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Sample records for ghz high power

  1. An 8-18 GHz broadband high power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifa, Wang; Ruixia, Yang; Jingfeng, Wu; Yanlei, Li

    2011-11-01

    An 8-18 GHz broadband high power amplifier (HPA) with a hybrid integrated circuit (HIC) is designed and fabricated. This HPA is achieved with the use of a 4-fingered micro-strip Lange coupler in a GaAs MMIC process. In order to decrease electromagnetic interference, a multilayer AlN material with good heat dissipation is adopted as the carrier of the power amplifier. When the input power is 25 dBm, the saturated power of the continuous wave (CW) outputted by the power amplifier is more than 39 dBm within the frequency range of 8-13 GHz, while it is more than 38.6 dBm within other frequency ranges. We obtain the peak power output, 39.4 dBm, at the frequency of 11.9 GHz. In the whole frequency band, the power-added efficiency is more than 18%. When the input power is 18 dBm, the small signal gain is 15.7 ± 0.7 dB. The dimensions of the HPA are 25 × 15 × 1.5 mm3.

  2. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kasa, J.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Kotera, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ~ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment.

  3. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  4. 4-GHz high-efficiency broadband FET power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, S.; Chang, C.

    1982-11-01

    The development and performance of a 4-GHz high-efficiency broadband FET power amplifier module for use in communications satellite transponders is discussed. The design, which is based on the parameters of a commercially available 7.2-mm multicell FET device, was optimized by the use of a CAD program, with broader bandwidth achieved by the addition of two open stubs to the input matching circuit. Six single-ended amplifier modules have been fabricated, tuned and tested, two being high-gain, 17.5% bandwidth designs and four being lower-gain, 25% bandwidth designs. The higher-gain modules, with a 0.5-dB bandwidth of 700 MHz (3.6 to 4.3 GHz) show a 6-dB gain and 3.23-W output power at the maximum efficiency of 48.6%, while broadband modules (0.5-dB bandwidth 900 MHz) deliver 5-W RF power at the maximum efficiency of 36%. The high-performance amplifiers may thus be used in satellite solid-state power amplifiers as replacements for traveling wave tubes.

  5. 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar for high power amplifier evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Hunter, Robert I.; Gallacher, Thomas F.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and characterization of a 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar to be used for the evaluation and demonstration of novel wideband, high power vacuum tube amplifier technology. The radar is designed to be fully coherent and exploits a low phase noise architecture to maximize Doppler performance. We selected to use horn-fed Fresnel zone plate lens antennas (FZPs) with 4-level phase quantization as a low cost method of realizing large aperture (0.5 m) antennas. The measured performance of these FZPs agrees closely with the design predictions and exceeds that obtainable with a Cassegrain of an equivalent size.

  6. 7.8GHz High power generation and extraction with a dielectric-loaded waveguide.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Gao, F.; Wong, T.; Yusof, Z.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Euclid Techlabs

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present updated results on power extraction testing of a 7.8 GHz dielectric loaded waveguide power extractor using both high charge single bunches and bunch trains. We have generated a 1.7 ns radio frequency (rf) pulse with 30 MW of power with a single 66 nC electron bunch. Then we have generated a pulse train of electron beam for rf generation of 10 ns and 22 ns rf pulses.

  7. 7.8 GHz High Power Generation And Extraction With A Dielectric-loaded Waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Yusof, Z.; Jing, C.; Wong, T.

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we present updated results on power extraction testing of a 7.8 GHz dielectric loaded waveguide power extractor using both high charge single bunches and bunch trains. We have generated a 1.7 ns radio frequency (rf) pulse with 30 MW of power with a single 66 nC electron bunch. Then we have generated a pulse train of electron beam for rf generation of 10 ns and 22 ns rf pulses.

  8. High-Power Accelerator Research and Development at the NRL 11.424-GHz Magnicon Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven H.; Kinkead, Allen K.; Nezhevenko, Oleg A.; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; Hirshfield, Jay L.; Vikharev, Anatoly; Ivanov, Oleg; Kuzikov, Sergey; Gorbachev, Alexey; Isaev, Vladimir A.; Gai, Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard

    2002-11-01

    An 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier has been jointly developed by the Naval Research Laboratory and Omega-P, Inc. as an alternative technology to klystrons for powering a future X-band linear collider. This paper will discuss its background, operating principles, and results to date, as well its present status as a facility for collaborative research on accelerator-related technologies that require high-power 11.424-GHz radiation. Two research programs are currently under way using the output of the magnicon. The first, a collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics, is investigating active microwave pulse compressors using plasma switch tubes. The second, a collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory and SLAC, is investigating dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, with the ultimate goal of developing a compact DLA accelerator.

  9. High Power Accelerator R&D at the NRL 11.424-GHz Magnicon Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven H.; Kinkead, Allen K.; Nezhevenko, Oleg A.; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; Hirshfield, Jay L.; Vikharev, Anatoly L.; Ivanov, Oleg A.; Kuzikov, Sergey V.; Gorbachev, Alexey M.; Isaev, Vladimir A.; Gai, Wei; Konecny, Richard; Power, John G.

    2002-12-01

    An 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier has been jointly developed by the Naval Research Laboratory and Omega-P, Inc. as an alternative technology to klystrons for powering a future X-band linear collider. This paper will discuss its background, operating principles, and results to date, as well its present status as part of a facility for collaborative research on accelerator-related technologies that require high-power 11.424-GHz radiation. Two collaborative research programs are currently under way using the magnicon output. The first, a collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics, is investigating active microwave pulse compressors using plasma switch tubes. The second, a collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory and SLAC, is investigating dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, with the ultimate goal of developing a compact DLA accelerator.

  10. Note: efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zappala, J C; Bailey, K; Lu, Z-T; O'Connor, T P; Jiang, W

    2014-04-01

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8-2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments. PMID:24784682

  11. Note: Efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, J. C.; Bailey, K.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Jiang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8-2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments.

  12. Note: Efficient generation of optical sidebands at GHz with a high-power tapered amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, J. C.; Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; O’Connor, T. P.; Jiang, W.

    2014-04-15

    Two methods using a laser-diode tapered amplifier to produce high-power, high-efficiency optical frequency sidebands over a wide tunable frequency range are studied and compared. For a total output of 500 mW at 811 nm, 20% of the power can be placed in each of the first-order sidebands. Functionality and characterization are presented within the sideband frequency region of 0.8–2.3 GHz, and it is shown that both methods can be applied beyond this frequency range. These methods provide a versatile and effective tool for atomic physics experiments.

  13. High power tests of an electroforming cavity operating at 11.424 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgashev, V. A.; Gatti, G.; Higashi, Y.; Leonardi, O.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Marcelli, A.; Rosenzweig, J.; Spataro, B.; Tantawi, S. G.; Yeremian, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    The achievement of ultra high accelerating gradients is mandatory in order to fabricate compact accelerators at 11.424 GHz for scientific and industrial applications. An extensive experimental and theoretical program to determine a reliable ultra high gradient operation of the future linear accelerators is under way in many laboratories. In particular, systematic studies on the 11.424 GHz frequency accelerator structures, R&D on new materials and the associated microwave technology are in progress to achieve accelerating gradients well above 120 MeV/m. Among the many, the electroforming procedure is a promising approach to manufacture high performance RF devices in order to avoid the high temperature brazing and to produce precise RF structures. We report here the characterization of a hard high gradient RF accelerating structure at 11.424 GHz fabricated using the electroforming technique. Low-level RF measurements and high power RF tests carried out at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on this prototype are presented and discussed. In addition, we present also a possible layout where the water-cooling of irises based on the electroforming process has been considered for the first time.

  14. Development of a high power 12GHz PPM focused traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a high efficiency coupled cavity traveling wave tube with periodic permanent magnetic focusing operating at 12.06 GHz, with 1 to 2 kilowatts CW power is described. Such a tube would ultimately be used for broadcasting power transmission from a satellite. The electron gun was designed to be demountable with a replaceable cathode, and the tube to be operable in a bakeable vacuum chamber with its collector replaced by a collector. Therefore, the high efficiency design was concerned with the slow wave structure only, utilizing velocity resynchronization. A special adapter was designed which incorporated an electromagnet refocusing section and a collector baseplate to facilitate testing the collector. CW output power of 1000 watts yielding 21.5% electronic efficiency was demonstrated, with a minimum output power of 525 watts across the specified 160 MHz bandwidth.

  15. Multi-nanosecond high power pulse generation at 7.8GHz with a dielectric-loaded power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M..; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Gao, F.; Jing, C.; Wong, T.; Yusof, Z.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Euclid Techlabs LLC; IEEE

    2009-06-01

    Power extraction from charged particle beams is a prospective way to develop future high power radio frequency (RF) sources. We have designed and tested a 7.8 GHz power extractor based on a dielectric-loaded waveguide. Building upon earlier work on single electron bunch tests, 10 ns and 22 ns megawatt-level RF pulses have been generated with trains consisting of 16 electron bunches each, by using a laser splitting-recombination scheme. In addition, 44 MW of peak power has been generated with a train consisting 4 electron bunches. Behaviors of higher-order-modes are also explored.

  16. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  17. High-Power Testing of 11.424-GHz Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven; Gai, Wei

    2001-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has previously described the design, construction, and bench testing of an X-band traveling-wave accelerating structure loaded with a permittivity=20 dielectric (P. Zou et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2301, 2000.). We describe a new program to build a test accelerator using this structure. The accelerator will be powered by the high-power 11.424-GHz radiation from the magnicon facility at the Naval Research Laboratory ( O.A. Nezhevenko et al., Proc. PAC 2001, in press). The magnicon is expected to provide up to 30 MW from each of two WR-90 output waveguide arms in pulses of up to 1 microsecond duration, permitting tests up to a gradient of 40 MV/m. Still higher power pulses (100-500 MW) may be available at the output of an active pulse compressor driven by the magnicon ( A.L. Vikharev et al., Proc. 9th Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts.).

  18. Formation of a laminar electron flow for 300 GHz high-power pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Teruo; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Mudiganti, Jagadish C.; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes the design of a triode magnetron injection gun for use in a 200 kW, 300 GHz gyrotron. As power and frequency increase, the performance of the gyrotron becomes quite sensitive to the quality of the electron beam. Formation of a laminar electron flow is essential for the realization of a high quality beam with a small velocity spread. In this study, a new method is developed for a quantitative evaluation of the laminarity and is applied to optimize the electrode design. The laminarity depends not only on conventional design parameters such as the cathode slant angle but also on the spatial distribution of the electric field along the beam trajectory. In the optimized design, the velocity pitch factors, {alpha}, larger than 1.2 are obtained at 65 kV, 10 A with spreads, {Delta}{alpha}, less than 5%.

  19. High Power SiGe X-Band (8-10 GHz) Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors and Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Zhenqiang; Jiang, Ningyue; Ponchak, George E.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    2005-01-01

    Limited by increased parasitics and thermal effects as the device size becomes large, current commercial SiGe power HBTs are difficult to operate at X-band (8-12 GHz) with adequate power added efficiencies at high power levels. We found that, by changing the heterostructure and doping profile of SiGe HBTs, their power gain can be significantly improved without resorting to substantial lateral scaling. Furthermore, employing a common-base configuration with proper doping profile instead of a common-emitter configuration improves the power gain characteristics of SiGe HBTs, which thus permits these devices to be efficiently operated at X-band. In this paper, we report the results of SiGe power HBTs and MMIC power amplifiers operating at 8-10 GHz. At 10 GHz, 22.5 dBm (178 mW) RF output power with concurrent gain of 7.32 dB is measured at the peak power-added efficiency of 20.0% and the maximum RF output power of 24.0 dBm (250 mW) is achieved from a 20 emitter finger SiGe power HBT. Demonstration of single-stage X-band medium-power linear MMIC power amplifier is also realized at 8 GHz. Employing a 10-emitter finger SiGe HBT and on-chip input and output matching passive components, a linear gain of 9.7 dB, a maximum output power of 23.4 dBm and peak power added efficiency of 16% is achieved from the power amplifier. The MMIC exhibits very low distortion with third order intermodulation (IM) suppression C/I of -13 dBc at output power of 21.2 dBm and over 20dBm third order output intercept point (OIP3).

  20. High-Power Plasma Switch for 11.4 GHz Microwave Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2010-03-04

    Results obtained in several experiments on active RF pulse compression at X-band using a magnicon as the high-power RF source are presented. In these experiments, microwave energy was stored in high-Q TE01 and TE02 modes of two parallel-fed resonators, and then discharged using switches activated with rapidly fired plasma discharge tubes. Designs and high-power tests of several versions of the compressor are described. In these experiments, coherent pulse superposition was demonstrated at a 5–9 MW level of incident power. The compressed pulses observed had powers of 50–70 MW and durations of 40–70 ns. Peak power gains were measured to be in the range of 7:1–11:1 with efficiency in the range of 50–63%.

  1. An efficient high power microwave source at 35 GHz using an induction linac free electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Yarema, S.M.

    1986-11-01

    The Electron Laser Facility (ELF) is a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier operating in the millimeter-wave regime. ELF uses the electron beam produced by the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA), which is a linear-induction accelerator. We discuss here (1) the experimental results reflecting the high-peak-power output and high-extraction efficiency obtained from an FEL amplifier operated with a tapered wiggler magnetic field and (2) the results of studies of the exponential gain and saturated power obtained from an FEL amplifier with a flat wiggler while we parametrically varied the input power to the amplifier and the beam current into the wiggler.

  2. Calculating the interaction of a high power 83 GHz beam with ceramic tubes for material processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliflet, Arne; Bruce, Ralph; Bruce, Robert; Gold, Steven; Lewis, David, III

    2004-11-01

    The high power millimeter-wave beams that can be generated by CW gyrotrons represent a promising energy source for rapid, high-temperature processing of materials. A program is under way at the Naval Research Laboratory to investigate the heating of ceramic tubes and cylinders using an 83 GHz beam for joining and sintering applications. In this presentation we discuss the scattering and absorption of microwave power by a workpiece consisting of concentric ceramic tubes and the resulting temperature profile. The analysis is complicated by the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties, an effect that can dramatically alter the microwave coupling during the heating process. In the process under investigation the tubes are rotated to promote azimuthally uniform heating so that only the radial dependence of the dielectric properties need be included.

  3. DNP enhanced NMR using a high-power 94 GHz microwave source: a study of the TEMPOL radical in toluene.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Eugeny V; Newton, Mark E; Pike, Kevin J; Bolton, David R; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw M; Howes, Andrew P; Smith, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2010-06-14

    DNP enhanced (1)H NMR at 143 MHz in toluene is investigated using an NMR spectrometer coupled with a modified EPR spectrometer operating at 94 GHz and TEMPOL as the polarisation agent. A 100 W microwave amplifier was incorporated into the output stage of the EPR instrument so that high microwave powers could be delivered to the probe in either CW or pulsed mode. The maximum enhancement for the ring protons increases from approximately -16 for a 5 mM TEMPOL solution to approximately -50 for a 20 mM solution at a microwave power of approximately 480 mW. The temperature dependence of the enhancement, the NMR relaxation rates and the ESR spectrum of TEMPOL were also studied in an effort to obtain information on the dynamics of the system.

  4. High (1 GHz) repetition rate compact femtosecond laser: A powerful multiphoton tool for nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Martin, S.; Le Harzic, R.; Bartels, A.; Janke, C.; König, K.

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton tomography of human skin and nanosurgery of human chromosomes have been performed with a 1GHz repetition rate laser by the use of the commercially available femtosecond multiphoton laser tomograph DermaInspect as well as a compact galvoscanning microscope. We performed the autofluorescence tomography up to 100μm in the depth of human skin. Submicron cutting lines and hole drillings have been conducted on labeled human chromosomes.

  5. High-power self-similar amplification seeded by a 1 GHz harmonically mode-locked Yb-fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Daping; Li, Wenxue; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenchao; Zeng, Heping

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate 1 GHz, 75 W, 65 fs pulse generation through chirped-pulse and self-similar amplification of a second-harmonic mode-locked Yb fiber oscillator. To confirm the experimental results of a chirped-pulse pre-amplifier, a theoretically calculative model is designed to simulate gain narrowing in the amplification. Specifically, the Kelly sidebands generated by a seed laser experience similar evolution under both conditions. The grism-based self-similar amplifier together with a high-efficiency grating compressor contribute to high-power ultrashort pulses whose spectra are efficiently broadened to a maximum 10 dB bandwidth of 56 nm with a center wavelength of 1032.2 nm owing to self-phase modulation in a gain fiber.

  6. Study of a high power sine waveguide traveling wave tube amplifier centered at 8 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brad W.; Simon, David S.; French, David M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Wong, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Performance of a 20-stage X-band sine waveguide amplifier, driven by a 40 A, 100 kV, cylindrical electron beam, is studied using numerical simulation and interpreted using Pierce's classical traveling wave tube theory. For an input signal power level of 1.8 kW, particle-in-cell simulations predict gain and bandwidth values exceeding 14 dB and 13%, respectively. For an input signal power level of 7.2 kW, particle-in-cell simulations predict gain and bandwidth values exceeding 12 dB and 15%, respectively, with output power levels exceeding 110 kW at peak gain. Also given are: an assessment of the space charge factor (Pierce's QC parameter) for the complex circuit using simulation data, and an evaluation of the harmonic contents in the beam current.

  7. High-power 140 GHz ECRH experiments at the W7-AS stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Erckmann, V.; Burhenn, R.; Geist, T.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Kick, M.; Maassberg, H. ); Kasparek, W.; Mueller, G.A.; Schueller, P.G. ); Il'in, V.I. ); Kurbatov, V.I.; Malygin, S. ); Malygin, V.I. ); NBI Team

    1994-10-15

    ECRH was combined with NBI at moderate and high densities with on- and off-axis heating. Density control was achieved for combined heating in long pulse operation despite the beam fueling in contrast to discharges with pure NBI heating. Particle confinement degradation by profile changes inferred by ECRH is discussed as a possible mechanism. The impurity confinement is strongly affected and is discussed for on- and off-axis combined heating conditions.

  8. Power-Amplifier Module for 145 to 165 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    A power-amplifier module that operates in the frequency range of 145 to 165 GHz has been designed and constructed as a combination of (1) a previously developed monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier and (2) a waveguide module. The amplifier chip was needed for driving a high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) frequency doubler. While it was feasible to connect the amplifier and frequency-doubler chips by use of wire bonds, it was found to be much more convenient to test the amplifier and doubler chips separately. To facilitate separate testing, it was decided to package the amplifier and doubler chips in separate waveguide modules. Figure 1 shows the resulting amplifier module. The amplifier chip was described in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11, (November 2003), page 49. To recapitulate: This is a three-stage MMIC power amplifier that utilizes HEMTs as gain elements. The amplifier was originally designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz. The waveguide module is based on a previously developed lower frequency module, redesigned to support operation in the frequency range of 140 to 220 GHz. Figure 2 presents results of one of several tests of the amplifier module - measurements of output power and gain as functions of input power at an output frequency of 150 GHz. Such an amplifier module has many applications to test equipment for power sources above 100 GHz.

  9. High efficiency IMPATT diodes for 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Intersatellite links are expected to play an increasingly important role in future satellite systems. Improved components are required to properly utilize the wide bandwidth allocated for intersatellite link applications around 60 GHz. IMPATT diodes offer the highest potential performance as solid state power sources for a 60 GHz transmitter. Presently available devices do not have the desired power and efficiency. High efficiency, high power IMPATT diodes for intersatellite link applications are being developed by NASA and other government agencies. The development of high efficiency 60 GHz IMPATT diodes by NASA is described.

  10. Development of 26GHz dielectric-based wakefield power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs; KEK; Dynamics Software

    2009-01-01

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  11. Development of 26 GHz Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.

    2009-01-22

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  12. Design of a 26 GHZ wakefield power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Gao, F.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Kazakov, S.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC; KEK

    2008-01-01

    High frequency, high output power, and high efficiency RF sources have compelling applications in accelerators for high energy physics. The 26 GHz RF power extractor proposed in this paper provides a practical approach for generating high power RF in this particular frequency range. The extractor is designed to couple out RF power generated from the high charge electron bunch train at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Designs are presented including parameter optimization, electromagnetic modeling of structures and RF couplers, and analysis of beam dynamics.

  13. Design of a high-power, high-gain, 2nd harmonic, 22.848 GHz gyroklystron

    SciTech Connect

    Veale, M.; Purohit, P.; Lawson, W.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we consider the design of a four-cavity, high-gain K-band gyroklystron experiment for high gradient structure testing. The frequency doubling gyroklystron utilizes a beam voltage of 500 kV and a beam current of 200 A from a magnetron injection gun (MIG) originally designed for a lower-frequency device. The microwave circuit features input and gain cavities in the circular TE{sub 011} mode and penultimate and output cavities that operate at the second harmonic in the TE{sub 021} mode. We investigate the MIG performance and study the behavior of the circuit for different values of perpendicular to parallel velocity ratio (α= V{sub ⊥}/ V{sub z}). This microwave tube is expected to be able to produce at least 20 MW of power in 1μs pulses at a repetition rate of at least 120 Hz. A maximum efficiency of 26% and a large signal gain of 58 dB under zero-drive stable conditions were simulated for a velocity ratio equal to 1.35.

  14. Bit-error-rate testing of high-power 30-GHz traveling-wave tubes for ground-terminal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted at NASA Lewis to measure the bit-error-rate performance of two 30-GHz 200-W coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes (TWTs). The transmission effects of each TWT on a band-limited 220-Mbit/s SMSK signal were investigated. The tests relied on the use of a recently developed digital simulation and evaluation system constructed at Lewis as part of the 30/20-GHz technology development program. This paper describes the approach taken to test the 30-GHz tubes and discusses the test data. A description of the bit-error-rate measurement system and the adaptations needed to facilitate TWT testing are also presented.

  15. Bit-error-rate testing of high-power 30-GHz traveling wave tubes for ground-terminal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Fujikawa, Gene

    1986-01-01

    Tests were conducted at NASA Lewis to measure the bit-error-rate performance of two 30 GHz, 200 W, coupled-cavity traveling wave tubes (TWTs). The transmission effects of each TWT were investigated on a band-limited, 220 Mb/sec SMSK signal. The tests relied on the use of a recently developed digital simulation and evaluation system constructed at Lewis as part of the 30/20 GHz technology development program. The approach taken to test the 30 GHz tubes is described and the resultant test data are discussed. A description of the bit-error-rate measurement system and the adaptations needed to facilitate TWT testing are also presented.

  16. Fabrication of Very High Efficiency 5.8 GHz Power Amplifiers using AlGaN HFETs on SiC Substrates for Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerry

    2001-01-01

    For wireless power transmission using microwave energy, very efficient conversion of the DC power into microwave power is extremely important. Class E amplifiers have the attractive feature that they can, in theory, be 100% efficient at converting, DC power to RF power. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor material has many advantageous properties, relative to silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon carbide (SiC), such as a much larger bandgap, and the ability to form AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions. The large bandgap of AlGaN also allows for device operation at higher temperatures than could be tolerated by a smaller bandgap transistor. This could reduce the cooling requirements. While it is unlikely that the AlGaN transistors in a 5.8 GHz class E amplifier can operate efficiently at temperatures in excess of 300 or 400 C, AlGaN based amplifiers could operate at temperatures that are higher than a GaAs or Si based amplifier could tolerate. Under this program, AlGaN microwave power HFETs have been fabricated and characterized. Hybrid class E amplifiers were designed and modeled. Unfortunately, within the time frame of this program, good quality HFETs were not available from either the RSC laboratories or commercially, and so the class E amplifiers were not constructed.

  17. Multi-MW 22.8 GHz Harmonic Multiplier - RF Power Source for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-26

    Electrodynamic and particle simulation studies have been carried out to optimize design of a two-cavity harmonic frequency multiplier, in which a linear electron beam is energized by rotating fields near cyclotron resonance in a TE111 cavity in a uniform magnetic field, and in which the beam then radiates coherently at the nth harmonic into a TEn11 output cavity. Examples are worked out in detail for 7th and 2nd harmonic converters, showing RF-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 45% and 88%, respectively at 19.992 GHz (K-band) and 5.712 GHz (C-band), for a drive frequency of 2.856 GHz. Details are shown of RF infrastructure (S-band klystron, modulator) and harmonic converter components (drive cavity, output cavities, electron beam source and modulator, beam collector) for the two harmonic converters to be tested. Details are also given for the two-frequency (S- and C-band) coherent multi-MW test stand for RF breakdown and RF gun studies.

  18. HIGH POWER TEST OF A 3.9 GHZ 5-CELL DEFLECTING-MODE CAVITY IN A CRYOGENIC OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-11-24

    A 3.9 GHz deflecting mode (S, TM110) cavity has been long used for six-dimensional phase-space beam manipulation tests [1-5] at the A0 Photo-Injector Lab (16 MeV) in Fermilab and their extended applications with vacuum cryomodules are currently planned at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) user facility (> 50 MeV). Despite the successful test results, the cavity, however, demonstrated limited RF performance during liquid nitrogen (LN2) ambient operation that was inferior to theoretical prediction. We have been performing full analysis of the designed cavity by analytic calculation and comprehensive system simulation analysis to solve complex thermodynamics and mechanical stresses. The re-assembled cryomodule is currently under the test with a 50 kW klystron at the Fermilab A0 beamline, which will benchmark the modeling analysis. The test result will be used to design vacuum cryomodules for the 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavity that will be employed at the ASTA facility for beam diagnostics and phase-space control.

  19. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard J.; Shapiro, Michael A.

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  20. High-peak-power microwave pulses at 2. 37 GHz: No effects on vigilance performance in monkeys. Interim report, February 1988-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Knepton, J.; Cobb, B.L.; Klauenberg, B.J.; Merritt, J.H.

    1989-11-02

    The current safety standards for occupational exposure radio frequency and microwave exposure do not limit the peak power of microwave pulses. To evaluate whether short-duration (93 ns) high-peak-power microwave pulses can alter behavioral performance, four rhesus monkeys were exposed to peak powers of 7.02-11.30 kW/cm2 while they performed a vigilance task. The behavior consisted of two components: responding on a variable interval schedule on one lever and to reaction time on a second lever. Correct responding on each lever was signaled by auditory stimuli. Trained monkeys performed the task during exposure to 2.37-GHz microwave pulses delivered concurrently with the auditory signals. The estimated peak whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) for each pulse was between 582.7 and 937.9 kW/kg (54-87 mJ/kg per pulse). Compared to sham irradiation, significant changes in behavioral performance were not observed.

  1. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  2. Test results for 20-GHz GaAs FET spacecraft power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Test were conducted to measure the performance of the 20-GHz solid state, proof-of-concept amplifier. The amplifier operates over the 17.7 to 20.2-GHz frequency range and uses high power gallium arsenide field effect transistors. The amplifier design and test methods are briefly described. NASA and contractor performance data are compared.

  3. Medium power amplifiers covering 90 - 130 GHz for telescope local oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Bryerton, Eric; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a set of power amplifier (PA) modules containing InP High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chips. The chips were designed and optimized for local oscillator sources in the 90-130 GHz band for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array telescope. The modules feature 20-45 mW of output power, to date the highest power from solid state HEMT MMIC modules above 110 GHz.

  4. IMPATT power building blocks for 20 GHz spaceborne transmit amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmus, J.; Cho, Y.; Degruyl, J.; Ng, E.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Okean, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Single-stage circulator coupled IMPATT building block constituents of a 20-GHz solid state power amplifier (SSPA) currently under development for spaceborne downlink transmitter usage have been demonstrated as providing 1.5 to 2.0W RF power output at 4 to 5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth. Using either commercially available or recently developed in-house GaAs Schottky Read-profile IMPATT diodes, DC/RF power added efficiencies of 14 to 15% were achieved in these amplifier stages. A two stage IMPATT driver amplifier with similar RF output power capability exhibited 13 + or - 0.5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth.

  5. Spacecraft mass trade-offs versus radio-frequency power and antenna size at 8 GHz and 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchriest, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to help determine the relative merits of 32 GHz over 8 GHz for future deep space communications. This analysis is only a piece of the overall analysis and only considers the downlink communication mass, power, and size comparisons for 8 and 32 GHz. Both parabolic antennas and flat-plate arrays are considered. The Mars Sample Return mission is considered in some detail as an example of the tradeoffs involved; for this mission the mass, power, and size show a definite advantage of roughly 2:1 in using the 32 GHz over 8 GHz.

  6. Development toward high-power sub-1-ohm DC-67 GHz RF switches using phase change materials for reconfigurable RF front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jeong-sun; Seo, Hwa-chang; Le, Duc

    2014-06-01

    We report GeTe-based phase change material RF switches with on-state resistance of 0.07 ohm*mm and off-state capacitance of 20 fF/mm. The RF switch figure-of-merit, Ron*Coff is comparable to RF MEMS ohmic switches. The PCM RF shunt and series switches were fabricated for the first time in a lateral FET configuration to reduce parasitics, different from the vertical via switches. In a shunt switch configuration, isolation of 30 dB was achieved up to 67 GHz with return loss of 15 dB. RF power handling was tested with ~10 W for series and 3 W for shunt configurations. Harmonic powers were suppressed more than 100 dBc at fundamental power of 1 W, for future tunable and reconfigurable RF technology.

  7. Submicron gate InP power MISFET's with improved output power density at 18 and 20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, M. D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Messick, L. J.; Nguyen, R.; Schmitz, D.; Juergensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    The microwave characteristics are presented at 18 and 20 GHz of submicron gate indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFET's) for high output power density applications. InP power MISFET's were fabricated and the output power density was investigated as a function of drain-source spacing. The best output power density and gain were obtained for drain-source spacing of 3 microns. The output power density is 2.7 times greater than was previously measured for InP MISFET's at 18 and 20 GHz, and the power-added efficiency also increased.

  8. Submicron gate InP power MISFET's with improved output power density at 18 and 20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, Michael D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard; Schmitz, Dietmar; Jurgensen, Holger

    1991-01-01

    The microwave characteristics are presented at 18 and 20 GHz of submicron gate indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFETs) for high output power density applications. InP power MISFET's were fabricated and the output power density was investigated as a function of drain-source spacing. The best output power density and gain were obtained for drain-source spacing of 3 micron. The output power density is 2.7 times greater than was previously measured for InP MISFET's at 18 and 20 GHz, and the power-added efficiency also increased.

  9. The 20 GHz power GaAs FET development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandell, M.

    1986-01-01

    The development of power Field Effect Transistors (FET) operating in the 20 GHz frequency band is described. The major efforts include GaAs FET device development (both 1 W and 2 W devices), and the development of an amplifier module using these devices.

  10. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Iturri, Peio López; Nazábal, Juan Antonio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Rodriguez, Pablo; Beruete, Miguel; Fernández-Valdivielso, Carlos; Falcone, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM) band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven's power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology. PMID:23202228

  11. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirm, Karl; Curt, Stephane; Dobert, Steffen; McMonagle, Gerard; Rossat, Ghislain; Syratchev, Igor; Timeo, Luca; Haase, Andrew Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Sprehn, Daryl; Vlieks, Arnold; Hamdi, Abdallah; Peauger, Franck; Kuzikov, Sergey; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  12. Start-up scenario of a high-power pulsed gyrotron for 300 GHz band collective Thomson scattering diagnostics in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We present results of theoretical study of mode competition during the voltage rise of a 300-kW, 300-GHz gyrotron operating in the TE22,2,1 mode. Simulations tracking eight competing modes show that, with a proper choice of the magnetic field, stable excitation of the operating mode can be realized, despite the presence of parasitic modes in the resonator spectrum. A finite voltage rise time, 1 kV/4 ns referred to as the slow voltage rise case, is taken into account to simulate realistically the experimental condition. Simulation results with the finite voltage rise time are in good agreement with the experimental test, in which the gyrotron demonstrated reliable operation at power levels up to 300 kW. Moreover, interesting phenomena are observed. Along with voltage rise, the oscillation manner changes from backward wave oscillation to gyrotron oscillation. In the range of the magnetic field lower than the magnetic field strength at which the TE22,2 mode attains to the maximum power, mode competition with the TE21,2 mode takes place although many other competing modes exist in between the two modes. In addition to the slow voltage rise case, the fast voltage rise case, 10 kV/4 ns, and the instant voltage rise case are considered. For these cases, simulations also predict stable oscillation of the TE22,2 mode with the same power level with the slow voltage rise case. This indicates that stable oscillations of the TE22,2 mode can be obtained in a wide range of the voltage rise time.

  13. A high-power LD-pumped linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser operating at 1152 nm with 42 GHz narrow linewidth and 18 dB PER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Long; Zhang, Hanwei; Wang, Xiaolin; Su, Rongtao; Zhou, Pu

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a high-power 1152 nm narrow-linewidth linearly polarized fiber laser based on a commercial polarization-maintaining double cladding Yb-doped fiber and cladding-pump regime at 976 nm. By carefully selecting the parameters of the cavity and heating the gain fiber, a maximum output power of 13 W with a slope efficiency of ~45% is obtained, with the amplified spontaneous emission suppressed more than 35 dB lower than the signal wavelength. The polarization extinction ratio and 3 dB linewidth at the maximum output power are 18 dB and 0.14 nm (~42 GHz) respectively, while no spectral broadening and polarization degradation are observed in the process of power scaling, which is an attractive result for some special applications, such as frequency doubling.

  14. Design concepts for a high-impedance narrow-band 42 GHz power TWT using a fundamental/forward ladder-based circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A.

    1980-01-01

    A low-cost, narrowband, millimeter wave space communications TWT design was studied. Cold test interaction structure scale models were investigated and analyses were undertaken to predict the electrical and thermal response of the hypothetical 200 W TWT at 42 GHz and 21 kV beam voltage. An intentionally narrow instantaneous bandwidth (1%, with the possibility of electronic tuning of the center frequency over several percent) was sought with a highly dispersive, high impedance "forward wave' interaction structure based on a ladder (for economy in fabrication) and nonspace harmonic interaction, for a high gain rate and a short, economically focused tube. The "TunneLadder' interaction structure devised combines ladder properties with accommodation for a pencil beam. Except for the impedance and bandwidth, there is much in common with the millimeter wave helix TWTs which provided the ideal of diamond support rods. The benefits of these are enhanced in the TunneLadder case because of spatial separation of beam interception and RF current heating.

  15. High Speed sub-GHz Spectrometer for Brillouin Scattering Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berghaus, Kim; Yun, Seok H.; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy allows non-contact, direct readout of viscoelastic properties of a material and has been a useful tool in material characterization1, structural monitoring2 and environmental sensing3,4. In the past, Brillouin spectroscopy has usually employed scanning Fabry-Perot etalons to perform spectral analysis which require high illumination power and long acquisition times, which prevents using this technique in biomedical applications. Our newly developed spectrometer overcomes this challenge by employing two virtually imaged phased arrays (VIPAs) in a cross-axis configuration, which enables us to do sub-GHz resolution spectral analysis with sub-seconds acquisition time and illumination power within the safety limits of biological tissue application5. This improvement allows for multiple applications of Brillouin spectroscopy, which are now being broadly explored in biological research and clinical application6. PMID:26779654

  16. 15.6 GHz Ceramic RF Power Extractor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.V.; Luo, Y.; Yu, D.

    2004-12-07

    A 15.6GHz, slow-wave dielectric structure with matched RF power outcoupler is described. The extractor is to be driven at the 12th harmonic of a bunched electron beam at the upgraded AWA facility at ANL. The design includes a single-port output with two stubs, an upstream absorber, and a ceramic tube matched for the fundamental mode at the downstream end and for the dipole mode at the upstream end. Two codes (Microwave Studio registered and Gd1) were used to optimize and analyze the design in frequency and time domains including wakefields.

  17. Influence of power density on high purity 63 mm diameter polycrystalline diamond deposition inside a 2.45 GHz MPCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengwang; Wang, Rong; Zheng, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaojing; Hei, Hongjun; Liu, Xiaoping; He, Zhiyong; Shen, Yanyan; Tang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    63 mm diameter polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films were synthesized via a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor in 99% H2–1% CH4 atmosphere. Two different conditions, i.e. the typical condition (input power of 5 kW and gas pressure of 13 kPa) and the high power density condition (input power of 10 kW and gas pressure of 18 kPa), were employed for diamond depositions. The color changes of the plasma under the two proposed conditions with and without methane were observed by photographs. Likewise, the concentrations of hydrogen atoms and carbon active chemical species in plasma were analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The morphologies and purity of the PCD films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Finally, the transmission spectrum of the polished PCD plates was characterized by a UV–Vis–NIR spectrometer. Experimental results showed that both the concentrations of hydrogen atoms and carbon radicals increased obviously, with the boost input power and higher pressure. The films synthesized under the high power density condition displayed higher purity and more uniform thickness. The growth rates in 10 kW and 18 kPa reached ~7.7 µm h‑1, approximately 6.5 times as much as that occurred in the typical process. Moreover, the polished plates synthesized under the high power density condition possessed a relatively high optical transmittance (~69%), approaching the theoretical values of approximately 71.4% in IR. These results indicate that the purity and growth rate of big-area PCD films could be simultaneously increased with power density.

  18. Influence of power density on high purity 63 mm diameter polycrystalline diamond deposition inside a 2.45 GHz MPCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengwang; Wang, Rong; Zheng, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaojing; Hei, Hongjun; Liu, Xiaoping; He, Zhiyong; Shen, Yanyan; Tang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    63 mm diameter polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films were synthesized via a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor in 99% H2-1% CH4 atmosphere. Two different conditions, i.e. the typical condition (input power of 5 kW and gas pressure of 13 kPa) and the high power density condition (input power of 10 kW and gas pressure of 18 kPa), were employed for diamond depositions. The color changes of the plasma under the two proposed conditions with and without methane were observed by photographs. Likewise, the concentrations of hydrogen atoms and carbon active chemical species in plasma were analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The morphologies and purity of the PCD films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Finally, the transmission spectrum of the polished PCD plates was characterized by a UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer. Experimental results showed that both the concentrations of hydrogen atoms and carbon radicals increased obviously, with the boost input power and higher pressure. The films synthesized under the high power density condition displayed higher purity and more uniform thickness. The growth rates in 10 kW and 18 kPa reached ~7.7 µm h-1, approximately 6.5 times as much as that occurred in the typical process. Moreover, the polished plates synthesized under the high power density condition possessed a relatively high optical transmittance (~69%), approaching the theoretical values of approximately 71.4% in IR. These results indicate that the purity and growth rate of big-area PCD films could be simultaneously increased with power density.

  19. Influence of the electron velocity spread and the beam width on the efficiency and mode competition in the high-power pulsed gyrotron for 300 GHz band collective Thomson scattering diagnostics in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a theoretical study of influence of the electron velocity spread and the radial width on the efficiency and mode competition in a 300-kW, 300-GHz gyrotron operating in the T E22 ,2 mode. This gyrotron was developed for application to collective Thomson scattering diagnostics in the large helical device and 300-kW level high power single T E22 ,2 mode oscillation has been demonstrated [Yamaguchi et al., J. Instrum. 10, c10002 (2015)]. Effects of a finite voltage rise time corresponding to the real power supply of this gyrotron are also considered. Simulations tracking eight competing modes show that the electron velocity spread and the finite beam width influence not only the efficiency of the gyrotron operation but also the mode competition scenario during the startup phase. A combination of the finite rise time with the electron velocity spread or the finite beam width affects the mode competition scenario. The simulation calculation reproduces the experimental observation of high power single mode oscillation of the T E22 ,2 mode as the design mode. This gives a theoretical basis of the experimentally obtained high power oscillation with the design mode in a real gyrotron and moreover shows a high power oscillation regime of the design mode.

  20. On the dependence of the efficiency of a 240 GHz high-power gyrotron on the displacement of the electron beam and on the azimuthal index

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Jelonnek, J.

    2014-01-15

    Two issues in the cavity design for a Megawatt-class, 240 GHz gyrotron are addressed. Those are first, the effect of a misaligned electron beam on the gyrotron efficiency and second, a possible azimuthal instability of the gyrotron. The aforementioned effects are important for any gyrotron operation, but could be more critical in the operation of Megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies above 200 GHz, which will be the anticipated requirement of DEMO. The target is to provide some basic trends to be considered during the refinement and optimization of the design. Self-consistent calculations are the base for simulations wherever possible. However, in cases for which self-consistent models were not available, fixed-field results are presented. In those cases, the conservative nature of the results should be kept in mind.

  1. A compact high-gradient 25 MeV 17 GHz RF linac for free-electron laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Chen, S.C.; Kreischer, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    A new compact high-gradient (60 MeV/m) high-frequency (17.136 GHz) RF linac is presently under construction by Haimson Research Corp. (HRC) for installation at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center in the High-Gradient Accelerator and High Power Microwave Laboratory. This accelerator will utilize an existing traveling-wave relativistic klystron (TWRK) which is now operation at MIT with 25 MW power, 67 dB gain, and 52% efficiency at 17.136 GHz.

  2. A 20-GHz ultra-high-speed InP DHBT comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenxing, Huang; Lei, Zhou; Yongbo, Su; Zhi, Jin

    2012-07-01

    An ultra-high-speed, master-slave voltage comparator circuit is designed and fabricated using InP/GaInAs double heterojunction bipolar transistor technology with a current gain cutoff frequency of 170 GHz. The complete chip die, including bondpads, is 0.75 × 1.04 mm2. It consumes 440 mW from a single -4 V power supply, excluding the clock part. 77 DHBTs have been used in the monolithic comparator. A full Nyquist test has been performed up to 20 GHz, with the input sensitivity varying from 6 mV at 10 GHz to 16 mV at 20 GHz. To our knowledge, this is the first InP based integrated circuit including more than 70 DHBTs, and it achieves the highest sampling rate found on the mainland of China.

