostei. Furthermore, it is likely that the evolution of the ghrelin receptor is distinct from that of its ligand, ghrelin, because only one ghrelin isoform has been detected in all species examined so far. In this review, we summarize current knowledge related to the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. Alpha-synuclein mRNA expression in oligodendrocytes in MSA.

    PubMed

    Asi, Yasmine T; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Wharton, Stephen B; Lees, Andrew J; Revesz, Tamas; Houlden, Henry; Holton, Janice L

    2014-06-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease presenting clinically with parkinsonian, cerebellar, and autonomic features. α-Synuclein (αsyn), encoded by the gene SNCA, is the main constituent of glial cytoplasmic inclusion (GCI) found in oligodendrocytes in MSA, but the methods of its accumulation have not been established. The aim of this study is to investigate alterations in regional and cellular SNCA mRNA expression in MSA as a possible substrate for GCI formation. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on postmortem brain samples from 15 MSA, 5 IPD, and 5 control cases to investigate regional expression in the frontal and occipital regions, dorsal putamen, pontine base, and cerebellum. For cellular expression analysis, neurons and oligodendrocytes were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from five MSA and five control cases. SNCA mRNA expression was not significantly different between the MSA, IPD and control cases in all regions (multilevel model, P = 0.14). After adjusting for group effect, the highest expression was found in the occipital cortex while the lowest was in the putamen (multilevel model, P < 0.0001). At the cellular level, MSA oligodendrocytes expressed more SNCA than control oligodendrocytes and expression in MSA neurons was slightly lower than that in controls, however, these results did not reach statistical significance. We have demonstrated regional variations in SNCA expression, which is higher in cortical than subcortical regions. This study is the first to demonstrate SNCA mRNA expression by oligodendrocytes in human postmortem tissue using qPCR and, although not statistically significant, could suggest that this may be increased in MSA compared to controls.

  2. An Integrative Review on Role and Mechanisms of Ghrelin in Stress, Anxiety and Depression.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is orexigenic hormone primarily synthesized by endocrine X/A-like cells of gastric oxyntic mucosa to stimulate appetite and food intake along with regulation of growth hormone and insulin secretion; glucose and lipid metabolism; gastrointestinal motility; blood pressure, heart rate and neurogenesis. Furthermore, peripherally (after crossing the blood brain barrier) as well as centrally synthesized ghrelin (in the hypothalamus) regulates diverse functions of central nervous system including stress-associated behavioral functions. Exposure to stress alters the ghrelin levels and alteration in ghrelin levels significantly affects neuro-endocrinological parameters; metabolism-related physiology, behavior and mood. Studies have shown both anxiolytic and anxiogenic role of ghrelin suggesting its dual role in modulating anxiety-related behavior. However, it is proposed that increase in ghrelin levels during stress condition is an endogenous stress coping behavior and increased ghrelin levels may be required to prevent excessive anxiety. In preclinical and clinical studies, an elevation in ghrelin levels during depression has been correlated with their antidepressant activities. Ghrelin-induced modulation of stress and associated conditions has been linked to alteration in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; autonomic nervous system (mainly sympathetic nervous system and serotonergic neurotransmission. A reciprocal relationship has been reported between corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and ghrelin as ghrelin increases the release of CRH, ACTH and corticosteroids; while CRH decreases the expression of ghrelin. Similarly, ghrelin increases the serotonin turnover and in turn, serotonin controls ghrelin signaling to modulate anxiety-related behavior. The present review discusses the dual role of ghrelin in stress and related behavioral disorders along with possible mechanisms.

  3. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression profiles in HBx-expressing hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruo-Chan; Wang, Juan; Kuang, Xu-Yuan; Peng, Fang; Fu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Yan; Li, Ning; Fan, Xue-Gong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network in hepatitis B virus X (HBx)-expressing hepatic cells. METHODS A stable HBx-expressing human liver cell line L02 was established. The mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of L02/HBx and L02/pcDNA liver cells were identified by RNA-sequencing analysis. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis was performed to investigate the function of candidate biomarkers, and the relationship between miRNA and mRNA was studied by network analysis. RESULTS Compared with L02/pcDNA cells, 742 unregulated genes and 501 downregulated genes were determined as differentially expressed in L02/HBx cells. Gene ontology analysis suggested that the differentially expressed genes were relevant to different biological processes. Concurrently, 22 differential miRNAs were also determined in L02/HBx cells. Furthermore, integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles identified a core miRNA-mRNA regulatory network that is correlated with the carcinogenic role of HBx. CONCLUSION Collectively, the miRNA-mRNA network-based analysis could be useful to elucidate the potential role of HBx in liver cell malignant transformation and shed light on the underlying molecular mechanism and novel therapy targets for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:28348484

  4. TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms influence mRNA and protein expression in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Marcela Alcântara; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Cadamuro, Aline Cristina Targa; Succi, Maysa; Netinho, João Gomes; Goloni-Bertolo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of promoter region polymorphisms of toll-like receptor (TLR)2-196 to -174del and TLR4-1607T/C (rs10759932) on mRNA and protein expression in tumor tissue and of TLR4+896A/G (rs4986790) on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. METHODS: The TLR2-196 to -174del polymorphism was investigated using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the TLR4-1607T/C and TLR4+896A/G by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We genotyped 434 DNA samples from 194 CRC patients and 240 healthy individuals. The mRNA relative quantification (RQ) was performed in 40 tumor tissue samples by quantitative PCR TaqMan assay, using specific probes for TLR2 and TLR4 genes, and ACTB and GAPDH reference genes were used as endogenous controls. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry with specific primary antibodies. RESULTS: No association was found for TLR4-1607T/C and TLR4+896A/G by three statistical models (log-additive, dominant and recessive). However, based on dominant and log-additive models, the polymorphic variant TLR2-196 to -174del was associated with increased CRC risk [dominant: odds ratio (OR) = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.03-2.89; P = 0.038 and log-additive: OR =1.59, 95%CI: 1.02-2.48; P = 0.039]. TLR2 mRNA expression was increased in tumor tissue (RQ = 2.36) when compared to adjacent normal tissue (RQ = 1; P < 0.0001), whereas the TLR4 mRNA showed a basal expression (RQ = 0.74 vs RQ = 1, P = 0.452). Immunohistochemistry analysis of TLR2 and TLR4 protein expression was concordant with the findings of mRNA expression. In addition, the TLR2-196 to -174del variant carriers showed mRNA relative expression 2.19 times higher than wild-genotype carriers. The TLR2 protein expression was also higher for the TLR2-196 to -174del variant carriers [117 ± 10 arbitrary unit (a.u.) vs 95 ± 4 a.u., P = 0.03]. However, for the TLR4 -1607T/C polymorphism no significant difference was found for both mRNA (P = 0.56) and protein expression (P = 0

  5. A role of ghrelin in canine mammary carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis and migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). They are often co-expressed in multiple human tumors and related cancer cell lines what can indicate that the ghrelin/GHS-R axis may have an important role in tumor growth and progression. However, a role of ghrelin in canine tumors remains unknown. Thus, the aim of our study was two-fold: (1) to assess expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer and (2) to examine the effect of ghrelin on carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines (isolated from primary tumors and their metastases) was examined using Real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. For apoptosis analysis the Annexin V and propidium iodide dual staining was applied whereas cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and BrdU incorporation test. The influence of ghrelin on cancer cells migration and invasion was assessed using Boyden chamber assays and wound healing assay. Results The highest expression of ghrelin was observed in metastatic cancers whereas the lowest expression of ghrelin receptor was detected in tumors of the 3rd grade of malignancy. Higher expression of ghrelin and its receptor was detected in cancer cell lines isolated from metastases than in cell lines isolated from primary tumors. In vitro experiments demonstrated that exposure to low doses of ghrelin stimulates cellular proliferation, inhibits apoptosis and promotes motility and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor inhibitor ([D-Lys3]-GHRP6) as well as RNA interference enhances early apoptosis. Conclusion The presence of ghrelin and GHS-R in all of the examined canine mammary tumors may indicate their biological role in cancer growth and development. Our experiments conducted in vitro confirmed that ghrelin promotes cancer development and metastasis. PMID:22999388

  6. Constitutive and allergen-induced expression of eotaxin mRNA in the guinea pig lung

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Eotaxin is a member of the C-C family of chemokines and is related during antigen challenge in a guinea pig model of allergic airway inflammation (asthma). Consistent with its putative role in eosinophilic inflammation, eotaxin induces the selective infiltration of eosinophils when injected into the lung and skin. Using a guinea pig lung cDNA library, we have cloned full-length eotaxin cDNA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 96 amino acids, including a putative 23-amino acid hydrophobic leader sequence, followed by 73 amino acids composing the mature active eotaxin protein. The protein-coding region of this cDNA is 73, 71, 50, and 48% identical in nucleic acid sequence to those of human macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP) 3, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1 alpha, and RANTES, respectively. Analysis of genomic DNA suggested that there is a single eotaxin gene in guinea pig which is apparently conserved in mice. High constitutive levels of eotaxin mRNA expression were observed in the lung, while the intestines, stomach, spleen, liver, heart, thymus, testes, and kidney expressed lower levels. To determine if eotaxin mRNA levels are elevated during allergen-induced eosinophilic airway inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs were challenged with aerosolized antigen. Compared with the lungs from saline-challenged animals, eotaxin mRNA levels increased sixfold within 3 h and returned to baseline by 6 h. Thus, eotaxin mRNA levels are increased in response to allergen challenge during the late phase response. The identification of constitutive eotaxin mRNA expression in multiple tissues suggests that in addition to regulating airway eosinophilia, eotaxin is likely to be involved in eosinophil recruitment into other tissues as well as in baseline tissue homing. PMID:7869037

  7. Control of Cytokine mRNA Expression by RNA-binding Proteins and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, V.; Jakymiw, A.; Van Tubergen, E.A.; D’Silva, N.J.; Kirkwood, K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are critical mediators of inflammation and host defenses. Regulation of cytokines can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcription, mRNA export, and post- transcriptional and translational levels. Among these modes of regulation, post-transcriptional regulation has been shown to play a vital role in controlling the expression of cytokines by modulating mRNA stability. The stability of cytokine mRNAs, including TNFα, IL-6, and IL-8, has been reported to be altered by the presence of AU-rich elements (AREs) located in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of the mRNAs. Numerous RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs bind to these 3′UTRs to regulate the stability and/or translation of the mRNAs. Thus, this paper describes the cooperative function between RNA-binding proteins and miRNAs and how they regulate AU-rich elements containing cytokine mRNA stability/degradation and translation. These mRNA control mechanisms can potentially influence inflammation as it relates to oral biology, including periodontal diseases and oral pharyngeal cancer progression. PMID:22302144

  8. The mRNA Decay Pathway Regulates the Expression of the Flo11 Adhesin and Biofilm Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tricia L.; Qu, Yue; Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Quenault, Tara; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the FLO11 adhesin is a model for gene expression control by extracellular signals and developmental switches. We establish that the major mRNA decay pathway regulates FLO11 expression. mRNA deadenylation of transcriptional repressors of FLO11 by the exonuclease Ccr4 keeps their levels low, thereby allowing FLO11 transcription. PMID:22595243

  9. Aging alters mRNA expression of amyloid transporter genes at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Doreen; Miller, Miles C; Messier, Arthur A; Gonzalez, Liliana; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2017-09-01

    Decreased clearance of potentially toxic metabolites, due to aging changes, likely plays a significant role in the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides and other macromolecules in the brain of the elderly and in the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aging is the single most important risk factor for AD development. Aβ transport receptor proteins expressed at the blood-brain barrier are significantly altered with age: the efflux transporters lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein are reduced, whereas the influx transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products is increased. These receptors play an important role in maintaining brain biochemical homeostasis. We now report that, in a rat model of aging, gene transcription is altered in aging, as measured by Aβ receptor gene messenger RNA (mRNA) at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 30, and 36 months. Gene mRNA expression from isolated cerebral microvessels was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein mRNA were significantly reduced in aging, and receptor for advanced glycation end products was increased, in parallel with the changes seen in receptor protein expression. Transcriptional changes appear to play a role in aging alterations in blood-brain barrier receptor expression and Aβ accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Activated Human T Cells Express Alternative mRNA Transcripts Encoding a Secreted Form of RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, NC; Alexander, KA; Manning, CA; Karmakar, S; Wang, JF; Weyand, CM; Pettit, AR; Gravallese, EM

    2013-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB -ligand (RANKL), encoded by the gene TNFSF11, is required for osteoclastogenesis, and its expression is upregulated in pathologic bone loss. Transcript variants of TNFSF11 mRNA have been described that encode a membrane-bound and a putative secreted form of RANKL. We identify a TNFSF11 transcript variant that extends the originally identified transcript encoding secreted RANKL. We demonstrate that this TNFSF11 transcript variant is expressed by the human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2, and by both primary human T cells and Jurkat T cells. Of relevance to the production of RANKL in pathologic bone loss, expression of this secreted TNFSF11 transcript is upregulated in Jurkat T cells and primary human T cells upon activation. Furthermore, this transcript can be translated and secreted in Jurkat T cells in vitro and is able to support osteoclast differentiation. Our data highlight the complexity of the TNFSF11 genomic locus and demonstrate the potential for the expression of alternate mRNA transcripts encoding membrane-bound and secreted forms of RANKL. Implications of alternate mRNA transcripts encoding different RANKL protein isoforms should be carefully considered and specifically examined in future studies, particularly those implicating RANKL in pathologic bone loss. PMID:23698708

  11. Cytokine mRNA expression in lesions in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    PubMed

    Harley, R; Helps, C R; Harbour, D A; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Day, M J

    1999-07-01

    Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays were developed to measure feline interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 (p35 & p40); gamma interferon (IFN-gamma); and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA concentrations in biopsies of feline oral mucosa. Biopsies were collected from 30 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (diseased) prior to each cat receiving one of four treatments. In 23 cases replicate biopsies were collected 3 months after treatment commenced. Biopsies were also analyzed from 11 cats without clinical disease (nondiseased). Expression of IL-2, IL-10, IL-12 (p35 and p40), and IFN-gamma was detected in most nondiseased biopsies, while IL-6 was detected in a minority, and IL-4 and IL-5 were both undetectable. Compared to nondiseased cats, the diseased population showed a significant increase in the relative mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p35 and p40), and IFN-gamma. In contrast, IL-5 mRNA expression was unchanged and was only detected in one case. No significant relationship was demonstrable between the change in relative expression of specific cytokine mRNA and the change in clinical severity of the local mucosal lesions over the treatment period. The results demonstrate that the normal feline oral mucosa is biased towards a predominantly (Th) type 1 profile of cytokine expression and that during the development of lesions seen in feline chronic gingivostomatitis there is a shift in the cytokine profile from a type 1 to a mixed type 1 and type 2 response.