  3. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-01

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm.

  4. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-01

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm. PMID:27505789

  5. Design and Development of Thermistor based Power Meter at 140 GHz Frequency Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajesh; Kush, Abhimanyue Kumar; Dixit, Rajendra Prasad

    2011-12-01

    Design and development of thermistor based power meter at 140 gigahertz (GHz) frequency band have been presented. Power meter comprises power sensor, amplifier circuit and dialog based graphical user interface in visual C++ for the average power measurement. The output power level of a component or system is very critical design factor. Thus there was a need of a power meter for the development of millimeter wave components at 140 GHz frequency band. Power sensor has been designed and developed using NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient) thermistors. The design aims at developing a direct, simple and inexpensive power meter that can be used to measure absolute power at 140 GHz frequency band. Due to absorption of 140 GHz frequencies, resistance of thermistor changes to a new value. This change in resistance of thermistor can be converted to a dc voltage change and amplified voltage change can be fed to computer through data acquisition card. Dialog based graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed in visual C++ language for average power measurement in dBm. WR6 standard rectangular waveguide is the input port for the sensor of power meter. Temperature compensation has been achieved. Moderate sensor return loss greater than 20 dB has been found over the frequency range 110 to 170 GHz. The response time of the power sensor is 10 second. Average power accuracy is better than ±0.25 dB within the power range from -10 to 10 dBm at 140 GHz frequency band.

  6. The 20 GHz GaAs monolithic power amplifier module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of a 20 GHz GaAs FET monlithic power amplifier module for advanced communication applications is described. Four-way power combing of four 0.6 W amplifier modules is used as the baseline approach. For this purpose, a monolithic four-way traveling-wave power divider/combiner was developed. Over a 20 GHz bandwidth (10 to 30 GHz), an insertion loss of no more than 1.2 dB was measured for a pair of back-to-back connected divider/combiners. Isolation between output ports is better than 20 dB, and VSWRs are better than 21:1. A distributed amplifier with six 300 micron gate width FETs and gate and drain transmission line tapers has been designed, fabricated, and evaluated for use as an 0.6 W module. This amplifier has achieved state-of-the-art results of 0.5 W output power with at least 4 dB gain across the entire 2 to 21 GHz frequency range. An output power of 2 W was achieved at a measurement frequency of 18 GHz when four distributed amplifiers were power-combined using a pair of traveling-wave divider/combiners. Another approach is the direct common-source cascading of three power FET stages. An output power of up to 2W with 12 dB gain and 20% power-added efficiency has been achieved with this approach (at 17 GHz). The linear gain was 14 dB at 1 W output. The first two stages of the three-stage amplifier have achieved an output power of 1.6 W with 9 dB gain and 26% power-added efficiency at 16 GHz.

  7. Flexible low-power RF nanoelectronics in the GHz regime using CVD MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogeesh, Maruthi

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted substantial interest for flexible nanoelectronics due to the overall device mechanical flexibility and thickness scalability for high mechanical performance and low operating power. In this work, we demonstrate the first MoS2 RF transistors on flexible substrates based on CVD-grown monolayers, featuring record GHz cutoff frequency (5.6 GHz) and saturation velocity (~1.8×106 cm/s), which is significantly superior to contemporary organic and metal oxide thin-film transistors. Furthermore, multicycle three-point bending results demonstrated the electrical robustness of our flexible MoS2 transistors after 10,000 cycles of mechanical bending. Additionally, basic RF communication circuit blocks such as amplifier, mixer and wireless AM receiver have been demonstrated. These collective results indicate that MoS2 is an ideal advanced semiconducting material for low-power, RF devices for large-area flexible nanoelectronics and smart nanosystems owing to its unique combination of large bandgap, high saturation velocity and high mechanical strength.

  8. SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Reeves, R.; Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Bronfman, L.; Church, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Gaier, T.; Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  9. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the CMB Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Dumoulin, R.N.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; ss, S.K.N\\ae; Newburgh, L.B.; /Columbia U., CBA /Princeton U. /Caltech

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx} 1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12'.8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C{ell} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between {ell} = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = {sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  10. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QUIET Collaboration; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bronfman, L.; Bustos, R.; Church, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Jones, M. E.; Kangaslahti, P.; Kapner, D. J.; Kubik, D.; Lawrence, C. R.; Limon, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Miller, A. D.; Nagai, M.; Nguyen, H.; Nixon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Piccirillo, L.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.; Samtleben, D.; Seiffert, M.; Shepherd, M. C.; Smith, K. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; Vanderlinde, K.; Williamson, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 μK\\sqrt{s}. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of ~1000 deg2 with an effective angular resolution of 12farcm8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C l (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with ΛCDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1+0.9 - 0.8 (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2+0.9 - 0.8 (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  11. Optical generation of single-cycle 10 MW peak power 100 GHz waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojun; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Ravi, Koustuban; Zhou, Chun; Hemmer, Michael; Reichert, Fabian; Zhang, Dongfang; Cankaya, Huseyin; Zapata, Luis E; Matlis, Nicholas H; Kärtner, Franz X

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the generation of 100 GHz single-cycle pulses with up to 10 MW of peak power using optical rectification and broadband phase matching via the tilted pulse front (TPF) technique in lithium niobate. The optical driver is a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG amplifier providing tens of mJ energy, ~5 ps long laser pulses. We obtain a high THz pulse energy up to 65 µJ with 31.6 MV/m peak electric field when focused close to its diffraction limit of 2.5 mm diameter. A high optical-to-THz energy conversion efficiency of 0.3% at 85 K is measured in agreement with numerical simulations. This source is of great interest for a broad range of applications, such as nonlinear THz field-matter interaction and charged particle acceleration for ultrafast electron diffraction and table-top X-ray sources. PMID:27607709

  12. Optical generation of single-cycle 10 MW peak power 100 GHz waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojun; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Ravi, Koustuban; Zhou, Chun; Hemmer, Michael; Reichert, Fabian; Zhang, Dongfang; Cankaya, Huseyin; Zapata, Luis E; Matlis, Nicholas H; Kärtner, Franz X

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the generation of 100 GHz single-cycle pulses with up to 10 MW of peak power using optical rectification and broadband phase matching via the tilted pulse front (TPF) technique in lithium niobate. The optical driver is a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG amplifier providing tens of mJ energy, ~5 ps long laser pulses. We obtain a high THz pulse energy up to 65 µJ with 31.6 MV/m peak electric field when focused close to its diffraction limit of 2.5 mm diameter. A high optical-to-THz energy conversion efficiency of 0.3% at 85 K is measured in agreement with numerical simulations. This source is of great interest for a broad range of applications, such as nonlinear THz field-matter interaction and charged particle acceleration for ultrafast electron diffraction and table-top X-ray sources.

  13. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  14. Efficient millimeter wave 1140 GHz/ diode for harmonic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Epitaxial gallium arsenide diode junction formed in a crossed waveguide structure operates as a variable reactance harmonic generator. This varactor diode can generate power efficiently in the low-millimeter wavelength.

  15. Review on high current 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance sources (invited).

    PubMed

    Gammino, S; Celona, L; Ciavola, G; Maimone, F; Mascali, D

    2010-02-01

    The suitable source for the production of intense beams for high power accelerators must obey to the request of high brightness, stability, and reliability. The 2.45 GHz off-resonance microwave discharge sources are the ideal device to generate the requested beams, as they produce multimilliampere beams of protons, deuterons, and monocharged ions, remaining stable for several weeks without maintenance. A description of different technical designs will be given, analyzing their strength, and weakness, with regard to the extraction system and low energy beam transport line, as the presence of beam halo is detrimental for the accelerator.

  16. In-Phase Power-Combined Frequency Tripler at 300 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John; Lin, Robert; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Mehdi, Imran; Javadi, Hamid; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2009-01-01

    This design starts with commercial 85- to 115-GHz sources that are amplified to as much as 250 mW using power amplifiers developed for the Herschel Space Observatory. The frequency is then tripled using a novel waveguide GaAs Schottky diode frequency tripler. This planar diode produces 26 mW at 318 GHz. Peak conversion efficiency is over 15 percent, and the measured bandwidth of about 265 - 30 GHz is limited more by the driving source than by the tripler itself. This innovation is based on an integrated circuit designed originally for a single-chip 260- to 340-GHz balanced tripler. The power-combined version has two mirror-image tripler chips that are power-combined in-phase in a single waveguide block using a compact Y-junction divider at the input waveguide, and a Y-junction combiner at the output waveguide. The tripler uses a split-block waveguide design with two independent DC bias lines.

  17. A 32-GHz solid-state power amplifier for deep space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamhof, P. D.; Rascoe, D. L.; Lee, K. A.; Lansing, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.5-W solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) has been demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 35 GHz for future deep space missions. Output power and efficiency measurements for a monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC)-based SSPA are reported. Technical design details for the various modules and a thermal analysis are discussed, as well as future plans.

  18. A High Efficiency Multiple-Anode 260-340 GHz Frequency Tripler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Tripon-Canseliet, Charlotte; Ward, John S.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of a fixed-tuned split-block waveguide balanced frequency tripler working in the 260-340 GHz band. This tripler will be the first stage of a x3x3x3 multiplier chain to 2.7 THz (the last stages of which are being fabricated at JPL) and is therefore optimized for high power operation. The multiplier features six GaAs Schottky planar diodes in a balanced configuration integrated on a GaAs membrane. Special attention was put on splitting the input power as evenly as possible among the diodes in order to ensure that no diode is overdriven. Preliminary RF tests indicate that the multiplier covers the expected bandwidth and that the efficiency is in the range 1.5-7.5 % with 100 mW of input power.

  19. A 3 Ghz photoelectron gun for high beam intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H.; Dehler, M.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) for new accelerator structures of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is to be equipped with a new RF gun containing a laser driven photocathode. The new 3 GHz gun with photocathode shall produce a bunch train of 48 electron bunches of 25 nC charge each with a bunch length of 8 - 15 ps fwhm. The new RF gun consists of 2{1/2} cells and accelerates the beam to an energy of 7 MeV with a peak field gradient Ez = 100 MV/m. The strong space charge forces at low beam energy caused by the high charge density of the electron bunches must be contained by radial and longitudinal RF focusing in the RF gun. Radial RF focusing is applied by a conical backplane around the photocathode in the first cell where the electrons have a low energy. Longitudinal RF focusing is obtained by varying the length of each of the three cells of the gun. The total electric charge of the bunch train exceeds 1{mu}C and causes strong beam loading to the RF structures so that the stored energy is reduced to half of the unloaded RF energy. The RF gun under construction is being optimized by MAFIA beam simulations for an injector assembly comprising a second accelerating RF structure of 4 cells and an intermediate solenoid magnet correcting the beam divergence of the 2{1/2} cell gun. The scheme with two accelerating RF sections will provide a linear energy increase along the bunch suitable for further compression of the bunch length in a magnetic chicane.

  20. High-efficiency high-gain monolithic heterostructure FET amplifier at 31 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tserng, H. Q.; Saunier, P.; Kao, Y.-C.

    1993-01-01

    A three-stage heterostructure FET monolithic amplifier has achieved a power-added efficiency of 36 percent with 200 mW output and 18 dB gain at 31 GHz. At a higher drain voltage, the output power increases to 280 mW (with 17.5 dB gain and 31 percent PAE) at a power density of 0.7 W/mm. The MMIC chip measures 2.63 x 1.35 sq mm and requires only a single drain bias and a single gate bias.

  1. Optical injection locking of monolithically integrated photonic source for generation of high purity signals above 100 GHz.

    PubMed

    Balakier, Katarzyna; Fice, Martyn J; van Dijk, Frederic; Kervella, Gael; Carpintero, Guillermo; Seeds, Alwyn J; Renaud, Cyril C

    2014-12-01

    A monolithically integrated photonic source for tuneable mm-wave signal generation has been fabricated. The source consists of 14 active components, i.e. semiconductor lasers, amplifiers and photodetectors, all integrated on a 3 mm(2) InP chip. Heterodyne signals in the range between 85 GHz and 120 GHz with up to -10 dBm output power have been successfully generated. By optically injection locking the integrated lasers to an external optical comb source, high-spectral-purity signals at frequencies >100 GHz have been generated, with phase noise spectral density below -90 dBc/Hz being achieved at offsets from the carrier greater than 10 kHz.

  2. Optical injection locking of monolithically integrated photonic source for generation of high purity signals above 100 GHz.

    PubMed

    Balakier, Katarzyna; Fice, Martyn J; van Dijk, Frederic; Kervella, Gael; Carpintero, Guillermo; Seeds, Alwyn J; Renaud, Cyril C

    2014-12-01

    A monolithically integrated photonic source for tuneable mm-wave signal generation has been fabricated. The source consists of 14 active components, i.e. semiconductor lasers, amplifiers and photodetectors, all integrated on a 3 mm(2) InP chip. Heterodyne signals in the range between 85 GHz and 120 GHz with up to -10 dBm output power have been successfully generated. By optically injection locking the integrated lasers to an external optical comb source, high-spectral-purity signals at frequencies >100 GHz have been generated, with phase noise spectral density below -90 dBc/Hz being achieved at offsets from the carrier greater than 10 kHz. PMID:25606875

  3. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  4. Development of a high-temperature oven for the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, J. Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Ozeki, K.; Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-15

    We have been developing the 28 GHz ECR ion source in order to accelerate high-intensity uranium beams at the RIKEN RI-beam Factory. Although we have generated U{sup 35+} beams by the sputtering method thus far, we began developing a high-temperature oven with the aim of increasing and stabilizing the beams. Because the oven method uses UO{sub 2}, a crucible must be heated to a temperature higher than 2000 °C to supply an appropriate amount of UO{sub 2} vapor to the ECR plasma. Our high-temperature oven uses a tungsten crucible joule-heated with DC current of approximately 450 A. Its inside dimensions are ϕ11 mm × 13.5 mm. Since the crucible is placed in a magnetic field of approximately 3 T, it is subject to a magnetic force of approximately 40 N. Therefore, we used ANSYS to carefully design the crucible, which was manufactured by machining a tungsten rod. We could raise the oven up to 1900 °C in the first off-line test. Subsequently, UO{sub 2} was loaded into the crucible, and the oven was installed in the 28 GHz ECR ion source and was tested. As a result, a U{sup 35+} beam current of 150 μA was extracted successfully at a RF power of approximately 3 kW.

  5. Low-power 24.1-GHz propagation effects on roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan L.; Greneker, Eugene F., III; Simas de Oliveria, Marcelo G.

    2001-08-01

    This paper discusses the experimental design and analysis of low power 24.1 GHz propagation effects on roadways around the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. The transmitter used was a 24.1 GHz Safety Warning System (SWS) transmitter operating in the continuous wave (CW) mode. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has licensed the Safety Warning System for Part 90 operation. A Part 90-compliant transmitter was used during the tests. The receiver was a modified Bel 855Sti radar detector that was calibrated in an anechoic chamber. The receiver was placed in a Ford F-150 truck and driven toward the transmitter. Three distinct propagation environments are characterized including a rural road, state route, and interstate highway. Shadowing effects from terrain features such as hills are examined as well as the effects of other vehicles, including large tractor-trailers. Signal strength is analyzed as a function of distance to the transmitter and using probability distribution function (pdf) modeling. It was found that the Weibull distribution provided the best statistical description for both the line of sight and shadowing cases. In many instances, the statistics of the received signal would change rapidly depending on the terrain features and interaction with surrounding traffic. The results provide insight into how the unlicensed 24.1 GHz band in the United States might be used for low power, intelligent transportation system (ITS) applications.

  6. A high-sensitivity 135 GHz millimeter-wave imager by compact split-ring-resonator in 65-nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Chang; Shang, Yang; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    A high-sensitivity 135 GHz millimeter-wave imager is demonstrated in 65 nm CMOS by on-chip metamaterial resonator: a differential transmission-line (T-line) loaded with split-ring-resonator (DTL-SRR). Due to sharp stop-band introduced by the metamaterial load, high-Q oscillatory amplification can be achieved with high sensitivity when utilizing DTL-SRR as quench-controlled oscillator to provide regenerative detection. The developed 135 GHz mm-wave imager pixel has a compact core chip area of 0.0085 mm2 with measured power consumption of 6.2 mW, sensitivity of -76.8 dBm, noise figure of 9.7 dB, and noise equivalent power of 0.9 fW/√{HZ } Hz. Millimeter-wave images has been demonstrated with millimeter-wave imager integrated with antenna array.

  7. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  8. 2.4 GHz CMOS Power Amplifier with Mode-Locking Structure to Enhance Gain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mode-locking method optimized for the cascode structure of an RF CMOS power amplifier. To maximize the advantage of the typical mode-locking method in the cascode structure, the input of the cross-coupled transistor is modified from that of a typical mode-locking structure. To prove the feasibility of the proposed structure, we designed a 2.4 GHz CMOS power amplifier with a 0.18 μm RFCMOS process for polar transmitter applications. The measured power added efficiency is 34.9%, while the saturated output power is 23.32 dBm. The designed chip size is 1.4 × 0.6 mm2. PMID:25045755

  9. A 35 GHz wireless millimeter-wave power sensor based on GaAs micromachining technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, De-bo; Liao, Xiao-ping

    2012-06-01

    A novel MEMS wireless millimeter-wave power sensor based on GaAs MMIC technology is presented in this paper. The principle of this wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is explained. It is designed and fabricated using MEMS technology and the GaAs MMIC process. With the millimeter-wave power range from 0.1 to 80 mW, the sensitivity of the wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is about 0.246 mV mW-1 at 35 GHz. In order to verify the power detection capability, this wireless power sensor is mounted on a PCB which influences the microwave performance of the CPW-fed antenna including the return loss and the radiation pattern. The frequency-dependent characteristic and the degree-dependent characteristic of this wireless power sensor are researched. Furthermore, in addition to the combination of the advantages of CPW-fed antenna with the advantages of the thermoelectric power sensor, another significant advantage of this wireless millimeter-wave power sensor is that it can be integrated with MMICs and other planar connecting circuit structures with zero dc power consumption. These features make it suitable for various applications ranging from the environment or space radiation detection systems to radar receiver and transmitter systems.

  10. An ISM 2.4 GHz low power low-IF RF receiver front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heping, Ma; Hua, Xu; Bei, Chen; Yin, Shi

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an RF receiver front-end for the 2.4 GHz industrial scientific medical band under TSMC 0.13 μm CMOS technology; it comprises a low noise amplifier (LNA) which uses an added gate-source capacitor for low power performance and a dual-converter composed of a single-balanced active RF mixer and double-balanced passive IF mixer. Dual-down-conversion technique is used for reducing power. A 2.4 GHz low power low-IF RF receiver front-end is proposed. An LNA for rejecting image signal, an inductor-capacitor (LC) tank is used in series with source of input-stage transistor of the RF mixer, and combined with the LC load of the LNA, 30-dB image rejection is realized. Fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process, the proposed chip occupies 0.42 mm2 area, achieves 4 dB noise figure, -22 dBm IIP3 and 37 dB voltage gain dissipating only 4.2-mW under 1.2-V supply.

  11. A 540-640-GHz High-efficiency Four-anode Frequency Tripler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John S.; Gill, John J.; Javadi, Hamid S.; Schlecht, Erich; Tripon-Canseliet, Charlotte; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, Imran

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design and performance of a broad-band, high-power 540-640-GHz fix-tuned balanced frequency tripler chip that utilizes four planar Schottky anodes. The suspended strip-line circuit is fabricated with a 12-micron-thick support frame and is mounted in a split waveguide block. The chip is supported by thick beam leads that are also used to provide precise RF grounding. At room temperature, the tripler delivers 0.9-1.8 mW across the band with an estimated efficiency of 4.5%-9%. When cooled to 120 K, the tripler provides 2.0-4.2 mW across the band with an estimated efficiency of 8%-12%.

  12. Lack of behavioral effects in the rhesus monkey: High peak microwave pulses at 1. 3 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Cobb, B.L.; de Lorge, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    The current safety standards for radiofrequency and microwave exposure do not limit the peak power of microwave pulses for general or occupational exposures. While some biological effects, primarily the auditory effect, depend on pulsed microwaves, hazards associated with very high peak-power microwave pulses in the absence of whole-body heating are unknown. Five rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, were exposed to peak-power densitites of 131.8 W/sq cm (RMS) while performing a time-related behavioral task. The task was composed of a multiple schedule of reinforcement consisting of three distinct behavioral components: inter-response time, time discrimination, and fixed interval. Trained monkeys performed the multiple schedule during exposure to 1.3-GHz pulses at low pulse-repetition rates (2-32 Hz). No significant change was observed in any behavior during irradiation as compared to sham-irradiation sessions. Generalization of these findings to experimental results with higher peak-power densities, other pulse rates, different carrier frequencies, or other behaviors is limited.

  13. Lack of behavioral effects in the rhesus monkey: high peak microwave pulses at 1. 3 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Cobb, B.L.; de Lorge, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    The current safety standards for radiofrequency and microwave exposure do not limit the peak power of microwave pulses for general or occupational exposures. While some biological effects, primarily the auditory effect, depend on pulsed microwaves, hazards associated with very high peak-power microwave pulses in the absence of whole-body heating are unknown. Five rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, were exposed to peak-power densities of 131.8 W/cm2 (RMS) while performing a time-related behavioral task. The task was composed of a multiple schedule of reinforcement consisting of three distinct behavioral components: inter-response time, time discrimination, and fixed interval. Trained monkeys performed the multiple schedule during exposure to 1.3-GHz pulses at low pulse-repetition rates (2-32 Hz). No significant change was observed in any behavior during irradiation as compared to sham-irradiation sessions. Generalization of these findings to experimental results with higher peak-power densities, other pulse rates, different carrier frequencies, or other behaviors is limited.

  14. 24-Way Radial Power Combiner/Divider for 31 to 36 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry; Hoppe, Daniel; Khan, Abdur; Kelley, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The figure shows a prototype radial power-combining waveguide structure, capable of operation at frequencies from 31 to 36 GHz, that features an unusually large number (N = 24) of combining (input) ports. The combination of wide-band operation and large N is achieved by incorporating several enhancements over a basic radial power-combiner design. In addition, the structure can be operated as a power divider by reversing the roles of the input and output ports. In this structure, full-height waveguides at the combining ports are matched in impedance to reduced-height radial waveguides inside the combiner base. This match is effected by impedance-transforming stepped waveguide sections. This matching scheme is essential to achievement of large N because N is limited by the height of the waveguides in the base. Power is coupled from the 24 reduced- height radial waveguides into the TE01 mode of a circular waveguide in the base with the help of a matching post at the bottom of the base. ( TE signifies transverse electric, the first subscript is the azimuthal mode number, and the second subscript is the radial mode number.) More specifically, the matching post matches the reflections from the walls of the 24 reduced-height waveguides and enables the base design to exceed the bandwidth requirement. After propagating along the circular waveguide, the combined power is coupled, via a mode transducer, to a rectangular waveguide output port. The mode transducer is divided into three sections, each sized and shaped as part of an overall design to satisfy the mode-conversion and output-coupling requirements while enabling the circular waveguide to be wide enough for combining the 24 inputs over the frequency range of 31 to 36 GHz. During the design process, it was found that two different rectangular waveguide outputs could be accommodated through modification of only the first section of the mode converter, thereby enabling operation in multiple frequency ranges.

  15. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Guo, Jiquan; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-01

    A very high power Coax RF Coupler (MW-Level) is very desirable for a number of accelerator and commercial applications. For example, the development of such a coupler operating at 1.5 GHz may permit the construction of a higher-luminosity version of the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) being planned at JLab. Muons, Inc. is currently funded by a DOE STTR grant to develop a 1.5-GHz high-power doublewindowcoax coupler with JLab (about 150 kW). Excellent progress has been made on this R&D project, so we propose an extension of this development to build a very high power coax coupler (MW level peak power and a max duty factor of about 4%). The dimensions of the current coax coupler will be scaled up to provide higher power capability.

  16. High Voltage EPC for 94 GHz Klystron for Cloud Profiling Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarara, Marcello; Ceruti, Luca; Cantamessa, Marco; Bartola, Furio

    2008-09-01

    The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) operating at 94 GHz is one of the payload instruments to be flown on the EarthCare mission in the time frame of year 2013. An important part of the CPR is the High Power Transmitter (HPT) that is composed by an Electronic Power Conditioner (EPC) and an Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK).The EIK, developed by CPI-Canada, has been selected as promising radio frequency power transmitter. This EIK is already flying on board of the Cloud Sat satellite and is recognised to be reliable for commercial and military applications throughout the world.This paper will be mainly focused on the EPC, developed in the frame of two subsequent ESA contracts, with particular attentions to the presentation of the activities performed, the design solutions adopted, the testing activities and main achieved performances.The activities of the contracts has been concluded on July 2007 with the realization of an elegant breadboard (EBB) of the EPC (see Fig. 1) that has been extensively tested (both alone and integrated with the EIK) and submitted to an accelerated life test.

  17. High-speed 850 nm VCSELs with 28 GHz modulation bandwidth for short reach communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbergh, Petter; Safaisini, Rashid; Haglund, Erik; Gustavsson, Johan S.; Larsson, Anders; Joel, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    We present results from our new generation of high performance 850 nm oxide confined vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). With devices optimized for high-speed operation under direct modulation, we achieve record high 3dB modulation bandwidths of 28 GHz for ~4 μm oxide aperture diameter VCSELs, and 27 GHz for devices with a ~7 μm oxide aperture diameter. Combined with a high-speed photoreceiver, the ~7 μm VCSEL enables error-free transmission at data rates up to 47 Gbit/s at room temperature, and up to 40 Gbit/s at 85°C.

  18. Coherent continuous-wave dual-frequency high-Q external-cavity semiconductor laser for GHz-THz applications.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Romain; Blin, Stéphane; Myara, Mikhaël; Gratiet, Luc Le; Sellahi, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-08-15

    We report a continuous-wave highly-coherent and tunable dual-frequency laser emitting at two frequencies separated by 30 GHz to 3 THz, based on compact III-V diode-pumped quantum-well surface-emitting semiconductor laser technology. The concept is based on the stable simultaneous operation of two Laguerre-Gauss transverse modes in a single-axis short cavity, using an integrated sub-wavelength-thick metallic mask. Simultaneous operation is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally by recording intensity noises and beat frequency, and time-resolved optical spectra. We demonstrated a >80  mW output power, diffraction-limited beam, narrow linewidth of <300  kHz, linear polarization state (>45  dB), and low intensity noise class-A dynamics of <0.3% rms, thus opening the path to a compact low-cost coherent GHz to THz source development. PMID:27519080

  19. Demonstration of An Image Rejection Mixer for High Frequency Applications (26-36 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, Cheryl D.; Carlstrom, John E.

    1999-01-01

    A new high frequency image-rejection mixer was successfully tested in a 26-36 GHz band receiver. This paper briefly describes the motivation for implementation of an image rejection mixer in a receiver system, the basic operation of an image rejection mixer, and the development and testing of an image rejection mixer for a high frequency, cryogenic receiver system.

  20. Sub-GHz-resolution C-band Nyquist-filtering interleaver on a high-index-contrast photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Leinse, Arne; Schröder, Jochen; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-03-21

    Modern optical communications rely on high-resolution, high-bandwidth filtering to maximize the data-carrying capacity of fiber-optic networks. Such filtering typically requires high-speed, power-hungry digital processes in the electrical domain. Passive optical filters currently provide high bandwidths with low power consumption, but at the expense of resolution. Here, we present a passive filter chip that functions as an optical Nyquist-filtering interleaver featuring sub-GHz resolution and a near-rectangular passband with 8% roll-off. This performance is highly promising for high-spectral-efficiency Nyquist wavelength division multiplexed (N-WDM) optical super-channels. The chip provides a simple two-ring-resonator-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which has a sub-cm2 footprint owing to the high-index-contrast Si3N4/SiO2 waveguide, while manifests low wavelength-dependency enabling C-band (> 4 THz) coverage with more than 160 effective free spectral ranges of 25 GHz. This device is anticipated to be a critical building block for spectrally-efficient, chip-scale transceivers and ROADMs for N-WDM super-channels in next-generation optical communication networks.

  1. Sub-GHz-resolution C-band Nyquist-filtering interleaver on a high-index-contrast photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Leinse, Arne; Schröder, Jochen; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-03-21

    Modern optical communications rely on high-resolution, high-bandwidth filtering to maximize the data-carrying capacity of fiber-optic networks. Such filtering typically requires high-speed, power-hungry digital processes in the electrical domain. Passive optical filters currently provide high bandwidths with low power consumption, but at the expense of resolution. Here, we present a passive filter chip that functions as an optical Nyquist-filtering interleaver featuring sub-GHz resolution and a near-rectangular passband with 8% roll-off. This performance is highly promising for high-spectral-efficiency Nyquist wavelength division multiplexed (N-WDM) optical super-channels. The chip provides a simple two-ring-resonator-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which has a sub-cm2 footprint owing to the high-index-contrast Si3N4/SiO2 waveguide, while manifests low wavelength-dependency enabling C-band (> 4 THz) coverage with more than 160 effective free spectral ranges of 25 GHz. This device is anticipated to be a critical building block for spectrally-efficient, chip-scale transceivers and ROADMs for N-WDM super-channels in next-generation optical communication networks. PMID:27136769

  2. Twenty-GHz broadband microstrip array with electromagnetically coupled high-{Tc} superconducting feed network

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, J.S.; Poles, L.D.; Kenney, J.P.

    1996-07-01

    The use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) feed lines and phase shifters can substantially improve the performance of microwave and millimeter-wave printed phased array antennas. A novel antenna architecture is described that provides a broadband radiating aperture to be used as a scanning array with compatible low-loss HTS phase shifters. The approach follows an earlier design demonstrated at 12 GHz, and this work extends the approach to 20 GHz. The antenna design, radiation patterns, bandwidth measurements, and thermal analysis are reported. A prototype thermal isolator design is described that reduces the heat load of coaxial interconnections between cryocooled and room temperature systems.

  3. W-band GaN MMIC PA with 257 mW output power at 86.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xu; Xubo, Song; Yuanjie, Lü; Yuangang, Wang; Shaobo, Dun; Jiayun, Yin; Yulong, Fang; Guodong, Gu; Zhihong, Feng; Shujun, Cai

    2015-08-01

    A three-stage W-band GaN monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifier (MMIC PA) is reported. In order to manage coupling effects between all the parts of the W-band MMIC, all matching and bias networks have been first optimized using circuit simulating software and then systematically simulated on 3D full-wave electromagnetic simulator. The fabricated MMIC PA achieves a 257 mW output power at 86.5 GHz in continuous-wave mode, with an associated power added efficiency of 5.4% and an associated power gain of 6.1 dB. The power density is 459 mW/mm. Moreover, the MMIC PA offers over 100 mW in the 83-90 GHz bandwidth. Those performances were measured at drain bias of 12 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306113).

  4. High power switching and other high power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1992-09-01

    High power thyratrons and devices such as high power microwave sources have cathode-related performance limits. Research is described of a simple, robust 'super-emissive' cathode that produces greater than 10,000 A/sq cm from a macroscopic area (approx. 1 sq cm), and operates with a low pressure (approx. 0.1 torr), spatially uniform glow plasma (density greater than 1015 cu cm). The cathode also can operate as a hollow cathode, and is at the heart of the operation of the pseudospark and back-lighted thyratron. The physics of this hollow and super-emissive cathode is very rich. The hollow cathode geometry traps electrons in the hollow cathode backspace. The lifetime of these electrons enables them to ionize a spatially homogeneous high density glow, and this hollow cathode mode of operation is responsible for certain types of electron and ion beam behavior. A plasma cathode sheath that is formed during this phase leads to super-emissive behavior, which is responsible for high current emission. Super-emissive cathode thyratron-type switches (with higher peak current, voltage, di/dt) being developed for pulsed power switching of lasers, accelerators, high current and high coulomb transfer, Marx bank operation, transfer of technology to commercial applications, high current electron beams, and millimeter wave generation (1 to 100 GHz) are described.

  5. 50 MHz-10 GHz low-power resistive feedback current-reuse mixer with inductive peaking for cognitive radio receiver.

    PubMed

    Vitee, Nandini; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Chong, Wei-Keat; Tan, Gim-Heng; Kanesan, Jeevan; Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    A low-power wideband mixer is designed and implemented in 0.13 µm standard CMOS technology based on resistive feedback current-reuse (RFCR) configuration for the application of cognitive radio receiver. The proposed RFCR architecture incorporates an inductive peaking technique to compensate for gain roll-off at high frequency while enhancing the bandwidth. A complementary current-reuse technique is used between transconductance and IF stages to boost the conversion gain without additional power consumption by reusing the DC bias current of the LO stage. This downconversion double-balanced mixer exhibits a high and flat conversion gain (CG) of 14.9 ± 1.4 dB and a noise figure (NF) better than 12.8 dB. The maximum input 1-dB compression point (P1dB) and maximum input third-order intercept point (IIP3) are -13.6 dBm and -4.5 dBm, respectively, over the desired frequency ranging from 50 MHz to 10 GHz. The proposed circuit operates down to a supply headroom of 1 V with a low-power consumption of 3.5 mW.

  6. 50 MHz-10 GHz low-power resistive feedback current-reuse mixer with inductive peaking for cognitive radio receiver.

    PubMed

    Vitee, Nandini; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Chong, Wei-Keat; Tan, Gim-Heng; Kanesan, Jeevan; Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    A low-power wideband mixer is designed and implemented in 0.13 µm standard CMOS technology based on resistive feedback current-reuse (RFCR) configuration for the application of cognitive radio receiver. The proposed RFCR architecture incorporates an inductive peaking technique to compensate for gain roll-off at high frequency while enhancing the bandwidth. A complementary current-reuse technique is used between transconductance and IF stages to boost the conversion gain without additional power consumption by reusing the DC bias current of the LO stage. This downconversion double-balanced mixer exhibits a high and flat conversion gain (CG) of 14.9 ± 1.4 dB and a noise figure (NF) better than 12.8 dB. The maximum input 1-dB compression point (P1dB) and maximum input third-order intercept point (IIP3) are -13.6 dBm and -4.5 dBm, respectively, over the desired frequency ranging from 50 MHz to 10 GHz. The proposed circuit operates down to a supply headroom of 1 V with a low-power consumption of 3.5 mW. PMID:25133252

  7. 50 MHz–10 GHz Low-Power Resistive Feedback Current-Reuse Mixer with Inductive Peaking for Cognitive Radio Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    A low-power wideband mixer is designed and implemented in 0.13 µm standard CMOS technology based on resistive feedback current-reuse (RFCR) configuration for the application of cognitive radio receiver. The proposed RFCR architecture incorporates an inductive peaking technique to compensate for gain roll-off at high frequency while enhancing the bandwidth. A complementary current-reuse technique is used between transconductance and IF stages to boost the conversion gain without additional power consumption by reusing the DC bias current of the LO stage. This downconversion double-balanced mixer exhibits a high and flat conversion gain (CG) of 14.9 ± 1.4 dB and a noise figure (NF) better than 12.8 dB. The maximum input 1-dB compression point (P1dB) and maximum input third-order intercept point (IIP3) are −13.6 dBm and −4.5 dBm, respectively, over the desired frequency ranging from 50 MHz to 10 GHz. The proposed circuit operates down to a supply headroom of 1 V with a low-power consumption of 3.5 mW. PMID:25133252

  8. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  9. High-frequency resonant tunnelling diode oscillator with high-output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Alharbi, Khalid; Ofiare, Afesomeh; Khalid, Ata; Cumming, David; Wasige, Edward

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a prototype G-band (140 GHz-220 GHz) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) resonant tunneling diode (RTD) oscillator is reported. The oscillator employs two In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs RTD devices in the circuit to increase the output power. The measured output power was about 0.34 mW (-4.7 dBm) at 165.7 GHz, which is the highest power reported for RTD oscillator in G-band frequency range. This result demonstrates the validity of the high frequency/high power RTD oscillator design. It indicates that RTD devices, as one of the terahertz (THz) source candidates, have promising future for room-temperature THz applications in such as imaging, wireless communication and spectroscopy analysis, etc. By optimizing RTD oscillator design, it is expected that considerably higher power (>1 mW) at THz frequencies (>300 GHz) will be obtained.

  10. FOREGROUND PREDICTIONS FOR THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM FROM MEASUREMENTS OF FAINT INVERTED RADIO SOURCES AT 5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Michael D.; Becker, Robert H.; De Vries, Willem; White, Richard L.

    2012-05-10

    We present measurements of a population of matched radio sources at 1.4 and 5 GHz down to a flux limit of 1.5 mJy in 7 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Field South. We find a significant fraction of sources with inverted spectral indices that all have 1.4 GHz fluxes less than 10 mJy and are therefore too faint to have been detected and included in previous radio source count models that are matched at multiple frequencies. Combined with the matched source population at 1.4 and 5 GHz in 1 deg{sup -2} in the ATESP survey, we update models for the 5 GHz differential number counts and distributions of spectral indices in 5 GHz flux bins that can be used to estimate the unresolved point source contribution to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. We find a shallower logarithmic slope in the 5 GHz differential counts than in previously published models for fluxes {approx}< 100 mJy as well as larger fractions of inverted spectral indices at these fluxes. Because the Planck flux limit for resolved sources is larger than 100 mJy in all channels, our modified number counts yield at most a 10% change in the predicted Poisson contribution to the Planck temperature power spectrum. For a flux cut of 5 mJy with the South Pole Telescope and a flux cut of 20 mJy with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, we predict a {approx}30% and {approx}10% increase, respectively, in the radio source Poisson power in the lowest frequency channels of each experiment relative to that predicted by previous models.

  11. Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (100 kHz-2 GHz) in Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rufo, M Montaña; Paniagua, Jesús M; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid increase in people's exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reports the measurements of radiofrequency (RF) total power densities and power density spectra in 35 towns of the region of Extremadura, Spain. The spectra were taken with three antennas covering frequencies from 100 kHz to 2.2 GHz. This frequency range includes AM/FM radio broadcasting, television, and cellular telephone signals. The power density data and transmitting antenna locations were stored in a geographic information system (GIS) as an aid in analyzing and interpreting the results. The results showed the power density levels to be below the reference level guidelines for human exposure and that the power densities are different for different frequency ranges and different size categories of towns.

  12. Exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (100 kHz-2 GHz) in Extremadura (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rufo, M Montaña; Paniagua, Jesús M; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid increase in people's exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reports the measurements of radiofrequency (RF) total power densities and power density spectra in 35 towns of the region of Extremadura, Spain. The spectra were taken with three antennas covering frequencies from 100 kHz to 2.2 GHz. This frequency range includes AM/FM radio broadcasting, television, and cellular telephone signals. The power density data and transmitting antenna locations were stored in a geographic information system (GIS) as an aid in analyzing and interpreting the results. The results showed the power density levels to be below the reference level guidelines for human exposure and that the power densities are different for different frequency ranges and different size categories of towns. PMID:22048492

  13. Techniques for High-Bandwidth (≥30 GHz) Chirped-Pulse Submillimeter-Wave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Justin L.; Steber, Amanda L.; Harris, Brent J.; Pate, Brooks H.; Douglass, Kevin O.; Plusquellic, David F.; Gerecht, Eyal

    2011-06-01

    Due to the increased availability of active multiplier chains for converting microwave pulses into the millimeter/submillimeter with reasonably high power (≥1 mW), chirped pulses with high phase stability and complete arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) frequency agility can be created and employed for high-sensitivity molecular spectroscopy, as demonstrated at the Symposium in the past few years. The bandwidths of multiplier chains, however, can exceed the current limitations on digitizer bandwidth. Therefore, in order to obtain ≥30 GHz spectra in ~1 ms or less, techniques are being developed in which a two-channel AWG creates both the chirped pulses for molecular irradiation and a local oscillator pulse for heterodyne detection. These approaches reduce the digitizer bandwidths to 500 MHz or less to collect a high-bandwidth spectrum. A single instrument design can be used to measure both absorption and emission spectra, only requiring that the AWG pulses are changed. Due to the phase stability of the pulse generation and detection, coherent time-domain signal averaging can be performed to enhance sensitivity as desired. Preliminary results from prototype instruments designed at UVa and NIST will be presented, with sensitivity, frequency accuracy, and measurement speed comparisons to current millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectrometers. G.B. Park, A.H. Steeves, K. Kuyanov-Prozument, A.P. Colombo, R.W. Field, J.L. Neill, and B.H. Pate, RH07, 64th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (2009) K.O. Douglass, D.F. Plusquellic, and E. Gerecht, WH09, 65th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (2010).

  14. High-finesse sub-GHz-resolution spectrometer employing VIPA etalons of different dispersion.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Kim; Zhang, Jitao; Yun, Seok H; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel configuration of a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer that enables high-throughput sub-GHz spectroscopy at a high finesse (>750). Two etalons with different free spectral range and different dispersion are arranged in an orthogonal direction and spread the spectrum across two dimensions, with a greatly improved rejection ratio of white-light background noise. A proof-of-concept application for Brillouin spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  15. High-Frequency Wireless Communications System: 2.45-GHz Front-End Circuit and System Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, M.-H.; Huang, M.-C.; Ting, Y.-C.; Chen, H.-H.; Li, T.-L.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a course on high-frequency wireless communications systems is presented. With the 145-MHz baseband subsystem available from a prerequisite course, the present course emphasizes the design and implementation of the 2.45-GHz front-end subsystem as well as system integration issues. In this curriculum, the 2.45-GHz front-end…

  16. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10-9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10-11 τ-1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  17. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24,000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2-4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be -23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is -105 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -150 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10(-9) at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10(-11) τ(-1/2) up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  18. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  19. A 300 mV sub-threshold region 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator and frequency divider with transformer technique for ultralow power RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Keisuke; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    A new ultralow voltage 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a divide-by-2 frequency divider circuits operating in a CMOS sub-threshold region using a transformer technique have been developed. In the sub-threshold region, the CMOS transistor high frequency performances are decreased to the point where oscillation and frequency division are challenging to achieve. The new proposed VCO uses the transformer feedback complementary VCO technique to improves VCO negative feedback gain. The circuits have been fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process. The oscillation frequency is designed at 2.4 GHz under a 300 mV supply voltage. The total power consumption is 202 µW with noise performance of -96 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. The new proposed frequency divider circuit consists of two stages master-slave D-type flip-flop (DFF). The DFF differential input is coupled to a transformer circuit instead of transistors to reduce the number of stacks. The minimum operating supply voltage is 300 mV with power consumption of 34 µW with a free-run frequency of 1.085 GHz.

  20. High Power Amplifier and Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Johnny; Stride, Scot; Harvey, Wayne; Haque, Inam; Packard, Newton; Ng, Quintin; Ispirian, Julie Y.; Waian, Christopher; Janes, Drew

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the creation of a high-voltage power supply (HVPS) that is able to contain voltages up to -20 kV, keep electrical field strengths to below 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm), and can provide a 200-nanosecond rise/fall time focus modulator swinging between cathode potential of 16.3 kV and -19.3 kV. This HVPS can protect the 95-GHz, pulsed extended interaction klystron (EIK) from arcs/discharges from all sources, including those from within the EIK fs vacuum envelope. This innovation has a multi-winding pulse transformer design, which uses new winding techniques to provide the same delays and rise/fall times (less than 10 nanoseconds) at different potential levels ranging from -20 kV to -16 kV. Another feature involves a high-voltage printed-wiring board that was corona-free at -20 kV DC with a 3- kV AC swing. The corona-free multilayer high-voltage board is used to simulate fields of less than 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm) at 20 kV DC. Drive techniques for the modulator FETs (field-effect transistors) (four to 10 in a series) were created to change states (3,000-V swing) without abrupt steps, while still maintaining required delays and transition times. The packing scheme includes a potting mold to house a ten-stage modulator in the space that, in the past, only housed a four-stage modulator. Problems keeping heat down were solved using aluminum oxide substrate in the high-voltage section to limit temperature rise to less than 10 while withstanding -20 kV DC voltage and remaining corona-free.

  1. Effects of 60-GHz millimeter waves on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells using high-content screening.

    PubMed

    Haas, Alexis J; Le Page, Yann; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Technologies for wireless telecommunication systems using millimeter waves (MMW) will be widely deployed in the near future. Forthcoming applications in this band, especially around 60GHz, are mainly developed for high data-rate local and body-centric telecommunications. At those frequencies, electromagnetic radiations have a very shallow penetration into biological tissues, making skin keratinocytes, and free nerve endings of the upper dermis the main targets of MMW. Only a few studies assessed the impact of MMW on neuronal cells, and none of them investigated a possible effect on neuronal differentiation. We used a neuron-like cell line (PC12), which undergoes neuronal differentiation when treated with the neuronal growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells were exposed at 60.4GHz for 24h, at an incident power density averaged over the cell monolayer of 10mW/cm(2). Using a large scale cell-by-cell analysis based on high-content screening microscopy approach, we assessed potential effects of MMW on PC12 neurite outgrowth and cytoskeleton protein expression. No differences were found in protein expression of the neuronal marker β3-tubulin nor in internal expression control β-tubulin. On the other hand, our data showed a slight increase, although insignificant, in neurite outgrowth, induced by MMW exposure. However, experimental controls demonstrated that this increase was related to heating. PMID:26921450

  2. Effects of 60-GHz millimeter waves on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells using high-content screening.

    PubMed

    Haas, Alexis J; Le Page, Yann; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Technologies for wireless telecommunication systems using millimeter waves (MMW) will be widely deployed in the near future. Forthcoming applications in this band, especially around 60GHz, are mainly developed for high data-rate local and body-centric telecommunications. At those frequencies, electromagnetic radiations have a very shallow penetration into biological tissues, making skin keratinocytes, and free nerve endings of the upper dermis the main targets of MMW. Only a few studies assessed the impact of MMW on neuronal cells, and none of them investigated a possible effect on neuronal differentiation. We used a neuron-like cell line (PC12), which undergoes neuronal differentiation when treated with the neuronal growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells were exposed at 60.4GHz for 24h, at an incident power density averaged over the cell monolayer of 10mW/cm(2). Using a large scale cell-by-cell analysis based on high-content screening microscopy approach, we assessed potential effects of MMW on PC12 neurite outgrowth and cytoskeleton protein expression. No differences were found in protein expression of the neuronal marker β3-tubulin nor in internal expression control β-tubulin. On the other hand, our data showed a slight increase, although insignificant, in neurite outgrowth, induced by MMW exposure. However, experimental controls demonstrated that this increase was related to heating.

  3. Conceptual definition of a high voltage power supply test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biess, John J.; Chu, Teh-Ming; Stevens, N. John

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is presently developing a 60 GHz traveling wave tube for satellite cross-link communications. The operating voltage for this new tube is - 20 kV. There is concern about the high voltage insulation system and NASA is planning a space station high voltage experiment that will demonstrate both the 60 GHz communications and high voltage electronics technology. The experiment interfaces, requirements, conceptual design, technology issues and safety issues are determined. A block diagram of the high voltage power supply test facility was generated. It includes the high voltage power supply, the 60 GHz traveling wave tube, the communications package, the antenna package, a high voltage diagnostics package and a command and data processor system. The interfaces with the space station and the attached payload accommodations equipment were determined. A brief description of the different subsystems and a discussion of the technology development needs are presented.

  4. High power microwave components for space communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A.

    1972-01-01

    Analyzed, developed, and tested were high power microwave components for communications satellites systems. Included were waveguide and flange configurations with venting, a harmonic filter, forward and reverse power monitors, electrical fault sensors, and a diplexer for two channel simultaneous transmission. The assembly of 8.36 GHz components was bench tested, and then operated for 60 hours at 3.5 kW CW in a high vacuum. The diplexer was omitted from this test pending a modification of its end irises. An RF leakage test showed only that care is required at flange junctions; all other components were RF tight. Designs were extrapolated for 12 GHz and 2.64 GHz high power satellite systems.

  5. An Optimized 2.4GHz RF Power Amplifier Performance for WLAN System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohammed H.; Chakrabarty, C. K.; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Hock, Goh C.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the design of RF power amplifiers (PAs) for modern wireless systems are faced with a difficult tradeoff for example, cellphone; battery lifetime is largely determined by the power efficiency of the PA and high spectral efficiency which have ability to transmit data at the highest possible rate for a given channel bandwidth. This paper presents the design a multi stage class AB power Amplifier with high power added efficiency (PAE) and acceptable linearity for the WLAN applications. The open-circuited third harmonic control circuit enhances the efficiency of the PA without deteriorating the linearity of class-AB mode of the PA. The voltage and current waveforms are simulated to evaluate the appropriate operation for the modes. The effectiveness of the proposed controller has been verified by comparing proposed method with another methods using simulation study under a variety of conditions. The proposed circuit operation for a WLAN signals delivers a power-added efficiency (PAE) of 37.6% is measured at 31.6-dBm output power while dissipating 34.61 mA from a 1.8V supply. Finally, the proposed PA is show a good and acceptable result for the WLAN system.

  6. Progress in high-temperature oven development for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, J; Higurashi, Y; Nakagawa, T

    2016-02-01

    We have been developing a high-temperature oven using UO2 in the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RIKEN since 2013. A total of eleven on-line tests were performed. The longest operation time in a single test was 411 h, and the consumption rate of UO2 was approximately 2.4 mg/h. In these tests, we experienced several problems: the ejection hole of a crucible was blocked with UO2 and a crucible was damaged because of the reduction of tungsten strength at high temperature. In order to solve these problems, improvements to the crucible shape were made by simulations using ANSYS.

  7. High-power Ka-band amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Development of a high-power tube suitable to power a Ka-band (34.5-GHz) antenna transmitter located at the Goldstone, California, tracking station is continuing. The University of Maryland Laboratory for Plasma Research and JPL are conducting a joint effort to test the feasibility of phase locking a second-harmonic gyrotron both by direct injection at the output cavity and by using a priming cavity to bunch the electrons in the beam. This article describes several design options and the results of computer simulation testing.

  8. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  9. Estimation of Transmitting Power to Compensate for Rain Attenuation for a Broadcasting Satellite System in the 21-GHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minematsu, Fumiaki; Tanaka, Shoji; Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Yutaka

    2002-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Rain attenuation in the 21-GHz band is much larger than that in the conventionally used 12-GHz band and the rain attenuation causes more serious program interruptions compared with that in the 12-GHz band. We are now studying an advanced broadcasting satellite in the 21-GHz band that enables adaptive compensation for heavy rain area by boosted beams using an on-board phased-array-transmitting antenna. To know the scale of this satellite system, it is important to estimate transmitting power needed to compensate for rain attenuation. Rain attenuation has so close association with rainfall that it is possible to estimate rain attenuation by measured rainfall. Japan meteorological agency is measuring 1-hour rainfalls for about 1300 locations in Japan. In this study, 1-hour rainfall data accumulated at more than 1000 locations over a period of 20 years were used statistically to grasp rainfall distribution throughout Japan and the transmitting power for compensation was estimated by use of these data. 2. CALCULATION MODEL FOR TRANSMITTING POWER ESTIMATION Assumed rain attenuation compensation area for Japanese archipelago was divided into 112 square areas. A size of each square was 0.1 degree in terms of azimuth and elevation angle for the beam direction of satellite transmitting antenna. For calculation, the link margin of 3.5 dB for clear sky was given to the area where 1-hour rainfall not larger than 3 mm was detected. For other square areas where 1-hour rainfall larger than 3 mm was detected, the link margin of 12 dB was given. The former link margin corresponds to the service availability of 99 % and the latter does to that of 99.9 % in an average year in Tokyo. A total system efficiency included radiation efficiency of the transmitting antenna of 1.0 was assumed. As modulation scheme, trellis coded 8-PSK (TC8PSK) was assumed. The required reception CN ratio for TC8PSK is 10.7 dB. As to TC8PSK, the baud rate of 57.72 Mbaud gives more than 100 Mbps

  10. A 1 to 18 GHz high gain ultra-broadband amplifier with temperature compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariel, D.; Thibout, T.; Lacombe, J. L.

    1989-05-01

    Design and performance of a high gain ultra-broadband hybrid amplifier with temperature compensation are presented. The amplifier consists of six distributed amplifier stages using GaAs FETs. Design emphasis was on minimizing gain variations with temperature; this was achieved by biasing the gates of the FETs with a temperature varying voltage. The amplifier exhibits a gain of 35 dB with a maximum deviation of + or - 4 dB over the frequency range from 1 to 18 GHz and the temperature range from -55 to +85 C. The gain flatness and temperature stability performance of this amplifier make it useful for EW subsystem applications.

  11. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  12. Verification of scattering parameter measurements in waveguides up to 325 GHz including highly-reflective devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Kuhlmann, K.; Dickhoff, R.; Dittmer, J.; Hiebel, M.

    2011-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) scattering parameters (S-parameters) play an important role to characterise RF signal transmission and reflection of active and passive devices such as transmission lines, components, and small-signal amplifiers. Vector network analysers (VNAs) are employed as instrumentation for such measurements. During the last years, the upper frequency limit of this instrumentation has been extended up to several hundreds of GHz for waveguide measurements. Calibration and verification procedures are obligatory prior to the VNA measurement to achieve accurate results and/or to obtain traceability to the International System of Units (SI). Usually, verification is performed by measuring well-matched devices with known S-parameters such as attenuators or short precision waveguide sections (shims). In waveguides, especially above 110 GHz, such devices may not exist and/or are not traceably calibrated. In some cases, e.g. filter networks, the devices under test (DUT) are partly highly reflective. This paper describes the dependency of the S-parameters a) on the calibration procedure, b) on the applied torque to the flange screws during the mating process of the single waveguide elements. It describes further c) how highly-reflective devices (HRD) can be used to verify a calibrated VNA, and d) how a measured attenuation at several hundreds of GHz can be substituted by a well-known coaxial attenuation at 279 MHz, the intermediate frequency (IF) of the VNA, to verify the linearity. This work is a contribution towards traceability and to obtain knowledge about the measurement uncertainty of VNA instrumentation in the millimetre-wave range.

  13. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  14. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  15. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  16. MMIC Power Amplifier Puts Out 40 mW From 75 to 110 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2006-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) W-band amplifier has been constructed and tested in a continuing effort to develop amplifiers as well as oscillators, frequency multipliers, and mixers capable of operating over wide frequency bands that extend above 100 GHz. There are numerous potential uses for MMICs like these in scientific instruments, radar systems, communication systems, and test equipment operating in this frequency range.

  17. A novel 2.45 GHz/200 W Microwave Plasma Jet for High Temperature Applications above 3600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopp, C.; Nachtrodt, F.; Heuermann, H.; Scherer, U. W.; Mostacci, D.; Finger, T.; Tietsch, W.

    2012-12-01

    State of the art atmosphere plasma sources are operated with frequencies in kHz/MHz regions and all high power plasma jets make use of tungsten electrodes. A microwave plasma torch has been developed at FH Aachen for the application in various fields. The advantages over other plasma jet technologies are the high efficiency combined with a maintenance-free compact design and non-tungsten electrodes. In this paper the development of a 200 W torch is described. Argon is used as the primary plasma gas and a second gas can be applied for additional purposes. For the plasma generation a microwave at 2.45 GHz is sent through the torch. The special internal topology causes a high electric field that ignites the plasma at the tip and leads to the ionization of the passing Argon atoms which are emitted as a jet. By designing the copper electrode as a cannula it is possible to gain plasma temperatures higher than the electrode's melting point. The electric field simulations are made with Ansoft HFSS. Experiments were carried out to verify the simulations. The upcoming steps in the development will be the scale-up to higher power levels of several kW with a magnetron as power source.

  18. Lightning control system using high power microwave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shiho, M.; Watanbe, A.; Kawasaki, S.

    1995-12-31

    A research project for developing a thunder lightning control system using an induction linac based high power microwave free electron laser (FEL) started at JAERI The system will produce weakly ionized plasma rod in the atmosphere by high power microwaves and control a lightning path, away from , e. g., nuclear power stations and rocket launchers. It has been known that about MW/cm{sup 2} power density is enough for the atmospheric breakdown in the microwave region, and which means high power microwave FEL with GW level output power is feasible for atmospheric breakdown, and accordingly is feasible for thunder lightning control tool with making a conductive plasma channel in the atmosphere. From the microwave attenuation consideration in the atmosphere, FEL of 35GHz(0.13dB/km), 90GHz(0.35dB/km), 140GHz(1.7dB/km), and of 270 GHz(4.5dB/km) are the best candidates for the system. Comparing with other proposed lightning control system using visible or ultraviolet laser, the system using microwave has an advantage that microwave suffers smaller attenuation by rain or snow which always exist in the real atmospheric circumstances when lightning occurs.

  19. Detection and tracking of personnel using a high-speed 94GHz surveillance radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, David G.; Robertson, Duncan A.; Jones, Ben; Clark, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Screening crowds for threats requires a stand-off sensor with wide area coverage, high spatial resolution and a high temporal update rate. We have assessed the capability of the NIRAD high speed 94 GHz FMCW surveillance radar against this requirement. NIRAD's sub-degree beamwidth, 25 cm range bins and 10 Hz azimuthal frame rate yield high resolution radar videos of scenes over ranges from tens to hundreds of meters, capable of tracking people walking or running around the scene. We present how people are detected and tracked in the scene to enable analysis of their radar cross section images to reveal signatures which may indicate the presence of a carried threat item.

  20. Power-Combined GaN Amplifier with 2.28-W Output Power at 87 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man; Ward, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Lin, Robert H.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Mehdi, Imran; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Soria, Mary M.; Cooperrider, Joelle T.; Bruneau, Peter J.; Kurdoghlian, Ara; Micovic, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Future remote sensing instruments will require focal plane spectrometer arrays with higher resolution at high frequencies. One of the major components of spectrometers are the local oscillator (LO) signal sources that are used to drive mixers to down-convert received radio-frequency (RF) signals to intermediate frequencies (IFs) for analysis. By advancing LO technology through increasing output power and efficiency, and reducing component size, these advances will improve performance and simplify architecture of spectrometer array systems. W-band power amplifiers (PAs) are an essential element of current frequency-multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. This work utilizes GaN monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) PAs developed from a new HRL Laboratories LLC 0.15- m gate length GaN semiconductor transistor. By additionally waveguide power combining PA MMIC modules, the researchers here target the highest output power performance and efficiency in the smallest volume achievable for W-band.

  1. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  2. High-Temperature RF Probe Station For Device Characterization Through 500 deg C and 50 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Zachary D.; Downey, Alan N.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Ponchak, George E.; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A high-temperature measurement system capable of performing on-wafer microwave testing of semiconductor devices has been developed. This high temperature probe station can characterize active and passive devices and circuits at temperatures ranging from room temperature to above 500 C. The heating system uses a ceramic heater mounted on an insulating block of NASA shuttle tile material. The temperature is adjusted by a graphical computer interface and is controlled by the software-based feedback loop. The system is used with a Hewlett-Packard 8510C Network Analyzer to measure scattering parameters over a frequency range of 1 to 50 GHz. The microwave probes, cables, and inspection microscope are all shielded to protect from heat damage. The high temperature probe station has been successfully used to characterize gold transmission lines on silicon carbide at temperatures up to 540 C.

  3. Enhanced highly charged ion production using a metal-dielectric liner in the KVI 14 GHz ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Rodrigues, G.; Drentje, A. G.

    2002-02-01

    Forming on an aluminum surface a dielectric layer of alumina (aluminum oxide) in order to create a metal-dielectric (MD) structure increases the secondary-electron emission properties. The idea of using this material as a MD (Al-Al2O3) cylindrical liner inside an ECR ion source was previously tested in the 14 GHz ECRIS of IKF (Frankfurt/Main, Germany). The purpose of the present experiment was to observe the effect of such a MD liner on the high charge state operation of the KVI 14 GHz ECRIS, in particular in comparison to the technique of gas mixing. Measurements were made both with and without the MD liner, with pure argon and with an argon plus oxygen mixture. In the case of pure argon, the source with the MD liner is running remarkably stable. The high charge state ion beam currents are by far higher than those obtained in the situation where the source was operated with pure argon but without the MD liner. With MD liner, some low intensity oxygen peaks were clearly present in the spectra, implying that oxygen escaping or sputtered from the MD structure could give rise to an effect of "gas mixing." Therefore, the effect of mixing small amounts of oxygen into an argon plasma without the liner was studied in the same conditions of rf power and O3+ peak intensity. The conclusion was that the high charge state beam increase is not due to the oxygen gas mixing effect. The reason for the good performances of the source in the presence of the MD liner can be the increased density of cold electrons, but other effects could occur as well. This is subject of further studies.

  4. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  5. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  6. High-power klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siambis, John G.; True, Richard B.; Symons, R. S.

    1994-05-01

    Novel emerging applications in advanced linear collider accelerators, ionospheric and atmospheric sensing and modification and a wide spectrum of industrial processing applications, have resulted in microwave tube requirements that call for further development of high power klystrons in the range from S-band to X-band. In the present paper we review recent progress in high power klystron development and discuss some of the issues and scaling laws for successful design. We also discuss recent progress in electron guns with potential grading electrodes for high voltage with short and long pulse operation via computer simulations obtained from the code DEMEOS, as well as preliminary experimental results. We present designs for high power beam collectors.

  7. 6 GHz Microwave Power-Beaming Demonstration with 6-kV Rectenna and Ion-Breeze Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, T.; Janssen, J.; Karnesky, J.; Laks, D.; Santillo, M.; Strause, B.; Myrabo, L. N.; Alden, A.; Bouliane, P.; Zhang, M.

    2004-03-01

    On 14 April 2003 at the Communications Research Center (CRC) in Ottawa, Ontario, a 5.85-GHz transmitter beamed 3-kW of microwave power to a remote rectifying antenna (i.e., rectenna) that delivered 6-kV to a special `Ion-Breeze' Engine (IBE). Three of CRC's 26.5-cm by 31-cm rectennas were connected in series to provide the ~6-kV output. RPI's low-voltage IBE thrusters performed well in a ``world's first'' power-beaming demonstration with rectennas and endoatmospheric ion-propulsion engines. The successful tests were a low-tech, proof-of-concept demonstration for the future full-sized MicroWave Lightcraft (MWLC) and its air breathing `loiter' propulsion mode. Additional IBE experiments investigated the feasibility of producing flight control forces on the MWLC. The objective was to torque the charged hull for `pitch' or `roll' maneuvers. The torquing demonstration was entirely successful.

  8. The 20 GHz circularly polarized, high temperature superconducting microstrip antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Jarrett D.; Williams, Jeffery T.; Long, Stuart A.; Wolfe, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal was to design and characterize a four-element, 20 GHz, circularly polarized microstrip patch antenna fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(x) superconductor. The purpose is to support a high temperature superconductivity flight communications experiment between the space shuttle orbiter and the ACTS satellite. This study is intended to provide information into the design, construction, and feasibility of a circularly polarized superconducting 20 GHz downlink or cross-link antenna. We have demonstrated that significant gain improvements can be realized by using superconducting materials for large corporate fed array antennas. In addition, we have shown that when constructed from superconducting materials, the efficiency, and therefore the gain, of microstrip patches increases if the substrate is not so thick that the dominant loss mechanism for the patch is radiation into the surface waves of the conductor-backed substrate. We have considered two design configurations for a superconducting 20 GHz four-element circularly polarized microstrip antenna array. The first is the Huang array that uses properly oriented and phased linearly polarized microstrip patch elements to realize a circularly polarized pattern. The second is a gap-coupled array of circularly polarized elements. In this study we determined that although the Huang array operates well on low dielectric constant substrates, its performance becomes extremely sensitive to mismatches, interelement coupling, and design imperfections for substrates with high dielectric constants. For the gap-coupled microstrip array, we were able to fabricate and test circularly polarized elements and four-element arrays on LaAlO3 using sputtered copper films. These antennas were found to perform well, with relatively good circular polarization. In addition, we realized a four-element YBa2Cu3O(x) array of the same design and measured its pattern and gain relative to a room temperature copper array. The patterns were

  9. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Ultra high-speed InP/InGaAs SHBTs with/t and/max of 185 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhou; Zhi, Jin; Yongbo, Su; Xiantai, Wang; Hudong, Chang; Anhuai, Xu; Ming, Qi

    2010-09-01

    An InP/InGaAs single heterojunction bipolar transistor (SHBT) with high maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) and high cutoff frequency (ft) is reported. Efforts have been made to maximize fmax and ft simultaneously including optimizing the epitaxial structure, base-collector mesa over-etching and base surface preparation. The measured ft and fmax both reached 185 GHz with an emitter size of 1 × 20 μm2, which is the highest fmax for SHBTs in mainland China. The device is suitable for ultra-high speed digital circuits and low power analog applications.

  10. Channel characterization in high-speed railway station environments at 1.89 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Tao, Cheng; Salous, Sana; Liu, Liu; Tan, Zhenhui

    2015-11-01

    Channel characterization is the prerequisite condition for the research and development of the next-generation high-speed railway (HSR) communication system. Train station is one of typical HSR scenarios, where channel characteristics have not yet been investigated sufficiently. In this paper, wideband multiantenna channel measurements are performed at 1.89 GHz in an open-type train station environment based on long-term evolution networks along Beijing to Tianjin HSR in China. Large-scale characteristics of the HSR station channel, focusing on path loss, shadow fading (SF), and the autocorrelation property of SF, are studied. Moreover, small-scale characteristics, such as Ricean K-factor, delay spread, and spatial correlation, are analyzed and modeled. In addition, the stationary region is characterized using the RUN test method. The obtained results provide useful information for deployment and assessment of the future HSR communication system in the HSR station scenario.

  11. Optimization of a GHz UV Laser System for a High Gradient X-band PWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, E.; Li, K.; Alvis, R.; Heritage, J. P.; Hartemann, F.; Baldis, H. A.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Unterberg, E.; Yu, D.; Rosenzweig, J.; Pellegrini, C.

    1998-11-01

    A Plane Wave Transformer (PWT) is being designed to produce 25 MeV electron bunches of extremely high brightness using a 20 MW of X-band klystron. The PWT average brightness can be further increased by filling multiple rf buckets in the accelerating cavity during an individual klystron pulse. A diode laser in a short optical cavity is modulated with external fields and modelocked using a fast saturable absorber to produce sub-picosecond pulses which then seed a CPA system. A fiber switch is used to select a GHz pulse train which is subsequently amplified and converted to UV. Temporal pulse shaping is used to optimize the photocathode laser and minimize the PWT emittance.

  12. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  13. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system.

  14. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system. PMID:20149698

  15. High sensitivity broadband 360GHz passive receiver for TeraSCREEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Oldfield, Matthew; Maestrojuán, Itziar; Platt, Duncan; Brewster, Nick; Viegas, Colin; Alderman, Byron; Ellison, Brian N.

    2016-05-01

    TeraSCREEN is an EU FP7 Security project aimed at developing a combined active, with frequency channel centered at 360 GHz, and passive, with frequency channels centered at 94, 220 and 360 GHz, imaging system for border controls in airport and commercial ferry ports. The system will include automatic threat detection and classification and has been designed with a strong focus on the ethical, legal and practical aspects of operating in these environments and with the potential threats in mind. Furthermore, both the passive and active systems are based on array receivers with the active system consisting of a 16 element MIMO FMCW radar centered at 360 GHz with a bandwidth of 30 GHz utilizing a custom made direct digital synthesizer. The 16 element passive receiver system at 360 GHz uses commercial Gunn diode oscillators at 90 GHz followed by custom made 90 to 180 GHz frequency doublers supplying the local oscillator for 360 GHz sub-harmonic mixers. This paper describes the development of the passive antenna module, local oscillator chain, frequency mixers and detectors used in the passive receiver array of this system. The complete passive receiver chain is characterized in this paper.

  16. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, S.; Kubo, S.; Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T.; Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.

    2012-10-15

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  17. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, S; Kubo, S; Nishiura, M; Tatematsu, Y; Saito, T; Tanaka, K; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Ito, S; Takita, Y; Kobayashi, S; Mizuno, Y; Okada, K; Minami, R; Kariya, T; Imai, T

    2012-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE(17,6) mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE(18,6) mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  18. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  19. A portable high power microwave source with permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2016-06-01

    A high power microwave source with permanent magnets is proposed in this paper. The source has the length 330 mm, maximum diameter 350 mm, and total weight 50 kg, including 25 kg of permanent magnets. 1 GW of microwave power with Gaussian radiation pattern and 24% of microwave power generation efficiency in a pulse duration of 75 ns are obtained in the experiment. Operating frequency of the source is 2.32 GHz. Such a small size, light weight, and highly stable in operation source will be used in portable repetitive high power microwave generation systems.

  20. Recent progress in high power ultrafast MIXSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfieri, C. G. E.; Waldburger, D.; Link, S. M.; Gini, E.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Mangold, M.; Keller, U.

    2016-03-01

    The modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser (MIXSEL) is the most compact technology of ultrafast semiconductor disk laser, combining in the same epitaxial structure an active region and a saturable absorber for stable and self-starting passive modelocking in a linear straight cavity. Here we present the first MIXSEL structure able to produce sub-300-fs pulses at an average output power of 235 mW and 3.35 GHz pulse repetition rate, resulting in a record-high peak power of 240 W. At 10 GHz repetition rate the same MIXSEL generated 279-fs pulses with 310 mW of average output power. An optimized antireflection coating for dispersion minimization together with a reduced field enhancement inside the structure enabled the sensible improvement and the record performances of this novel MIXSEL. Furthermore, thanks to the development of suitable saturable absorbers with fast recovery dynamics and low saturation fluence, we demonstrate the first entirely MOVPE-grown MIXSEL.

  1. High-efficiency 20 GHz traveling wave tube development for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldana, S. L.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    A 75 watt CW high efficiency helix TWT operating at 20 GHz was developed for satellite communication systems. The purpose was to extend the performance capabilities of helix TWTs by using recent technology developments. The TWT described is a unique design because high overall efficiency is obtained with a low perveance beam. In the past, low perveance designs resulted in low beam efficiencies. However, due to recent breakthoughs in diamond rod technology and in collector electrode materials, high efficiencies can now be achieved with low perveance beams. The advantage of a low perveance beam is a reduction in space charge within the beam which translates to more efficient collector operation. In addition, this design incorporates textured graphite electrodes which further enhance collector operation by suppressing backstreaming secondaries. The diamond supported helix circuit features low RF losses, high interaction impedance, good thermal handling capability and has been designed to compensate for the low perveance beam. One more discussed tube feature is the use of a velocity taper in the output helix that achieves low signal distortion while maintaining high efficiency.

  2. A 23.75-GHz frequency comb with two low-finesse filtering cavities in series for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hou; Hai-Nian, Han; Wei, Wang; Long, Zhang; Li-Hui, Pang; De-Hua, Li; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2015-02-01

    A laser frequency comb with several tens GHz level is demonstrated, based on a Yb-doped femtosecond fiber laser and two low-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavities (FPCs) in series. The original 250-MHz mode-line-spacing of the source comb is filtered to 4.75 GHz and 23.75 GHz, respectively. According to the multi-beam interferences theory of FPC, the side-mode suppression rate of FPC schemes is in good agreement with our own theoretical results from 27 dB of a single FPC to 43 dB of paired FPCs. To maintain long-term stable operation and determine the absolute frequency mode number in the 23.75-GHz comb, the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) locking technology is utilized. Such stable tens GHz frequency combs have important applications in calibrating astronomical spectrographs with high resolution. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11078022 and 61378040).

  3. High power connection system

    DOEpatents

    Schaefer, Christopher E.; Beer, Robert C.; McCall, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A high power connection system adapted for automotive environments which provides environmental and EMI shielding includes a female connector, a male connector, and a panel mount. The female connector includes a female connector base and a snap fitted female connector cover. The male connector includes a male connector base and a snap fitted male connector cover. The female connector base has at least one female power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective female power terminal. The male connector base has at least one male power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective male power terminal. The female connector is covered by a cover seal and a conductive shroud. A pair of lock arms protrude outward from the front end of the male connector base, pass through the panel mount and interface with a lever of a lever rotatably connected to the shroud to thereby mechanically assist mating of the male and female connectors. Safety terminals in the male and female connectors provide a last-to-connect-first-to-break connection with an HVIL circuit.

  4. Multi-GHz bandpass, high-repetition rate single channel mobile diagnostic system for ultra-wideband applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miner, Lynn M.; Voss, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    Characterizing radiated ultra-wideband (UWB) signals poses challenges due to requirements for (1) multi-GHz bandpass recording of the signal's leading edge; (2) GHz-bandpass recording of long record lengths (10s-100s of ns); and (3) determining shot-to-shot reproducibility at rep-rates exceeding 10 kHz. The System Verification Apparatus (SVA) is a novel diagnostic system which can measure 60-ps rise-time signals on a single-shot basis, while monitoring pulse-to-pulse variation. The fully-integrated SVA includes a broadband sensor, signal and trigger conditioning electronics, multiple parallel digitizers with deep local storge, and automated software for acquiring, archiving, and analyzing waveform data with rapid (secs-minute) turnaround time. The instruments are housed in a portable 100-dB shielded aluminum enclosure. The SVA utilizes a 6-GHz bandpass free-field D-dot sensor to measure the incident electric field. Three separate digitizers together meet the requirements of high bandwidth, long record length, and high repetition rate. A 6-GHz bandpass scan converter digitizer captures the leading edge (few ns) of the radiated signal. 1-GHz and 600 MHz bandwidth solid-state digitizers supporting long record lengths (greater than 2 micrometers) record the balance of the signal, which typically contains negligible content above 1 GHz. These solid-state digitizers can store greater than 900 waveforms locally at rep-rates exceeding 65 Hz and 100 kHz, respectively. Data management and instrument control use an 80486-based PC, operating in a user-friendly Windows environment. All waveform and system configuration data are automatically stored in a built-in database. A fiber-optic link, up to 2 km long, provides electromagnetic isolation of the computer.

  5. High Power Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Kao, Y. C.; Carnahan, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Improved switching transistors handle 400-A peak currents and up to 1,200 V. Using large diameter silicon wafers with twice effective area as D60T, form basis for D7 family of power switching transistors. Package includes npn wafer, emitter preform, and base-contact insert. Applications are: 25to 50-kilowatt high-frequency dc/dc inverters, VSCF converters, and motor controllers for electrical vehicles.

  6. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  7. High-power MUTC photodetectors for RF photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrella, Steven; Johansson, Leif A.; Mashanovitch, Milan L.; Beling, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    High power photodiodes are needed for a range of applications. The high available power conversion efficiency makes these ideal for antenna remoting applications, including high power, low duty-cycle RF pulse generation. The compact footprint and fiber optic input allow densely packed RF aperture arrays with low cross-talk for phased high directionality emitters. Other applications include linear RF photonic links and other high dynamic range optical systems. Freedom Photonics has developed packaged modified uni-traveling carrier (MUTC) photodetectors for high-power applications. Both single and balanced photodetector pairs are mounted on a ceramic carrier, and packaged in a compact module optimized for high power operation. Representative results include greater than 100 mA photocurrent, >100m W generated RF power and >20 GHz bandwidth. In this paper, we evaluate the saturation and bandwidth of these single ended and balanced photodetectors for detector diameter in the 16 μm to 34 μm range. Packaged performance is compared to chip performance. Further new development towards the realization of <100GHz packaged photodetector modules with optimized high power performance is described. Finally, incorporation of these photodetector structures in novel photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for high optical power application areas is outlined.

  8. Waveguide Power Combiner Demonstration for Multiple High Power Millimeter Wave TWTAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    NASA is presently developing nuclear reactor technologies, under Project Prometheus, which will provide spacecraft with greatly increased levels of sustained onboard power and thereby dramatically enhance the capability for future deep space exploration. The first mission planned for use of this high power technology is the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). In addition to electric propulsion and science, there will also be unprecedented onboard power available for deep space communications. A 32 GHz transmitter with 1 kW of RF output power is being considered to enable the required very high data transmission rates. One approach to achieving the 1 kW RF power, now being investigated at NASA GRC, is the possible power combining of a number of 100-1 50 W TWTs now under development. The work presented here is the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration of the power combining Ka-band waveguide circuit design and test procedure using two Ka- band TWTAs (Varian model VZA6902V3 and Logimetrics model A440/KA-1066), both of which were previously employed in data uplink evaluation terminals at 29.36 GHz for the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program. The characterization of the individual TWTAs and power combining demonstration were done over a 500 MHz bandwidth from 29.1 to 29.6 GHz to simulate the Deep Space Network (DSN) bandwidth of 3 1.8 to 32.3 GHz. Figures 1-3 show some of the power transfer and gain measurements of the TWTAs using a swept signal generator (Agilent 83640b) for the RF input. The input and output powers were corrected for circuit insertion losses due to the waveguide components. The RF saturated powers of both ACTS TWTAs were on the order of 120 W, which is comparable to the expected output powers of the 32 GHz TWTs. Additional results for the individual TWTAs will be presented (AM/AM, AM/PM conversion and gain compression), some of which were obtained from swept frequency and power measurements using a vector network

  9. Low power considerations and design for CMOS VCOs applied for direct conversion receivers at 5GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adin, Iñigo; Quemada, Carlos; Solar, Hector; Sedano, Beatriz; Gutierrez, Iñigo

    2007-05-01

    Low power design often requires direct conversion architectures, such as low-IF or zero-IF. Any of these two possibilities needs a low power, low phase noise voltage control oscillator (VCO) in the frequency synthesizer. This work is focused on low power considerations applied to the practical modern conception of this device. Fulfilling the standard specifications (output power, phase noise, frequency range) should be completed with this deeper step. A conscious design leads moreover to an improvement in the results obtained by the classical considerations. The increase of the quality factor of the passive elements is one of the key points, followed by an accurate design of the architecture scheme. Furthermore, lower current consumption provides higher oscillation frequencies and facilitates higher frequency ranges, which follow the trends of modern wireless and wideband communication standards. In order to validate the aforementioned assumptions, a CMOS VCO has been implemented in UMC 0.18μm 1P6M technology, with power consumption down to 3.4mW.

  10. High power arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goelz, T. M.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.; Schrade, H. O.

    1992-01-01

    In this period a new mass flow controller was brought into the gas supply system, so that the upper limit for the mass flow rate could be increased up to 500 mg/s with hydrogen. A maximum specific impulse of 1500 s could be achieved with the high powered arcjet (HIPARC) at an efficiency of slightly better than 20 percent. Different nozzle throat diameters had been tested. The 100 kilo-watt input power limit was reached with the 4 mm nozzle throat diameter at a mass flow rate of 400 mg/s. Tests were carried out with different cathode gaps and with three different cathodes. In addition measurements of pressure and gas temperature were taken in the feed line in order to determine the pressure drop in the propellant injectors.

  11. A fully integrated 3.5 GHz CMOS differential power amplifier driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaodong, Xu; Haigang, Yang; Tongqiang, Gao; Hongfeng, Zhang

    2013-07-01

    A fully integrated CMOS differential power amplifier driver (PAD) is proposed for WiMAX applications. In order to fulfill the differential application requirements, a transmission line transformer is used as the output matching network. A differential inductance constitutes an inter-stage matching network. Meanwhile, an on chip balun realizes input matching as well as single-end to differential conversion. The PAD is fabricated in a 0.13 μm RFCMOS process. The chip size is 1.1 × 1.1 mm2 with all of the matching network integrated on chip. The saturated power is around 10 dBm and power gain is about 12 dB.

  12. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: A MEASUREMENT OF THE 600 < l < 8000 COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM AT 148 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. W.; Appel, J. W.; Das, S.; Dunkley, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fisher, R. P.; Acquaviva, V.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, P.; Barrientos, L. F.; Duenner, R.; Amiri, M.; Battistelli, E. S.; Burger, B.; Bond, J. R.; Brown, B.; Chervenak, J.; Doriese, W. B.

    2010-10-20

    We present a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation observed at 148 GHz. The measurement uses maps with 1.'4 angular resolution made with data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The observations cover 228 deg{sup 2} of the southern sky, in a 4.{sup 0}2 wide strip centered on declination 53{sup 0} south. The CMB at arcminute angular scales is particularly sensitive to the Silk damping scale, to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from galaxy clusters, and to emission by radio sources and dusty galaxies. After masking the 108 brightest point sources in our maps, we estimate the power spectrum between 600 < l < 8000 using the adaptive multi-taper method to minimize spectral leakage and maximize use of the full data set. Our absolute calibration is based on observations of Uranus. To verify the calibration and test the fidelity of our map at large angular scales, we cross-correlate the ACT map to the WMAP map and recover the WMAP power spectrum from 250 < l < 1150. The power beyond the Silk damping tail of the CMB (l {approx} 5000) is consistent with models of the emission from point sources. We quantify the contribution of SZ clusters to the power spectrum by fitting to a model normalized to {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.8. We constrain the model's amplitude A{sub SZ} < 1.63 (95% CL). If interpreted as a measurement of {sigma}{sub 8}, this implies {sigma}{sup SZ}{sub 8} < 0.86 (95% CL) given our SZ model. A fit of ACT and WMAP five-year data jointly to a six-parameter {Lambda}CDM model plus point sources and the SZ effect is consistent with these results.

  13. Standoff imaging of a masked human face using a 670 GHz high resolution radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellgren, Jan; Svedin, Jan; Cooper, Ken B.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents an exploratory attempt to use high-resolution radar measurements for face identification in forensic applications. An imaging radar system developed by JPL was used to measure a human face at 670 GHz. Frontal views of the face were measured both with and without a ski mask at a range of 25 m. The realized spatial resolution was roughly 1 cm in all three dimensions. The surfaces of the ski mask and the face were detected by using the two dominating reflections from amplitude data. Various methods for visualization of these surfaces are presented. The possibility to use radar data to determine certain face distance measures between well-defined face landmarks, typically used for anthropometric statistics, was explored. The measures used here were face length, frontal breadth and interpupillary distance. In many cases the radar system seems to provide sufficient information to exclude an innocent subject from suspicion. For an accurate identification it is believed that a system must provide significantly more information.

  14. High voltage power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruitberg, A. P.; Young, K. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage power supply is formed by three discrete circuits energized by a battery to provide a plurality of concurrent output signals floating at a high output voltage on the order of several tens of kilovolts. In the first two circuits, the regulator stages are pulse width modulated and include adjustable ressistances for varying the duty cycles of pulse trains provided to corresponding oscillator stages while the third regulator stage includes an adjustable resistance for varying the amplitude of a steady signal provided to a third oscillator stage. In the first circuit, the oscillator, formed by a constant current drive network and a tuned resonant network included a step up transformer, is coupled to a second step up transformer which, in turn, supplies an amplified sinusoidal signal to a parallel pair of complementary poled rectifying, voltage multiplier stages to generate the high output voltage.