  12. Cytokine mRNA Expression in Lesions in Cats with Chronic Gingivostomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Harley, R.; Helps, C. R.; Harbour, D. A.; Gruffydd-Jones, T. J.; Day, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays were developed to measure feline interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 (p35 & p40); gamma interferon (IFN-γ); and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA concentrations in biopsies of feline oral mucosa. Biopsies were collected from 30 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (diseased) prior to each cat receiving one of four treatments. In 23 cases replicate biopsies were collected 3 months after treatment commenced. Biopsies were also analyzed from 11 cats without clinical disease (nondiseased). Expression of IL-2, IL-10, IL-12 (p35 and p40), and IFN-γ was detected in most nondiseased biopsies, while IL-6 was detected in a minority, and IL-4 and IL-5 were both undetectable. Compared to nondiseased cats, the diseased population showed a significant increase in the relative mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p35 and p40), and IFN-γ. In contrast, IL-5 mRNA expression was unchanged and was only detected in one case. No significant relationship was demonstrable between the change in relative expression of specific cytokine mRNA and the change in clinical severity of the local mucosal lesions over the treatment period. The results demonstrate that the normal feline oral mucosa is biased towards a predominantly (Th) type 1 profile of cytokine expression and that during the development of lesions seen in feline chronic gingivostomatitis there is a shift in the cytokine profile from a type 1 to a mixed type 1 and type 2 response. PMID:10391845

  13. Elevated tph2 mRNA Expression in a Rat Model of Chronic Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Johnson, Philip L.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Kellen, Karen E.; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allelic variations in TPH2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis, may be genetic predictors of panic disorder and panic responses to panicogenic challenges in healthy volunteers. To test the hypothesis that tph2 mRNA is altered in chronic anxiety states, we measured tph2 expression in an established rat model of panic disorder. Methods We implanted 16 adult, male rats with bilateral guide cannulae and then primed them with daily injections of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor agonist, urocortin 1 (UCN1, 6 fmoles/100 nl per side, n = 8) or vehicle (n = 8) into the basolateral amygdaloid complex (BL) for 5 consecutive days. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed, 24 hr prior to and 48 hr following priming, in the social interaction (SI) test. A third group (n = 7) served as undisturbed home cage controls. All rats were killed 3 days after the last intra-BL injection to analyze tph2 and slc6a4 (gene encoding the serotonin transporter, SERT) mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), the main source of serotonergic projections to anxiety-related brain regions, using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results UCN1 priming increased anxiety-related behavior in the SI test compared to vehicle-injected controls and elevated tph2, but not slc6a4, mRNA expression in DR subregions, including the ventrolateral DR/ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (DRVL/VLPAG), a subregion previously implicated in control of panic-related physiologic responses. Tph2 mRNA expression in the DRVL/VLPAG was correlated with increased anxiety-related behavior. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that chronic anxiety states are associated with dysregulated tph2 expression. PMID:22511363

  14. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  15. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  16. Rift Valley fever virus NSS gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NSS gene, but not the N, GN or NSM genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NSS, confirming that expression of NSS is likely responsible for this phenomenon.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression signatures in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-hui; Fu, Sheng-bo; Xiao, Hua-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is an extremely diverse and complex disease that results from various genetic and epigenetic changes such as DNA copy-number variations, mutations, and aberrant mRNA and/or protein expression caused by abnormal transcriptional regulation. The expression profiles of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are closely related to cancer progression stages. In the past few decades, DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing techniques have been widely applied to identify miRNA and mRNA signatures for cancers on a genome-wide scale and have provided meaningful insights into cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize the progress in genome-wide analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs as cancer biomarkers, highlighting their diagnostic and prognostic roles. PMID:26299954

  18. Chronic nicotine and smoking treatment increases dopamine transporter mRNA expression in the rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shupeng; Kim, Kun Yang; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Moon Seok; Bahk, Jong Yoon; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2004-06-03

    Previous pharmacokinetics and electrophysiological results indicated an important role of nicotine in the modulation of dopamine transporter (DAT). To elucidate the expression changes of DAT on chronic nicotine and smoke administration, the effects of nicotine and passive cigarette smoke on DAT mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the substantia nigra (SN) area were examined using in situ hybridization and RNase protection assay. The results showed that chronic nicotine and smoke exposure highly unregulated DAT mRNA in the VTA and SN areas, including the dorsal part of substantia nigra pars compacta. Smoke for 30 min showed the highest increasing effect, whereas nicotine and smoke for 10 min only had slightly increasing effects. However, smoke for 1 h showed an increasing effect to a lesser extent than 30 min. These results revealed a new aspect of nicotine's modulation on the DAT, and may have important roles in neuropsychological disorders related to the midbrain abnormalities such as drugs addiction.

  19. Ghrelin and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ezquerro, Silvia; Frühbeck, Gema; Rodríguez, Amaia

    2017-09-01

    A compromised autophagy is associated with the onset of obesity, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Our aim is to review the potential role of ghrelin, a gut hormone involved in energy homeostasis, in the regulation of autophagy. In the recent years, it has been demonstrated that autophagy constitutes an important mechanism by which ghrelin exerts a plethora of central and peripheral actions. Ghrelin enhances autophagy through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in different target organs to regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, the remodeling and protection of small intestine mucosa, protection against cardiac ischemia as well as higher brain functions such as learning and memory consolidation. Nonetheless, in inflammatory states, such as acute hepatitis, liver fibrosis or adipose tissue inflammation, ghrelin acts as an anti-inflammatory factor reducing the autophagic flux to prevent further cell injury. Interestingly, several cardiometabolic disorders, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or chronic heart failure are accompanied by low ghrelin levels in addition to altered autophagy. Ghrelin represents an attractive target for development of therapeutics for prevention or treatment of metabolic, cardiac or neuronal disorders, in which autophagy is impaired.

  20. [Ghrelin: beyond hunger regulation].

    PubMed

    Milke García, Maria del Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Man ingests food to mitigate hunger (mediated by physiological and biochemical signals), satisfy appetite (subjective sensation) and because of psychosocial reasons. Satiation biomarkers (stop feeding) are gastric distention and hormones (CCK, GLP-1) and satiety biomarkers (induce feeding) are food-induced thermogenesis, body temperature, glycaemia and also hormones (insulin, leptin and ghrelin). Oxidative metabolism/body composition, tryptophan/serotonin and proinflammatory cytokines are also implicated on hunger physiology. At the present time, ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic with potential on hunger/body weight regulation. It is a neuropeptide (endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue) recently isolated from the oxyntic mucosa and synthesized mainly in the stomach. Its blood concentration depends on diet, hyperglucemia and adiposity/leptin. It is secreted 1-2 hours preprandially and its concentration decreases drastically during the postprandium. Ghrelin acts on the lateral hypothalamus and theoretically inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and antagonizes leptin. Ghrelin physiologically increases food intake and stimulates adipogenesis, gastrointestinal motility and gastric acid secretion, and has other hormonal and cardiovascular functions. Ghrelin blood concentration is reduced in massive obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, polycystic ovary syndrome, acromegaly, hypogonadism, ageing, short bowel syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis; and increased in primary or secondary anorexia, starvation, chronic liver disease and celiac disease. Cerebral and peritoneal ghrelin administration (rats) and systemic administration (rats and healthy volunteers, cancer patients or patients on peritoneal dialysis) promotes food consumption and increases adiposity, of utmost importance in the treatment of patients with anorexia.

  1. Anesthesia for euthanasia influences mRNA expression in healthy mice and after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Staib-Lasarzik, Irina; Kriege, Oliver; Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Pieter, Dana; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2014-10-01

    Tissue sampling for gene expression analysis is usually performed under general anesthesia. Anesthetics are known to modulate hemodynamics, receptor-mediated signaling cascades, and outcome parameters. The present study determined the influence of anesthetic paradigms typically used for euthanization and tissue sampling on cerebral mRNA expression in mice. Naïve mice and animals with acute traumatic brain injury induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) were randomized to the following euthanasia protocols (n=10-11/group): no anesthesia (NA), 1 min of 4 vol% isoflurane in room air (ISO), 3 min of a combination of 5 mg/kg midazolam, 0.05 mg/kg fentanyl, and 0.5 mg/kg medetomidine intraperitoneally (COMB), or 3 min of 360 mg/kg chloral hydrate intraperitoneally (CH). mRNA expression of actin-1-related gene (Act1), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (FosB), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), heat shock protein beta-1 (HspB1), interleukin (IL)-6, tight junction protein 1 (ZO-1), IL-1ß, cyclophilin A, micro RNA 497 (miR497), and small cajal body-specific RNA 17 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in hippocampus samples. In naïve animals, Act1 expression was downregulated in the CH group compared with NA. FosB expression was downregulated in COMB and CH groups compared with NA. CCI reduced Act1 and FosB expression, whereas HspB1 and TNFα expression increased. After CCI, HspB1 expression was significantly higher in ISO, COMB, and CH groups, and TNFα expression was elevated in ISO and COMB groups. MiR497, IL-6, and IL-1ß were upregulated after CCI but not affected by anesthetics. Effects were independent of absolute mRNA copy numbers. The data demonstrate that a few minutes of anesthesia before tissue sampling are sufficient to induce immediate mRNA changes, which seem to predominate in the early-regulated gene cluster. Anesthesia-related effects on gene expression might explain limited reproduciblity of real

  2. Anesthesia for Euthanasia Influences mRNA Expression in Healthy Mice and after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Staib-Lasarzik, Irina; Kriege, Oliver; Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Pieter, Dana; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tissue sampling for gene expression analysis is usually performed under general anesthesia. Anesthetics are known to modulate hemodynamics, receptor-mediated signaling cascades, and outcome parameters. The present study determined the influence of anesthetic paradigms typically used for euthanization and tissue sampling on cerebral mRNA expression in mice. Naïve mice and animals with acute traumatic brain injury induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) were randomized to the following euthanasia protocols (n=10–11/group): no anesthesia (NA), 1 min of 4 vol% isoflurane in room air (ISO), 3 min of a combination of 5 mg/kg midazolam, 0.05 mg/kg fentanyl, and 0.5 mg/kg medetomidine intraperitoneally (COMB), or 3 min of 360 mg/kg chloral hydrate intraperitoneally (CH). mRNA expression of actin-1-related gene (Act1), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (FosB), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), heat shock protein beta-1 (HspB1), interleukin (IL)-6, tight junction protein 1 (ZO-1), IL-1ß, cyclophilin A, micro RNA 497 (miR497), and small cajal body-specific RNA 17 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in hippocampus samples. In naïve animals, Act1 expression was downregulated in the CH group compared with NA. FosB expression was downregulated in COMB and CH groups compared with NA. CCI reduced Act1 and FosB expression, whereas HspB1 and TNFα expression increased. After CCI, HspB1 expression was significantly higher in ISO, COMB, and CH groups, and TNFα expression was elevated in ISO and COMB groups. MiR497, IL-6, and IL-1ß were upregulated after CCI but not affected by anesthetics. Effects were independent of absolute mRNA copy numbers. The data demonstrate that a few minutes of anesthesia before tissue sampling are sufficient to induce immediate mRNA changes, which seem to predominate in the early-regulated gene cluster. Anesthesia-related effects on gene expression might explain limited

  3. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D.; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D.; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas comparedwith normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24–72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca2+ and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  4. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2015-03-04

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas compared with normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24-72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca(2+) and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors.

  5. Cloning, comparative sequence analysis and mRNA expression of calcium-transporting genes in horses.

    PubMed

    Rourke, K M; Coe, S; Kohn, C W; Rosol, T J; Mendoza, F J; Toribio, R E

    2010-05-15

    Epithelial calcium transport occurs by paracellular and transcellular mechanisms. Transcellular transport in intestinal and renal epithelia involves several transport proteins, including transient receptor potential vanilloid member 5 (TRPV5), member 6 (TRPV6), calbindin D9k (CB9), calbindin D28k (CB28), sodium calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1), plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1 (PMCA1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We are interested in the horse because of its unique calcium physiology (high blood calcium, high intestinal calcium absorption, high renal excretion of calcium, low vitamin D concentrations), and because horses often have dysregulated calcium balance with various diseases. We cloned the mRNA for equine TRPV5, TRPV6, CB9, CB28, NCX1, PMCA1, and VDR, performed comparative mRNA and protein sequence analysis, and quantified their mRNA expression in the kidney and gastrointestinal tract. Sequence homology for the mRNAs and proteins was high among mammals (>75%), with fish having the lowest homology (<75%). TRPV5, TRPV6, and CB9 expression was higher in the duodenum and proximal jejunum and followed a similar expression pattern. CB28 expression was greatest in the kidney. PMCA1 and NCX1 expression was similar throughout the intestine, but in the kidney PMCA1 expression was higher. Based on our findings, the proximal small intestine is the main site for transcellular calcium transport, with TRPV6 and CB9 serving as the main transport proteins. In the kidney, TRPV6, CB28, and PMCA1 are likely more important. The low VDR expression in the equine small intestine and kidney relative to the large intestine, together with the reported high intestinal absorption and renal excretion of calcium, and low vitamin D concentrations suggests that epithelial calcium transport in horses is not as dependent on vitamin D as in other species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Progressive APOBEC3B mRNA expression in distant breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; de Weerd, Vanja; Moelans, Cathy B.; ter Hoeve, Natalie; van Diest, Paul J.; Martens, John W. M.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background APOBEC3B was recently identified as a gain-of-function enzymatic source of mutagenesis, which may offer novel therapeutic options with molecules that specifically target this enzyme. In primary breast cancer, APOBEC3B mRNA is deregulated in a substantial proportion of cases and its expression is associated with poor prognosis. However, its expression in breast cancer metastases, which are the main causes of breast cancer-related death, remained to be elucidated. Patients and methods RNA was isolated from 55 primary breast cancers and paired metastases, including regional lymph node (N = 20) and distant metastases (N = 35). APOBEC3B mRNA levels were measured by RT-qPCR. Expression levels of the primary tumors and corresponding metastases were compared, including subgroup analysis by estrogen receptor (ER/ESR1) status. Results Overall, APOBEC3B mRNA levels of distant metastases were significantly higher as compared to the corresponding primary breast tumor (P = 0.0015), an effect that was not seen for loco-regional lymph node metastases (P = 0.23). Subgroup analysis by ER-status showed that increased APOBEC3B levels in distant metastases were restricted to metastases arising from ER-positive primary breast cancers (P = 0.002). However, regarding ER-negative primary tumors, only loco-regional lymph node metastases showed increased APOBEC3B expression when compared to the corresponding primary tumor (P = 0.028). Conclusion APOBEC3B mRNA levels are significantly higher in breast cancer metastases as compared to the corresponding ER-positive primary tumors. This suggests a potential role for APOBEC3B in luminal breast cancer progression, and consequently, a promising role for anti-APOBEC3B therapies in advanced stages of this frequent form of breast cancer. PMID:28141868

  7. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  8. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  9. Conditioned Fear Inhibits c-fos mRNA Expression in the Central Extended Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Day, Heidi E.W.; Kryskow, Elisa M.; Nyhuis, Tara J.; Herlihy, Lauren; Campeau, Serge

    2008-01-01

    We have shown previously that unconditioned stressors inhibit neurons of the lateral/capsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEAl/c) and oval division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTov), which form part of the central extended amygdala. The current study investigated whether conditioned fear inhibits c-fos mRNA expression in these regions. Male rats were trained either to associate a visual stimulus (light) with footshock or were exposed to the light alone. After training, animals were replaced in the apparatus, and 2 hours later injected remotely, via a catheter, with amphetamine (2 mg/kg i.p.), to induce c-fos mRNA and allow inhibition of expression to be measured. The rats were then presented with 15 visual stimuli over a 30 minute period. As expected, fear conditioned animals that were not injected with amphetamine, had extremely low levels of c-fos mRNA in the central extended amygdala. In contrast, animals that were trained with the light alone (no fear conditioning) and were injected with amphetamine had high levels of c-fos mRNA in the CEAl/c and BSTov. Animals that underwent fear-conditioning, and were re-exposed to the conditioned stimulus after amphetamine injection had significantly reduced levels of c-fos mRNA in both the BSTov and CEAl/c, compared to the non-conditioned animals. These data suggest that conditioned fear can inhibit neurons of the central extended amygdala. Because these neurons are GABAergic, and project to the medial CEA (an amygdaloid output region), this may be a novel mechanism whereby conditioned fear potentiates amygdaloid output. PMID:18634767

  10. Nutritional control of mRNA isoform expression during developmental arrest and recovery in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Colin S; Antoshechkin, Igor; Kurhanewicz, Nicole; Belsky, Jason A; Baugh, L Ryan

    2012-10-01

    Nutrient availability profoundly influences gene expression. Many animal genes encode multiple transcript isoforms, yet the effect of nutrient availability on transcript isoform expression has not been studied in genome-wide fashion. When Caenorhabditis elegans larvae hatch without food, they arrest development in the first larval stage (L1 arrest). Starved larvae can survive L1 arrest for weeks, but growth and post-embryonic development are rapidly initiated in response to feeding. We used RNA-seq to characterize the transcriptome during L1 arrest and over time after feeding. Twenty-seven percent of detectable protein-coding genes were differentially expressed during recovery from L1 arrest, with the majority of changes initiating within the first hour, demonstrating widespread, acute effects of nutrient availability on gene expression. We used two independent approaches to track expression of individual exons and mRNA isoforms, and we connected changes in expression to functional consequences by mining a variety of databases. These two approaches identified an overlapping set of genes with alternative isoform expression, and they converged on common functional patterns. Genes affecting mRNA splicing and translation are regulated by alternative isoform expression, revealing post-transcriptional consequences of nutrient availability on gene regulation. We also found that phosphorylation sites are often alternatively expressed, revealing a common mode by which alternative isoform expression modifies protein function and signal transduction. Our results detail rich changes in C. elegans gene expression as larvae initiate growth and post-embryonic development, and they provide an excellent resource for ongoing investigation of transcriptional regulation and developmental physiology.

  11. Developmental and tissue-specific expression of prosaposin mRNA in murine tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.; Witte, D. P.; Grabowski, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Prosaposin is a multifunctional locus in humans and mice that encodes in tandem and in the same reading frame four glycoprotein activators, or saposins, of lysosomal hydrolases. These ubiquitously expressed glycoproteins and the precursor, prosaposin, have been proposed to function in glycosphingolipid catabolic pathways and glycolipid transport. To characterize the temporal and spatial expression of the prosaposin locus, prenatal and postnatal mouse tissues were screened by in situ hybridization with a mouse antisense riboprobe for prosaposin. Prenatally, prosaposin mRNA was expressed differentially in the placenta and prominently in the decidua basalis and capsularis where expression was gestational age dependent. No other region of high-level expression was detectable in the prenatal mouse. In comparison, high-level differential expression of prosaposin was clearly evident postnatally in a variety of organs, including secretory epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, ependymal lining, upper trachea, esophagus, cortical tubules of the kidney, sertoli cells of the testes and epididymis. Discrete localization of prosaposin mRNA expression was also found in neurons of the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, and lateral columns of the spinal cord as well as in hepatocytes of the mature liver. Very high levels of expression were found in specialized tissues including the Harderian glands and macrophages of lymph nodes, lungs, splenic tissue, and thymus. These studies indicate that the expression of the prosaposin locus, a presumed "housekeeping" gene, is under tissue- and cell-specific differential control. The spatial organization of expression suggests a role for this locus in the expression of glycosphingolipid-storage diseases. Images Figure 2 PMID:7992842

  12. Hormone and metabolic factors associated with leptin mRNA expression in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Martha E; Malacara, Juan M; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2004-06-01

    Recent information has extended leptin's action, beyond the control of appetite, to various sites of metabolic regulation. To better understand leptin's role we studied its production in subcutaneous and visceral fat compartments before and after menopause. During elective abdominal surgery, biopsies of subcutaneous and omental tissues were taken from 20 women at pre- (BMI 28.4 +/- 4.5 kg/m2) and 10 at postmenopause (BMI 30.6 +/- 7.7 kg/m2). In both groups serum leptin levels were similar, and highly correlated with BMI. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, leptin mRNA expression was significantly higher in pre- than in postmenopausal women (50.4 +/- 20.5 amol/microg total RNA versus 34.5 +/- 24.9 amol/microg total RNA, respectively). Leptin mRNA expression in subcutaneous tissue was independently correlated with fasting glucose (R = 0.89, P < 0.006) at premenopause, and with serum estradiol (R = 0.77, P < 0.04) at postmenopause. Leptin mRNA expression in visceral fat was correlated with DHEAS (R = 0.86, P < 0.001), at premenopause. These results indicate that in both compartments, leptin production is sensitive to different but overlapping stimuli, conveying information about energy availability to central and peripheral sites under different conditions of estrogen exposure.

  13. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  14. Expression of connexin 43 mRNA and protein in developing follicles of prepubertal porcine ovaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melton, C.M.; Zaunbrecher, G.M.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patio, R.; Whisnant, S.; Rendon, A.; Lee, V.H.

    2001-01-01

    A major form of cell-cell communication is mediated by gap junctions, aggregations of intercellular channels composed of connexins (Cxs), which are responsible for exchange of low molecular weight (< 1200 Da) cytosolic materials. These channels are a growing family of related proteins. This study was designed to determine the ontogeny of connexin 43 (Cx43) during early stages of follicular development in prepubertal porcine ovaries. A partial-length (412 base) cDNA clone was obtained from mature porcine ovaries and determined to have 98% identity with published porcine Cx43. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.3-kb mRNA in total RNA isolated from prepubertal and adult porcine ovaries. In-situ hybridization revealed that Cx43 mRNA was detectable in granulosa cells of primary follicles but undetectable in dormant primordial follicles. The intensity of the signal increased with follicular growth and was greatest in the large antral follicles. Immunohistochemical evaluation indicated that Cx43 protein expression correlated with the presence of Cx43 mRNA. These results indicate that substantial amounts of Cx43 are first expressed in granulosa cells following activation of follicular development and that this expression increases throughout follicular growth and maturation. These findings suggest an association between the enhancement of intercellular gap-junctional communication and onset of follicular growth. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1.

    PubMed

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem-loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3' splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing.

  16. Distinct prognostic values of four-Notch-receptor mRNA expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinling; Teng, Lingling; Wang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling pathway includes ligands and Notch receptors, which are frequently deregulated in several human malignancies including ovarian cancer. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been linked to ovarian carcinogenesis and progression. In the current study, we used the "Kaplan-Meier plotter" (KM plotter) database, in which updated gene expression data and survival information from a total of 1306 ovarian cancer patients were used to access the prognostic value of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer patients. Hazard ratio (HR), 95 % confidence intervals, and log-rank P were calculated. Notch1 messenger RNA (mRNA) high expression was not found to be correlated to overall survival (OS) for all ovarian cancer, as well as in serous and endometrioid cancer patients followed for 20 years. However, Notch1 mRNA high expression is significantly associated with worsen OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, while it is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 mutation-type ovarian cancer patients. Notch2 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to worsen OS for all ovarian cancer patients, as well as in grade II ovarian cancer patients. Notch3 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to better OS for all ovarian cancer patients, but not in serous cancer patients and endometrioid cancer patients. Notch4 mRNA high expression was not found to be significantly correlated to OS for all ovarian cancer patients, serous cancer patients, and endometrioid cancer patients. These results indicate that there are distinct prognostic values of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer. This information will be useful for better understanding of the heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of ovarian cancer and for developing tools to more accurately predict their prognosis. Based on our results, Notch1 could be a potential drug target of TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer and Notch2 could be a potential drug

  17. Determination of ghrelin immunoreactivity in the rat stomach after fasting and refeeding.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Mehmet Fatih; Ozan, Enver

    2007-01-01

    Ghrelin is a recently discovered hormone secreted by cells of the stomach. The aim of this study was to investigate fasting and refeeding induced alterations on ghrelin immunolabelling of cells of the stomach. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats were used in this study. Rats were divided into six groups. Group I: control group; Group II: rats fasted for 7 days; Group III: rats fed for 1 day after 7 days of fasting; Group IV: rats fed for 3 days after 7 days of fasting; Group V: rats fed for 5 days after 7 days of fasting; Group VI: rats fed for 7 days after 7 days of fasting. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed and stomach tissues were processed for imunohistochemistry to localize ghrelin. Ghrelin-immunopositive cells were detected only in the mucosal lining of the stomach. After fasting for 7 days, the number of ghrelin-immunopositive cells increased significantly compared to the control rats. Following refeeding, the number of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells was reduced to a level comparable to the controls. Therefore, fasting and refeeding after fasting were observed to result in changes in ghrelin immunoreactivity in the cells of the stomach. We conclude that ghrelin is highly expressed in the stomach and that fasting increases the expression of ghrelin in the stomach, but this expression decreases after refeeding. Our results indicate that regulation of ghrelin is a process probably involved in the long-term control of nutritional states.

  18. Ghrelin produces antidepressant-like effect in the estrogen deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Li, Bing Jin; Wang, Xue Feng; Zhong, Li Li; Cui, Ran Ji

    2017-08-29

    Recent evidence shows that ghrelin plays an important role in depression. However, it was little known whether ghrelin produces antidepressant-like effect in the ovariectomized mice. The present study was aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of the ghrelin in ovariectomized mice. In the forced swim test, ghrelin significantly decreased immobility time, reversing the "depressive-like" effect observed in ovariectomized mice, and this effect was reversed by the tamoxifen. In addition, immunohistochemical study indicated that ghrelin treatment reversed the reductions in c-Fos expression induced by ovariectomy. An estrogen antagonist tamoxifen also antagonized the effect of ghrelin on the c-Fos expression. Furthermore, the western blotting indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus, but not phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)/CREB in the frontal cortex, were affected by ghrelin treatment. Ghrelin treatment significantly increased BrdU expression. Therefore, these findings suggest that ghrelin produces antidepressant-like effects in ovariectomized mice, and estrogen receptor may be involved in the antidepressant-like effects of the ghrelin.

  19. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  20. Ghrelin improves vascular autophagy in rats with vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingming; Liu, Lin; Song, Chenfang; Chen, Wei; Gui, Shuyan

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether ghrelin ameliorated vascular calcification (VC) through improving autophagy. VC model was induced by nicotine plus vitamin D3 in rats and β-glycerophosphate in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Calcium deposition was detected by von Kossa staining or alizarin red S staining. ALP activity was also detected. Western blot was used to assess the protein expression. Ghrelin treatment attenuated the elevation of calcium deposition and ALP activity in VC model both in vivo and in vitro. Interesting, the protein levels of autophagy markers, LC3 and beclin1 were significantly upregulated by ghrelin in VC model. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine blocks the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on VC. Furthermore, protein expressions of phosphate-AMPK were increased by ghrelin treatment both in calcified aorta and VSMC. The effect of ghrelin on autophagy induction and VC attenuation was prevented by AMPK inhibitor, compound C. Our results suggested that ghrelin improved autophagy through AMPK activation, which was resulted in VC amelioration. These data maybe throw light on prevention and therapy of VC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sequencing of mRNA identifies re-expression of fetal splice variants in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ames, E G; Lawson, M J; Mackey, A J; Holmes, J W

    2013-09-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy has been well-characterized at the level of transcription. During cardiac hypertrophy, genes normally expressed primarily during fetal heart development are re-expressed, and this fetal gene program is believed to be a critical component of the hypertrophic process. Recently, alternative splicing of mRNA transcripts has been shown to be temporally regulated during heart development, leading us to consider whether fetal patterns of splicing also reappear during hypertrophy. We hypothesized that patterns of alternative splicing occurring during heart development are recapitulated during cardiac hypertrophy. Here we present a study of isoform expression during pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy induced by 10 days of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in rats and in developing fetal rat hearts compared to sham-operated adult rat hearts, using high-throughput sequencing of poly(A) tail mRNA. We find a striking degree of overlap between the isoforms expressed differentially in fetal and pressure-overloaded hearts compared to control: forty-four percent of the isoforms with significantly altered expression in TAC hearts are also expressed at significantly different levels in fetal hearts compared to control (P<0.001). The isoforms that are shared between hypertrophy and fetal heart development are significantly enriched for genes involved in cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, developmental processes, and metabolic enzymes. Our data strongly support the concept that mRNA splicing patterns normally associated with heart development recur as part of the hypertrophic response to pressure overload. These findings suggest that cardiac hypertrophy shares post-transcriptional as well as transcriptional regulatory mechanisms with fetal heart development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of global mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle during recovery from endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, D J; Parise, G; Melov, S; Safdar, A; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2005-09-01

    To search for novel transcriptional pathways that are activated in skeletal muscle after endurance exercise, we used cDNA microarrays to measure global mRNA expression after an exhaustive bout of high-intensity cycling (approximately 75 min). Healthy, young, sedentary males performed the cycling bout, and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before, and at 3 and 48 h after exercise. We examined mRNA expression in individual muscle samples from four subjects using cDNA microarrays, used repeated-measures significance analysis of microarray (SAM) to determine statistically significant expression changes, and confirmed selected results using real-time RT-PCR. In total, the expression of 118 genes significantly increased 3 h postcycling and 8 decreased. At 48 h, the expression of 29 genes significantly increased and 5 decreased. Many of these are potentially important novel genes involved in exercise recovery and adaptation, including several involved in 1) metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis (FOXO1, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, nuclear receptor binding protein 2, IL-6 receptor, ribosomal protein L2, aminolevulinate delta-synthase 2); 2) the oxidant stress response (metalothioneins 1B, 1F, 1G, 1H, 1L, 2A, 3, interferon regulatory factor 1); and 3) electrolyte transport across membranes [Na+-K+-ATPase (beta3), SERCA3, chloride channel 4]. Others include genes involved in cell stress, proteolysis, apoptosis, growth, differentiation, and transcriptional activation, as well as all three nuclear receptor subfamily 4A family members (Nur77, Nurr1, and Nor1). This study is the first to characterize global mRNA expression during recovery from endurance exercise, and the results provide potential insight into 1) the transcriptional contributions to homeostatic recovery in human skeletal muscle after endurance exercise, and 2) the transcriptional contributions from a single bout of endurance exercise to the adaptive processes that occur after a period of

  3. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  4. DDR2 polymorphisms and mRNA expression in lung cancers of Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidefumi; Shitara, Masayuki; Yokota, Keisuke; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Hikosaka, Yu; Moriyama, Satoru; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2012-07-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2, DDR2, is a tyrosine kinase receptor for fibrillar collagen that is involved in postnatal development, tissue repair and primary and metastatic cancer progression. Recently, mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene were identified in squamous cell lung cancer from large-scale Sanger sequencing. The present study investigated the DDR2 gene mutations and mRNA expression in surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of squamous histology cases. The presence or absence of DDR2 mutations at the kinase and discoidin domain was analyzed by direct sequencing. In this cohort, DDR2 mutations were not observed in the 166 patients with lung cancer, although DDR2 polymorphisms were observed (H136H, n=14) at the discoidin domain. mRNA levels of DDR2 in lung tumor samples and the adjacent normal lung samples were simultaneously analyzed. DDR2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in tumor samples compared with normal lung samples. However, the DDR2 mRNA levels were elevated in the DDR2 polymorphism cases.

  5. Hypoxia-induced gene expression results from selective mRNA partitioning to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Jonas J.; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S.; Ujvari, Stefanie J.; Klinger, Bertram; Kasim, Mumtaz; Benko, Edgar; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.; Bondke Persson, Anja; Lorenzen, Stephan; Meier, Jochen C.; Blüthgen, Nils; Persson, Pontus B.; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Mrowka, Ralf; Fähling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a primary energy-consuming process in the cell. Therefore, under hypoxic conditions, rapid inhibition of global mRNA translation represents a major protective strategy to maintain energy metabolism. How some mRNAs, especially those that encode crucial survival factors, continue to be efficiently translated in hypoxia is not completely understood. By comparing specific transcript levels in ribonucleoprotein complexes, cytoplasmic polysomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes, we show that the synthesis of proteins encoded by hypoxia marker genes is favoured at the ER in hypoxia. Gene expression profiling revealed that transcripts particularly increased by the HIF-1 transcription factor network show hypoxia-induced enrichment at the ER. We found that mRNAs favourably translated at the ER have higher conservation scores for both the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) and contain less upstream initiation codons (uAUGs), indicating the significance of these sequence elements for sustained mRNA translation under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, we found enrichment of specific cis-elements in mRNA 5′- as well as 3′-UTRs that mediate transcript localization to the ER in hypoxia. We conclude that transcriptome partitioning between the cytoplasm and the ER permits selective mRNA translation under conditions of energy shortage. PMID:25753659

  6. Translational signatures and mRNA levels are highly correlated in human stably expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Line, Sergio R P; Liu, Xiaoming; de Souza, Ana Paula; Yu, Fuli

    2013-04-19

    Gene expression is one of the most relevant biological processes of living cells. Due to the relative small population sizes, it is predicted that human gene sequences are not strongly influenced by selection towards expression efficiency. One of the major problems in estimating to what extent gene characteristics can be selected to maximize expression efficiency is the wide variation that exists in RNA and protein levels among physiological states and different tissues. Analyses of datasets of stably expressed genes (i.e. with consistent expression between physiological states and tissues) would provide more accurate and reliable measurements of associations between variations of a specific gene characteristic and expression, and how distinct gene features work to optimize gene expression. Using a dataset of human genes with consistent expression between physiological states we selected gene sequence signatures related to translation that can predict about 42% of mRNA variation. The prediction can be increased to 51% when selecting genes that are stably expressed in more than 1 tissue. These genes are enriched for translation and ribosome biosynthesis processes and have higher translation efficiency scores, smaller coding sequences and 3' UTR sizes and lower folding energies when compared to other datasets. Additionally, the amino acid frequencies weighted by expression showed higher correlations with isoacceptor tRNA gene copy number, and smaller absolute correlation values with biosynthetic costs. Our results indicate that human gene sequence characteristics related to transcription and translation processes can co-evolve in an integrated manner in order to optimize gene expression.

  7. Organ specific expression of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA and protein in different human tissues.