  15. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  16. High Power Microwaves for Accelerator Applications*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    Realization of a future high-energy electron-positron collider rests upon many technological advancements, among which are high-power microwave amplifiers, and rf pulse compressors. In one scenario for the 0.5 TeV NLC, each linac requires about 1000, 75 MW, 11.4 GHz amplifiers furnishing peak powers of 75 MW in 1.6 mcs pulses at 120 Hz pps. Pulse compression to 0.4 mcs would result in a total rf peak power of over 400 GW. After a decade of intense development, SLAC has evidently reached the amplifier goal with the XP3 PPM klystron. Dual-mode double-delay-line pulse compression has demonstrated 4:1 compression to a peak output of 500 MW. These achievements help provide technological justification for NLC. Further justification rests with NLC's capability for a subsequent energy upgrade to 1.0-1.5 TeV. Nascent microwave technologies for the energy upgrade are discussed. These include an X-band magnicon, with double the output of a SLAC klystron: peak and average powers are predicted to reach 155 MW and 60 kW. Each magnicon could replace two SLAC klystrons, and operate with twice the pulse width. Therefore, an 8:1 pulse compressor is required. Active, efficient, rf pulse compression, with switching during the rf pulse could be provided by an externally-varied semiconductor, plasma, or ferroelectric switching element. Demonstration of an X-band magnicon, and of 10:1 X-band pulse compression using plasma switches is described. Prospects for higher efficiency rf pulse compression using ferroelectric switching elements is also described. A scenario for obtaining an energy upgrade to 2.0 TeV is outlined, based on use of 34-GHz technology in the inner halves of each linac. This option rests upon development of a 34-GHz magnicon amplifier, first results with which are described. *Sponsored by DoE, Division of High Energy Physics.

  17. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  18. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  19. High Power Coax Window

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M. L.; Dudas, A.; Sah, R.; Elliott, T. S.; Rimmer, R. A.; Stirbet, M. S.

    2010-05-23

    A su­per­con­duct­ing RF (SRF) power cou­pler ca­pa­ble of han­dling 500 kW CW RF power is re­quired for pre­sent and fu­ture stor­age rings and linacs. There are over 35 cou­pler de­signs for SRF cav­i­ties rang­ing in fre­quen­cy from 325 to 1500 MHz. Cou­pler win­dows vary from cylin­ders to cones to disks, and RF power cou­plers are lim­it­ed by the abil­i­ty of ce­ram­ic win­dows to with­stand the stress­es due to heat­ing and me­chan­i­cal flex­ure. We pro­pose a novel ro­bust co-ax­i­al SRF cou­pler de­sign which uses com­pressed win­dow tech­nol­o­gy. This tech­nol­o­gy will allow the use of high­ly ther­mal­ly con­duc­tive ma­te­ri­als for cryo­genic win­dows. Using com­pressed win­dow tech­niques on disk co-ax­i­al win­dows will make sig­nif­i­cant im­prove­ments in the power han­dling of SRF cou­plers. We pre­sent the bench test re­sults of two win­dow as­sem­blies back to back, as well as in­di­vid­u­al win­dow VSWR in EIA3.125 coax. A vac­u­um test as­sem­bly was made and the win­dows baked out at 155C. The pro­cess­es used to build win­dows is scal­able to larg­er di­am­e­ter coax and to high­er power lev­els.

  20. High Power Local Oscillator Sources for 1-2 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand; Lin, Robert; Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John; Schlecht, Erich; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Maiwald, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Recent results from the Heterodyne Instrument for Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Telescope have confirmed the usefulness of high resolution spectroscopic data for a better understanding of our Universe. This paper will explore the current status of tunable local oscillator sources beyond HIFI and provide demonstration of how power combining of GaAs Schottky diodes can be used to increase both power and upper operating frequency for heterodyne receivers. Availability of power levels greater than 1 watt in the W-band now makes it possible to design a 1900 GHz source with more than 100 microwatts of expected output power.

  1. High power coaxial ubitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkcum, Adam J.

    In the ubitron, also known as the free electron laser, high power coherent radiation is generated from the interaction of an undulating electron beam with an electromagnetic signal and a static periodic magnetic wiggler field. These devices have experimentally produced high power spanning the microwave to x-ray regimes. Potential applications range from microwave radar to the study of solid state material properties. In this dissertation, the efficient production of high power microwaves (HPM) is investigated for a ubitron employing a coaxial circuit and wiggler. Designs for the particular applications of an advanced high gradient linear accelerator driver and a directed energy source are presented. The coaxial ubitron is inherently suited for the production of HPM. It utilizes an annular electron beam to drive the low loss, RF breakdown resistant TE01 mode of a large coaxial circuit. The device's large cross-sectional area greatly reduces RF wall heat loading and the current density loading at the cathode required to produce the moderate energy (500 keV) but high current (1-10 kA) annular electron beam. Focusing and wiggling of the beam is achieved using coaxial annular periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stacks without a solenoidal guide magnetic field. This wiggler configuration is compact, efficient and can propagate the multi-kiloampere electron beams required for many HPM applications. The coaxial PPM ubitron in a traveling wave amplifier, cavity oscillator and klystron configuration is investigated using linear theory and simulation codes. A condition for the dc electron beam stability in the coaxial wiggler is derived and verified using the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, MAGIC. New linear theories for the cavity start-oscillation current and gain in a klystron are derived. A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the ubitron-TWT and a new nonlinear theory for the ubitron oscillator are presented. These form the basis for simulation codes which, along

  2. Blood-brain barrier permeation in the rat during exposure to low-power 1. 7-GHz microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.R.; Ali, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to high-and low-molecular-weight compounds has been measured as a function of continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-microwave radiation. Adult rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital and injected intravenously with a mixture of (/sup 14/C) sucrose and (/sup 3/H) inulin, were exposed for 30 min at a specific absorption rate of 0.1 W/kg to 1.7-GHz CW and pulsed (0.5-microseconds pulse width, 1,000 pps) microwaves. After exposure, the brain was perfused and sectioned into nine regions, and the radioactivity in each region was counted. During identical exposure conditions, temperatures of rats were measured in eight of the brain regions by a thermistor probe that did not perturb the field. No change in uptake of either tracer was found in any of the eight regions as compared with those of sham-exposed animals.

  3. Blood-brain barrier permeation in the rat during exposure to low-power 1. 7-GHz microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.R.; Ali, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to high-and low-molecular-weight compounds has been measured as a function of continuous wave (CW) and pulsed microwave radiation. Adult rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital and injected intravenously with a mixture of /sup 14/C-sucrose and /sup 3/H-insulin, were exposed for 30 min at a specific absorption rate of 0.1 W/kg to 1.7 GHz CW and pulsed (0.5-us pulse width, 1000 pps) microwave radiation. Following exposure, the brain was perfused and sectioned into nine regions and the radioactivity in each region was counted. During identical exposure conditions, temperatures were measured in eight of the brain regions using a nonperturbing thermistor probe. No change in uptake of either tracer was found in any region as compared to sham-exposed animals.

  4. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  5. Human speech articulator measurements using low power, 2GHz Homodyne sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F

    1999-06-29

    Very low power, short-range microwave ''radar-like'' sensors can measure the motions and vibrations of internal human speech articulators as speech is produced. In these animate (and also in inanimate acoustic systems) microwave sensors can measure vibration information associated with excitation sources and other interfaces. These data, together with the corresponding acoustic data, enable the calculation of system transfer functions. This information appears to be useful for a surprisingly wide range of applications such as speech coding and recognition, speaker or object identification, speech and musical instrument synthesis, noise cancellation, and other applications.

  6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Power Spectrum at 148 AND 218 GHz from the 2008 Southern Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sudeep; Marriage, Tobias A.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia A.; Bond, J. Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Doriese, W. Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Wollack, Ed

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. Our results dearly show the second through the seventh acoustic peaks in the CMB power spectrum. The measurements of these higher-order peaks provide an additional test of the ACDM cosmological model. At l > 3000, we detect power in excess of the primary anisotropy spectrum of the CMB. At lower multipoles 500 < l < 3000, we find evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB in the power spectrum at the 2.8(sigma) level. We also detect a low level of Galactic dust in our maps, which demonstrates that we can recover known faint, diffuse signals.

  7. 95 GHz Gyrotron with Ferroelectric Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einat, M.; Pilossof, M.; Ben-Moshe, R.; Hirshbein, H.; Borodin, D.

    2012-11-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ˜0.5μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  8. Absence of direct effect of low-power millimeter-wave radiation at 60.4 GHz on endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Nicolas Nicolaz, Christophe; Zhadobov, Maxim; Desmots, Fabienne; Sauleau, Ronan; Thouroude, Daniel; Michel, Denis; Le Drean, Yves

    2009-10-01

    Millimeter waves (MMW) at frequencies around 60 GHz will be used in the very near future in the emerging local wireless communication systems and the potential health hazards of artificially induced environmental exposures represent a major public concern. The main aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of low-power MMW radiations on cellular physiology. To this end, the human glial cell line, U-251 MG, was exposed to 60.4 GHz radiation at a power density of 0.14 mW/cm(2) and potential effect of MMW radiations on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was investigated. ER is very sensitive to environmental insults and its homeostasis is altered in various pathologies. Through several assay systems, we found that exposure to 60.4 GHz does not modify ER protein folding and secretion, nor induces XBP1 or ATF6 transcription factors maturation. Moreover, expression of ER-stress sensor, BiP/GRP78 was examined by real-time PCR, in exposed or non-exposed cells to MMW radiations. Our data demonstrated the absence of significant changes in mRNA levels for BiP/GRP78. Our results showed that ER homeostasis does not undergo any modification at molecular level after exposure to low-power MMW radiation at 60.4 GHz. This report is the first study of ER-stress induction by MMW radiations.

  9. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  10. High power beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Oren

    2014-02-01

    In various modern scientific and industrial laser applications, beam-shaping optics manipulates the laser spot size and its intensity distribution. However the designed laser spot frequently deviates from the design goal due to real life imperfections and effects, such as: input laser distortions, optical distortion, heating, overall instabilities, and non-linear effects. Lasers provide the ability to accurately deliver large amounts of energy to a target area with very high accuracy. Thus monitoring beam size power and beam location is of high importance for high quality results and repeatability. Depending on the combination of wavelength, beam size and pulse duration , laser energy is absorbed by the material surface, yielding into processes such as cutting, welding, surface treatment, brazing and many other applications. This article will cover the aspect of laser beam measurements, especially at the focal point where it matters the most. A brief introduction to the material processing interactions will be covered, followed by fundamentals of laser beam propagation, novel measurement techniques, actual measurement and brief conclusions.

  11. RF dosimetry: a comparison between power absorption of female and male numerical models from 0.1 to 4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, L.; Vaccari, A.; Malacarne, C.; Cristoforetti, L.; Pontalti, R.

    2004-11-01

    Realistic numerical models of human subjects and their surrounding environment represent the basic points of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic dosimetry. This also involves differentiating the human models in men and women, possibly with different body shapes and postures. In this context, the aims of this paper are, firstly, to propose a female dielectric anatomical model (fDAM) and, secondly, to compare the power absorption distributions of a male and a female model from 0.1 to 4 GHz. For realizing the fDAM, a magnetic resonance imaging tomographer to acquire images and a recent technique which avoids the discrete segmentation of body tissues into different types have been used. Simulations have been performed with the FDTD method by using a novel filtering-based subgridding algorithm. The latter is applied here for the first time to dosimetry, allowing an abrupt mesh refinement by a factor of up to 7. The results show that the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) of the female model is higher than that of the male counterpart, mainly because of a thicker subcutaneous fat layer. In contrast, the maximum averaged SAR over 1 g (1gA-SAR) and 10 g (10gA-SAR) does not depend on gender, because it occurs in regions where no subcutaneous fat layer is present.

  12. Ku-band high efficiency GaAs MMIC power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tserng, H. Q.; Witkowski, L. C.; Wurtele, M.; Saunier, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The development of Ku-band high efficiency GaAs MMIC power amplifiers is examined. Three amplifier modules operating over the 13 to 15 GHz frequency range are to be developed. The first MMIC is a 1 W variable power amplifier (VPA) with 35 percent efficiency. On-chip digital gain control is to be provided. The second MMIC is a medium power amplifier (MPA) with an output power goal of 1 W and 40 percent power-added efficiency. The third MMIC is a high power amplifier (HPA) with 4 W output power goal and 40 percent power-added efficiency. An output power of 0.36 W/mm with 49 percent efficiency was obtained on an ion implanted single gate MESFET at 15 GHz. On a dual gate MESFET, an output power of 0.42 W/mm with 27 percent efficiency was obtained. A mask set was designed that includes single stage, two stage, and three stage single gate amplifiers. A single stage 600 micron amplifier produced 0.4 W/mm output power with 40 percent efficiency at 14 GHz. A four stage dual gate amplifier generated 500 mW of output power with 20 dB gain at 17 GHz. A four-bit digital-to-analog converter was designed and fabricated which has an output swing of -3 V to +/- 1 V.

  13. GHz laser-free time-resolved transmission electron microscopy: A stroboscopic high-duty-cycle method.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiaqi; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Baryshev, Sergey V; Reed, Bryan W; Lau, June W; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-02-01

    A device and a method for producing ultrashort electron pulses with GHz repetition rates via pulsing an input direct current (dc) electron beam are provided. The device and the method are based on an electromagnetic-mechanical pulser (EMMP) that consists of a series of transverse deflecting cavities and magnetic quadrupoles. The EMMP modulates and chops the incoming dc electron beam and converts it into pico- and sub-pico-second electron pulse sequences (pulse trains) at >1GHz repetition rates, as well as controllably manipulates the resulting pulses. Ultimately, it leads to negligible electron pulse phase-space degradation compared to the incoming dc beam parameters. The temporal pulse length and repetition rate for the EMMP can be continuously tunable over wide ranges. Applying the EMMP to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with any dc electron source (e.g. thermionic, Schottky, or field-emission source), a GHz stroboscopic high-duty-cycle TEM can be realized. Unlike in many recent developments in time-resolved TEM that rely on a sample pumping laser paired with a laser launching electrons from a photocathode to probe the sample, there is no laser in the presented experimental set-up. This is expected to be a significant relief for electron microscopists who are not familiar with laser systems. The EMMP and the sample are externally driven by a radiofrequency (RF) source synchronized through a delay line. With no laser pumping the sample, the problem of the pump laser induced residual heating/damaging the sample is eliminated. As many RF-driven processes can be cycled indefinitely, sampling rates of 1-50GHz become accessible. Such a GHz stroboscopic TEM would open up a new paradigm for in situ and in operando experiments to study samples externally driven electromagnetically. Complementary to the lower (MHz) repetition rates experiments enabled by laser photocathode TEM, new experiments in the multi-GHz regime will be enabled by the proposed RF design

  14. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-09-19

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - 165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  15. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power ( P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  16. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power (P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  17. 60-GHz integrated-circuit high data rate quadriphase shift keying exciter and modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grote, A.; Chang, K.

    1984-01-01

    An integrated-circuit quadriphase shift keying (QPSK) exciter and modulator have demonstrated excellent performance directly modulating a carrier frequency of 60 GHz with an output phase error of less than 3 degrees and maximum amplitude error of 0.5 dB. The circuit consists of a 60-GHz Gunn VCO phase-locked to a low-frequency reference source, a 4th subharmonic mixer, and a QPSK modlator packaged into a small volume of 1.8 x 2.5 x 0.35 in. The use of microstrip has the advantages of small size, light-weight, and low-cost fabrication. The unit has the potential for multigigabit data rate applications.

  18. TlCaBaCuO high Tc superconducting microstrip ring resonators designed for 12 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, G.; Kapoor, V. J.; Chorey, C. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave properties of sputtered Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O thin films were investigated by designing, fabricating, and testing microstrip ring resonators. Ring resonators designed for 12 GHz fundamental resonance frequency, were fabricated and tested. From the unloaded Q values for the resonators, the surface resistance was calculated by separating the conductor losses from the total losses. The penetration depth was obtained from the temperature dependence of resonance frequency, assuming that the shift in resonance frequency is mainly due to the temperature dependence of penetration depth. The effective surface resistance at 12 GHz and 77 K was determined to be between 1.5 and 2.75 mOmega, almost an order lower than Cu at the same temperature and frequency. The effective penetration depth at 0 K is approximately 7000 A.

  19. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  20. A stable, high power optically pumped far infrared laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1988-01-01

    The generation of 1.25 watts of CW laser power at the 119-micron (2522.8 GHz) methanol line is reported. The maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. This laser has also been tested on numerous other lines ranging from 403.7 GHz (HCOOH) to 5260 GHz (CH3OD) with improved power and stability.

  1. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  2. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  3. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  4. A smile insensitive method for spectral linewidth narrowing on high power laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Li, Yuandong; Lu, Qisheng; Hua, Weihong; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2011-10-01

    To eliminate the smile effect in spectral linewidth narrowing on high power laser diode arrays, we have introduced a plane reflective mirror into a common Littrow configuration external cavity to enhance the correlation among emitters. By this way, we obtained uniform spectral distribution among emitters of a 64-elements laser diode array with 35 GHz linewidth and 41 W output laser power.

  5. Feasibility of an EHF (40/50 GHz) mobile satellite system using highly inclined orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falciasecca, G.; Paraboni, A.; Ruggieri, M.; Valdoni, F.; Vatalaro, F.

    1990-01-01

    The pan-European L-band terrestrial cellular system (GSM) is expected to provide service to more than 10 million users by the year 2000. Discussed here is the feasibility of a new satellite system at EHF (40/50 GHz) to complement, at the end of the decade, the GSM system or its decendants in order to provide additional services at 64 kbits/s, or so. The main system aspects, channel characteristics, technology issues, and both on-board and earth terminal architectures are highlighted. Based on the performed analyses, a proposal was addressed to the Italian Space Agency (ASI), aimed at the implementation of a national plan.

  6. 110 GHz ECH on DIII-D: System overview and initial operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, W.P.; Allen, J.C.; Callis, R.W.; Doane, J.L.; Harris, T.E.; Moeller, C.P.; Nerem, A.; Prater, R.; Remsen, D.

    1991-11-01

    A new high power electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system has been introduced on D3-D. This system is designed to operate at 110 GHz with a total output power of 2 MW. The system consists of four Varian VGT-8011 gyrotrons, (output power of 500 kW), and their associated support equipment. All components have been designed for up to a 10 second pulse duration. The 110 GHz system is intended to further progress in rf current drive experiments on D3-D when used in conjunction with the existing 60 GHz ECH (1.6 MW), and the 30--60 MHz ICH (2 MW) systems. H-mode physics, plasma stabilization experiments and transport studies are also to be conducted at 110 GHz. The present system design philosophy was based on experience gained from the existing 60 GHz ECH system. The consequences of these design decisions will be addressed as will the actual performance of various 110 GHz components.

  7. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  8. 2250-MHz High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tnis paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  9. High-power MIXSEL: an integrated ultrafast semiconductor laser with 6.4 W average power.

    PubMed

    Rudin, B; Wittwer, V J; Maas, D J H C; Hoffmann, M; Sieber, O D; Barbarin, Y; Golling, M; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2010-12-20

    High-power ultrafast lasers are important for numerous industrial and scientific applications. Current multi-watt systems, however, are based on relatively complex laser concepts, for example using additional intracavity elements for pulse formation. Moving towards a higher level of integration would reduce complexity, packaging, and manufacturing cost, which are important requirements for mass production. Semiconductor lasers are well established for such applications, and optically-pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) are most promising for higher power applications, generating the highest power in fundamental transverse mode (>20 W) to date. Ultrashort pulses have been demonstrated using passive modelocking with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), achieving for example 2.1-W average power, sub-100-fs pulse duration, and 50-GHz pulse repetition rate. Previously the integration of both the gain and absorber elements into a single wafer was demonstrated with the MIXSEL (modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser) but with limited average output power (<200 mW). We have demonstrated the power scaling concept of the MIXSEL using optimized quantum dot saturable absorbers in an antiresonant structure design combined with an improved thermal management by wafer removal and mounting of the 8-µm thick MIXSEL structure directly onto a CVD-diamond heat spreader. The simple straight cavity with only two components has generated 28-ps pulses at 2.5-GHz repetition rate and an average output power of 6.4 W, which is higher than for any other modelocked semiconductor laser. PMID:21197032

  10. Ion-implanted high microwave power indium phosphide transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, Michael D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Encapsulated rapid thermal annealing (RTA) has been used in the fabrication of InP power MISFETs with ion-implanted source, drain, and active-channel regions. The MISFETs had a gate length of 1.4 microns. Six to ten gate fingers per device, with individual gate finger widths of 100 or 125 microns, were used to make MISFETs with total gate widths of 0.75, 0.8, or 1 mm. The source and drain contact regions and the channel region of the MISFETs were fabricated using Si implants in InP at energies from 60 to 360 keV with doses of (1-560) x 10 to the 12th/sq cm. The implants were activated using RTA at 700 C for 30 sec in N2 or H2 ambients using an Si3N4 encapsulant. The high-power high-efficiency MISFETs were characterized at 9.7 GHz, and the output microwave power density for the RTA conditions used was as high as 2.4 W/mm. For a 1-W input at 9.7 GHz gains up to 3.7 dB were observed, with an associated power-added efficiency of 29 percent and output power density 70 percent greater than that of GaAs MESFETs.

  11. Single foreplane high power rectenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, A.; Ohno, T.

    1992-05-01

    A dual polarization rectenna capable of high power handling is described. It consists of contiguous dipoles and rectification units on a single substrate. High efficiencies comparable to previous linear and multiplane dual polarization devices have been achieved.

  12. The faint source population at 15.7 GHz - III. A high-frequency study of HERGs and LERGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittam, I. H.; Riley, J. M.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    A complete sample of 96 faint (S > 0.5 mJy) radio galaxies is selected from the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7 GHz. Optical spectra are used to classify 17 of the sources as high-excitation or low-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs and LERGs, respectively), for the remaining sources three other methods are used; these are optical compactness, X-ray observations and mid-infrared colour-colour diagrams. 32 sources are HERGs and 35 are LERGs while the remaining 29 sources could not be classified. We find that the 10C HERGs tend to have higher 15.7-GHz flux densities, flatter spectra, smaller linear sizes and be found at higher redshifts than the LERGs. This suggests that the 10C HERGs are more core dominated than the LERGs. Lower-frequency radio images, linear sizes and spectral indices are used to classify the sources according to their radio morphology; 18 are Fanaroff and Riley type I or II sources, a further 13 show some extended emission, and the remaining 65 sources are compact and are referred to as FR0 sources. The FR0 sources are sub-divided into compact, steep-spectrum sources (13 sources) or gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources (10 sources) with the remaining 42 in an unclassified class. FR0 sources are more dominant in the subset of sources with 15.7-GHz flux densities <1 mJy, consistent with the previous result that the fainter 10C sources have flatter radio spectra. The properties of the 10C sources are compared to the higher-flux density Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey. The 10C sources are found at similar redshifts to the AT20G sources but have lower luminosities. The nature of the high-frequency selected objects changes as flux density decreases; at high flux densities the objects are primarily quasars, while at low flux densities radio galaxies dominate.

  13. FIRST SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA AT 43 GHz IN THE MULTIPOLE RANGE 25 {<=} l {<=} 475

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Smith, K. M.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Reeves, R.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R.; Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Zuntz, J. A.; Bronfman, L.; Church, S. E.; Dickinson, C.

    2011-11-10

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43 GHz and 94 GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, over 10,000 hr of data were collected, first with the 19 element 43 GHz array (3458 hr) and then with the 90 element 94 GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering Almost-Equal-To 1000 deg{sup 2}. This paper reports initial results from the 43 GHz receiver, which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69 {mu}K{radical}s. The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until the null tests passed. Cross-correlating maps with different telescope pointings is used to eliminate a bias. This paper reports the EE, BB, and EB power spectra in the multipole range l = 25-475. With the exception of the lowest multipole bin for one of the fields, where a polarized foreground, consistent with Galactic synchrotron radiation, is detected with 3{sigma} significance, the E-mode spectrum is consistent with the {Lambda}CDM model, confirming the only previous detection of the first acoustic peak. The B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero, leading to a measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.35{sup +1.06}{sub -0.87}. The combination of a new time-stream 'double-demodulation' technique, side-fed Dragonian optics, natural sky rotation, and frequent boresight rotation leads to the lowest level of systematic contamination in the B-mode power so far reported, below the level of r

  14. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  15. TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY

    DOEpatents

    Driver, G.E.

    1958-07-15

    High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

  16. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement. PMID:26724055

  17. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement.

  18. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-15

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an “inline” calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an “offline” calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a “cold test” on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the “inline” calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device’s power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the “offline” calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the “cold tests,” and the experiments show good agreement.

  19. Generation of high-power laser light with Gigahertz splitting.

    PubMed

    Unks, B E; Proite, N A; Yavuz, D D

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate the generation of two high-power laser beams whose frequencies are separated by the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in (87)Rb. The system uses a single master diode laser appropriately shifted by high frequency acousto-optic modulators and amplified by semiconductor tapered amplifiers. This produces two 1 W laser beams with a frequency spacing of 6.834 GHz and a relative frequency stability of 1 Hz. We discuss possible applications of this apparatus, including electromagnetically induced transparency-like effects and ultrafast qubit rotations. PMID:17764314

  20. High power test of a wideband diplexer with short-slotted metal half mirrors for electron cyclotron current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Saigusa, M.; Atsumi, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nagashima, K.; Oda, Y.; Fukunari, M.; Sakamoto, K.

    2014-02-12

    The wideband high power diplexer has been developed for combining and fast switching of high power millimeter waves generated by a dual frequency gyrotron. The actual diplexer was tested at the frequency band of 170 GHz in low power. After adjusting a resonant frequency of diplexer for the gyrotron frequency, the evacuated wideband diplexer with short-slotted metal half mirrors was tested at an incident power of about 150 kW, a pulse duration of 30 ms and a frequency band of 170.2–170.3 GHz. Any discharge damage was not observed in the diplexer.

  1. Radially combined 30 W, 14-16 GHz amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Sechi, F.; Bujatti, M.; Knudson, R.; Bugos, R.

    1994-04-01

    The paper describes a highly integrated 30 W power amplifier for a Synthetic Aperture Radar, operating in the 14--16 GHz band. The use of a waveguide radial combiner, a microstrip power divider and direct microstrip to waveguide miniaturized ceramic technology, leads to an unusually compact and accessible structure, well suited for commercial production.

  2. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  3. High average power pockels cell

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

  4. Development of a High Resolution Passive Microwave 3U Cubesat for High Resolution Temperature Sounding and Imaging at 118 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Sanders, B. T.; Gallaher, D. W.; Periasamy, L.; Alvarenga, G.; Weaver, R.; Scambos, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    PolarCube is a 3U CubeSat based on the CU ALL-STAR bus hosting an eight-channel passive microwave scanning spectrometer operating at the 118.7503 GHz (1-) O2 resonance. The anticipated launch date is in late 2015. It is being designed to operate for 12 months on orbit to provide global 118-GHz spectral imagery of the Earth over a full seasonal cycle. The mission will focus on the study of Arctic vertical temperature structure and its relation to sea ice coverage, but include the secondary goals of assessing the potential for convective cloud mass detection and cloud top altitude measurement and hurricane warm core sounding. The principles used by PolarCube for sounding and cloud measurement have been well established in number of peer-reviewed papers, although measurements using the 118 GHz oxygen line over the dry polar regions (unaffected by water vapor) have never been demonstrated from space. The PolarCube channels are selected to probe clear-air emission over vertical levels from the surface to the lower stratosphere. Operational spaceborne microwave soundings have available for decades but using lower frequencies (50-57 GHz) and from higher altitudes. While the JPSS ATMS sensor provides global coverage at ~32 km resolution PolarCube will improve on this resolution by a factor of two (~16 km), thus facilitating a key science goal of mapping sea ice concentration and extent while obtaining temperature profile data. Additionally, we seek to correlate freeze-thaw line data from the NASA SMAP mission with atmospheric temperature structure to help understand the relationship between clouds, temperature, and surface energy fluxes during seasonal transitions. PolarCube will also provide the first demonstration of a very low cost passive microwave sounder that if operated in a fleet configuration would have the potential to fulfill the goals of the Precipitation Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission, as defined in the NRC Decadal Survey.

  5. Citizens protest high power lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.

    1980-04-01

    Survey report:Following an extensive public hearing in New York State concerning the health effects and safety of high voltage power lines, negotiations to establish a research program on the biological effects of the power lines' 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields have been concluded. The aim will be to determine the potential health risks to people who live and work along high voltage rights-of-way. The $5,000,000 program will be designed and administered by three New York State agencies: the Public Service Commission, the Dept. of Health, and the Power Authority. (3 photos)

  6. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A 3.1-4.8 GHz transmitter with a high frequency divider in 0.18 μm CMOS for OFDM-UWB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renliang, Zheng; Junyan, Ren; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2009-12-01

    A fully integrated low power RF transmitter for a WiMedia 3.1-4.8 GHz multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing ultra-wideband system is presented. With a separate transconductance stage, the quadrature up-conversion modulator achieves high linearity with low supply voltage. The co-design of different resonant frequencies of the modulator and the differential to single (D2S) converter ensures in-band gain flatness. By means of a series inductor peaking technique, the D2S converter obtains 9 dB more gain without extra power consumption. A divided-by-2 divider is used for carrier signal generation. The measurement results show an output power between -10.7 and -3.1 dBm with 7.6 dB control range, an OIP3 up to 12 dBm, a sideband rejection of 35 dBc and a carrier rejection of 30 dBc. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in the Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process with an area of 1.74 mm2 and only consumes 32 mA current (at 1.8 V) including the test associated parts.

  7. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  8. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  9. Power combination of a self-coherent high power microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xiaolu Zhang, Xiaoping; Li, Yangmei; Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Jun

    2015-09-15

    In our previous work, generating two phase-locked high power microwaves (HPMs) in a single self-coherent HPM device has been demonstrated. In this paper, after optimizing the structure of the previous self-coherent source, we design a power combiner with a folded phase-adjustment waveguide to realize power combination between its two sub-sources. Further particle-in-cell simulation of the combined source shows that when the diode voltage is 687 kV and the axial magnetic field is 0.8 T, a combined output microwave with 3.59 GW and 9.72 GHz is generated. The impedance of the combined device is 36 Ω and the total power conversion efficiency is 28%.

  10. Present developments and status of electron sources for high power gyrotron tubes and free electron masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, M.

    1997-02-01

    Gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power mm-wave sources for start-up, electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for controlled thermonuclear fusion research. 140 GHz (110 GHz) gyrotrons with output power Pout = 0.55 MW (0.93 MW), pulse length τ = 3.0 s (2.0 s) and efficiency η = 40% (38%) are commercially available. Total efficiencies around 50% have been achieved using single-stage depressed collectors. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver Pout = 40 kW with τ = 40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz ( η≥4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in materials processing, for example sintering of high performance, structural and functional ceramics. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with f≥24 GHz, Pout = 10-100 kW, CW, η≥30%. This paper reports on recent achievements in the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotron oscillators for long pulse or CW operation. In addition a short overview of the present development status of gyrotrons for technological applications, gyroklystron amplifiers, gyro-TWT amplifiers, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs) and free electron masers (FEMs) is given. The most impressive FEM output parameters are: Pout = 2GW, τ = 20 ns, η = 13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and Pout = 15 kW, τ = 20 μs, η = 5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). In gyro-devices, magnetron injection guns (MIGs) operating in the temperature limited current regime have thus far been used most successfully. Diode guns as well as triode guns with a modulating anode are employed. Tests of a MIG operated under space-charge limited conditions have been not very successful. Electrostatic CW FEMs are driven by thermionic Pierce guns whereas pulsed high power devices employ many types of accelerators as drivers for example pulse-line accelerators, microtrons and induction or rf linacs, using field and photo emission cathodes.

  11. High resolution measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in galaxy clusters at 90 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Alexander H.

    The MUltiplexed SQUID/TES Array at Ninety GHz (MUSTANG) is a 64-pixel array of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers built at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in collaboration with a number of universities and government agencies such as NASA-GSFC, NRAO, and NIST. MUSTANG carried out observations between 2008 and 2013 and will soon be replaced by a new receiver (MUSTANG-1.5). MUSTANG-1.5 is a 223-pixel array of feedhorn-coupled polarimeters, which are read out with a novel microwave SQUID multiplexer. MUSTANG-1.5 offers many advantages over MUSTANG including more stable cryogenics, a larger field of view (5.5' compared to 42" for MUSTANG), and a significant improvement in sensitivity. These capabilities enable a far more comprehensive observing program. MUSTANG is aimed at measuring the distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectrum that arises due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE). The SZE is the inverse Compton-scattering of CMB photons as they pass through the dense plasma in clusters of galaxies. The SZE is a nearly redshift-independent, complementary probe of the ICM to X-ray emission and combined analyses of both data sets provide a better understanding of astrophysical phenomena such as shocks, cold fronts, and Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) outbursts. Understanding how substructure, especially in merging clusters, affects the scaling between SZE flux and total cluster mass is essential to placing tight constraints on cosmological parameters with SZE surveys. In this thesis, I present some of the last ever observations carried out by MUSTANG, which are centered on two massive galaxy clusters, MACS J0647.7+7015 and MACS J1206.2-0847. I discuss a model-fitting technique that has been used to quantitatively compare MUSTANG and lower resolution SZE data from Bolocam to study ICM pressure profiles. I report on the design, commissioning, and current status of MUSTANG-1.5 including the detectors

  12. Measurement of the dielectric properties of high-purity sapphire at 1.865 GHZ from 2-10 Kelvin

    SciTech Connect

    N. Pogue, P. McIntyre, Akhdiyor Sattarov, Charles Reece

    2012-06-01

    A dielectric test cavity was designed and tested to measure the microwave dielectric properties of ultrapure sapphire at cryogenic temperatures. Measurements were performed by placing a large cylindrical crystal of sapphire in a Nb superconducting cavity operating in the TE01 mode at 1.865 GHz. The dielectric constant, heat capacity, and loss tangent were all calculated using experimental data and RF modeling software. The motivation for these measurements was to determine if such a sapphire could be used as a dielectric lens to focus the magnetic field onto a sample wafer in a high field wafer test cavity. The measured properties have been used to finalize the design of the wafer test cavity.

  13. High Efficiency Power Combining of Ka-Band TWTs for High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Vaden, K. R.; Lesny, G. G.; Glass, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    Future NASA deep space exploration missions are expected in some cases to require telecommunication systems capable of operating at very high data rates (potentially 1 Gbps or more) for the transmission back to Earth of large volumes of scientific data, which means high frequency transmitters with large bandwidth. Among the Ka band frequencies of interest are the present 500 MHz Deep Space Network (DSN) band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz and a broader band at 37-38 GHz allocated for space science [1]. The large distances and use of practical antenna sizes dictate the need for high transmitter power of up to 1 kW or more. High electrical efficiency is also a requirement. The approach investigated by NASA GRC is a novel wave guide power combiner architecture based on a hybrid magic-T junction for combining the power output from multiple TWTs [1,2]. This architecture was successfully demonstrated and is capable of both high efficiency (90-95%, depending on frequency) and high data rate transmission (up to 622 Mbps) in a two-way power combiner circuit for two different pairs of Ka band TWTs at two different frequency bands. One pair of TWTs, tested over a frequency range of 29.1 to 29.6 GHz, consisted of two 110-115W TWTs previously used in uplink data transmission evaluation terminals in the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program [1,2]. The second pair was two 100W TWTs (Boeing 999H) designed for high efficiency operation (greater than 55%) over the DSN frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz [3]. The presentation will provide a qualitative description of the wave guide circuit, results for power combining and data transmission measurements, and results of computer modeling of the magic-T and alternative hybrid junctions for improvements in efficiency and power handling capability. The power combiner results presented here are relevant not only to NASA deep space exploration missions, but also to other U.S. Government agency programs.

  14. HIGH-TIME-RESOLUTION MEASUREMENTS OF THE POLARIZATION OF THE CRAB PULSAR AT 1.38 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Słowikowska, Agnieszka; Stappers, Benjamin W.; Harding, Alice K.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2015-01-20

    Using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we obtained high-time-resolution measurements of the full polarization of the Crab pulsar. At a resolution of 1/8192 of the 34 ms pulse period (i.e., 4.1 μs), the 1.38 GHz linear-polarization measurements are in general agreement with previous lower-time-resolution 1.4 GHz measurements of linear polarization in the main pulse (MP), in the interpulse (IP), and in the low-frequency component (LFC). We find the MP and IP to be linearly polarized at about 24% and 21% with no discernible difference in polarization position angle. However, contrary to theoretical expectations and measurements in the visible, we find no evidence for significant variation (sweep) in the polarization position angle over the MP, the IP, or the LFC. We discuss the implications, which appear to be in contradiction to theoretical expectations. We also detect weak circular polarization in the MP and IP, and strong (≈20%) circular polarization in the LFC, which also exhibits very strong (≈98%) linear polarization at a position angle of 40° from that of the MP or IP. The properties are consistent with the LFC, which is a low-altitude component, and the MP and IP, which are high-altitude caustic components. Current models for the MP and IP emission do not readily account for the absence of pronounced polarization changes across the pulse. We measure IP and LFC pulse phases relative to the MP consistent with recent measurements, which have shown that the phases of these pulse components are evolving with time.

  15. High-time-resolution Measurements of the Polarization of the Crab Pulsar at 1.38 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Agnieszka; Stappers, Benjamin W.; Harding, Alice K.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we obtained high-time-resolution measurements of the full polarization of the Crab pulsar. At a resolution of 1/8192 of the 34 ms pulse period (i.e., 4.1 μs), the 1.38 GHz linear-polarization measurements are in general agreement with previous lower-time-resolution 1.4 GHz measurements of linear polarization in the main pulse (MP), in the interpulse (IP), and in the low-frequency component (LFC). We find the MP and IP to be linearly polarized at about 24% and 21% with no discernible difference in polarization position angle. However, contrary to theoretical expectations and measurements in the visible, we find no evidence for significant variation (sweep) in the polarization position angle over the MP, the IP, or the LFC. We discuss the implications, which appear to be in contradiction to theoretical expectations. We also detect weak circular polarization in the MP and IP, and strong (≈20%) circular polarization in the LFC, which also exhibits very strong (≈98%) linear polarization at a position angle of 40° from that of the MP or IP. The properties are consistent with the LFC, which is a low-altitude component, and the MP and IP, which are high-altitude caustic components. Current models for the MP and IP emission do not readily account for the absence of pronounced polarization changes across the pulse. We measure IP and LFC pulse phases relative to the MP consistent with recent measurements, which have shown that the phases of these pulse components are evolving with time.

  16. Optical properties of high-frequency radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Bannister, Keith W.; Chhetri, Rajan; Hancock, Paul J.; Johnston, Helen M.; Massardi, Marcella; Murphy, Tara

    2011-11-01

    Our current understanding of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) comes predominantly from studies at frequencies of 5 GHz and below. With the recent completion of the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey, we can now gain insight into the high-frequency radio properties of AGN. This paper presents supplementary information on the AT20G sources in the form of optical counterparts and redshifts. Optical counterparts were identified using the SuperCOSMOS data base and redshifts were found from either the 6dF Galaxy Survey or the literature. We also report 144 new redshifts. For AT20G sources outside the Galactic plane, 78.5 per cent have optical identifications and 30.9 per cent have redshift information. The optical identification rate also increases with increasing flux density. Targets which had optical spectra available were examined to obtain a spectral classification. There appear to be two distinct AT20G populations; the high luminosity quasars that are generally associated with point-source optical counterparts and exhibit strong emission lines in the optical spectrum, and the lower luminosity radio galaxies that are generally associated with passive galaxies in both the optical images and spectroscopic properties. It is suggested that these different populations can be associated with different accretion modes (cold-mode or hot-mode). We find that the cold-mode sources have a steeper spectral index and produce more luminous radio lobes, but generally reside in smaller host galaxies than their hot-mode counterparts. This can be attributed to the fact that they are accreting material more efficiently. Lastly, we compare the AT20G survey with the S-cubed semi-empirical (S3-SEX) models and conclude that the S3-SEX models need refining to correctly model the compact cores of AGN. The AT20G survey provides the ideal sample to do this.

  17. Atmospheric propagation and combining of high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W; Sprangle, P; Davis, C C

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze beam combining and atmospheric propagation of high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications. The large linewidths inherent in high-power fiber and slab lasers cause random phase and intensity fluctuations that occur on subnanosecond time scales. Coherently combining these high-power lasers would involve instruments capable of precise phase control and operation at rates greater than ∼10  GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this technology does not currently exist. This presents a challenging problem when attempting to phase lock high-power lasers that is not encountered when phase locking low-power lasers, for example, at milliwatt power levels. Regardless, we demonstrate that even if instruments are developed that can precisely control the phase of high-power lasers, coherent combining is problematic for DE applications. The dephasing effects of atmospheric turbulence typically encountered in DE applications will degrade the coherent properties of the beam before it reaches the target. Through simulations, we find that coherent beam combining in moderate turbulence and over multikilometer propagation distances has little advantage over incoherent combining. Additionally, in cases of strong turbulence and multikilometer propagation ranges, we find nearly indistinguishable intensity profiles and virtually no difference in the energy on the target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams. Consequently, we find that coherent beam combining at the transmitter plane is ineffective under typical atmospheric conditions.