    PubMed

    Shahrara, S; Drvota, V; Sylvén, C

    1999-10-01

    The major physiologic effect of thyroid hormone is thought to be initiated by the binding of T3 to the DNA binding thyroid hormone receptor (TR). The aim of this study has been to characterize the organ specific expression of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA, as well as its protein distribution and molecular weight in man. Determination of TRalpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2 mRNA molecular size was performed using Northern blot analysis in the human heart, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and pancreas. TRalpha1, alpha2 and beta1 protein expression was characterized by Western blot analysis of human tissues. TRalpha1 mRNA of 4.9 kb was detected in all 8 tissues analyzed, with varying abundance in the various tissues. TRalpha2 mRNA was detected in 2 different sizes, with higher intensity at 5.7 and lower intensity at 3.2 kb. There were, however, multiple TRbeta1 mRNA of 8, 2 and 1 kb detected. TRbeta1 transcripts of 2 kb and 1 kb showed an organ specific pattern of expression. Multiple TRbeta2 mRNA of 6.6, 5.2, 2.5 and 2.4 kb were detected, as well as a unique 1 kb transcript, in the heart. TRbeta2 transcripts also displayed tissue specific expression. Western blot analysis displayed a single band of 48 kD for TRalpha1. The abundance of the TRalpha1 immunoreactive band was highest in the heart, brain, kidney and skeletal muscle, and lowest in the liver, placenta and lung, while no signals were detected in the spleen. The TRalpha2 specific antibody detected a band of 58 kD in all the tissues analyzed. The relative intensity of the immunoreactive TRalpha2 band detected was highest in the placenta and lung, with a medium concentration range in skeletal muscle, the heart and kidney. The TRalpha2 protein concentration was lowest in the spleen, liver and brain. Human TRbeta1 protein was detected as 55 and 52 kD bands, as well as a unique band of 45 kD in heart. The 52 kD band was detected in all tissues except the kidney and spleen. The 55 kD band was not

  8. Seasonal relationship between gonadotropin, growth hormone, and estrogen receptor mRNA expression in the pituitary gland of largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Kroll, Kevin J; Porak, Wesley F; Steward, Cheree; Grier, Harry J; Denslow, Nancy D

    2009-09-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the seasonal changes in pituitary gonadotropins, growth hormone (GH), and estrogen receptor (ER) isoform mRNA in wild female and male largemouth bass (LMB) (Micropterus salmoides) from an unpolluted habitat to better understand reproductive physiology in this ecologically important species. Female pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) beta subunit and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) beta subunit mRNA showed significant seasonal variation with levels peaking from January to April and were lowest from May to August. Male LMB showed more variation in gonadotropin subunit expression from month to month. Females had approximately 2-3 times higher gonadotropin mRNA levels in the pituitary when compared to males. All three gonadotropin mRNAs in females were positively correlated to gonadosomatic index (GSI), but only LHbeta mRNA was correlated to GSI in males. Gonadotropin mRNA expression also increased with increasing oocyte and sperm maturation. Gonadotropin beta subunit mRNA expression was positively correlated to GH mRNA in both sexes. The expression of all three ER isoforms was significantly correlated to each other in both sexes. The concurrent increase in all three ER mRNA isoforms with increasing gonadotropin mRNA in females and males suggests a prominent role for E2 feedback on pituitary gonadotropin synthesis in both sexes and that each of the three ER isoforms are likely to play a role in the pituitary during teleost reproduction.

  9. Seasonal Relationship between Gonadotropin, Growth Hormone, and Estrogen Receptor mRNA Expression in the Pituitary Gland of Largemouth Bass

    PubMed Central

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Kroll, Kevin J.; Porak, Wesley F.; Steward, Cheree; Grier, Harry J.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the seasonal changes in pituitary gonadotropins, growth hormone (GH), and estrogen receptor (ER) isoform mRNA in wild female and male largemouth bass (LMB) (Micropterus salmoides) from an unpolluted habitat to better understand reproductive physiology in this ecologically important species. Female pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) β subunit and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) β subunit mRNA showed significant seasonal variation with levels peaking from January to April and were lowest from May through August. Male LMB showed more variation in gonadotropin subunit expression from month to month. Females had approximately 2–3 times higher gonadotropin mRNA levels in the pituitary when compared to males. All three gonadotropin mRNAs in females were positively correlated to gonadosomatic index (GSI), but only LHβ mRNA was correlated to GSI in males. Gonadotropin mRNA expression also increased with increasing oocyte and sperm maturation. Gonadotropin β subunit mRNA expression was positively correlated to GH mRNA in both sexes. The expression of all three ER isoforms was significantly correlated to each other in both sexes. The concurrent increase in all three ER mRNA isoforms with increasing gonadotropin mRNA in females and males suggests a prominent role for E2 feedback on pituitary gonadotropin synthesis in both sexes and that each of the three ER isoforms are likely to play a role in the pituitary during teleost reproduction. PMID:19416730

  10. Optimization of mRNA design for protein expression in the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Törner, Kerstin; Nakanishi, Takashi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    The water flea Daphnia is a new model organism for ecological, evolutionary, and toxicological genomics. Detailed functional analysis of genes newly discovered through genomic approaches often requires overexpression of the identified protein. In the present study, we report the microinjection of in vitro-synthesized RNAs into the eggs as a method for overexpressing ubiquitous proteins in Daphnia magna. We injected a 1.3-kb mRNA that coded for the red fluorescent protein (DsRed2) flanked by UTRs from the ubiquitously expressed elongation factor 1α-1 (EF1α-1) into D. magna embryos. DsRed2 fluorescence in the embryos was measured 24 h after microinjection. Unexpectedly, the reporter RNA containing the 522-bp full-length EF1α-1 3' UTR failed to induce fluorescence. To assess reporter expression, the length of the 3' UTR that potentially contained negative regulatory elements of protein expression, including AU-rich regions and Musashi binding elements, was serially reduced from the 3' end. Assessing all injected RNA alternatives, mRNA containing the first 60 bp of the 3' UTR gave rise to the highest fluorescence, 14 times the Daphnia auto-fluorescence. In contrast, mRNA lacking the entire 3' UTR hardly induced any change in fluorescence intensity. This is the first evaluation of UTRs of mRNAs delivered into Daphnia embryos by microinjection for overexpressing proteins. The mRNA with truncated 3' UTRs of Daphnia EF1α-1 will be useful not only for gain-of-function analyses but also for labeling proteins and organelles with fluorescent proteins in Daphnia.

  11. The Role of Neuropeptide Y mRNA Expression Level in Distinguishing Different Types of Depression.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yingying; Jiang, Haitang; Yin, Yingying; Zhang, Yuqun; Liang, Jinfeng; Li, Shenghua; Wang, Jun; Lu, Jianxin; Geng, Deqin; Wu, Aiqin; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the protein of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abnormal in depression patients, but the changes of NPY in different types of depression are unclear. This study was aimed to examine protein and mRNA expression levels of NPY in 159 cases with four groups including post-stroke depression (PSD) group, stroke without depression (Non-PSD) group, major depressive disorder (MDD) group and normal control (NC) group. The protein and gene expression analysis were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based methods. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests and nonparametric test were used to evaluate general characteristics, clinical and biological materials. In order to explore the role of NPY in different types of depression, the partial correlations, binary logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated for PSD and MDD groups. There are significant differences of NPY protein (Fdf(3) = 5.167, P = 0.002) and mRNA expression levels ([Formula: see text] = 20.541, P < 0.001) among four groups. Bonferroni multiple comparisons found that the NPY protein was significantly decreased in PSD (FBonferroni = -7.133, P = 0.002) and Non-PSD group (FBonferroni = -5.612, P = 0.018) compared with NC group. However, contrasted with MDD group, the mRNA expression was increased in PSD and Non-PSD group by nonparametric test (all P < 0.05). In binary logistic analyses, NPY mRNA expression was independent predictors of PSD (odds ratio: 1.452, 95% CI, 1.081-1.951, P = 0.013). The ROC curve showed NPY mRNA had a general prognostic accuracy (area under the curve: 0.766, 95% CI, 0.656-0.876, P < 0.001). This is the first study to explore the distinguishing function of NPY in different types of depression. It will provide help in the identification of different subtypes of depression.

  12. The Role of Neuropeptide Y mRNA Expression Level in Distinguishing Different Types of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yingying; Jiang, Haitang; Yin, Yingying; Zhang, Yuqun; Liang, Jinfeng; Li, Shenghua; Wang, Jun; Lu, Jianxin; Geng, Deqin; Wu, Aiqin; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the protein of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abnormal in depression patients, but the changes of NPY in different types of depression are unclear. This study was aimed to examine protein and mRNA expression levels of NPY in 159 cases with four groups including post-stroke depression (PSD) group, stroke without depression (Non-PSD) group, major depressive disorder (MDD) group and normal control (NC) group. The protein and gene expression analysis were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based methods. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests and nonparametric test were used to evaluate general characteristics, clinical and biological materials. In order to explore the role of NPY in different types of depression, the partial correlations, binary logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated for PSD and MDD groups. There are significant differences of NPY protein (Fdf(3) = 5.167, P = 0.002) and mRNA expression levels (χKruskal2-Wallis, df(3) = 20.541, P < 0.001) among four groups. Bonferroni multiple comparisons found that the NPY protein was significantly decreased in PSD (FBonferroni = −7.133, P = 0.002) and Non-PSD group (FBonferroni = −5.612, P = 0.018) compared with NC group. However, contrasted with MDD group, the mRNA expression was increased in PSD and Non-PSD group by nonparametric test (all P < 0.05). In binary logistic analyses, NPY mRNA expression was independent predictors of PSD (odds ratio: 1.452, 95% CI, 1.081–1.951, P = 0.013). The ROC curve showed NPY mRNA had a general prognostic accuracy (area under the curve: 0.766, 95% CI, 0.656–0.876, P < 0.001). This is the first study to explore the distinguishing function of NPY in different types of depression. It will provide help in the identification of different subtypes of depression. PMID:28082897

  13. The atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, potentiates ghrelin-induced receptor signaling: An in vitro study with cells expressing cloned human growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keita; Kashiwase, Yohei; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Nishimura, Hitomi; Miyano, Kanako; Suzuki, Masami; Shiraishi, Seiji; Matoba, Motohiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) belongs to Gαq-coupled G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates growth hormone release, food intake, appetite, glucose metabolism and body composition. Ghrelin has been identified as an endogenous ligand for GHS-R, and it is the only orexigenic peptide found in the peripheral organs. Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent that binds to and inhibits the activation of GPCR for several neurotransmitters, has metabolic side effects such as excessive appetite and weight gain. Recently, studies have revealed that the orexigenic mechanism of olanzapine is mediated via GHS-R signaling, although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the effect of olanzapine on ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling by using an electrical impedance-based receptor biosensor assay system (CellKey™). Olanzapine at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L enhanced ghrelin-induced (10(-10)-10(-8)mol/L) GHS-R activation. A Ca(2+) imaging assay revealed that olanzapine (10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L) enhanced ghrelin (10(-7) M)-induced GHS-R activity. In contrast, haloperidol (an antipsychotic agent) failed to enhance this ghrelin-mediated GHS-R activation, as demonstrated by both the CellKey™ and Ca(2+) imaging assays. Together, these results suggest that olanzapine, but not haloperidol, promotes appetite by enhancing ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling.

  14. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  15. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value.

  16. MRNA and miRNA expression patterns associated to pathways linked to metal mixture health effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pacheco, M; Hidalgo-Miranda, A; Romero-Córdoba, S; Valverde, M; Rojas, E

    2014-01-10

    Metals are a threat to human health by increasing disease risk. Experimental data have linked altered miRNA expression with exposure to some metals. MiRNAs comprise a large family of non-coding single-stranded molecules that primarily function to negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Although several human populations are exposed to low concentrations of As, Cd and Pb as a mixture, most toxicology research focuses on the individual effects that these metals exert. Thus, this study aims to evaluate global miRNA and mRNA expression changes induced by a metal mixture containing NaAsO2, CdCl2, Pb(C2H3O2)2·3H2O and to predict possible metal-associated disease development under these conditions. Our results show that this metal mixture results in a miRNA expression profile that may be responsible for the mRNA expression changes observed under experimental conditions in which coding proteins are involved in cellular processes, including cell death, growth and proliferation related to the metal-associated inflammatory response and cancer.

  17. Prognostic value of amphiregulin and epiregulin mRNA expression in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhai; Qiong, Qian; Jun, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) play a central role in the development of colorectal cancer, but the prognostic values of AREG and EREG are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies that investigated AREG and/or EREG mRNA levels in primary tumors to determine their prognostic value in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). In addition, RAS status was assessed. Relevant articles were identified by searching the EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library databases. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Nine studies involving 2167 patients were included in this meta-analysis. High AREG expression was associated with longer overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). High EREG expression was also associated with prolonged OS and PFS. In RAS wild-type (WT) patients who received anti-EGFR therapy, high AREG and EREG expression was associated with longer OS. Our results indicate that high AREG and EREG mRNA expression are independent favorable prognostic biomarkers in mCRC. The expression of these ligands should be considered when evaluating prognoses in RAS-WT patients receiving anti-EGFR therapy. PMID:27344184

  18. Regulation of selenoprotein mRNA expression by hormones and retinoic acid in bovine mammary cells.

    PubMed

    Bruzelius, Katharina; Sundler, Roger; Pagmantidis, Vasileios; Akesson, Björn

    2010-10-01

    Selenium is essential for maintaining many body functions through the actions of selenoproteins. To find factors regulating selenoprotein biosynthesis in the bovine mammary cell line MAC-T, the effects of supplementation with selenite and also with retinoic acid, insulin, hydrocortisone and prolactin on the mRNA expression of a number of selenoproteins were investigated. It was found that MAC-T cells express glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 1 and 4, thioredoxin reductase 1 and selenoprotein P, but not GPx 3, which is interesting considering that GPx 3 is one of the only few selenoproteins detected in milk so far. Addition of selenite to the cell culture resulted in a large increase in GPx 1 expression and an increase in selenoprotein P expression, which is similar to the findings made in other systems investigated. Increased mRNA levels of GPx 1 were also observed in cells treated with insulin and hydrocortisone or with retinoic acid. The expression of thioredoxin reductase 1 was increased in cells treated with retinoic acid, whereas that of selenoprotein P was decreased in cells exposed to insulin. The results indicate that several hormones, selenium, and retinoic acid regulate the biosynthesis of various selenoproteins differently in the bovine mammary cell. The possible implications of the findings for processes related to milk formation and mammary carcinogenesis will need additional investigation. Further study of the detailed mechanisms involved is also necessary. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Neonatal overfeeding disrupts pituitary ghrelin signalling in female rats long-term; Implications for the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Ziko, Ilvana; Spencer, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to psychological stress are exacerbated in adult female but not male rats made obese due to overfeeding in early life. Ghrelin, traditionally known for its role in energy homeostasis, has been recently recognised for its role in coordinating the HPA responses to stress, particularly by acting directly at the anterior pituitary where the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), the receptor for acyl ghrelin, is abundantly expressed. We therefore hypothesised that neonatal overfeeding in female rats would compromise pituitary responsiveness to ghrelin, contributing to a hyperactive central stress responsiveness. Unlike in males where hypothalamic ghrelin signalling is compromised by neonatal overfeeding, there was no effect of early life diet on circulating ghrelin or hypothalamic ghrelin signalling in females, indicating hypothalamic feeding and metabolic ghrelin circuitry remains intact. However, neonatal overfeeding did lead to long-term alterations in the pituitary ghrelin system. The neonatally overfed females had increased neonatal and reduced adult expression of GHSR and ghrelin-O-acyl transferase (GOAT) in the pituitary as well as reduced pituitary responsiveness to exogenous acyl ghrelin-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in vitro. These data suggest that neonatal overfeeding dysregulates pituitary ghrelin signalling long-term in females, potentially accounting for the hyper-responsive HPA axis in these animals. These findings have implications for how females may respond to stress throughout life, suggesting the way ghrelin modifies the stress response at the level of the pituitary may be less efficient in the neonatally overfed. PMID:28282447

  20. Ghrelin knockout mice show decreased voluntary alcohol consumption and reduced ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Tolle, Virginie; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Brunel, Luc; Martinez, Jean; Tomasetto, Catherine-Laure; Karam, Sherif M

    2013-05-01

    Recent work suggests that stomach-derived hormone ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonism may reduce motivational aspects of ethanol intake. In the current study we hypothesized that the endogenous GHS-R1A agonist ghrelin modulates alcohol reward mechanisms. For this purpose ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation and voluntary ethanol consumption in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm were examined under conditions where ghrelin and its receptor were blocked, either using ghrelin knockout (KO) mice or the specific ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist "JMV2959". We showed that ghrelin KO mice displayed lower ethanol-induced CPP than their wild-type (WT) littermates. Consistently, when injected during CPP-acquisition, JMV2959 reduced CPP-expression in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation was lower in ghrelin KO mice. Moreover, GHS-R1A blockade, using JMV2959, reduced alcohol-stimulated locomotion only in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. When alcohol consumption and preference were assessed using the two-bottle choice test, both genetic deletion of ghrelin and pharmacological antagonism of the GHS-R1A (JMV2959) reduced voluntary alcohol consumption and preference. Finally, JMV2959-induced reduction of alcohol intake was only observed in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. Taken together, these results suggest that ghrelin neurotransmission is necessary for the stimulatory effect of ethanol to occur, whereas lack of ghrelin leads to changes that reduce the voluntary intake as well as conditioned reward by ethanol. Our findings reveal a major, novel role for ghrelin in mediating ethanol behavior, and add to growing evidence that ghrelin is a key mediator of the effects of multiple abused drugs.