  18. Atmospheric propagation and combining of high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W; Sprangle, P; Davis, C C

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze beam combining and atmospheric propagation of high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications. The large linewidths inherent in high-power fiber and slab lasers cause random phase and intensity fluctuations that occur on subnanosecond time scales. Coherently combining these high-power lasers would involve instruments capable of precise phase control and operation at rates greater than ∼10  GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this technology does not currently exist. This presents a challenging problem when attempting to phase lock high-power lasers that is not encountered when phase locking low-power lasers, for example, at milliwatt power levels. Regardless, we demonstrate that even if instruments are developed that can precisely control the phase of high-power lasers, coherent combining is problematic for DE applications. The dephasing effects of atmospheric turbulence typically encountered in DE applications will degrade the coherent properties of the beam before it reaches the target. Through simulations, we find that coherent beam combining in moderate turbulence and over multikilometer propagation distances has little advantage over incoherent combining. Additionally, in cases of strong turbulence and multikilometer propagation ranges, we find nearly indistinguishable intensity profiles and virtually no difference in the energy on the target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams. Consequently, we find that coherent beam combining at the transmitter plane is ineffective under typical atmospheric conditions. PMID:26974640

  19. Submillimeter sources for radiometry using high power Indium Phosphide Gunn diode oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Naresh C.

    1990-01-01

    A study aimed at developing high frequency millimeter wave and submillimeter wave local oscillator sources in the 60-600 GHz range was conducted. Sources involved both fundamental and harmonic-extraction type Indium Phosphide Gunn diode oscillators as well as varactor multipliers. In particular, a high power balanced-doubler using varactor diodes was developed for 166 GHz. It is capable of handling 100 mW input power, and typically produced 25 mW output power. A high frequency tripler operating at 500 GHz output frequency was also developed and cascaded with the balanced-doubler. A dual-diode InP Gunn diode combiner was used to pump this cascaded multiplier to produce on the order of 0.5 mW at 500 GHz. In addition, considerable development and characterization work on InP Gunn diode oscillators was carried out. Design data and operating characteristics were documented for a very wide range of oscillators. The reliability of InP devices was examined, and packaging techniques to enhance the performance were analyzed. A theoretical study of a new class of high power multipliers was conducted for future applications. The sources developed here find many commercial applications for radio astronomy and remote sensing.

  20. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of soft magnetic Nd2Co17 micron flakes fractured along c crystal plane with natural resonance frequency exceeding 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbo; Wang, Peng; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Planar anisotropy Nd2Co17 flakes fractured along c crystal plane were fabricated by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling technique. The magnetic flakes have a diameter range of 5-20 μm and a typical thickness of approximately 120 nm. The frequency dependence of complex permeability of Nd2Co17 epoxy resin composite has been investigated in the frequency range of 0.1-18 GHz. The measurement results show that the natural resonance frequency reaches 12.5 GHz while the initial permeability survives up to 2.26. The superior high frequency properties come from the large out-of-plane anisotropy field and the flake structure fractured along the c crystal plane of Nd2Co17. The planar anisotropic Nd2Co17 flakes have significant potential applications in the high-frequency devices working in the frequency beyond 10 GHz.

  1. Integrated 1.55 µm photomixer local oscillator sources for heterodyne receivers from 70 GHz to beyond 250 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggard, Peter G.; Azcona, Luis; Laisné, Alexandre; Ellison, Brian N.; Shen, Pengbo; Gomes, Nathan J.; Davies, Phil A.

    2004-10-01

    Photomixing is a flexible and efficient method of providing both local oscillator signals for heterodyne receivers and high frequency phase reference signals. Ultrafast, 70 GHz bandwidth, λ = 1.55 µm, photodiodes from u2t Photonics AG have been incorporated into three designs of mm-wave waveguide mounts. The photomixers utilise a thin freestanding gold foil, or a gold on dielectric, probe to couple power into the waveguide and to deliver the photodiode bias. The frequency coverage of the designs is from 70 GHz to 300 GHz. A method of rapidly characterizing the frequency response of these photomixers using spontaneous-spontaneous beating of light from an EDFA is described. Recent work has been directed at increasing the degree of integration of the photodiode with the waveguide probe and choke filter to reduce the frequency dependence of the output power. A simplified photomixer block manufacturing process has also been introduced. A combined probe and filter structure, impedance matched to both the coplanar output line on the photodiode chip and to 0.4 height milled waveguide, is presented. This matching is achieved over the W-band with a fixed waveguide backshort. We present modelled and experimental results showing the increased efficiency and smoother tuning. The design and frequency response of such a probe is reported. We also present the performance of a simpler mount, operating in the frequency range from 160 GHz to 300 GHz, which generates powers of around 10 µW up to 250 GHz.

  2. Integrated high power VCSEL systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Conrads, Ralf; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gu, Xi; Miller, Michael; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Pruijmboom, Armand; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    High power VCSEL systems are a novel laser source used for thermal treatment in industrial manufacturing. These systems will be applied in many applications, which have not used a laser source before. This is enabled by the unique combination of efficiency, compactness and robustness. High power VCSEL system technology encompasses elements far beyond the VCSEL chip itself: i.e. heat sinks, bonding technology and integrated optics. This paper discusses the optimization of these components and processes specifically for building high-power laser systems with VCSEL arrays. New approaches help to eliminate components and process steps and make the system more robust and easier to manufacture. New cooler concepts with integrated electrical and mechanical interfaces have been investigated and offer advantages for high power system design. The bonding process of chips on sub-mounts and coolers has been studied extensively and for a variety of solder materials. High quality of the interfaces as well as good reliability under normal operation and thermal cycling have been realized. A viable alternative to soldering is silver sintering. The very positive results which have been achieved with a variety of technologies indicate the robustness of the VCSEL chips and their suitability for high power systems. Beam shaping micro-optics can be integrated on the VCSEL chip in a wafer scale process by replication of lenses in a polymer layer. The performance of VCSEL arrays with integrated collimation lenses has been positively evaluated and the integrated chips are fully compatible with all further assembly steps. The integrated high power systems make the application even easier and more robust. New examples in laser material processing and pumping of solid state lasers are presented.

  3. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  4. High-Average Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Power, John G.; /Argonne

    2012-09-05

    There has been significant progress in the development of high-power facilities in recent years yet major challenges remain. The task of WG4 was to identify which facilities were capable of addressing the outstanding R&D issues presently preventing high-power operation. To this end, information from each of the facilities represented at the workshop was tabulated and the results are presented herein. A brief description of the major challenges is given, but the detailed elaboration can be found in the other three working group summaries.

  5. High-Power Ka-Band Window and Resonant Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2006-11-29

    A stand-alone 200 MW rf test station is needed for carrying out development of accelerator structures and components for a future high-gradient multi-TeV collider, such as CLIC. A high-power rf window is needed to isolate the test station from a structure element under test. This project aimed to develop such a window for use at a frequency in the range 30-35 GHz, and to also develop a high-power resonant ring for testing the window. During Phase I, successful conceptual designs were completed for the window and the resonant ring, and cold tests of each were carried out that confirmed the designs.

  6. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  7. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  8. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  9. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  10. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  11. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  12. High power microwave simulator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James

    1987-12-01

    Emerging applications for high power microwaves in defense necessitate the development of reliable GW level sources for simulation of effects. For broadband variable frequency survey work, the vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) was developed; this is a tunable RF source operating from the upper X band to below the L band range. For narrowband fixed frequency studies, a special magnetron was developed.

  13. High voltage power transistor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Design considerations, fabrication procedures, and methods of evaluation for high-voltage power-transistor development are discussed. Technique improvements such as controlling the electric field at the surface and perserving lifetimes in the collector region which have advanced the state of the art in high-voltage transistors are discussed. These improvements can be applied directly to the development of 1200 volt, 200 ampere transistors.

  14. 25 GHz embedded-gate graphene transistors with high-k dielectrics on extremely flexible plastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongho; Ha, Tae-Jun; Li, Huifeng; Parrish, Kristen N; Holt, Milo; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Ruoff, Rodney S; Akinwande, Deji

    2013-09-24

    Despite the widespread interest in graphene electronics over the past decade, high-performance graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) on flexible substrates have been rarely achieved, even though this atomic sheet is widely understood to have greater prospects for flexible electronic systems. In this article, we report detailed studies on the electrical and mechanical properties of vapor synthesized high-quality monolayer graphene integrated onto flexible polyimide substrates. Flexible graphene transistors with high-k dielectric afforded intrinsic gain, maximum carrier mobilities of 3900 cm(2)/V·s, and importantly, 25 GHz cutoff frequency, which is more than a factor of 2.5 times higher than prior results. Mechanical studies reveal robust transistor performance under repeated bending, down to 0.7 mm bending radius, whose tensile strain is a factor of 2-5 times higher than in prior studies. In addition, integration of functional coatings such as highly hydrophobic fluoropolymers combined with the self-passivation properties of the polyimide substrate provides water-resistant protection without compromising flexibility, which is an important advancement for the realization of future robust flexible systems based on graphene.

  15. The mechanical design of a high-power, dual frequency, millimeter-wave antenna feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, N.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and fabrication of a high power, dual-frequency, millimeter-wave feed system. The feed system consists of a 35 GHz circularly polarized monopulse subsystem and a 95 GHz circularly polarized feed. The 35 GHz feed is designed to handle 5.0 kW average and 50 kW peak power and the 95 GHz 1.2 kW average and 12 kW peak power. A Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) is incorporated to provide dual frequency capability. Each feed is liquid cooled to provide suitable cooling during high power operation. The two feeds and FSS assembly are mounted in a supporting space frame to provide an optically integral assembly ready to be mounted at the vertex of a reflector. The paper addresses three main areas: the general feed design, which includes the manufacturing processes, flange considerations and waveguide cooling; the FSS fabrication; and beam alignment for both the primary and secondary field.

  16. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude δ f of frequency. The amplitude δ f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage Δ V a. At the Δ V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude δ f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  17. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  18. All-metal metamaterial slow-wave structure for high-power sources with high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanshuai; Duan, Zhaoyun Tang, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhanliang; Zhang, Yabin; Gong, Yubin; Feng, Jinjun

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we have proposed a metamaterial (MTM) which is suitable for the compact high-power vacuum electron devices. For example, an S-band slow-wave structure (SWS) based on the all-metal MTMs has been studied by both simulation and experiment. The results show that this MTM SWS is very helpful to miniaturize the high-power vacuum electron devices and largely improve the output power and the electronic efficiency. The simulation model of an S-band MTM backward wave oscillator (BWO) is built, and the particle-in-cell simulated results are presented here: a 2.454 GHz signal is generated and its peak output power is 4.0 MW with a higher electronic efficiency of 31.5% relative to the conventional BWOs.

  19. Hybrid high power femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing demand for ultrafast laser systems with high average power and repetition rate. We present two hybrid master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architectures employing variety of available technologies to achieve 100 W average power femtosecond pulses. We achieved 120 W 820 fs pulses using solid-state oscillator and fiber amplifiers and chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique (10 μJ pulse energy at 10 MHz and 100 μJ at 400 kHz). In the second experiment, we achieved 160 W 800 fs pulses in a compact system without the standard CPA using solidstate oscillator and single crystal fiber amplifiers. As currently every component experiences some limitations, it is a challenge to choose the optimal architecture with associated components to achieve a desired combination of laser output parameters.

  20. Time-reversal duality of high-efficiency RF power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reveyrand, T; Ramos, I; Popovic, Z

    2012-12-06

    The similarity between RF power amplifiers and rectifiers is discussed. It is shown that the same high-efficiency harmonically-terminated power amplifier can be operated in a dual rectifier mode. Nonlinear simulations with a GaN HEMT transistor model show the time-reversal intrinsic voltage and current waveform relationship between a class-F amplifier and rectifier. Measurements on a class-F-1 amplifier and rectifier at 2.14 GHz demonstrate over 80% efficiency in both cases.

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION VERY LARGE ARRAY IMAGING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY STRIPE 82 AT 1.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, J. A.; Becker, R. H.; Zeimann, G. R.; White, R. L.; Richards, G. T.

    2011-07-15

    We present a high-resolution radio survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Southern Equatorial Stripe, a.k.a. Stripe 82. This 1.4 GHz survey was conducted with the Very Large Array primarily in the A-configuration, with supplemental B-configuration data to increase sensitivity to extended structure. The survey has an angular resolution of 1.''8 and achieves a median rms noise of 52 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} over 92 deg{sup 2}. This is the deepest 1.4 GHz survey to achieve this large of an area, filling a gap in the phase space between small, deep and large, shallow surveys. It also serves as a pilot project for a larger high-resolution survey with the Expanded Very Large Array. We discuss the technical design of the survey and details of the observations, and we outline our method for data reduction. We present a catalog of 17,969 isolated radio components, for an overall source density of {approx}195 sources deg{sup -2}. The astrometric accuracy of the data is excellent, with an internal check utilizing multiply observed sources yielding an rms scatter of 0.''19 in both right ascension and declination. A comparison to the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog further confirms that the astrometry is well tied to the optical reference frame, with mean offsets of 0.''02 {+-} 0.''01 in right ascension, and 0.''01 {+-} 0.''02 in declination. A check of our photometry reveals a small, negative CLEAN-like bias on the level of 35 {mu}Jy. We report on the catalog completeness, finding that 97% of FIRST-detected quasars are recovered in the new Stripe 82 radio catalog, while faint, extended sources are more likely to be resolved out by the resolution bias. We conclude with a discussion of the optical counterparts to the catalog sources, including 76 newly detected radio quasars. The full catalog as well as a search page and cutout server are available online at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/stripe82cutout.

  2. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  3. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  4. Analysis of High Order Modes in 1.3 GHZ CW SRF Electron Linac for a Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Vostrikov, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2013-01-01

    Design of a Light Source (LS) based on the continuous wave superconducting RF (CW SRF) electron linac is currently underway. This facility will provide soft coherent X-ray radiation for a braod spectrum of basic research applications. Quality of the X-ray laser radiation is affected by the electron beam parameters such as the stability of the transverse beam position and longitudinal and transverse beam emittances. High order modes (HOMs) excited in the SRF structures by a passing beam may deteriorate the beam quality and affect the beam stability. Deposition of HOM energy in the walls of SRF cavities adds to the heat load of he cryogenic system and leads to the increased cost of building and operation of the linac. In this paper we evaluate effects of HOMs in an LS CW SRF linac based on Tesla-type 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities. We analyze non-coherent losses and resonance excitation of HOMs. We estimate heat load due to the very high frequency HOMs. We study influence of the HOMs on the transverse beam dynamics.

  5. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully. PMID:20192353

  6. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  7. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  8. Automated Microwave Complex on the Basis of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz and an Output Power of 1 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Morozkin, M. V.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Lubyako, L. V.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zapevalov, V. E.; V. Kholoptsev, V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Sedov, A. S.; Malygin, V. I.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Sokolov, E. V.; Denisov, G. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study experimentally the automated microwave complex for microwave spectroscopy and diagnostics of various media, which was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with GYCOM Ltd. on the basis of a gyrotron with a frequency of 263 GHz and operated at the first gyrofrequency harmonic. In the process of the experiments, a controllable output power of 0 .1 -1 kW was achieved with an efficiency of up to 17 % in the continuous-wave generation regime. The measured radiation spectrum with a relative width of about 10 -6 and the frequency values measured at various parameters of the device are presented. The results of measuring the parameters of the wave beam, which was formed by a built-in quasioptical converter, as well as the data obtained by measuring the heat loss in the cavity and the vacuum output window are analyzed.

  9. 30/20-GHz earth station components for satellite digital communication service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeo; Yamada, Yoshihide; Kawashima, Fujio

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes the design method, configurations and performance of two recently developed components for satellite digital communications application. The 30-GHz band high-power transmitters featuring a 300-watt output power are of two types: a small-size klystron tube unit and wide-bandwidth traveling wave tube unit. The 30/20-GHz band earth station antennas are a small size, lightweight axisymmetrical Gregorian and an offset Cassegrain having good wide angle directivity.

  10. Record-high and robust 17.125 Gb/s gross-rate over 25 km SSMF transmissions of real-time dual-band optical OFDM signals directly modulated by 1 GHz RSOAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q W; Hugues-Salas, E; Ling, Y; Zhang, H B; Giddings, R P; Zhang, J J; Wang, M; Tang, J M

    2014-03-24

    Aggregated 17.125 Gb/s real-time end-to-end dual-band optical OFDM (OOFDM) transmissions over 25 km SSMF IMDD systems with 7 dB receiver sensitivity improvements are experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, by utilizing low-cost transceiver components such as directly modulated 1GHz RSOAs and DACs/ADCs operating at sampling speeds as low as 4GS/s. The demonstrated OOFDM transceivers have both strong adaptability and sufficiently large passband carrier frequency tunability, which enable full use of highly dynamic spectral characteristics of the transmission systems. This results in the achievements of not only excellent performance robustness to variations in system operating conditions but also significantly relaxed requirements on RSOA small-signal modulation bandwidth. It is shown that the aforementioned transmission capacity only varies by <23% over a RSOA-injected optical power variation range as large as 20dB, and that the 1 GHz RSOAs can support successful transmissions of adaptively modulated OOFDM signals having bandwidths of 8.5 GHz. By taking into account the adopted 25% cyclic prefix and a typical 7.3% FEC overhead, the demonstrated real-time OOFDM transmission systems are capable of conveying 11.6 Gb/s user data. PMID:24663982

  11. A High Resolution, Unobscured View of the Active Regions in (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies from a VLA 33 GHz Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos-Muñoz, Loreto; Leroy, Adam K.; Evans, Aaron S.; Armus, Lee; Condon, James J.; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Murphy, Eric J.; Ott, Juergen; Privon, George C.; Reichardt, Ashley; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Sanders, David B.; Schinnerer, Eva; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason A.; Thompson, Todd A.; Walter, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    I will present a new survey of 33 GHz radio continuum emission from local U/LIRGs carried out using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This is the first such survey and it combines high resolution, good sensitivity, and multi-configuration observations that should have sensitivity to emission on all spatial scales. (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies host some of the most extreme star-forming environments in the local universe, with large reservoirs of molecular gas and dust concentrated in the central few kpc. Our VLA observations allow us to see through the dust in these systems and to resolve the sizes of their active regions, which is essential to understand the surface and volume densities of star formation and gas in these extreme systems. I will present the best size measurements to date of the active regions for our 22 targets. I will show what these sizes imply about gas volume and surface density and infrared luminosity surface densities. I will also lay out the physical implications of these values for the strength of star formation and feedback (especially radiative feedback) in extreme environments.

  12. A High Resolution, Unobscured View of the Active Regions in (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies from a VLA 33 GHz Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Leroy, A.; Evans, A.; et al.

    2016-06-01

    I will present a new survey of 33 GHz radio continuum emission from local U/LIRGs carried out using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This is the first such survey and it combines high resolution, good sensitivity, and multi-configuration observations that should have sensitivity to emission on all spatial scales. (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies host some of the most extreme star-forming environments in the local universe, with large reservoirs of molecular gas and dust concentrated in the central few kpc. Our VLA observations allow us to see through the dust in these systems to resolve the sizes of their active regions, which is essential to understand the surface and volume densities of star formation and gas in these extreme systems. I will present the best size measurements to date of the active regions for our 22 targets. I will show what these sizes imply about gas volume and surface density and infrared luminosity surface densities. I will also lay out the physical implications of these values for the strength of star formation and feedback (especially radiative feedback) in extreme environments.

  13. High-power millimeter-wave rotary joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Yu, B. R.

    2009-03-01

    The rotary joint is a useful microwave component that connects a fixed part to a rotatable part. This study systematically analyzes the effect of the discontinuity on the interface of a rotary joint for several waveguide modes. Simulation results indicate that the transmission of the TE01 mode is independent of the geometry of the joint, and thus is ideal for such application. A rotary joint consisting of two identical TE01 mode converters, clasped each other by a bearing, is designed, fabricated, and tested. Back-to-back transmission measurements exhibit an excellent agreement to the results of computer simulations. The measured optimum transmission is 97% with a 3 dB bandwidth of 8.5 GHz, centered at 35.0 GHz. The cold measurement shows that the results are independent of the angle of rotation. In addition, a high-power experiment is conducted. The just developed rotary joint can operate up to a peak input power of 210 W with a duty of 18%. The working principle, although demonstrated in the millimeter-wave region, can be applied up to the terahertz region where the joint gap is generally critical except for the operating TE01 mode.

  14. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  15. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  16. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  17. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  18. A novel slotted helix slow-wave structure for high power Ka-band traveling-wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu-Wei; Wei, Yan-Yu; Wang, Shao-Meng; Hou, Yan; Yin, Hai-Rong; Zhao, Guo-Qing; Duan, Zhao-Yun; Xu, Jin; Gong, Yu-Bin; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2013-10-01

    A novel slotted helix slow-wave structure (SWS) is proposed to develop a high power, wide-bandwidth, and high reliability millimeter-wave traveling-wave tube (TWT). This novel structure, which has higher heat capacity than a conventional helix SWS, evolves from conventional helix SWS with three parallel rows of rectangular slots made in the outside of the helix tape. In this paper, the electromagnetic characteristics and the beam-wave interaction of this novel structure operating in the Ka-band are investigated. From our calculations, when the designed beam voltage and beam current are set to be 18.45 kV and 0.2 A, respectively, this novel circuit can produce over 700-W average output power in a frequency range from 27.5 GHz to 32.5 GHz, and the corresponding conversion efficiency values vary from 19% to 21.3%, and the maximum output power is 787 W at 30 GHz.

  19. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, T.F.

    1989-12-19

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

  20. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively.

  1. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  2. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  3. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  4. High average power solid state laser power conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkraus, R.F.

    1987-03-03

    The power conditioning system for the High Average Power Laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. The system has been operational for two years. It is high voltage, high power, fault protected, and solid state. The power conditioning system drives flashlamps that pump solid state lasers. Flashlamps are driven by silicon control rectifier (SCR) switched, resonant charged, (LC) discharge pulse forming networks (PFNs). The system uses fiber optics for control and diagnostics. Energy and thermal diagnostics are monitored by computers.

  5. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  6. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  7. Improved Programmable High-Voltage Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castell, Karen; Rutberg, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Improved dc-to-dc converter functions as programmable high-voltage power supply with low-power-dissipation voltage regulator on high-voltage side. Design of power supply overcomes deficiencies of older designs. Voltage regulation with low power dissipation provided on high-voltage side.

  8. 230 GHz VLBI Observations of M87: Event-horizon-scale Structure during an Enhanced Very-high-energy γ-Ray State in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kazunori; Lu, Ru-Sen; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Broderick, Avery E.; Dexter, Jason; Hada, Kazuhiro; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Johnson, Michael D.; Algaba, Juan C.; Asada, Keiichi; Brinkerink, Christiaan; Blundell, Ray; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cappallo, Roger; Crew, Geoffrey B.; Dexter, Matt; Dzib, Sergio A.; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Gurwell, Mark; Ho, Paul T. P.; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Loinard, Laurent; MacMahon, David; Marrone, Daniel P.; Moran, James M.; Nakamura, Masanori; Nagar, Neil M.; Ortiz-Leon, Gisela; Plambeck, Richard; Pradel, Nicolas; Primiani, Rurik A.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Roy, Alan L.; SooHoo, Jason; Tavares, Jonathan-León; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Titus, Michael; Wagner, Jan; Weintroub, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Paul; Young, Ken H.; Zensus, Anton; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2015-07-01

    We report on 230 GHz (1.3 mm) very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope using antennas on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Mt. Graham in Arizona, and Cedar Flat in California. For the first time, we have acquired 230 GHz VLBI interferometric phase information on M87 through measurement of the closure phase on the triangle of long baselines. Most of the measured closure phases are consistent with 0° as expected by physically motivated models for 230 GHz structure such as jet models and accretion disk models. The brightness temperature of the event-horizon-scale structure is ˜ 1× {10}10 K derived from the compact flux density of ˜1 Jy and the angular size of ˜40 μ {as} ˜ 5.5 {R}{{s}}, which is broadly consistent with the peak brightness of the radio cores at 1-86 GHz located within ˜ {10}2 {R}{{s}}. Our observations occurred in the middle of an enhancement in very-high-energy (VHE) γ -ray flux, presumably originating in the vicinity of the central black hole. Our measurements, combined with results of multi-wavelength observations, favor a scenario in which the VHE region has an extended size of ˜20-60 {R}{{s}}.

  9. The Construction and Preliminary High Power Test Results of an X-Band RF Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. H.; Lau, W. K.; Yang, T. T.; Hwang, J. Y.; Liu, Y. C.; Le Sage, G. P.; Hartemann, F. V.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The collaboration between UC Davis and SRRC for developing a high brightness, high repetition rate, multibunch photoinjector has reached the high power rf processing stage. The X-band (8.548 GHz) photocathode rf gun consists of a 1-1/2 cell, side wall coupled, standing wave cavity, driven by a 20 MW SLAC Klystron, and a GHz repetition rate laser system. A solenoid is installed at the exit of the rf gun for focusing the diverging electron beam. A train of one hundred, 0.1 - 1 nC electron bunches will be accelerated to an energy in the range of 5 MeV. The construction of the gun structure and the solenoid will be described, and the preliminary high power rf conditioning results will be presented.

  10. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  11. 80-GHz MMIC HEMT Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi

    2003-01-01

    A voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) that operates in the frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz has been constructed in the form of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). This circuit is a prototype of electronically tunable signal sources in the 75-to-110-GHz range, needed for communication, imaging, and automotive radar applications, among others. This oscillator (see Figure 1) includes two AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMTs. One HEMT serves mainly as an oscillator gain element. The other HEMT serves mainly as a varactor for controlling the frequency: the frequency-control element is its gate-to-source capacitance, which is varied by changing its gate supply voltage. The gain HEMT is biased for class-A operation (meaning that current is conducted throughout the oscillation cycle). Grounded coplanar waveguides are used as impedance-matching transmission lines, the input and output matching being chosen to sustain oscillation and maximize output power. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. A high density of vias is necessary for suppressing a parallel-plate electromagnetic mode that is undesired because it can propagate energy into the MMIC substrate. Previous attempts at constructing HEMT-based oscillators yielded circuits with relatively low levels of output power and narrow tuning ranges. For example, one HEMT VCO reported in the literature had an output power of 7 dBm (.5 mW) and a tuning range 2-GHz wide centered approximately at a nominal frequency of 77 GHz. In contrast, as shown in Figure 2, the present MMIC HEMT VCO puts out a power of 12.5 dBm (.18 mW) or more over the 6-GHz-wide frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz

  12. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A Measurement of the 600 less than l less than 8000 Cosmic Microwave Background Power Spectrum at 148 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. W.; Acquaviva, V.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, P.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Barrientos, L. F.; Bassistelli, E. S.; Bond, J. R.; Brown, B.; Burger, B.; Chervenak, J.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Dunkley, J.; Duenner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fisher, R. P.; Hajian, A.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Moseley, H.; Wollack, Ed

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation observed at 148 GHz. The measurement uses maps with 1.4' angular resolution made with data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The observations cover 228 deg(sup 2) of the southern sky, in a 4 deg. 2-wide strip centered on declination 53 deg. South. The CMB at arc minute angular scales is particularly sensitive to the Silk damping scale, to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from galaxy dusters, and to emission by radio sources and dusty galaxies. After masking the 108 brightest point sources in our maps, we estimate the power spectrum between 600 less than l less than 8000 using the adaptive multi-taper method to minimize spectral leakage and maximize use of the full data set. Our absolute calibration is based on observations of Uranus. To verify the calibration and test the fidelity of our map at large angular scales, we cross-correlate the ACT map to the WMAP map and recover the WMAP power spectrum from 250 less than l less than 1150. The power beyond the Silk damping tail of the CMB (l approximately 5000) is consistent with models of the emission from point sources. We quantify the contribution of SZ clusters to the power spectrum by fitting to a model normalized to sigma 8 = 0.8. We constrain the model's amplitude A(sub sz) less than 1.63 (95% CL). If interpreted as a measurement of as, this implies sigma (sup SZ) (sub 8) less than 0.86 (95% CL) given our SZ model. A fit of ACT and WMAP five-year data jointly to a 6-parameter ACDM model plus point sources and the SZ effect is consistent with these results.

  13. High Power Intermodulation Measurements up to 30 W of High Temperature Superconducting Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilker, Charles; Carter, Charles F., III; Shen, Zhi-Yuan

    1999-01-01

    We have demonstrated a high power intermodulation measurement set-up capable of delivering 30 W in each of two fundamental tones. For closely spaced frequencies (less than 35 MHz), the dynamic range of the measurement is limited by the nonlinear performance of the mixer in the front end of the HP71210C spectrum analyzer. A tunable TE(sub 011) mode copper cavity was fabricated in which one of the endwalls could be adjusted shifting its resonant frequency between 5.7 and 6.6 GHz. Since the Q-value of this cavity is high, greater than 10(exp 4), and its bandwidth is small, less than 1 MHz, it can be used to attenuate the two fundamental tones relative to one of the harmonic tones, which greatly enhances the dynamic range of the measurement. This set-up can be used to measure the two-tone intermodulation distortion of any passive microwave device, e.g. a HTS filter, a connector, a cable, etc., over a frequency range of 5.9 to 6.4 GHz and a power range of 0.1 to 30 W. The third order intercept (TOI) of a prototype HTS filter measured at powers up to 30 W was +81.3 dBm.

  14. Highly efficient welding power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thommes, J. M.

    1980-09-01

    The results and findings of an energy efficient welding power development project are presented. The power source developed is to be used for electric arc welding processes in which 3.5 trillion Btu of energy can be saved annually. The power source developed incorporates the use of switch mode power supply techniques in order to convert industrial supply mains to appropriate welding voltages and currents. A series capacitor switch mode power circuit was the circuit technique chosen in order to optimize energy efficiency, costs, reliability, size/weight, and welding performance. Test results demonstrated an effective efficiency (taking into account idle power consumption) of 80 to 91 percent for the energy efficient power source while the conventional types of power sources tested ranged from 41 to 74 percent efficiency. Line power factor was also improved for the energy efficient power source. Field tests indicated additional refinements of weld process performance and power source audible noise emission reduction could be beneficial.

  15. MOCVD growth of group III nitrides for high power, high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Forte Poisson, M.-A.; Magis, M.; Tordjman, M.; Sarazin, N.; di Persio, J.

    2005-02-01

    This paper reports on the LP-MOCVD growth optimisation of bulk GaN, GaAlN materials and GaAlN/GaN heterostructures grown on Sapphire and Silicon Carbide substrates for MESFET and HEMT applications, and on the device performances obtained with these structures. High purity and high resistivity GaN grown on sapphire and Silicon Carbide has been obtained. GaN/Al2O3 MESFETs based on such high purity GaN buffer layers, have exhibited very promising static and microwave performances: high beakdown voltage 200 V, ft = 12 GHz, fmax = 25 GHz and CW output power in excess of 2.2 W/mm at 2 GHz.. They have shown the best low frequency noise performances, with the lowest Hooge's parameter as compared to previous values reported in the literature for different GaN-based FETs (HFETs and HEMTs). The main mechanisms involved in the growth of GaAlN/GaN alloys have been studied and their impact on the physical properties of these materials determined. A parasitic reaction was clearly identified to occur in the gas phase between TMA and NH3, with a strong influence on the growth rate and the aluminium incorporation. The SiC substrate surface preparation (both ex-situ and in-situ) and the nucleation layer growth conditions (growth temperature, thickness, composition and strain) have been found to be key steps of the GaAlN/GaN/SiC growth process. Static characteristics of the devices such as maximum drain current Idss or pinch-off voltage have been correlated with the nucleation layer composition of the HEMT structure and the defect density of the SiC substrate. The devices performances related to our first GaAlN/GaN HEMT structures grown on Sapphire and Silicon Carbide have confirmed the high potentiality of GaN and related alloys for high power microwave transistors. Load-Pull measurements performed at 2 GHz on devices related to GaAlN/GaN/Al2O3 HEMT structures, have shown a remarkably high output power density (4.4 W/mm) and absolute power level (3.2 W

  16. Observations of Regular Filamentary Plasma Arrays in High-Pressure Gas Breakdown by 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru

    2008-11-01

    Formation of regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays has been observed in long open-shuttered images of air breakdown at atmospheric pressure [Y. Hidaka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035003 (2008)]. The breakdown was generated by a focused linearly-polarized Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron with a 3-microsecond pulse length. Each plasma filament is elongated in the electric field direction and separated roughly one-quarter wavelength from each other in the H-plane. The development of this array structure can be explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the highly conductive filaments. The diffraction generates a new electric field profile in which a high intensity region emerges about a quarter wavelength upstream from an existing filament. A new plasma filament is likely to appear at the intensified spot. The same process continues and results in the formation of the observed array. Electromagnetic wave simulations that model plasma filaments as metallic posts agree quite well with the hypothesis above. With a nanoseconds-gated ICCD camera, we directly confirmed that only a few rows of the observed array are bright at any one moment, as well as that the light emitting region propagates towards the microwave source. Further experimental breakdown research has been carried out with nitrogen, helium, and SF6 at different pressures. Although each species exhibits qualitatively different structures, in general, a lumpy plasma at high pressures transforms into a more familiar, diffuse plasma as pressure is decreased. The propagation velocity of the ionization front has been also estimated both from the ICCD images and a photodiode array. The velocity is on the order of 10 km/s, and increases as the pressure decreases and the power density increases.

  17. High Power, High Voltage Electric Power System for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aintablian, Harry; Kirkham, Harold; Timmerman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the 30 KW, 600 V MRHE power subsystem. Descriptions of the power subsystem elements, the mode of power transfer, and power and mass estimates are presented. A direct-drive architecture for electric propulsion is considered which reduces mass and complexity. Solar arrays with concentrators are used for increased efficiency. Finally, the challenges due to the environment of a hypothetical lunar mission as well as due to the advanced technologies considered are outlined.

  18. First Results of the Superconducting ECR Ion Source Venus with 28 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Abbott, S. R.; Dwinell, R. D.; Collins, D.; Leitner, M.

    2005-03-01

    VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end. The magnetic confinement configuration consists of three superconducting axial coils and six superconducting radial coils in a sextupole configuration. The nominal design fields of the axial magnets are 4T at injection and 3T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2T, making VENUS the world most powerful ECR plasma confinement structure. From the beginning, VENUS has been designed for optimum operation at 28 GHz with high power (10 kW). In 2003 the VENUS ECR ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz, while preparations for 28 GHz operation were being conducted. During this commissioning phase with 18 GHz, tests with various gases and metals have been performed with up to 2000 W RF power. At the initial commissioning tests at 18 GHz, 1100 eμA of O6+, 160 eμA of Xe20+, 160 eμA of Bi25+ and 100 eμA of Bi30+ and 11 eμA of Bi41+ were produced. In May 2004 the 28 GHz microwave power has been coupled into the VENUS ECR ion source. At initial operation more than 320 eμA of Xe20+ (twice the amount extracted at 18 GHz), 240 eμA of Bi24+ and Bi25+, and 245 eμA of Bi29+ were extracted. The paper briefly describes the design of the VENUS source, the 28 GHz microwave system and its beam analyzing system. First results at 28 GHz including emittance measurements are presented.

  19. First Results of the Superconducting ECR Ion Source Venus with 28 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Abbott, S.R.; Dwinell, R.D.; Collins, D.; Leitner, M.

    2005-03-15

    VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end. The magnetic confinement configuration consists of three superconducting axial coils and six superconducting radial coils in a sextupole configuration. The nominal design fields of the axial magnets are 4T at injection and 3T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2T, making VENUS the world most powerful ECR plasma confinement structure. From the beginning, VENUS has been designed for optimum operation at 28 GHz with high power (10 kW).In 2003 the VENUS ECR ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz, while preparations for 28 GHz operation were being conducted. During this commissioning phase with 18 GHz, tests with various gases and metals have been performed with up to 2000 W RF power. At the initial commissioning tests at 18 GHz, 1100 e{mu}A of O6+, 160 e{mu}A of Xe20+, 160 e{mu}A of Bi25+ and 100 e{mu}A of Bi30+ and 11 e{mu}A of Bi41+ were produced.In May 2004 the 28 GHz microwave power has been coupled into the VENUS ECR ion source. At initial operation more than 320 e{mu}A of Xe20+ (twice the amount extracted at 18 GHz), 240 e{mu}A of Bi24+ and Bi25+, and 245 e{mu}A of Bi29+ were extracted. The paper briefly describes the design of the VENUS source, the 28 GHz microwave system and its beam analyzing system. First results at 28 GHz including emittance measurements are presented.

  20. High-Power, High-Frequency Si-Based (SiGe) Transistors Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.

    2002-01-01

    Future NASA, DOD, and commercial products will require electronic circuits that have greater functionality and versatility but occupy less space and cost less money to build and integrate than current products. System on a Chip (SOAC), a single semiconductor substrate containing circuits that perform many functions or containing an entire system, is widely recognized as the best technology for achieving low-cost, small-sized systems. Thus, a circuit technology is required that can gather, process, store, and transmit data or communications. Since silicon-integrated circuits are already used for data processing and storage and the infrastructure that supports silicon circuit fabrication is very large, it is sensible to develop communication circuits on silicon so that all the system functions can be integrated onto a single wafer. Until recently, silicon integrated circuits did not function well at the frequencies required for wireless or microwave communications, but with the introduction of small amounts of germanium into the silicon to make silicon-germanium (SiGe) transistors, silicon-based communication circuits are possible. Although microwavefrequency SiGe circuits have been demonstrated, there has been difficulty in obtaining the high power from their transistors that is required for the amplifiers of a transmitter, and many researchers have thought that this could not be done. The NASA Glenn Research Center and collaborators at the University of Michigan have developed SiGe transistors and amplifiers with state-of-the-art output power at microwave frequencies from 8 to 20 GHz. These transistors are fabricated using standard silicon processing and may be integrated with CMOS integrated circuits on a single chip. A scanning electron microscope image of a typical SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor is shown in the preceding photomicrograph. This transistor achieved a record output power of 550 mW and an associated power-added efficiency of 33 percent at 8

  1. High power, millimeter-wavelength, coherent radiation sources. Final report, 1 February 1982-31 January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.E.

    1986-09-25

    A summary of the results of the Cherenkov Maser development is presented. During the course of this work, operation over the spectral range extending from just below 30 GHz to just above 300 GHz was demonstrated. Sources based upon high-power microwave-tube technology and sources driven by pulse-power generators were both used to drive Cherenkov Masers. In the former type, 10% efficiency from single-pass, untapered resonators were obtained, while in the latter, efficiency was in the 0.1-1% range. Extensive computer codes describing linear and nonlinear aspects of Cerenkov Maser operation were also developed.

  2. Microwave interferometer using 94-GHz solid-state sources

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.E.; Thomas, S.R.; Lang, D.D.; Stever, R.D.

    1983-11-14

    A 94-GHz microwave interferometer has been designed for the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade and the Mirror Fusion Test Facility to replace the 140-GHz system. The new system is smaller and has modular single-channel units designed for high reliability. It is magnetically shielded and can be mounted close to the machine, which allows the use of lower power solid-state sources. Test results of the 94-GHz prototype indicate that the phase resolution is better than 1/sup 0/, the Impatt FM noise is 5 MHz wide, and the Gunn FM noise is 6 kHz wide. This paper presents the antenna designs along with the test results and discusses the unique problems associated with diagnosing a high electron temperature plasma in the presence of electron cyclotron resonant heating.

  3. High power thrust vector actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  4. Application of high power lasers to space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nored, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The transmission of laser power over long distances for applications such as direct conversion to propulsive thrust or electrical power is considered. Factors discussed include: problems inherent in transmitting, propagating, and receiving the laser beam over long ranges; high efficiency, closed-cycle, continuous wave operation; advancement of CO2 laser technology; and compatibility with photovoltaic power conversion devices.

  5. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  6. High power laser apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high-power, continuous-wave laser was designed for use in power transmission and energy-collecting systems, and for producing incoherent light for pumping a laser material. The laser has a high repetitive pulsing rate per unit time, resulting in a high-power density beam. The laser is composed of xenon flash tubes powered by fast-charging capacitors flashed in succession by a high-speed motor connected to an automobile-type distributor.

  7. Development of high-power gyrotrons with gradually tapered cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Chaojun; Yu Sheng; Niu Xinjian; Liu Yinghui; Li Hongfu; Li Xiang

    2012-12-15

    In high power gyrotrons, the parasitic modes coupled with the operating mode cannot be avoided in the beam-wave interaction. These parasitic modes will decrease the efficiency of the gyrotrons. The purity of the operating mode affected by different tapers should be carefully studied. The steady-state self-consistent nonlinear theory for gyrotron with gradually tapered cavity is developed in this paper. A steady-state calculation code including 'cold cavity' and 'hot cavity' is designed. By comparison, a time-domain model analysis of gyrotron operation is also studied by particle-in-cell (PIC). It is found that the tapers of gyrotron have different influences on the modes coupling between the operating mode and the parasitic modes. During the study, an example of 94 GHz gyrotron with pure operating mode TE{sub 03} has been designed. The purity of the operating mode in the optimized cavity is up to -77 dB, and in output waveguide of the cavity is up to -76 dB. At the same time, the beam-wave interaction in the designed cavity has been simulated, too. An output power of 120 kW, corresponding to 41.6% efficiency and an oscillation frequency of 94.099 GHz have been achieved with a 50 kV, 6 A helical electron beam at a guiding magnetic field of 3.5485 T. The results show that the power in spurious modes of the optimized cavity may be kept far below than that of the traditional tapered cavity.