  1. Apigenin prevents UVB-induced cyclooxygenase 2 expression: coupled mRNA stabilization and translational inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Van Dross, Rukiyah T; Abu-Yousif, Adnan; Morrison, Aubrey R; Pelling, Jill C

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is a key enzyme in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, and COX-2 overexpression plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Exposure to UVB strongly increased COX-2 protein expression in mouse 308 keratinocytes, and this induction was inhibited by apigenin, a nonmutagenic bioflavonoid that has been shown to prevent mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by both chemical carcinogens and UV exposure. Our previous study suggested that one pathway by which apigenin inhibits UV-induced and basal COX-2 expression is through modulation of USF transcriptional activity in the 5' upstream region of the COX-2 gene. Here, we found that apigenin treatment also increased COX-2 mRNA stability, and the inhibitory effect of apigenin on UVB-induced luciferase reporter gene activity was dependent on the AU-rich element of the COX-2 3'-untranslated region. Furthermore, we identified two RNA-binding proteins, HuR and the T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1-related protein (TIAR), which were associated with endogenous COX-2 mRNA in 308 keratinocytes, and apigenin treatment increased their localization to cell cytoplasm. More importantly, reduction of HuR levels by small interfering RNA inhibited apigenin-mediated stabilization of COX-2 mRNA. Cells expressing reduced TIAR showed marked resistance to apigenin's ability to inhibit UVB-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, these results indicate that in addition to transcriptional regulation, another mechanism by which apigenin prevents COX-2 expression is through mediating TIAR suppression of translation.

  2. Apigenin Prevents UVB-Induced Cyclooxygenase 2 Expression: Coupled mRNA Stabilization and Translational Inhibition▿

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Van Dross, Rukiyah T.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan; Morrison, Aubrey R.; Pelling, Jill C.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is a key enzyme in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, and COX-2 overexpression plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Exposure to UVB strongly increased COX-2 protein expression in mouse 308 keratinocytes, and this induction was inhibited by apigenin, a nonmutagenic bioflavonoid that has been shown to prevent mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by both chemical carcinogens and UV exposure. Our previous study suggested that one pathway by which apigenin inhibits UV-induced and basal COX-2 expression is through modulation of USF transcriptional activity in the 5′ upstream region of the COX-2 gene. Here, we found that apigenin treatment also increased COX-2 mRNA stability, and the inhibitory effect of apigenin on UVB-induced luciferase reporter gene activity was dependent on the AU-rich element of the COX-2 3′-untranslated region. Furthermore, we identified two RNA-binding proteins, HuR and the T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1-related protein (TIAR), which were associated with endogenous COX-2 mRNA in 308 keratinocytes, and apigenin treatment increased their localization to cell cytoplasm. More importantly, reduction of HuR levels by small interfering RNA inhibited apigenin-mediated stabilization of COX-2 mRNA. Cells expressing reduced TIAR showed marked resistance to apigenin's ability to inhibit UVB-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, these results indicate that in addition to transcriptional regulation, another mechanism by which apigenin prevents COX-2 expression is through mediating TIAR suppression of translation. PMID:17074806

  3. CRF Type 2 Receptors Mediate the Metabolic Effects of Ghrelin in C2C12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Eran; Vale, Wylie W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ghrelin is known to regulate appetite control and cellular metabolism. The Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) family is also known to regulate energy balance. In this study, we investigated the links between ghrelin and the CRF family in C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line. Design and methods C2C12 cells were treated with ghrelin in the presence or absence of CRF receptor antagonists and then subjected to different metabolic analyses. Results Ghrelin enhanced glucose uptake by C2C12 cells, induced GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and decreased RBP4 expression. A CRF-R2 selective antagonist, anti-sauvagine-30, blocked ghrelin-induced glucose uptake, Ghrelin upregulated CRF-R2 but not CRF-R1 levels. Moreover, ghrelin-treated C2C12 cells displayed a cAMP and pERK activation in response to Ucn3, a CRF-R2 specific ligand, but not in response to CRF or stressin, CRF-R1 specific ligands. Ghrelin also induced UCP2 and UCP3 expression, which were blocked by anti-sauvagine-30. Ghrelin did not induce fatty acids uptake by C2C12 cells or ACC expression. Even though C2C12 cells clearly exhibited responses to ghrelin, the known ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, was not detectable in C2C12 cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that, ghrelin plays a role in regulating muscle glucose and, raise the possibility that suppression of the CRF-R2 pathway might provide benefits in high ghrelin states. PMID:23804489

  4. Increased ghrelin signaling prolongs survival in mouse models of human aging through activation of sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Morinaga, A; Amitani, M S; Amitani, H; Katsuura, G; Sawada, Y; Sudo, Y; Uezono, Y; Mochiki, E; Sakata, I; Sakai, T; Hanazaki, K; Yada, T; Yakabi, K; Sakuma, E; Ueki, T; Niijima, A; Nakagawa, K; Okubo, N; Takeda, H; Asaka, M; Inui, A

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to retard aging and delay functional decline as well as the onset of diseases in most organisms. Ghrelin is secreted from the stomach in response to CR and regulates energy metabolism. We hypothesized that in CR ghrelin has a role in protecting aging-related diseases. We examined the physiological mechanisms underlying the ghrelin system during the aging process in three mouse strains with different genetic and biochemical backgrounds as animal models of accelerated or normal human aging. The elevated plasma ghrelin concentration was observed in both klotho-deficient and senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8) mice. Ghrelin treatment failed to stimulate appetite and prolong survival in klotho-deficient mice, suggesting the existence of ghrelin resistance in the process of aging. However, ghrelin antagonist hastened death and ghrelin signaling potentiators rikkunshito and atractylodin ameliorated several age-related diseases with decreased microglial activation in the brain and prolonged survival in klotho-deficient, SAMP8 and aged ICR mice. In vitro experiments, the elevated sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity and protein expression through the cAMP–CREB pathway was observed after ghrelin and ghrelin potentiator treatment in ghrelin receptor 1a-expressing cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, rikkunshito increased hypothalamic SIRT1 activity and SIRT1 protein expression of the heart in the all three mouse models of aging. Pericarditis, myocardial calcification and atrophy of myocardial and muscle fiber were improved by treatment with rikkunshito. Ghrelin signaling may represent one of the mechanisms activated by CR, and potentiating ghrelin signaling may be useful to extend health and lifespan. PMID:26830139

  5. Increased protein and mRNA expression of resistin after dexamethasone administration.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, D; Hori, H; Nakamura, S; Yamamoto, N; Hattori, K; Teraishi, T; Ota, M; Kunugi, H

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone are widely used to treat a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, but they may induce adverse events including hyperglycemia. To shed light on the effect and action mechanism of dexamethasone, we examined the alterations of gene expression levels caused by dexamethasone.Microarray analysis was performed on whole blood collected from 24 physically healthy subjects at baseline and after dexamethasone administration. The expression levels of resistin mRNA were found to be significantly increased after the dexamethasone administration. In a separate sample of 12 subjects, we examined plasma resistin protein levels and found that they were increased after dexamethasone administration. Furthermore, the plasma mRNA and protein levels of resistin were significantly higher in individuals who carried the A allele of RETN single nucleotide polymorphism rs3219175 than in those who did not carry the allele. There was no significant interaction between the genotype and dexamethasone administration. No significant correlation was found between plasma levels of cortisol and resistin. Consistent with previous studies, the genotype of RETN rs3219175 was a strong determinant of resistin levels. The present study showed that oral administration of dexamethasone increases the protein and mRNA levels of resistin irrespective of the rs3219175 genotype. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Combinatorial analysis of mRNA expression patterns in mouse embryos using hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huss, David; Choi, Harry M T; Readhead, Carol; Fraser, Scott E; Pierce, Niles A; Lansford, Rusty

    2015-03-02

    Multiplexed fluorescent hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and advanced imaging techniques can be used to evaluate combinatorial gene expression patterns in whole mouse embryos with unprecedented spatial resolution. Using HCR, DNA probes complementary to mRNA targets trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled DNA HCR hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. Each target mRNA is detected by a probe set containing one or more DNA probes, with each probe carrying two HCR initiators. For multiplexed experiments, probe sets for different target mRNAs carry orthogonal initiators that trigger orthogonal DNA HCR amplification cascades labeled by spectrally distinct fluorophores. As a result, in situ amplification is performed for all targets simultaneously, and the duration of the experiment is independent of the number of target mRNAs. We have used multiplexed fluorescent in situ HCR and advanced imaging technologies to address questions of cell heterogeneity and tissue complexity in craniofacial patterning and anterior neural development. In the sample protocol presented here, we detect three different mRNA targets: Tg(egfp), encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene (typically used as a control); Twist1, encoding a transcription factor involved in cell lineage determination and differentiation; and Pax2, encoding a transcription factor expressed in the mid-hindbrain region of the mouse embryo.

  7. Distinct prognostic values of S100 mRNA expression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Weiwei; Lei, Rui; Shan, Jinlan; Li, Ling; Wang, Xiaochen

    2017-01-01

    S100 family genes encode low molecular weight, acidic-Ca2+ binding proteins implicating in a wide spectrum of biological processes. S100 family contains at least 20 members, most of which are frequently dysregulated in human malignancies including breast cancer. However, the prognostic roles of each individual S100, especially the mRNA level, in breast cancer patients remain elusive. In the current study, we used “The Kaplan-Meier plotter” (KM plotter) database to investigate the prognostic values of S100 mRNA expression in breast cancer. Our results indicated that high mRNA expression of S100A8, S100A9, S100A11 and S100P were found to be significantly correlated to worse outcome, while S100A1 and S100A6 were associated with better prognosis in all breast cancer patients. We further assessed the prognostic value of S100 in different intrinsic subtypes and clinicopathological features of breast cancer. The associated results will elucidate the role of S100 in breast cancer and may further lead the research to explore the S100-targeting reagents for treating breast cancer patients. PMID:28051137

  8. Tia1 dependent regulation of mRNA subcellular location and translation controls p53 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Manuel D; Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Novère, Nicolas Le; Curk, Tomaz; Ule, Jernej; Turner, Martin

    2017-09-13

    Post-transcriptional regulation of cellular mRNA is essential for protein synthesis. Here we describe the importance of mRNA translational repression and mRNA subcellular location for protein expression during B lymphocyte activation and the DNA damage response. Cytoplasmic RNA granules are formed upon cell activation with mitogens, including stress granules that contain the RNA binding protein Tia1. Tia1 binds to a subset of transcripts involved in cell stress, including p53 mRNA, and controls translational silencing and RNA granule localization. DNA damage promotes mRNA relocation and translation in part due to dissociation of Tia1 from its mRNA targets. Upon DNA damage, p53 mRNA is released from stress granules and associates with polyribosomes to increase protein synthesis in a CAP-independent manner. Global analysis of cellular mRNA abundance and translation indicates that this is an extended ATM-dependent mechanism to increase protein expression of key modulators of the DNA damage response.Sequestering mRNA in cytoplasmic stress granules is a mechanism for translational repression. Here the authors find that p53 mRNA, present in stress granules in activated B lymphocytes, is released upon DNA damage and is translated in a CAP-independent manner.

  9. The stability of an mRNA is influenced by its concentration: a potential physical mechanism to regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nouaille, Sébastien; Mondeil, Sophie; Finoux, Anne-Laure; Moulis, Claire; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2017-09-07

    Changing mRNA stability is a major post-transcriptional way of controlling gene expression, particularly in newly encountered conditions. As the concentration of mRNA is the result of an equilibrium between transcription and degradation, it is generally assumed that at constant transcription, any change in mRNA concentration is the consequence of mRNA stabilization or destabilization. However, the literature reports many cases of opposite variations in mRNA concentration and stability in bacteria. Here, we analyzed the causal link between the concentration and stability of mRNA in two phylogenetically distant bacteria Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis. Using reporter mRNAs, we showed that modifying the stability of an mRNA had unpredictable effects, either higher or lower, on its concentration, whereas increasing its concentration systematically reduced stability. This inverse relationship between the concentration and stability of mRNA was generalized to native genes at the genome scale in both bacteria. Higher mRNA turnover in the case of higher concentrations appears to be a simple physical mechanism to regulate gene expression in the bacterial kingdom. The consequences for bacterial adaptation of this control of the stability of an mRNA by its concentration are discussed. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of prohibitin mRNA in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    MATSUYAMA, Satoshi; NAKANO, Yuko; NAKAMURA, Mieko; YAMAMOTO, Ryohei; SHIMADA, Terumasa; OHASHI, Fumihito; KUBO, Kihei

    2014-01-01

    Prohibitin is an antiproliferative protein that is a product of a putative tumor suppressor gene. However, there is little information on prohibitins in companion animals. In this study, we cloned canine prohibitin mRNA using RT-PCR and 3′-RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends). The sequence was well conserved compared with those of other mammals, including human. The deduced amino acid sequence translated from the open reading frame completely corresponded to the human sequence. Canine prohibitin mRNA was expressed in all normal mammary and tumor samples examined. These results suggest that this protein plays a vital role in cell growth mechanisms and may be related to the occurrence of canine mammary tumors. PMID:25312047

  11. Cloning and expression analysis of prohibitin mRNA in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakano, Yuko; Nakamura, Mieko; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Shimada, Terumasa; Ohashi, Fumihito; Kubo, Kihei

    2015-01-01

    Prohibitin is an antiproliferative protein that is a product of a putative tumor suppressor gene. However, there is little information on prohibitins in companion animals. In this study, we cloned canine prohibitin mRNA using RT-PCR and 3'-RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends). The sequence was well conserved compared with those of other mammals, including human. The deduced amino acid sequence translated from the open reading frame completely corresponded to the human sequence. Canine prohibitin mRNA was expressed in all normal mammary and tumor samples examined. These results suggest that this protein plays a vital role in cell growth mechanisms and may be related to the occurrence of canine mammary tumors.

  12. Effect of running training on uncoupling protein mRNA expression in rat brown adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Mikio; Sato, Yuzo; Izawa, Tetsuya; Komabayashi, Takao; Saito, Daizo; Ohno, Hideki

    1993-03-01

    The effect was investigated of endurance training on the expression of uncoupling protein (UCP) mRNA in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of rats. The exercised rats were trained on a rodent treadmill for 5 days per week and a total of 9 weeks. After the training programme, a marked decrease in BAT mass was found in terms of weight or weight per unit body weight; there was a corresponding decrease in DNA content and a downward trend in RNA and glycogen levels. The UCP mRNA was present at a markedly decreased level in BAT of trained animals. In consideration of the reduced levels of mRNAs for hormone-sensitive lipase and acylCoA synthetase, the brown adipose tissue investigated appeared to be in a relatively atrophied and thermogenically quiescent state.

  13. Induction of Ski protein expression upon luteinization in rat granulosa cells without a change in its mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2012-01-01

    The Ski protein is implicated in the proliferation/differentiation of a variety of cells. We previously reported that the Ski protein is present in granulosa cells of atretic follicles, but not in preovulatory follicles, suggesting that Ski has a role in apoptosis of granulosa cells. However, granulosa cells cannot only undergo apoptosis but can alternatively differentiate into luteal cells. It is unknown whether Ski is expressed and has a role in granulosa cells undergoing luteinization. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the localization of the Ski protein in the rat ovary during luteinization to examine if Ski might play a role in this process. In order to examine the Ski protein expression during the progression of luteinization, follicular growth was induced in immature female rats by administration of equine chorionic gonadotropin, and luteinization was induced by human chorionic gonadotropin treatment to mimic the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. While no Ski-positive granulosa cells were present in the preovulatory follicle, Ski protein expression was induced in response to the LH surge and was maintained after formation of the corpus luteum (CL). Although the Ski protein is absent from the granulosa cells of the preovulatory follicle, its mRNA (c-ski) was expressed, and the level of c-ski mRNA was unchanged even after the LH surge. The combined results demonstrated that Ski protein expression is induced in granulosa cells upon luteinization, and suggested that its expression is regulated posttranscriptionally.

  14. Exercise protects against obesity induced semen abnormalities via downregulating stem cell factor, upregulating Ghrelin and normalizing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alhashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Sakr, Hussein; Alshahrani, Mesfer; Alsunaidi, Mohammad; Elrefaey, Hesham; Alessa, Riyad; Sarhan, Mohammad; Eleawa, Samy M; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and hormonal imbalance have been hypothesized to underlie infertility in obese animals. However, recent evidence suggests that Ghrelin and Stem Cell Factor (SCF) play an important role in fertility, in lean individuals. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating whether changes in the levels of Ghrelin and SCF in rat testes underlie semen abnormal parameters observed in obese rats, and secondly, whether endurance exercise or Orlistat can protect against changes in Ghrelin, SCF, and/or semen parameters in diet induced obese rats. Obesity was modelled in male Wistar rats using High Fat Diet (HFD) 12-week protocol. Eight week-old rats (n=40) were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: fed with a standard diet (12 % of calories as fat); Group II: fed HFD (40 % of calories as fat); Group III: fed the HFD with a concomitant dose of Orlistat (200 mg/kg); and Group IV: fed the HFD and underwent 30 min daily swimming exercise. The model was validated by measuring the levels of testosterone, FSH, LH, estradiol, leptin, triglycerides, total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol, and final change in body weight. Levels were consistent with published obesity models (see Results). As predicted, the HFD group had a 76.8 % decrease in sperm count, 44.72 % decrease in sperm motility, as well as 47.09 % increase in abnormal sperm morphology. Unlike the control group, in the HFD group (i.e. obese rats) Ghrelin mRNA and protein were elevated, while SCF mRNA and protein were diminished in the testes. Furthermore, in the HFD group, SOD and GPx activities were significantly reduced, 48.5±5.8 % (P=0.0012) and 45.6±4.6 % (P=0.0019), respectively, while TBARS levels were significantly increased (112.7±8.9 %, P=0.0001). Finally, endurance exercise training and Orlistat administration individually and differentially protected semen parameters in obese rats. The mechanism includes, but is not limited to, normalizing the levels of Ghrelin, SCF, SOD, GPx and TBARS. In rat

  15. Prevention of diet-induced obesity by safflower oil: insights at the levels of PPARalpha, orexin, and ghrelin gene expression of adipocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Fengchen; Sun, Yuqian; Zhang, Jinchao

    2010-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevention of diet-induced obesity by a high safflower oil diet and adipocytic gene expression in mice. Forty 3-week-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CON, 5% lard + 5% safflower oil), high lard group (LAR, 45% lard + 5% safflower oil), and high safflower oil group (SAF, 45% safflower oil + 5% lard). After 10 weeks, 10 mice of the LAR group were switched to high safflower oil diet (LAR-SAF). Ten weeks later, glucose tolerance tests were performed by intraperitoneal injection of glucose. Circulating levels of lipid and insulin were measured and white adipose tissues were taken for gene chip and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The LAR group showed higher body weight, adiposity index, insulin, and lipids than the CON group (P<0.05). The body weight in the LAR-SAF group decreased after dietary reversal. The plasma biochemical profiles decreased in the LAR-SAF and SAF groups (P<0.05) compared with those of the LAR group. The blood glucose level of the LAR-SAF group was reduced during intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test compared with that of the LAR group. The LAR-SAF group had lower levels of Orexin and Ghrelin gene expression, whereas the level of PPARalpha gene expression was significantly enhanced compared with that of the LAR group. So, the SAF diet can alter adipocytic adiposity-related gene expression and result in effective amelioration of diet-induced obesity.

  16. Direct versus indirect actions of ghrelin on hypothalamic NPY neurons.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Sheng, Zhenyu; Routh, Vanessa; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc; Bryan, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    ω-conotoxin, inhibitors of L- and N-type Ca2+ channels, respectively, while Ni2+, mibefradil, and TTA-P2 completely or partially inhibited ghrelin action, implicating T-type Ca2+ channels. Activation was also sensitive to a spider toxin, SNX-482, at concentrations selective for R-type Ca2+ channels. Nanomolar concentrations of GABA markedly inhibited ghrelin-activation of isolated NPY-GFP neurons, consistent with chronic suppression of ghrelin action in vivo. NPY neurons express all the molecular machinery needed to respond directly to ghrelin. Consistent with recent studies, ghrelin stimulates presynaptic inputs that activate NPY-GFP neurons in situ. Ghrelin can also directly activate a depolarizing conductance. Results with isolated NPY-GFP neurons suggest the ghrelin-activated, depolarizing current is a Na+ conductance with the pharmacologic properties of SUR1/Trpm4 non-selective cation channels. In the isolated neuron model, the opening of SUR1/Trpm4 channels activates T- and SNX482-sensitive R-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channels, which could contribute to NPY neuronal activity in situ.

  17. Increases in mRNA and DREAM protein expression in the rat spinal cord after formalin induced pain.

    PubMed

    Long, Idris; Suppian, Rapeah; Ismail, Zalina

    2011-03-01

    Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM) protein modulates pain by regulating prodynorphin gene transcription. Therefore, we investigate the changes of mRNA and DREAM protein in relation to the mRNA and prodynorphin protein expression on the ipsilateral side of the rat spinal cord after formalin injection (acute pain model). DREAM like immunoreactivity (DLI) was not significantly different between C and F groups. However, we detected the upregulation of mean relative DREAM protein level in the nuclear but not in the cytoplasmic extract in the F group. These effects were consistent with the upregulation of the relative DREAM mRNA level. Prodynorphin like immunoreactivity (PLI) expression increased but the relative prodynorphin mRNA level remained unchanged. In conclusion, we suggest that upregulation of DREAM mRNA and protein expression in the nuclear compartment probably has functional consequences other than just the repression of prodynorphin gene. It is likely that these mechanisms are important in the modulation of pain.

  18. Chondrogenic mRNA expression in prechondrogenic cells after blue laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tajiri, Takako; Ninomiya, Yoshihisa; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-03-08

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as a method for biostimulation. Cartilage develops through the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into chondrocytes, and differentiated chondrocytes in articular cartilage maintain cartilage homeostasis by synthesizing cartilage-specific extracellular matrix. The aim of this study is to evaluate the enhancement of chondrocyte differentiation and the expression levels of chondrogenic mRNA in prechondrogenic ATDC5 cells after laser irradiation. For chondrogenic induction, ATDC5 cells were irradiated with a blue laser (405 nm, continuous wave) at 100 mW/cm(2) for 180 s following incubation in chondrogenic differentiation medium. Differentiation after laser irradiation was quantitatively evaluated by the measurement of total collagen contents and chondrogenesis-related mRNAs. The total amount of collagen and mRNA levels of aggrecan, collagen type II, SOX-9, and DEC-1 were increased relative to those of a non-laser irradiated group after 14 days of laser irradiation. On the other hand, Ap-2alpha mRNA, a negative transcription factor of chondrogenesis, was dramatically decreased after laser irradiation. In addition, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated after laser irradiation. These results, for the first time, provide functional evidence that mRNA expression relating to chondrogenesis is increased, and Ap-2alpha is decreased immediately after laser irradiation. As this technique could readily be applied in situ to control the differentiation of cells at an implanted site within the body, this approach may have therapeutic potential for the restoration of damaged or diseased tissue.

  19. Zinc transporter mRNA expression in the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Amy L; Somji, Seema; Sens, Mary Ann; Sens, Donald A; Garrett, Scott H

    2008-08-01

    The human prostate gland undergoes a prominent alteration in Zn+2 homeostasis during the development of prostate cancer. The goal of the present study was to determine if the immortalized human prostate cell line (RWPE-1) could serve as a model system to study the role of zinc in prostate cancer. The study examined the expression of mRNA for 19 members of the zinc transporter gene family in normal prostate tissue, the prostate RWPE-1 cell line, and the LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. The study demonstrated that the expression of the 19 zinc transporters was similar between the RWPE-1 cell line and the in situ prostate gland. Of the 19 zinc transporters, only 5 had levels that were different between the RWPE-1 cells and the tissue samples; all five being increased (ZnT-6, Zip-1, Zip-3A, Zip-10, and Zip-14). The response of the 19 transporters was also determined when the cell lines were exposed to 75 microM Zn+2 for 24 h. It was shown for the RWPE-1 cells that only 5 transporters responded to Zn+2 with mRNA for ZnT-1 and ZnT-2 being increased while mRNA for ZnT-7, Zip-7 and Zip-10 transporters were decreased. It was shown for the LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 cells that Zn+2 had no effect on the mRNA levels of all 19 transporters except for an induction of ZnT-1 in PC-3 cells. Overall, the study suggests that the RWPE-1 cells could be a valuable model for the study of the zinc transporter gene family in the prostate.

  20. Diet-induced obesity suppresses ghrelin in rat gastrointestinal tract and serum.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine ghrelin expression in serum and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tissues, and to measure tissue ghrelin levels and obesity-related alterations in some serum biochemical variables in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). The study included 12 male rats, 60 days old. The rats were randomly allocated to two groups (n = 6). Rats in the DIO group were fed a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity, while those in the control group were fed on standard rat pellets. After a 12 week diet program including an adaptation period all rats were decapitated, tissues were individually fixed, ghrelin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry , and tissue and serum ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum biochemical variables were measured using an autoanalyzer. When the baseline and week 12 body mass index and GIT ghrelin expression were compared between DIO and control rats, BMI had increased and ghrelin expression decreased due to obesity. The RIA results were consistent with these findings. Serum glucose, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels were elevated and HDL cholesterol significantly decreased in the DIO group. A comparison of GIT tissues between the control and obese groups demonstrated that ghrelin was decreased in all tissues of the latter. This decrease was brought about a decline in the circulating ghrelin pool. This suggests that rather than being associated with a change in a single tissue, obesity is a pathological condition in which ghrelin expression is changed in all tissues.

  1. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    PubMed

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  2. Expression and clinicopathological significance of Mel-18 mRNA in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ji; Liu, Yan-Long; Zhang, Gan; Ma, Yu-Yan; Cui, Bin-Bin; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Mel-18 is a member of the polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, which are chromatin regulatory factors that play an important role in oncogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the clinical and prognostic significance of Mel-18 in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. For this purpose, expression of Mel-18 mRNA was evaluated in 82 primary CRC and paired noncancerous mucosa samples by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. We found that overall Mel-18 mRNA expression in the CRC tissue was significantly lower than in the noncancerous mucosal tissue (p = 0.007, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test). Mel-18 was conversely correlated with the pathological classifications (p = 0.003 for T, p < 0.001 for N, and p = 0.015 for M classifications, respectively) and clinical AJCC stage (p < 0.001). Furthermore, CRC patients with a higher level of Mel-18 showed prolonged disease-free survivals (DFS) (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the diminished Mel-18 expression may be a risk factor for the patients' 3-year DFS (HR = 1.895; 95 % CI 1.032, 3.477; p = 0.039). It was therefore concluded that the lower Mel-18 expression might contribute to the CRC development/progression.

  3. Cellular expression of gut chitinase mRNA in the gastrointestinal tract of mice and chickens.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masako; Fujimoto, Wakako; Goto, Marie; Morimatsu, Masami; Syuto, Bunei; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2002-08-01

    Recently, the second mammalian chitinase, designated acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), has been identified in human, mouse, and cow. In contrast to the earlier identified macrophage-derived chitinase (chitotriosidase), this chitinase is richly expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, suggesting its role in digestion of chitin-containing foods as well as defense against chitin-coated microorganisms and parasites. This in situ hybridization study first revealed cellular localization of the gut-type chitinase in the mouse and chicken. In adult mice, the parotid gland, von Ebner's gland, and gastric chief cells, all of which are exocrine cells of the serous type, expressed the gut chitinase mRNA. In the chicken, oxyntico-peptic cells in glandular stomach (proventriculus) and hepatocytes expressed the chitinase mRNA. Because cattle produce the gut chitinase (chitin-binding protein b04) only in the liver, the gut chitinases in mammals and birds have three major sources of production, i.e., the salivary gland, stomach, and liver. During ontogenetic development, the expression level in the parotid gland and stomach of mice increased to the adult level before weaning, whereas in the stomach of chickens intense signals were detectable in embryos from incubation day 7.

  4. Effect of different culture systems on mRNA expression in developing rabbit embryos.

    PubMed

    Saenz-de-Juano, M D; Naturil-Alfonso, C; Vicente, J S; Marco-Jiménez, F

    2013-02-01

    The rate of zygotes in vitro developed to hatched blastocyst stage was evaluated between two different commercial media (TCM-199 and Ham's F10) and two different culture systems (renewal and non-renewal single medium) to determine the effects of culture conditions on rabbit embryo preimplantation development. The relative transcript abundances of OCT4, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (erbB3) of resultant blastocysts were also analysed and compared with in vivo developed blastocysts. Results showed an important divergence in mRNA expression between embryos developed under in vivo and in vitro conditions despite there being no significant difference in hatching blastocyst rates between different culture systems and different media. For OCT4, transcript abundance of in vitro culture embryos differs from their in vivo chronological counterparts, but, when the medium is renewed, mRNA expression seemed similar to in vivo developed 4-day-old embryos. In addition, VEGF and erbB3 expression showed marked variation between different in vitro conditions. Therefore, the study of specific transcript abundance in rabbit blastocyst provides a more detailed description of which alterations in gene expression occur due in vitro conditions, and further studies should be carried out to reduce current limitations of long-term culture of rabbit pre-implantation embryos.

  5. Differential cytokine mRNA expression in heterophils isolated from Salmonella-resistant and -susceptible chickens

    PubMed Central

    Swaggerty, Christina L; Kogut, Michael H; Ferro, Pamela J; Rothwell, Lisa; Pevzner, Igal Y; Kaiser, Pete

    2004-01-01

    We recently showed that increased in vitro heterophil functional efficiency translates to increased in vivo resistance to a systemic Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection utilizing a parental pair of broiler chickens (lines A and B) and the F1 reciprocal crosses (C and D). Heterophils produce cytokines and modulate acute protection against Salmonella in young poultry. Therefore, we hypothesize that heterophils from SE-resistant chickens (A and D) have the ability to produce an up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokine response compared to that of heterophils from SE-susceptible chickens (B and C). In this study, heterophils were isolated from day-old chickens and treated with either RPMI-1640 (as the control), or phagocytic agonists (SE, or SE opsonized with either normal chicken serum or immune serum against SE) and cytokine mRNA expression assessed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Heterophils from SE-resistant chickens (A and D) had significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-18) mRNA expression upon treatment with all agonists compared to heterophils from SE-susceptible lines (B and C). Further, heterophils from SE-resistant chickens had significantly decreased mRNA expression levels of transforming growth factor-β4, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, when compared to heterophils from SE-susceptible chickens. These data indicate cytokine gene expression in heterophils may be a useful parameter in determining resistance to Salmonella, as indicated by our previous in vivo SE studies. Therefore, heterophil functional efficiency and cytokine production may be useful biomarkers for poultry breeders to consider when developing new immunocompetent lines of birds. PMID:15312145

  6. Different structure and mRNA expression of Entamoeba invadens chitinases in the encystation and excystation.

    PubMed

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Hiranuka, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2011-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica forms chitin-walled cysts during encystation process, where formation of the cyst wall needs not only chitin synthase but also chitinase. During excystation, quadruplet amoebae emerge from the chitin-walled cysts by dissolving the wall, so that chitinase may be necessary for excystation process as well. There is, however, no report on chitinase expression during excystation. In this study, we used Entamoeba invadens, a reptilian amoeba, as a model for encystation and excystation of E. histolytica, and studied chitinase mRNA expression in those processes. Although expression of three E. invadens chitinases designated EiChit1, EiChit2, and EiChit3 during encystation has been reported, we identified another enzyme named as EiChit4 in the E. invadens genome database. Therefore, we investigated the primary structure and mRNA expression of these four chitinases of Ei in the excystation as well as the encystation by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Like EiChit1, EiChit4 had an 8 × Cys chitin-binding domain (CBD) and a hydrophilic spacer between the CBD and catalytic domain, and was also closer to EiChit1 than EiChit2 and EiChit3 in the phylogenetic tree. During encystation, the expression of all four chitinases increased in the early phase; the increase in EiChit1 and EiChit4 was much higher than in EiChit2 and EiChit3. Then, the expression of all four chitinases sharply decreased in the later phase. In cysts, EiChit1 was most abundantly expressed and EiChit4 was at a lower level, while the expressions of EiChit2 and EiChit3 were virtually absent. Following the induction of excystation, mRNA levels of EiChit1 and EiChit4 in cysts 5 h after induction were significantly lower than those in cysts before induction, while those of EiChit2 and EiChit3 were remarkably higher than before induction. The mRNAs of only EiChit2 and EiChit3 remarkably increased when the excystation was induced in the presence of cytochalasin D

  7. Ghrelin, food intake, and botanical extracts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, Peyman; Mazidi, Mohsen; Nematy, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    A kind of growth hormone secretagogue (GHS), ghrelin, was first isolated from the rat stomach and plays a major role in the activation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) resulting the release of growth hormone (GH). The preproghrelin gene is placed on chromosome 3, at locus 3p25 –2 in humans and constitutes five exons and three introns. Ghrelin is most plentifully expressed in particular cells in the oxyntic glands of the gastric epithelium, initially named X/A-like cells. Almost 60-70% of circulating ghrelin is secreted by the stomach. Plasma ghrelin concentration alters throughout the day. Ghrelin has been suggested to act as a meal initiator because of its appetite-stimulating influences in free feeding rats in short period. In addition to ghrelin’s function as a meal motivator, it seems to contribute in long-term energy balance and nutritional status. In addition, many studies have been carried out in order to investigate the effects of natural and medicinal plants and botanical extracts on appetite, food intake, energy hemostasis, and the level of related hormones including ghrelin. Due to the importance of ghrelin in nutritional and medical sciences, this review was performed to understand new aspects of this hormone’s function. PMID:26445708

  8. Decreased plasma ghrelin contributes to anorexia following novelty stress.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yayoi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Muto, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Koji; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Sadakane, Chiharu; Nahata, Miwa; Hattori, Tomohisa; Asaka, Masahiro

    2011-10-01

    We hypothesized that anorexia induced by novelty stress caused by exposure to a novel environment may be due to activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and subsequently mediated by decreasing peripheral ghrelin concentration via serotonin (5-HT) and melanocortin-4 receptors (MC4R). Each mouse was transferred from group-housed cages to individual cages to establish the novelty stress. We observed the effect of changes in feeding behavior in a novel environment using the method of transferring group-housed mice to individual cages. We investigated the effect of an intracerebroventricular injection of antagonists/agonists of CRF1/2 receptors (CRF1/2Rs), 5-HT(1B)/(2C) receptors (5-HT(1B)/(2C)R), and MC4R to clarify the role of each receptor on the decrease in food intake. Plasma ghrelin levels were also measured. The novelty stress caused a reduction in food intake that was abolished by administering a CRF1R antagonist. Three hours after the novelty stress, appetite reduction was associated with reduced levels of neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide mRNA, increased levels of proopiomelanocortin mRNA in the hypothalamus, and a decrease in plasma ghrelin level. Administering a CRF1R antagonist, a 5-HT(1B)/(2C)R antagonist, an MC4R antagonist, exogenous ghrelin, and an enhancer of ghrelin secretion, rikkunshito, resolved the reduction in food intake 3 h after the novelty stress by enhancing circulating ghrelin concentrations. We showed that anorexia during a novelty stress is a process in which CRF1R is activated at the early stage of appetite loss and is subsequently activated by a 5-HT(1B)/(2C)R and MC4R stimulus, leading to decreased peripheral ghrelin concentrations.