  8. High power ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The ion thruster is one of several forms of space electric propulsion being considered for use on future SP-100-based missions. One possible major mission ground rule is the use of a single Space Shuttle launch. Thus, the mass in orbit at the reactor activation altitude would be limited by the Shuttle mass constraints. When the spacecraft subsystem masses are subtracted from this available mass limit, a maximum propellant mass may be calculated. Knowing the characteristics of each type of electric thruster allows maximum values of total impulse, mission velocity increment, and thrusting time to be calculated. Because ion thrusters easily operate at high values of efficiency (60 to 70%) and specific impulse (3000 to 5000 sec), they can impart large values of total impulse to a spacecraft. They also can be operated with separate control of the propellant flow rate and exhaust velocity. This paper presents values of demonstrated and projected performance of high power ion thrusters used in an analysis of electric propulsion for an SP-100 based mission.

  9. High-power dual-fed traveling wave photodetector circuits in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Sinsky, Jeffrey H; Dong, Po; de Valicourt, Guilhem; Chen, Young-Kai

    2015-08-24

    We introduce the concept of dual-illuminated photodetectors for high-power applications. Illuminating the photodetector on both sides doubles the number of optical channels, boosting DC and RF power handling capability. This concept is demonstrated utilizing multiple-stage dual-illuminated traveling wave photodetector circuits in silicon photonics, showing a maximum DC photocurrent of 112 mA and a 3-dB bandwidth of 40 GHz at 0.3 mA. Peak continuous-wave RF power is generated up to 12.3 dBm at 2 GHz and 5.3 dBm at 40 GHz, at a DC photocurrent of 55 mA. High speed broadband data signals are detected with eye amplitudes of 2.2 V and 1.3 V at 10 Gb/s and 40 Gb/s, respectively. A theoretical analysis is presented illustrating design tradeoffs for the multiple-stage photodetector circuits based on the bandwidth and power requirements.

  10. GHz laser-free time-resolved transmission electron microscopy: A stroboscopic high-duty-cycle method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Yimei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Lau, June W.

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a device and a method for producing ultrashort electron pulses with GHz repetition rates via pulsing an input direct current (dc) electron beam are provided. The device and the method are based on an electromagnetic-mechanical pulser (EMMP) that consists of a series of transverse deflecting cavities and magnetic quadrupoles. The EMMP modulates and chops the incoming dc electron beam and converts it into pico- and sub-pico-second electron pulse sequences (pulse trains) at >1 GHz repetition rates, as well as controllably manipulates the resulting pulses. Ultimately, it leads to negligible electron pulse phase-space degradation compared to the incomingmore » dc beam parameters. The temporal pulse length and repetition rate for the EMMP can be continuously tunable over wide ranges.« less

  11. GHz laser-free time-resolved transmission electron microscopy: A stroboscopic high-duty-cycle method

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Yimei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Lau, June W.

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a device and a method for producing ultrashort electron pulses with GHz repetition rates via pulsing an input direct current (dc) electron beam are provided. The device and the method are based on an electromagnetic-mechanical pulser (EMMP) that consists of a series of transverse deflecting cavities and magnetic quadrupoles. The EMMP modulates and chops the incoming dc electron beam and converts it into pico- and sub-pico-second electron pulse sequences (pulse trains) at >1 GHz repetition rates, as well as controllably manipulates the resulting pulses. Ultimately, it leads to negligible electron pulse phase-space degradation compared to the incoming dc beam parameters. The temporal pulse length and repetition rate for the EMMP can be continuously tunable over wide ranges.

  12. Operation and performance analyses of 350 and 700 MHz low-/high-temperature superconductor nuclear magnetic resonance magnets: A march toward operating frequencies above 1 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Lee, Haigun; Bobrov, Emanuel S.; Kim, Wooseok; Ahn, Min Cheol; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2009-01-01

    Since 2000, a three-phase program with a final goal to complete a 1 GHz high-resolution low-/high-temperature superconductor (LTS/HTS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet has been conducted at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In a LTS/HTS magnet assembly, a HTS insert is placed in the cold bore of a LTS background magnet. To date, two LTS/HTS magnets have been designed, constructed, and tested: a 350 MHz (LH350) in phase 1 and a 700 MHz (LH700) in phase 2. The program's target has recently been upgraded from the original goal of 1 GHz to a new goal of 1.3 GHz. In this paper, we present extensive performance analyses of the two LTS/HTS NMR magnets. Spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of LH350 and LH700, examined with harmonic analysis, and four key issues that became evident in the operation of these two magnets are discussed: (1) field constant reduction, (2) "large" residual Z1 gradient and its temporal decay, (3) large one-periodic tesseral field gradients, and (4) screening-current-induced field in the HTS inserts.

  13. Investigation of a metallic photonic crystal high power microwave mode converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong Qin, Fen; Xu, Sha; Yu, Aimin; Wu, Yong

    2015-02-15

    It is demonstrated that an L band metallic photonic crystal TEM-TE{sub 11} mode converter is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. The proposed mode converter is realized by partially filling metallic photonic crystals along azimuthal direction in a coaxial transmission line for phase-shifting. A three rows structure is designed and simulated by commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Simulation results show that its conversion efficiency is 99% at the center frequency 1.58 GHz. Over the frequency range of 1.56-1.625 GHz, the conversion efficiency exceeds 90 %, with a corresponding bandwidth of 4.1 %. This mode converter has a gigawatt level power handling capability which is suitable for narrow band high power microwave application. Using magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator(MILO) as a high power microwave source, particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to test the performance of the mode converter. The expected TE{sub 11} mode microwave output is obtained and the MILO works well. Mode conversion performance of the converter is tested by far-field measurement method. And the experimental result confirms the validity of our design. Then, high power microwave experiment is carried out on a Marx-driven Blumlein water line pulsed power accelerator. Microwave frequency, radiated pattern and power are measured in the far-field region and the results agree well with simulation results. The experiment also reveals that no microwave breakdown or pulse shortening took place in the experimental setup.

  14. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.

    1983-01-01

    Key requirements for a 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne communication antenna feed array applications include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five-bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. The RF designs for each of the four submodules (low noise amplifier, some gain control, phase shifter, and RF to IF sub-module) are presented. Except for the phase shifter, high frequency, low noise FETs with sub-half micron gate lengths are employed in the submodules. For the gain control, a two stage dual gate FET amplifier is used. The phase shifter is of the passive switched line type and consists of 5-bits. It uses relatively large gate width FETs (with zero drain to source bias) as the switching elements. A 20 GHz local oscillator buffer amplifier, a FET compatible balanced mixer, and a 5-8 GHz IF amplifier constitute the RF/IF sub-module. Phase shifter fabrication using ion implantation and a self-aligned gate technique is described. Preliminary RF results obtained on such phase shifters are included.

  15. Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS): studies of honey bees exposed to 2. 45 GHz continuous-wave electromagnetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N E; Westerdahl, B B

    1980-12-01

    A system for small animal exposure was developed for treating honey bees, Apis mellifera L., in brood and adult stages, with 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at selected power densities and exposure times. Post-treatment brood development was normal and teratological effects were not detected at exposures of 3 to 50 mw/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. Post-treatment survival, longevity, orientation, navigation, and memory of adult bees were also normal after exposures of 3 to 50 mw/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. Post-treatment longevity of confined bees in the laboratory was normal after exposures of 3 to 50 mw/cm/sup 2/ for 24 hours. Thermoregulation of brood nest, foraging activity, brood rearing, and social interaction were not affected by chronic exposure to 1 mw/cm/sup 2/ during 28 days. In dynamic behavioral bioassays the frequency of entry and duration of activity of unrestrained, foraging adult bees was identical in microwave-exposed (5 to 40 mw/cm/sup 2/) areas versus control areas.

  16. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-04

    We report the results of ongoing high power tests of single-cell standing wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the maximum gradient possibilities for normal-conducting rf powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode launchers and short test structures powered by SLACs XL-4 klystron. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested at the SLAC klystron test laboratory.

  17. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  18. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale.

  19. Low-Power Testing of Losses in Millimeter-Wave Transmission Lines for High-Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Han, S T; Comfoltey, E N; Shapiro, M A; Sirigiri, J R; Tax, D S; Temkin, R J; Woskov, P P; Rasmussen, D A

    2008-11-01

    We report the measurement of small losses in transmission line (TL) components intended for high-power millimeter-wave applications. Measurements were made using two different low-power techniques: a coherent technique using a vector network analyzer (VNA) and an incoherent technique using a radiometer. The measured loss in a 140 GHz 12.7 mm diameter TL system, consisting of 1.7 m of circular corrugated waveguide and three miter bends, is dominated by the miter bend loss. The measured loss was 0.3±0.1 dB per miter bend using a VNA; and 0.22±0.1 dB per miter bend using a radiometer. Good agreement between the two measurement techniques implies that both are useful for measuring small losses. To verify the methodology, the VNA technique was employed to measure the extremely small transmission loss in a 170 GHz ITER prototype TL system consisting of three lengths of 1 m, 63.5 mm diameter, circular corrugated waveguide and two miter bends. The measured loss of 0.05±0.02 dB per miter bend may be compared with the theoretical loss of 0.027 dB per miter bend. These results suggest that low-power testing of TL losses, utilizing a small, simple TL system and a VNA, is a reliable method for evaluating performance of low-loss millimeter-wave TL components intended for use in high-power applications.

  20. Low-Power Testing of Losses in Millimeter-Wave Transmission Lines for High-Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S. T.; Comfoltey, E. N.; Shapiro, Michael; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Tax, David; Temkin, Richard J; Woskov, P. P.; Chang, Won; Rasmussen, David A

    2008-08-01

    We report the measurement of small losses in transmission line (TL) components intended for high-power millimeter-wave applications. Measurements were made using two different low-power techniques: a coherent technique using a vector network analyzer (VNA) and an incoherent technique using a radiometer. The measured loss in a 140 GHz 12.7 mm diameter TL system, consisting of 1.7 m of circular corrugated waveguide and three miter bends, is dominated by the miter bend loss. The measured loss was 0.3 {+-} 0.1 dB per miter bend using a VNA; and 0.22 {+-} 0.1 dB per miter bend using a radiometer. Good agreement between the two measurement techniques implies that both are useful for measuring small losses. To verify the methodology, the VNA technique was employed to measure the extremely small transmission loss in a 170 GHz ITER prototype TL system consisting of three lengths of 1 m, 63.5 mm diameter, circular corrugated waveguide and two miter bends. The measured loss of 0.05 {+-} 0.02 dB per miter bend may be compared with the theoretical loss of 0.027 dB per miter bend. These results suggest that low-power testing of TL losses, utilizing a small, simple TL system and a VNA, is a reliable method for evaluating performance of low-loss millimeter-wave TL components intended for use in high-power applications.

  1. Next generation ECR ion sources: First results of the superconducting 28 GHz ECRIS VENUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Abbott, S. R.; Collins, D.; Dwinell, R. D.; Galloway, M. L.; Leitner, M.; Todd, D. S.

    2005-07-01

    VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (rare isotope accelerator) front end. The goal of the VENUS ECR ion source project as the RIA R&D injector is the production of 200 eμA of U30+, a high current medium charge state beam. On the other hand, as an injector ion source for the 88-Inch Cyclotron the design objective is the production of 5 eμA of U48+, a low current, very high charge state beam. To achieve those ambitious goals, the VENUS ECR ion source has been designed for optimum operation at 28 GHz. The nominal design fields of the axial magnets are 4 T at injection and 3 T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2 T, making VENUS currently the world’s most powerful ECR plasma confinement structure. Recently, the six year project has made significant progress. In June 2002, the first plasma was ignited at 18 GHz. During 2003, the VENUS ECR ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz, while preparations for 28 GHz operation were being conducted. In May 2004 28 GHz microwave power has been coupled into the VENUS ECR ion source for the first time. Preliminary performance-tests with oxygen, xenon and bismuth at 18 GHz and 28 GHz have shown promising results. Intensities close to or exceeding the RIA requirements have been produced for those few test beams. The paper will briefly describe the design of the VENUS source and its beam analyzing system. Results at 18 GHz and 28 GHz including first emittance measurements will be described.

  2. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Caplan, M.; Jory, H.

    1983-09-01

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues.

  3. High Power Photodetectors for Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.

    1995-01-01

    High power photodetectors in coplanar waveguide and distributed traveling-wave structures have been under development for communications applications. The distributed photodetectors demonstrated 70percent efficiency with a linear response up to 25 mW of optical power input.

  4. High-power, high-frequency, annular-beam free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Fortgang, C.M.; Haynes, W.B.; Haddock, P.C.

    1998-11-01

    The authors have developed a 15--17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) capable of producing high power pulses with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source is a 1 {micro}s, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacts with the TM{sub 02} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. They studied the phase stability by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field was transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories were purely longitudinal. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations demonstrated the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction and explicit calculations of the growing root of the dispersion relation are included to verify the phase stability.

  5. A high-average power tapered FEL amplifier at submillimeter frequencies using sheet electron beams and short-period wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Bidwell, S.W.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Booske, J.H.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Latham, P.E.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A high-average-power FEL amplifier operating at submillimeter frequencies is under development at the University of Maryland. Program goals are to produce a CW, {approximately}1 MW, FEL amplifier source at frequencies between 280 GHz and 560 GHz. To this end, a high-gain, high-efficiency, tapered FEL amplifier using a sheet electron beam and a short-period (superconducting) wiggler has been chosen. Development of this amplifier is progressing in three stages: (1) beam propagation through a long length ({approximately}1 m) of short period ({lambda}{sub {omega}} = 1 cm) wiggler, (2) demonstration of a proof-of-principle amplifier experiment at 98 GHz, and (3) designs of a superconducting tapered FEL amplifier meeting the ultimate design goal specifications. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Solar Patrol Polarization Telescopes at 45 and 90 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valio, A.; Kaufmann, P.; Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Raulin, J.-P.; Fernandes, L. O.; Marun, A.

    2012-12-01

    The spectra of solar flares provide important information about the physics involved in the flaring process. Presently, however, there is a large frequency gap at radio frequencies between 20 and 200 GHz. Unfortunately, this gap hinders the determination of important flare parameters such as: (i) the frequency of the peak of the spectra, or turnover frequency, which yields the magnetic field intensity in the flaring source and electron density; (ii) the optically thin frequency slope, that is related to the accelerated electrons with a power-law energy distribution, allowing information about the acceleration mechanism; (iii) and other physical parameters such as source size and inhomogeneities that may also be estimated from spectra with complete spectral coverage. Recently a new spectral component at high frequencies was discovered with fluxes increasing above 200 GHz, distinct from the traditional microwave component, with peak frequencies at about 10 GHz. To elucidate the nature of both components and fully characterize the spectra of solar flares, we analyze new observations at the intermediate frequencies obtained by two antennas with receivers at 45 and 90 GHz, capable of measuring circular polarization. The telescope, installed at CASLEO Observatory (Argentina), is described in detail. We also analyze the observations of the flares it has already detected, including their spectra especially when data at 212 and 405 GHz from the Solar Submillimeter Telescope (SST), located at the same site, is available.

  7. A 50 GHz GaAs FET MIC transmitter/receiver using hermetic miniature probe transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Koichi; Ishizaki, Toshio; Hashimoto, Koji; Sakakura, Makoto; Uwano, Tomoki

    1989-09-01

    A very compact 50-GHz-band transmitter/receiver for a video link is described. The RF assemblies used in the system consist of 25/50-GHz frequency doublers, a 25-GHz dielectric-resonator oscillator, and a 25-GHz FM modulator. The circuits make extensive use of microwave IC technology with all GaAs FETs as active elements. The frequency doublers exhibit a minimum conversion loss of 2.6 dB and a maximum output power of 11 dBm. The modulator is highly frequency stabilized by the dielectric resonator. Recently developed miniature probe microstrip-to-waveguide transitions permit the IC assemblies to be installed compactly in hermetically sealed packages. Design considerations and experimental data for the transition are presented. Using these technologies a transmitting power of 10 dBm and a receiver noise figure of 13 dB have been obtained.

  8. High voltage-high power components for large space power distribution systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Space power components including a family of bipolar power switching transistors, fast switching power diodes, heat pipe cooled high frequency transformers and inductors, high frequency conduction cooled transformers, high power-high frequency capacitors, remote power controllers and rotary power transfer devices were developed. Many of these components such as the power switching transistors, power diodes and the high frequency capacitor are commercially available. All the other components were developed to the prototype level. The dc/dc series resonant converters were built to the 25 kW level.

  9. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AT 340 GHz FROM THE LOW-MASS T TAURI STAR FN TAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Momose, Munetake; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Motohide; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2010-03-20

    FN Tau is a rare example of a very low-mass T Tauri star that exhibits a spatially resolved nebulosity in near-infrared scattering light. To directly derive the parameters of a circumstellar disk around FN Tau, observations of dust continuum emission at 340 GHz are carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A point-like dust continuum emission was detected with a synthesized beam of {approx}0.''7 in FWHM. From the analysis of the visibility plot, the radius of the emission is estimated to be <=0.''29, corresponding to 41 AU. This is much smaller than the radius of the nebulosity, 1.''85 for its brighter part at 1.6 {mu}m. The 340 GHz continuum emission observed with the SMA and the photometric data at lambda <= 70 {mu}m are explained by a power-law disk model whose outer radius and mass are 41 AU and (0.24-5.9) x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun}, respectively, if the exponent of dust mass opacity (beta) is assumed to be 0-2. The disk model cannot fully reproduce the flux density at 230 GHz obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, suggesting that there is another extended 'halo' component that is missed in the SMA observations. By requiring the halo not to be detected with the SMA, the lower limit to the size of the halo is evaluated to be between 174 AU and 574 AU, depending on the assumed beta value. This size is comparable to the near-infrared nebulosity, implying that the halo unseen with the SMA corresponds to the origin of the near-infrared nebulosity. The halo can contain mass comparable to or at most 8 times greater than that of the inner power-law disk, but its surface density should be lower than that at the outer edge of the power-law disk by more than 1 order of magnitude. The physical nature of the halo is unclear, but it may be the periphery of a flared circumstellar disk that is not described well in terms of a power-law disk model, or a remnant of a protostellar envelope having flattened structure.

  11. Commissioning of the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS at 18 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Abbott, Steven R.; Dwinell, Roger D.; Leitner, Matthaeus; Taylor, Clyde E.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2004-06-01

    During the last year, the VENUS ECR ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz and preparations for 28 GHz operation are now underway. During the commissioning phase with 18 GHz, tests with various gases and metals have been performed with up to 2000 W RF power. The ion source performance is very promising [1,2]. VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for Nuclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end. The goal of the VENUS ECR ion source project as the RIA R&D injector is the production of 240e{micro}A of U{sup 30+}, a high current medium charge state beam. On the other hand, as an injector ion source for the 88-Inch Cyclotron the design objective is the production of 5e{micro}A of U{sup 48+}, a low current, very high charge state beam. To meet these ambitious goals, VENUS has been designed for optimum operation at 28 GHz. This frequency choice has several design consequences. To achieve the required magnetic confinement, superconducting magnets have to be used. The size of the superconducting magnet structure implies a relatively large plasma volume. Consequently, high power microwave coupling becomes necessary to achieve sufficient plasma heating power densities. The 28 GHz power supply has been delivered in April 2004.

  12. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  13. Study of high power, two-stage, TWT X-band amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Golkowski, C.; Hayashi, Y.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    A disk loaded slow wave structure with a cold wave phase (without electron beam) velocity of the TM{sub 01} wave greater than the speed of light (1.05c) is used as the electron bunching stage of a two stage X-band amplifier. The high phase velocity section produces well defined electron bunches. The second section, where the cold wave phase velocity is (0.84c), i.e., less than beam velocity of 0.91c, is used to generate the high output power microwave radiation. The tightly bunched beam from the high phase velocity section enhances the beam energy conversion into microwave radiation compared to that obtained with a synchronous electron-wave bunches. The amplifier is driven by a 7mm diameter 750 kV, 500A pencil electron beam. The structure, which has a 4 GHz bandwidth, produces an amplified output with a power in the range of 20--60 MW. At higher output powers (>60MW) pulse shortening develops. The authors suspect that the pulse shortening is a result of excitation of the hybrid mode, HEM{sub 11}, which overlaps (about 0.5 GHz separation) with the frequency domain of the desired TM{sub 0.1} mode. A new amplifier with similar phase velocity characteristics but with a 1 GHz bandwidth and an HEM{sub 11}, TM{sub 01} mode frequency separation of 3.3 GHz has been designed and constructed. The interaction frequency for the HEM mode is above the passband of the TM mode. Testing is in progress. The performance of the new amplifier will be compared with results obtained using the earlier configuration.

  14. High-Power Electromagnetic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Mikellides, Pavlos G.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT).

  15. Operation of high power converters in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.

    1993-01-01

    High power converters that are used in space power subsystems are limited in power handling capability due to component and thermal limitations. For applications, such as Space Station Freedom, where multi-kilowatts of power must be delivered to user loads, parallel operation of converters becomes an attractive option when considering overall power subsystem topologies. TRW developed three different unequal power sharing approaches for parallel operation of converters. These approaches, known as droop, master-slave, and proportional adjustment, are discussed and test results are presented.

  16. Low Power Compact Radio Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, G.; Taylor, G.B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NRAO, Socorro

    2005-06-30

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution multi-frequency (8 and 22 GHz) VLA images of five low power compact (LPC) radio sources, and phase referenced VLBA images at 1.6 GHz of their nuclear regions. At the VLA resolution we resolve the structure and identify component positions and flux densities. The phase referenced VLBA data at 1.6 GHz reveals flat-spectrum, compact cores (down to a few milliJansky) in four of the five sources. The absolute astrometry provided by the phase referencing allows us to identify the center of activity on the VLA images. Moreover, these data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. On the basis of the arcsecond scale structures and of the nuclear properties, we rule out the presence of strong relativistic effects in our LPCs, which must be intrinsically small (deprojected linear sizes {approx}< 10 kpc). Fits of continuous injection models reveal break frequencies in the GHz domain, and ages in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} yrs. In LPCs, the outermost edge may be advancing more slowly than in more powerful sources or could even be stationary; some LPCs might also have ceased their activity. In general, the properties of LPCs can be related to a number of reasons, including, but not limited to: youth, frustration, low kinematic power jets, and short-lived activity in the radio.

  17. A high efficiency C-band internally-matched harmonic tuning GaN power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Zhao, B. C.; Zheng, J. X.; Zhang, H. S.; Zheng, X. F.; Ma, X. H.; Hao, Y.; Ma, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency C-band gallium nitride (GaN) internally-matched power amplifier (PA) is presented. This amplifier consists of 2-chips of self-developed GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 16 mm total gate width on SiC substrate. New harmonic manipulation circuits are induced both in the input and output matching networks for high efficiency matching at fundamental and 2nd-harmonic frequency, respectively. The developed amplifier has achieved 72.1% power added efficiency (PAE) with 107.4 W output power at 5 GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this amplifier exhibits the highest PAE in C-band GaN HEMT amplifiers with over 100 W output power. Additionally, 1000 hours' aging test reveals high reliability for practical applications.

  18. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  19. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  20. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power. PMID:22380155

  1. Development of gallium arsenide high-speed, low-power serial parallel interface modules: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Final report to NASA LeRC on the development of gallium arsenide (GaAS) high-speed, low power serial/parallel interface modules. The report discusses the development and test of a family of 16, 32 and 64 bit parallel to serial and serial to parallel integrated circuits using a self aligned gate MESFET technology developed at the Honeywell Sensors and Signal Processing Laboratory. Lab testing demonstrated 1.3 GHz clock rates at a power of 300 mW. This work was accomplished under contract number NAS3-24676.

  2. Volumetric and elastic properties of basalt at high pressure by X-ray microtomography and GHz-ultrasonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A. N.; Lesher, C. E.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Independent measurements of volume and sound velocity of basaltic glass (BCR-2) were made up to 5 GPa at room temperature by X-ray microtomography (HPXMT) and GHz- ultrasonic interferometry, respectively. These results are used to constrain bulk and shear moduli, and demonstrate that basaltic glass violates Birch's law as found for vitreous silica and other network glasses. Specifically for basalt, there is a 12% increase in density from 0 - 4.5 GPa, while P- and S-wave velocities decrease by 2.8 and 7.2%, respectively over the same pressure range. At higher pressures a positive correlation exists between density, and P- and S-wave velocities. There is no detectable frequency dependence for P- and S-wave velocities between 1-2 GHz, and velocities determined on compression and decompress are identical within uncertainties demonstrating fully elastic behavior up to at least 5 GPa. We find the pressure of P- and S-wave velocity minima for basaltic glass are ~2 GPa higher than for vitreous silica. We further find that overall velocity reductions approaching the minima are more modest than for vitreous silica and posit that this behavior reflects network flexibility approaching the effective locking limit during compression. Expansion of the pressure range of anomalous behavior coupled with the more modest overall velocity reduction relative to silica is attributed to the more depolymerized (disordered) structure of basaltic glass. We postulate that the velocity decrease observed in basaltic glass extends into the liquid state consistent with the recent work of Sakamai et al. (2013) and Sanloup et al. (2013). If this is true, the effect of melt on decreasing seismic velocities will be greater than currently assumed, and thus estimates of melt fraction in the upper mantle from velocity anomalies may be overestimated. T. Sakamaki et al., Nat. Geosci. (2013). C. Sanloup et al., Nature (2013).

  3. High speed and high power polarization insensitive germanium photodetector with lumped structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Xiao, Xi; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a high speed and high power polarization insensitive germanium photodetector (Ge PD) with lumped structure based on related parallel Ge absorption regions. Two absorption regions are double sides illuminated to optimize the space charge density and the two dimensional (2D) grating coupler is adopted for both coupling and polarization independent operation. Being different from previous reported high power scheme with separate absorption areas, the proposed structure is specifically designed with doubled but related Ge absorption regions, forming the equivalent parallel resistor and thus the parasitic parameter can be engineered to ensure a simultaneous large bandwidth. The bandwidth is measured to be >35 GHz, while the maximum current density is measured to be 1.152 mA/μm3. The dark current and the responsivity of the proposed Ge PD are measured to be 1.82 μΑ and 1.06 A/W. Modulated signals experimentally validate the high speed operation and doubled power handling capacity for the proposed scheme. Furthermore, the bit error rate results show the superior performance for the proposed Ge PD at high photocurrent. PMID:27137613

  4. Test facilities for high power electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Vetrone, Robert H.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Electric propulsion has applications for orbit raising, maneuvering of large space systems, and interplanetary missions. These missions involve propulsion power levels from tenths to tens of megawatts, depending upon the application. General facility requirements for testing high power electric propulsion at the component and thrust systems level are defined. The characteristics and pumping capabilities of many large vacuum chambers in the United States are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high power electric propulsion testing.

  5. GHz spurious mode free AlN lamb wave resonator with high figure of merit using one dimensional phononic crystal tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoqiang; Zhu, Yao; Merugu, Srinivas; Wang, Nan; Sun, Chengliang; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    This letter reports a spurious mode free GHz aluminum nitride (AlN) lamb wave resonator (LWR) towards high figure of merit (FOM). One dimensional gourd-shape phononic crystal (PnC) tether with large phononic bandgaps is employed to reduce the acoustic energy dissipation into the substrate. The periodic PnC tethers are based on a 1 μm-thick AlN layer with 0.26 μm-thick Mo layer on top. A clean spectrum over a wide frequency range is obtained from the measurement, which indicates a wide-band suppression of spurious modes. Experimental results demonstrate that the fabricated AlN LWR has an insertion loss of 5.2 dB and a loaded quality factor (Q) of 1893 at 1.02 GHz measured in air. An impressive ratio of the resistance at parallel resonance (Rp) to the resistance at series resonance (Rs) of 49.8 dB is obtained, which is an indication of high FOM for LWR. The high Rp to Rs ratio is one of the most important parameters to design a radio frequency filter with steep roll-off.

  6. High power test results of the first SRRC/ANL high current L-band RF gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-09-11

    A joint program is underway between the SRRC (Synchrotrons Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) for developing a high current L-band photocathode rf guns. We have constructed an L-Band (1.3 Ghz), single cell rf photocathode gun and conducted low power tests at SRRC. High power rf conditioning of the cavity has been completed at ANL. In this paper we report on the construction and high power test results. So far we have been able to achieve > 120 MV/m axial electric field with minimal dark current. This gun will be used to replace the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[l] high current gun.

  7. Photoconductive switching for high power microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Hofer, W.W.

    1990-10-01

    Photoconductive switching is a technology that is being increasingly applied to generation of high power microwaves. Two primary semiconductors used for these devices are silicon and gallium arsenide. Diamond is a promising future candidate material. This paper discusses the important material parameters and switching modes, critical issues for microwave generation, and future directions for this high power, photoconductive switching technology.

  8. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  9. High efficiency solar photovoltaic power module concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of a preliminary concept for high efficiency solar power generation in space is presented. The concept was a synergistic combination of spectral splitting, tailored bandgap cells, high concentration ratios, and cool cell areas.

  10. 28 GHz Gyrotron ECRH on LDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Kesner, J.; Michael, P. C.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    A 10 kW, CW, 28 GHz gyrotron has been implemented on LDX to increase the plasma density and to more fully explore the potential of high beta plasma stability in a dipole magnetic configuration. This added power represents about a 60% increase in ECRH to a new total of 26.9 kW with sources at 2.45, 6.4, and 10.5 GHz. The 1 Tesla resonances in LDX form small rings encompassing the entire plasma cross-section above and below the floating coil (F-coil) near the dipole axial region. A 32.5 mm diameter TE01 waveguide with a partial Vlasov step cut launches a diverging beam from above the F-coil that depends on internal wall reflections for plasma coupling. Initial gyrotron only plasmas exhibit steep natural profiles with fewer hot electrons than with the other sources. The background scattered radiation suggests that only about half the power is being absorbed with the present launcher.

  11. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  12. High-power multiple-frequency narrow-linewidth laser source based on a semiconductor tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Mewes, M O; Schreck, F; Salomon, C

    1999-02-01

    The output of two grating-stabilized external-cavity diode lasers was injected into a semiconductor tapered amplif ier in a master oscillator-power amplif ier (MOPA) configuration. At a wavelength of 671 nm this configuration produced 210 mW of power in a diffraction-limited mode with two frequency components of narrow linewidth. The frequency difference delta was varied from 20 MHz to 12 GHz, while the power ratio of the two components was freely adjustable. For delta < 2 GHz additional frequency sidebands appear in the output of the MOPA. This configuration is a f lexible and simple high-power cw laser source for light with multiple narrow-linewidth frequency components. PMID:18071437

  13. Design and cold testing of a high peak power x-band gyroklystron

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, W.; Calame, J.; Granatstein, V.L.; Latham, P.E.; McAdoo, J.; Park, G.S.; Striffler, C.D.; Williams, F.J.; Chu, K.R.; Seftor, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The main goal of the University of Maryland's gyroklystron project is to develop an efficient, high power, high gain, phase controllable amplifier at 10 GHz. While peak powers of several hundred megawatts are ultimately of interest, our initial experimental design values include 30 MW of output power in 1 ..mu..s pulses with a gain in excess of 50 dB. The 30 MW power level represents an enhancement of almost three orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art in gyroklystron amplifiers. This enhancement will be achieved by going to high beam energies (..gamma..approx. =2) and overmoded cavities (TE/sub 01//sup 0/). Outlined in this report are the steps being taken to realize our goal.

  14. Sixty GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. E.; Chen, J.; Benko, E.; Barger, M. J.; Nghiem, H.; Trinh, T. Q.; Kung, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT Diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goal of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10 year life time. During the course of the program, double drift (DD) GaAs IMPATT Diodes have been developed resulting in the state of the art performance at V band frequencies. A CW output power of 1.12 W was demonstrated at 51.9 GHz with 9.7 percent efficiency. The best conversion efficiency achieved was 15.3 percent. V band DD GaAs IMPATTs were developed using both small signal and large signal analyses. GaAs wafers of DD flat, DD hybrid, and DD Read profiles using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were developed with excellent doping profile control. Wafer evaluation was routinely made by the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurement. Ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis was also used for more detailed profile evaluation.

  15. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  16. High Density Power Converters for Photovoltaic Power Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Rahul

    In typical photovoltaic systems, PV cells are connected in series to achieve high output voltages, which decreases conduction losses and helps the downstream power electronics operate at higher efficiencies. A series connection means that the current through the string is limited by the worst case cell, substring, or module, which can result in suboptimal operation of the rest of the string. Given how even small shading can have a large effect on performance, there has been growing interest in the use of distributed power management architectures to mitigate losses from variation in PV systems. In particular, partial power processing converters have gained traction as a means to improve the performance of PV arrays with small, distributed converters that configure in parallel with PV cells. These converters can use low voltage components, only process a fraction of the total power allowing them to achieve higher efficiencies and power density and also have higher reliability. This work details the design and operation of a partial power processing converter implemented as a Resonant Switched Capacitor (ReSC) converter. An integrated circuit (IC) is designed in 0.18 mum CMOS process. Operation at high frequencies (20-50 MHz) allows high levels of integration with air core inductors directly attached to the die through a gold bump, solder reflow process. Test results for the IC are presented with power density and efficiency metrics. The IC is then used as a partial power processing converter to implement equalization with a specially constructed PV panel. The converter is shown to mitigate power loss due to mismatch.

  17. Phase locking and frequency locking of a 140 GHz klystron and a 280 GHz carcinotron

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.W.; Rettig, C.L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. )

    1992-10-01

    A phase and frequency-locked loop to synchronize two microwave tube oscillators for a high density plasma collective scattering diagnostic has been designed, assembled, and tested. A Varian (VRT2121A16) reflex klystron was down converted by mixing with the eighth harmonic of a 17.437 GHz phase-locked Gunn oscillator, and the resulting baseband was used to lock the klystron phase to a 200 MHz crystal. The down-converted 140 GHz klystron frequency spectrum shows a linewidth {lt}50 Hz and sideband power {lt}50 dB below the carrier (dBc). Frequency locking of a Thomson CSF TH4224S 280 GHz carcinotron was performed and the klystron was then down converted by the stabilized carcinotron and phase locked to the 200 MHz crystal. The klystron would track the frequency excursions of the carcinotron when the system was perturbed by direct modulation with frequencies of up to 10 MHz and remained locked as long as modulation sidebands were kept {lt}15 dBc. The locked states of both configurations show 3 to 4 orders of magnitude improvement in short and long term stability over the unlocked states.

  18. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. The overall project will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements are presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  19. Ka-Band TWT High-Efficiency Power Combiner for High-Rate Data Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee; Vaden, Karl R.; Lesny, Gary G.; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    A four-port magic-T hybrid waveguide junction serves as the central component of a high-efficiency two-way power combiner circuit for transmitting a high-rate phase-modulated digital signal at a carrier frequency in the Ka-band (between 27 and 40 GHz). This power combiner was developed to satisfy a specific requirement to efficiently combine the coherent outputs of two traveling-wavetube (TWT) amplifiers that are typically characterized by power levels on the order of 100 W or more. In this application, the use of a waveguide-based power combiner (instead of a coaxial-cable- or microstrip-based power combiner, for example) is dictated by requirements for low loss, high power-handling capability, and broadband response. Combiner efficiencies were typically 90 percent or more over both the linear and saturated output power regions of operation of the TWTs . Figure 1 depicts the basic configuration of the magic-T hybrid junction. The coherent outputs of the two TWTs enter through ports 1 and 4. As a result of the orientations of the electromagnetic fields, which also provides a needed high port-to-port isolation, of these two input signals and the interior design of the magic-T junction, the input powers are divided so as to add in phase at one output port (port 2), and to be opposite in phase and hence cancel each other at the opposite coplanar output port (port 3). The net result is that the output power at port 2 is essentially double that of the output of one TWT, minus the power lost in the magic-T hybrid junction. Optimum performance as a high-efficiency power combiner thus requires a balance of both power and phase at the input ports of the magic-T. Replicas of this two-way combiner can be arranged in a binary configuration to obtain a 2n-way (where n is an integer) combiner. For example, Figure 2 illustrates the use of three two-way combiners to combine the outputs of four TWTs.

  20. A quasi-optical resonant ring for high power millimeter-wave testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1997-08-01

    Gyrotrons of > 1-MW cw power in the 110- to 160-GHz frequency range with HE{sub 11} output beams are being developed for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of plasmas. Windows are required for gyrotrons and for waveguide transmission systems at the plasma device to provide vacuum isolation and containment. Windows ar difficult to build for these systems because the window dielectric losses increase with frequency and the centrally peaked output power beam concentrates the power deposition near the center. Development and testing of a window independent of gyrotron development is desirable since window failure on a cw gyrotron usually means an expensive reprocessing of the entire tube or possibly even total loss. A quasi-optical resonant ring is being developed for testing of millimeter wave components, windows and low-loss materials at very high power levels using medium power level sources. The resonant ring generates a traveling wave resonance of uniform amplitude along the waveguide that is ideal for testing components and materials. Both smooth-wall TE{sub 01} mode and a corrugated-wall HE{sub 11} mode versions have been constructed. These units use highly oversized waveguide and four miter bends to form a quasi-optical resonant ring. A perforated plate miter bend serves as the input directional coupler. A water-cooled tube array is being designed for a coupler capable high-power cw operation. A theoretical power gain of > 10 is possible using the 63.5 mm HE{sub 11} version at 53 GHz. Low power measurements have been performed to confirm the operation and > 1.5 MW high power tests using a 200 kW gyrotron are expected in the near future.

  1. K-band high power latching switch. [communication satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlinar, M. J.; Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A 19 GHz waveguide latching switch with a bandwidth of 1400 MHz and an exceptionally low insertion loss of 0.25 dB was demonstrated. The RF and driver ferrites are separate structures and can be optimized individually. This analysis for each structure is separately detailed. Basically, the RF section features a dual turnstile junction. The circulator consists of a dielectric tube which contains two ferrite rods, and a dielectric spacer separating the ferrite parts along the center of symmetry of the waveguide to form two turnstiles. This subassembly is indexed and locked in the center of symmetry of a uniform junction of three waveguides by the metallic transformers installed in the top and bottom walls of the housing. The switching junction and its actuating circuitry met all RF performance objectives and all shock and vibration requirements with no physical damage or performance degradation. It exceeds thermal requirements by operating over a 100 C temperature range (-44 C to +56 C) and has a high power handling capability allowing up to 100 W of CW input power.

  2. The MALT 90 GHz Pilot Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, James; Rathborne, Jill; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Brooks, Kate; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Longmore, Steven; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Walsh, Andrew; Peretto, Nicolas

    2009-04-01

    In early November, 2008, Australian and international Galactic astronomers met to plan future surveys of the Galactic plane with ATNF facilities. We intend to coordinate our efforts so that such surveys produce the maximum scientific return with minimal overlap in observations. To this end, the Millimetre Astronomers Large-area multi-Transition (MALT) team was formed. The MALT team has identified key Galactic plane surveys: a 42--50 GHz survey, a 90 GHz survey and a 115 GHz survey. In this proposal, we aim to conduct a pilot survey to explore options in the 90 GHz (3 mm) range. This pilot survey will provide detection rates, typical line strengths, and source sizes for various "finder charts" for high-mass star-forming cores. Such information is crucial for a rational design of a complete 90 GHz MALT survey.

  3. Capacitors for aircraft high power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.

    1980-04-01

    This report describes an exploratory program conducted to develop reliable lightweight pulse discharge capacitors for airborne application. The specific duty was a 1 minute burst every 2hours, and both low (50pps) and high (300pps) repetition rate service was to be considered. The energy density goals were 400 to 1100 J/kg with a 20 microsec capacitor current pulse width. A five layer polysulfone/kraft paper dielectric was selected for high rate service, while polyvinylidene fluoride/kraft paper was chosen for the low rate service. Both mineral oil and dioctylphthalate fluids were used. Tension controlled winding was used to eliminate failure producing folds. Reduced temperature drying further reduced wrinkles. Special filtration, purification, and cleaning produced very high resistivity fluids free from particles. A highly instrumented test bay accurately simulated a pulse forming network environment and allowed detailed and accurate testing. The best single section high rate results were 550 J/kg at 100,000 - 1,000,000 shot life at double the specified duty, while the best low rate results were slightly higher. Case weight minimization was stuided, and three prototype lightweight cases were built. Several techniques for smoothing rough capacitor foils were examined, and a flame technique was selected as being most easily implemented. Problems of terminating extended foils were examined, and a flame-spray method selected as most practical.

  4. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  5. Activities on Realization of High-Power and Steady-State ECRH System and Achievement of High Performance Plasmas in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ikeda, R.; Tamura, N.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Takita, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Idei, H.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.; Felici, F.; Goodman, T.

    2009-11-26

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) has contributed to the achievement of high performance plasma production, high electron temperature plasmas and sustainment of steady-state plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Our immediate targets of upgrading the ECRH system are 5 MW several seconds and 1 MW longer than one hour power injection into LHD. The improvement will greatly extend the plasma parameter regime. For that purpose, we have been promoting the development and installation of 77 GHz/1-1.5 MW/several seconds and 0.3 MW/CW gyrotrons in collaboration with University of Tsukuba. The transmission lines are re-examined and improved for high and CW power transmission. In the recent experimental campaign, two 77 GHz gyrotrons were operated. One more gyrotron, which was designed for 1.5 MW/2 s output, was constructed and is tested. We have been promoting to improve total ECRH efficiency for efficient gyrotron-power use and efficient plasma heating, e.g. a new waveguide alignment method and mode-content analysis and the feedback control of the injection polarization. In the last experimental campaign, the 77 GHz gyrotrons were used in combination with the existing 84 GHz range and 168 GHz gyrotrons. Multi-frequency ECRH system is more flexible in plasma heating experiments and diagnostics. A lot of experiments have been performed in relation to high electron temperature plasmas by realization of the core electron-root confinement (CERC), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), Electron Bernstein Wave heating, and steady-state plasma sustainment. Some of the experimental results are briefly described.