  9. Structure-Activity Study of Ghrelin(1-8) Resulting in High Affinity Fluorine-Bearing Ligands for the Ghrelin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Charron, Carlie L; Hou, Jinqiang; McFarland, Mark S; Dhanvantari, Savita; Kovacs, Michael S; Luyt, Leonard G

    2017-09-14

    The ghrelin receptor, also known as the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a), is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is differentially expressed in healthy tissue and several cancers, including prostate, testicular, and ovarian. Selectively targeting the ghrelin receptor using fluorine-18 tagged entities would allow localization and visualization of ghrelin receptor expressing carcinomas using PET imaging. The endogenous ligand ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide with 3.1 nM affinity, has poor in vivo stability. Here we report on ghrelin(1-8) analogues bearing modifications at residues 1, 3, 4, and 8. The lead analogue, [Inp(1),Dpr(3)(6-fluoro-2-naphthoate),1-Nal(4),Thr(8)]ghrelin(1-8), possessed an IC50 value of 0.11 nM that is a 28-fold improvement compared to the natural ligand. A novel 6-fluoro-2-pentafluorophenyl naphthoate (PFPN) prosthetic group was synthesized to incorporate fluorine-18 for PET imaging. This is not only the highest affinity ghrelin analogue reported but also the shortest ghrelin analogue capable of binding GHS-R1a with better affinity than ghrelin(1-28).

  10. Alterations in Somatostatin mRNA Expression in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Harvey M.; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the inhibitory circuitry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia include reduced expression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) for somatostatin (SST), a neuropeptide present in a subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. However, neither the cellular substrate nor the causal mechanisms for decreased SST mRNA levels in schizophrenia are known. We used in situ hybridization to quantify the compartmental, laminar, and cellular levels of SST mRNA expression in the DLPFC of 23 pairs of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and control subjects. We also explored potential causal mechanisms by utilizing similar methods to analyze SST mRNA expression in 2 animal models. The expression of SST mRNA was significantly decreased in layers 2–superficial 6 of subjects with schizophrenia, but not in layer 1, deep 6 or the white matter. At the cellular level, both the density of cortical SST mRNA-positive neurons and the expression of SST mRNA per neuron were reduced in the subjects with schizophrenia. These alterations were not due to potential confounds and appeared to be a downstream consequence of impaired neurotrophin signaling through the trkB receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that a marked reduction in SST mRNA expression in a subset of GABA neurons contributes to DLPFC dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:18203698

  11. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole H; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O; Smith, Roy G

    2016-04-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin-/-) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr-/-), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin-/- and Ghsr-/- mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr-/- mice. CR of WT, Ghsr-/-, and Ghrelin-/- mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling.

  12. Identification of prostate cancer mRNA markers by averaged differential expression and their detection in biopsies, blood, and urine

    PubMed Central

    Bai, V. Uma; Kaseb, Ahmed; Tejwani, Sheela; Divine, George W.; Barrack, Evelyn R.; Menon, Mani; Pardee, Arthur B.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer

    2007-01-01

    The advent of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a biomarker has enabled early detection of prostate cancer and, hence, improved clinical outcome. However, a low PSA is not a guarantee of disease-free status, and an elevated PSA is frequently associated with a negative biopsy. Therefore, our goal is to identify molecular markers that can detect prostate cancer with greater specificity in body fluids such as urine or blood. We used the RT-PCR differential display method to first identify mRNA transcripts differentially expressed in tumor vs. patient-matched nontumor prostate tissue. This analysis led to the identification of 44 mRNA transcripts that were expressed differentially in some but not all tumor specimens examined. To identify mRNA transcripts that are differentially expressed in most tumor specimens, we turned to differential display of pooled tissue samples, a technique we name averaged differential expression (ADE). We performed differential display of mRNA from patient-matched nontumor vs. tumor tissue, each pooled from 10 patients with various Gleason scores. Differentially expressed mRNA transcripts identified by ADE were fewer in number, but were expressed in a greater percentage of tumors (>75%) than those identified by differential display of mRNA from individual patient samples. Differential expression of these mRNA transcripts was also detected by RT-PCR in mRNA isolated from urine and blood samples of prostate cancer patients. Our findings demonstrate the principle that specific cDNA probes of frequently differentially expressed mRNA transcripts identified by ADE can be used for the detection of prostate cancer in urine and blood samples. PMID:17283334

  13. Isoeugenol destabilizes IL-8 mRNA expression in THP-1 cells through induction of the negative regulator of mRNA stability tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Carne, Alice; Mitjans, Montserrat; Galli, Corrado Lodovico; Marinovich, Marina; Corsini, Emanuela

    2012-02-01

    We previously demonstrated in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1 that all allergens tested, with the exception of the prohapten isoeugenol, induced a dose-related release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). In the present study, we investigated whether this abnormal behavior was regulated by the AU-rich element-binding proteins HuR and tristetraprolin (TTP) or by the downstream molecule suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3. The contact allergens isoeugenol, diethylmaleate (DEM), and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and the irritant salicylic acid were used as reference compounds. Chemicals were used at concentrations that induced a 20% decrease in cell viability as assessed by propidium iodide staining, namely 100 μg/ml (0.61 mM) for isoeugenol, 100 μg/ml (0.58 mM) for DEM, 3 μg/ml (14.8 μM) for DNCB, and 250 μg/ml (1.81 mM) for salicylic acid. Time course experiments of IL-8 mRNA expression and assessment of IL-8 mRNA half-life, indicated a decreased IL-8 mRNA stability in isoeugenol-treated cells. We could demonstrate that a combination and regulation of HuR and TTP following exposure to contact allergens resulted in a different modulation of IL-8 mRNA half-life and release. The increased expression of TTP in THP-1 cells treated with isoeugenol results in destabilization of the IL-8 mRNA, which can account for the lack of IL-8 release. In contrast, the strong allergen DNCB failing to up-regulate TTP, while inducing HuR, resulted in longer IL-8 mRNA half-life and protein release. SOCS-3 was induced only in isoeugenol-treated cells; however, its modulation did not rescue the lack of IL-8 release, indicating that it is unlikely to be involved in the lack of IL-8 production. Finally, the destabilization effect of isoeugenol on IL-8 mRNA expression together with SOCS-3 expression resulted in an anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by the ability of isoeugenol to modulate LPS or ionomycin-induced cytokine release.

  14. The role of leptin and ghrelin in appetite regulation in the Australian Spinifex hopping mouse, Notomys alexis, during long-term water deprivation.

    PubMed

    Donald, John A; Hamid, Noor Khalidah Abdul; McLeod, Janet L

    2017-04-01

    Water deprivation of the Spinifex hopping mouse, Notomys alexis, induced a biphasic pattern of food intake with an initial hypophagia that was followed by an increased, and then sustained food intake. The mice lost approximately 20% of their body mass and there was a loss of white adipose tissue. Stomach ghrelin mRNA was significantly higher at day 2 of water deprivation but then returned to the same levels as water-replete (day 0) mice for the duration of the experiment. Plasma ghrelin was unaffected by water deprivation except at day 10 where it was significantly increased. Plasma leptin levels decreased at day 2 and day 5 of water deprivation, and then increased significantly by the end of the water deprivation period. Water deprivation caused a significant decrease in skeletal muscle leptin mRNA expression at days 2 and 5, but then it returned to day 0 levels by day 29. In the hypothalamus, water deprivation caused a significant up-regulation in both ghrelin and neuropeptide Y mRNA expression, respectively. In contrast, hypothalamic GHSR1a mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated. A significant increase in LepRb mRNA expression was observed at days 17 and 29 of water deprivation. This study demonstrated that the sustained food intake in N. alexis during water deprivation was uncoupled from peripheral appetite-regulating signals, and that the hypothalamus appears to play an important role in regulating food intake; this may contribute to the maintenance of fluid balance in the absence of free water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Robust Transgene Expression from Bicistronic mRNA in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Pringle, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism that provides an opportunity to understand the evolution and functional biology of the lineage that includes the land plants, as well as aspects of the fundamental core biology conserved throughout the eukaryotic phylogeny. Although many tools are available to facilitate genetic, molecular biological, biochemical, and cell biological studies in Chlamydomonas, expression of unselected transgenes of interest (GOIs) has been challenging. In most methods used previously, the GOI and a selectable marker are expressed from two separate mRNAs, so that their concomitant expression is not guaranteed. In this study, we developed constructs that allow expression of an upstream GOI and downstream selectable marker from a single bicistronic mRNA. Although this approach in other systems has typically required a translation-enhancing element such as an internal ribosome entry site for the downstream marker, we found that a short stretch of unstructured junction sequence was sufficient to obtain adequate expression of the downstream gene, presumably through post-termination reinitiation. With this system, we obtained robust expression of both endogenous and heterologous GOIs, including fluorescent proteins and tagged fusion proteins, in the vast majority of transformants, thus eliminating the need for tedious secondary screening for GOI-expressing transformants. This improved efficiency should greatly facilitate a variety of genetic and cell-biological studies in Chlamydomonas and also enable new applications such as expression-based screens and large-scale production of foreign proteins. PMID:27770025

  16. miRNA and mRNA expression analysis reveals potential sex-biased miRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Jun; Liang, Tingming

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mRNAs may be differentially expressed between males and females. This study aimed to perform expression analysis of mRNA and its main regulatory molecule, microRNA (miRNA), to discuss the potential sex-specific expression patterns using abnormal expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Generally, deregulated miRNAs and mRNAs had consistent expression between males and females, but some miRNAs may be oppositely expressed in specific diseases: up-regulated in one group and down-regulated in another. Studies of miRNA gene families and clusters further confirmed that these sequence or location related miRNAs might have opposing expression between sexes. The specific miRNA might have greater expression divergence across different groups, suggesting flexible expression across different individuals, especially in tumor samples. The typical analysis regardless of the sex will ignore or balance these sex-specific deregulated miRNAs. Compared with flexible miRNAs, their targets of mRNAs showed relative stable expression between males and females. These relevant results provide new insights into miRNA-mRNA interaction and sex difference. PMID:28045090

  17. [Expression of heat shock protein 70 and its mRNA in career exposure to manganese].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenwen; Shao, Hua; Chi, Mingfeng; Zhang, Zhihu; Shan, Yongle; Zou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the expression levels of heat shock protein70 (HSPs70) and HSPs70 mRNA in different exposure to manganese, and research the neuroprotective effect on the career exposure to manganese. From 2008 to 2009, with cross-sectional study design, and in a locomotive and rolling stock works, by stratified random sampling method, the exposed sample consisted of 180 welders from different welding shops and 100 unexposed in the last three years, non-welder controls with age-matched workers of similar socioeconomic status from the same industry. The control workers had not been exposed to neurotoxic chemicals. The mRNA expressions of four different metabolic enzyme were detected by SYBR Green I quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression levels of the two enzymes mRNA in different exposure to manganese were analyzed. The expressions of HSPs70 were detected by Western blot. The concentration of air manganese was determined by GFAAS. The average concentration of 8 h time (8h-TWA) was used to express the level of individual exposure to manganese, according to the air manganese workplace occupational exposure limit (8h-TWA=0.15 mg/m3), the exposed group is divided into high exposed group (>0.15 mg/m3) and low exposure group (<0.15 mg/m3). The individuals exposed to manganese dose of exposed group ((0.25±0.31) mg/m3) was higher than the control group ((0.06±0.02) mg/m3) (t=6.15, P=0.001); individuals exposed to manganese dose of high exposure group for (0.42±0.34) mg/m3, which was higher than low exposure group (0.09±0.07) mg/m3 (t=9.80, P=0.001). HSPs70 mRNA and protein of exposure group (5.65±0.21, 3.26±0.15) were higher than the reference group (0.41±0.03, 1.32±0.12) (t=18.91, t=8.68, P=0.001). HSP70 mRNA and protein of high exposure group (6.48±0.37, 3.67±0.26) were higher than the low exposure group (5.15±0.23, 3.02±0.19) (t=3.24, t=2.01, P=0.003, P=0.043). The expression of peripheral blood lymphocytes HSPs70 level and HSPs70 mRNA

  18. Differential expression and clinical significance of glioblastoma mRNA expression profiles in Uyghur and Han patients in Xinjiang province.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Li, Wenting; Xia, Haicheng; Zhu, Zhengquan; Luan, Xinping

    2014-11-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in glioblastoma RNA gene expression profiles between Uyghur and Han patients in Xinjiang province and to screen and compare differentially expressed genes with respect to their clinical significance in the pathogenesis of high-grade glioma and their relationship to disease prognosis. Illumina HT-12mRNA expression profiles microarray was employed to measure the gene expression profiles of 6 patients with advanced glioma and to screen for differentially expressed genes. GO and KEGG analyses were performed on the differentially expressed genes using Web Gestalt software (P<0.05). Comparison of glioblastoma RNA expression profiles in the Uyghur and Han patients indicated that 1475 genes were significantly differentially expressed, of which 669 showed increased expression, while 807 showed decreased expression. One gene (STRC) corresponded to 2 transcripts, 1 of which showed increased expression and the other showed decreased expression. The differentially expressed genes participate in metabolic processes, biological regulation, stress response, and multi-cellular organic processes, including small GTPase regulatory signaling pathways, Ras signaling pathway, neuronal reactive protein regulation, and myelination of the central nervous system. The genes are also involved in tumor-related signaling pathways, including metabolic pathways, cancer pathways, MAPK signaling pathway, TGF-β signaling pathway, neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway, and mTOR signaling pathway. Differentially expressed genes were screened by studying the gene expression profiles in glioblastoma from Uyghur and Han patients. The cellular function and location of these genes were further investigated. Based on related molecular markers of glioblastoma, the differences in the mechanism of initiation and development of glioblastoma between Uyghur and Han patients were investigated for polygenic interactions.