  6. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  7. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  8. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  9. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses. PMID:20596201

  10. Power processing units for high power solar electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.; Das, Radhe S.; Krauthamer, Stanley

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of high-power processing units (PPUs) for multimegawatt solar electric propulsion (SEP) vehicles using advanced ion thrusters is presented. Significant savings of scale are possible for PPUs used to supply power to ion thrusters operating at 0.1 to 1.5 MWe per thruster. The PPU specific mass is found to be strongly sensitive to variations in the ion thruster's power per thruster and moderately sensitive to variations in the thruster's screen voltage due to varying the I(sp) of the thruster. Each PPU consists of a dc-to-dc converter to increase the voltage from the 500 V dc of the photovoltaic power system to the 5 to 13 kV dc required by the ion thrusters.

  11. Microwave ablation at 10.0 GHz achieves comparable ablation zones to 1.9 GHz in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Luyen, Hung; Gao, Fuqiang; Hagness, Susan C; Behdad, Nader

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using high-frequency microwaves for tissue ablation by comparing the performance of a 10 GHz microwave ablation system with that of a 1.9 GHz system. Two sets of floating sleeve dipole antennas operating at these frequencies were designed and fabricated for use in ex vivo experiments with bovine livers. Combined electromagnetic and transient thermal simulations were conducted to analyze the performance of these antennas. Subsequently, a total of 16 ablation experiments (eight at 1.9 GHz and eight at 10.0 GHz) were conducted at a power level of 42 W for either 5 or 10 min. In all cases, the 1.9 and 10 GHz experiments resulted in comparable ablation zone dimensions. Temperature monitoring probes revealed faster heating rates in the immediate vicinity of the 10.0 GHz antenna compared to the 1.9 GHz antenna, along with a slightly delayed onset of heating farther from the 10 GHz antenna, suggesting that heat conduction plays a greater role at higher microwave frequencies in achieving a comparably sized ablation zone. The results obtained from these experiments agree very well with the combined electromagnetic/thermal simulation results. These simulations and experiments show that using lower frequency microwaves does not offer any significant advantages, in terms of the achievable ablation zones, over using higher frequency microwaves. Indeed, it is demonstrated that high-frequency microwave antennas may be used to create reasonably large ablation zones. Higher frequencies offer the advantage of smaller antenna size, which is expected to lead to less invasive interstitial devices and may possibly lead to the development of more compact multielement arrays with heating properties not available from single-element antennas.

  12. High voltage photovoltaic power converter

    DOEpatents

    Haigh, Ronald E.; Wojtczuk, Steve; Jacobson, Gerard F.; Hagans, Karla G.

    2001-01-01

    An array of independently connected photovoltaic cells on a semi-insulating substrate contains reflective coatings between the cells to enhance efficiency. A uniform, flat top laser beam profile is illuminated upon the array to produce electrical current having high voltage. An essentially wireless system includes a laser energy source being fed through optic fiber and cast upon the photovoltaic cell array to prevent stray electrical signals prior to use of the current from the array. Direct bandgap, single crystal semiconductor materials, such as GaAs, are commonly used in the array. Useful applications of the system include locations where high voltages are provided to confined spaces such as in explosive detonation, accelerators, photo cathodes and medical appliances.

  13. NASA GRC High Power Electromagnetic Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Pensil, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). This paper describes the MPD thruster and the test facility.

  14. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  15. MAMBO observations at 240GHz of optically obscured Spitzer sources: source clumps and radio activity at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, P.; Magliocchetti, M.; de Zotti, G.

    2010-01-01

    Optically very faint (R > 25.5) sources detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24μm represent a very interesting population at redshift z ~ (1.5-3). They exhibit strong clustering properties, implying that they are hosted by very massive haloes, and their mid-infrared emission could be powered by either dust-enshrouded star formation and/or by an obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). We report observations carried out with the Max Planck Millimetre Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the IRAM 30-m antenna on Pico Veleta of a candidate protocluster with five optically obscured sources selected from the 24-μm Spitzer sample of the First-Look Survey. Interestingly, these sources appear to lie on a high-density filament aligned with the two radio jets of an AGN. Four out of five of the observed sources were detected. We combine these measurements with optical, infrared and radio observations to probe the nature of the candidate protocluster members. Our preliminary conclusions can be summarized as follows: the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of all sources include both AGN and starburst contributions; the AGN contribution to the bolometric luminosities ranges between 14 and 26 per cent of the total. Such a contribution is enough for the AGN to dominate the emission at 5.8, 8 and 24μm, while the stellar component, inferred from SED fitting, prevails at 1.25mm and at λ < 4.5μm. The present analysis suggests a coherent interplay at high z between extended radio activity and the development of filamentary large-scale structures.

  16. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.; Giguet, E. |

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  17. Quasi-Optical 34-GHz Rf Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2007-06-19

    Designs have been carried out on non-high-vacuum, low-power versions of three- and four-mirror quasi-optical passive and active Ka-band pulse compressors, and prototypes built and tested based on these designs. The active element is a quasi-optical grating employing gas discharge tubes in the gratings. Power gains of about 3:1 were observed experimentally for the passive designs, and about 7:1 with the active designs. High-power, high-vacuum versions of the three-and four-mirror quasi-optical pulse compressors were built and tested at low power. These now await installation and testing using multi-MW power from the 34-GHz magnicon.

  18. High-power dielectric Cherenkov maser oscillator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Main, W. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Cherry, R. ); Garate, E. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on the dielectric Cherenkov maser (DCM) oscillator. The device consists of a cylindrical metallic waveguide of inner radius 3.64 cm which is partially filled with a dielectric liner. Traveling through the lined waveguide is an annular relativistic electron beam. Liners of dielectric constant {epsilon} = 10, 5 and 2.3 were investigated for liner thicknesses of 4 and 6 mm. The 6-mm-thick, {epsilon} = 10 liner generated an RF output of 200 MW for 20 ns at 3.8 Hz with electron-beam parameters of 700 kV, 12 kA, and pulse duration of 100 ns. The maximum measured power output for the other configurations was 80 MW at a frequency of 7 GHz ({epsilon} = 5), with several MW of power output from the polyethylene liner ({epsilon} = 2.3) at a frequency of {approximately} 9 GHz.

  19. High-Speed, high-power, switching transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, D.; Ohu, C. K.; Hower, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon transistor rate for 200 angstroms at 400 to 600 volts combines switching speed of transistors with ruggedness, power capacity of thyristor. Transistor introduces unique combination of increased power-handling capability, unusally low saturation and switching losses, and submicrosecond switching speeds. Potential applications include high power switching regulators, linear amplifiers, chopper controls for high frequency electrical vehicle drives, VLF transmitters, RF induction heaters, kitchen cooking ranges, and electronic scalpels for medical surgery.

  20. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guolin; Shu Ting; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing; Yin Yi; Wu Dapeng; Zhu Jun; Ren Heming; Yang Jie

    2010-12-15

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  1. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guolin; Shu, Ting; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Zhenxing; Yin, Yi; Wu, Dapeng; Zhu, Jun; Ren, Heming; Yang, Jie

    2010-12-01

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  2. A 12 GHz low-jitter LC-VCO PLL in 130 nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Chen, J.; Feng, Y.; Tang, Y.; Huang, D.; Rui, W.; Gong, D.; Liu, T.; Ye, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a wideband low-jitter LC-VCO phase-locked loop in 130 nm CMOS technology for high speed serial link applications. The PLL covers a 5.6 GHz to 13.4 GHz frequency range by using two LC-VCO cores with an RMS jitter of 370 fs. The single event effects testing is performed with a neutron beam at Los Alamos National Laboratory and no frequency disturbance is found over the test period. The PLL consumes 50.88 mW of power under a 1.2 V power supply.

  3. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  4. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  5. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  6. Spacecraft high-voltage power supply construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. F.; Stern, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The design techniques, circuit components, fabrication techniques, and past experience used in successful high-voltage power supplies for spacecraft flight systems are described. A discussion of the basic physics of electrical discharges in gases is included and a design rationale for the prevention of electrical discharges is provided. Also included are typical examples of proven spacecraft high-voltage power supplies with typical specifications for design, fabrication, and testing.

  7. High Voltage Power Transmission for Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young il

    The high wind speeds and wide available area at sea have recently increased the interests on offshore wind farms in the U.S.A. As offshore wind farms become larger and are placed further from the shore, the power transmission to the onshore grid becomes a key feature. Power transmission of the offshore wind farm, in which good wind conditions and a larger installation area than an onshore site are available, requires the use of submarine cable systems. Therefore, an underground power cable system requires unique design and installation challenges not found in the overhead power cable environment. This paper presents analysis about the benefit and drawbacks of three different transmission solutions: HVAC, LCC/VSC HVDC in the grid connecting offshore wind farms and also analyzed the electrical characteristics of underground cables. In particular, loss of HV (High Voltage) subsea power of the transmission cables was evaluated by the Brakelmann's theory, taking into account the distributions of current and temperature.

  8. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  9. High power microwave beam steering based on gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Romanchenko, I. V. Rostov, V. V.; Gunin, A. V.; Konev, V. Yu.

    2015-06-07

    We demonstrate electronically controlled beam steering by high power RF pulses produced by two gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines (NLTLs) connected to a one high voltage driver. Each NLTL is capable of producing several ns RF pulses with peak power from 50 to 700 MW (6% standard deviation) at frequencies from 0.5 to 1.7 GHz (1% standard deviation) with 100 Hz repetition rate. Using a helix antenna allows irradiating of RF pulses with almost circular polarization and 350 MW maximum peak power, which corresponds to 350 kV effective potential of radiation. At the installation of two identical channels, we demonstrate the possibility of beam steering within ±15° in the horizontal plane by coherent RF pulses with circular polarization at 1.0 GHz center frequency. Fourfold increase in the power flux density for in-phase irradiation of RF pulses is confirmed by comparison with one-channel operation.

  10. Optical power splitter for splitting high power light

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Christensen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    An optical power splitter for the distribution of high-power light energy has a plurality of prisms arranged about a central axis to form a central channel. The input faces of the prisms are in a common plane which is substantially perpendicular to the central axis. A beam of light which is substantially coaxial to the central axis is incident on the prisms and at least partially strikes a surface area of each prism input face. The incident beam also partially passes through the central channel.

  11. Optical power splitter for splitting high power light

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Christensen, J.J.

    1995-04-18

    An optical power splitter for the distribution of high-power light energy has a plurality of prisms arranged about a central axis to form a central channel. The input faces of the prisms are in a common plane which is substantially perpendicular to the central axis. A beam of light which is substantially coaxial to the central axis is incident on the prisms and at least partially strikes a surface area of each prism input face. The incident beam also partially passes through the central channel. 5 figs.

  12. New, rugged, high power Cockcroft-Walton power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.; Behrsing, G.; Hazelton, E.; Hearn, W.; Lancaster, H.

    1981-03-01

    A ten foot (3 m), ten-stage air-insulated Crockcroft-Walton power supply designed and built at LBL has been tested to 900 kV at the SuperHILAC. Operating at 80 kHz, the power supply features low ripple, moderate stored energy, 10 ma average current, and no bouncer requirement for pulsed loads. Other system features include: inexpensive generating voltmeters and a capacitive pick off for monitoring and regulation in lieu of costly resistance dividers, home-made semiconductor rectifier modules, excellent component protection against sparking, and easy maintenance. This report describes design, construction, and testing of the high voltage system.

  13. High-Efficiency Ka-Band Waveguide Two-Way Asymmetric Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Simons, R. N.; Freeman, J. C.; Chevalier, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is planning a number of Space Exploration, Earth Observation and Space Science missions where Ka-band solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) could have a role. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based SSPAs with output powers on the order of 10 W at Ka-band frequencies would be adequate to satisfy the data transmission rate requirements at the distances involved. MMICs are a type of integrated circuit fabricated on a GaAs wafer, which operates at micro wave frequencies and performs the function of signal amplification. The highest power Ka-band (31.8 to 32.3 GHz) SSPA to have flown in space had an output power of 2.6 W with an overall efficiency of 14.3 percent. This SSPA was built around discrete GaAs pHEMT (high electron mobility transistor) devices and flew aboard the Deep Space One spacecraft. State-of-the-art GaAs pHEMT-based MMIC power amplifiers (PAs) can deliver RF power at Ka-band frequencies anywhere from 3 W with a power added efficiency (PAE) of 32 percent to 6 W with a PAE of 26 percent. However, to achieve power levels higher than 6 W, the output of several MMIC PAs would need to be combined using a high-efficiency power combiner. Conventional binary waveguide power combiners, based on short-slot and magic-T circuits, require MMIC PAs with identical amplitude and phase characteristics for high combining efficiency. However, due to manufacturing process variations, the output powers of the MMIC PAs tend to be unequal, and hence the need to develop unequal power combiners. A two-way asymmetric magic-T based power combiner for MMIC power amplifiers, which can take in unequal inputs, has been successfully designed, fabricated, and characterized over NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) frequency range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The figure is a transparent view of the a sym - metric combiner that shows the 4-port configuration and the internal structure. The rod, post, and iris are positioned by design to achieve the desired asymmetric power ratio

  14. Cryogenic silicon photoconductive power switches for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Petr, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The silicon photoconductive power switch (PCPS) is an attractive switch technology because it is capable of switching extremely large energy pulses of short duration with good efficiency and precise timing control. At high operating frequencies, there are enormous advantages to be gained by operating at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For example, the mechanical properties of silicon at 77K are such that its power-dissipation limit due to stress fracture is an order of magnitude higher than at 300K. Also, its thermal conductivity is improved at lower temperatures. Another important characteristic of 77K silicon is that its optical absorption depth at 1.06um extends out to 13cm, as compared to 0.1cm at 300K. Important aspects of operating a cryogenic silicon PCPS at high average power levels are addressed here. Electrical and optical properties of silicon at both 77K and 300K are developed, along with its thermomechanical properties when switching high peak and average power. In addition, experimental data concerning PCPS electrical-switching characteristics, optical trigger uniformity, and thermal stress response during conduction are presented. Finally, a system study compares the silicon PCPS to the thyratron.

  15. RadioAstron space VLBI imaging of polarized radio emission in the high-redshift quasar 0642+449 at 1.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. P.; Gómez, J. L.; Bruni, G.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Anderson, J.; Bach, U.; Kraus, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Voytsik, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Polarization of radio emission in extragalactic jets at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution holds important clues for understanding the structure of the magnetic field in the inner regions of the jets and in close vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the centers of active galaxies. Aims: Space VLBI observations provide a unique tool for polarimetric imaging at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution and studying the properties of magnetic field in active galactic nuclei on scales of less than 104 gravitational radii. Methods: A space VLBI observation of high-redshift quasar TXS 0642+449 (OH 471), made at a wavelength of 18 cm (frequency of 1.6 GHz) as part of the early science programme (ESP) of the RadioAstron mission, is used here to test the polarimetric performance of the orbiting Space Radio Telescope (SRT) employed by the mission, to establish a methodology for making full Stokes polarimetry with space VLBI at 1.6 GHz, and to study the polarized emission in the target object on sub-milliarcsecond scales. Results: Polarization leakage of the SRT at 18 cm is found to be within 9% in amplitude, demonstrating the feasibility of high fidelity polarization imaging with RadioAstron at this wavelength. A polarimetric image of 0642+449 with a resolution of 0.8 mas (signifying an ~4 times improvement over ground VLBI observations at the same wavelength) is obtained. The image shows a compact core-jet structure with low (≈2%) polarization and predominantly transverse magnetic field in the nuclear region. The VLBI data also uncover a complex structure of the nuclear region, with two prominent features possibly corresponding to the jet base and a strong recollimation shock. The maximum brightness temperature at the jet base can be as high as 4 × 1013 K.

  16. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  17. The NASA CSTI high capacity power project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  18. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  19. Small high cooling power space cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-01

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  20. Silver based batteries for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinski, A. P.; Russell, S. J.; Serenyi, J. R.; Murphy, J. P.

    The present status of silver oxide-zinc technology and applications has been described by Karpinski et al. [A.P. Karpinski, B. Makovetski, S.J. Russell, J.R. Serenyi, D.C. Williams, Silver-Zinc: status of technology and applications, Journal of Power Sources, 80 (1999) 53-60], where the silver-zinc couple is still the preferred choice where high specific energy/energy density, coupled with high specific power/power density are important for high-rate, weight or size/configuration sensitive applications. Perhaps the silver oxide cathode can be considered one of the most versatile electrode materials. When coupled with other anodes and corresponding electrolyte management system, the silver electrode provides for a wide array of electrochemical systems that can be tailored to meet the most demanding, high power requirements. Besides zinc, the most notable include cadmium, iron, metal hydride, and hydrogen electrode for secondary systems, while primary systems include lithium and aluminum. Alloys including silver are also available, such as silver chloride, which when coupled with magnesium or aluminum are primarily used in many seawater applications. The selection and use of these couples is normally the result of a trade-off of many factors. These include performance, safety, risk, reliability, and cost. When high power is required, silver oxide-zinc, silver oxide-aluminum, and silver oxide-lithium are the most energetic. For moderate performance (i.e., lower power), silver oxide-zinc or silver-cadmium would be the system of choice. This paper summarizes the suitability of the silver-based couples, with an emphasis on the silver-zinc system, as primary or rechargeable power sources for high energy/power applications.

  1. 23 GHz ferroelectric electron gun based gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Moshe, R.; Einat, M.

    2011-04-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes have been explored as an alternative electron source for microwave tubes. Past experiments have demonstrated operation at frequencies of 2-10 GHz. Since the ferroelectric cathode is based on surface plasma, the relatively high energy spread limits the tube operation frequency. Hence, the possibility to obtain higher frequencies remained questionable. In this experimental work a gyrotron oscillator was designed with the operation frequency increased toward that of millimeter waves. A cylindrical tube with a cutoff frequency of ˜22 GHz was integrated to a ferroelectric electron gun. Pulses of ˜0.5 μs duration with a frequency of 23 GHz were obtained.

  2. High-Power, High-Temperature Superconductor Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) 10 years ago, the most promising areas for their applications in microwave systems have been as passive components for communication systems. Soon after the discovery, experiments showed that passive microwave circuits made from HTS material exceeded the performance of conventional devices for low-power applications and could be 10 times as small or smaller. However, for superconducting microwave components, high-power microwave applications have remained elusive until now. In 1996, DuPont and Com Dev Ltd. developed high-power superconducting materials and components for communication applications under a NASA Lewis Research Center cooperative agreement, NCC3-344 "High Power High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Technology Development." The agreement was cost shared between the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program Office and the two industrial partners. It has the following objectives: 1) Material development and characterization for high-power HTS applications; 2) Development and validation of generic high-power microwave components; 3) Development of a proof-of-concept model for a high-power six-channel HTS output multiplexer.

  3. A role for high frequency superconducting devices in free space power transmission systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jose L., Jr.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    Major advances in space power technology are being made in photovoltaic, solar thermal, and nuclear systems. Despite these advances, the power systems required by the energy and power intensive mission of the future will be massive due to the large collecting surfaces, large thermal management systems, and heavy shielding. Reducing this mass on board the space vehicle can result in significant benefits because of the high cost of transporting and moving mass about in space. An approach to this problem is beaming the power from a point where the massiveness of the power plant is not such a major concern. The viability of such an approach was already investigated. Efficient microwave power beam transmission at 2.45 GHz was demonstrated over short range. Higher frequencies are desired for efficient transmission over several hundred or thousand kilometers in space. Superconducting DC-RF conversion as well as RF-DC conversion offers exciting possibilities. Multivoltage power conditioning for multicavity high power RF tubes could be eliminated since only low voltages are required for Josephson junctions. Small, high efficiency receivers may be possible using the reverse Josephson effects. A conceptual receiving antenna design using superconducting devices to determine possible system operating efficiency is assessed. If realized, these preliminary assessments indicate a role for superconducting devices in millimeter and submillimeter free space power transmission systems.

  4. 42GHz ECRH assisted Plasma Breakdown in tokamak SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B. K.; Pradhan, S.; Patel, Paresh; Babu, Rajan; Patel, Jatin; Patel, Harshida; Dhorajia, Pragnesh; Tanna, V.; Atrey, P. K.; Manchanda, R.; Gupta, Manoj; Joisa, Shankar; Gupta, C. N.; Danial, Raju; Singh, Prashant; Jha, R.; Bora, D.

    2015-03-01

    In SST-1, 42GHz ECRH system has been commissioned to carry out breakdown and heating experiments at 0.75T and 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic fields. The 42GHz ECRH system consists of high power microwave source Gyrotron capable to deliver 500kW microwave power for 500ms duration, approximately 20 meter long transmission line and a mirror based launcher. The ECRH power in fundamental O-mode & second harmonic X-mode is launched from low field side (radial port) of the tokamak. At 0.75T operation, approximately 300 kW ECH power is launched in second harmonic X-mode and successful ECRH assisted breakdown is achieved at low loop_voltage ~ 3V. The ECRH power is launched around 45ms prior to loop voltage. The hydrogen pressure in tokamak is maintained ~ 1×10-5mbar and the pre-ionized density is ~ 4×1012/cc. At 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic field, the ECH power is launched in fundamental O-mode. The ECH power at fundamental harmonic is varied from 100 kW to 250 kW and successful breakdown is achieved in all ECRH shots. In fundamental harmonic there is no delay in breakdown while at second harmonic ~ 40ms delay is observed, which is normal in case of second harmonic ECRH assisted breakdown.

  5. Graphene based GHz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony K.; El Fatimy, Abdel; Barbara, Paola; Nath, Anindya; Campbell, Paul M.; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, D. Kurt

    Graphene demonstrates great promise as a detector over a wide spectral range especially in the GHz range. This is because absorption is enhanced due to the Drude contribution. In the GHz range there are viable detection mechanisms for graphene devices. With this in mind, two types of GHz detectors are fabricated on epitaxial graphene using a lift off resist-based clean lithography process to produce low contact resistance. Both device types use asymmetry for detection, consistent with recent thoughts of the photothermoelectric effect (PTE) mechanism. The first is an antenna coupled device. It utilizes two dissimilar contact metals and the work function difference produces the asymmetry. The other device is a field effect transistor constructed with an asymmetric top gate that creates a PN junction and facilitates tuning the photovoltaic response. The response of both device types, tested from 100GHz to 170GHz, are reported. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award Number N000141310865).

  6. Tapered fiber based high power random laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Du, Xueyuan; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel high power random fiber laser (RFL) based on tapered fiber. It can overcome the power scaling limitation of RFL while maintaining good beam quality to a certain extent. An output power of 26.5 W has been achieved in a half-open cavity with one kilometer long tapered fiber whose core diameter gradually changes from 8 μm to 20 μm. The steady-state light propagation equations have been modified by taking into account the effective core area to demonstrate the tapered RFL through numerical calculations. The numerical model effectively describes the power characteristics of the tapered fiber based RFL, and both the calculating and experimental results show higher power exporting potential compared with the conventional single mode RFL. PMID:27137338

  7. Design and experiment of a cross-shaped mode converter for high-power microwave applications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengren; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhong, Huihuang; Fan, Yuwei

    2013-12-01

    A compact mode converter, which is capable of converting a TM01 mode into a circularly polarized TE11 mode, was developed and experimentally studied with high-power microwaves. The converter, consisting of two turnstile junctions, is very short along the wave propagation direction, and therefore is suitable for designing compact and axially aligned high-power microwave radiation systems. In this paper, the principle of a converter working at 1.75 GHz is demonstrated, as well as the experimental results. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement. At the center frequency, the conversion efficiency is more than 95%, the measured axial ratio is about 0.4 dB, and the power-handing capacity is excess of 1.9 GW.

  8. Design and experiment of a cross-shaped mode converter for high-power microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shengren Yuan, Chengwei; Zhong, Huihuang; Fan, Yuwei

    2013-12-15

    A compact mode converter, which is capable of converting a TM{sub 01} mode into a circularly polarized TE{sub 11} mode, was developed and experimentally studied with high-power microwaves. The converter, consisting of two turnstile junctions, is very short along the wave propagation direction, and therefore is suitable for designing compact and axially aligned high-power microwave radiation systems. In this paper, the principle of a converter working at 1.75 GHz is demonstrated, as well as the experimental results. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement. At the center frequency, the conversion efficiency is more than 95%, the measured axial ratio is about 0.4 dB, and the power-handing capacity is excess of 1.9 GW.

  9. The influence of desorption gas to high power microwave window multipactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Tang Chuanxiang; Liu Guozhi; Chen Changhua; Qiu Shi; Fang Jinyong; Hou Qin

    2008-09-15

    Gas desorbed by electrons plays a key role in multipactor saturation and final plasma breakdown at the vacuum side of the window in high power microwave systems. A multipactor model involving electron-neutral collision and ionization is established. When desorption gas pressure reaches 1 Torr, the electron impact energy apparently decreases, multipactor saturates at a lower surface charging field, and multipactor saturation meets easier, compared to vacuum. Experiments for different material windows of high power microwave, with the power of 1 GW, frequency of 9.4 GHz, and 20 ns single and multiple pulses was conducted. It was discovered that gas pressure rose prominently in the horn, when breakdown occurred. The increase in local gas pressure during the 20 ns pulse is estimated from the experiment to reach several Torr, a pressure that is consistent with the presented dynamic model.

  10. The influence of desorption gas to high power microwave window multipactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao; Liu, Guozhi; Tang, Chuanxiang; Chen, Changhua; Qiu, Shi; Fang, Jinyong; Hou, Qin

    2008-09-01

    Gas desorbed by electrons plays a key role in multipactor saturation and final plasma breakdown at the vacuum side of the window in high power microwave systems. A multipactor model involving electron-neutral collision and ionization is established. When desorption gas pressure reaches 1Torr, the electron impact energy apparently decreases, multipactor saturates at a lower surface charging field, and multipactor saturation meets easier, compared to vacuum. Experiments for different material windows of high power microwave, with the power of 1GW, frequency of 9.4GHz, and 20ns single and multiple pulses was conducted. It was discovered that gas pressure rose prominently in the horn, when breakdown occurred. The increase in local gas pressure during the 20ns pulse is estimated from the experiment to reach several Torr, a pressure that is consistent with the presented dynamic model.

  11. Design of pulsed guiding magnetic field for high power microwave generators

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.-C. Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on designing solenoid together with the corresponding power supply system to excite pulsed magnetic field required for high power microwave generators. Particularly, a solenoid is designed and the excited magnetic field is applied to a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov generator. It is found in experiment that the electron beam is properly guided by the magnetic field and a 1.1 GW high power microwave is achieved at a central frequency of 13.76 GHz. Pulsed solenoid system has the advantages of compactness and low energy consumption, which are of great interest for repetitive operation. The reported studies and results can be generalized to other applications which require magnetic fields.

  12. Design of pulsed guiding magnetic field for high power microwave generators.

    PubMed

    Ju, J-C; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Shu, T; Zhong, H-H

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on designing solenoid together with the corresponding power supply system to excite pulsed magnetic field required for high power microwave generators. Particularly, a solenoid is designed and the excited magnetic field is applied to a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov generator. It is found in experiment that the electron beam is properly guided by the magnetic field and a 1.1 GW high power microwave is achieved at a central frequency of 13.76 GHz. Pulsed solenoid system has the advantages of compactness and low energy consumption, which are of great interest for repetitive operation. The reported studies and results can be generalized to other applications which require magnetic fields. PMID:25273750

  13. Efficiency enhancement of high power vacuum BWO's using nonuniform slow wave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, L.D.; Schamiloglu, E. . Pulsed Power and Plasma Science Lab.); Lemke, R.W. ); Korovin, S.D.; Rostov, V.V.; Roitman, A.M. . Inst. of High Current Electronics); Hendricks, K.J.; Spencer, T.A. . Advanced Weapons and Survivability Directorate)

    1994-10-01

    The Sinus-6, a high-power relativistic repetitively-pulsed electron beam accelerator, is used to drive various slow wave structures in a BWO configuration in vacuum. Peak output power of about 550 MW at 9.45 GHz was radiated in an 8-ns pulse. The authors describe experiments which study the relative efficiencies of microwave generation from a two-stage nonuniform amplitude slow wave structure and its variations without an initial stage. Experimental results are compared with 2.5 D particle-in-cell computer simulations. The results suggest that prebunching the electron beam in the initial section of the nonuniform BWO results in increased microwave generation efficiency. Furthermore, simulations reveal that, in addition to the backward propagating surface harmonic of the TM[sub 01] mode, backward and forward propagating volume harmonics with phase velocity twice that of the surface harmonic play an important role in high-power microwave generation and radiation.

  14. Enhanced frequency agility of high-power relativistic backward wave oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, L.D.; Schamiloglu, E.; Lemke, R.W.; Roitman, A.M.; Korovin, S.D.; Rostov, V.V.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes how finite length effects in high-power backward wave oscillators can be exploited in a controlled manner to achieve enhanced frequency agility. Experiments were performed using a Sinus-6 high-power relativistic repetitively pulsed electron beam accelerator. A uniform slow wave structure was used in these studies and its parameters were fixed. Sections of smooth-walled circular waveguide of varying lengths were inserted both before and after the slow wave structure. Variations in the length of smooth-walled waveguide on the order of a quarter-wavelength of the generated electromagnetic radiation were found to significantly affect both microwave frequency and radiation efficiency in a periodic-like manner. The experimental results were reproduced in TWOQUICK electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. A bandwidth of about 500 MHz centered around 9.5 GHz at hundreds of MW power levels has been achieved with constant beam and slow wave structure parameters.

  15. New applications for high average power beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.; Turman, B. N.; Patterson, E. L.

    1993-06-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, FEL's, and ICF drivers from the early 60's through the late 80's is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of supporting new types of manufacturing processes and performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications. This paper discusses a process for identifying and developing possible commercial applications, specifically those requiring very high average power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. The authors discuss specific technology requirements and give examples of application development efforts. The application development work is directed at areas that can possibly benefit from the high specific energies attainable with short pulse machines.

  16. Preliminary experimental investigation of a complex dual-band high power microwave source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Li, Yangmei; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang

    2015-10-01

    In order to promote the power conversion efficiency of a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) and obtain microwaves in dual bands, an axially extracted C-band virtual cathode oscillator (VCO) with multiple resonant cavities is introduced to partially utilize the load current of an S-band MILO. The formed novel dual-band high power microwave source called MILO and VCO is investigated with simulation and experimentally. A dual-band radiation antenna is designed to effectively radiate microwaves generated by the MILO and the VCO, respectively, while avoiding them being influenced by the microwave reflection and diffraction. The preliminary experimental results measured by the dual-band diagnostic system show that both the MILO and the VCO operate normally under repeated shots. A microwave of 2.1 GHz, 1.70 GW is generated from the MILO and a 0.37 GW microwave at frequencies of 4.1 GHz and 3.8 GHz is generated from the VCO under the condition of about 440 kV and 35 kA. Compared with a single MILO (10.6%), a MILO and VCO achieves higher total power and efficiency (13.4%) in both S and C bands, indicating that the load current of the MILO partially couples into the beam-wave interaction in the VCO and then contributes to the output microwaves. However, more works are needed regarding the spectrum purification of the VCO and promotion of the output power of both the MILO and the VCO.

  17. Preliminary experimental investigation of a complex dual-band high power microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoping Li, Yangmei; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang

    2015-10-15

    In order to promote the power conversion efficiency of a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) and obtain microwaves in dual bands, an axially extracted C-band virtual cathode oscillator (VCO) with multiple resonant cavities is introduced to partially utilize the load current of an S-band MILO. The formed novel dual-band high power microwave source called MILO and VCO is investigated with simulation and experimentally. A dual-band radiation antenna is designed to effectively radiate microwaves generated by the MILO and the VCO, respectively, while avoiding them being influenced by the microwave reflection and diffraction. The preliminary experimental results measured by the dual-band diagnostic system show that both the MILO and the VCO operate normally under repeated shots. A microwave of 2.1 GHz, 1.70 GW is generated from the MILO and a 0.37 GW microwave at frequencies of 4.1 GHz and 3.8 GHz is generated from the VCO under the condition of about 440 kV and 35 kA. Compared with a single MILO (10.6%), a MILO and VCO achieves higher total power and efficiency (13.4%) in both S and C bands, indicating that the load current of the MILO partially couples into the beam-wave interaction in the VCO and then contributes to the output microwaves. However, more works are needed regarding the spectrum purification of the VCO and promotion of the output power of both the MILO and the VCO.

  18. CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

  19. A high-power xenon dimer excilamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Skakun, V. S.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shitts, D. V.

    2006-06-01

    A high-power sealed-off excilamp operating on xenon dimers excited by a barrier discharge and emitting in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range (λ ˜ 172 nm) has been designed, constructed, and tested. The lamp comprises six quartz tubes (emitters) and has a total radiating surface area of 20 × 20 = 400 cm2. The average output power density radiated from the surface of each emitter exceeds 120 mW/cm2. The total output power of the excilamp immediately upon discharge ignition exceeds 50 W.

  20. High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E.; Cheverton, R.D.

    1997-03-01

    A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

  1. T-junction waveguide-based combining high power microwave beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qiang; Yuan Chengwei; Liu Lie

    2011-08-15

    Waveguide-based combining microwave beams is an attractive technique for enhancing the output capacities of narrow-band high power microwave devices. A specific T-junction combiner is designed for combining the X/X band microwave beams, and the detailed combining method and experimental results are presented. In the experiments, two microwave sources which can generate gigawatt level microwaves are driven by a single accelerator simultaneously, and their operation frequencies are 9.41 and 9.60 GHz, respectively. The two microwave beams with durations of about 35 ns have been successfully combined, and no breakdown phenomenon occurs.

  2. Advances in industrial high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Holger

    2005-03-01

    Four major types of laser sources are used for material processing. Excluding Excimer lasers, this paper focuses on advances in High Power CO2 lasers, Solid State Lasers and Diode Lasers. Because of their unrivaled cost to brightness relationship the fast axial flow CO2 laser remains unrivaled for flat-sheet laser cutting. Adding approximately a kW of output power ever four years, this laser type has been propelling the entire sheet metal fabrication industry for the last two decades. Very robust, diffusion cooled annular discharge CO2 lasers with 2kW output power have enabled robot mounted lasers for 3D applications. Solid State Lasers are chosen mainly because of the option of fiber delivery. Industrial applications still rely on lamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with guaranteed output powers of 4.5 kW at the workpiece. The introduction of the diode pumped Thin Disc Laser 4.5 kW laser enables new applications such as the Programmable Focus Optics. Pumping the Thin Disc Laser requires highly reliable High Power Diode Lasers. The necessary reliability can only be achieved in a modern, automated semiconductor manufacturing facility. For Diode Lasers, electro-optical efficiencies above 65% are as important as the passivation of the facets to avoid Burn-In power degradation.

  3. Optimizing the design of very high power, high performance converters

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R J; Tiagha, E A; Ganetis, G; Nawrocky, R J

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes how various technologies are used to achieve the desired performance in a high current magnet power converter system. It is hoped that the discussions of the design approaches taken will be applicable to other power supply systems where stringent requirements in stability, accuracy and reliability must be met.

  4. Experimental investigation of a Ka band high power millimeter wave generator operated at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai; Fan Yuwei

    2011-05-15

    An overmoded slow wave type Ka band generator is investigated experimentally to produce high power millimeter waves in this paper. The experiments were carried out at the TORCH-01 accelerator. The produced microwave frequency was measured by dispersive line method, and the power was estimated by integrating over the radiation pattern at far field. With relatively low guiding magnetic field of 0.8 T and diode voltage and beam current of 590 kV and 5.2 kA, respectively, a 33.56 GHz millimeter wave with an output power of 320 MW was generated, and the microwave mode was quasi-TM{sub 01} mode.

  5. High-power radio frequency pulse generation and extration based on wakefield excited by an intense charged particle beam in dielectric-loaded waveguides.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech

    2009-07-24

    Power extraction using a dielectric-loaded (DL) waveguide is a way to generate high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for future particle accelerators, especially for two-beam-acceleration. In a two-beam-acceleration scheme, a low-energy, high-current particle beam is passed through a deceleration section of waveguide (decelerator), where the power from the beam is partially transferred to trailing electromagnetic waves (wakefields); then with a properly designed RF output coupler, the power generated in the decelerator is extracted to an output waveguide, where finally the power can be transmitted and used to accelerate another usually high-energy low-current beam. The decelerator, together with the RF output coupler, is called a power extractor. At Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA), we designed a 7.8GHz power extractor with a circular DL waveguide and tested it with single electron bunches and bunch trains. The output RF frequency (7.8GHz) is the sixth harmonic of the operational frequency (1.3GHz) of the electron gun and the linac at AWA. In single bunch excitation, a 1.7ns RF pulse with 30MW of power was generated by a single 66nC electron bunch passing through the decelerator. In subsequent experiments, by employing different splitting-recombining optics for the photoinjector laser, electron bunch trains were generated and thus longer RF pulses could be successfully generated and extracted. In 16-bunch experiments, 10ns and 22ns RF pulses have been generated and extracted; and in 4-bunch experiments, the maximum power generated was 44MW with 40MW extracted. A 26GHz DL power extractor has also been designed to test this technique in the millimeter-wave range. A power level of 148MW is expected to be generated by a bunch train with a bunch spacing of 769ps and bunch charges of 20nC each. The arrangement for the experiment is illustrated in a diagram. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power extraction has also been explored in a dual-frequency design. By using a bunch

  6. Review of High Power Pulse Transformer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Tan, Xiaohua

    Vacuum devices generally work under high power pulse voltage of order 103 V to 106 V, and this pulse voltage could be generated by high power pulse transformer. Relatively, pulse transformer has the advantages of compact structure and excellent repetitiveness. It is expected of short rise-time, wide pulse-width and high energy transferring efficiency in most applications. Aiming at this purpose, it is feasible to select magnetic core with high permeability and high saturation magnetic flux density, use closed core and take some special measures to diminish leakage inductance in the making-process. This paper is a brief summary of high power pulse transformer design. In this paper, the principle, types and characteristics specification of high power pulse transformer are presented, and the design methods of electrical, magnetic and structure parameters are summarized. The methods of shortening rise time, diminishing droop and expanding output pulse-width (electrical parameter design), testing magnetic core materials (magnetic parameter design) and minimizing leakage inductance (structure parameter design) are emphasized.

  7. High power diode laser Master Oscillator-Power Amplifier (MOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, John R.; Mouroulis, P.; Wicks, G.

    1994-01-01

    High power multiple quantum well AlGaAs diode laser master oscillator - power amplifier (MOPA) systems were examined both experimentally and theoretically. For two pass operation, it was found that powers in excess of 0.3 W per 100 micrometers of facet length were achievable while maintaining diffraction-limited beam quality. Internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies as high as 25 percent were observed at an internal amplifier gain of 9 dB. Theoretical modeling of multiple quantum well amplifiers was done using appropriate rate equations and a heuristic model of the carrier density dependent gain. The model gave a qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the model allowed exploration of a wider design space for the amplifiers. The model predicted that internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies in excess of 50 percent should be achievable with careful system design. The model predicted that no global optimum design exists, but gain, efficiency, and optical confinement (coupling efficiency) can be mutually adjusted to meet a specific system requirement. A three quantum well, low optical confinement amplifier was fabricated using molecular beam epitaxial growth. Coherent beam combining of two high power amplifiers injected from a common master oscillator was also examined. Coherent beam combining with an efficiency of 93 percent resulted in a single beam having diffraction-limited characteristics. This beam combining efficiency is a world record result for such a system. Interferometric observations of the output of the amplifier indicated that spatial mode matching was a significant factor in the less than perfect beam combining. Finally, the system issues of arrays of amplifiers in a coherent beam combining system were investigated. Based upon experimentally observed parameters coherent beam combining could result in a megawatt-scale coherent beam with a 10 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency.

  8. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  9. High power infrared QCLs: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    QCLs are becoming the most important sources of laser radiation in the midwave infrared (MWIR) and longwave infrared (LWIR) regions because of their size, weight, power and reliability advantages over other laser sources in the same spectral regions. The availability of multiwatt RT operation QCLs from 3.5 μm to >16 μm with wall plug efficiency of 10% or higher is hastening the replacement of traditional sources such as OPOs and OPSELs in many applications. QCLs can replace CO2 lasers in many low power applications. Of the two leading groups in improvements in QCL performance, Pranalytica is the commercial organization that has been supplying the highest performance QCLs to various customers for over four year. Using a new QCL design concept, the non-resonant extraction [1], we have achieved CW/RT power of >4.7 W and WPE of >17% in the 4.4 μm - 5.0 μm region. In the LWIR region, we have recently demonstrated QCLs with CW/RT power exceeding 1 W with WPE of nearly 10 % in the 7.0 μm-10.0 μm region. In general, the high power CW/RT operation requires use of TECs to maintain QCLs at appropriate operating temperatures. However, TECs consume additional electrical power, which is not desirable for handheld, battery-operated applications, where system power conversion efficiency is more important than just the QCL chip level power conversion efficiency. In high duty cycle pulsed (quasi-CW) mode, the QCLs can be operated without TECs and have produced nearly the same average power as that available in CW mode with TECs. Multiwatt average powers are obtained even in ambient T>70°C, with true efficiency of electrical power-to-optical power conversion being above 10%. Because of the availability of QCLs with multiwatt power outputs and wavelength range covering a spectral region from ~3.5 μm to >16 μm, the QCLs have found instantaneous acceptance for insertion into multitude of defense and homeland security applications, including laser sources for infrared

  10. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  11. An experimental study of high power microwave pulsed discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, M.; Bonaventura, Z.; Vasina, P.; Kudrle, V.; Tálský, A.; Trunec, D.; Frgala, Z.; Janca, J.

    2006-08-01

    We investigated a plasma excited by high power pulsed microwaves (MWs) (pulse duration 2.5 µs, repetition rate 400 Hz, peak power 105 W, frequency 9.4 GHz) in nitrogen at reduced pressure (pressure range 10-2000 Pa) with the aim of a better understanding of such types of discharge. The construction of the experimental device suppresses the plasma-wall interactions and therefore the volume processes are predominant. To obtain the temporal evolution of the electron density we used two MW interferometers at frequencies of 15 and 35 GHz with dielectric rod waveguides which gives them the capability of localized measurements. We estimated the effective collision frequency from the absorption of a measurement beam. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of the 1st negative system and the 2nd positive system was carried out, too. Due to a high power input the discharge dynamics was fast and the steady state was typically reached in 1 µs. We found that the effective collision frequency has the same temporal behaviour as the 2nd positive system of N2, including a characteristic maximum at the beginning of the pulse.

  12. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  13. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-15

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20 deg. - 40 deg. from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  14. A 31 GHz Survey of Low-Frequency Selected Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. S.; Weintraub, L.; Sievers, J.; Bond, J. R.; Myers, S. T.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Shepherd, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the 40 m Owens Valley Radio Observatory telescope have been used to conduct a 31 GHz survey of 3165 known extragalactic radio sources over 143 deg2 of the sky. Target sources were selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey in fields observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI); most are extragalactic active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with 1.4 GHz flux densities of 3-10 mJy. The resulting 31 GHz catalogs are presented in full online. Using a maximum-likelihood analysis to obtain an unbiased estimate of the distribution of the 1.4-31 GHz spectral indices of these sources, we find a mean 31-1.4 GHz flux ratio of 0.110 ± 0.003 corresponding to a spectral index of α = -0.71 ± 0.01 (S ν vprop να) 9.0% ± 0.8% of sources have α > - 0.5 and 1.2% ± 0.2% have α > 0. By combining this spectral-index distribution with 1.4 GHz source counts, we predict 31 GHz source counts in the range 1 mJy < S 31 < 4 mJy, N(>S 31) = (16.7 ± 1.7) deg-2(S 31/1 mJy)-0.80±0.07. We also assess the contribution of mJy-level (S 1.4 GHz < 3.4 mJy) radio sources to the 31 GHz cosmic microwave background power spectrum, finding a mean power of ell(ell + 1)C src ell/(2π) = 44 ± 14 μK2 and a 95% upper limit of 80 μK2 at ell = 2500. Including an estimated contribution of 12 μK2 from the population of sources responsible for the turn-up in counts below S 1.4 GHz = 1 mJy, this amounts to 21% ± 7% of what is needed to explain the CBI high-ell excess signal, 275 ± 63 μK2. These results are consistent with other measurements of the 31 GHz point-source foreground.

  15. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems - Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 years lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operation as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  16. High-Performance Power-Semiconductor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David; Hansen, Irving; Berman, Albert

    1989-01-01

    A 600-V, 50-A transistor and 1,200-V, 50-A diode in rugged, compact, lightweight packages intended for use in inverter-type power supplies having switching frequencies up to 20 kHz. Packages provide low-inductance connections, low loss, electrical isolation, and long-life hermetic seal. Low inductance achieved by making all electrical connections to each package on same plane. Also reduces high-frequency losses by reducing coupling into inherent shorted turns in packaging material around conductor axes. Stranded internal power conductors aid conduction at high frequencies, where skin effect predominates. Design of packages solves historical problem of separation of electrical interface from thermal interface of high-power semiconductor device.

  17. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  18. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet; Dylla, III, Henry Frederick

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  19. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  20. High current H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} beam generation by pulsed 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan; Peng, Shixiang Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Tao; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailin; Chen, Jia'er

    2014-02-15

    The permanent magnet 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University can produce more than 100 mA hydrogen ion beam working at pulsed mode. For the increasing requirements of cluster ions (H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +}) in linac and cyclotron, experimental study was carried out to further understand the hydrogen plasma processes in the ion source for the generation of cluster ions. The constituents of extracted beam have been analyzed varying with the pulsed duration from 0.3 ms to 2.0 ms (repetition frequency 100 Hz) at different operation pressure. The fraction of cluster ions dramatically increased when the pulsed duration was lower than 0.6 ms, and more than 20 mA pure H{sub 3}{sup +} ions with fraction 43.2% and 40 mA H{sub 2}{sup +} ions with fraction 47.7% were obtained when the operation parameters were adequate. The dependence of extracted ion fraction on microwave power was also measured at different pressure as the energy absorbed by plasma will greatly influence electron temperature and electron density then the plasma processes in the ion source. More details will be presented in this paper.

  1. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  2. High voltage solar cell power generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Opjorden, R. W.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kW), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2,560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500-watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 percent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water-cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  3. High-Power Millimeter- and Centimeter-Wave Magnicons for Particle Accelerator Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhevenko, O. A.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.; LaPointe, M. A.; Kozyrev, E. V.; Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Shchelkunov, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    Two high power, high frequency magnicons have recently been developed by Omega-P, Inc. The first tube, a frequency-doubling amplifier at 11.424 GHz, was designed and built in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), to be the prototype of an alternative to the klystron for the Next Linear Collider (NLC); its current use is to furnish RF power for tests of high power components, active pulse compressors, and accelerating structures. The tube is designed to produce ˜60 MW, in ˜1.2 μsec pulses at 58% efficiency and 59 dB gain using a 470 kV, 220 A, 2-mm-diameter beam. Operation of this magnicon has established a research facility at NRL which is only the second laboratory in the USA where high-power microwave R&D at X-band can take place. The second tube is a third harmonic amplifier at 34.272 GHz, with a design power of ˜45 MW in ˜1 μsec pulses at >40% efficiency and 54 dB gain. Its beam voltage is 500 kV, beam current is ˜220 A, and beam diameter is ˜1 mm. This tube, which is now in operation at Yale University, is designed for developing RF technology in the millimeter wavelength domain for a future high-gradient multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider. Design features and latest experimental results for these two magnicons are presented in this paper.

  4. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  5. E3000 High Power SADM development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, Steve G.; McMahon, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Astrium UK has been actively involved in the study, design, development, manufacture and test of Solar Array Drive Mechanisms (SADMs) and Bearing and Power Transfer Assemblies (BAPTAs) since the early 1970s having delivered 105 of these mechanisms to 22 spacecraft programs. As a result Astrium UK has accumulated in excess of 700 years of failure free SADM operation in-orbit. During that period power transfer requirements have grown steadily from below 1kW to 9.9kW and beyond. With this increase in power handling capability comes the associated problem of handling and dissipating the heat being generated within the SADM. The Eurostar 2000 family of SADMs were designed to handle up to 5.6kW for the E2000 family of spacecraft but the High Power SADM was conceived to meet the needs of the much bigger Eurostar 3000 family of spacecraft that could potentially grow to 15kW.

  6. High efficiency low cost solar cell power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Blocker, W.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for generating high-efficiency, low-cost, solar-cell power is outlined with reference to solar cell parameters, optical concentrators, and thermal control procedures. A design for a 12.5-kw power module for space operation is discussed noting the optical system, spectrum splitter, light conversion system, cell cooling, power conditioner, and tracking mechanism. It is found that for an unconcentrated array, efficiency approaches 60% when ten or more bandgaps are used. For a 12-band system, a computer program distributed bandgaps for maximum efficiency and equal cell currents. Rigid materials and thin films have been proposed for optical components and prisms, gratings, and dichroic mirrors have been recommended for spectrum splitting. Various radiator concepts are noted including that of Weatherston and Smith (1960) and Hedgepeth and Knapp (1978). The concept may be suitable for the Solar Power Satellite.

  7. Heterodyne detection of the 752.033-GHz H2O rotational absorption line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T. S.; Litvak, M. M.; Fetterman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable high resolution two stage heterodyne radiometer was developed for the purpose of investigating the intensity and lineshape of the 752.033 GHz rotational transition of water vapor. Single-sideband system noise temperatures of approximately 45,000 K were obtained using a sensitive GaAs Schottky diode as the first stage mixer. First local oscillator power was supplied by a CO2 laser pumped formic acid laser (761.61 GHz), generating an X-band IF signal with theoretical line center at 9.5744 GHz. Second local oscillator power was provided by means of a 3 GHz waveguide cavity filter with only 9 dB insertion loss. In absorption measurements of the H2O taken from a laboratory simulation of a high altitude rocket plume, the center frequency of the 752 GHz line was determined to within 1 MHz of the reported value. A rotational temperature 75 K, a linewidth 5 MHz and a Doppler shift 3 MHz were measured with the line-of-sight intersecting the simulated-plume axis at a distance downstream of 30 nozzle diameters. These absorption data were obtained against continuum background radiation sources at temperatures of 1175 and 300 K.

  8. Ionospheric Stimulation By High Power Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, S.; Nishino, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, S.; Tanikawa, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed an experiment to artificially stimulate the ionosphere using higher power radio waves at the HIPAS (High Power Auroral Stimulation) facility in Alaska. A radio transmission of 2.85 MHz was made at 80 MW (ERP). Diagnostics were made at the other site located 35 km from the transmission site. The results of cross-correlating the excited HF wave and observed with an 8 channel, 30 MHz scanning cosmic radio noise absorption records revealed the excited height of 90 km. Also atmospheric pressure waves observed on the ground show evident propagation of pressure waves which are generated in the ionosphere by the high-power HF wave. The results determine the excitation height of 90 km in the ionosphere and show evidence of the pressure wave coupling between the ionosphere and the lower atmosphere for periods of 10 min

  9. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  10. High-average-power exciplex laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, M.

    The LUX high-average-power high-PRF exciplex laser (EL) system being developed at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Marseille is characterized, and some preliminary results are presented. The fundamental principles and design criteria of ELs are reviewed, and the LUX components are described and illustrated, including a closed-circuit subsonic wind tunnel and a 100-kW-average power 1-kHz-PRF power pulser providing avalanche-discharge preionization by either an electron beam or an X-ray beam. Laser energy of 50 mJ has been obtained at wavelength 308 nm in the electron-beam mode (14.5 kV) using a 5300/190/10 mixture of Ne/Xe/HCl at pressure 1 bar.

  11. A reliable, compact, and repetitive-rate high power microwave generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Li, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Xiao-liang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-15

    A compact high power microwave (HPM) generation system is described in this paper. The main parts of the HPM system are a Marx generator with a pulse forming line and a magnetron with diffraction output. The total weight and length of the system are 250 kg and 120 cm, respectively. The output microwave power of the HPM system at 550 kV of applied voltage and 0.33 T of magnetic field reaches 1 GW at 2.32 GHz of central frequency with 38 ns of pulse duration, 23% of power conversion efficiency, and Gaussian radiation pattern. In the bursts operation, both time and amplitude jitters are less than 4 ns and lower than 1.5 dB, respectively.

  12. Device and Design Optimization for AlGaN/GaN X-Band-Power-Amplifiers with High Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Jutta; van Raay, Friedbert; Quay, Rüdiger; Kiefer, Rudolf; Mikulla, Michael; Seelmann-Eggebert, Matthias; Bronner, Wolfgang; Schlechtweg, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver; Thumm, Manfred

    2010-03-01

    The design, realization and characterization of dual-stage X-band high-power and highly-efficient monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) with AlGaN/GaN high electronic mobility transistors (HEMTs) is presented. These high power amplifiers (HPAs) are based on a precise investigation of circuit-relevant HEMT behavior using two different field-plate variants and its effects on PA performance as well as optimization of HPA driver stage size which also has a deep impact on the entire HPA. Two broadband (3 GHz) MMICs with different field-plate variants and two narrowband (1 GHz) PAs with different driver- to final-stage gate-width ratio are realized with a maximum output power of 19-23 W, a maximum power-added efficiency (PAE) of ≥40%, and an associated power gain of 17 dB at X-band. Furthermore, two 1 mm test transistors of the same technology with the mentioned field-plate variants and a 1 mm test MMIC support VSWR-ratio tests of 6:1 and 4:1, respectively.

  13. High-power, single-longitudinal-mode terahertz-wave generation pumped by a microchip Nd:YAG laser [Invited].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Koji; Sakai, Hiroshi; Taira, Takunori; Minamide, Hiroaki; Kawase, Kodo

    2012-01-30

    We report on the development of a high-peak-power, single-longitudinal-mode and tunable injection-seeded terahertz-wave parametric generator using MgO:LiNbO3, which operates at room temperature. The high peak power (> 120 W) is enough to allow easy detection by commercial and calibrated pyroelectric detectors, and the spectral resolution (< 10 GHz) is the Fourier transform limit of the sub-nanosecond terahertz-wave pulse. The tunability (1.2-2.8 THz) and the small footprint size (A3 paper, 29.7 × 42 cm) are suitable for a variety of applications.

  14. Continuous high-power gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    High power gas laser concepts are discussed with emphasis on the role that fluid mechanics has played in their development. Consideration is given to three types of systems: gasdynamic lasers, HF supersonic diffusion lasers, and electric discharge lasers. Flow effects and aerodynamic windows in such lasers are briefly described. Future directions of research are outlined.

  15. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  16. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  17. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  18. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CCEM key comparison CCEM.RF-K10.CL (GT-RF/99-2) 'Power in 50 Ω coaxial lines, frequency: 50 MHz to 26 GHz' measurement techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Dieter; Inoue, T.; Michaud, A.

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results and the measuring methods of an international key comparison between twelve national metrology institutes (NMIs) and is concerning the calibration factor of RF power sensors in the coaxial 3.5 mm line for frequencies up to 26 GHz. Two RF power travelling standards fitted with male PC 3.5 mm connectors were measured at seven frequencies. The following NMIs participated: NMIJ (Japan), NRC (Canada), NIST (USA), METAS (Switzerland), CSIR-NML (South Africa), NMIA (Australia), NPL (UK), SiQ (Slovenia), IEN (Italy), VNIIFTRI (Russian Federation), SPRING (Singapore) and PTB (Germany), as the pilot laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  20. High-Power, High-Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-power photovoltaic technology have enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high-specific power solar arrays. At high specific powers, power levels ranging from 50 to several hundred kilowatts are feasible. Ion thrusters offer long life and overall high efficiency (typically greater than 70 percent efficiency). In Phase I, the team at ElectroDynamic Applications, Inc., built a 25-kW, 50-cm ion thruster discharge chamber and fabricated a laboratory model. This was in response to the need for a single, high-powered engine to fill the gulf between the 7-kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) system and a notional 25-kW engine. The Phase II project matured the laboratory model into a protoengineering model ion thruster. This involved the evolution of the discharge chamber to a high-performance thruster by performance testing and characterization via simulated and full beam extraction testing. Through such testing, the team optimized the design and built a protoengineering model thruster. Coupled with gridded ion thruster technology, this technology can enable a wide range of missions, including ambitious near-Earth NASA missions, Department of Defense missions, and commercial satellite activities.

  1. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz

  2. High power bipolar lead-acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Attia, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with interest in advanced energy storage systems, is involved in the development of a unique lead acid battery design. This battery utilizes the same combination of lead and lead dioxide active materials present in the automobile starting battery. However, it can provide 2 to 10 times the power while minimizing volume and weight. The typical starting battery is described as a monopolar type using one current collector for both the positive and negative plate of adjacent cells. Specific power as high as 2.5 kW/kg was projected for 30 second periods with as many as 2000 recharge cycles.

  3. Scaling blackbody laser to high powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasers pumped by solar heated blackbody cavities have potential for multimegawatt power beaming in space. There are two basic types of blackbody lasers; cavity pumped and transfer system. The transfer system is judged to be more readily scalable to high power. In this system, either N2 or CO is heated by the blackbody cavity then transferred into the laser cavity where CO2 is injected. The N2-CO2 system was demonstrated, but probably has lower efficiency than the CO-CO system. The characteristics of potential transfer laser systems are outlined.

  4. High Power MPD Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Strzempkowski, Eugene; Pencil, Eric

    2004-01-01

    High power magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are being developed as cost effective propulsion systems for cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, crewed missions to Mars and the outer planets, and robotic deep space exploration missions. Electromagnetic MPD thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the ability to process megawatts of electrical power while providing significantly higher thrust densities than electrostatic electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission, and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of programs envisioned by the NASA Office of Exploration Systems, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to steady state high power thruster tests. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power pulsed thruster test facility, and presents preliminary performance data for a quasi-steady baseline MPD thruster geometry.

  5. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  6. MULTIPULSE - high resolution and high power in one TDEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianyou; Hodges, Greg; Miles, Philip

    2015-09-01

    An airborne time domain electromagnetic (TEM) system with high resolution and great depth of exploration is desired for geological mapping as well as for mineral exploration. The MULTIPULSE technology enables an airborne TEM system to transmit a high power pulse (a half-sine, for instance) and one or multiple low power pulse(s) (trapezoid or square) within a half-cycle. The high power pulse ensures good depth of exploration and the low power pulse allows a fast transmitter current turn off and earlier off-time measurement thus providing higher frequency signals, which allows higher near-surface resolution and better sensitivity to weak conductors. The power spectrum of the MULTIPULSE waveform comprising a half-sine and a trapezoid pulse clearly shows increased power in the higher frequency range (> ~2.3 kHz) compared to that of a single half-sine waveform. The addition of the low power trapezoid pulse extends the range of the sensitivity 10-fold towards the weak conductors, expanding the geological conductivity range of a system and increasing the scope of its applications. The MULTIPULSE technology can be applied to standard single-pulse airborne TEM systems on both helicopter and fixed-wing. We field tested the HELITEM MULTIPULSE system over a wire-loop in Iroquois Falls, demonstrating the different sensitivity of the high and low power pulses to the overburden and the wire-loop. We also tested both HELITEM and GEOTEM MULTIPULSE systems over a layered oil sand geologic setting in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. The results show comparable shallow geologic resolution of the MULTIPULSE to that of the RESOLVE system while maintaining superior depth of exploration, confirming the increased geological conductivity range of a system employing MULTIPULSE compared to the standard single-pulse systems.

  7. Quasi-Optical Transmission Line for 94-GHz Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.; Veruttipong, Watt

    2008-01-01

    A quasi-optical transmission line (QOTL) has been developed as a low-loss transmission line for a spaceborne cloudobserving radar instrument that operates at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz. This QOTL could also readily be redesigned for use in terrestrial millimeter-wave radar systems and millimeter-wave imaging systems. In the absence of this or another lowloss transmission line, it would be necessary to use a waveguide transmission line in the original radar application. Unfortunately, transmission losses increase and power-handling capacities of waveguides generally decrease with frequency, such that at 94 GHz, the limitation on transmitting power and the combined transmission and reception losses (greater than 5 dB) in a waveguide transmission line previously considered for the original application would be unacceptable. The QOTL functions as a very-lowloss, three-port circulator. The QOTL includes a shaped input mirror that can be rotated to accept 94-GHz transmitter power from either of two high-power amplifiers. Inside the QOTL, the transmitter power takes the form of a linearly polarized beam radiated from a feed horn. This beam propagates through a system of mirrors, each of which refocuses the beam to minimize diffraction losses. A magnetically biased ferrite disc is placed at one of the foci to utilize the Faraday effect to rotate the polarization of the beam by 45 degrees. The beam is then transmitted via an antenna system. The radar return (scatter from clouds, and/or reflections from other objects) is collected by the same antenna and propagates through the Faraday rotator in the reverse of the direction of propagation of the transmitted beam. In the Faraday rotator, the polarization of the received signal is rotated a further 45 degrees, so that upon emerging from the Faraday rotator, the received beam is polarized at 90 with respect to the transmitted beam. The transmitted and received signals are then separated by a wire-grid polarizer.

  8. Contributions to resolving issues impeding the operation of high power microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyn, Dmytro

    This thesis reports an experimental study aimed at extending high power, high efficiency gyrotron operation to submillimeter wavelengths. A series of experiments carried out both at the University of Maryland and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science, succeeded in demonstrating output power at 670 GHz of 180 kilowatts with 20% efficiency (gyrotron voltage was 57 kV and beam current was 16 amperes). The maximum output power achieved in the experiments was 210kW at somewhat higher voltage and current (viz. 58kV and 22A). The achieved output power and efficiency are twice as large as achieved in previous experiments in this frequency range with pulse duration in the range of tens of microseconds. These performance parameters are relevant to a previously proposed application of detecting concealed radioactive materials by air breakdown in a focused beam of sub-millimeter radiation. The 670 GHz gyrotron combined features of two lines of previous experiments: (a) to operate at the required frequency, pulsed solenoids producing 28T magnetic were employed and (b) to obtain high efficiency a very high order mode was used in the gyrotron cavity, as in the experiments with gyrotrons for plasma heating. Evidence of multimode beating was observed in submillimeter output envelope. The excitation of spurious modes, especially during the rise of the gyrotron voltage pulse, was analyzed and the method of avoiding this was proposed which also allows to reduce collector loading in gyrotrons operating in modulated regimes. The present study also includes theoretical analysis of the processes that deepens the understanding of microwave breakdown (arcing) in high power microwave devices. The effect of the dust particles microprotrusions on the device operation was analyzed. These microprotrusions were observed and their negative effects were remedied by careful polishing and machining of the resonator surface. Finally, the generated 670 GHz radiation was

  9. High average power linear induction accelerator development

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, J.R.; Adler, R.J.

    1987-07-01

    There is increasing interest in linear induction accelerators (LIAs) for applications including free electron lasers, high power microwave generators and other types of radiation sources. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed LIA technology in combination with magnetic pulse compression techniques to achieve very impressive performance levels. In this paper we will briefly discuss the LIA concept and describe our development program. Our goals are to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of LIA systems. An accelerator is presently under construction to demonstrate these improvements at an energy of 1.6 MeV in 2 kA, 65 ns beam pulses at an average beam power of approximately 30 kW. The unique features of this system are a low cost accelerator design and an SCR-switched, magnetically compressed, pulse power system. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  10. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  11. High power performance limits of fiber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holehouse, Nigel; Magné, Julien; Auger, Mathieu

    2015-03-01

    High power combiners are essential for practical fiber lasers, recent developments in pump technology has increased the available brightness and power of pumps significantly, enabling multi kW lasers and pushing combiner designs to new limits. I will present the challenges, measurements and some solutions to these issues. Traditional calculations for combiners underestimate the issues associated with the `tails' of the pump NA distribution, losses in fully filled combiners increase rapidly as pump NA blooms, and subsequent heating effects dominate the combiner's power handling. Acrylate coated pump fibers are reaching their limits and devices and measurements on double clad pump combiners with losses <0.05dB, will be presented enabling multi kW operation, The use of triple clad fibers in the gain section will discussed as a solution for multi kW applications. Results on ultra-low background loss FBG's will be presented, along with developed measurement techniques.

  12. High thermal power density heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1980-10-01

    Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. The first heat pipe is used to cool the nuclear reactor while the second heat pipe is connected thermally and electrically to a thermionic converter. If the receiver requires greater thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparatively low thermal power densities through the electrically non-conducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  13. Fast-switching system for injection seeding of a high-power Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Khalesifard, Hamid R; Fix, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard; Schiller, Max; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2009-07-01

    A high frequency switching and tunable seed laser system has been designed and constructed for injection seeding of a high-power pulsed Ti:sapphire laser. The whole laser system operates as the transmitter of a scanning, ground-based, water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL). The output of two seed lasers can be tuned in the wavelength range of 815-840 nm up to the power of 20 mW and switched between the online and offline wavelengths of the DIAL at frequencies of 0-1 kHz. The frequency stability of online and offline seed lasers is better than +/-20 MHz rms and the mode-hop-free tuning range is greater than 40 GHz with external cavity diode lasers. The advantage of this system for efficient injection seeding of the Ti:sapphire cavity is that it is modular, robust, fully fiber-coupled, and polarization maintaining.

  14. Fast-switching system for injection seeding of a high-power Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Khalesifard, Hamid R; Fix, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard; Schiller, Max; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2009-07-01

    A high frequency switching and tunable seed laser system has been designed and constructed for injection seeding of a high-power pulsed Ti:sapphire laser. The whole laser system operates as the transmitter of a scanning, ground-based, water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL). The output of two seed lasers can be tuned in the wavelength range of 815-840 nm up to the power of 20 mW and switched between the online and offline wavelengths of the DIAL at frequencies of 0-1 kHz. The frequency stability of online and offline seed lasers is better than +/-20 MHz rms and the mode-hop-free tuning range is greater than 40 GHz with external cavity diode lasers. The advantage of this system for efficient injection seeding of the Ti:sapphire cavity is that it is modular, robust, fully fiber-coupled, and polarization maintaining. PMID:19655946

  15. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondal, J.; Contolatis, T.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.; Sokolov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The technical achievements and deliveries made during the duration of the program to develop a 30 GHz monolithic receive module for communication feed array applications and to deliver submodules and 30 GHz monolithic receive modules for experimental evaluation are discussed. Key requirements include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF-to-RF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. In addition, the monolithic receive module design addresses a cost goal of less than one thousand dollars (1980 dollars) per module in unit buys of 5,000 or more, and a mechanical configuration that is applicable to a spaceborne phase array system. An additional task for the development and delivery of 32 GHz phase shifter integrated circuit (IC) for deep space communication is also described.

  16. High-altitude solar power platform

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.D.; Bower, M.V.

    1992-04-01

    Solar power is a preeminent alternative to conventional aircraft propulsion. With the continued advances in solar cells, fuel cells, and composite materials technology, the solar powered airplane is no longer a simple curiosity constrained to flights of several feet in altitude or minutes of duration. A high altitude solar powered platform (HASPP) has several potential missions, including communications and agriculture. In remote areas, a HASPP could be used as a communication link. In large farming areas, a HASPP could perform remote sensing of crops. The impact of HASPP in continuous flight for one year on agricultural monitoring mission is presented. This mission provides farmers with near real-time data twice daily from an altitude which allows excellant resolution on water conditions, crop diseases, and insect infestation. Accurate, timely data will enable farmers to increase their yield and efficiency. A design for HASPP for the foregoing mission is presented. In the design power derived from solar cells covering the wings is used for propulsion, avionics, and sensors. Excess power produced midday will be stored in fuel cells for use at night to maintain altitude and course.

  17. GHz low noise short wavelength infrared (SWIR) photoreceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogang; Yuan, Ping; McDonald, Paul; Boisvert, Joseph; Chang, James; Woo, Robyn; Labios, Eduardo; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Krainak, Michael; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; McIntosh, Dion; Zhou, Qiugui; Campbell, Joe

    2011-06-01

    Next generation LIDAR mapping systems require multiple channels of sensitive photoreceivers that operate in the wavelength region of 1.06 to 1.55 microns, with GHz bandwidth and sensitivity less than 300 fW/√Hz. Spectrolab has been developing high sensitivity photoreceivers using InAlAs impact ionization engineering (I2E) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) structures for this application. APD structures were grown using metal organic vapor epitaxy (MOVPE) and mesa devices were fabricated using these structures. We have achieved low excess noise at high gain in these APD devices; an impact ionization parameter, k, of about 0.15 has been achieved at gains >20 using InAlAs/InGaAlAs as a multiplier layer. Electrical characterization data of these devices show dark current less than 2 nA at a gain of 20 at room temperature; and capacitance of 0.4 pF for a typical 75 micron diameter APD. Photoreceivers were built by integrating I2E APDs with a low noise GHz transimpedance amplifier (TIA). The photoreceivers showed a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 150 fW/rt(Hz) at room temperature.

  18. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  19. High power THz sources for nonlinear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Kozlov, Vladimir G.

    2014-02-01

    Many biological and chemical compounds have unique absorption features in the THz (0.1 - 10 THz) region, making the use of THz waves attractive for imaging in defense, security, biomedical imaging, and monitoring of industrial processes. Unlike optical radiation, THz frequencies can pass through many substances such as paper, clothing, ceramic, etc. with little attenuation. The use of currently available THz systems is limited by lack of highpower, sources as well as sensitive detectors and detector arrays operating at room temperature. Here we present a novel, high power THz source based on intracavity downconverison of optical pulses. The source delivers 6 ps pulses at 1.5 THz, with an average power of >300 μW and peak powers >450 mW. We propose an imaging method based on frequency upconverison that is ideally suited to use the narrow bandwidth and high peak powers produced by the source. By upconverting the THz image to the infrared, commercially available detectors can be used for real time imaging.

  20. High power THz sources for nonlinear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Kozlov, Vladimir G.

    2014-02-18

    Many biological and chemical compounds have unique absorption features in the THz (0.1 - 10 THz) region, making the use of THz waves attractive for imaging in defense, security, biomedical imaging, and monitoring of industrial processes. Unlike optical radiation, THz frequencies can pass through many substances such as paper, clothing, ceramic, etc. with little attenuation. The use of currently available THz systems is limited by lack of highpower, sources as well as sensitive detectors and detector arrays operating at room temperature. Here we present a novel, high power THz source based on intracavity downconverison of optical pulses. The source delivers 6 ps pulses at 1.5 THz, with an average power of >300 μW and peak powers >450 mW. We propose an imaging method based on frequency upconverison that is ideally suited to use the narrow bandwidth and high peak powers produced by the source. By upconverting the THz image to the infrared, commercially available detectors can be used for real time imaging.

  1. Development of High-Power, Long-Pulse Gyrotrons and Its Application for High Electron Temperature, EBWH and ECCD Experiments on LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nishiura, M.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Takita, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Marushchenko, Nikolai B.; Turkin, Yuri

    2011-12-23

    To sustain plasmas with higher parameters and with longer pulse duration in LHD, ECH system has been upgraded by introducing newly developed 77 GHz gyrotrons. The designed output power and operation duration time are over 1 MW for several seconds and 0.3 MW for continuous operation, respectively. Owing to the upgrade of gyrotrons and improved power supply operation procedure, total injection power of EC-waves to LHD increased up to 3.7 MW at the last LHD experimental campaign in 2010.Application of the high-power 77 GHz EC-waves of 3.4 MW as focused beams to the center of plasma with low line-average electron density of {approx}0.2x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} causes highly steep electron temperature profile and the central electron temperature reached up to 20 keV, which highly exceeds the former record of 15 keV. At higher density region of 1x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, central electron temperature reached 8.6 keV.Additional electron Bernstein wave heatings, O-X-B and slow X-B heatings, using a 77 GHz ECH system caused clear increase in plasma stored energy even for the high-density plasmas over plasma cutoff (>7.35x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) sustained with NBI. For the O-X-B scenario, the 77 GHz EC-wave was obliquely injected from low-field side in O-mode polarization, aiming at the point where high mode-conversion efficiency was expected. For realizing slow X-B scenario, new inner-vessel mirrors were installed in LHD just close to a helical coil, that is, at the high-field side (HFS) region. Using the inner-vessel mirror, X-mode waves were injected from HFS, showing evident increase in plasma stored energy.Oblique injection of long-pulse 0.77 MW/8 s 77 GHz wave with various N{sub ||} clearly demonstrated ECCD in LHD. The EC-driven current changes its direction with the sign of N{sub ||}, and the highest EC-driven current reached up to 42 kA.

  2. On life assessment of high reliability high power optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanjian; Chu, Peter

    2014-09-01

    High data rate and long range free space lasercom links require multi-watt optical transmitter power, which creates a need for high power redundancy switches to ensure high payload reliability. A high power optical switch (HPOS) with less than 0.15 dB loss and capable of switching more than 40 watts of optical power in a single mode fiber has been previously demonstrated in the Transformational Satellite Communication System program. Prototype switches, in either 1x2 or 2x2 configuration, have been subjected to pyro-shock test, vibration test, and vacuum operation. These switches showed no performance degradation as a result of these tests. Three prototypes went through 60,000 35-watt switching cycles and over 30 million low power switching cycles, and the switches showed no mechanical failure. The HPOS life is about 3.2 million switching cycles with a definition of 3-dB degradation in on/off extinction ratio, which is well suited for space applications.

  3. High power operation of an [ital X]-band gyrotwistron

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, P.E.; Lawson, W.; Irwin, V.; Hogan, B.; Nusinovich, G.S.; Matthews, H.W.; Flaherty, M.K.E. )

    1994-06-06

    We report the first experimental verification of a gyrotwistron amplifier. The device utilized a single 9.858 GHz, TE[sub 011] cavity, a heavily attenuated drift tube, and a long tapered output waveguide section. With a 440 kV, 200-245 A, 1 [mu]s electron beam and a sharply tapered axial magnetic field, peak powers above 21 MW were achieved with a gain near 24 dB. Performance was limited by competition from a fundamental TE[sub 11] mode. A multimode code was developed to analyze this system, and simulations were in good agreement with the experiment.

  4. High-Performance Solid-State W-Band Power Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Samoska, Lorene; Wells, Mary; Ferber, Robert; Pearson, John; Campbell, April; Peralta, Alejandro; Swift, Gerald; Yocum, Paul; Chung, Yun

    2003-01-01

    The figure shows one of four solid-state power amplifiers, each capable of generating an output power greater than or equal to 240 mW over one of four overlapping frequency bands from 71 to 106 GHz. (The bands are 71 to 84, 80 to 92, 88 to 99, and 89 to 106 GHz.) The amplifiers are designed for optimum performance at a temperature of 130 K. These amplifiers were developed specifically for incorporation into frequency-multiplier chains in local oscillators in a low-noise, far-infrared receiving instrument to be launched into outer space to make astrophysical observations. The designs of these amplifiers may also be of interest to designers and manufacturers of terrestrial W-band communication and radar systems. Each amplifier includes a set of six high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) GaAs monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) chips, microstrip cavities, and other components packaged in a housing made from A-40 silicon-aluminum alloy. This alloy was chosen because, for the original intended spacecraft application, it offers an acceptable compromise among the partially competing requirements for high thermal conductivity, low mass, and low thermal expansion. Problems that were solved in designing the amplifiers included designing connectors and packages to fit the available space; designing microstrip signal-power splitters and combiners; matching of impedances across the frequency bands; matching of the electrical characteristics of those chips installed in parallel power-combining arms; control and levelling of output power across the bands; and designing the MMICs, microstrips, and microstrip cavities to suppress tendencies toward oscillation in several modes, both inside and outside the desired frequency bands.

  5. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  6. Industrial Applications of High Power Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patist, Alex; Bates, Darren

    Since the change of the millennium, high-power ultrasound has become an alternative food processing technology applicable to large-scale commercial applications such as emulsification, homogenization, extraction, crystallization, dewatering, low-temperature pasteurization, degassing, defoaming, activation and inactivation of enzymes, particle size reduction, extrusion, and viscosity alteration. This new focus can be attributed to significant improvements in equipment design and efficiency during the late 1990 s. Like most innovative food processing technologies, high-power ultrasonics is not an off-the-shelf technology, and thus requires careful development and scale-up for each and every application. The objective of this chapter is to present examples of ultrasonic applications that have been successful at the commercialization stage, advantages, and limitations, as well as key learnings from scaling up an innovative food technology in general.

  7. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  8. Feedthrough terminal for high-power cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1982-05-28

    A feedthrough terminal for a high power electrochemical storage cell providing low resistance coupling to the conductive elements therein while isolating the terminal electrode from the highly corrosive environment within the cell is disclosed. A large diameter, cylindrical copper electrode is enclosed in a stainless steel tube with a BN powder feedthrough seal maintained around the stainless steel tube by means of facing insulative bushings and an outer sleeve. One end of the copper conductor is silver-brazed directly to a flat, butterfly bus bar within the cell, with the adjacent end of the surrounding outer feedthrough sleeve welded to the bus bar. A threaded seal is fixedly positioned on a distal portion of the stainless steel tube immediately adjacent the distal insulative bushing so as to compress the feedthrough seal in tight fitting relation around the stainless steel tube in providing a rugged, leak-proof electrical feedthrough terminal for the power cell.

  9. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  10. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  11. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  12. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP. PMID:24593475

  13. Optimization of transistor design including large signal device/circuit interactions at extremely high frequencies (20-100+GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Ralph; Grubin, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Transistor design for extremely high frequency applications requires consideration of the interaction between the device and the circuit to which it is connected. Traditional analytical transistor models are to approximate at some of these frequencies and may not account for variations of dopants and semiconductor materials (especially some of the newer materials) within the device. Physically based models of device performance are required. These are based on coupled systems of partial differential equations and typically require 20 minutes of Cray computer time for a single AC operating point. A technique is presented to extract parameters from a few partial differential equation solutions for the device to create a nonlinear equivalent circuit model which runs in approximately 1 second of personal computer time. This nonlinear equivalent circuit model accurately replicates the contact current properties of the device as computed by the partial differential solver on which it is based. Using the nonlinear equivalent circuit model of the device, optimization of systems design can be performed based on device/circuit interactions.

  14. ALMA 690 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF IRAS 16293-2422B: INFALL IN A HIGHLY OPTICALLY THICK DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Hernandez-Hernandez, Vicente; Takahashi, Satoko; Trejo, Alfonso; Parise, Berengere

    2013-02-10

    We present sensitive, high angular resolution ({approx}0.''2) submillimeter continuum and line observations of IRAS 16293-2422B made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The 0.45 mm continuum observations reveal a single and very compact source associated with IRAS 16293-2422B. This submillimeter source has a deconvolved angular size of about 400 mas (50 AU) and does not show any inner structure inside of this diameter. The H{sup 13}CN, HC{sup 15}N, and CH{sub 3}OH line emission regions are about twice as large as the continuum emission and reveal a pronounced inner depression or ''hole'' with a size comparable to that estimated for the submillimeter continuum. We suggest that the presence of this inner depression and the fact that we do not see an inner structure (or a flat structure) in the continuum are produced by very optically thick dust located in the innermost parts of IRAS 16293-2422B. All three lines also show pronounced inverse P-Cygni profiles with infall and dispersion velocities larger than those recently reported from observations at lower frequencies, suggesting that we are detecting faster and more turbulent gas located closer to the central object. Finally, we report a small east-west velocity gradient in IRAS 16293-2422B that suggests that its disk plane is likely located very close to the plane of the sky.

  15. Interaction of an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train with a W-band accelerating structure: High power and high gradient

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; et al

    2016-02-05

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to themore » interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. As a result, measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.« less

  16. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W-Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Antipov, S; Jing, C; Power, J G; Conde, M; Wisniewski, E; Liu, W; Qiu, J; Ha, G; Dolgashev, V; Tang, C; Gai, W

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method. PMID:26894715

  17. Crystal fibers for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Florea, C.; Gibson, D.; Peele, J.; Askins, C.; Shaw, B.; Bowman, S.; O'Connor, S.; Bayya, S.; Aggarwal, I.; Sanghera, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present our recent progress in developing single crystal fibers for high power single frequency fiber lasers. The optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the loss and gain measured from these crystal fibers drawn by Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) system are also discussed. Results on application of various cladding materials on the crystal core and the methods of fiber end-face polishing are also presented.

  18. Gate Drive For High Speed, High Power IGBTs

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Cassel, R.L.; de Lamare, J.E.; Pappas, G.C.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    A new gate drive for high-voltage, high-power IGBTs has been developed for the SLAC NLC (Next Linear Collider) Solid State Induction Modulator. This paper describes the design and implementation of a driver that allows an IGBT module rated at 800A/3300V to switch up to 3000A at 2200V in 3{micro}S with a rate of current rise of more than 10000A/{micro}S, while still being short circuit protected. Issues regarding fast turn on, high de-saturation voltage detection, and low short circuit peak current will be presented. A novel approach is also used to counter the effect of unequal current sharing between parallel chips inside most high-power IGBT modules. It effectively reduces the collector-emitter peak current, and thus protects the IGBT from being destroyed during soft short circuit conditions at high di/dt.

  19. High peak power diode stacks for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Viorel C.; Vethake, Thilo; Jiang, John; Roff, Robert; Shih, Ming; Duck, Richard; Bauer, Marc; Mite, Roberto; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2015-02-01

    High energy solid state lasers are being developed for fusion experiments and other research applications where high energy per pulse is required but the repetition rate is rather low, around 10Hz. We report our results on high peak power diode laser stacks used as optical pumps for these lasers. The stacks are based on 10 mm bars with 4 mm cavity length and 55% fill factor, with peak power exceeding 500 W per bar. These bars are stacked and mounted on a cooler which provides backside cooling and electrical insulation. Currently we mount 25 bars per cooler for a nominal peak power of 12.5 kW, but in principle the mounting scheme can be scaled to a different number of devices depending on the application. Pretesting of these bars before soldering on the cooler enables us to select devices with similar wavelength and thus we maintain tight control of the spectral width (FWHM less than 6 nm). Fine adjustments of the centroid wavelength can be done by means of temperature of the cooling fluid or bias current. The available wavelength range spans from 880 nm to 1000 nm, and the wavelength of the entire assembly of stacks can be controlled to within 0.5 nm of the target value, which makes these stacks suitable for pumping a variety of gain media. The devices are fast axis collimated, with over 95% power being collimated in 6 mrad (full angle). The slow axis divergence is 9° (full angle) for 95% power content.

  20. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not