  19. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fain, John N; Company, Joseph M; Booth, Frank W; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Bahouth, Suleiman W; Sacks, Harold S

    2013-10-01

    Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16-20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemically modified tetracyclines selectively inhibit IL-6 expression in osteoblasts by decreasing mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Keith; Martin, Thomas; Andreadis, Stelios T; Kim, Young Joon

    2003-11-01

    In bone biology, interleukin (IL)-6 is an autocrine/paracrine cytokine which can induce osteoclasts formation and activation to help mediate inflammatory bone destruction. Previous studies have shown that tetracycline and its derivatives have potentially beneficial therapeutic effects in the prevention and treatment of metabolic bone diseases by modulating osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Our previous studies indicated that non-antimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) can dose-dependently inhibit IL-1 beta-induced IL-6 secretion in osteoblastic cells. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of doxycycline analogs CMT-8 and its non-chelating pyrazole derivative, CMT-5 to affect IL-6 gene expression in murine osteoblasts. Steady-state IL-6 mRNA was decreased with CMT-8 (ca. 50%) but not by CMT-5 when stimulated by IL-1 beta. CMT-8 regulation of IL-1 beta-induced IL-6 gene expression was further explored. CMT-8 did not affect IL-6 promoter activity in reporter gene assays. However, the IL-6 mRNA stability was decreased in the presence of CMT-8. These effects require de novo protein synthesis as they were inhibited by cycloheximide. Western blot analysis indicated that CMT-8 did not affect p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinases, or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (1 and 2) phosphorylation in response to IL-1 beta. These data suggest that CMT-8 can modulate inhibit IL-1 beta-induced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells at the post-transcriptional level affecting IL-6 mRNA stability. These observations may offer a novel molecular basis for this treatment of metabolic bone diseases that are mediated by IL-6.

  1. Changes in superoxide dismutase mRNA expression by streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments were designed to investigate the involvement of superoxide anions in the attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of the rat aorta from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. 2. The endothelium-dependent relaxation responses to acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-7) M) in helical strips of the aorta precontracted with noradrenaline (NA, 5 x 10(-3) approximately 3 x 10(-7) M) were significantly decreased in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The recovery phase of the relaxation after single administration of ACh in the STZ-induced diabetic rats was more rapid than those in control vessels. 3. Preincubation of aortic strips with superoxide dismutase (SOD, 60 u ml-1) normalized the recovery phase of the relaxation of diabetic aorta after single administration of ACh, whereas catalase (150 u ml-1) or indomethacin (10(-5) M) had no effects on the relaxation. 4. SOD (180 u ml-1) caused relaxation in NA precontracted aortic strips and the degree of the SOD-induced relaxation was significantly greater in diabetic aorta as compared with age-matched control vessels. 5. When the changes in mRNA expressions of Mn-SOD or Cu-Zn-SOD were observed, Mn-SOD mRNA expression was markedly decreased, and Cu-Zn-SOD was slightly decreased in diabetic aorta. 6. These results suggest that the rapid destruction of NO by superoxide anions may occur in the STZ-induced diabetic rats, and this may be due to a decrease in mRNA expression of Mn-SOD or Cu-Zn-SOD. Images Figure 4 PMID:8894182

  2. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fain, John N.; Company, Joseph M.; Booth, Frank W.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Sacks, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Methods Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16–20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. Results There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Conclusion Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. PMID:23831442

  3. GABAergic mRNA expression is upregulated in the prefrontal cortex of rats sensitized to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Wearne, Travis A; Parker, Lindsay M; Franklin, Jane L; Goodchild, Ann K; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-01-15

    Inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission plays an important role in the regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with increasing evidence suggesting that dysfunctional GABAergic processing of the PFC may underlie certain deficits reported across psychotic disorders. Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant that induces chronic psychosis in a subset of users, with repeat administration producing a progressively increased vulnerability to psychotic relapse following subsequent drug administration (sensitization). The aim here was to investigate changes to GABAergic mRNA expression in the PFC of rats sensitized to METH using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) underwent repeated methamphetamine (intraperitoneal (i.p.) or saline injections for 7 days. Following 14 days of withdrawal, rats were challenged with acute methamphetamine (1mg/kg i.p.) and RNA was isolated from the PFC to compare the relative mRNA expression of a range of GABA enzymes, transporters and receptors subunits. METH challenge resulted in a significant sensitized behavioral (locomotor) response in METH pre-treated animals compared with saline pre-treated controls. The mRNAs of transporters (GAT1 and GAT3), ionotropic GABAA receptor subunits (α3 and β1), together with the metabotropic GABAB1 receptor, were upregulated in the PFC of sensitized rats compared with saline controls. These findings indicate that GABAergic mRNA expression is significantly altered at the pre and postsynaptic level following sensitization to METH, with sensitization resulting in the transcriptional upregulation of several inhibitory genes. These changes likely have significant consequences on GABA-mediated neurotransmission in the PFC and may underlie certain symptoms conserved across psychotic disorders, such as executive dysfunction.

  4. FKBP5, SERT and COMT mRNA expressions in the peripheral leukocytes during menstruation cycle in healthy reproductive females.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Sawako; Iga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Shu-Ichi; Yamauchi, Ken; Numata, Shusuke; Song, Hongwei; Sumitani, Satsuki; Shibuya-Tayoshi, Sumiko; Haku, Mari; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru; Morita, Kyoko; Rokutan, Kazuhito; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2008-03-21

    There have been several evidences that the mRNA expressions in the peripheral leukocytes may indicate not only physical but also psychological states. The purpose of this study is whether the mRNA expressional changes in the leukocytes are related to the mental states across the menstrual cycle in reproductive healthy female subjects. Thirty-eight female subjects (22.4+/-1.4 year-old) were participated in this study at three menstruation cycle periods (menstrual, follicular and luteal phase). The FKBP5 (FK506-binding protein gene), SERT (serotonin transporter gene) and COMT (catechol-o-methyltransferase gene) mRNA expressions in the leukocytes were determined with hormonal data. The psychological changes were assessed with self-rating hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Only one thirds of subjects (n=12) had regular menstrual cycles during the experiment. So we analyzed the data from these 12 subjects. The anxiety score of each subject was changed across the menstrual cycle (Friedman test: P<0.05). The FKBP5 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the follicular phase than in the other phases but no changes were seen in either SERT or COMT mRNA expressions among the phases. In conclusion, there are differences of HADS anxiety score and FKBP5 mRNA expression in the leukocytes across the menstrual cycle but there is no correlation between anxiety scores and FKBP5 mRNA.

  5. BCL6 mRNA Expression Level in Invasive Duct Carcinoma not otherwise Specified

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Eman; Masoud, Eman; Eldien, Marwa Serag

    2016-01-01

    Introduction B-Cell Lymphoma 6 (BCL6) has an oncogenic role in tumourigenesis of various malignancies. It represses genes involved in terminal differentiation and plays complementary role with Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) in triple-negative breast cancer cellular function. Aim To evaluate the expression of BCL6 in cancer breast and determine its correlation with the clinico-pathological features including the molecular subtype of breast carcinoma. Materials and Methods This prospective case control study was carried out on 150 patients, divided into 100 cases of invasive duct carcinoma not otherwise specified and 50 benign breast lesions including fibroadenoma and fibrocystic disease. Fresh tissues were excised, which were then subjected to RNA extraction. The BCL6 mRNA level was assessed using real-time reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results There was a significant higher levels of BCL6 mRNA in malignant cases compared to benign ones (p<0.001). The level of BCL6 mRNA was higher in cases showing advanced tumor stage (p<0.04), triple negative subtype and associated in situ component (p<0.001) compared to cases with an early stage, luminal or Her 2-neu positive subtypes and those lacking in situ component. Conclusion BCL6 is up-regulated in breast cancer and is associated with poor prognostic features such as advanced stage and triple negative molecular subtype. BCL6 inhibitors might be considered as targeted therapy for breast cancer. PMID:28208987

  6. Keratin14 mRNA expression in human pneumocytes during quiescence, repair and disease

    PubMed Central

    Confalonieri, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Grassi, Gabriele; Bussani, Rossana; Chilosi, Marco; Farra, Rossella; Abrami, Michela; Stuani, Cristiana; Salton, Francesco; Ficial, Miriam; Confalonieri, Paola; Zandonà, Lorenzo; Romano, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    The lung alveoli slowly self-renew pneumocytes, but their facultative regeneration capacity is rapidly efficient after an injury, so fibrosis infrequently occurs. We recently observed Keratin 14 (KRT14) expression during diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), but not in controls. We wonder if KRT14 may be a marker of pneumocyte transition from quiescence to regeneration. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses highlighted the presence of KRT14 (mRNA and protein) only in human lung samples with DAD or interstitial lung disease (ILD). In the exponentially growing cell lines A549 and H441, the mRNA and protein levels of KRT14 peaked at day one after cell seeding and decreased at day two, opposite to what observed for the proliferation marker E2F1. The inverse relation of KRT14 versus E2F1 expression holds true also for other proliferative markers, such as cyclin E1 and cyclin D1. Of interest, we also found that E2F1 silencing caused cell cycle arrest and increased KRT14 expression, whilst E2F1 stimulation induced cell cycle progression and decreased KRT14. KRT14 also increased in proliferative pneumocytes (HPAEpiC) just before transdifferentiation. Overall, our results suggest that KRT14 is a viable biomarker of pneumocyte activation, and repair/regeneration. The involvement of KRT14 in regenerative process may suggest a novel pharmaceutical target to accelerate lung repair. PMID:28199407

  7. On a stochastic gene expression with pre-mRNA, mRNA and protein contribution.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Ryszard; Tomski, Andrzej

    2015-12-21

    In this paper we develop a model of stochastic gene expression, which is an extension of the model investigated in the paper [T. Lipniacki, P. Paszek, A. Marciniak-Czochra, A.R. Brasier, M. Kimmel, Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression, J. Theor. Biol. 238 (2006) 348-367]. In our model, stochastic effects still originate from random fluctuations in gene activity status, but we precede mRNA production by the formation of pre-mRNA, which enriches classical transcription phase. We obtain a stochastically regulated system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing evolution of pre-mRNA, mRNA and protein levels. We perform mathematical analysis of a long-time behavior of this stochastic process, identified as a piece-wise deterministic Markov process (PDMP). We check exact results using numerical simulations for the distributions of all three types of particles. Moreover, we investigate the deterministic (adiabatic) limit state of the process, when depending on parameters it can exhibit two specific types of behavior: bistability and the existence of the limit cycle. The latter one is not present when only two kinds of gene expression products are considered.

  8. Embedding mRNA stability in correlation analysis of time-series gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Farina, Lorenzo; De Santis, Alberto; Salvucci, Samanta; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-08-01

    Current methods for the identification of putatively co-regulated genes directly from gene expression time profiles are based on the similarity of the time profile. Such association metrics, despite their central role in gene network inference and machine learning, have largely ignored the impact of dynamics or variation in mRNA stability. Here we introduce a simple, but powerful, new similarity metric called lead-lag R(2) that successfully accounts for the properties of gene dynamics, including varying mRNA degradation and delays. Using yeast cell-cycle time-series gene expression data, we demonstrate that the predictive power of lead-lag R(2) for the identification of co-regulated genes is significantly higher than that of standard similarity measures, thus allowing the selection of a large number of entirely new putatively co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the lead-lag metric can also be used to uncover the relationship between gene expression time-series and the dynamics of formation of multiple protein complexes. Remarkably, we found a high lead-lag R(2) value among genes coding for a transient complex.

  9. Analysis of the sequence and embryonic expression of chicken neurofibromin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Schafer, G L; Ciment, G; Stocker, K M; Baizer, L

    1993-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common inherited disorder that primarily affects tissues derived from the neural crest. Recent identification and characterization of the human NF1 gene has revealed that it encodes a protein (now called neurofibromin) that is similar in sequence to the ras-GTPase activator protein (or ras-GAP), suggesting that neurofibromin may be a component of cellular signal transduction pathways regulating cellular proliferation and/or differentiation. To initiate investigations on the role of the NF1 gene product in embryonic development, we have isolated a partial cDNA for chicken neurofibromin. Sequence analysis reveals that the predicted amino acid sequence is highly conserved between chick and human. The chicken cDNA hybridizes to a 12.5-kb transcript on RNA blots, a mol wt similar to that reported for the human and murine mRNAs. Ribonuclease protection assays indicate that NF1 mRNA is expressed in a variety of tissues in the chick embryo; this is confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis. NF1 mRNA expression is detectable as early as embryonic stage 18 in the neural plate. This pattern of expression may suggest a role for neurofibromin during normal development, including that of the nervous system.

  10. Upregulation and nuclear translocation of testicular ghrelin protects differentiating spermatogonia from ionizing radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, W; Zeng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhu, C-J; Hou, W-G; Zhang, S

    2014-01-01

    Proper control of apoptotic signaling is important for maintenance of testicular homeostasis after ionizing radiation (IR). Herein, we challenged the hypothesis that ghrelin, a pleiotropic modulator, is potentially involved in IR-induced germ cell injury. Lower body exposure to 2 Gy of IR induced a notable increase of ghrelin expression in the nuclear of differentiating spermatogonia at defined stages, with an impairment in the Leydig cells (LCs)-expressing ghrelin. Unexpectedly, inhibition of the ghrelin pathway by intraperitoneal injection of a specific GHS-R1α antagonist enhanced spermatogonia elimination by apoptosis during the early recovery following IR, and thereafter resulted in impaired male fertility, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic effects of evoked ghrelin, although transient along testicular IR injury, have a profound influence on the post-injury recovery. In addition, inhibition of ghrelin signaling resulted in a significant increase in the intratesticular testosterone (T) level at the end of 21 days after IR, which should stimulate the spermatogenic recovery from surviving spermatogonia to a certain extent during the late stage. We further demonstrated that the upregulation and nuclear trafficking of ghrelin, elaborately regulated by IR-elicited antioxidant system in spermatogonia, may act through a p53-dependent mechanism. The elicitation of ghrelin expression by IR stress, the regulation of ghrelin expression by IR-induced oxidative stress and the interaction between p53 and ghrelin signaling during IR injury were confirmed in cultured spermatogonia. Hence, our results represent the first evidence in support of a radioprotective role of ghrelin in the differentiating spermatogonia. The acutely, delicate regulation of local-produced ghrelin appears to be a fine-tune mechanism modulating the balance between testicular homeostasis and early IR injury. PMID:24853426

  11. Upregulation and nuclear translocation of testicular ghrelin protects differentiating spermatogonia from ionizing radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zeng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhu, C-J; Hou, W-G; Zhang, S

    2014-05-22

    Proper control of apoptotic signaling is important for maintenance of testicular homeostasis after ionizing radiation (IR). Herein, we challenged the hypothesis that ghrelin, a pleiotropic modulator, is potentially involved in IR-induced germ cell injury. Lower body exposure to 2 Gy of IR induced a notable increase of ghrelin expression in the nuclear of differentiating spermatogonia at defined stages, with an impairment in the Leydig cells (LCs)-expressing ghrelin. Unexpectedly, inhibition of the ghrelin pathway by intraperitoneal injection of a specific GHS-R1α antagonist enhanced spermatogonia elimination by apoptosis during the early recovery following IR, and thereafter resulted in impaired male fertility, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic effects of evoked ghrelin, although transient along testicular IR injury, have a profound influence on the post-injury recovery. In addition, inhibition of ghrelin signaling resulted in a significant increase in the intratesticular testosterone (T) level at the end of 21 days after IR, which should stimulate the spermatogenic recovery from surviving spermatogonia to a certain extent during the late stage. We further demonstrated that the upregulation and nuclear trafficking of ghrelin, elaborately regulated by IR-elicited antioxidant system in spermatogonia, may act through a p53-dependent mechanism. The elicitation of ghrelin expression by IR stress, the regulation of ghrelin expression by IR-induced oxidative stress and the interaction between p53 and ghrelin signaling during IR injury were confirmed in cultured spermatogonia. Hence, our results represent the first evidence in support of a radioprotective role of ghrelin in the differentiating spermatogonia. The acutely, delicate regulation of local-produced ghrelin appears to be a fine-tune mechanism modulating the balance between testicular homeostasis and early IR injury.

  12. Ghrelin: an emerging player in the regulation of reproduction in non-mammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Unniappan, Suraj

    2010-07-01

    The endocrine regulation of vertebrate reproduction is achieved by the coordinated actions of multiple endocrine factors mainly produced from the brain, pituitary, and gonads. In addition to these, several other tissues including the fat and gut produce factors that have reproductive effects. Ghrelin is one such gut/brain hormone with species-specific effects in the regulation of mammalian reproduction. Recent studies have shown that ghrelin and ghrelin receptor mRNAs, and protein are expressed in the ovary and testis of mammals, indicating a direct effect for ghrelin in the control of reproduction. Ghrelin regulates mammalian reproduction by modulating hormone secretion from the brain and pituitary, and by acting directly on the gonads to influence reproductive tissue development and steroid hormone release. Based on the studies reported so far, ghrelin seems to have a predominantly inhibitory role on mammalian reproduction. The presence of ghrelin and ghrelin receptor has been found in the brain, pituitary and gonads of several non-mammalian vertebrates. In contrast to mammals, ghrelin seems to have a stimulatory role in the regulation of non-mammalian reproduction. The main objective of this review is to do a perspective analysis of the comparative aspects of ghrelin regulation of reproduction.

  13. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  14. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepati