Science.gov

Sample records for ghz methanol masers

  1. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  2. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A.

    2011-06-01

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  3. Class II 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser Association with Young Massive Cores Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Csengeri, Timea; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Iguchi, Satoru; Alhassan, Jibrin A.; Higuchi, Aya E.; Bontemps, Sylvain; Menten, Karl M.

    2017-02-01

    We explored the implication of the association (or lack of it) of 6.7 GHz class II methanol (CH3OH) masers with massive dense cores (MDCs) detected (within a sample of ATLASGAL selected infrared quiet massive clumps) at 0.9 mm with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array. We found 42 out of the 112 cores (37.5%) detected with the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) to be associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. The lowest mass core with CH3OH maser association is ∼ 12 {M}ȯ . The angular offsets of the ACA cores from the 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser peak positions range from 0.″17 to 4.″79, with a median value of 2.″19. We found a weak correlation between the 0.9 mm continuum (MDCs) peak fluxes and the peak fluxes of their associated methanol multibeam (MMB) 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. About 90% of the cores associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers have masses of >40 M ⊙. The CH3OH maser containing cores are candidates for embedded high-mass protostellar objects in their earliest evolutionary stages. With our ACA 0.9 continuum data compared with the MMB 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser survey, we have constrained the cores already housing massive protostars based on their association with the radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  4. Zeeman Effect observations toward 36 GHz methanol masers in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potvin, Justin A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Pratim Sarma, Anuj

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of 36 GHz Class I methanol masers taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the B configuration with the aim of detecting the Zeeman Effect. We targeted several 36 GHz Class I methanol masers associated with supernova remnants (SNRs) toward the Galactic Center. Each source was observed in dual circular polarizations for three hours. The observed spectral profiles of the masers are complex, with several components blended in velocity. In only one case was the Stokes V maser profile prominent enough to reveal a 2-sigma hint of a magnetic field of zBlos = 14.56 +/- 5.60 Hz; we have chosen to express our results in terms of zBlos since the Zeeman splitting factor (z) for 36 GHz methanol masers has not been measured. There are several hints that these spectra would reveal significant magnetic fields if they could be spatially and spectrally resolved.

  5. AMMONIA AND CO OBSERVATIONS TOWARD LOW-LUMINOSITY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. W.; Xu, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. B.; Pandian, J. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether distinctions exist between low- and high-luminosity Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers, we have undertaken multi-line mapping observations of various molecular lines, including the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), and {sup 12}CO (1-0) transitions, toward a sample of nine low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers and {sup 12}CO (1-0) observations toward a sample of eight high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers, for which we already had NH{sub 3} spectral line data. Emission in the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) transitions was detected in eight out of nine low-luminosity maser sources, in which 14 cores were identified. We derive densities, column densities, temperatures, core sizes, and masses of both low- and high-luminosity maser regions. A comparative analysis of the physical quantities reveals marked distinctions between the low-luminosity and high-luminosity groups: in general, cores associated with high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers are larger and more massive than those traced by low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers; regions traced by the high-luminosity masers have larger column densities but lower densities than those of the low-luminosity maser regions. Further, strong correlations between 6.7 GHz maser luminosity and NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line widths are found, indicating that internal motions in high-luminosity maser regions are more energetic than those in low-luminosity maser regions. A {sup 12}CO (1-0) outflow analysis also shows distinctions in that outflows associated with high-luminosity masers have wider line wings and larger sizes than those associated with low-luminosity masers.

  6. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS AROUND 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS. I. AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect

    Pandian, J. D.; Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2012-07-01

    Methanol masers at 6.7 GHz are known to be tracers of high-mass star formation in our Galaxy. In this paper, we study the large-scale physical conditions in the star-forming clumps/cores associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers using observations of the (1, 1), (2, 2), and (3, 3) inversion transitions of ammonia with the Effelsberg telescope. The gas kinetic temperature is found to be higher than in infrared dark clouds, highlighting the relatively evolved nature of the maser sources. Other than a weak correlation between maser luminosity and the ammonia line width, we do not find any differences between low- and high-luminosity methanol masers.

  7. A SEARCH FOR 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Cong-Gui; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Ye; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2013-01-20

    We have observed a sample of 288 molecular outflow sources including 123 high-mass and 165 low-mass sources in order to search for class I methanol masers at the 95 GHz transition and to investigate the relationship between outflow characteristics and class I methanol maser emission with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Our survey detected 62 sources with 95 GHz methanol masers above a 3{sigma} detection limit, which includes 47 high-mass sources and 15 low-mass sources. Therefore, the detection rate is 38% for high-mass outflow sources and 9% for low-mass outflow sources, suggesting that class I methanol masers are relatively easily excited in high-mass sources. There are 37 newly detected 95 GHz methanol masers (including 27 high-mass and 10 low-mass sources), 19 of which are newly identified (i.e., first identification) class I methanol masers (including 13 high-mass and 6 low-mass sources). A statistical analysis of the distributions of maser detections with the outflow parameters reveals that the maser detection efficiency increases with the outflow properties (e.g., mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity of outflows, etc.). Systematic investigations of the relationships between the intrinsic luminosity of methanol masers and the outflow properties (including mass, momentum, kinetic energy, bolometric luminosity, and mass-loss rate of the central stellar sources) indicate a positive correlation. This further supports the theory that class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and associated with shocks when outflows interact with the surrounding ambient medium.

  8. A 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASER SURVEY TOWARD GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Shen Zhiqiang; Gan Conggui; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita

    2011-09-01

    We report the results of a systematic survey for 95 GHz class I methanol masers toward a new sample of 192 massive young stellar object candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects or EGOs) identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey. The observations were made with the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Mopra 22 m radio telescope and resulted in the detection of 105 new 95 GHz class I methanol masers. For 92 of the sources our observations provide the first identification of a class I maser transition associated with these objects (i.e., they are new class I methanol maser sources). Our survey proves that there is indeed a high detection rate (55%) of class I methanol masers toward EGOs. Comparison of the GLIMPSE point sources associated with EGOs with and without class I methanol maser detections shows that they have similar mid-IR colors, with the majority meeting the color selection criteria -0.6 < [5.8]-[8.0] < 1.4 and 0.5 < [3.6]-[4.5] < 4.0. Investigations of the Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 {mu}m colors and the associated millimeter dust clump properties (mass and density) of the EGOs for the sub-samples based on the class of methanol masers they are associated with suggest that the stellar mass range associated with class I methanol masers extends to lower masses than for class II methanol masers, or alternatively class I methanol masers may be associated with more than one evolutionary phase during the formation of a high-mass star.

  9. EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF 44.1 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN SAGITTARIUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Fish, V. L.

    2011-09-20

    We report on the detection of 44 GHz Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission in the Sagittarius A (Sgr A) complex with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). These EVLA observations show that the Sgr A complex harbors at least four different tracers of shocked regions in the radio regime. The 44 GHz masers correlate with the positions and velocities of previously detected 36 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers, but less with 1720 MHz OH masers. Our detections agree with theoretical predictions that the densities and temperatures conducive for 1720 MHz OH masers may also produce 36 and 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser emission. However, many 44 GHz masers do not overlap with 36 GHz methanol masers, suggesting that 44 GHz masers also arise in regions too hot and too dense for 36 GHz masers to form. This agrees with the non-detection of 1720 MHz OH masers in the same area, which are thought to be excited under even cooler and less dense conditions. We speculate that the geometry of the 36 GHz masers outlines the current location of a shock front.

  10. The Zeeman Effect in the 44 GHz Class I Methanol Maser Line toward DR21(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momjian, E.; Sarma, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report detection of the Zeeman effect in the 44 GHz Class I methanol maser line, toward the star-forming region DR21(OH). In a 219 Jy beam‑1 maser centered at an LSR velocity of 0.83 km s‑1, we find a 20-σ detection of zBlos = 53.5 ± 2.7 Hz. If 44 GHz methanol masers are excited at n ∼ 107–8 cm‑3, then the B versus n1/2 relation would imply, from comparison with Zeeman effect detections in the CN(1 ‑ 0) line toward DR21(OH), that magnetic fields traced by 44 GHz methanol masers in DR21(OH) should be ∼10 mG. Combined with our detected zBlos = 53.5 Hz, this would imply that the value of the 44 GHz methanol Zeeman splitting factor z is ∼5 Hz mG‑1. Such small values of z would not be a surprise, as the methanol molecule is non-paramagnetic, like H2O. Empirical attempts to determine z, as demonstrated, are important because there currently are no laboratory measurements or theoretically calculated values of z for the 44 GHz CH3OH transition. Data from observations of a larger number of sources are needed to make such empirical determinations robust.

  11. The almost ubiquitous association of 6.7-GHz methanol masers with dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Menten, K. M.; König, C.; Wyrowski, F.; Thompson, M. A.; Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Eden, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    We report the results of 870-μm continuum observations, using the Large APEX Bolometer Camera, towards 77 class-II, 6.7-GHz methanol masers identified by the Methanol MultiBeam (MMB) survey to map the thermal emission from cool dust towards these objects. These data complement a study of 630 methanol masers associated with compact dense clumps identified from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) survey. Compact dust emission is detected towards 70 sources, which implies a dust-association rate of 99 per cent for the full MMB catalogue. Evaluation of the derived dust and maser properties leads us to conclude that the combined sample represents a single population tracing the same phenomenon. We find median clump masses of a few 103 M⊙ and that all but a handful of sources satisfy the mass-size criterion required for massive star formation. This study provides the strongest evidence of the almost ubiquitous association of methanol masers with massive, star-forming clumps. The fraction of methanol-maser associated clumps is a factor of ˜2 lower in the outer Galaxy than the inner Galaxy, possibly a result of the lower metallicity environment of the former. We find no difference in the clump-mass and maser-luminosity distributions of the inner and outer Galaxy. The maser-pumping and clump formation mechanisms are therefore likely to be relatively invariant to Galactic location. Finally, we use the ratio of maser luminosity and clump mass to investigate the hypothesis that the maser luminosity is a good indicator of the evolutionary stage of the embedded source, however, we find no evidence to support this.

  12. 44 GHz Class I Methanol (CH_3OH) Maser Survey in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Pihlström, Ylva M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a large 44 GHz (70-61 A +) methanol (CH3OH) maser survey of the Galactic Center. The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array was used to search for CH3OH maser emission covering a large fraction of the region around Sgr A. In 25 pointings, over 300 CH3OH maser sources (>10σ) were detected. The majority of the maser sources have a single peak emission spectrum with line of sight velocities that range from about -13 to 72 km s-1. Most maser sources were found to have velocities around 35-55 km s-1, closely following velocities of neighboring interacting molecular clouds (MCs). The full width at half-maximum of each individual spectral feature is very narrow (˜0.85 km s-1 on average). In the north, where Sgr A East is known to be interacting with the 50 km s-1 MC, more than 100 44 GHz CH3OH masers were detected. In addition, three other distinct concentrations of masers were found, which appear to be located closer to the interior of the interacting MCs. It is possible that a subset of masers is associated with star formation, although conclusive evidence is lacking.

  13. Studying Star Formation in the Central Molecular Zone using 22 GHz Water and 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; SWAG

    2016-01-01

    The inner 400 pc of our Galaxy, or the so-called the central molecular zone (CMZ), has a unique environment with a large mass of dense, warm molecular gas. One of the premier questions is how star formation (SF) differs in this unique environment from elsewhere in the Galaxy. We intend to address this issue by identifying improved numbers and locations of early sites of SF. We have conducted high resolution surveys of the CMZ, looking for early SF indicators such as 22 GHz water and 6.7 GHz methanol masers. We present the initial water maser results from the SWAG survey and methanol results from the first full VLA survey of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the CMZ. These surveys span beyond the inner 1.2ο x 0.5ο of the Galaxy, including Sgr B through Sgr C. The improved spatial and spectral resolutions (~26" and 2 km s-1) and sensitivity (RMS ~10 mJy beam-1) of our ATCA observations have allowed us to identify over 140 water maser candidates in the SWAG survey. This is a factor of 3 more than detected from prior surveys of the CMZ. The preliminary distribution of these candidates appears to be uniform along Galactic longitude. Should this distribution persist for water masers associated with star formation (as opposed to those produced by evolved stars), then this result would imply a more uniform distribution of recent SF activity in the CMZ. Prior works have shown that 2/3 of the molecular gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes, and young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by IR SEDs are located predominantly at negative Galactic longitudes. A combination of these results can provide insight on the evolution of SF within the CMZ. We are currently comparing the water maser positions to other catalogs (ex. OH/IR stars) in order to distinguish between the mechanisms producing these masers. We are also currently working on determining the distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. These masers do not contain the same ambiguity as water masers as to their source

  14. Ammonia and CO Outflow around 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F. C.; Xu, Y.; Wu, Y. W.; Yang, J.; Lu, D. R.; Menten, K. M.; Henkel, C.

    2016-10-01

    Single point observations are presented in NH3 (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion transitions using the Effelsberg 100 m telescope for a sample of 100 6.7 GHz methanol masers and mapping observations in the 12CO and 13CO (1 - 0) transitions using the Purple Mountain Observatory Delingha 13.7 m telescope for 82 sample sources with detected ammonia. A further 62 sources were selected for either 12CO or 13CO line outflow identification, producing 45 outflow candidates, 29 using 12CO and 16 using 13CO data. Twenty-two of the outflow candidates were newly identified, and 23 had trigonometric parallax distances. Physical properties were derived from ammonia lines and CO outflow parameters were calculated. Histograms and statistical correlations for ammonia, CO outflow parameters, and 6.7 GHz methanol maser luminosities are also presented. No significant correlation was found between ammonia and maser luminosity. However, weak correlations were found between outflow properties and maser luminosities, which may indicate that outflows are physically associated with 6.7 GHz masers.

  15. DETECTION OF 36 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASER EMISSION TOWARD NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simon P.; Chen, Xi; Qiao, Hai-Hua; Baan, Willem; An, Tao; Li, Juan; Breen, Shari L.

    2014-08-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for emission from the 4{sub –1} → 3{sub 0} E transition of methanol (36.2 GHz) toward the center of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253. Two regions of emission were detected, offset from the nucleus along the same position angle as the inner spiral arms. The emission is largely unresolved on a scale of 5'', has a FWHM line width of <30 km s{sup –1}, and an isotropic luminosity orders of a magnitude larger than that observed in any Galactic star formation region. These characteristics suggest that the 36.2 GHz methanol emission is most likely a maser, although observations with higher angular and spectral resolution are required to confirm this. If it is a maser, this represents the first detection of a class I methanol maser outside the Milky Way. The 36.2 GHz methanol emission in NGC 253 has more than an order of magnitude higher isotropic luminosity than the widespread emission recently detected toward the center of the Milky Way. If emission from this transition scales with the nuclear star formation rate, then it may be detectable in the central regions of many starburst galaxies. Detection of methanol emission in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies would open up a new tool for testing for variations in fundamental constants (particularly the proton-to-electron mass ratio) on cosmological scales.

  16. MAJOR STRUCTURES OF THE INNER GALAXY DELINEATED BY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Breen, S. L.; Voronkov, M. A.; Avison, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Gray, M. D.; Burton, M. G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Pestalozzi, M.

    2011-05-20

    We explore the longitude-velocity distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the context of the inner structure of our Galaxy. We analyze the correlation in velocities within this distribution and identify density enhancements indicating large-scale regions of enhanced star formation. These are interpreted as the starting points of the spiral arms and the interaction of the Galactic bar with the 3 kpc arms. The methanol masers support the presence of a long thin bar with a 45{sup 0} orientation. Signatures of the full 3 kpc arm structure are seen, including a prominent tangent at approximately -22{sup 0} Galactic longitude. We compare this distribution with existing models of the gas dynamics of our Galaxy. The 3 kpc arm structure appears likely to correspond to the radius of corotation resonance of the bar, with the bar on its inner surface and the starting points of the spiral arms on its outer surface.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: General Catalogue of 6.7GHz Methanol Masers (Pestalozzi+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestalozzi, M. R.; Minier, V.

    2003-10-01

    The catalogue of the 6.7GHz methanol masers comprises all detected sources since the discovery of this intense radiation. For every source we report name, right ascension and declination in J2000, galactic coordinates, vlsr, velocity range, peak flux, galactocentric and heliocentric distances (near and far), IRAS and MSX associations if any, usual name, detected methanol masers at 12, 44, 85.5, 86.5, 95, 107, 108, 156GHz, reference of the 6.7GHz detection and reobservation. (2 data files).

  18. Detection of the Zeeman Effect in the 36 GHz Class I Methanol Maser Line with the EVLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momjian, Emmanuel; Sarma, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first detection of the Zeeman effect in the 36 GHz Class I methanol maser line. The observations were carried out with 13 antennas of the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) equipped with the new 27-40 GHz (Ka-Band) receivers, and targeted the high-mass star-forming region M8E. The detected line of sight magnetic field values are -31.3 ± 3.5 mG and 20.2 ± 3.5 mG to the northwest and southeast of the maser line peak, respectively. These magnetic field values have been derived using a Zeeman splitting factor based on laboratory measurements of the 25 GHz methanol line, since no measurements exist for the 36 GHz line. The change in sign of the magnetic field, as revealed in our observations, is over a size scale of 1300 AU in the source M8E (assuming a distance of 1.5 kpc). This may indicate that the masers are tracing two regions with different magnetic fields, or that the same field curves across the regions where the masers are being excited. The detected fields are not significantly different from the magnetic fields detected in the 6.7 GHz Class II methanol maser line, indicating that these masers may trace the large scale magnetic field, or that the magnetic field remains unchanged during the early evolution of star forming regions. Given what is known about the densities at which 36 GHz methanol masers are excited, we find that the magnetic field is dynamically significant in this star forming region. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Probing the Evolution of Massive Young Stellar Objects using Weak Class II 6.7GHz Methanol Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Bethany Ann; Cunningham, Nichol

    2017-01-01

    We present results from an investigation of class II 6.7GHz methanol masers towards four Massive Young Stellar Objects (MYSOs). The sources, selected from the Red MSX Source (RMS) Survey (Lumsden et al. 2013), were previously understood to be non-detections for class II methanol maser emission in the methanol multi-beam (MMB) Survey (Caswell et al. 2010.) Class II methanol masers are a well-known sign post of massive star forming regions and may be utilized to probe their relatively poorly understood formation. It is possible that these non-detections are simply weak masers that are potentially associated with a younger evolutionary phase of MYSOs as hypothesized by Olmi et al. (2014). The sources were chosen to sample various stages of evolution, having similar 21 to 8 micron flux ratios and bolometric luminosities as other MYSOs with previous class II methanol maser detections. We observed all 4 MYSOs with ATCA (~2" resolution) at 10 times deeper sensitivity than previously obtained with the MMB survey and have a spectral resolution of 0.087kms^-1 . The raw data is reduced using the program Miriad (Sault, R. J., et al., 1995) and deconvolutioned using the program CASA (McMullin, J. P., et al. 2007.) We determine one of the four observed MYSOs is harboring a weak class II methanol maser. We discuss the possibility of sensitivity limitations on the remaining sources as well as environmental and evolutionary differences between the sources.

  20. DISCOVERY OF THE ZEEMAN EFFECT IN THE 44 GHz CLASS I METHANOL (CH{sub 3}OH) MASER LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, A. P.; Momjian, E.

    2011-03-20

    We report the discovery of the Zeeman effect in the 44 GHz Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser line. The observations were carried out with 22 antennas of the Expanded Very Large Array toward a star-forming region in OMC-2. Based on our adopted Zeeman splitting factor of z = 1.0 Hz mG{sup -1}, we detect a line-of-sight magnetic field of 18.4 {+-} 1.1 mG toward this source. Since such 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers arise from shocks in the outflows of star-forming regions, we can relate our measurement of the post-shock magnetic field to field strengths indicated by species tracing pre-shock regions, and thus characterize the large-scale magnetic field. Moreover, since Class I masers trace regions more remote from the star-forming core than Class II masers, and possibly earlier phases, magnetic fields detected in 6.7 GHz Class II and 36 and 44 GHz Class I methanol maser lines together offer the potential of providing a more complete picture of the magnetic field. This motivates further observations at high angular resolution to find the positional relationships between Class I and Class II masers, and masers at various frequencies within each category. In particular, CH{sub 3}OH masers are widespread in high- as well as intermediate-mass star-forming regions, and our discovery provides a new method of studying the magnetic field in such regions, by observing small physical scales that are not accessible by any other lines.

  1. A 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASER SURVEY TOWARD A SAMPLE OF GLIMPSE POINT SOURCES ASSOCIATED WITH BGPS CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Gan Conggui; Shen Zhiqiang; An Tao; Ellingsen, Simon P.; He Jinhua

    2012-05-01

    We report a survey with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope for class I methanol masers from the 95 GHz (8{sub 0}-7{sub 1} A{sup +}) transition. Two hundred and fourteen target sources were selected by combining information from both the Spitzer GLIMPSE and 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalogs. The observed sources satisfy the GLIMPSE mid-IR criteria of [3.6]-[4.5] > 1.3, [3.6]-[5.8] > 2.5, [3.6]-[8.0] > 2.5 and 8.0 {mu}m mag less than 10; they also have an associated 1.1 mm BGPS source. Class I methanol maser emission was detected in 63 sources, corresponding to a detection rate of 29% for this survey. For the majority of detections (43), this is the first identification of class I methanol masers associated with these sources. We show that the intensity of the class I methanol maser emission is not closely related to mid-IR intensity or the colors of the GLIMPSE point sources; however, it is closely correlated with properties (mass and beam-averaged column density) of the BGPS sources. Comparison of measures of star formation activity for the BGPS sources with and without class I methanol masers indicates that the sources with class I methanol masers usually have higher column density and larger flux density than those without them. Our results predict that the criteria log (S{sub int}) {<=} -38.0 + 1.72log (N{sup beam}{sub H{sub 2}}) and log (N{sub H{sub 2}{sup beam}}){>=}22.1, which utilizes both the integrated flux density (S{sub int}) and beam-averaged column density (N{sub H{sub 2}{sup beam}}) of the BGPS sources, are very efficient for selecting sources likely to have an associated class I methanol maser. Our expectation is that searches using these criteria will detect 90% of the predicted number of class I methanol masers from the full BGPS catalog ({approx}1000), and that they will do so with a high detection efficiency ({approx}75%).

  2. Parallaxes of 6.7-GHz methanol masers towards the G 305.2 high-mass star formation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Reid, M. J.; Bignall, H. E.; McCallum, J.; Phillips, C. J.; Reynolds, C.; Stevens, J.

    2017-02-01

    We have made measurements to determine the parallax and proper motion of the three 6.7-GHz methanol masers G 305.200+0.019, G 305.202+0.208 and G 305.208+0.206. The combined parallax is found to be 0.25±0.05 mas, corresponding to a distance of 4.1^{+1.2}_{-0.7} kpc. This places the G 305.2 star formation region in the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm. The inclusion of G 305.2 increases the Galactic azimuth range of the sources in this arm by 40° from Sato et al., allowing us to determine the pitch angle of this spiral with greater confidence to be ψ = 19.0° ± 2.6°. The first very long baseline interferometry spot maps of the 6.7-GHz methanol masers towards these sources show that they have simple linear and ring-like structures, consistent with emission expected from class II methanol masers in general.

  3. Measurement of the bipolar outflow motions of the 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers in G320.23-0.28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Koichiro; Ellingsen, Simon; Fujisawa, Kenta; Bartkiewicz, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Internal proper-motion measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol masers can provide unique information about high-mass star-forming regions (HMSFRs). The source G320.23-0.28 is the best case where the methanol masers are parallel to a large-scale bi-lobed outflow traced by H_2, SiO, and EGO emissions in the east-west direction. Therefore, it appears that the G320.23-0.28 methanol maser spatially and physically trace the outflow ejected from a high-mass YSO in early evolutionary stage. We have accurately measured the spatial distribution of the G320.23-0.28 methanol maser using the LBA (Project: v292a), and that distribution exhibited a complex spatial distribution. By applying the bipolar outflow model of Moscadelli et al. (2000, 2005) to our observed distribution, we obtained maser-outflow axis and opening angles that were consistent with the large-scale outflow. We propose to carry out three-epoch observations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers in G320.23-0.28 to measure their internal proper motions. This measurement will provide vital information about both the location of this maser with SFRs and studies of outflows at early evolutionary stages in HMSF.

  4. Observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers with East-Asian VLBI Network. II. Internal proper motion measurement in G006.79-00.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Koichiro; Fujisawa, Kenta; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Motogi, Kazuhito; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Matsumoto, Naoko; Hirano, Daiki; Hayashi, Kyonosuke; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Honma, Mareki; Hirota, Tomoya; Murata, Yasuhiro; Doi, Akihiro; Ogawa, Hideo; Kimura, Kimihiro; Niinuma, Kotaro; Chen, Xi; Xia, Bo; Li, Bin; Sorai, Kazuo; Momose, Munetake; Saito, Yu; Takaba, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Kim, Kee-Tae; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2016-10-01

    We detected internal proper motions of the methanol maser features at 6.7 GHz in a high-mass star-forming region G006.79-00.25 with the East-Asian VLBI Network. The spatial distribution of the maser features shows an elliptical morphology. The internal proper motions of 17 methanol maser features relative to the barycenter of the features were measured. The amplitude of the internal motions ranged from 1.30 to 10.25 km s-1. Most of the internal proper motions of the maser features seem to point counterclockwise along the elliptical morphology of the maser features. We applied the disk model, which includes both rotating and expanding components, to the observed positions, l.o.s. velocities, and proper motions. The derived rotation, expansion, and systemic velocities are +3^{+2}_{-2}, +6^{+2}_{-2}, and +21^{+2}_{-2}km s-1, respectively, at the radius of 1260 au on the disk with a position angle of the semi-major axis of - 140° and an inclination of 60°. The derived rotating motion suggests that the methanol maser emissions showing the elliptical spatial morphology possibly trace the rotating disk. The derived expanding motion might be caused by the magnetic-centrifugal wind on the disk, which was estimated on the basis of the typical magnetic field strength at emitting zones of a methanol maser.

  5. COMPARISON OF TWO EPOCHS OF THE ZEEMAN EFFECT IN THE 44 GHz CLASS I METHANOL (CH{sub 3}OH) MASER LINE IN OMC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Momjian, E.; Sarma, A. P. E-mail: asarma@depaul.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present a second epoch of observations of the 44 GHz Class I methanol maser line toward the star-forming region Orion Molecular Cloud 2. The observations were carried out with the Very Large Array, and constitute one of the first successful Zeeman effect detections with the new Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. Comparing to the result of our earlier epoch of data for this region, we find that the intensity of the maser increased by 50%, but the magnetic field value has stayed the same, within the errors. This suggests that the methanol maser may be tracing the large-scale magnetic field that is not affected by the bulk gas motions or turbulence on smaller scales that is causing the change in maser intensity.

  6. THE FIRST VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY IMAGE OF A 44 GHz METHANOL MASER WITH THE KVN AND VERA ARRAY (KaVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Naoko; Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kameya, Osamu; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Motogi, Kazuhito; Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Mikyoung; Byun, Do-Young; Jung, Taehyun; Kim, Jongsoo; Lyo, A-Ran; Oh, Chungsik; Bae, Jaehan; Chung, Hyunsoo; Chung, Moon-Hee; Cho, Se-Hyung; Chibueze, James O.; Shino, Nagisa; and others

    2014-07-01

    We have carried out the first very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) imaging of a 44 GHz class I methanol maser (7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +}) associated with a millimeter core MM2 in a massive star-forming region IRAS 18151–1208 with KaVA (KVN and VERA Array), which is a newly combined array of KVN (Korean VLBI Network) and VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). We have succeeded in imaging compact maser features with a synthesized beam size of 2.7 milliarcseconds × 1.5 milliarcseconds (mas). These features are detected at a limited number of baselines within the length of shorter than ≈ 650 km corresponding to 100 Mλ in the uv-coverage. The central velocity and the velocity width of the 44 GHz methanol maser are consistent with those of the quiescent gas rather than the outflow traced by the SiO thermal line. The minimum component size among the maser features is ∼5 mas × 2 mas, which corresponds to the linear size of ∼15 AU × 6 AU assuming a distance of 3 kpc. The brightness temperatures of these features range from ∼3.5 × 10{sup 8} to 1.0 × 10{sup 10} K, which are higher than the estimated lower limit from a previous Very Large Array observation with the highest spatial resolution of ∼50 mas. The 44 GHz class I methanol maser in IRAS 18151–1208 is found to be associated with the MM2 core, which is thought to be less evolved than another millimeter core MM1 associated with the 6.7 GHz class II methanol maser.

  7. The 6-GHz methanol multibeam maser catalogue - IV. Galactic longitudes 186°-330° including the Orion-Monoceros region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Avison, A.; Breen, S. L.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    We present the fourth portion of a Galactic plane survey of methanol masers at 6668 MHz, spanning the longitude range 186°-330°. We report 207 maser detections, 89 new to the survey. This completes the southern sky part of the methanol multibeam survey and includes a large proportion of new sources, 43 per cent. We also include results from blind observations of the Orion-Monoceros star-forming region, formally outside the latitude range of the methanol multibeam survey; only the four previously known methanol emitting sites were detected, of which we present new positions and spectra for masers at Orion A (south) and Orion B, obtained with the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) array.

  8. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Class I methanol masers are thought to be tracers of interstellar shock waves. However, they have received relatively little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities compared to other maser transitions. This situation has changed recently and Class I methanol masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflow activity especially in high extinction regions. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain direct observational information about magnetic fields in interstellar shocks. Aims: We make use of newly calculated collisional rate coefficients for methanol to investigate the excitation of Class I methanol masers and to reconcile the observed Class I methanol maser properties with model results. Methods: We performed large velocity gradient calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry appropriate for shocks to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate coefficient, the maser loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of several Class I masers on the physics of the emitting gas. Results: We predict inversion in all transitions where maser emission is observed. Bright Class I methanol masers are mainly high-temperature (>100 K) high-density (n(H2) ~ 107-108 cm-3) structures with methanol maser emission measures, ξ, corresponding to high methanol abundances close to the limits set by collisional quenching. Our model predictions reproduce reasonably well most of the observed properties of Class I methanol masers. Class I masers in the 25 GHz series are the most sensitive to the density of the medium and mase at higher densities than other lines. Moreover, even at high density and high methanol abundances, their luminosity is predicted to be lower than that of the 44 GHz and 36 GHz masers. Our model predictions also reflect the observational result that the

  9. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  10. Unbiased water and methanol maser surveys of NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Ho-Gyu

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of unbiased 22 GHz H{sub 2}O water and 44 GHz class I CH{sub 3}OH methanol maser surveys in the central 7' × 10' area of NGC 1333 and two additional mapping observations of a 22 GHz water maser in a ∼3' × 3' area of the IRAS4A region. In the 22 GHz water maser survey of NGC 1333 with a sensitivity of σ ∼ 0.3 Jy, we confirmed the detection of masers toward H{sub 2}O(B) in the region of HH 7-11 and IRAS4B. We also detected new water masers located ∼20'' away in the western direction of IRAS4B or ∼25'' away in the southern direction of IRAS4A. We could not, however, find young stellar objects or molecular outflows associated with them. They showed two different velocity components of ∼0 and ∼16 km s{sup –1}, which are blue- and redshifted relative to the adopted systemic velocity of ∼7 km s{sup –1} for NGC 1333. They also showed time variabilities in both intensity and velocity from multi-epoch observations and an anti-correlation between the intensities of the blue- and redshifted velocity components. We suggest that the unidentified power source of these masers might be found in the earliest evolutionary stage of star formation, before the onset of molecular outflows. Finding this kind of water maser is only possible through an unbiased blind survey. In the 44 GHz methanol maser survey with a sensitivity of σ ∼ 0.5 Jy, we confirmed masers toward IRAS4A2 and the eastern shock region of IRAS2A. Both sources are also detected in 95 and 132 GHz methanol maser lines. In addition, we had new detections of methanol masers at 95 and 132 GHz toward IRAS4B. In terms of the isotropic luminosity, we detected methanol maser sources brighter than ∼5 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup –1} from our unbiased survey.

  11. Observations of the Zeeman effect in Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratim Sarma, Anuj; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in Class I methanol maser sources toward high mass star forming regions. Toward DR21(OH), we have detected the Zeeman effect at 44 GHz in a 219 Jy/beam maser centered at an LSR velocity of 0.83 km/s, and we find $zB_\\text{los} = 53.5 \\pm 2.7$ Hz. If 44 GHz methanol masers are excited at $10^{7-8}$ cm$^{-3}$, then magnetic fields in DR21(OH) should be ~10 mG. Our detected $zB_\\text{los}$ would then imply that the Zeeman splitting factor for the 44 GHz methanol maser line should be ~5 Hz/mG. Such small values for z would not be surprising, since the methanol molecule is non-paramagnetic, like H2O. Since there are no direct measurements or calculations of the 44 GHz methanol maser Zeeman splitting factor to date, such empirical attempts could prove valuable in building a repository of measurements from which to gain an understanding of the magnitude of z.

  12. Detection of class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser candidates in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlström, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A.; McEwen, B. C.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Frail, D. A.; Claussen, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) lines in a sample of 21 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). Mainly the regions of the SNRs with 1720 MHz OH masers were observed. Despite the limited spatial extent covered in our search, methanol masers were detected in both G1.4–0.1 and W28. Additional masers were found in Sgr A East. More than 40 masers were found in G1.4–0.1, which we deduce are due to interactions between the SNR and at least two separate molecular clouds. The six masers in W28 are associated with the molecular cloud that is also associated with the OH maser excitation. We discuss the possibility that the methanol maser may be more numerous in SNRs than the OH maser, but harder to detect due to observational constraints.

  13. Development of 32-m Radio Telescopes for Monitoring Observations of Methanol Masers, H2O Masers, and Radio Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Y.; Saito, Y.; Saito, T.; Mori, T.; Soon, K. L.; Momose, M.; Yokosawa, M.; Ogawa, H.; Fujisawa, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Motogi, K.; Takaba, H.; Sorai, K.; Nakai, N.; Kameno, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Kawaguchi, N.; Hachisuka, K.

    2013-10-01

    We report the renovation of two satellite-communication antennas, named Takahagi and Hitachi 32-m antennas, into cm-wave radio telescopes. Both antennas have been successfully renovated into radio telescopes until 2012. VLBI observations at 6.7, 8, and 22 GHz have been successful since 2010. We have started single-dish observations of methanol masers at 6.7 GHz and H2O masers at 22 GHz from 2013.

  14. ALMA Observations of the IRDC Clump G34.43+00.24 MM3: 278 GHz Class I Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takahiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Sakai, Nami; Foster, Jonathan B.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    We have observed a molecular clump (MM3) associated with the infrared dark cloud G34.43+00.24 in the CH3OH JK = 9-1-80 E, 50-40 E, and 5-1-4-1 E lines at sub-arcsecond resolution by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. By comparing the CH3OH JK = 9-1-80 E emission with the CH3OH 50-40 E and 5-1-4-1 E emission, we have found that the CH3OH JK = 9-1-80 E emission is masing. We have clearly shown that the CH3OH JK = 9-1-80 masers arise from the post shocked gas in the interacting regions between the outflows and ambient dense gas. Toward the strongest peak of the CH3OH maser emission, SiO J = 6-5 emission is very weak. This indicates that the CH3OH maser emission traces relatively old shocks or weak shocks.

  15. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-11-10

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 6.7GHz methanol maser polarization in SFR (Surcis+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surcis, G.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Hutawarakorn Kramer, B.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Blasi, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    The first seven massive SFRs were observed at 6.7GHz in full polarization spectral mode with eight of the EVN antennas (Effelsberg, Jodrell, Onsala, Medicina, Noto, Torun, Westerbork, and Yebes-40m) between November 2012 and June 2013, for a total observation time of 49h. The bandwidth was 2MHz, providing a velocity range of ~100km/s. (8 data files).

  17. THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE STRONGEST GALACTIC METHANOL MASER

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, A.; Menten, K. M.; Carrasco-González, C.; Brunthaler, A.; Reid, M. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Krishnan, V.; Moscadelli, L.; Cesaroni, R.

    2015-05-01

    The high-mass star-forming site G009.62+00.20 E hosts the 6.7 GHz methanol maser source with the greatest flux density in the Galaxy which has been flaring periodically over the last 10 yr. We performed high-resolution astrometric measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}O, and OH maser emission and 7 mm continuum in the region. The radio continuum emission was resolved in two sources separated by 1300 AU. The CH{sub 3}OH maser cloudlets are distributed along two north–south ridges of emission to the east and west of the strongest radio continuum component. This component likely pinpoints a massive young stellar object which heats up its dusty envelope, providing a constant IR pumping for the Class II CH{sub 3}OH maser transitions. We suggest that the periodic maser activity may be accounted for by an independent, pulsating, IR radiation field provided by a bloated protostar in the vicinity of the brightest masers. We also report the discovery of an elliptical distribution of CH{sub 3}OH maser emission in the region of periodic variability.

  18. The 6-GHz multibeam maser survey - I. Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Avison, A.; Breen, S. L.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Cox, J.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cohen, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new seven-beam 6-7GHz receiver has been built to survey the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds for newly forming high-mass stars that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6668MHz. The receiver was jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) and allows simultaneous coverage at 6668 and 6035MHz. It was successfully commissioned at Parkes in 2006 January and is now being used to conduct the Parkes-Jodrell multibeam maser survey of the Milky Way. This will be the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane for masers of not only 6668-MHz methanol, but also 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl. The survey is two orders of magnitude faster than most previous systematic surveys and has an rms noise level of ~0.17Jy. This paper describes the observational strategy, techniques and reduction procedures of the Galactic and Magellanic Cloud surveys, together with deeper, pointed, follow-up observations and complementary observations with other instruments. It also includes an estimate of the survey detection efficiency. The 111d of observations with the Parkes telescope have so far yielded >800 methanol sources, of which ~350 are new discoveries. The whole project will provide the first comprehensive Galaxy-wide catalogue of 6668-MHz and 6035-MHz masers.

  19. REVISING THE KINEMATICS OF 12 GHz CH{sub 3}OH MASERS TOWARD W3(OH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moscadelli, L.; Xu, Y.; Chen, X.

    2010-06-20

    We derive accurate proper motions of the CH{sub 3}OH 12 GHz masers toward the W3(OH) ultra-compact (UC) H II region, employing seven epochs of VLBA observations spanning a time interval of about 10 yr. The achieved velocity accuracy is of the order of 0.1 km s{sup -1}, adequate to precisely measure the relative velocities of most of the 12 GHz masers in W3(OH), with amplitude varying in the range 0.3-3 km s{sup -1}. Toward W3(OH), the most intense 12 GHz masers concentrate in a small area toward the north (the northern clump) of the UC H II region. We have compared the proper motions of the CH{sub 3}OH 12 GHz masers with those (derived from literature data) of the OH 6035 MHz masers, emitting from the same region of the methanol masers. In the northern clump, the two maser emissions emerge from nearby (but likely distinct) cloudlets of masing gas with, in general, a rather smooth variation of line-of-sight and sky-projected velocities, which suggests some connection of the environments and kinematics traced by both maser types. The conical outflow model, previously proposed to account for the 12 GHz maser kinematics in the northern clump, does not reproduce the new, accurate measurements of 12 GHz maser proper motions and has to be rejected. We focus on the subset of 12 GHz masers of the northern clump belonging to the 'linear structure at P.A. = 130{sup 0}-140{sup 0}', whose regular variation of LSR velocities with position presents evidence for some ordered motion. We show that the three-dimensional velocities of this 'linear distribution' of 12 GHz masers can be well fitted considering a flat, rotating disk, seen almost edge-on.

  20. Linear Polarization of Class I Methanol Masers in Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ji-hyun; Byun, Do-Young; Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Jongsoo; Lyo, A.-Ran; Vlemmings, W. H. T.

    2016-12-01

    Class I methanol masers are found to be good tracers of the interaction between outflows from massive young stellar objects with their surrounding media. Although polarization observations of Class II methanol masers have been able to provide information about magnetic fields close to the central (proto)stars, polarization observations of Class I methanol masers are rare, especially at 44 and 95 GHz. We present the results of linear polarization observations of 39 Class I methanol maser sources at 44 and 95 GHz. These two lines are observed simultaneously with one of the 21 m Korean VLBI Network telescopes in single-dish mode. Approximately 60% of the observed sources have fractional polarizations of a few percent in at least one transition. This is the first reported detection of linear polarization of the 44 GHz methanol maser. The two maser transitions show similar polarization properties, indicating that they trace similar magnetic environments, although the fraction of the linear polarization is slightly higher at 95 GHz. We discuss the association between the directions of polarization angles and outflows. We also discuss some targets having different polarization properties at both lines, including DR21(OH) and G82.58+0.20, which show the 90° polarization angle flip at 44 GHz.

  1. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswanganye, J. P.; van der Walt, D. J.; Goedhart, S.; Gaylard, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    10 new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26-m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radio telescope for 2 yr and 9 months, from 2012 August to 2015 May. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 ± 1 d. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7- and 12.2-GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  2. High Resolution Surveys of the Water and Methanol Star Formation Masers in the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; Krieger, Nico; SWAG

    2017-01-01

    We present some of the first high resolution fully interferometric surveys of 6.7 GHz methanol and 22 GHz water masers towards the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). These masers are good signposts for early (<0.05 Myrs) star formation. Using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), we searched the inner 3 x 0.7 deg of the Galactic Center (GC) for methanol masers with resolutions of 0.9” (0.04 pc) and 0.4 km/s (8 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.01 Jy/beam. With this high resolution and sensitivity, we have detected ~100 methanol masers, which is over a factor of two more than has previously been detected. We have also conducted two surveys of water masers in this region. As part of the Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG), the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to survey a variety of molecular lines, including the 22 GHz water line. With the ATCA, we have detected over 200 water masers using resolutions of 26” (1 pc) and 2 km/s (60 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.01 Jy/beam. Afterward, we conducted the first on-the-fly (OTF) VLA survey of water masers with improved resolutions of 0.7” (0.03 pc) and 0.4 km/s (26 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.05 Jy/beam. Although the analysis of this OTF survey is not yet complete, we have already identified water masers that were not visible in the SWAG data.The improvement in the number of detected masers allows us to better analyze the distribution of these masers. We show that the SWAG water masers appear uniformly distributed along the Galactic plane, despite the asymmetry of the molecular gas distribution, where ~2/3 of the gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes. The methanol masers follow the molecular gas distribution, with a majority of the masers being found at positive longitudes. This could indicate a difference in the star forming history of these two parts of the CMZ and/or that the 22 GHz water masers are contaminated by water

  3. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  4. CANDIDATES FOR THE YOUNG STELLAR OUTFLOWS: WATER AND METHANOL MASERS FROM YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Wanggi; Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Kee-Tae; Byun, Do-Young

    2012-11-01

    We conducted simultaneous 22 GHz water maser and 44 GHz class I methanol maser surveys of newly identified 282 H{sub 2} emission features from the 2.122 {mu}m H{sub 2} narrowband image survey in the Galactic plane (UWISH2 project) using Korean VLBI Network 21 m radio telescopes. We detected 16 and 13 new water and methanol maser sources, respectively. This result indicates that at least {approx}5% of the H{sub 2} emission features originate from young stellar objects (YSOs) that are in the right physical condition to produce the water and methanol masers. The masers are closely related to the current outflow activities in the Galactic plane. The power sources of these 23 diffused/collimated H{sub 2} emission features (six sources are detected for both masers) are likely to be intermediate- to high-mass YSOs, based on a comparison with the maser luminosities of other well-studied YSOs. Both maser velocities are mostly close to their own systemic velocities within {approx}<5 km s{sup -1}, even though water masers generally show larger variabilities in the intensity, velocity, and shape than methanol masers. We also discovered three new water maser sources with high-velocity components: {approx}25 km s{sup -1} redshifted CMHO 019, {approx}50 km s{sup -1} blueshifted CMHO 132, and {approx}120 km s{sup -1} blueshifted CMHO 182. In particular, we propose that the dominant blueshifted water maser of CHMO 182 can be a unique laboratory for the study of the high-mass young stellar jet and its acceleration.

  5. On the Relationship of UC HII Regions and Class II Methanol Masers. I. Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B.; Menten, K. M.; Wu, Y.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Rygl, K.; Reid, M. J.; Urquhart, J. S.; Zheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    We conducted Very Large Array C-configuration observations to measure positions and luminosities of Galactic Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers and their associated ultra-compact H ii regions. The spectral resolution was 3.90625 kHz and the continuum sensitivity reached 45 μJy beam-1. We mapped 372 methanol masers with peak flux densities of more than 2 Jy selected from the literature. Absolute positions have nominal uncertainties of 0.″3. In this first paper on the data analysis, we present three catalogs; the first gives information on the strongest feature of 367 methanol maser sources, and the second provides information on all detected maser spots. The third catalog presents derived data of the 127 radio continuum counterparts associated with maser sources. Our detection rate of radio continuum counterparts toward methanol masers is approximately one-third. Our catalogs list properties including distance, flux density, luminosity, and the distribution in the Galactic plane. We found no significant relationship between luminosities of masers and their associated radio continuum counterparts, however, the detection rate of radio continuum emission toward maser sources increases statistically with the maser luminosities.

  6. New OH Observations toward Northern Class I Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val'tts, I. E.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Bayandina, O. S.; Alakoz, A. V.; Larionov, G. M.; Mukha, D. V.; Nabatov, A. S.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Alekseev, E. V.; Nikolaenko, V. S.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Odincov, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    Maser emission of OH(1720) is formed, according to modern concepts, under the influence of collisional pumping. Class I methanol masers (MMI) are also formed by a collisional mechanism of the inversion of the molecular levels. It is not excluded in this case that physical conditions in the condensations of the interstellar medium where masers are formed may be similar for MMI and OH(1720) masers, and they can associate with each other. To establish a possible association between these two kinds of masers, and obtain reliable statistical estimates, a survey of class I methanol masers at a frequency of 1720 MHz has been carried out.

  7. DISCOVERY OF 6.035 GHz HYDROXYL MASER FLARES IN IRAS 18566+0408

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Marzouk, A. A.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.

    2012-05-10

    We report the discovery of 6.035 GHz hydroxyl (OH) maser flares toward the massive star-forming region IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20), which is the only region known to show periodic formaldehyde (4.8 GHz H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH) maser flares. The observations were conducted between 2008 October and 2010 January with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico. We detected two flare events, one in 2009 March and one in 2009 September to November. The OH maser flares are not simultaneous with the H{sub 2}CO flares, but may be correlated with CH{sub 3}OH flares from a component at corresponding velocities. A possible correlated variability of OH and CH{sub 3}OH masers in IRAS 18566+0408 is consistent with a common excitation mechanism (IR pumping) as predicted by theory.

  8. DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST METHANOL (CH{sub 3}OH) MASER IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY (M31)

    SciTech Connect

    Sjouwerman, Lorant O.; Murray, Claire E.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.; Fish, Vincent L.; Araya, Esteban D.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first detection of a 6.7 GHz Class II methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). The CH{sub 3}OH maser was found in a VLA survey during the fall of 2009. We have confirmed the methanol maser with the new EVLA, in operation since 2010 March, but were unsuccessful in detecting a water maser at this location. A direct application for this methanol maser is the determination of the proper motion of M31, such as was previously obtained with water masers in M33 and IC10. Unraveling the three-dimensional velocity of M31 would solve for the biggest unknown in the modeling of the dynamics and evolution of the Local Group of galaxies.

  9. Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser conditions near supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4{sub –1}-3{sub 0} E), 44.070 (7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +}), 84.521 (5{sub –1}-4{sub 0} E), and 95.169 (8{sub 0}-7{sub 1} A {sup +}) GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n ∼ 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup –3} and T > 60 K. The 36 GHz and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 GHz and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results are discussed using recent observations of CH{sub 3}OH and hydroxyl (OH) masers near the SNRs G1.4–0.1, W28, and Sgr A East.

  10. A Catalog of Methanol Masers in Massive Star-forming Regions. III. The Molecular Outflow Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Kurtz, S. E.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Loinard, L.

    2016-02-01

    We present an interferometric survey of the 44 GHz class I methanol maser transition toward a sample of 69 sources consisting of high-mass protostellar object (HMPO) candidates and ultracompact (UC) H ii regions. We found a 38% detection rate (16 of 42) in the HMPO candidates and a 54% detection rate (13 of 24) for the regions with ionized gas. This result indicates that class I methanol maser emission is more common toward the more evolved young stellar objects of our sample. Comparing with similar interferometric data sets, our observations show narrower linewidths, likely due to our higher spatial resolution. Based on a comparison between molecular outflow tracers and the maser positions, we find several cases where the masers appear to be located at the outflow interface with the surrounding core. Unlike previous surveys, we also find several cases where the masers appear to be located close to the base of the molecular outflow, although we cannot discard projection effects. This and other surveys of class I methanol masers not only suggest that these masers may trace shocks at different stages, but also that they may even trace shocks arising from a number of different phenomena occurring in star-forming regions: young/old outflows, cloud-cloud collisions, expanding H ii regions, among others.

  11. A CATALOG OF METHANOL MASERS IN MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. III. THE MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Kurtz, S. E.; Loinard, L.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.

    2016-02-15

    We present an interferometric survey of the 44 GHz class I methanol maser transition toward a sample of 69 sources consisting of high-mass protostellar object (HMPO) candidates and ultracompact (UC) H ii regions. We found a 38% detection rate (16 of 42) in the HMPO candidates and a 54% detection rate (13 of 24) for the regions with ionized gas. This result indicates that class I methanol maser emission is more common toward the more evolved young stellar objects of our sample. Comparing with similar interferometric data sets, our observations show narrower linewidths, likely due to our higher spatial resolution. Based on a comparison between molecular outflow tracers and the maser positions, we find several cases where the masers appear to be located at the outflow interface with the surrounding core. Unlike previous surveys, we also find several cases where the masers appear to be located close to the base of the molecular outflow, although we cannot discard projection effects. This and other surveys of class I methanol masers not only suggest that these masers may trace shocks at different stages, but also that they may even trace shocks arising from a number of different phenomena occurring in star-forming regions: young/old outflows, cloud–cloud collisions, expanding H ii regions, among others.

  12. Insights into high mass star formation from methanol maser observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Hontas Freeman

    2013-06-01

    We present high angular resolution data on Class I and Class II methanol masers, together with other tracers of star formation like H2O masers, ultracompact (UC) ionized hydrogen (H II) regions, and 4.5 um infrared sources, taken from the literature. The aim is to study what these data tell us about the process of high mass star formation; in particular, whether disk-outflow systems are compatible with the morphology exhibited by Class I and Class II methanol masers. Stars form in the dense cores inside molecular clouds, and while the process of the formation of stars like our Sun is reasonably well understood, details of the formation of stars with masses eight times that of our Sun or greater, the so-called high mass stars, remain a mystery. Being compact and bright sources, masers provide an excellent way to observe high mass star forming regions. In particular, Class II methanol masers are found exclusively in high mass star forming regions. Based on the positions of the Class I and II methanol and H2O masers, UCHII regions and 4.5 um infrared sources, and the center velocities (vLSR) of the Class I methanol and H2O masers, compared to the vLSR of the Class II methanol masers, we propose three disk-outflow models that may be traced by methanol masers. In all three models, we have located the Class II methanol maser near the protostar, and the Class I methanol maser in the outflow, as is known from observations during the last twenty years. In our first model, the H2O masers trace the linear extent of the outflow. In our second model, the H2O masers are located in a circumstellar disk. In our third model, the H2O masers are located in one or more outflows near the terminating shock where the outflow impacts the ambient interstellar medium. Together, these models reiterate the utility of coordinated high angular resolution observations of high mass star forming regions in maser lines and associated star formation tracers.

  13. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE IRDC CLUMP G34.43+00.24 MM3: 278 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagida, Takahiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Sanhueza, Patricio; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Foster, Jonathan B.; Jackson, James M.; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri

    2014-10-10

    We have observed a molecular clump (MM3) associated with the infrared dark cloud G34.43+00.24 in the CH{sub 3}OH J{sub K}  = 9{sub –1}-8{sub 0} E, 5{sub 0}-4{sub 0} E, and 5{sub –1}-4{sub –1} E lines at sub-arcsecond resolution by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. By comparing the CH{sub 3}OH J{sub K}  = 9{sub –1}-8{sub 0} E emission with the CH{sub 3}OH 5{sub 0}-4{sub 0} E and 5{sub –1}-4{sub –1} E emission, we have found that the CH{sub 3}OH J{sub K}  = 9{sub –1}-8{sub 0} E emission is masing. We have clearly shown that the CH{sub 3}OH J{sub K}  = 9{sub –1}-8{sub 0} masers arise from the post shocked gas in the interacting regions between the outflows and ambient dense gas. Toward the strongest peak of the CH{sub 3}OH maser emission, SiO J = 6-5 emission is very weak. This indicates that the CH{sub 3}OH maser emission traces relatively old shocks or weak shocks.

  14. Experimental evaluation of a ruby maser at 43 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. R.; Neff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Inversion ratio measurements were conducted at several frequencies between 27 and 43 GHz for a pink ruby material (0.05% Cr/3+/ in Al2O3) at the push-pull pump angle of 54.7 degrees in order to determine the upper frequency limit where pink ruby could be expected to operate as a practical maser amplifier. Based on these measurements, a single-stage maser was developed which yielded 8 + or - 1 dB net gain and a 3 dB bandwidth of 180 MHz at a center frequency of 42.5 GHz. It is concluded that a multistage reflected wave maser could achieve bandwidths exceeding 1 GHz with 30 dB net gain at center frequencies near 40 GHz.

  15. The Revised Version of Class I Methanol Maser Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, G. M.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Val'tts, I. E.; Alakoz, A. V.

    2011-05-01

    The revised version of the class I methanol maser catalog is presented. It contains 198 sources in total. New class I methanol masers detected in the direction of EGOs (38 sources) were added to the previous list containing ˜ 160 sources (the list have been published in the first version of this catalog - see reference in the text). Electronic version of the catalog has been generated in the form of html file - http://www.asc.rssi.ru/MMI. A statistical analysis was carried out within 2' around a maser position to find an identification of class I methanol masers with any objects typical for star-forming regions - UCHII regions, IRAS sources, dark clouds, bipolar outflows, CS lines as of dense gas tracer, and other masers (class II methanol masers, OH and H_2O). Class I methanol masers identification was made with short-wave infrared objects EGO (extended green objects), which are tracers of bipolar outflows in young stellar objects. It was shown that in the new version of catalog more than 50% of class I methanol masers are identified with bipolar outflow - given EGOs as bipolar outflows (compared with the result of 22% in the first version of the catalog that contains no information about EGO). This result is a strong evidence in favor of the fact that EGOs are indeed active bipolar outflows. At the same time it is important to note, that none of the bipolar outflow, already registered in the direction of class I methanol maser, did not coincide with EGO (with the exception of G45.47+0.07). The results are submitted in a form of a diagram.

  16. Discovery Of 6.035 GHz OH Maser Flares In IRAS 18566+0408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Esteban; Marzouk, A. A. Al; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.

    2011-05-01

    We report the discovery of 6.035 GHz hydroxyl (OH) maser flares toward the massive young stellar object IRAS 18566+0408, which is the only region known to show periodic formaldehyde (4.8 GHz H2CO) and methanol (6.7 GHz CH3OH) maser flares. The observations were conducted between October 2008 and January 2010 with the 305m Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico. We detected two flare events, one in March 2009 and the other in September to November 2009. The 6.035 GHz OH flares are not simultaneous with the H2CO flares; the peak of the OH flares appears to be delayed by 1 to 3 months with respect to the formaldehyde flares. On the other hand, the OH flares occurred simultaneously with CH3OH flares from maser components that have approximately the same LSR velocity as the OH. The correlated variability of OH and CH3OH masers in IRAS 18566+0408 supports a common excitation mechanism (IR pumping) as predicted by theory. EA acknowledges support from the WIU OSP. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Class I methanol maser catalog (Bayandina+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayandina, O. S.; Val'Tts, I. E.; Larionov, G. M.

    2012-11-01

    We have revised the Astro Space Center catalog of Class I methanol masers detected in starforming regions (MMI/SFR), mainly at 44GHz, and created a new electronic version of the catalog. Currently, the catalog contains 206 objects, selected from publications through 2011 inclusive. The data from the survey of Chen et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/9), performed specifically for objects EGO, which form a new specific catalog, are not included. The MMI/SFR objects were identified with emission and absorption objects in the near IR, detected during the MSX and Spitzer space missions. Seventy-one percent of Class I methanol masers that emit at 44GHz and fall within the Galactic longitude range surveyed by Spitzer (GLIMPSE) are identified with Spitzer Dark Clouds (SDCs), and 42% with Extended Green Objects (EGOs). It is possible that Class I methanol masers arise in isolated, self-gravitating clumps, such as SDCs, at certain stages of their evolution. A sample of SDCs is proposed as a new target list for Class I methanol maser searches. A detailed statistical analysis was carried out, taking into account the characteristics of the regions of MMI/SFR formation presented in the catalog. (1 data file).

  18. Finding Short-Term Variability in Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Samuel; Barott, W. C.; Catanach, T.

    2012-05-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) performed 53 observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers between July 2010 and January 2011 in an effort to identify short-timescale variability. With the notable exception of Weisberg et al. (2005), few analyses have been performed analyzing variability in masers on timescales of minutes or less. This work is aimed both at providing additional data (including refined positions) on the catalog of observed sources as well as identifying the prevalence and cause of short-term phenomena. Observations utilized both the ATA correlator (for mapping) and beamformer (for recording voltage time series). A combination of Fast-Fourier Transforms and Continuous Wavelet Transforms are applied to channelized power series waterfalls) in this investigation. Wavelet analysis can be thought of as a generalization of Fourier analysis that allows us to examine non-stationary characteristics of the spectra. The survey included both short (10 minute), long (60 minute), and follow-up observations on candidate targets. Analysis so far has identified three variable sources out of 43 distinct objects that were observed. These objects exhibit significant variation on the order of several minutes, are consistent in follow-up observations, and we have ruled out instrumental variation. Future and ongoing work includes identifying the source of this variation as intrinsic to the source or a property of the ISM. Shorter time-scales will be investigated using a combination of techniques, including total power variation, pulse searching (in an attempt to find pulsars), and phase-shift demodulation techniques. The case for SETI analysis of these data is given, for example, by Cordes (1993), who suggested that extraterrestrial intelligences could use masers to amplify interstellar signals.This project was funded by the National Science Foundation Grant AST0852095. [1] Weisberg J. M. et al. (2005) Science, 309, 5731. [2] Cordes J. M. (1993) Astron. Soc. Pacific Conf. Series

  19. Methanol masers probing the ordered magnetic field of W75N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surcis, G.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Dodson, R.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic fields during the protostellar phase of high-mass star-formation is a debated topic. In particular, it is still unclear how magnetic fields influence the formation and dynamic of disks and outflows. Most current information on magnetic fields close to high-mass protostars comes from H2O and OH maser observations. Recently, the first 6.7 GHz methanol maser polarization observations were made, and they reveal strong and ordered magnetic fields. Aims: The morphology of the magnetic field during high-mass star-formation needs to be investigated on small scales, which can only be done using very long baseline interferometry observations. The massive star-forming region W75N contains three radio sources and associated masers, while a large-scale molecular bipolar outflow is also present. Polarization observations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers at high angular resolution probe the strength and structure of the magnetic field and determine its relation to the outflow. Methods: Eight of the European VLBI network antennas were used to measure the linear polarization and Zeeman-splitting of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the star-forming region W75N. Results: We detected 10 methanol maser features, 4 of which were undetected in previous work. All arise near the source VLA 1 of W75N. The linear polarization of the masers reveals a tightly ordered magnetic field over more than 2000 AU around VLA 1 that is exactly aligned with the large-scale molecular outflow. This is consistent with the twisted magnetic field model proposed for explaining dust polarization observations. The Zeeman-splitting measured on 3 of the maser features indicates a dynamically important magnetic field in the maser region of the order of 50 mG. We suggest VLA 1 is the powering sources of the bipolar outflow. Member of the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne.

  20. Targeted VLA Observations of 22 GHz Water Masers Towards the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Ott, Juergen; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Meier, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) has a unique environment with a large amount (5 x107 M⊙) of dense (104 cm-3) warm (75-200 K) molecular gas. To probe sites of ongoing star formation in this region, we carried out follow-up VLA observations targeting 22 GHz water masers detected by a recent Mopra survey of the inner 3° x 1° of the Galactic Center (Chambers et al. 2014, A&A 563, A68). We present preliminary results of these measurements with higher angular resolution (2" x 0.9"), spectral resolution (0.2 km s-1), and sensitivity (40 mJy beam-1) and a velocity coverage of -200 to 250 km s-1. A total of 32 maser positions are detected. Several sources display complex spectra with a number of new velocity components. From the 32 maser positions, over 200 spectral features have been identified, indicating clusters of masers. The complex spectra are indicative of young (< 105 years) star forming regions, with some of the components likely being produced from outflows. The brightest component is over 500 Jy beam-1 towards the HII region G359.14+0.03 with a vLSR of -9 km s-1. The most prominent location of water masers is the star forming region Sgr B2, where over 80 spectral components are identified from 9 different positions with peak flux densities ranging from 0.8 to 142 Jy beam-1. Three of these positions contain enhanced 4.5 μm green extended sources, indicating these masers are likely associated with outflows. Sgr C contains 3 separate maser positions with a total of 4 spectral components ranging from -70 to -66 km s-1 and peak flux densities of 4 to 15 Jy beam-1. One of these positions is also associated with a green source. We will compare the water maser positions with positions of radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz methanol masers and other green (3-8 μm) sources. This comparison will be used to verify that star formation is the underlying source of these masers and to identify masers associated with outlfows.

  1. THE ARECIBO METHANOL MASER GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. III. DISTANCES AND LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pandian, J. D.; Menten, K. M.; Goldsmith, P. F. E-mail: kmenten@mpifr-bonn.mpg.d

    2009-12-01

    We derive kinematic distances to the 86 6.7 GHz methanol masers discovered in the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey. The systemic velocities of the sources were derived from {sup 13}CO (J = 2-1), CS (J = 5-4), and NH{sub 3} observations made with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, the APEX telescope, and the Effelsberg 100 m telescope, respectively. Kinematic distance ambiguities were resolved using H I self-absorption with H I data from the VLA Galactic Plane Survey. We observe roughly three times as many sources at the far distance compared to the near distance. The vertical distribution of the sources has a scale height of approx 30 pc, and is much lower than that of the Galactic thin disk. We use the distances derived in this work to determine the luminosity function of 6.7 GHz maser emission. The luminosity function has a peak at approximately 10{sup -6} L{sub sun}. Assuming that this luminosity function applies, the methanol maser population in the Large Magellanic Cloud and M33 is at least 4 and 14 times smaller, respectively, than in our Galaxy.

  2. Discovery of periodic and alternating flares of the methanol and water masers in G107.298+5.639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Olech, M.; Wolak, P.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Gawroński, M.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol and water vapour masers are signposts of early stages of high-mass star formation but it is generally thought that due to different excitation processes they probe distinct parts of stellar environments. Here we present observations of the intermediate-mass young stellar object G107.298+5.639, revealing for the first time that 34.4 d flares of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission alternate with flares of individual features of the 22 GHz water maser. High angular resolution data reveal that a few components of both maser species showing periodic behaviour coincide in position and velocity and all the periodic water maser components appear in the methanol maser region of size of 360 au. The maser flares could be caused by variations in the infrared radiation field induced by cyclic accretion instabilities in a circumstellar or protobinary disc. The observations do not support either the stellar pulsations or the seed photon flux variations as the underlying mechanisms of the periodicity in the source.

  3. Characterizing supernova remnant and molecular cloud interaction environments using Class I methanol (CH3OH) masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Bridget C.

    Astronomical masers are useful probes of the physical conditions of the gas in which they are formed. Masers form under specific physical conditions and therefore, can be used to trace distinct environments, for example, star forming regions (SFRs), supernova remnants (SNRs), evolved stars, and outflows. In particular, collisionally excited 36 and 44 GHz methanol (CH3OH) and 1720 MHz hydroxl (OH) masers are found associated with gas shocked by the interaction between SNRs and neighboring molecular clouds (MCs). The overall goal of my thesis research is to combine modeling and observations to characterize the properties and formation of Class I CH3OH masers in these SNR/MC interaction regions. Developing a general model of the distribution of maser emission in these regions in all SNRs interacting with MCs will aid in the understanding of different processes that may be triggered through these interactions, namely induced star formation (SF) and cosmic ray (CR) acceleration. More accurate information on the density (and density gradients) in these turbulent regions could, for example, be used as inputs or constraints for models of galactic SNR CR acceleration and help explain if conditions are conducive for SF. In this thesis, I present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of collisionally pumped Class I 36, 44, 84, and 95 GHz CH3OH maser lines near SNRs, using an escape probability and level population code. The modeling shows that given a sufficient CH3OH abundance, CH3OH maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at 10 4 < n 60 K, overlapping with masing conditions for 1720 MHz OH masers. In addition, the 36 and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of the physical conditions. The line intensity ratios between multiple transitions significantly change with altering physical

  4. Massive Molecular Outflows Toward Methanol Masers: by Eye and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, Helena

    2013-07-01

    The best known evolutionary state of massive stars is that of the UC HII region, occurring a few 10^5 years after the initial formation of a massive YSO. Currently objects in the "hot core" phase, occurring prior to the UC HII region, are studied with great interest. Because the YSO is still supposed to be accreting at this stage, one would expect outflows from the central object to develop during this phase, entraining surrounding cold molecular gas in their wake. During this time, 6.7 GHz (Class II) methanol masers will also turn on. They are uniquely associated with massive YSO's, thus serve as a useful signpost. We searched for molecular outflows with the JCMT and HARP focal plane array in a sample of targets toward 6.7 GHz methanol maser coordinates within 20 < Glon < 34. We found 58 CO clumps but only 47 of them were closely associated with the methanol masers. Their spectra were analyzed for broadened line wings, which were found to be present in 46 of the spectra, indicating either bi- or mono-polar outflows. This is a 98% detection frequency. The velocity ranges of these spectrum wings were used to create two dimensional blue and red maps. The out flows' physical parameters were calculated and compared with literature. We created a catalog of kinematic distances and properties of all the 13CO outflows associated with Class II methanol masers, as well as their associated H_2 core and virial masses as derived from the C18O data. In the the light of our results we emphasize the need for an automated detection process, especially with the increasing number of wide-area surveys. We are currently exploring the use of machine learning algorithms (specifically Support Vector Machines) in the detection of high velocity structures in p-p-v cubes.

  5. Annular-beam, 17 GHz free-electron maser experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted on a 15-17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) for producing a 500 MW output pulse with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source was a 1 {mu}s, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacted with the TM{sub 02} and TM{sub 03} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. This greatly reduced the kinetic energy loss caused by the beam potential depression associated with the space charge which was a significant advantage in comparison with conventional solid beam microwave tubes at the same beam current. The experiment was operated in a single shot mode with a large number of diagnostics to measure power, frequency and energy.

  6. Methanol observation of IRAS 19312+1950: A possible new type of class I methanol maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Sobolev, Andrej M.; Salii, Svetlana V.; Zhang, Yong; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Deguchi, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    We report the result of a systematic methanol observation toward IRAS 19312+1950. The properties of the SiO, H2O, and OH masers of this object are consistent with those of mass-losing evolved stars, but some other properties are difficult to explain in the standard scheme of stellar evolution in its late stage. Interestingly, a tentative detection of radio methanol lines was suggested toward this object by a previous observation. To date, there are no confirmed detections of methanol emission towards evolved stars, so investigation of this possible detection is important to better understand the circumstellar physical/chemical environment of IRAS 19312+1950. In this study, we systematically observed multiple methanol lines of IRAS 19312+1950 in the λ = 3 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm bands, and detected six lines including four thermal lines and two class I maser lines. We derived basic physical parameters, including kinetic temperature and relative abundances, by fitting a radiative transfer model. According to the derived excitation temperature and line profiles, a spherically expanding outflow lying at the center of the nebulosity is excluded from the possibilities for methanol emission regions. The detection of class I methanol maser emission suggests that a shock region is involved in the system of IRAS 19312+1950. If the central star of IRAS 19312+1950 is an evolved star as suggested in the past, the class I maser detected in the present observation is the first case detected in an interaction region between an evolved star outflow and ambient molecular gas.

  7. Dual-polarization 8.45 GHz traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    An 8.5 GHz dual-channel, dual-polarization traveling-wave maser (TWM) amplifier was installed in the XKR solar system radar cone at DSS 14. The TWM is based on the Blk IIA 8.45 GHz maser structure, with two of the four maser stages being used for each channel, and each maser half then followed by a high-performance GaAs FET amplifier to achieve the desired net gain. A shortened low-noise input waveguide and an orthogonal-mode junction which is cooled to 4.5 K feeds each amplifier chain. The rotation of an external polarizer permits the polarization of each channel to be defined as either linear or circular. A circular waveguide switch was also developed to provide for noise calibration and to protect the maser from incident transmitter power.

  8. Extragalactic Sub-millimeter H2O Maser - Detection of a 321 GHz Water Maser in Circinus Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Horiuchi, S.; Doi, A.; Miyoshi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first detection of the extragalactic 321 GHz H2O emission towards the Circinus Galaxy, the nearby Type2 Seyfert galaxy. It is likely that the detected emission is a maser because of the narrow line shape, the compact emission (< 0.66″) and the high energy level of the transition. High velocity emission, red-shifted up to 635 km/s, was tentatively detected. The maser location of about 0.02 pc from the center of the galaxy is estimated by adopting the Kepler rotating disk model. This could be the molecular material observed closest to the central engine.

  9. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS THAT METHANOL MASER RINGS TRACE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    De Buizer, James M.; Bartkiewicz, Anna; Szymczak, Marian

    2012-08-01

    Milliarcsecond very long baseline interferometry maps of regions containing 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission have lead to the recent discovery of ring-like distributions of maser spots and the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high-mass stars. We aimed to test this hypothesis by imaging these regions in the near- and mid-infrared at high spatial resolution and compare the observed emission to the expected infrared morphologies as inferred from the geometries of the maser rings. In the near-infrared we used the Gemini North adaptive optics system of ALTAIR/NIRI, while in the mid-infrared we used the combination of the Gemini South instrument T-ReCS and super-resolution techniques. Resultant images had a resolution of {approx}150 mas in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared. We discuss the expected distribution of circumstellar material around young and massive accreting (proto)stars and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for the different maser ring orientations under the assumption that the masers are coming from within circumstellar disks. Based upon the observed infrared emission geometries for the four targets in our sample and the results of spectral energy distribution modeling of the massive young stellar objects associated with the maser rings, we do not find compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that methanol masers rings reside in circumstellar disks.

  10. Identification of Class I Methanol Masers with Objects of Near and Mid-Infrared Bands and the Third Version of the Class I Methanol Maser (MMI) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayandina, Olga; Val'tts, Irina; Larionov, Grigorii

    2012-07-01

    An identification has been conducted of class I methanol masers with 1) short-wave infrared objects EGO (extended green objects) - tracer bipolar outflow of matter in young stellar objects, and 2) isolated pre-protostellar gas-dust cores of the interstellar medium which are observed in absorption in the mid-infrared in the Galactic plane. It is shown that more than 50% of class I methanol masers are identified with bipolar outflows, considering the EGO as bipolar outflows (as compared with the result of 22% in the first version of the MMI catalog that contains no information about EGO). 99 from 139 class I methanol masers (71%) are identified with SDC. Thus, it seems possible that the MMI can be formed in isolated self-gravitating condensations, which are the silhouette of dark clouds - IRDC and SDC.

  11. Class I methanol maser emission in infrared clouds and the third version of the Astro Space Center MMI/SFR catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayandina, O. S.; Val'tts, I. E.; Larionov, G. M.

    2012-07-01

    We have revised the Astro Space Center catalog of Class I methanol masers detected in star-forming regions (MMI/SFR), mainly at 44 GHz, and created a new electronic version of the catalog. Currently, the catalog contains 206 objects, selected from publications through 2011 inclusive. The data from the survey of Chen et al. (2011), performed specifically for objects EGO, which form a new specific catalog, are not included. The MMI/SFR objects were identified with emission and absorption objects in the near IR, detected during the MSX and Spitzer space missions. Seventy-one percent of Class I methanol masers that emit at 44 GHz and fall within the Galactic longitude range surveyed by Spitzer (GLIMPSE) are identified with Spitzer Dark Clouds (SDCs), and 42% with Extended Green Objects (EGOs). It is possible that Class I methanol masers arise in isolated, self-gravitating clumps, such as SDCs, at certain stages of their evolution. A sample of SDCs is proposed as a new target list for Class I methanol maser searches. A detailed statistical analysis was carried out, taking into account the characteristics of the regions of MMI/SFR formation presented in the catalog.

  12. A Search for Submillimeter H2O Masers in Active Galaxies: The Detection of 321 GHZ H2O Maser Emission in NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Horiuchi, Shinji; Doi, Akihiro; Miyoshi, Makoto; Edwards, Philip G.

    2016-08-01

    We present further results of a search for extragalactic submillimeter H2O masers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The detection of a 321 GHz H2O maser in the nearby type 2 Seyfert galaxy, the Circinus galaxy, has previously been reported, and here the spectral analysis of four other galaxies is described. We have discovered H2O maser emission at 321 GHz toward the center of NGC 4945, a nearby type 2 Seyfert. The maser emission shows Doppler-shifted velocity features with velocity ranges similar to those of the previously reported 22 GHz H2O masers however, the non-contemporaneous observations also show differences in velocity offsets. The subparsec-scale distribution of the 22 GHz H2O masers revealed by earlier very long baseline interferometry observations suggests that the submillimeter masers could arise in an edge-on rotating disk. The maser features remain unresolved by the synthesized beam of ˜0.″54 (˜30 pc) and are located toward the 321 GHz continuum peak within errors. A marginally detected (3σ) high-velocity feature is redshifted by 579 km {{{s}}}-1 with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Assuming that this feature is real and arises from a Keplerian rotating disk in this galaxy, it is located at a radius of ˜0.020 pc (˜1.5 × 105 Schwarzschild radii), which would enable molecular material closer to the central engine to be probed than the 22 GHz H2O masers. This detection confirms that submillimeter H2O masers are a potential tracer of the circumnuclear regions of active galaxies, which will benefit from higher angular resolution studies with ALMA.

  13. THE FIRST DETECTION OF THE 232 GHz VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED H{sub 2}O MASER IN ORION KL WITH ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Tomoya; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Honma, Mareki

    2012-09-20

    We investigated the ALMA science verification data of Orion KL and found a spectral signature of the vibrationally excited H{sub 2}O maser line at 232.68670 GHz ({nu}{sub 2} = 1, 5{sub 5,0}-6{sub 4,3}). This line has been detected previously in circumstellar envelopes of late-type stars but not in young stellar objects such as Orion KL. Thus, this is the first detection of the 232 GHz vibrationally excited H{sub 2}O maser in star-forming regions. The distribution of the 232 GHz maser is concentrated at the position of the radio Source I, which is remarkably different from other molecular lines. The spectrum shows a double-peak structure at the peak velocities of -2.1 and 13.3 km s{sup -1}. It appears to be consistent with the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers and 43 GHz SiO masers observed around Source I. Thus, the 232 GHz H{sub 2}O maser around Source I would be excited by the internal heating by an embedded protostar, being associated with either the root of the outflows/jets or the circumstellar disk around Source I, as traced by the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers or 43 GHz SiO masers, respectively.

  14. GLOBAL VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY OBSERVATIONS OF THE 6.0 GHz HYDROXYL MASERS IN ONSALA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Vincent L.; Sjouwerman, Lorant O. E-mail: lsjouwer@nrao.ed

    2010-06-10

    We present global very long baseline interferometry observations of the first excited-state hydroxyl (OH) masers in the massive star-forming region Onsala 1 (ON 1). The 29 masers detected are nearly all from the 6035 MHz transition and nearly all are identifiable as Zeeman pair components. The 6030 and 6035 MHz masers are coincident with previously published positions of ground-state masers to within a few milliarcseconds, and the magnetic fields deduced from Zeeman splitting are comparable. The 6.0 GHz masers in ON 1 are always found in close spatial association with 1665 MHz OH masers, in contrast to the situation in the massive star-forming region W3(OH), suggesting that extreme high density OH maser sites (excited-state masers with no accompanying ground-state maser, as seen in W3(OH)) are absent from ON 1. The large magnetic field strength among the northern, blueshifted masers is confirmed. The northern masers may trace an outflow or be associated with an exciting source separate from the other masers, or the relative velocities of the northern and southern masers may be indicative of expansion and rotation. High angular resolution observations of nonmasing material will be required in order to understand the complex maser distribution in ON 1.

  15. A Sensitive Search for Predicted Methanol Maser Transitions with the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Sobolev, A. M.; Cragg, D. M.

    2016-11-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for a number of centimetre wavelength methanol transitions which are predicted to show weak maser emission towards star formation regions. Sensitive, high spatial, and spectral resolution observations towards four high-mass star formation regions which show emission in a large number of class II methanol maser transitions did not result in any detections. From these observations, we are able to place an upper limit of ≲ 1300 K on the brightness temperature of any emission from the 31A+-31A-, 17-2-18-3 E (vt = 1), 124-133 A-, 124-133 A+, and 41A+-41A- transitions of methanol in these sources on angular scales of 2 arcsec. This upper limit is consistent with current models for class II methanol masers in high-mass star formation regions and better constraints than those provided here will likely require observations with next-generation radio telescopes.

  16. The 8.4-GHz low-noise maser pump source assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Improved pump source assemblies and new 8.4-GHz low noise traveling-wave masers (TWMs) were installed at the same time at Deep Space Stations 14 and 43 as part of the Mark IVA DSCC Antenna Microwave Subsystems upgrade. The pump source assemblies are part of the new 8.4-GHz TWMs, which are identified as Block IIA Low-Noise TWMs. Improved reliability of the pump source assemblies was required to meet stress analysis criteria.

  17. Excited-state hydroxyl maser catalogue from the methanol multibeam survey - I. Positions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avison, A.; Quinn, L. J.; Fuller, G. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Breen, S. L.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of the first complete unbaised survey of the Galactic plane for 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl (ex-OH) masers undertaken as part of the methanol multibeam (MMB) survey. These observations cover the Galactic longitude ranges 186° < l < 60° including the Galactic Centre. We report the detection of 127 ex-OH masers within the survey region, 47 being new sources. The positions of new detections were determined from interferometric observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We discuss the association of 6035-MHz masers in our survey with the 6668-MHz masers from the MMB Survey, finding 37 likely CH3OH-ex-OH maser pairs with physical separations of ≤0.03 pc and 55 pairings separated by ≤0.1 pc. Using these we calculate for the first time an ex-OH maser lifetime of between 3.3 × 103 and 8.3 × 103 yr. We also discuss the variability of the 6035-MHz masers and detection rates of counterpart 6030-MHz ex-OH masers (28 per cent of our sample having detection at both frequencies).

  18. Search for the 22 GHz water maser emission in selected comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmovici, C. B.; Pluchino, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; Pogrebenko, S.

    2014-06-01

    Following the first evidence of planetary water maser emission induced by the collision of comet Shoemaker/Levy with Jupiter and the puzzling detection of the 22 GHz water emission line in Comet Hyakutake we started in the period 2002-2008 systematic observations of selected comets at 22 GHz (1.35 cm) with the aim of clarifying the unusual behavior of the maser line in the cometary “scenario”. Using a fast multichannel spectrometer coupled to the 32 m dish of the Medicina (Bologna, Italy) Radio Telescope we investigated 6 bright or sungrazing comets down to a heliocentric distance of 0.11 AU: 96P/Machholz, 153P/ Ikeya-Zhang, C/2002 V1 (NEAT), C/2002 X5 (Kudo-Fujikawa), C/2002 T7 (Linear), and 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3. All of them, similarly to Comet Hyakutake, demonstrate spectral features that, if real and due to the 1.35 cm water vapor transition, are strongly (up to tens of km/s) shifted relative to the radial velocity of the nucleus and, at least sometimes, seem to be present as two separate peaks. If our interpretation of these spectral peaks is correct, there must be some mechanism of acceleration of neutral water molecules up to the velocities of ions. We discuss here the results achieved and the possible explanation of the chemo-physical constraints. First possible detection of the water maser emission line at 22 GHz in sun-grazing comets Observed puzzling acceleration of neutral water molecules at ion velocities and split of the line in two components. Evidence of plasma-grain interaction in sun-grazing comets. Possible new detections in six peculiar comets.

  19. A 250-GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser) oscillator experiment driven by an induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.; Bubp, D.G. ); McDermott, D.; Luhmann, N. )

    1990-09-14

    A 250-GHz Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator has been designed and constructed and will be tested using a 1-kA, 2-MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the Accelerator Research Center (ARC) facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The oscillator circuit was made to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode at ten times cutoff using waveguide Bragg reflectors to create an external cavity Q of 8000. Theory predicts cavity fill times of less than 30 ns (pulse length) and efficiencies approaching 20% is sufficiently low transverse electron velocity spreads are maintained (2%).

  20. VLA survey of 22 GHz H2O masers toward ten silicate carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Boboltz, D. A.; Mulitz-Schimel, G.; Izumiura, H.; Wittkowski, M.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Despite their carbon-rich photospheres, silicate carbon stars show evidence of oxygen-rich circumstellar material, which is thought to exist in disks. Silicate carbon stars represent interesting cases that allow us to study the possible effects of binarity on stellar evolution and mass loss accompanied by the formation of disks. Aims: We present a small survey of 22 GHz H2O masers toward ten silicate carbon stars with much better sensitivity than is the case for previous observations. Methods: We observed our sample with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) using the most expanded configuration (A-configuration) with a maximum baseline of 36 km. For some of our program stars with noisy Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Low Resolution Spectra (LRS), we present new mid-IR spectra obtained with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results: We detected H2O masers toward five out of ten silicate carbon stars (EU And, V778 Cyg, IRAS 06017+1011, V1415 Cyg, and NC83 = V1945 Cyg), with NC83 being a new detection. No H2O masers were detected toward BM Gem, IRAS 07221-0431, IRAS 08002-3803, IRAS 18006-3213, and HD 189605. The velocity separation between the most blue- and red-shifted maser features is 10-14 km s-1. If we assume that the masers originate in circum-companion disks, the measured velocity separations translate into a lower limit of the rotational velocity of 5-7 km s-1, and the upper limit of the radius of the maser emitting region is estimated to be 10-68 AU for a companion mass of 0.5-1.7 M⊙. The new mid-IR spectra of NC83, IRAS 06017+1011, and HD 189605 confirm the 10 μm silicate emission. The latter two stars show a bump at ~11.5 μm, which is presumably due to SiC originating in the ongoing mass loss from the carbon-rich primary star, not due to crystalline silicate. We also report on the detection of the UV flux at 2271 Å toward HD 189605. Based on MIDI observations made with the Very Large

  1. An 8.4-GHz dual-maser front-end system for Parkes reimplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, D. L.; Loreman, J. R.; Brunzie, T. J.; Quinn, R.

    1990-02-01

    An 8.4-GHz front-end system consisting of a feedhorn, a waveguide feed assembly, dual masers, and downconverters was reimplemented at Parkes as part of the Parkes Canberra Telemetry Array for the Voyager Neptune encounter. The front-end system was originally assembled by the European Space Agency and installed on the Parkes antenna for the Giotto project. It was also used on a time-sharing basis by the Deep Space Network as part of the Parkes Canberra Telemetry Array to enhance the data return from the Voyager Uranus encounter. At the conclusion of these projects in 1986, part of the system was then shipped to JPL on loan for reimplementation at Parkes for the Voyager Neptune encounter. New design and implementation required to make the system operable at Parkes included new microwave front-end control cabinets, closed-cycle refrigeration monitor system, noise-adding radiometer system, front-end controller assembly, X81 local oscillator multiplier, and refurbishment of the original dual 8.4-GHz traveling-wave masers and waveguide feed system. The front-end system met all requirements during the encounter and was disassembled in October 1989 and returned to JPL.

  2. A MULTI-EPOCH, SIMULTANEOUS WATER AND METHANOL MASER SURVEY TOWARD INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jae-Han; Kim, Kee-Tae; Youn, So-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Hyunwoo; Oh, Chung Sik E-mail: whorujh@kasi.re.kr

    2011-10-01

    We report a multi-epoch, simultaneous 22 GHz H{sub 2}O and 44 GHz Class I CH{sub 3}OH maser line survey toward 180 intermediate-mass young stellar objects, including 14 Class 0 and 19 Class I objects, and 147 Herbig Ae/Be stars. We detected H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}OH maser emission toward 16 (9%) and 10 (6%) sources with one new H{sub 2}O and six new CH{sub 3}OH maser sources. The detection rates of both masers rapidly decrease as the central (proto)stars evolve, which is contrary to the trends in high-mass star-forming regions. This suggests that the excitations of the two masers are closely related to the evolutionary stage of the central (proto)stars and the circumstellar environments. H{sub 2}O maser velocities deviate on average 9 km s{sup -1} from the ambient gas velocities whereas CH{sub 3}OH maser velocities match quite well with the ambient gas velocities. For both maser emissions, large velocity differences (|v{sub H{sub 2}O} - v{sub sys}| > 10kms{sup -1} and |v{sub CH3OH} - v{sub sys}| > 1kms{sup -1}) are mostly confined to Class 0 objects. The formation and disappearance of H{sub 2}O masers is frequent and their integrated intensities change by up to two orders of magnitude. In contrast, CH{sub 3}OH maser lines usually show no significant change in intensity, shape, or velocity. This is consistent with the previous suggestion that H{sub 2}O maser emission originates from the base of an outflow while 44 GHz Class I CH{sub 3}OH maser emission arises from the interaction region of the outflow with the ambient gas. The isotropic maser luminosities are well correlated with the bolometric luminosities of the central objects. The fitted relations are L{sub H2O}= 1.71x10{sup -9}(L{sub bol}){sup 0.97} and L{sub CH3OH}= 1.71x10{sup -10}(L{sub bol}){sup 1.22}.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 22-GHz water maser clouds (Richards+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. M. S.; Etoka, S.; Gray, M. D.; Lekht, E. E.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Murakawa, K.; Rudnitskij, G.; Yates, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of 22-GHz water maser clouds, made with the MERLIN radio interferometer. Obects presented (number of epochs): S Per (2); U Ori (4); U Her (3); IK Tau (3); RT Vir (7); W Hya (4). Results for VX Sgr were presented in Murakawa et al, 2003, Cat. J/MNRAS/344/1. The position and other properties of each patch of maser emission in each channel were measured by fitting 2D Gaussian components. The components form features corresponding to spatially distinct clouds and the properties of each cloud was calculated as described in the paper. For each cloud, we give the mean Vlsr, the total velocity extent DV, the full width half maximum DV1/2, the offsets of the cloud centroid from the assumed stellar position x, y and a (=sqrt(x2+y2), the feature largest angular size l and the peak flux density I. All velocities, angular distances and flux densities are in km/s, mas and Jy, respectively. (2 data files).

  4. Research on Haystack radiometer, 20-24 GHz maser, and radio astronomy programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    During the first half of 1973, the Haystack antenna was utilized 76% of the time. Of this useful time, 72% was devoted to radio astronomy observing, 5% was spent on radar-related research and 23% went into maintenance and system improvements. Twenty-eight new radio astronomy programs were accepted, eight of which were completed during the period. One new radar program, topographic observations of Mars, was started in June and will be completed early in 1974. Fourteen programs continued from the previous period were also defined as complete. As of 1 July, 28 ratio observing programs were in a continuing status on the Haystack books. Four radar projects were also continuing. The 20-24 GHz maser development described in the preceding report progressed very well during an on-antenna test phase which began early in the year, but which terminated unfortunately in June with the complete loss of gain in the maser. Investigation of this problem is in progress. During this on-antenna test phase, the most sensitive water vapor observing capability which has yet become available was demonstrated.

  5. OH 1720-MHz lines as tracers of bipolar outflows in the vicinity of Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, I. D.; Bayandina, O. S.; Alakoz, A. V.; Val'tss, I. E.; Larionov, G. M.; Mukha, D. V.; Nabatov, A. S.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Alekseev, E. V.; Nikolaenko, V. S.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Odintsov, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    A sample of Class I methanol masers (MMI) has been surveyed at 1720 MHz to search for possible associations between MMI and 1720-MHz OH masers, which should be formed by the same collisional pumping mechanism. If the model for methanol masers is correct, the sample should contain a statistically significant number of 1720-MHz OH masers at the positions of MMI. The observations were conducted on the 70-meter radio telescope of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU). The results show that ˜50% of 72 MMI are associated with OH emission at 1720 MHz. In many sources, strong absorption lines are also observed. In most cases, the OH (1720) lines are narrow (linewidths of <2 km/s) suggesting they may be maser lines. The OH column densities obtained from Gaussian fitting of these narrow OH lines are, on average, 1.5 × 1017 cm-2. TheH2 density in the emitting medium reaches 107 cm-3 if the region of the OH (1720) emission has been subject to interaction with a bipolar-outflow front. This is sufficient to excite MMI, and the presence of narrow, possibly masing OH (1720) lines at the MMI velocities indicates the likely presence of shocks from bipolar outflows in the vicinity of the maser condensations, supporting models in which these molecules are collisionally pumped.

  6. 183 GHz H{sub 2}O MASER EMISSION AROUND THE LOW-MASS PROTOSTAR SERPENS SMM1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kempen, T. A.; Wilner, D.; Gurwell, M.

    2009-11-20

    We report the first interferometric detection of 183 GHz water emission in the low-mass protostar Serpens SMM1 using the Submillimeter Array with a resolution of 3'' and rms of approx7 Jy in a 3 km s{sup -1} bin. Due to the small size and high brightness of more than 240 Jy beam{sup -1}, it appears to be maser emission. In total, three maser spots were detected out to approx700 AU from the central protostar, lying along the redshifted outflow axis, outside the circumstellar disk but within the envelope region as evidenced by the continuum measurements. Two of the maser spots appear to be blueshifted by about 1-2 km s{sup -1}. No extended or compact thermal emission from a passively heated protostellar envelope was detected with a limit of 7 Jy (16 K), in agreement with recent modeling efforts. We propose that the maser spots originate within the cavity walls due to the interaction of the outflow jet with the surrounding protostellar envelope. Hydrodynamical models predict that such regions can be dense and warm enough to invert the 183 GHz water transition.

  7. A CATALOG OF CH{sub 3}OH 7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +} MASER SOURCES IN MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. II. MASERS IN NGC 6334F, G8.67-0.36, AND M17

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Laura; Luis, Leticia; Hernandez-Curiel, Idalia; Kurtz, Stan E.; Hofner, Peter; Araya, Esteban D.

    2010-12-15

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the 7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +} methanol maser transition at 44 GHz toward NGC 6334F, G8.67-0.36, and M17. These arcsecond resolution observations complete a previous, larger VLA survey of this maser transition in high-mass, star-forming regions reported by Kurtz et al. We confirm the presence of 44 GHz methanol maser emission in all 3 sources, detecting 8 distinct maser components in NGC 6334F, 12 components in G8.67-0.36, and 1 in M17.

  8. HERSCHEL /HIFI OBSERVATIONS OF A NEW INTERSTELLAR WATER MASER: THE 5{sub 32}-4{sub 41} TRANSITION AT 620.701 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, David A.; Wu, Yuanwei; Kraus, Alex; Menten, Karl M.; Tolls, Volker; Melnick, Gary J.; Nagy, Zsofia

    2013-05-20

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have performed mapping observations of the 620.701 GHz 5{sub 32}-4{sub 41} transition of ortho-H{sub 2}O within a {approx}1.'5 Multiplication-Sign 1.'5 region encompassing the Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion (Orion-KL), and pointed observations of that transition toward the Orion South condensation and the W49N region of high-mass star formation. Using the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope, we obtained ancillary observations of the 22.23508 GHz 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} water maser transition; in the case of Orion-KL, the 621 GHz and 22 GHz observations were carried out within 10 days of each other. The 621 GHz water line emission shows clear evidence for strong maser amplification in all three sources, exhibiting narrow ({approx}1 km s{sup -1} FWHM) emission features that are coincident (kinematically and/or spatially) with observed 22 GHz features. Moreover, in the case of W49N-for which observations were available at three epochs spanning a 2 yr period-the spectra exhibited variability. The observed 621 GHz/22 GHz line ratios are consistent with a maser pumping model in which the population inversions arise from the combined effects of collisional excitation and spontaneous radiative decay, and the inferred physical conditions can plausibly arise in gas heated by either dissociative or non-dissociative shocks. The collisional excitation model also predicts that the 22 GHz population inversion will be quenched at higher densities than that of the 621 GHz transition, providing a natural explanation for the observational fact that 22 GHz maser emission appears to be a necessary but insufficient condition for 621 GHz maser emission.

  9. DETECTION OF THE ZEEMAN EFFECT IN THE 36 GHz CLASS I CH{sub 3}OH MASER LINE WITH THE EVLA

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, A. P.; Momjian, E.

    2009-11-10

    We report the first detection of the Zeeman effect in the 36 GHz Class I CH{sub 3}OH maser line. The observations were carried out with 13 antennas of the EVLA toward the high mass star-forming region M8E. Based on our adopted Zeeman splitting factor of z = 1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}, we detect a line-of-sight magnetic field of -31.3 +- 3.5 mG and 20.2 +- 3.5 mG to the northwest and southeast of the maser line peak, respectively. This change in sign over a 1300 AU size scale may indicate that the masers are tracing two regions with different fields, or that the same field curves across the regions where the masers are being excited. The detected fields are not significantly different from the magnetic fields detected in the 6.7 GHz Class II CH{sub 3}OH maser line, indicating that CH{sub 3}OH masers may trace the large-scale magnetic field, or that the magnetic field remains unchanged during the early evolution of star-forming regions. Given what is known about the densities at which 36 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers are excited, we find that the magnetic field is dynamically significant in the star-forming region.

  10. G 10.472+0.027: AN EXTREME WATER MASER OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH A MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Titmarsh, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2013-09-20

    An Australia Telescope Compact Array search for 22 GHz water masers toward 6.7 GHz class II methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey has resulted in the detection of extremely high-velocity emission from one of the sources. The water maser emission associated with this young stellar object covers a velocity span of nearly 300 km s{sup –1}. The highest velocity water maser emission is redshifted from the systemic velocity by 250 km s{sup –1}, which is a new record for high-mass star formation regions. The maser is associated with a very young late O, or early B star, which may still be actively accreting matter (and driving the extreme outflow). If that is the case, future observations of the kinematics of this water maser will provide a unique probe of accretion processes in the highest mass young stellar objects and test models of water maser formation.

  11. Future Observations of Cosmic Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slysh, V.

    size to 1.9 mas [4]. In W3(OH) the same spectral resolution will smear 12 GHz methanol maser spot images to the size from 0.15 to 2 mas [5]. Similar gradient may be present in OH and H2O masers. It is interesting that the position-velocity gradient of the same magnitude is required by OH maser pump models in order to provide non-local overlap of far-infrared rotational lines [6]. VLBI observations with high spectral resolution like those described in [5] show that when the spectral resolution is sufficient to avoid bandwidth smearing the maser spots remain unresolved. Therefore more angular resolution is needed in order to image maser spots. For the masers the only way to increase angular resolution is to increase the baseline, up to the space baselines. The imaging of the maser spots is one of the goals of the space-ground interferometer RADIOASTRON.

  12. Polarisation observations of H2O JK-1 K1 = 532 - 441 620.701 GHz maser emission with Herschel/HIFI in Orion KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. C.; Houde, M.; Harwit, M.; Kidger, M.; Kraus, A.; MCoey, C.; Marston, A.; Melnick, G.; Menten, K. M.; Morris, P.; Teyssier, D.; Tolls, V.

    2014-07-01

    Context. The high intensities and narrow bandwidths exhibited by some astronomical masers make them ideal tools for studying star-forming giant molecular clouds. The water maser transition JK-1K1 = 532-441 at 620.701 GHz can only be observed from above Earth's strongly absorbing atmosphere; its emission has recently been detected from space. Aims: We sought to further characterize the star-forming environment of Orion KL by investigating the linear polarisation of a source emitting a narrow 620.701 GHz maser feature with the heterodyne spectrometer HIFI on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Methods: High-resolution spectral datasets were collected over a thirteen month period beginning in 2011 March, to establish not only the linear polarisation but also the temporal variability of the source. Results: Within a 3σ uncertainty, no polarisation was detected to an upper limit of approximately 2%. These results are compared with coeval linear polarisation measurements of the 22.235 GHz JK-1K1 = 616 - 523 maser line from the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, typically a much stronger maser transition. Although strongly polarised emission is observed for one component of the 22.235 GHz maser at 7.2 km s-1, a weaker component at the same velocity as the 620.701 GHz maser at 11.7 km s-1 is much less polarised. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with significant participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Extended CH3OH maser flare excited by a bursting massive YSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscadelli, L.; Sanna, A.; Goddi, C.; Walmsley, M. C.; Cesaroni, R.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Stecklum, B.; Menten, K. M.; Kraus, A.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: Recently, substantial flaring in the 6.7 GHz methanol maser line has been observed toward the high-mass young stellar object (YSO) S255 NIRS 3, where an accretion burst was also detected in the IR. Our goal is to study the change in the properties of the 6.7 GHz masers between the pre- and outburst phases, and investigate the connection between the maser and the accretion burst. Methods: With the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) and the European VLBI Network (EVN), we performed observations of the 6.7 GHz masers (covering a range in angular resolution from a few milliarcseconds to ≈1'') during the burst phase and compared these observations with pre-burst measurements at similar spatial scales. Results: The accretion burst and the subsequent increase in IR luminosity are very likely the origin of the 6.7 GHz maser flare. Since most maser centers operate in the unsaturated regime, a change by a relatively small factor (≈5) in the flux of pumping photons has produced an exponential growth in the maser intensity. The main pre-burst maser cluster is no longer detected during the burst. Compared to the pre-burst phase, flaring 6.7 GHz masers emit across a different VLSR range that is more strongly redshifted, and the emission extends over a larger area at larger separation from the high-mass YSO. In particular, the outburst peak emission originates from a remarkably extended (0.̋2-0.̋3) maser plateau at a radial distance of 500-1000 AU from the source. Conclusions: Both the maser flare and the extraordinarily large extent of the maser structure can be a natural consequence of the burst in the accretion luminosity of the high-mass YSO. Our results strongly support models that predict IR radiative pumping for the 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  14. Astrophysical masers; Proceedings of the Conference, Arlington, VA, Mar. 9-11, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, Andrew W. (Editor); Nedoluha, Gerald E. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on astrophysical masers are presented. The general topics addressed include: theory, maser surveys, extragalactic masers, masers in star-forming regions (general), OH masers in star-forming regions, water masers in star-forming regions, methanol masers in star-forming regions, proper motions, scattering, variability, circumstellar masers (general), circumstellar OH masers, circumstellar water masers, circumstellar SiO masers, and solar system masers.

  15. Astrometrically registered simultaneous observations of the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O and 43 GHz SiO masers toward R Leonis Minoris using KVN and source/frequency phase referencing

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, Richard; Rioja, María J.; Jung, Tae-Hyun; Sohn, Bong-Won; Byun, Do-Young; Cho, Se-Hyung; Lee, Sang-Sung; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Kee-Tae; Oh, Chung-Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Chung, Moon-Hee; Wi, Seog-Oh; Kang, Jiman; Lee, Jung-Won; Chung, Hyunsoo; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; and others

    2014-11-01

    Oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can be intense emitters of SiO (v = 1 and 2, J = 1 → 0) and H{sub 2}O maser lines at 43 and 22 GHz, respectively. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the maser emission provide a unique tool to probe the innermost layers of the circumstellar envelopes in AGB stars. Nevertheless, the difficulties in achieving astrometrically aligned H{sub 2}O and v = 1 and v = 2 SiO maser maps have traditionally limited the physical constraints that can be placed on the SiO maser pumping mechanism. We present phase-referenced simultaneous spectral-line VLBI images for the SiO v = 1 and v = 2, J = 1 → 0, and H{sub 2}O maser emission around the AGB star R LMi, obtained from the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). The simultaneous multi-channel receivers of the KVN offer great possibilities for astrometry in the frequency domain. With this facility, we have produced images with bona fide absolute astrometric registration between high-frequency maser transitions of different species to provide the positions of the H{sub 2}O maser emission and the center of the SiO maser emission, hence reducing the uncertainty in the proper motions for R LMi by an order of magnitude over that from Hipparcos. This is the first successful demonstration of source frequency phase referencing for millimeter VLBI spectral-line observations and also where the ratio between the frequencies is not an integer.

  16. The Design of a 100 GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser) Oscillator Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-14

    2364. (Radio Engng. Electron. Phys., 21, 78-73). 5) Ginzburg , N. S., Zarnitsyna, I. G., and Nusinovich, G. S., 1981, Theory of relativistic cyclotron...An efficient Doppler-shifted electron-cyclotron maser oscillator. Int J. Electron., 53, 555-57 1. 7) Bratman, V. L., Ginzburg , N. S., Nusinovich, G...1386-1389. (Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett., 8, 596-597). 12) Botvinnik, I. E., Bratman, V. L., Volkov, A. B., Ginzburg , N. S, Denisov, G. G., Kol’chugin, B

  17. Resolved Ammonia Thermometry, Water and Methanol Masers from the “Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby Galaxies (SWAN)”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Mark; Ott, Juergen; Rand, Richard J.; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Walter, Fabian; Schinnerer, Eva

    2017-01-01

    We present Karl G Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) molecular line observations of the nearby star forming galaxies NGC 253 and IC 342. These galaxies are close enough to be resolved with a few tens of pc resolution with the VLA. At this resolution we are well matched to the physical scales of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) and therefore sensitive to the dominant processes therein. We have selected metastable inversion transitions of NH3 from (1,1) to (5,5) and the (9,9), the 22.2 GHz H2O (616-523) maser, and the 36.1 GHz CH3OH (414-303) maser. We use the metastable NH3 transitions to calculate rotation temperatures of the gas, and apply LVG models to estimate kinetic temperatures. Our selected masers are collisionally pumped and reveal the locations of shocked material. We find that the molecular gas is well described by cool 57K and warm 130K components, and there is no significant temperature variation over the central kpc. The result suggests that neither PDRs nor superbubbles significantly heat the molecular gas, but superbubbles likely increase the bulk motion of GMCs. We also report the discovery of H2O masers associated with the large-scale biconical outflow for the first time, indicating the presence of shocked dense gas. Finally, we find CH3OH masers, indicative of weak shocks, coincident with superbubble walls.

  18. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  19. 6.7 GHz maser astrometry with the Australian long baseline array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vasaant

    2016-01-01

    Astrometry is the science of measuring the positions of astronomical objects in the sky, and as such forms a practical bedrock for astrophysics in general. This is because it is only when a source's position is unambiguously known, can it be observed while it transits across the sky or be detected at different wavelengths. One of the first discoveries as a result of astrometry was in differentiating between the planets in our Solar System and the stars in the Milky Way. Early astronomers would have noted the arcminute/day rate of proper motion of the nearby planets with respect to the distant celestial objects fixed in the sky with the passage of time. With the advancement of telescopes the arcsecond/year proper motions for the fastest moving nearby stars was resolved as well. In comparing comets or asteroid size objects of a few kilometres, to galaxies spanning hundreds of thousands of light-years, it becomes apparent that the absolute size of astronomical objects extends across dimensions spanning many orders of magnitude. Despite this, the distances to these objects render many of them regardless of size to be minuscule pinpoints, when viewed from the Earth. The accuracy with which an object's position can be known is governed by the diffraction limit θd ≈ λ/D of the observing system and improvements in astrometric resolution have led to astronomical discoveries including Earth's precession, stellar aberration, atmospheric refraction, particle jets from black holes, the rate of expansion of planetary nebulae, detailed structure of circumstellar disks and out outflows from protostars, high-energy jets from quasars and the orbits of exoplanets around distant stars. The focus of this thesis is on the impact of accurate astrometry to measure trigonometric stellar parallaxes (from now on parallax) towards masers in high-mass star formation regions (HMSFRs) in the Milky Way galaxy using the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA).

  20. MeerKAT and its potential for Cosmic MASER Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Roy; Goedhart, Sharmila; Jonas, Justin

    2012-07-01

    The MeerKAT radio telescope array is the South African precursor instrument for the proposed Square Kilometer Array's mid-band frequency range. It will be the most sensitive centimetre-wavelength telescope in the southern hemisphere until the SKA is built. It will cover a broad range of astronomical science from the evolution of galaxies to tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, using Pulsars. The chosen frequency bands will enable sensitive southern Galactic maser surveys in the main lines of hydroxyl, 12 GHz methanol and perhaps 14.5 GHz formaldehyde lines as well as searches for redshifted water masers from red-shifts greater than about 0.5. Proposals for Large Surveys using MeerKAT were solicited in late 2009 and resulted in some 20 proposals from teams comprising 500 scientists, world-wide. The successful proposals relevant to maser research will be discussed below.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Methanol maser associated outflows (de Villiers+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, H. M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Thompson, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Urquhart, J. S.; Breen, S. L.; Burton, M. G.; Csengeri, T.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2015-04-01

    The targets were observed with the JCMT, on the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii on seven nights between 2007 May 17 and 2008 July 22. Targets were mapped in the 13CO and C18O (J=3-2) transitions (330.6 and 329.3GHz), using the 16-receptor HARP. (5 data files).

  2. ON THE METHANOL MASERS IN G9.62+0.20E AND G188.95+0.89

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Walt, D. J.

    2011-05-15

    A comparison between the observed light curves of periodic masers in G9.62+0.20E and G188.95+0.89 and the results of a simple colliding-wind binary model is made to establish whether the flaring and other time-dependent behavior of the masers in these two star-forming regions can be ascribed to changes in the environment of the masers or in the continuum emission from parts of the background H II region. It is found that the light curves of widely different shape and amplitude in these two objects can be explained within the framework of a periodic pulse of ionizing radiation that raises the electron density in a volume of partially ionized gas against which the masers are projected. It is also shown that the decay of the 11.405 km s{sup -1} maser in G188.95+0.89 can be explained very well in terms of the recombination of the ionized gas against which the maser is projected, while it would require very special conditions to explain it in terms of changes in the environment of the maser. We conclude that for G9.62+0.20E and G188.95+0.89 the observed changes in the masers are most likely due to changes in the background free-free emission which is amplified by the masers.

  3. Applied research using a 30 GHz free-electron maser: Experimental study of interacton of high-power pulsed radiation with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. G.; Vdovin, V. A.; Vikharev, A. A.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Golubev, I. I.; Golubykh, S. M.; Zaitsev, N. I.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kozlov, A. P.; Kratko, A. F.; Kryachko, I. A.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Lesnikovich, A. I.; Milevich, I. A.; Perel'shtein, E. A.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Petelin, M. I.; Sedykh, S. N.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Fedotova, Yu. A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a facility for testing the properties of different objects affected by a sequence of highpower pulses of the microwave electromagnetic field. The facility performance is implemented due to the power level and stability of the single-mode generation of a free electron maser with an output frequency of 30 GHz, which have been achieved at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. This paper describes the experiments on studying of the thermal fatigue of the copper surface in a test cavity, which models the thermal regime of the accelerating structure of the CLIC project (CERN), as well as the experiments on irradiation of biological tissues, metal films, and nanoclusters.

  4. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Spectrum of Methanol Between 214 and 265 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, James; Neese, Christopher F.; Fortman, Sarah; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied methanol, one of the so-called 'astronomical weeds', in the 215--265 GHz band. We have gathered a set of intensity calibrated, complete, experimental, and temperature resolved spectra from across the temperature range of 240--389 K. A number of low lying transitions, including the ν_t = 3, have not been produced by available catalogs. Using our previously reported method of analysis we were able generate a line list that contains lower state energies and linestrengths, for all of the observed lines in the band. This line list includes those lines which have no quantum mechanical assignment. In addition to this line list we provide a point by point method capable of generating the complete spectrum at an arbitrary temperature. The sensitivity of the point by point analysis is such that we are able to identify lines which would not have manifest in a single scan across the band. The consequence has been to reveal not only a number of new methanol lines, but also trace amounts of contaminants. We show how the intensities from the contaminants can be removed with indiscernible impact on the signal from methanol. To do this we use the point by point results from our previous studies of these contaminants. The efficacy of this process serves as strong proof of concept for usage of our point by point results on the problem of the weeds. The success of this approach for dealing with the weeds has also previously been reported. S. Fortman et al. 2014 ApJ 782 75 S. Fortman et al. 2012 J. Mol. Spectrosc. 782, 75

  5. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experimental Spectrum of Methanol Between 560 and 654 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2013-06-01

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH_3OH) in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures, 248-397 K. Analysis of experimental spectra recorded with absolute intensity calibration over a slow temperature ramp provides a means for the simulation of the spectrum as a function of temperature without a complete quantum mechanical (QM) model. These results include contributions from v_t = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via QM techniques. They also contain contributions from the ^{13}C isotopologue in natural abundance. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format and in a frequency point-by-point format that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines. In contrast to our earlier work on the semi-rigid species ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity difference between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for some of the lines. Analysis of these differences points to the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. We will compare our experimental intensities with the most recent QM model, as well as an earlier QM model that includes the variation of the dipole moment function with the torsional angle. S. M. Fortman, I. R. Medvedev, C. F. Neese, and F. C. De Lucia, Astrophys. J. 737, 20/1-6 (2011). L.-H. Xu, et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251, 305-313 (2008). M. A. Mekhtiev, P. D. Godfrey, and J. T. Hougen, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 194, 171-178 (1999).

  6. Astronomical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Recent research related to astronomical masers is reviewed. First, attention is given to phenomenology, including observations and modeling of galactic and extragalactic maser sources. The discussion then focuses on the developments concerning the physical properties of maser radiation. Finally, the use of masers as general tools for the study of astronomical environments where the radiation is produced and where it propagates, is discussed.

  7. Molecular maser flares in the high-mass star-forming region IRAS18566+0408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbe, Daniel M.

    We report results of a long-termmonitoring study of 6cmformaldehyde (H 2CO), 6.035GHz hydroxyl (OH), and 6.7GHz methanol (CH3OH) masers in the young high-mass protostellar object IRAS18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20). This is the only high-mass star-forming region where correlated variability of three different maser species has been reported. The observations were conducted with the 305m Arecibo Radio Telescope, and together with data from the literature, we present H2CO flux density measurements from 2002 to 2014, CH3OH data from 2006 to 2013, and discuss OH observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. Our extended monitoring observations of the H2CO maser agree with the quasi-periodic flare phenomenon and exponential decrease in quiescent and flare flux densities proposed by Araya and collaborators in 2010. We also confirm the occurrence of 6.035GHz OH flares and a time delay with respect to the H2CO flares. An analysis between the variability behavior of different CH3OH maser components and the H2CO maser suggests that multiple variability mechanisms are responsible for CH3OH flux density changes.

  8. A Large-scale Spectroscopic Survey of Methanol and OH Line Emission from the Galactic Center: Observations and Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    2016-11-01

    Class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and are generally correlated with outflows in star-forming sites in the Galaxy. Using the Very Large Array in its A-array configuration, we present a spectral line survey to identify methanol J={4}-1\\to {3}0E emission at 36.169 GHz. Over 900 pointings were used to cover a region 66‧ × 13‧ along the inner Galactic plane. A shallow survey of OH at 1612, 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz was also carried out over the area covered by our methanol survey. We provide a catalog of 2240 methanol masers with narrow line-widths of ˜1 km s-1, spatial resolutions of ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 14× 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 05, and rms noises ˜20 mJy beam-1 per channel. Lower limits on the brightness temperature range from 27,000 to 10,000,000 K, showing that the emission is of non-thermal origin. We also provide a list of 23 OH (1612), 14 OH (1665), 5 OH (1667), and 5 OH (1720 MHz) masers. The origin of such a large number of methanol masers is not clear. Many methanol masers appear to be associated with infrared dark clouds, though it appears unlikely that the entire population of these masers traces the early phase of star formation in the Galactic center.

  9. Interpretation of the newly discovered submillimeter water maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    The 10(29)-9(36)321 GHz water maser discovered recently by Menten et al. (1990) may be pumped collisionally under a wide range of physical conditions. This range of conditions is similar but not identical to that required to excite the well-studied 22 GHz water maser. The ratio of the observed 22 GHz and 321 GHz intersteller maser luminosities can be explained by collisional excitation within the same warm, dense gas. Collisional pumping in a circumstellar envelope can account for the observed 321 GHz maser emission in the supergiant star VY CMa.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CH3OH and H2O Galactic center masers (Ch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, E. T.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Ott, J.

    2014-05-01

    The 6.7GHz CH3OH masers we use in our analysis were identified b (Caswell et al., 2010MNRAS.404.1029C, Cat. VIII/96) as part of the Parkes Methanol Multibeam Survey. Initial detections of the 6.7GHz CH3OH masers were made with the Parkes Observatory, and subsequent follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to pinpoint the maser locations to 0.4" accuracy. We observed the Galactic center region with the CSIRO/CASS Mopra telescope in the period 2006 Sep. 13 to 2006 Oct. 15 and 2007 July 24 to September 17. Data were taken in the on-the-fly mode, dumping data every 2s with the then newly installed 12mm receiver, dual polarization. To identify enhanced 4.5μm sources, we use data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope using the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) (5 data files).

  11. DETECTION OF A METHANOL MEGAMASER IN A MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Baan, Willem A.; Qiao, Hai-Hua; Li, Juan; An, Tao; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.

    2015-02-10

    We have detected emission from both the 4{sub −1}→3{sub 0} E (36.2 GHz) class I and 7{sub −2}→8{sub −1} E (37.7 GHz) class II methanol transitions toward the center of the closest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. The emission in both methanol transitions shows narrow spectral features and has luminosities approximately 8 orders of magnitude stronger than those observed from typical class I methanol masers observed in Galactic star formation regions. The emission is also orders of magnitude stronger than the expected intensity of thermal emission from these transitions and based on these findings we suggest that the emission from the two transitions are masers. These observations provide the first detection of a methanol megamaser in the 36.2 and 37.7 GHz transitions and represent only the second detection of a methanol megamaser, following the recent report of an 84 GHz methanol megamaser in NGC 1068. We find that the methanol megamasers are significantly offset from the nuclear region and arise toward regions where there is Hα emission, suggesting that they are associated with starburst activity. The high degree of correlation between the spatial distribution of the 36.2 GHz methanol and X-ray plume emission suggests that the production of strong extragalactic class I methanol masers is related to galactic-outflow-driven shocks and perhaps cosmic rays. In contrast to OH and H{sub 2}O megamasers which originate close to the nucleus, methanol megamasers provide a new probe of feedback (e.g., outflows) processes on larger scales and of star formation beyond the circumnuclear starburst regions of active galaxies.

  12. H2CO Observations Towards CH3OH Maser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoh, Daniel; Esimbek, Jarken; Zhou, JianJun; Tang, Xindi; Chukwude, Augustine; Urama, Johnson; Okeke, Pius

    2013-03-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) is an accurate probe of physical conditions in dense and low-temperature molecular clouds towards massive star formation regions, while 6.7 GHz methanol (CH3OH) masers provide ideal sites to probe the earliest stages of massive stellar formation. We present preliminary results of our investigation into the possible relationship between formaldehyde and methanol astrophysical masers with the view to expanding knowledge on massive star formation processes. Observations are done using the Nanshan 25m radio telescope of the Xinjiang Astronomical Observatories, Urumqi, China. 127 Methanol sources (from the work of Green et al. 2010, Xu et al. 2003, Pestalozzi et al. 2005, and Xu et al. 2009) have been observed so far for 4.8 GHz formaldehyde absorption lines, and H2CO signals have been detected in 86 of them, 31 of which are newly discovered. We obtained good correlation (0.85 correlation coefficient) between the velocities of the sources, and a poor correlation (-0.03 correlation coefficient) between their intensities, an indication that signals from the two lines originate from about the same region, but that the excitation mechanisms that drive them are likely different.

  13. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 560 and 654 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-02-20

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region. Absolute intensity calibration and analysis of 166 experimental spectra recorded over a slow 248-398 K temperature ramp provide a means for the simulation of the complete spectrum of methanol as a function of temperature. These results include contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via quantum mechanical (QM) techniques. They also contain contributions from the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In contrast to our earlier work on semi-rigid species, such as ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity differences between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for many of the lines. Analysis of these differences shows the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format, as well as in a frequency point-by-point catalog that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines.

  14. Explaining recurring maser flares in the ISM through large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Fereshteh; Houde, Martin

    2017-03-01

    We apply Dicke's theory of superradiance (introduced in 1954) to the 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water spectral lines, often detected in molecular clouds as signposts for the early stages of the star formation process. We suggest that superradiance, characterized by burst-like features taking place over a wide range of time scales, may provide a natural explanation for the recent observations of periodic and seemingly alternating methanol and water maser flares in G107.298+5.639. Although these observations would be very difficult to explain within the context of maser theory, we show that these flares may result from simultaneously initiated 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water superradiant bursts operating on different time scales, thus providing a natural mechanism for their observed durations and time ordering. The evidence of superradiance in this source further suggests the existence of entangled quantum mechanical states, involving a very large number of molecules, over distances of up to a few kilometers in the interstellar medium.

  15. Explaining recurring maser flares in the ISM through large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Fereshteh; Houde, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We apply Dicke’s theory of superradiance (introduced in 1954) to the 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water spectral lines, often detected in molecular clouds as signposts for the early stages of the star formation process. We suggest that superradiance, characterized by burst-like features taking place over a wide range of time scales, may provide a natural explanation for the recent observations of periodic and seemingly alternating methanol and water maser flares in G107.298+5.639. Although these observations would be very difficult to explain within the context of maser theory, we show that these flares may result from simultaneously initiated 6.7-GHz methanol and 22-GHz water superradiant bursts operating on different time scales, thus providing a natural mechanism for their observed durations and time ordering. The evidence of superradiance in this source further suggests the existence of entangled quantum mechanical states, involving a very large number of molecules, over distances of up to a few kilometers in the interstellar medium. PMID:28378015

  16. ATCA OBSERVATIONS OF SiO MASERS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Li Juan; An Tao; Shen Zhiqiang; Miyazaki, Atsushi E-mail: antao@shao.ac.c E-mail: amiya@miz.nao.ac.j

    2010-09-01

    We present the Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the SiO masers in the Galactic center (GC) in transitions of v = 1, J = 2-1 at 86 GHz and v = 1, J = 1-0 at 43 GHz. Two 86 GHz SiO masers were detected within the central parsec, and they are associated with IRS 10EE and IRS 15NE, respectively. We detected eighteen 43 GHz SiO masers within a projected separation of {approx_lt}2 pc from Sagittarius A*, among which seven masers are newly discovered from our observations. This raises the total number of 43 GHz SiO masers within the central 4 pc of the GC region to 22. Simultaneous observations at 86 and 43 GHz showed that the intensity of 43 GHz SiO maser is {approx}3 times higher than that of 86 GHz maser in IRS 10EE (an OH/IR star), while the integrated flux of the SiO maser emission at 43 GHz is comparable with that at 86 GHz in IRS 15NE (an ordinary Mira variable). These results are consistent with previous observations of massive late-type stars in the Galaxy in which the 86 GHz SiO maser is in general weaker than the 43 GHz SiO maser in OH/IR stars, while the two transitions are comparably strong in Mira stars.

  17. Cosmic Masers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Dale F.

    1978-01-01

    Intense radiation at microwave frequencies is emitted by certain nebular regions and stellar atmospheres. It is generated by maser action, which does for microwaves what laser action does for light. Describes in detail the types of masers and their action. (Author/MA)

  18. Development of a High-Power Wideband Amplifier on the Basis of a Free-Electron Maser Having an Operating Frequency Near 30 GHz: Modeling and Results of the Initial Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Donets, D. E.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Perel'shteyn, E. A.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Savilov, A. V.; Sedykh, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a high-power wideband amplifier based on a free-electron maser for particle acceleration, which will be operated in the 30 GHz frequency band, on the basis of the LIU-3000 linear induction accelerator forming an electron beam with an electron energy of 0.8 MeV, a current of 250 A, and a pulse duration of 200 ns. As the operating regime, we chose the regime of grazing of dispersion curves, since, according to the modeling performed, it allows one to ensure an instantaneous amplification band of about 5-7% in an undulator with regular winding for an output radiation power at a level of 20 MW and a gain of 30-35 dB. The results of the first experiments studying this FEM-based scheme are presented, in which the specified power level is achieved in the range around 30 GHz, and fast tuning of ±0.5 GHz in the band of variations in the frequency of the master magnetron is demonstrated. Modeling shows that the use of the non-resonance trapping/braking regime, which is realized in an undulator with profiled parameters, allows one to expect an increase in the radiation power of up to 35-40 MW with simultaneous widening of the amplification band up to 30% under the conditions of the LIU-3000 experiments.

  19. FIRST INTERSTELLAR HCO{sup +} MASER

    SciTech Connect

    Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Crutcher, Richard M. E-mail: crutcher@illinois.edu

    2012-10-10

    A previously unseen maser in the J = 1-0 transition of HCO{sup +} has been detected by the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). A subarcsecond map was produced of the 2 arcmin{sup 2} region around DR21(OH), which has had previous detections of OH and methanol masers. This new object has remained undetected until now due to its extremely compact size. The object has a brightness temperature of >2500 K and an FWHM linewidth of 0.497 km s{sup -1}, both of which suggest non-thermal line emission consistent with an unsaturated maser. This object coincides in position and velocity with the methanol maser named DR21(OH)-1 by Plambeck and Menten. No compact HCO{sup +} emission was present in the CARMA data toward the other methanol masers described in that Letter. These new results support the theory introduced in Plambeck and Menten that these masers likely arise from strong outflows interacting with low mass, high density pockets of molecular gas. This is further supported by recent observations of a CO outflow by Zapata et al. that traces the outflow edges and confirms that the maser position lies along the edge of the outflow where interaction with molecular tracers can occur.

  20. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 11 / 001Fa www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHANOL ( NONCANCER ) ( CAS No . 67 - 56 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2013 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document

  1. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  2. Simultaneous Observatinos of H2O and SiO Masers Toward Known Extragalactic Water Maser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young; Wagner, Jan

    2015-12-01

    We observe ten known 22 GHz H_{2}O maser galaxies during February 19-22, 2011 using the 21 m Tamna telescope of the Korean VLBI Network and a new wide-band digital spectrometer. Simultaneously we searched for 43 GHz SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0 maser emission. We detect H_{2}O maser emission towards five sources (M 33, NGC 1052, NGC 1068, NGC 4258, M 82), with non-detections towards the remaining sources (UGC 3193, UGC 3789, Antennae H_{2}O-West, M 51, NGC 6323) likely due to sensitivity. Our 22 GHz spectra are consistent with earlier findings. Our simultaneous 43 GHz SiO maser search produced non-detections, yielding - for the first time - upper limits on the 43 GHz SiO maser emission in these sources at a 3 σ sensitivity level of 0.018 K-0.033 K (0.24 Jy-0.44 Jy) in a 1.75 km s^{-1} velocity resolution. Our findings suggest that any 43 GHz SiO masers in these sources (some having starburst-associated H_{2}O kilomasers) must be faint compared to the 22 GHz H_{2}O maser emission.

  3. Hydrogen maser frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental theoretical limitations of the maser, systematic processes that cause instability, and some aspects of recently designed masers are described. A design for field use that has evolved from the development of the space borne maser is presented. The performance of this type of maser is close to theoretical limits imposed by thermal noise. Further developments of smaller masers for space and terrestrial use and recent work on masers operating at low temperatures is also discussed.

  4. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, James P.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz for astrophysically significant temperatures. Four hundred and eighty-six spectra with absolute intensity calibration recorded between 240 and 389 K provided a means for the calculation of the complete experimental spectrum (CES) of methanol as a function of temperature. The CES includes contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model quantum mechanically (QM). It also includes the spectrum of the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In general the QM models provide frequencies that are within 1 MHz of their experimental values, but there are several outliers that differ by tens of MHz. As in our recent work on methanol in the 560-654 GHz region, significant intensity differences between our experimental intensities and cataloged values were found. In this work these differences are explored in the context of several QM analyses. The experimental results presented here are analyzed to provide a frequency point-by-point catalog that is well suited for the simulation of crowded and overlapped spectra. Additionally, a catalog in the usual line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy format is provided.

  5. Detection of water masers toward young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, A. K.; Migenes, V.; Breen, S. L.

    2014-02-01

    We present results from a search for water maser emission toward N4A, N190, and N206, three regions of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Four water masers were detected; two toward N4A, and two toward N190. In the latter region, no previously known maser emission has been reported. Future studies of maser proper motion to determine the galactic dynamics of the LMC will benefit from the independent data points the new masers in N190 provide. Two of these masers are associated with previously identified massive young stellar objects (YSOs), which strongly supports the authenticity of the classification. We argue that the other two masers identify previously unknown YSOs. No masers were detected toward N206, but it does host a newly discovered 22 GHz continuum source, also associated with a massive YSO. We suggest that future surveys for water maser emission in the LMC be targeted toward the more luminous, massive YSOs.

  6. Pumping Mechanisms for SiO Masers around VX Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. B.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Chen, X.; Yi, Jiyune; Jiang, D. R.; Yun, Y. J.

    2011-06-01

    VX Sgr, a semi-regular variable, is a red giant star with intense SiO maser emission at 43 GHz. The pumping mechanism of the circumstellar SiO masers has been controversial for decades since its discovery. In order to pursue this long-standing problem further, we have carried out simultaneous VLBA observations of two 7 mm SiO masers at five epochs in about two years. We present relatively aligned υ = 1 and υ = 2, J = 1-0 SiO maser maps and discuss the dominant pumping mechanism, which may be epoch dependent or a combination of both mechanisms.

  7. Water masers in the Saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebenko, S. V.; Gurvits, L. I.; Elitzur, M.; Cosmovici, C. B.; Avruch, I. M.; Montebugnoli, S.; Salerno, E.; Pluchino, S.; Maccaferri, G.; Mujunen, A.; Ritakari, J.; Wagner, J.; Molera, G.; Uunila, M.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The presence of water has long been seen as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini spacecraft discovered water vapour in the Saturnian system by detecting absorption of UV emission from a background star. Investigating other possible manifestations of water is essential, one of which, provided physical conditions are suitable, is maser emission. Aims: We report detection of water maser emission at 22 GHz associated with several Kronian satellites using Earth-based radio telescopes. Methods: We searched for water maser emission in the Saturnian system in an observing campaign using the Metsähovi and Medicina radio telescopes. Spectral data were Doppler-corrected over orbital phase for the Saturnian satellites, yielding detections of water maser emission associated with the moons Hyperion, Titan, Enceladus, and Atlas. Results: The detection of Saturnian water molecules by remote astronomical observation can be combined with in situ spacecraft measurements to harmonise the physical model of the Saturnian system.

  8. Spectral line profiles and luminosities of astrophysical water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral line narrowing and rebroadening that occurs for astrophysical masers as a function of the emergent radiative flux is calculated for the prominent, 22 GHz masing transition of water. The increased line breadths due to hyperfine structure lead to reliable, essentially model-independent upper limits to the emergent flux that tend to be lower than other estimates for these masers. For many 22 GHz masers, including the outbursts in W49 and Orion, the observed line breadths are less than 0.9 km/s. For these, the upper limit to the emergent maser flux is 10 to the 10th K-sr when expressed in terms of the brightness temperature and the solid angle for beaming. It is concluded that the extreme brightness of the interstellar water masers is due to a high degree of beaming and not to more effective pumping.

  9. Multiple Methanol Transitions Detected in W51-E2 from the Arecibo Galactic Chemistry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, Robert F.; Harrington, Kevin; Ghosh, Tapasi; Salter, Christopher J.; Araya, Esteban; Arce, Hector G.; Lebron Santos, Mayra E.; De Vries, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Two major components of the star-forming region W51 have been observed with the Arecibo 305-m telescope as a part of the Arecibo Galactic Chemistry Survey. Located at a distance of ~6 kpc towards the Sagittarius Arm, W51 is one of the most luminous and massive (upper 5-10% by mass and upper 1% by size of all Giant Molecular Clouds in our Galaxy; Carpenter & Sanders, 1998). The infrared source, IRS1, was observed over 1.1 - 10 GHz from 2010 through 2012, and the angularly nearby compact component, E2, over 4.3 - 4.9 GHz and 8.0 - 10.2 GHz in 2014. Methanol (CH3OH) transitions at 8.34-GHz (4(1,3)-4(1,4)-+), 9.94-GHz (9(-1,9)-8(-2,7)), 9.98-GHz (4(3,2)-5(2,3)++), and 10.06-GHz (4(3,1)-5(2,4)--) were detected towards W51-E2 for the first time, some showing a mixture of emission and absorption. The peak emission ratios for the 9.94- to 9.98-GHz, and the 9.94- to 10.06-GHz transitions are consistent with the predictions of Slysh, Kalenskii & Val'tts (1993). All three 6-cm wavelength hydroxyl (OH) transitions were also detected, with the 4.66-GHz satellite line masing strongly. In IRS1, the intense methanol maser at 6.67 GHz (Araya et al. 2013) was observed to have a flux density of > 200 Jy, with the 4.66-GHz OH maser having an intensity of ~1 Jy. In IRS1, we also detected the methanol 9.94-GHz transition featuring emission with multiple components. Additionally, a total of over 60 H, 30 He, and 8 C radio recombination lines (RRLs) were identified in E2 over the two frequency ranges observed. This includes the highest frequency spectral line yet detected at Arecibo, namely the He(86)α RRL at 10.17 GHz. Over 120 H, 70 He, and 40 C recombination lines were identified in IRS1 over the frequency range of 4 - 10 GHz.

  10. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  11. NEW MASER EMISSION FROM NONMETASTABLE AMMONIA IN NGC 7538

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Kim, Stella Seojin

    2011-09-20

    We present the first interferometric observations at 18.5 GHz of IRS 1 in NGC 7538. These observations include images of the nonmetastable {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9, 6) masers with a synthesized beam of 2 arcsec and images of the continuum emission with a synthesized beam of 150 mas. Of the maser emission, the previously known feature near v {sub LSR} = -60 km s{sup -1} is spectrally resolved into at least two components and we observe several new maser emission features near v {sub LSR} = -57 km s{sup -1}. The new maser emission near -57 km s{sup -1} lies 250 {+-} 90 mas northwest of the maser emission near -60 km s{sup -1}. All of the masers are angularly unresolved indicating brightness temperatures T{sub B} > 2000 K. We are also able to conclusively associate the ammonia masers with the position of IRS 1. The excitation of these rare ammonia masers is discussed in the context of the rich maser environment of IRS 1.

  12. Origin of Observed Periodic Components in Astrophysical Masers' Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siparov, S.; Samodurov, V.; Laptev, G.

    2017-01-01

    Further analysis of data previously obtained during the monitoring observations of 49 astrophysical water (22 GHz) masers shows that in some cases the intensity of an individual component of the maser spectrum changes periodically, on timescales of tens of minutes. It is argued that this variation cannot be the effect of instrumental errors, weather conditions or interstellar medium instabilities, because only a single feature of the maser spectrum fluctuates but not the whole spectrum. The suggested interpretation of this effect is based on the optic-metrical parametric resonance produced by gravitational radiation emitted by short-period binary stars, with the examples of such binaries sufficing the conditions given.

  13. A receiver design for the superconducting cavity-maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A new frequency standard was demonstrated with the aid of a double phase locked loop (PLL) receiver. A superconducting cavity maser oscillator (SCMO) and a hydrogen maser are combined to show the medium term performance of the hydrogen maser together with improved short term performance made possible by the SCMO. The receiver, which generates a 100 MHz signal with reduced noise, is phase locked to (and may be used in place of) the 100 MHz hydrogen maser output. The maser signal, 2.69xxx-GHz SCMO output, and a 100 MHz quartz crystal oscillator are optimally combined by the receiver. A measured two source fractional frequency stability of 2 x 10(exp -14) was obtained for a measuring time of r = 1 sec, and 1 x 10(exp -15) at r = 1,000 sec. The 1 sec value is approx. 10 times lower than that for hydrogen masers, while the 1,000 sec value is identical to hydrogen maser performance. The design is based on phase noise models for the hydrogen maser, the SCMO, and quartz crystal oscillators for offset frequencies down to 1 x 10(exp -6) Hz.

  14. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF HOST GALAXIES OF EXTRAGALACTIC NUCLEAR WATER MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Zaw, Ingyin; Blanton, Michael R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2011-12-01

    We study the optical properties of the host galaxies of nuclear 22 GHz ({lambda} = 1.35 cm) water masers. To do so, we cross-match the galaxy sample surveyed for water maser emission (123 detections and 3806 non-detections) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) low-redshift galaxy sample (z < 0.05). Out of 1636 galaxies with SDSS photometry, we identify 48 detections; out of the 1063 galaxies that also have SDSS spectroscopy, we identify 33 detections. We find that maser detection rate is higher at higher optical luminosity (M{sub B} ), larger velocity dispersion ({sigma}), and higher [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity, with [O III] {lambda}5007 being the dominant factor. These detection rates are essentially the result of the correlations of isotropic maser luminosity with all three of these variables. These correlations are natural if maser strength increases with central black hole mass and the level of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We also find that the detection rate is higher in galaxies with higher extinction. Based on these results, we propose that maser surveys seeking to efficiently find masers should rank AGN targets by extinction-corrected [O III] {lambda}5007 flux when available. This prioritization would improve maser detection efficiency, from an overall {approx}3% without pre-selection to {approx}16% for the strongest intrinsic [O III] {lambda}5007 emitters, by a factor of {approx}5.

  15. Theory of astronomical masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylafis, Nikolaos D.

    The theory of astronomical masers is reviewed. As with laboratory masers, masing occurs when a transition between two energy levels of a molecule exhibits inverted populations. In order to present the basic concepts about masers, an idealized two-level system is used. The exact energy level structure is taken into account later on when the pumping of specific molecules is discussed. Unlike laboratory masers, where the radiation must be bounced between two mirrors to accumulate gain, the propagation of radiation in astronomical masers is a lot simpler. This is because astronomical masers are single-pass and broadband. Thus, the main theoretical effort has concentrated on inventing efficient mechanisms that produce population inversion. Specific pumping mechanisms for the three molecules (H2O, SiO and OH) that exhibit strong masing are presented and their ability to explain the observations is discussed.

  16. Polarized maser growth

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D.B.; Judge, A.C.

    2004-11-01

    A polarized maser is assumed to operate in an anisotropic medium with natural modes polarized differently to the maser. It is shown that when the spatial growth rate and the generalized Faraday rotation rate are comparable, the polarization of the growing radiation is different from those of the maser and medium. In particular, for a lineary polarized maser operating in a medium with linearly polarized natural modes, the growing radiation is partially circularly polarized. This provides a previously unrecognized source of circular polarization that may be relevant to pulsar radio emission.

  17. S Persei: Optical and water maser variability - 1984 to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, I. R.; Benson, P. J.; Mcconahay, M. M.; Cadmus, R. R., Jr.; Stencel, R. E.; Eriksson, K.

    1991-01-01

    The M supergiant S Persei was monitored since 1984 optically and since 1987 for water maser emission at 22 GHz. The dozen H2O maser features show complex variations in intensity with many of the features varying independently of one another. Some of the water maser features brightened dramatically at the time of the bright optical maximum observed in 1988 August and again 10 weeks later. It is possible the increase in water maser intensity is related to the ejection of a dust shell near the time of the preceding optical minimum. The intensity variations of the maser spectrum as being produced by an asymmetric distribution of maser spots are interpreted. A double shell of maser spots may be present on the near side of the shell, but appears to be lacking or be occulted on the far side. No chromospheric activity was detected about 10 weeks after optical maximum. A well developed shock is seen in a near-infrared spectrum obtained in 1988 October.

  18. UNUSUAL SHOCK-EXCITED OH MASER EMISSION IN A YOUNG PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Walsh, Andrew J.; Gómez, José F.; Green, James A.; Dawson, Joanne R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Jones, Paul A.; Cunningham, Maria R.; Gibson, Steven J.

    2016-01-20

    We report on OH maser emission toward G336.644−0.695 (IRAS 16333−4807), which is a H{sub 2}O maser-emitting Planetary Nebula (PN). We have detected 1612, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH masers at two epochs using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, hereby confirming it as the seventh known case of an OH-maser-emitting PN. This is only the second known PN showing 1720 MHz OH masers after K 3−35 and the only evolved stellar object with 1720 MHz OH masers as the strongest transition. This PN is one of a group of very young PNe. The 1612 MHz and 1667 MHz masers are at a similar velocity to the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers, whereas the 1720 MHz masers show a variable spectrum, with several components spread over a higher velocity range (up to 36 km s{sup −1}). We also detect Zeeman splitting in the 1720 MHz transition at two epochs (with field strengths of ∼2 to ∼10 mG), which suggests the OH emission at 1720 MHz is formed in a magnetized environment. These 1720 MHz OH masers may trace short-lived equatorial ejections during the formation of the PN.

  19. DIRECT DIAGNOSTICS OF FORMING MASSIVE STARS: STELLAR PULSATION AND PERIODIC VARIABILITY OF MASER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Hosokawa, Takashi; Motogi, Kazuhito E-mail: koichiro@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2013-06-01

    The 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission, a tracer of forming massive stars, sometimes shows enigmatic periodic flux variations over several 10-100 days. In this Letter, we propose that these periodic variations could be explained by the pulsation of massive protostars growing under rapid mass accretion with rates of M-dot{sub *}{approx}>10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Our stellar evolution calculations predict that the massive protostars have very large radii exceeding 100 R{sub Sun} at maximum, and here we study the pulsational stability of such bloated protostars by way of the linear stability analysis. We show that the protostar becomes pulsationally unstable with various periods of several 10-100 days depending on different accretion rates. With the fact that the stellar luminosity when the star is pulsationally unstable also depends on the accretion rate, we derive the period-luminosity relation log (L/ L{sub Sun }) = 4.62 + 0.98log (P/100 days), which is testable with future observations. Our models further show that the radius and mass of the pulsating massive protostar should also depend on the period. It would be possible to infer such protostellar properties and the accretion rate with the observed period. Measuring the maser periods enables a direct diagnosis of the structure of accreting massive protostars, which are deeply embedded in dense gas and are inaccessible with other observations.

  20. SUBMILLIMETER H{sub 2}O MASER IN CIRCINUS GALAXY-A NEW PROBE FOR THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR REGION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Miyoshi, Makoto; Doi, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Shinji

    2013-05-10

    We present the first detection of extragalactic submillimeter H{sub 2}O maser in the 321 GHz transition toward the center of Circinus galaxy, the nearby Type 2 Seyfert using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. We find that Doppler features of the detected 321 GHz H{sub 2}O maser straddle the systemic velocity of the galaxy as seen in the spectrum of the known 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser in the galaxy. By comparing the velocities of the maser features in both transitions, it can be deduced that the 321 GHz maser occurs in a region similar to that of the 22 GHz maser, where the sub-parsec-scale distribution of the 22 GHz maser was revealed by earlier very long baseline interferometry observations. The detected maser features remain unresolved at the synthesized beam of {approx}0.''66 ({approx}15 pc) and coincide with the 321 GHz continuum peak within small uncertainties. We also present a tentative detection of the highest velocity feature (redshifts up to {approx}635 km s{sup -1}) in the galaxy. If this high-velocity feature arises from a Keplerian rotating disk well established in this galaxy, it is located at a radius of {approx}0.018 pc ({approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} Schwarzschild radii), which might probe molecular material closest to the central engine.

  1. Relaxation of molecular velocities and spectral line profiles of astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Nels; Watson, William D.

    1993-01-01

    The rates at which the velocities of water molecules relax to a Maxwellian distribution are calculated under conditions that are representative of those in astrophysical water masers. Populations are calculated as a function of velocity for the lowest 40 rotational energy levels of ortho-water in order to make a detailed determination of the velocity relaxation rate. Relaxation rates for the 22 GHz maser at H2 densities of 10 exp 9/cu cm are 2.0/s and 5.1/s for temperatures of 400 K and 1000 K, respectively. Under these and other conditions, as well as for other maser transitions, the relaxation rate far exceeds the loss rate - usually by more than a factor of 10. Thus maser lines can remain narrow up to intensities that are at least a factor of 10 greater than the saturation intensity, and to path lengths that are at least a factor of 10 greater than the path length at which saturation occurs. Relaxation is dominated by the effects of trapped infrared radiation, though elastic and inelastic collisions are also included in the calculations. These relaxation rates, together with the observed line breadths of the 22 GHz masers, provide limits on maser luminosities which indicate that the brightest 22 GHz masers are highly beamed, with solid angles smaller than 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -4 Sr.

  2. Excited-State OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlström, Ylva M.; Fish, Vincent L.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Zschaechner, Laura K.; Lockett, Philip B.; Elitzur, Moshe

    2008-03-01

    The collisionally pumped, ground-state 1720 MHz maser line of OH is widely recognized as a tracer for shocked regions and observed in star-forming regions and supernova remnants. Whereas some lines of excited states of OH have been detected and studied in star-forming regions, the subject of excited-state OH in supernova remnants—where high collision rates are to be expected—is only recently being addressed. Modeling of collisional excitation of OH demonstrates that 1720, 4765, and 6049 MHz masers can occur under similar conditions in regions of shocked gas. In particular, the 6049 and 4765 MHz masers become more significant at increased OH column densities where the 1720 MHz masers begin to be quenched. In supernova remnants, the detection of excited-state OH line maser emission could therefore serve as a probe of regions of higher column densities. Using the Very Large Array, we searched for excited-state OH in the 4.7, 7.8, 8.2, and 23.8 GHz lines in four well-studied supernova remnants with strong 1720 MHz maser emission (Sgr A East, W28, W44 and IC 443). No detections were made, at typical detection limits of around 10 mJy beam-1. The search for the 6 GHz lines were done using Effelsberg since the VLA receivers did not cover those frequencies, and are reported on in an accompanying letter (Fish and coworkers). We also cross-correlated the positions of known supernova remnants with the positions of 1612 MHz maser emission obtained from blind surveys. No probable associations were found, perhaps except in the Sgr A East region. The lack of detections of excited-state OH indicates that the OH column densities suffice for 1720 MHz inversion but not for inversion of excited-state transitions, consistent with the expected results for C-type shocks.

  3. Evolved star water maser cloud size determined by star size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. M. S.; Etoka, S.; Gray, M. D.; Lekht, E. E.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Murakawa, K.; Rudnitskij, G.; Yates, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    Context. Cool, evolved stars undergo copious mass loss but the detailed mechanisms and the form in which the matter is returned to the ISM are still under debate. Aims: We investigated the structure and evolution of the wind at 5 to 50 stellar radii from asymptotic giant branch and red supergiant stars. Methods: 22-GHz water masers around seven evolved stars were imaged using MERLIN, at sub-AU resolution. Each source was observed at between 2 and 7 epochs, covering several stellar periods. We compared our results with long-term single dish monitoring provided by the Pushchino radio telescope. Results: The 22-GHz emission is located in approximately spherical, thick, unevenly filled shells. The outflow velocity increases twofold or more between the inner and outer shell limits. Water maser clumps could be matched at successive epochs separated by less than two years for AGB stars, or at least 5 years for RSG. This is much shorter than the decades taken for the wind to cross the maser shell, and comparison with spectral monitoring shows that some features fade and reappear. In five sources, most of the matched maser features brighten or dim in concert from one epoch to the next. A number of individual maser features show idiosyncratic behaviour, including one cloud in W Hya caught in the act of passing in front of a background cloud leading to 50-fold, transient amplification. The masing clouds are one or two orders of magnitude denser than the wind average and contain a substantial fraction of the mass loss in this region, with a filling factor <1%. The RSG clouds are about ten times bigger than those round the AGB stars. Conclusions: Proper motions are dominated by expansion, with no systematic rotation. The maser clouds presumably survive for decades (the shell crossing time) but the masers are not always beamed in our direction. Only radiative effects can explain changes in flux density throughout the maser shells on short timescales. The size of the clouds is

  4. Hydrogen-Maser/Ruby-Maser/Quartz-Crystal Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Highly stable oscillator suitable for use as 100-MHz frequency standard consists of 100-MHz hydrogen maser combined with double-phase-locked-loop receiver. Generates 100-MHz signal with reduced noise. Contains 100-MHz voltage-controlled quartz-crystal oscillator (VCO) locked in phase to superconducting-cavity maser oscillator (SCMO). SCMO, locks in phase to hydrogen maser, phase-locking receiver and its SCMO/ VCO combination to hydrogen maser. Aspects of SCMO described in previous reports, including "Performance of Superconducting-Cavity Maser" (NPO-18175), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 15, No. 6. Performances of component oscillators complement each other.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water masers in M31. II. Multiwavelength data (Amiri+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, N.; Darling, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative multiwavelength analysis of 22GHz water-maser-emitting and non-maser-emitting 24um luminous star-forming regions in M31. We use WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel infrared continuum maps, maps of derived quantities such as star formation and dust temperature, and archival catalogs to examine the differences between maser-emitting and non-maser-emitting regions, to examine correlations between observable quantities among each population, and to constrain the parameter space most likely to produce detectable water masers. Throughout the manuscript, we assume a distance to M31 of 780kpc when calculating luminosities from continuum or line flux measurements. (2 data files).

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE ACTIVE GALAXIES NGC 6240 AND M51

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Edwards, Philip G. E-mail: Philip.Edwards@csiro.au

    2015-12-20

    We present the results of observations of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission in NGC 6240 and M51 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Two major H{sub 2}O maser features and several minor features are detected toward the southern nucleus of NGC 6240. These features are redshifted by about 300 km s{sup −1} from the galaxy’s systemic velocity and remain unresolved at the synthesized beam size. A combination of our two-epoch observations and published data reveals an apparent correlation between the strength of the maser and the 22 GHz radio continuum emission, implying that the maser excitation relates to the activity of an active galactic nucleus in the southern nucleus rather than star-forming activity. The star-forming galaxy M51 hosts H{sub 2}O maser emission in the center of the galaxy; however, the origin of the maser has been an open question. We report the first detection of 22 GHz nuclear radio continuum emission in M51. The continuum emission is co-located with the maser position, which indicates that the maser arises from nuclear active galactic nucleus-activity and not from star-forming activity in the galaxy.

  7. SiO and H2O maser emission in OH/IR objects and late-type variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyman, L.-A.; Johansson, L. E. B.; Booth, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    A four-year search for 86-GHz SiO and H2O maser emission towards about 20 unidentified OH/IR objects and about 35 optically identified variable stars has yielded information on the temporal variations of many of these sources. The SiO maser emission is noted to behave differently in OH/IR objects as compared with Mira variables. An attempt is made to explain the appearance of strong masers in both vibrational states solely at the 43 GHz transition, under the assumption that an intrinsically weak pump mechanism generates weak (v=1, J=2-1) emission.

  8. Maser and laser engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    This book is intended to be a textbook for an upper division one-semester electrical engineering course. Students are expected to have had some undegraduate course work in modern physics and in electromagnetic field theory. General aspects regarding devices based on quantum electronics are considered along with gas masers, solid masers, gas lasers, solid lasers, semiconductor lasers, liquid lasers, modulation techniques for lasers, and opto-electrical demodulators and energy convertors. Attention is given to quantum electric harmonic generators, Raman lasers, optical parametric interactions, holograms, optical terms, crystallographic terms, band theory, Schroedinger formulation and Dirac formation, and the quantum number of electrons in a hydrogen atom.

  9. Recirculating cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Huerlimann, M.D.; Hardy, W.N.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Cline, R.W.

    1986-08-01

    We report on the design and initial testing of a new type of hydrogen maser, operated at dilution refrigerator temperatures, in which H atoms circulate back and forth between a microwave-pumped state selector and the maser cavity. Other novel design features include liquid-/sup 4/He-coated walls, He-cooled electronics, and the use of microscopic magnetic particles to relax the two lowest hyperfine levels in the state selector. Stabilities at least as good as that of a Rb clock and a high-stability quartz oscillator are observed for measuring times between 1 and 300 s.

  10. INTERSTELLAR H{sub 2}O MASERS FROM J SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, David; Elitzur, Moshe; McKee, Christopher F.

    2013-08-10

    We present a model in which the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers observed in star-forming regions occur behind shocks propagating in dense regions (preshock density n{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}). We focus on high-velocity (v{sub s} {approx}> 30 km s{sup -1}) dissociative J shocks in which the heat of H{sub 2} re-formation maintains a large column of {approx}300-400 K gas; at these temperatures the chemistry drives a considerable fraction of the oxygen not in CO to form H{sub 2}O. The H{sub 2}O column densities, the hydrogen densities, and the warm temperatures produced by these shocks are sufficiently high to enable powerful maser action. The observed brightness temperatures (generally {approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} K) are the result of coherent velocity regions that have dimensions in the shock plane that are 10-100 times the shock thickness of {approx}10{sup 13} cm. The masers are therefore beamed toward the observer, who typically views the shock ''edge-on'', or perpendicular to the shock velocity; the brightest masers are then observed with the lowest line-of-sight velocities with respect to the ambient gas. We present numerical and analytic studies of the dependence of the maser inversion, the resultant brightness temperature, the maser spot size and shape, the isotropic luminosity, and the maser region magnetic field on the shock parameters and the coherence path length; the overall result is that in galactic H{sub 2}O 22 GHz masers, these observed parameters can be produced in J shocks with n{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} and v{sub s} {approx} 30-200 km s{sup -1}. A number of key observables such as maser shape, brightness temperature, and global isotropic luminosity depend only on the particle flux into the shock, j = n{sub 0} v{sub s} , rather than on n{sub 0} and v{sub s} separately.

  11. Free electron maser experiments in the low-frequency limit

    SciTech Connect

    Drori, R.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Table-top free-electron maser (FEM) experiments operating in the low-frequency (< 1 GHz) low-energy ({approximately} 1 keV) limit are reported. These FEM devices employ parallel-stripline non-dispersive waveguides (which support TEM-modes), and planar folded-foil wigglers. Thermionic cathodes and carbon-fiber cold-cathodes are used in these experiments. Results of oscillator and amplifier experiments are presented and compared with theory.

  12. Natural lasers and masers in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Population inversions have been found in the atmospheres of planets and comets, and amplification has been inferred for several cases. In this paper, I review the molecular systems that exhibit lasing and masing action, review the properties of atmospheres that permit these natural lasers and masers to exist, and give examples of their use as probes of remote regions. One potential future application is the possible communication over interstellar distances at GHz rates.

  13. Very Large Array Detection of the 36 GHz Zeeman Effect in DR21W Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momjian, Emmanuel; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Fish, Vincent L.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the observation of the 36 GHz methanol maser line in the star-forming region DR21W to accurately measure the Zeeman effect. The Zeeman signature reported by Fish et al. became suspicious after an instrumental effect was discovered in the early days of the commissioning of the Very Large Array Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. We conclude that the previously reported magnetic field strength of 58 mG (1.7 Hz mG-1/z) is instrumental in nature and thus incorrect. With the improved performance of the array, we now deduce a 3σ limit of -4.7 to +0.4 mG (1.7 Hz mG-1/z) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength in DR21W.

  14. VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF THE 36 GHz ZEEMAN EFFECT IN DR21W REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Momjian, Emmanuel; Sjouwerman, Lorant O.; Fish, Vincent L.

    2012-09-20

    We report on the observation of the 36 GHz methanol maser line in the star-forming region DR21W to accurately measure the Zeeman effect. The Zeeman signature reported by Fish et al. became suspicious after an instrumental effect was discovered in the early days of the commissioning of the Very Large Array Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. We conclude that the previously reported magnetic field strength of 58 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) is instrumental in nature and thus incorrect. With the improved performance of the array, we now deduce a 3{sigma} limit of -4.7 to +0.4 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength in DR21W.

  15. High-resolution VLBA Observations of Three 7 mm SiO Masers toward VX Sgr at Five Epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. B.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Chen, X.; Yi, Jiyune; Jiang, D. R.; Yun, Y. J.

    2012-07-01

    VX Sgr is a red supergiant at an adopted distance of 1.6 kpc with intense 43 GHz SiO maser emission. In this paper, we present the high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of SiO masers toward VX Sgr at five epochs. We used the Very Long Baseline Array to map the J = 1→0 (v = 1, 2) 28SiO masers and confirmed a ring-like structure. In the first two epochs, the v = 1 masers form a ring, but v = 2 maser spots residing only in the southern and northern regions do not form a complete ring. In the third epoch, the two masers are distributed in a ring structure and the v = 2 masers are a bit closer to the central star. In the last two epochs, many new maser spots appear and overlap each other. These overlapping maser spots can be related to the shock waves and reflect the collisional pumping. We compare the observations with the pumping models and speculate that the real pumping mechanism may be complex in VX Sgr and vary with time. The J = 1→0 (v = 0) 29SiO line emission is also detected, but is too weak to produce any VLBI map.

  16. HIGH-RESOLUTION VLBA OBSERVATIONS OF THREE 7 mm SiO MASERS TOWARD VX Sgr AT FIVE EPOCHS

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. B.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Chen, X.; Jiang, D. R.; Yi Jiyune; Yun, Y. J.

    2012-07-20

    VX Sgr is a red supergiant at an adopted distance of 1.6 kpc with intense 43 GHz SiO maser emission. In this paper, we present the high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of SiO masers toward VX Sgr at five epochs. We used the Very Long Baseline Array to map the J = 1{yields}0 (v = 1, 2) {sup 28}SiO masers and confirmed a ring-like structure. In the first two epochs, the v = 1 masers form a ring, but v = 2 maser spots residing only in the southern and northern regions do not form a complete ring. In the third epoch, the two masers are distributed in a ring structure and the v = 2 masers are a bit closer to the central star. In the last two epochs, many new maser spots appear and overlap each other. These overlapping maser spots can be related to the shock waves and reflect the collisional pumping. We compare the observations with the pumping models and speculate that the real pumping mechanism may be complex in VX Sgr and vary with time. The J = 1{yields}0 (v = 0) {sup 29}SiO line emission is also detected, but is too weak to produce any VLBI map.

  17. A search for gravitationally lensed water masers in dusty quasars and star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, J. P.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Roy, A. L.; Castangia, P.; Samuel, F.; Brunthaler, A.; Henkel, C.; Wucknitz, O.

    2011-02-01

    Luminous extragalactic water masers are known to be associated with active galactic nuclei and have provided accurate estimates for the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the size and structure of the circumnuclear accretion disc in nearby galaxies. To find water maser systems at much higher redshifts, we have begun a survey of known gravitationally lensed quasars and star-forming galaxies. In this paper, we present a search for 22 GHz (rest-frame) water masers towards five dusty, gravitationally lensed quasars and star-forming galaxies at redshifts between 2.3 and 2.9 with the Effelsberg radio telescope and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). Our observations do not find any new definite examples of high-redshift water maser galaxies, suggesting that large reservoirs of dust and gas are not a sufficient condition for powerful water maser emission. However, we do find the tentative detection of a water maser system in the active galaxy IRAS 10214+4724 at redshift 2.285. Our survey has now doubled the number of gravitationally lensed galaxies and quasars that have been searched for high-redshift water maser emission. We also present an updated analysis of the high-redshift water maser luminosity function that is based on the results presented here and from the only cosmologically distant (z > 1) water maser galaxy found thus far, MG J0414+0534 at redshift 2.64. By comparing with the water maser luminosity function locally and at moderate redshifts, we find that there must be some evolution in the luminosity function of water maser galaxies at high redshifts. By assuming a moderate evolution [(1 +z)4] in the water maser luminosity function, we find that blind surveys for water maser galaxies are only worthwhile with extremely high sensitivity like that of the planned Square Kilometre Array (Phase 2), which is scheduled to be completed by 2020. However, instruments like the EVLA and MeerKAT will be capable of detecting water maser systems similar to the

  18. DISCOVERY OF NUCLEAR WATER MASER EMISSION IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; Walter, Fabian; Mao, Minnie Y. E-mail: dmeier@nmt.edu E-mail: mmao@nrao.edu; and others

    2013-07-10

    We report the detection of a 22 GHz water maser line in the nearest (D {approx} 3.8 Mpc) radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The line is centered at a velocity of {approx}960 km s{sup -1}, which is redshifted by about 415 km s{sup -1} from the systemic velocity. Such an offset, as well as the width of {approx}120 km s{sup -1}, could be consistent with either a nuclear maser arising from an accretion disk of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), or with a jet maser that is emitted from the material that is shocked near the base of the jet in Cen A. The best spatial resolution of our ATCA data constrains the origin of the maser feature within <3 pc of the SMBH. The maser exhibits an isotropic luminosity of {approx}1 L{sub Sun }, which classifies it as a kilomaser, and appears to be variable on timescales of months. A kilomaser can also be emitted by shocked gas in star-forming regions. Given the small projected distance from the core, the large offset from systemic velocity, and the smoothness of the line feature, we conclude that a jet maser line emitted by shocked gas around the base of the active galactic nucleus is the most likely explanation. For this scenario we can infer a minimum density of the radio jet of {approx}> 10 cm{sup -3}, which indicates substantial mass entrainment of surrounding gas into the propagating jet material.

  19. Water maser emission from X-ray-heated circumnuclear gas in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Conger, Sarah

    1994-01-01

    We have modeled the physical and chemical conditions present within dense circumnuclear gas that is irradiated by X-rays from an active galactic nucleus. Over a wide range of X-ray fluxes and gas pressures, the effects of X-ray heating give rise to a molecular layer at temperatures of 400-1000 K within which the water abundance is large. The physical conditions within this molecular layer naturally give rise to collisionally pumped maser emission in the 6(sub 16) - 5(sub 23) 22 GHz transition of ortho-water, with predicted maser luminosities of 10(exp 2 +/- 0.5) solar luminosity per sq. pc of illuminated area. Given plausible assumptions about the geometry of the source and about the degree to which the maser emission is anisotropic, such surface luminosities are sufficient to explain the large apparent luminosities observed in water maser sources that are associated with active galactic nuclei.

  20. A Search for H2O Maser Emission from Wide-Angle Outflows in Nearby AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Emily; Braatz, James A.; Pesce, Dom; Megamaser Cosmology Project

    2017-01-01

    As part of large surveys for 22 GHz water maser emission in external galaxies, the Green Bank Telescope has made over 4000 distinct observations resulting in nondetections. Most of these observations are 10-minute integrations toward nearby active galaxies, often as part of the Megamaser Cosmology Project. We have grouped the observed galaxies according their nuclear activity type and made stacked averages of the nondetections, searching for low-level, ubiquitous maser emission. Such emission might be expected, for example, if there is faint maser emission from a wide-angle outflow component in the nuclei of AGNs. We detected no maser emission in our stacked averages of Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s, or in the sum of all nondetections. We explore the significance of this result in the context of clumpy outflow models.

  1. Water maser emission in the Saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Cimo, Giuseppe; Gurvits, Leonid; Pogrebenko, Sergei; Molera Calves, Guifré

    2010-10-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of a water vapour plume of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft, our team started an observational programme to search for possible 22 GHz water vapour maser emission associated with different objects in the Kronian system. The observations have been conducted so far with the 32 m Medicina radio telescope (INAF-IRA, Italy) and the 14 m Metsahovi radio telescope (Aalto University, MRO, Finland). During the 2006-2008 campaigns, more than 300 hours of data have been analysed, and initial results including maser detections up to 7.0 sigma level have been presented. The detections attracted considerable interest and attempts to confirm them and investigate the phenomenon in depth. No confirmations have been published so far. In order to provide critical verification of these detections and study the details of masing conditions efficiently, we request a total of 20 hours on the Tidbinbilla 70 m telescope (DSS43) to observe Saturn and its moons during several, non-consecutive days. Due to natural changes of the planetary target positions, targets' coordinates will be provided after the antenna time is allocated.

  2. Ultra-stable performance of the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, Rabi T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent measurements on the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) oscillator show frequency stability of parts in 10 exp 15 for times from 1 to 1000 sec. Phase noise of approximately -80 dB/f-cubed was also measured. This short- and mid-term performance is believed to be better than that of any known microwave oscillator. In particular, stability at a measuring time of 1 sec is 10 times better than that of a hydrogen maser, and phase noise at 8 GHz is more than 20 dB below that of the best multiplied quartz crystal oscillators. Substantial technical improvements have been made to eliminate frequency instability due to operational parameters. They are temperature, pump frequency, pump power, pump frequency polarization, temperature gradient, coupling strength, and output VSWR. Either the parameter was stabilized or the coefficient which couples the parameter to the operating frequency was minimized. A frequency pulling coil has been implemented and tested to enable the SCM to be slaved to a hydrogen maser with a time constant of approximately 50 sec. This combination would allow the excellent long term performance of the hydrogen maser to be improved by the newly available short term performance of the SCM.

  3. Dust Grains and the Luminosity of Circumnuclear Water Masers in Active Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collison, Alan J.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    In previous calculations for the luminosities of 22 GHz water masers, the pumping is reduced and ultimately quenched with increasing depth into the gas because of trapping of the infrared (approximately equals 30-150 micrometers), spectral line radiation of the water molecule. When the absorption (and reemission) of infrared radiation by dust grains is included, we demonstrate that the pumping is no longer quenched but remains constant with increasing optical depth. A temperature difference between the grains and the gas is required. Such conditions are expected to occur, for example, in the circumnuclear masing environments created by X-rays in active galaxies. Here, the calculated 22 GHz maser luminosities are increased by more than an order of magnitude. Application to the well-studied, circumnuclear masing disk in the galaxy NGC 4258 yields a maser luminosity near that inferred from observations if the observed X-ray flux is assumed to be incident onto only the inner surface of the disk.

  4. The Protocluster G18.67+0.03: A Test Case for Class I CH3OH Masers as Evolutionary Indicators for Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Zhang, Q.; Friesen, R. K.; Indebetouw, R.; Chandler, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the massive protocluster G18.67+0.03. Previously targeted in maser surveys of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects (EGOs), this cluster contains three Class I CH3OH maser sources, providing a unique opportunity to test the proposed role of Class I masers as evolutionary indicators for massive star formation. The millimeter observations reveal bipolar molecular outflows, traced by 13CO(2-1) emission, associated with all three Class I maser sources. Two of these sources (including the EGO) are also associated with 6.7 GHz Class II CH3OH masers; the Class II masers are coincident with millimeter continuum cores that exhibit hot core line emission and drive active outflows, as indicated by the detection of SiO(5-4). In these cases, the Class I masers are coincident with outflow lobes, and appear as clear cases of excitation by active outflows. In contrast, the third Class I source is associated with an ultracompact (UC) H II region, and not with Class II masers. The lack of SiO emission suggests that the 13CO outflow is a relic, consistent with its longer dynamical timescale. Our data show that massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) associated only with Class I masers are not necessarily young and provide the first unambiguous evidence that Class I masers may be excited by both young (hot core) and older (UC H II) MYSOs within the same protocluster.

  5. Surface-state hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, A.C.; Verhaar, B.J.; Stoof, H.T.C. ); Silvera, I.F. )

    1993-11-01

    We describe a hydrogen maser operating at very low temperatures in which most of the hydrogen atoms are condensed on a superfluid helium surface in long-lived states. This proposed maser can be used to obtain information on the properties of the hydrogen--liquid-helium-surface system. In addition, it promises to be an interesting system from the point of view of nonlinear dynamics. It is found that the surface recombination to molecular hydrogen, which might be considered as undesirable, is actually necessary to achieve the masing conditions. We develop the maser equations and consider a number of realistic conditions for operation.

  6. A study of the region of massive star formation L379IRS1 in radio lines of methanol and other molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, S. V.; Shchurov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The results of spectral observations of the region of massive star formation L379IRS1 (IRAS18265-1517) are presented. The observations were carried out with the 30-m Pico Veleta radio telescope (Spain) at seven frequencies in the 1-mm, 2-mm, and 3-mm wavelength bands. Lines of 24 molecules were detected, from simple diatomic or triatomic species to complex eight- or nine-atom compounds such as CH3OCHO or CH3OCH3. Rotation diagrams constructed from methanol andmethyl cyanide lines were used to determine the temperature of the quiescent gas in this region, which is about 40-50 K. In addition to this warm gas, there is a hot component that is revealed through high-energy lines of methanol and methyl cyanide, molecular lines arising in hot regions, and the presence of H2O masers and Class II methanol masers at 6.7 GHz, which are also related to hot gas. One of the hot regions is probably a compact hot core, which is located near the southern submillimeter peak and is related to a group of methanol masers at 6.7 GHz. High-excitation lines at other positions may be associated with other hot cores or hot post-shock gas in the lobes of bipolar outflows. The rotation diagrams can be use to determine the column densities and abundances of methanol (10-9) and methyl cyanide (about 10-11) in the quiescent gas. The column densities of A- and E-methanol in L379IRS1 are essentually the same. The column densities of other observedmolecules were calculated assuming that the ratios of the molecular level abundances correspond to a temperature of 40 K. The molecular composition of the quiescent gas is close to that in another region of massive star formation, DR21(OH). The only appreciable difference is that the column density of SO2 in L379IRS1 is at least a factor of 20 lower than the value in DR21(OH). The SO2/CS and SO2/OCS abundance ratios, which can be used as chemical clocks, are lower in L379IRS1 than in DR21(OH), suggesting that L379IRS1 is probably younger than DR21(OH).

  7. A dual-cavity ruby maser for the Ka-band link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J.; Quinn, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    A 33.68-GHz dual-cavity ruby maser was built to support the Ka-Band Link Experiment (KABLE) conducted with the Mars Observer spacecraft. It has 25 dB of net gain and a 3-dB bandwidth of 85 MHz. Its noise temperature in reference to the cooled feedhorn aperture is 5 K.

  8. Monitoring Observatinos of H2O and SiO Masers Toward Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Yoon, Dong-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of simultaneous monitoring observations of H_2O 6_{1,6}-5_{2,3} (22 GHz) and SiO J=1-0, 2-1, 3-2 maser lines (43, 86, 129 GHz) toward five post-AGB (candidate) stars, using the 21-m single-dish telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network. Depending on the target objects, 7 - 11 epochs of data were obtained. We detected both H_2O and SiO maser lines from four sources: OH16.1-0.3, OH38.10-0.13, OH65.5+1.3, and IRAS 19312+1950. We could not detect H_2O maser emission toward OH13.1+5.1 between the late OH/IR and post-AGB stage. The detected H_2O masers show typical double-peaked line profiles. The SiO masers from four sources, except IRAS 19312+1950, show the peaks around the stellar velocity as a single peak, whereas the SiO masers from IRAS 19312+1950 occur above the red peak of the H_2O maser. We analyzed the properties of detected maser lines, and investigated their evolutionary state through comparison with the full widths at zero power. The distribution of observed target sources was also investigated in the IRAS two-color diagram in relation with the evolutionary stage of post-AGB stars. From our analyses, the evolutionary sequence of observed sources is suggested as OH65.5+1.3 → OH13.1+5.1 → OH16.1-0.3 → OH38.10-0.13, except for IRAS 19312+1950. In addition, OH13.1+5.1 from which the H_2O maser has not been detected is suggested to be on the gateway toward the post-AGB stage. With respect to the enigmatic object, IRAS 19312+1950, we could not clearly figure out its nature. To properly explain the unusual phenomena of SiO and H_2O masers, it is essential to establish the relative locations and spatial distributions of two masers using VLBI technique. We also include the 1.2 - 160 μm spectral energy distribution using photometric data from the following surveys: 2MASS, WISE, MSX, IRAS, and AKARI (IRC and FIS). In addition, from the IRAS LRS spectra, we found that the depth of silicate absorption features shows significant variations

  9. Location of H2O maser in the double-nuclei system of NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Diamond, P. J.; Miyoshi, M.

    2003-03-01

    We performed VLA observations of the 22 GHz H2O; maser emission in the merging galaxy NGC 6240, which hosts the well-known double active nuclei. In a previous paper, we reported on the first solid detection of the H2O; maser emission in 2001. After two abortive attempts due to the weakness and probable variability of the emission, the maser was detected with the VLA in June 2002. The emission is unresolved at ~ 0.3 arcsec and coincides with the southern 22 GHz continuum peak to ~ 0.007 arcsec ( ~ 3 pc: D = 97 Mpc). The detection of the maser in the southern nucleus indicates that nuclear activity of the galaxy, which is significant in X-ray and far-infrared (FIR) bands, lies mainly in the southern nucleus, and the nucleus without a high brightness peak could be explained by thick dust emitting FIR radiation. We favour the idea that the maser in NGC 6240 is associated with the AGN-activity.

  10. Nanosecond time-resolved characterization of a pentacene-based room-temperature MASER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, Enrico; Breeze, Jonathan D.; Tan, Ke-Jie; Sathian, Juna; Richards, Benjamin; Fung, Mei Wai; Wolfowicz, Gary; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil Mcn.; Kay, Christopher W. M.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of a room temperature, zero-field MASER operating at 1.45 GHz has been examined. Nanosecond laser pulses, which are essentially instantaneous on the timescale of the spin dynamics, allow the visible-to-microwave conversion efficiency and temporal response of the MASER to be measured as a function of excitation energy. It is observed that the timing and amplitude of the MASER output pulse are correlated with the laser excitation energy: at higher laser energy, the microwave pulses have larger amplitude and appear after shorter delay than those recorded at lower laser energy. Seeding experiments demonstrate that the output variation may be stabilized by an external source and establish the minimum seeding power required. The dynamics of the MASER emission may be modeled by a pair of first order, non-linear differential equations, derived from the Lotka-Volterra model (Predator-Prey), where by the microwave mode of the resonator is the predator and the spin polarization in the triplet state of pentacene is the prey. Simulations allowed the Einstein coefficient of stimulated emission, the spin-lattice relaxation and the number of triplets contributing to the MASER emission to be estimated. These are essential parameters for the rational improvement of a MASER based on a spin-polarized triplet molecule.

  11. Nanosecond time-resolved characterization of a pentacene-based room-temperature MASER

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Enrico; Breeze, Jonathan D.; Tan, Ke-Jie; Sathian, Juna; Richards, Benjamin; Fung, Mei Wai; Wolfowicz, Gary; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN.; Kay, Christopher W. M.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of a room temperature, zero-field MASER operating at 1.45 GHz has been examined. Nanosecond laser pulses, which are essentially instantaneous on the timescale of the spin dynamics, allow the visible-to-microwave conversion efficiency and temporal response of the MASER to be measured as a function of excitation energy. It is observed that the timing and amplitude of the MASER output pulse are correlated with the laser excitation energy: at higher laser energy, the microwave pulses have larger amplitude and appear after shorter delay than those recorded at lower laser energy. Seeding experiments demonstrate that the output variation may be stabilized by an external source and establish the minimum seeding power required. The dynamics of the MASER emission may be modeled by a pair of first order, non-linear differential equations, derived from the Lotka-Volterra model (Predator-Prey), where by the microwave mode of the resonator is the predator and the spin polarization in the triplet state of pentacene is the prey. Simulations allowed the Einstein coefficient of stimulated emission, the spin-lattice relaxation and the number of triplets contributing to the MASER emission to be estimated. These are essential parameters for the rational improvement of a MASER based on a spin-polarized triplet molecule. PMID:28169331

  12. Nanosecond time-resolved characterization of a pentacene-based room-temperature MASER.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Enrico; Breeze, Jonathan D; Tan, Ke-Jie; Sathian, Juna; Richards, Benjamin; Fung, Mei Wai; Wolfowicz, Gary; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN; Kay, Christopher W M

    2017-02-07

    The performance of a room temperature, zero-field MASER operating at 1.45 GHz has been examined. Nanosecond laser pulses, which are essentially instantaneous on the timescale of the spin dynamics, allow the visible-to-microwave conversion efficiency and temporal response of the MASER to be measured as a function of excitation energy. It is observed that the timing and amplitude of the MASER output pulse are correlated with the laser excitation energy: at higher laser energy, the microwave pulses have larger amplitude and appear after shorter delay than those recorded at lower laser energy. Seeding experiments demonstrate that the output variation may be stabilized by an external source and establish the minimum seeding power required. The dynamics of the MASER emission may be modeled by a pair of first order, non-linear differential equations, derived from the Lotka-Volterra model (Predator-Prey), where by the microwave mode of the resonator is the predator and the spin polarization in the triplet state of pentacene is the prey. Simulations allowed the Einstein coefficient of stimulated emission, the spin-lattice relaxation and the number of triplets contributing to the MASER emission to be estimated. These are essential parameters for the rational improvement of a MASER based on a spin-polarized triplet molecule.

  13. Excited-state hydroxyl maser polarimetry: who ate all the πs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present polarimetric maser observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of excited-state hydroxyl (OH) masers. We observed 30 fields of OH masers in full Stokes polarization with the Compact Array Broadband Backend at both the 6030 and 6035 MHz excited-state OH transitions, and the 6668 MHz methanol maser transition, detecting 70 sites of maser emission. Amongst the OH we found 112 Zeeman pairs, of which 18 exhibited candidate π components. This is the largest single full polarimetric study of multiple sites of star formation for these frequencies, and the rate of 16 per cent π components clearly indicates that the π component exists, and is comparable to the percentage recently found for ground-state transitions. This significant percentage of π components, with consistent proportions at both ground- and excited-state transitions, argues against Faraday rotation suppressing the π component emission. Our simultaneous observations of methanol found the expected low level of polarization, with no circular detected, and linear only found at the ≤10 per cent level for the brightest sources.

  14. The physics of water masers observable with ALMA and SOFIA: model predictions for evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, M. D.; Baudry, A.; Richards, A. M. S.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Yates, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of models that were designed to study all possible water maser transitions in the frequency range 0-1.91 THz, with particular emphasis on maser transitions that may be generated in evolved-star envelopes and observed with the ALMA and SOFIA telescopes. We used tens of thousands of radiative transfer models of both spin-species of H2O, spanning a considerable parameter space in number density, kinetic temperature and dust temperature. Results, in the form of maser optical depths, have been summarized in a master table. Maser transitions identified in these models were grouped according to loci of inverted regions in the density/kinetic temperature plane, a property clearly related to the dominant mode of pumping. A more detailed study of the effect of dust temperature on maser optical depth enabled us to divide the maser transitions into three groups: those with both collisional and radiative pumping schemes (22, 96, 209, 321, 325, 395, 941 and 1486 GHz), a much larger set that are predominantly radiatively pumped, and another large group with a predominantly collisional pump. The effect of accelerative and decelerative velocity shifts of up to 5 km s-1 was found to be generally modest, with the primary effect of reducing computed maser optical depths. More subtle asymmetric effects, dependent on line overlap, include maximum gains offset from zero shift by >1 km s-1, but these effects were predominantly found under conditions of weak amplification. These models will allow astronomers to use multitransition water maser observations to constrain physical conditions down to the size of individual masing clouds (size of a few astronomical units).

  15. A Survey for Water Maser Emission toward Planetary Nebulae: New Detection in IRAS 17347-3139

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Gómez, Yolanda; Anglada, Guillem; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Miranda, Luis F.; Gómez, José F.; Torrelles, José M.

    2004-02-01

    We report on a water maser survey toward a sample of 27 planetary nebulae (PNe) using the Robledo de Chavela and Medicina single-dish antennas, as well as the Very Large Array (VLA). Two detections have been obtained: the already known water maser emission in K3-35, and a new cluster of masers in IRAS 17347-3139. This low rate of detections is compatible with the short lifetime of water molecules in PNe (~100 yr). The water maser cluster at IRAS 17347-3139 are distributed on a ellipse of size ~=0.2"×0.1", spatially associated with compact 1.3 cm continuum emission (simultaneously observed with the VLA). From archive VLA continuum data at 4.9, 8.4, and 14.9 GHz, a spectral index α=0.76+/-0.03 (Sν~να) is derived for this radio source, which is consistent with either a partially optically thick ionized region or an ionized wind. However, the latter scenario can be ruled out by mass-loss considerations, thus indicating that this source is probably a young PN. The spatial distribution and the radial velocities of the water masers are suggestive of a rotating and expanding maser ring, tracing the innermost regions of a torus formed at the end of the asymptotic giant branch phase. Given that the 1.3 cm continuum emission peak is located near one of the tips of the major axis of the ellipse of masers, we speculate on a possible binary nature of IRAS 17347-3139, where the radio continuum emission could belong to one of the components and the water masers would be associated with a companion.

  16. Intermittent maser flare around the high-mass young stellar object G353.273+0.641

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Kazuhito; Sorai, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Kenta; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Honma, Mareki

    2012-07-01

    The water maser site associated with G353.273+0.641 is classified as a dominant blueshifted H2O maser, which shows an extremely wide velocity range (+/- 100 km s-1) with almost all flux concentrated in the highly blueshifted emission. The previous study has proposed that this peculiar H2O maser site is excited by a pole-on jet from high mass protostellar object. We report on the monitoring of 22-GHz H2O maser emission from G353.273+0.641 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) and the Tomakamai 11-m radio telescope. Our VLBI imaging has shown that all maser features are distributed within a very small area of 200 × 200 au2, in spite of the wide velocity range (> 100 km s-1). The light curve obtained by weekly single-dish monitoring shows notably intermittent variation. We have detected three maser flares during three years. Frequent VLBI monitoring has revealed that these flare activities have been accompanied by a significant change of the maser alignments. We have also detected synchronized linear acceleration (-5 km s-1yr-1) of two isolated velocity components, suggesting a lower-limit momentum rate of 10-3 M⊙ km s-1yr-1 for the maser acceleration. All our results support the previously proposed pole-on jet scenario, and finally, a radio jet itself has been detected in our follow-up ATCA observation. If highly intermittent maser flares directly reflect episodic jet-launchings, G353.273+0.641 and similar dominant blueshifted water maser sources can be suitable targets for a time-resolved study of high mass protostellar jet.

  17. Detection of 183 GHz H2O megamaser emission towards NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, E. M. L.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Galametz, M.; Olberg, M.; Conway, J. E.; Belitsky, V.; De Breuck, C.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to search Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4945, a well-known 22 GHz water megamaser galaxy, for H2O (mega)maser emission at 183 GHz. Methods: We used APEX SEPIA Band 5 (an ALMA Band 5 receiver on the APEX telescope) to perform the observations. Results: We detected 183 GHz H2O maser emission towards NGC 4945 with a peak flux density of ~3 Jy near the galactic systemic velocity. The emission spans a velocity range of several hundred km s-1. We estimate an isotropic luminosity of >1000 L⊙, classifying the emission as a megamaser. A comparison of the 183 GHz spectrum with that observed at 22 GHz suggests that 183 GHz emission also arises from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) central engine. If the 183 GHz emission originates from the circumnuclear disk, then we estimate that a redshifted feature at 1084 km s-1 in the spectrum should arise from a distance of 0.022 pc from the supermassive black hole (1.6 × 105 Schwarzschild radii), i.e. closer than the water maser emission previously detected at 22 GHz. This is only the second time 183 GHz maser emission has been detected towards an AGN central engine (the other galaxy being NGC 3079). It is also the strongest extragalactic millimetre/submillimetre water maser detected to date. Conclusions: Strong millimetre 183 GHz H2O maser emission has now been shown to occur in an external galaxy. For NGC 4945, we believe that the maser emission arises, or is dominated by, emission from the AGN central engine. Emission at higher velocity, i.e. for a Keplerian disk closer to the black hole, has been detected at 183 GHz compared with that for the 22 GHz megamaser. This indicates that millimetre/submillimetre H2O masers can indeed be useful for tracing out more of AGN central engine structures and dynamics than previously probed. Future observations using ALMA Band 5 should unequivocally determine the origin of the emission in this and other galaxies.

  18. Merging Maser and Cesium Clocks in Timescales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    OCT 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Merging Maser And Cesium Clocks In Timescales 5a...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Merging Maser and Cesium Clocks In Timescales Demetrios...recent maser data relatively higher than older maser data. A Kalman Filter could assign different phase, frequency, and frequency drift process

  19. WIDESPREAD METHANOL EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE ROLE OF COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Royster, M.; Cotton, W.; Viti, S.; Wardle, M.

    2013-02-20

    We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4{sub -1} to 3{sub 0} E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66' Multiplication-Sign 18' (160 Multiplication-Sign 43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of 16.6 km s{sup -1} taken from 41 channels of a Very Large Array continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2-1) and CH{sub 3}OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km s{sup -1} clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25 + 0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H{sub 2}. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH{sub 3}OH abundance of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7} on a chemical timescale of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years. The average methanol abundance produced by the release of methanol from grain surfaces is consistent with the available data.

  20. OH Observations in the Direction of H2O Masers in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, F. F.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    1985-07-01

    1.6-GHz OH observations have been made towards five LMC H II regions that have been associated with H2O maser emission. Circularly polarized maser emission was observed in two cases, 0510-689 and 0540-696B, but not towards 0540-697A (N159), where emission had been previously reported. Weak OH absorption was detected for two regions (0539-691 and 0540-697A) and possibly a third (0540-696). The optical depths are low (around 0.01), providing additional evidence that molecular densities in the LMC are signficantly lower than in our Galaxy.

  1. Radiative transfer in astronomical masers. III - Filamentary masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Mckee, Christopher F.; Hollenbach, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The complete solution of a filamentary maser is presented. An integral equation and an iterative procedure are developed to calculate and solve the contribution of rays emanating from the filament sidewall. The solution provides complete expressions for the distributions of intensity and flux across the source as functions of position and direction with regard to the axis. The results are used to find the number distribution of brightness temperature in a large sample of randomly oriented filaments with an arbitrary distribution of lengths. The effects of external radiation on the maser structure and intensity are studied. It is proposed that the two giant bursts of H2O maser emission observed in W49 and Orion resulted from the interaction or two interacting filaments and a foreground slab amplifying a background filament.

  2. Water masers in dusty environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkovskaia, N.; Poutanen, J.

    2004-04-01

    We study in detail a pumping mechanism for the λ=1.35 cm maser transition 616 -> 523 in ortho-H2O based on the difference between gas and dust temperatures. The upper maser level is populated radiatively through 414 -> 505 and 505 -> 616 transitions. The heat sink is realized by absorbing the 45 μm photons, corresponding to the 523 -> 414 transition, by cold dust. We compute the inversion of maser level populations in the optically thick medium as a function of the hydrogen concentration, the water-to-dust mass ratio, and the difference between the gas and the dust temperatures. The main results of the numerical simulations are interpreted in terms of a simplified four-level model. We show that the maser strength depends mostly on the product of hydrogen concentration and the dust-to-water mass ratio but not on the size distribution of the dust particles or their type. We also suggest approximate formulae that describe accurately the inversion and can be used for fast calculations of the maser luminosity. Depending on the gas temperature, the maximum maser luminosity is reached when the water concentration NH_2O approx 106-107 cm-3 times the dust-to-hydrogen mass ratio, and the inversion completely disappears at densities just an order of magnitude larger. For a dust temperature of 130 K, the 616 -> 523 transition becomes inverted already at a temperature difference of Δ T˜ 1 K, while other possible masing transitions require a larger Δ T⪆ 30 K. We identify the region of the parameter space where other ortho- and para-water masing transitions can appear.

  3. MAGMO: Mapping the Galactic Magnetic field through OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Caswell, James L.; Robishaw, Tim; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Mao, Sui Ann

    2015-03-01

    We are undertaking a project (MAGMO) to examine large-scale magnetic fields pervading regions of high-mass star formation. The project will test if the orientations of weak large-scale magnetic fields can be maintained in the contraction (and field amplification) to the high densities encountered in high-mass star forming regions. This will be achieved through correlating targeted observations of ground-state hydroxyl (OH) maser emission towards hundreds of sites of high-mass star formation spread throughout the spiral arms of the Milky Way. Through the Zeeman splitting of the OH maser emission these observations will determine the strength and orientation of the in-situ magnetic field. The completion of the southern hemisphere Methanol Multibeam survey has provided an abundance of targets for ground-state OH maser observations, approximately 1000 sites of high-mass star formation. With this sample, much larger and more homogeneous than previously available, we will have the statistics necessary to outweigh random fluctuations and observe an underlying Galactic magnetic field if it exists. We presented details of the overall progress of the project illustrated by the results of a pilot sample of sources towards the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm tangent, where a coherent field is implied.

  4. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    In house research and development at Goddard Space Flight Center to provide advanced frequency and time standards for the most demanding applications is concentrated primarily in field operable atomic hydrogen masers. Some of the most important goals for the new maser designs have been improved long and short term stability, elimination of the need for auto tuning, increased maser oscillation level, improved hydrogen economy, increased operational life, minimization of operator control or monitoring, improvement in magnetic isolation or sensitivity, and reduction in size and weight. New design concepts which have been incorporated in these masers to achieve these goals are described. The basic maser assemblies and control systems have recently been completed; the masers are oscillating; and operational testing has begun. Data illustrating the improvements in maser performance was available and presented.

  5. Analysis of NTSC's Timekeeping Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. J.; Dong, S. W.; Wang, Z. M.; Qu, L. L.; Jing, Y. J.; Li, W.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the hydrogen masers were tested in NTSC (National Time Service Center) keeping time laboratory. In order to avoid the impact of larger noise of caesium atomic clocks, TA(k) or UTC(k) was not used as reference, and four hydrogen masers were mutually referred and tested. The frequency stabilities of hydrogen masers were analyzed by using four-cornered hat method, and the Allan standard deviation of single hydrogen maser was estimated in different sampling time. Then according to the characteristics of hydrogen masers, by removing the trend term, excluding outliers, and smoothing data with mathematical methods to separate the Gaussian noise of hydrogen masers, and finally through the normal Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, a single hydrogen maser's Gaussian noise has been estimated.

  6. An Analysis of NTSC's Timekeeping Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-jie, Song; Shao-wu, Dong; Zheng-ming, Wang; Li-li, Qu; Yue-juan, Jing; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    In this article, the hydrogen masers in the NTSC (National Time Service Center) timekeeping laboratory are tested. In order to avoid the impact of larger noise of caesium atomic clocks, TA(k) or UTC(k) is not used as reference, instead, the four hydrogen masers are mutually referred and tested. The frequency stability of hydrogen masers is analyzed using the four-cornered hat method, and the Allan standard deviations of each single hydrogen maser in different sample times are estimated. Then, according to the characteristics of hydrogen masers, by removing the trend term, excluding outliers, and smoothing the data with a mathematical method to separate the Gaussian noises of hydrogen masers, and finally by through the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Gaussian noise of each hydrogen maser is estimated.

  7. Measuring the Distance of VX Sagittarii with SiO Maser Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Ye

    2007-08-01

    We report on 43 GHz v=1, J=1--0 SiO maser proper motions in the circumstellar envelope of the M-type semi-regular variable star VX Sgr, observed by Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 3 epochs during 1999 April--May. Applying the statistical parallax analysis to these proper motions, we estimated a distance of VX Sgr of 1.57±0.27 kpc, which is consistent with that based on the proper motions of H2O masers, or on the assumption that VX Sgr belongs to the Sgr OB1 association. At this distance, VX Sgr can be classified as a red supergiant. Comparing the statistical parallax method with those of model fitting and annual parallax, we think that the statistical parallax method may be a good way of estimating SiO maser distances at present.

  8. A Circumstellar H2O Maser Associated With the Galactic Circumnuclear Molecular Disk?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Deborah A.

    1995-01-01

    In the course of conducting a survey of 22-GHzH2O masers in the inner galaxy, we discovered a maser source in Sgr A West. It is located 30'N and 35'E of Sgr A*, near the edge of the Eastern arm of the radio mini-spiral, which presumably coincides with the inside edge of the circumnuclear disk. Furthermore, the radial velocity of the maser is remarkably similar to that expected for gas in the circumnuclear disk at this location. We have also found a luminous, reddened star having a bolometric magnitude and IR spectrum characteristic of an M supergiant at this location. The extinction is consistent with a location in the inner galaxy, near or possibly within the circumnuclear disk. If this star is associated with the circumnuclear disk, it will have implications for star formation in the unusual galactic center environment.

  9. FORMALDEHYDE MASERS: EXCLUSIVE TRACERS OF HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Brown, J. E.; Olmi, L.; Ortiz, J. Morales; Hofner, P.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.

    2015-11-15

    The detection of four formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) maser regions toward young high-mass stellar objects in the last decade, in addition to the three previously known regions, calls for an investigation of whether H{sub 2}CO masers are an exclusive tracer of young high-mass stellar objects. We report the first survey specifically focused on the search for 6 cm H{sub 2}CO masers toward non high-mass star-forming regions (non HMSFRs). The observations were conducted with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope toward 25 low-mass star-forming regions, 15 planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars, and 31 late-type stars. We detected no H{sub 2}CO emission in our sample of non HMSFRs. To check for the association between high-mass star formation and H{sub 2}CO masers, we also conducted a survey toward 22 high-mass star-forming regions from a Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey) sample known to harbor 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers. We detected a new 6 cm H{sub 2}CO emission line in G32.74−0.07. This work provides further evidence that supports an exclusive association between H{sub 2}CO masers and young regions of high-mass star formation. Furthermore, we detected H{sub 2}CO absorption toward all Hi-GAL sources, and toward 24 low-mass star-forming regions. We also conducted a simultaneous survey for OH (4660, 4750, 4765 MHz), H110α (4874 MHz), HCOOH (4916 MHz), CH{sub 3}OH (5005 MHz), and CH{sub 2}NH (5289 MHz) toward 68 of the sources in our sample of non HMSFRs. With the exception of the detection of a 4765 MHz OH line toward a pre-planetary nebula (IRAS 04395+3601), we detected no other spectral line to an upper limit of 15 mJy for most sources.

  10. A CLASS I AND CLASS II CH{sub 3}OH MASER SURVEY OF EGOs FROM THE GLIMPSE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Churchwell, E.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.

    2009-09-10

    We present the results of a high angular resolution Very Large Array (VLA) Class I 44 GHz and Class II 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser survey of a sample of {approx}20 massive young stellar object (MYSO) outflow candidates selected on the basis of extended 4.5 {mu}m emission in Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire images. These 4.5 {mu}m selected candidates are referred to as extended green objects (EGOs), for the common coding of this band as green in three-color Infrared Array Camera images. The detection rate of 6.7 GHz Class II CH{sub 3}OH masers, which are associated exclusively with massive YSOs, toward EGOs is {approx}>64%-nearly double the detection rate of surveys using other MYSO selection criteria. The detection rate of Class I 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers, which trace molecular outflows, is {approx}89% toward EGOs associated with 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers. The two types of CH{sub 3}OH masers exhibit different spatial distributions: 6.7 GHz masers are centrally concentrated and usually coincide with 24 {mu}m emission, while 44 GHz masers are widely distributed and generally trace diffuse 4.5 {mu}m features. We also present results of a complementary James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) single-pointing molecular line survey of EGOs in the outflow tracers HCO{sup +}(3-2) and SiO(5-4). The HCO{sup +} line profiles and high SiO detection rate (90%) are indicative of the presence of active outflows. No 44 GHz continuum emission is detected at the 5 mJy beam{sup -1} (5{sigma}) level toward 95% of EGOs surveyed, excluding bright ultracompact H II regions as powering sources for the 4.5 {mu}m outflows. The results of our surveys constitute strong evidence that EGOs are young, massive YSOs, with active outflows, presumably powered by ongoing accretion.

  11. TWO EPOCHS OF VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE ACTIVE GALAXY NGC 6240

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki

    2010-12-15

    Studies of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission from the merging galaxy NGC 6240 with double nuclei are presented. Two epochs of Very Large Array (VLA) observations in the A-configuration in spectral-line mode were carried out at 0.1 arcsec resolution by covering the redshifted velocity range of {approx}300 km s{sup -1} with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The purpose of these new observations is twofold: to detect an H{sub 2}O maser that an earlier VLA observation pinpointed in the southern nucleus in the northern nucleus as well to clarify the kinematics of the double nuclei, and to understand the origin of the maser in the galaxy. In the second epoch, one velocity feature peaking at V{sub LSR} = 7491.1 km s{sup -1}, redshifted by {approx}200 km s{sup -1} relative to the systemic velocity, was detected only toward the southern nucleus. The detection of an H{sub 2}O maser feature at or near this velocity had never been reported in earlier observations. However, including the known velocity features at redshifted velocities, no other velocity features were observed toward either nuclei throughout these epochs. The maser remains unresolved at an angular resolution of {approx}0.''1, corresponding to a linear size of less than about 45 pc. The two epochs of VLA observations show that the maser intensity is variable on timescales of at least three months, while the correlation between the maser intensity and the radio continuum intensity is not certain from our data. It is plausible that the maser in NGC 6240 is associated with the activity of an active galactic nucleus in the southern nucleus. Alternatively, the maser can be explained by star-forming activity at the site of massive star formation in the galaxy.

  12. Cyclotron resonance maser experiment in a nondispersive waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.; Drori, R.

    1996-06-01

    A cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) oscillator experiment in which a spiraling electron beam interacts with a transverse electromagnetic wave in a nondispersive waveguide is presented. The experiment employs a low-energy low-current electron beam in a two-wire (Lecher type) waveguide. The microwave output frequency is tuned in this experiment by the axial magnetic field in the range 3.5--6.0 GHz. A second harmonic emission is observed at {approximately}7 GHz. CRM theory shows that in a free-space TEM-mode interaction, the gain might be canceled due to the equal and opposite effects of the axial (Weibel) and the azimuthal bunching mechanisms. This balance is violated in the large transverse velocity regime (V{sub {perpendicular}} {much_gt} V{sub z}) in which the experiment operates. The tunability measurements of the CRM oscillator experiment in the nondispersive waveguide are discussed in view of the CRM theory.

  13. MASERS (CHAPTERS I THRU III),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This work was provided in order to illustrate the possibility of creation of a maser by use of inversional transitions in a beam of heavy ammonia ND3...radiation of such a generator at frequency of 1656.18 Mc. (line J = 6, K = 6 of inversional spectrum of ND3) constitutes a magnitude of the order of

  14. Room-temperature solid-state maser.

    PubMed

    Oxborrow, Mark; Breeze, Jonathan D; Alford, Neil M

    2012-08-16

    The invention of the laser has resulted in many innovations, and the device has become ubiquitous. However, the maser, which amplifies microwave radiation rather than visible light, has not had as large an impact, despite being instrumental in the laser's birth. The maser's relative obscurity has mainly been due to the inconvenience of the operating conditions needed for its various realizations: atomic and free-electron masers require vacuum chambers and pumping; and solid-state masers, although they excel as low-noise amplifiers and are occasionally incorporated in ultrastable oscillators, typically require cryogenic refrigeration. Most realizations of masers also require strong magnets, magnetic shielding or both. Overcoming these various obstacles would pave the way for improvements such as more-sensitive chemical assays, more-precise determinations of biomolecular structure and function, and more-accurate medical diagnostics (including tomography) based on enhanced magnetic resonance spectrometers incorporating maser amplifiers and oscillators. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a solid-state maser operating at room temperature in pulsed mode. It works on a laboratory bench, in air, in the terrestrial magnetic field and amplifies at around 1.45 gigahertz. In contrast to the cryogenic ruby maser, in our maser the gain medium is an organic mixed molecular crystal, p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, the latter being photo-excited by yellow light. The maser's pumping mechanism exploits spin-selective molecular intersystem crossing into pentacene's triplet ground state. When configured as an oscillator, the solid-state maser's measured output power of around -10 decibel milliwatts is approximately 100 million times greater than that of an atomic hydrogen maser, which oscillates at a similar frequency (about 1.42 gigahertz). By exploiting the high levels of spin polarization readily generated by intersystem crossing in photo-excited pentacene and other

  15. Water masers in the Kronian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebenko, Sergei V.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Elitzur, Moshe; Cosmovici, Cristiano B.; Avruch, Ian M.; Pluchino, Salvatore; Montebugnoli, Stelio; Salerno, Emma; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Mujunen, Ari; Ritakari, Jouko; Molera, Guifre; Wagner, Jan; Uunila, Minttu; Cimo, Giuseppe; Schilliro, Francesco; Bartolini, Marco

    The presence of water has been considered for a long time as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini mission discovered water vapour in the Kronian system by detecting absorption of UV emission from a background star (Hansen et al. 2006). Prompted by this discovery, we started an observational campaign for search of another manifestation of the water vapour in the Kronian system, its maser emission at the frequency of 22 GHz (1.35 cm wavelength). Observations with the 32 m Medicina radio telescope (INAF-IRA, Italy) started in 2006 using Mk5A data recording and the JIVE-Huygens software correlator. Later on, an on-line spectrometer was used at Medicina. The 14 m Metsähovi radio telescope (TKK-MRO, Finland) joined the observational campaign in 2008 using a locally developed data capture unit and software spectrometer. More than 300 hours of observations were collected in 2006-2008 campaign with the two radio telescopes. The data were analysed at JIVE using the Doppler tracking technique to compensate the observed spectra for the radial Doppler shift for various bodies in the Kronian system (Pogrebenko et al. 2009). Here we report the observational results for Hyperion, Titan, Enceladus and Atlas, and their physical interpretation. Encouraged by these results we started a campaign of follow up observations including other radio telescopes.

  16. Temperature-Control Apparatus For Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-control apparatus maintains hydrogen maser at nearly constant temperature during long-term operational test. Designed to maintain, in small cylindrical vacuum tank containing maser, nearly isothermal condition when test conducted in air. Provides approximation of more nearly isothermal condition expected to be maintained in intended application, in which maser operated in vacuum environment and losses of heat reduced further by multilayer reflective insulation.

  17. Water maser variability over 20 years in a large sample of star-forming regions: the complete database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felli, M.; Brand, J.; Cesaroni, R.; Codella, C.; Comoretto, G.; Di Franco, S.; Massi, F.; Moscadelli, L.; Nesti, R.; Olmi, L.; Palagi, F.; Panella, D.; Valdettaro, R.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Water vapor emission at 22 GHz from masers associated with star-forming regions is highly variable. Aims: We present a database of up to 20 years of monitoring of a sample of 43 masers within star-forming regions. The sample covers a large range of luminosities of the associated IRAS source and is representative of the entire population of H2O masers of this type. The database forms a good starting point for any further study of H2O maser variability. Methods: The observations were obtained with the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, at a rate of 4-5 observations per year. Results: To provide a database that can be easily accessed through the web, we give for each source: plots of the calibrated spectra, the velocity-time-flux density plot, the light curve of the integrated flux, the lower and upper envelopes of the maser emission, the mean spectrum, and the rate of the maser occurrence as a function of velocity. Figures for just one source are given in the text for representative purposes. Figures for all the sources are given in electronic form the appendix. A discussion of the main properties of the H2O variability in our sample will be presented in a forthcoming paper. Based on observations with the Medicina radiotelescope operated by INAF - Istituto di Radioastronomia.

  18. SiO Maser Emission in Miras

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 394, 51–66 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14237.x SiO maser emission in Miras M. D. Gray,1 M. Wittkowski,2 M. Scholz...October 27; in original form 2008 September 1 ABSTRACT We describe a combined dynamic atmosphere and maser propagation model of SiO maser emission in...brightest at an optical phase of 0.1–0.25, which is consistent with observed phase lags. Dust can have both mild and profound effects on the maser emission

  19. Design of a tunable 4-MW Free Electron Maser for heating fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kamin, G.; Shang, C.C.; Lindquist, W.

    1993-09-01

    There is an ongoing program at the FOM institute, The Netherlands, to develop a 1-MW, long-pulse, 200-Ghz Free Electron Maser (FEM) using a DC accelerator system with depressed collector. We present an extrapolation of this design to more than 4MW of output microwave power in order to reduce the cost per kW and increase the power per module in a plasma heating system.

  20. Design and analysis of optically pumped submillimeter waveguide maser amplifiers and oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    The design and experimental measurements are described of an optically pumped far-infrared (FIR) waveguide maser; preliminary measurements on a FIR waveguide amplifier are presented. The FIR maser was found to operate satisfactorily in a chopped CW mode using either methanol (CH3OH) or acetonitrile (CH3CN) as the active molecule. Two other gases, difluoroethane and difluoroethylene, produced an unstable output with high threshold and low output power when operated in the chopped CW mode. Experimental measurements include FIR output versus cavity length, output beam pattern, output power versus pressure, and input power. The FIR output was the input to an amplifier which was constructed similar to the oscillator. An increase of 10% in output power was noted on the 118.8 microns line of methanol.

  1. THE PROTOCLUSTER G18.67+0.03: A TEST CASE FOR CLASS I CH{sub 3}OH MASERS AS EVOLUTIONARY INDICATORS FOR MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Zhang, Q.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Friesen, R. K.; Indebetouw, R.; Chandler, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the massive protocluster G18.67+0.03. Previously targeted in maser surveys of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects (EGOs), this cluster contains three Class I CH{sub 3}OH maser sources, providing a unique opportunity to test the proposed role of Class I masers as evolutionary indicators for massive star formation. The millimeter observations reveal bipolar molecular outflows, traced by {sup 13}CO(2-1) emission, associated with all three Class I maser sources. Two of these sources (including the EGO) are also associated with 6.7 GHz Class II CH{sub 3}OH masers; the Class II masers are coincident with millimeter continuum cores that exhibit hot core line emission and drive active outflows, as indicated by the detection of SiO(5-4). In these cases, the Class I masers are coincident with outflow lobes, and appear as clear cases of excitation by active outflows. In contrast, the third Class I source is associated with an ultracompact (UC) H II region, and not with Class II masers. The lack of SiO emission suggests that the {sup 13}CO outflow is a relic, consistent with its longer dynamical timescale. Our data show that massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) associated only with Class I masers are not necessarily young and provide the first unambiguous evidence that Class I masers may be excited by both young (hot core) and older (UC H II) MYSOs within the same protocluster.

  2. The Zeeman effect in astrophysical water masers and the observation of strong magnetic fields in regions of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The present study solves the transfer equations for the polarized radiation of astrophysical 22-GHz water masers in the presence of a magnetic field which causes a Zeeman splitting that is much smaller than the spectral line breadth. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between the recently detected circular polarization in this maser radiation and the strength of the magnetic field. When the observed spectral line breadth is smaller than about 0.8 km/s (FWHM), it is calculated that the uncertainty is less than a factor of about 2. The accuracy is improved significantly when the angle between the line of sight and the direction of the magnetic field does not exceed about 45 deg. Uncertainty in the strength of the magnetic field due to lack of knowledge about which hyperfine transition is the source of the 22-GHz masers is removed. The 22-GHz maser feature is found to be the result of a merger of the three strongest hyperfine components.

  3. Hydrogen maser oscillation at 10 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.; Jones, K. M.; Souza, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    A low temperature atomic hydrogen maser was developed using frozen atomic neon as the storage surface. The maser has been operated in the pulsed mode at temperatures from 6 K to 11 K and as a self-excited oscillator from 9 K to 10.5 K.

  4. First experiences with the H-maser EFOS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlueter, W.; Nottarp, K.; Feil, D.; Busca, G.

    1983-01-01

    The results are given on the performance measurements, on the dependence on external temperature, and on external magnetic field of a hydrogen maser. It is compared with another hydrogen maser. Details of the transportation and installation of the maser are given. The hydrogen maser frequency is compared with cesium oscillators to derive long-term behavior.

  5. A kind of small hydrogen maser for time-keeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, Z. C.; Lin, C. F.; He, J. W.; Huang, H. X.; Lu, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A kind of small hydrogen maser standard for timekeeping is being developed at Shanghai Observatory. The maser employs a cylindrical capacitively loaded cavity construction, resulting in significant size and weight reduction compared to a traditional hydrogen maser. The Q of the compact cavity is electronically enhanced by a suitable positive feedback into the cavity to enable sustained maser oscillation. The long-term stability of the maser is improved by a cavity frequency stabilization servo-system. The design and development of the maser, as well as photographs of the new maser system during the construction phase are described.

  6. H2O masers in a jet-driven bow shock: episodic ejection from a massive young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. A.; Handa, T.; Nagayama, T.; Sunada, K.; Omodaka, T.

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) multi-epoch VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) 22 GHz water maser observations of S255IR-SMA1, a massive young stellar object located in the S255 star-forming region. By annual parallax the source distance was measured as D = 1.78^{+0.12}_{-0.11} kpc and the source systemic motion was (μαcos δ, μδ) = (-0.13 ± 0.20, -0.06 ± 0.27) mas yr-1. Masers appear to trace a U-shaped bow shock whose morphology and proper motions are well reproduced by a jet-driven outflow model with a jet radius of about 6 au. The maser data, in the context of other works in the literature, reveal ejections from S255IR-SMA1 to be episodic, operating on time-scales of ˜1000 yr.

  7. WATER MASER SURVEY ON AKARI AND IRAS SOURCES: A SEARCH FOR ''LOW-VELOCITY'' WATER FOUNTAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Imai, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Shuji; Henkel, Christian

    2013-05-20

    We present the results of a 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser survey toward a new sample of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB star candidates. Most of the objects are selected for the first time based on the AKARI data, which have high flux sensitivity in the mid-infrared ranges. We aim at finding H{sub 2}O maser sources in the transient phase between the AGB and post-AGB stages of evolution, where the envelopes start to develop large deviations from spherical symmetry. The observations were carried out with the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope. Among 204 observed objects, 63 detections (36 new) were obtained. We found four objects that may be ''water fountain'' sources (IRAS 15193+3132, IRAS 18056-1514, OH 16.3-3.0, and IRAS 18455+0448). They possess an H{sub 2}O maser velocity coverage much smaller than those in other known water fountains. However, the coverage is still larger than that of the 1612 MHz OH maser. It implies that there is an outflow with a higher velocity than the envelope expansion velocity (typically {<=}25 km s{sup -1}), meeting the criterion of the water fountain class. We suggest that these candidates are possibly oxygen-rich late AGB or early post-AGB stars in a stage of evolution immediately after the spherically symmetric AGB mass loss has ceased.

  8. ON THE NUCLEAR OBSCURATION OF H{sub 2}O MASER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. S.; Guo, Q.; Wang, H. G.; Fan, J. H.; Henkel, C.

    2010-01-10

    To shed light onto the circumnuclear environment of 22 GHz ({lambda} {approx} 1.3 cm) H{sub 2}O maser galaxies, we have analyzed some of their multiwavelength properties, including the far-infrared luminosity (FIR), the luminosity of the [O{sub III}]{lambda}5007 emission line, the nuclear X-ray luminosity, and the equivalent width (EW) of the neutral iron K{alpha} emission line (EW (K{sub {alpha}})). Our statistical analysis includes a total of 85 sources, most of them harboring an active galactic nucleus (AGN). There are strong anticorrelations between EW (K{sub {alpha}}) and two 'optical thickness parameters', i.e., the ratios of the X-ray luminosity versus the presumably more isotropically radiated [O{sub III}] and FIR luminosities. Based on these anticorrelations, a set of quantitative criteria, EW (K{sub {alpha}})>300 eV, L{sub 2-10keV}<2L{sub [O{sub III}]}, and L{sub FIR}>600 L{sub 2-10{sub keV}} can be established for Compton-thick nuclear regions. Eighteen H{sub 2}O maser galaxies belong to this category. There are no obvious correlations between the EW (K{sub a}lpha), the [O{sub III}] luminosity, and the isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity. When comparing samples of Seyfert 2s with and without detected H{sub 2}O maser lines, there seem to exist differences in EW (K{sub {alpha}}) and the fraction of Compton-thick nuclei. This should be studied further. For AGN masers alone, there is no obvious correlation between FIR and H{sub 2}O maser luminosities. However, including masers associated with star-forming regions, a linear correlation is revealed. Overall, the extragalactic FIR-H{sub 2}O data agree with the corresponding relation for Galactic maser sources, extrapolated by several orders of magnitude to higher luminosities.

  9. The Circumstellar Environment of Evolved Stars as Revealed by Studies of Circumstellar Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K.

    1997-11-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) study of water masers located in the extended atmospheres of seven evolved stars. The research was performed using the Very Long Baseline Array and Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Water masers are found to exist in the atmospheres of evolved, oxygen-rich stars where a population inversion of the rotational transition at 22 GHz can be maintained by collisional pumping. The masers are identified as individual pockets or filaments of gas, which have good velocity coherence and may be imaged using radio interferometry. Stellar winds are initiated in these sources by dust formation and acceleration of the gas through momentum coupling. The typical wind speeds in the region of the water masers are 10 to 20 \\kms. The water masers in several evolved stars (VY CMa, VX Sgr, S Per, U Her, IK Tau, RX Boo and NML Cyg) have been observed at three epochs and exhibit proper motions consistent with the assumed source distances and the measured outflow velocity in the water maser region. Estimates of the distance to the sources using statistical approximation are in agreement with the currently accepted distances to the stars. The following stars had reliable distances determined using proper motion data: S Per (2.3 +/- 0.5 kpc), VY CMa (1.4 +/- 0.2 kpc), VX Sgr (1.4 +/- 0.3 kpc). An upper limit for the distance of NML Cyg was obtained ( 3.5 kpc). The remaining stars had too few maser detections (RX BOO, IK Tau) or were not strong enough at all epochs (U Her) to self-calibrate using the VLBA. A detailed kinematic model was used to describe the flow motions of the gas in the maser region. The regions are found to be complex and not well modeled by uniform radial outflow, radial outflow with rotation, or radial outflow with acceleration. The reasons for this are explored and include the probable presence of anisotropic velocity fields induced through non

  10. Frequency stability of maser oscillators operated with cavity Q. [hydrogen and rubidium masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetu, M.; Tremblay, P.; Lesage, P.; Petit, P.; Audoin, C.

    1982-01-01

    The short term frequency stability of masers equipped with an external feedback loop to increase the cavity quality factor was studied. The frequency stability of a hydrogen and a rubidium maser were measured and compared with theoretical evaluation. It is shown that the frequency stability passes through an optimum when the cavity Q is varied. Long term fluctuations are discussed and the optimum mid term frequency stability achievably by small size active and passive H-masers is considered.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 22GHz observations of VX Sgr (Murakawa+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, K.; Yates, J. A.; Richards, A. M. S.; Cohen, R. J.

    2012-07-01

    The 22-GHz H2O maser emission from VX Sgr was observed on 1994 26 and 1999 January 16 for 5 and 7hr, respectively, in both left and right circular polarization, using 5 antennas of MERLIN. (3 data files).

  12. Intensity-dependent circular polarization and circumstellar magnetic fields from the observation of SiO masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A new aspect of the propagation of astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field is described in which circular polarization is created. The resulting antisymmetric spectral line profile for this circular polarization resembles that produced by the ordinary Zeeman effect when the Zeeman splittings are much less than the spectral line breadth. It is caused by the change, with increasing maser intensity, in the axis of symmetry for the molecular quantum states from a direction that is parallel to the magnetic field to a direction that is parallel to the direction of propagation. When the maser is radiatively saturated, and the rate for stimulated emission is within an order of magnitude of the Zeeman splitting in frequency units, this 'intensity-dependent circular polarization' is greater than that due to the ordinary Zeeman effect by factors as large as 1000. The circular polarization that is observed in the spectra of circumstellar SiO (J = 1-0) masers associated with late-type giants and supergiants may then be caused by magnetic fields as weak as about 10 mG. With the standard Zeeman interpretation of the observations, magnetic fields of 10-100 G are indicated. The lower fields are similar to the limits obtained from the observation of the 22 GHz water masers which are typically somewhat further from the central star. The observed tendency for the fractional linear polarization of SiO masers to increase with increasing angular momentum of the molecular state is shown to be a likely result of anisotropic pumping. Errors are identified that invalidate a recent conflicting claim in the literature about the basic theory of maser polarization in the regime that is relevant here.

  13. Hydrogen maser development at Laval University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Racine, G.; Kunski, R.; Picard, M.

    1981-01-01

    The physical construction of two hydrogen masers is described and results of measurements made on one of the masers are given. These include: cavity Q, thermal time constant, line Q, signal power output, magnetic shielding factor. Preliminary results indicate that the frequency stability will be mainly affected by the thermal of the cavity. The magnetic field and the barometric fluctuations should not affect the maser at the stability level above a few parts in 10 to the 15th power, which is the goal for averaging times of several hours.

  14. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-05-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  15. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  16. Performance of Soviet and US hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uljanov, Adolph A.; Demidov, Nikolai A.; Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.; Allan, David W.; Winkler, Gernot M. R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequencies of Soviet- and U.S.-built hydrogen masers located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and at the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) were compared with each other and, via Global Positioning System (GPS) common-view measurements, with three primary frequency-reference scales. The best masers were found to have fractional frequency stabilities as low as 6 times 10(exp -16) for averaging times of approximately 10(exp 4) s. Members of the USNO maser ensemble provided frequency prediction better than 1 times 10(exp 14) for periods up to a few weeks. The frequency residuals of these masers, after removal of frequency drift and rate of change of drift, had stabilities of a few parts in 10(exp -15), with serveral masers achieving residual stabilities well below 1 times 10(exp -15) for intervals from 10(exp 5)s to 2 times 10(exp 6)s. The fractional frequency drifts of the 13 masers studied, relative to the primary reference standards, ranged from -0.2 times 10(exp -15)/day to +9.6 times 10(exp -15)/day.

  17. Hydrogen masers and cesium fountains at NRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, J.-S.; Morris, D.; Douglas, R. J.; Gagne, M.-C.

    1994-01-01

    The NRC masers H-3 and H-4 have been operating since June 1993 with cavity servo control. These low-flux active H masers are showing stabilities of about 10(exp -15) from 1 hour to several days. Stability results are presented, and the current and planned uses of the masers are discussed. A cesium fountain primary frequency standard project has been started at NRC. Trapping and launching experiments with the goal of 7 m/s launches are beginning. We discuss our plans for a local oscillator and servo that exploit the pulsed aspect of cesium fountain standards, and meet the challenge of 10(exp -14) tau(exp -1/2) stability without requiring masers. At best, we expect to run this frequency standard initially for periods of hours each working day rather than continuously for years, and so frequency transfer to outside laboratories has been carefully considered. We conclude that masers (or other even better secondary clocks) are required to exploit this potential accuracy of the cesium fountain. We present and discuss our conclusion that it is feasible to transfer frequency in this way with a transfer-induced uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15), even in the presence of maser frequency drift and random walk noise.

  18. External bulb variable volume maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Cervenka, P. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A maser functioning as a frequency standard stable to one part in 10 to the 14th power includes a variable volume, constant surface area storage bulb having a fixed volume portion located in a resonant cavity from which the frequency standard is derived. A variable volume portion of the bulb, exterior to the resonant cavity, has a maximum volume on the same order of magnitude as the fixed volume bulb portion. The cavity has a length to radius ratio of at least 3:1 so that the operation is attained without the need for a feedback loop. A baffle plate, between the fixed and variable volume bulb portions, includes apertures for enabling hydrogen atoms to pass between the two bulb portions and is an electromagnetic shield that prevents coupling of the electromagnetic field of the cavity into the variable volume bulb portion.

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE WATER MASER EXPANDING SHELL IN W75N VLA 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Soon-Wook; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Honma, Mareki; Sasao, Tesuo; Surcis, Gabriele; Canto, Jorge; Torrelles, Jose M. E-mail: skim@kasi.re.kr

    2013-04-10

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers in the high-mass star-forming region of W75N, carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) for three epochs in 2007 with an angular resolution of {approx}1 mas. We detected H{sub 2}O maser emission toward the radio jet in VLA 1 and the expanding shell-like structure in VLA 2. The spatial distribution of the H{sub 2}O masers detected with VERA and measured proper motions around VLA 1 and VLA 2 are similar to those found with previous VLBI observations in epochs 1999 and 2005, with the masers in VLA 1 mainly distributed along a linear structure parallel to the radio jet and, on the other hand, forming a shell-like structure around VLA 2. We have made elliptical fits to the VLA 2 H{sub 2}O maser shell-like structure observed in the different epochs (1999, 2005, and 2007), and found that the shell is still expanding eight years after its discovery. From the difference in the size of the semi-major axes of the fitted ellipses in epochs 1999 ({approx_equal}71 {+-} 1 mas), 2005 ({approx_equal}97 {+-} 3 mas), and 2007 ({approx_equal}111 {+-} 1 mas), we estimate an average expanding velocity of {approx}5 mas yr{sup -1}, similar to the proper motions measured in the individual H{sub 2}O maser features. A kinematic age of {approx}20 yr is derived for this structure. In addition, our VERA observations indicate an increase in the ellipticity of the expanding shell around VLA 2 from epochs 1999 to 2007. In fact, the elliptical fit of the VERA data shows a ratio of the minor and major axes of {approx}0.6, in contrast with an almost circular shape for the shell detected in 1999 and 2005 (b/a {approx} 0.9). This suggests that we are probably observing the formation of a jet-driven H{sub 2}O maser structure in VLA2, evolving from a non-collimated pulsed-outflow event during the first stages of evolution of a massive young stellar object (YSO). This may support predictions made

  20. A hydrogen maser with cavity auto-tuner for timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; He, J. W.; Zhai, Z. C.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen maser frequency standard for timekeeping was worked on at the Shanghai Observatory. The maser employs a fast cavity auto-tuner, which can detect and compensate the frequency drift of the high-Q resonant cavity with a short time constant by means of a signal injection method, so that the long term frequency stability of the maser standard is greatly improved. The cavity auto-tuning system and some maser data obtained from the atomic time comparison are described.

  1. Extrapolation of the FOM 1MW free electron maser to a multi-megawatt millimeter microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Valentini, M.; Verhoeven, A.; Urbanus, W.; Tulupov, A.

    1996-12-01

    A Free Electron Maser is now under test at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60%. An extrapolated version of this device is proposed, which would produce microwave power levels of up to 5 MW CW. This would allow for practical applications in such diverse areas as space power beaming, heating of fusion plasmas and hearing of high Mach number wind tunnels.

  2. Outward Motions of SiO Masers around VX Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. B.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Chen, X.; Jiang, D. R.

    2014-09-01

    We report the proper motions of SiO maser features around VX Sgr from the two-epoch VLBA observations (2006 December 15 and 2007 August 19). The majority of maser feature activities show a trend of outward motions. It is consistent with our previous finding that the outflow may play an important role for SiO maser pumping.

  3. The magnetic field of IRAS 16293-2422 as traced by shock-induced H2O masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, F. O.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Girart, J. M.; Torrelles, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Shock-induced H2O masers are important magnetic field tracers of very high density gas. Water masers are found in both high- and low-mass star-forming regions, and are a powerful tool for comparing magnetic field morphologies in both mass regimes. Aims: We present one of the first magnetic field determinations for the low-mass protostellar core IRAS 16293-2422 at volume densities as high as 108-10 cm-3. Our goal is to determine wether the collapsing regime of this source is controlled by magnetic fields or other factors such as turbulence. Methods: We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to carry out spectropolarimetric observations of the 22 GHz Zeeman emission from H2O masers. From the Stokes V line profile, we are then able to estimate the magnetic field strength in the dense regions around the protostar. Results: A blend of at least three maser features can be inferred from our relatively high spatial resolution data set (~0.1''), which is reproduced as a clear non-Gaussian line profile. The emission is very stable in terms of polarization fraction and position angle across the channels. The maser spots are aligned with some components of the complex outflow configuration of IRAS 16293-2422, and are excited in zones of compressed gas produced by shocks. The post-shock particle density is in the range of 1-3 × 109 cm-3, consistent with typical water-maser pumping densities. Zeeman emission is produced by a very strong line-of-sight magnetic field (B ~ 113 mG). Conclusions: The magnetic field pressure derived from our data is comparable to the ram pressure of the outflow dynamics. This indicates that the magnetic field is energetically important to the dynamical evolution of IRAS 16293-2422.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 86 and 43GHz observations of NRAO 150 (Agudo+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudo, I.; Bach, U.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Marscher, A. P.; Gonidakis, I.; Diamond, P. J.; Perucho, M.; Alef, W.; Graham, D. A.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Bremer, M.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Barrena, R.

    2008-01-01

    The data set presented here consists of 5 VLBI images at 86GHz taken with the Global mm VLBI Array (GMVA, and its predecessor, the CMVA) covering the time range from October 2001 to April 2004, and 34 Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images taken at 43GHz from June 1997 to February 2007. Among these 34 images, 20 obtained from June 1997 to May 2002 were taken as calibration measurements of the SiO maser monitoring program of TX Cam. A new 8.4GHz VLBA image obtained in June 2002 is also presented here. (3 data files).

  5. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) at three microwave frequencies; 2 GHz, 8 GHz and 22 GHz have been carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34 m farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations is to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars; 3C279 and 3C273B were used for Kashima IPS observations at 2 GHz and 8 GHz, and a water vapor maser source, IRC20431 was used for the IPS observations at 22 GHz. Solar wind velocities derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (R(sub s)) from the sun. Properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from Kashima data are found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with coronal holes are found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declines. Nevertheless, Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  6. Flexible bulb large storage box hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1973-01-01

    The principal limitation on the accuracy of the hydrogen maser as a primary frequency standard has been the irreproducibility of the frequency shift caused by collisions of the radiating atoms with the walls of the vessel containing them. The flexible bulb-large storage box hydrogen maser allows correction for this wall shift within a single device, sidestepping the reproducibility problem, and reducing the frequency error from the wall shift to the level imposed by the device's stability. The principles of the device are discussed including the flexible bulb technique and the complications caused by a multiple region storage bulb. The stability of the device is discussed including a comparison with an ordinary hydrogen maser. Data is presented from a working flexible bulb-large storage box hydrogen maser demonstrating the feasibility of the device and showing some of its operating characteristics. The flexibility of the device is demonstrated by showing how the device's added degrees of freedom allow measurement of parameters unmeasurable in an ordinary hydrogen maser.

  7. Cryogenic masers. [frequency stability and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlinsky, A. J.; Hardy, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    Various factors affecting the frequency stability of hydrogen masers are described and related to maser design parameters. The long-term frequency stability of a hydrogen maser is limited by the mechanical stability of the cavity, and the magnitudes of the wall relaxation, spin exchange, and recombination rates which affect the Q of the line. Magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen atoms at temperatures below 1 K and in containers coated with liquid helium films demonstrated that cryogenic masers may allow substantial improvements in all of these parameters. In particular the thermal expansion coefficients of most materials are negligible at 1 K. Spin exchange broadening is three orders of magnitude smaller at 1 K than at room temperature, and the recombination and wall relaxation rates are negligible at 0.52 K where the frequency shift due to the 4 He-coated walls of the container has a broad minimum as a function of temperature. Other advantages of the helium-cooled maser result from the high purity, homogeneity, and resilence of helium-film-coated walls and the natural compatibility of the apparatus with helium-cooled amplifiers.

  8. First operation of a dielectric-loaded double-stripline free-electron maser experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Einat, M.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-12-31

    A tabletop free-electron maser (FEM) experiment based on a dielectric-loaded double-stripline waveguide is presented. It employs a low-energy (8 keV, 0.5 A) electron beam and a folded-foil wiggler ({lambda}w = 2 cm). Metal striplines protects the dielectric slabs from the electron beam and support quasi-TEM modes in the waveguide. Radiation output is observed at f = 3.5 GHz, in agreement with the dielectric-loaded FEM tuning relation.

  9. Hydrogen Maser Clock (HMC) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hydrogen Maser Clock (HMC) project was originally conceived to fly on a reflight of the European Space Agency (ESA) free flying platform, the European Recoverable Carrier (EURECA) that had been launched into space and recovered by NASA's Space Transportation System (STS). A Phase B study for operation of HMC as one of the twelve EURECA payload components was begun in July 1991, and completed a year later. Phase C/D of HMC began in August 1992 and continued into early 1995. At that time ESA decided not to refly EURECA, leaving HMC without access to space. Approximately 80% of the flight support electronics are presently operating the HMC's physics package in a vacuum tank at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and are now considered to be well-tested flight electronics. The package will continue to be operated until the end of 1997 or until a flight opportunity becomes avaiable. Appendices: letters and trip report; proceedings of the symposium on frequency standards and metrology; milli-celsius-stability thermal control for an orbiting frequency standard.

  10. Stability limit of the cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, A.C.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J. ); Mandel, P. )

    1990-05-28

    It is pointed out that the usual oscillation condition of the H maser is only a necessary condition for steady operation. Reducing the coupled field-matter dynamics to the complex Lorenz equations we derive a second requirement which together with the first forms a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for the steady operation to be stable. The instability of the steady state predicted by the equations should be easily accessible experimentally for the cryogenic H maser. It will be characterized by a pulsed output power which, depending on the detuning, is either periodic or chaotic.

  11. Rubidium 87 gas cell studies, phase 2. [design and characteristics of rubidium maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and characteristics of a rubidium 87 maser are discussed. The design of a receiver capable of locking a crystal oscillator to the maser signal is reported. The subjects considered are: (1) maser construction, (2) maser control electronics, (3) the characteristics of the receiver, and (4) results of experimental maser tests.

  12. VLA positions and distributions of H2O masers associated with 15 Mira and semiregular variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, P. F.; Johnston, K. J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of VLA observations of 22 GHz H2O masers associated with 15 Mira and semiregular variables are reported. The combination of angular resolution (approximately equals 70 mas), spectral resolution (0.3 km/sec), rms sensitivity (+/- 35 mJy/beam), and hour-angle coverage is the best yet obtained for H2O masers from a significant sample of stars. Comparison of accurate optical positions of the stars with estimates from the masers yields total differences typically less than or equal to 0 sec .15-an improvement over previous comparisons by a factor of about 2. There are indications of some combination of nonuniformities in the density distribution, deviations from sphericity, and anisotropies in the velocity field, but it is difficult to disentangle the effects of these phenomena and achieve unique interpretation. A plausible model is clumps or filaments distributed at radii which vary with direction from the star. From the angular distributions and velocity ranges, there is good evidence that at least some parcels of gas are accelerated to the terminal outflow velocity at rho greater than or equal to 20 AU and that there is a component of outflow at rho approximately equals 10 to 15 AU; some gas probably is fully accelerated at radii less than 10 AU. To illustrate the problems of interpretation, the well-known case of VX Sgr is reexamined. The data do not support a simple model of increasing outflow velocity with increasing maser shell radius. It is proposed that the outflow is weakly bipolar.

  13. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.; Giguet, E. |

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  14. Maser and infrared studies of oxygen-rich late/post-asymptotic giant branch stars and water fountains: development of a new identification method

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Henkel, Christian

    2014-10-10

    We explored an efficient method to identify evolved stars with oxygen-rich envelopes in the late asymptotic giant branch (AGB) or post-AGB phase of stellar evolution, which include a rare class of objects—the 'water fountains (WF)'. Our method considers the OH and H{sub 2}O maser spectra, the near-infrared Q-parameters (these are color indices accounting for the effect of extinction), and far-infrared AKARI colors. Here we first present the results of a new survey on OH and H{sub 2}O masers. There were 108 color-selected objects: 53 of them were observed in the three OH maser lines (1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz), with 24 detections (16 new for 1612 MHz); and 106 of them were observed in the H{sub 2}O maser line (22 GHz), with 24 detections (12 new). We identify a new potential WF source, IRAS 19356+0754, with large velocity coverages of both OH and H{sub 2}O maser emission. In addition, several objects with high-velocity OH maser emission are reported for the first time. The Q-parameters as well as the infrared [09]–[18] and [18]–[65] AKARI colors of the surveyed objects are then calculated. We suggest that these infrared properties are effective in isolating aspherical from spherical objects, but the morphology may not necessarily be related to the evolutionary status. Nonetheless, by considering altogether the maser and infrared properties, the efficiency of identifying oxygen-rich late/post-AGB stars could be improved.

  15. Report on the Special Hydrogen Maser Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Derek

    1990-01-01

    This workshop was held as a discussion forum for hydrogen maser problems, particularly for those related to wall shift and wall relaxation effects. Brief summaries of the presentations made by the speakers together with some of the discussion that followed are given. These summaries were derived from tape recordings of the session and from notes.

  16. A database of circumstellar OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, D.; Bunzel, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new database of circumstellar OH masers at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz in the Milky Way galaxy. The database (version 2.4) contains 13 655 observations and 2341 different stars detected in at least one transition. Detections at 1612 MHz are considered to be complete until the end of 2014 as long as they were published in refereed papers. Detections of the main lines (1665 and 1667 MHz) and non-detections in all transitions are included only if published after 1983. The database contains flux densities and velocities of the two strongest maser peaks, the expansion velocity of the shell, and the radial velocity of the star. Links are provided for about 100 stars (<5% of all stars with OH masers) to interferometric observations and monitoring programs of the maser emission published since their beginnings in the 1970s. Access to the database is possible over the Web (http://www.hs.uni-hamburg.de/maserdb), allowing cone searches for individual sources and lists of sources. A general search is possible in selected regions of the sky and by defining ranges of flux densities and/or velocities. Alternative ways to access the data are via the German Virtual Observatory and the CDS. The data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A68

  17. Performance Of Superconducting-Cavity Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi T.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiments on operation of superconducting-cavity maser - all-cryogenic oscillator. Operates with degree of stability, at short measuring times, superior to that achievable by any other means. All components designed for cryogenic operation and stabilizing cavity very rigid, consisting of sapphire filling coated with lead.

  18. ABUNDANT CH{sub 3}OH MASERS BUT NO NEW EVIDENCE FOR STAR FORMATION IN GCM0.253+0.016

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, E. A. C.; Ott, J.; Butterfield, N.; Ludovici, D. A.; Lang, C. C.; Schmitz, S.; Morris, M. R.

    2015-05-20

    We present new observations of the quiescent giant molecular cloud GCM0.253+0.016 in the Galactic center, using the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Observations were made at wavelengths near 1 cm, at the K (24–26 GHz) and Ka (27 and 36 GHz) bands, with velocity resolutions of 1–3 km s{sup −1} and spatial resolutions of ∼0.1 pc, at the assumed 8.4 kpc distance of this cloud. The continuum observations of this cloud are the most sensitive yet made, and reveal previously undetected emission which we attribute primarily to free–free emission from external ionization of the cloud. In addition to the sensitive continuum map, we produce maps of 12 molecular lines: 8 transitions of NH{sub 3}–(1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6), (7, 7), and (9, 9), as well as the HC{sub 3}N (3–2) and (4–3) lines, and CH{sub 3}OH 4{sub −1}–3{sub 0}, the latter of which is known to be a collisionally excited maser. We identify 148 CH{sub 3}OH 4{sub −1}–3{sub 0} (36.2 GHz) sources, of which 68 have brightness temperatures in excess of the highest temperature measured for this cloud (400 K) and can be confirmed to be masers. The majority of these masers are concentrated in the southernmost part of the cloud. We find that neither these masers nor the continuum emission in this cloud provide strong evidence for ongoing star formation in excess of that previously inferred by the presence of an H{sub 2}O maser.

  19. A gravitationally lensed water maser in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, C M Violette; McKean, John P; Castangia, Paola; Roy, Alan L; Henkel, Christian; Brunthaler, Andreas; Wucknitz, Olaf

    2008-12-18

    Water masers are found in dense molecular clouds closely associated with supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies. On the basis of the understanding of the local water-maser luminosity function, it was expected that masers at intermediate and high redshifts would be extremely rare. However, galaxies at redshifts z > 2 might be quite different from those found locally, not least because of more frequent mergers and interaction events. Here we use gravitational lensing to search for masers at higher redshifts than would otherwise be possible, and find a water maser at redshift 2.64 in the dust- and gas-rich, gravitationally lensed type-1 quasar MG J0414+0534 (refs 6-13). The isotropic luminosity is 10,000 (, solar luminosity), which is twice that of the most powerful local water maser and half that of the most distant maser previously known. Using the locally determined luminosity function, the probability of finding a maser this luminous associated with any single active galaxy is 10(-6). The fact that we see such a maser in the first galaxy we observe must mean that the volume densities and luminosities of masers are higher at redshift 2.64.

  20. A superconducting hydrogen maser resonator made from electrophoretic YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Opie, D.; Schone, H. . Dept. of Physics); Hein, M.; Muller, G.; Piel, H.; Wehler, D. ); Folen, V.; Wolf, S. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a compact loop-gap hydrogen maser resonator constructed by electrophoretic deposition of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) onto silver. The resonator is tuned to operate at the hyperfine transition frequency of hydrogen (1.42 GHz). This device is considered to be the first step towards a superconducting cavity for a compact hydrogen maser to be used in the Global Positioning System (GPS). The required miniaturization of the resonator reduces its Q value. This effect can be compensated for by the low surface resistance of YBCO at 77 K. Large and curved polycrystalline YBCO layers can be obtained by the electrophoretic deposition technique. In this contribution we report on the construction and the test of High Temperature Superconductor Space Experiment (HTSSE).

  1. Ground-state OH maser distributions in the Galactic Centre region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Walsh, Andrew J.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Dawson, Joanne R.

    2017-01-01

    Ground-state OH masers identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl were observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to obtain positions with high accuracy (~1 arcsec). We classified these OH masers into evolved star OH maser sites, star formation OH maser sites, supernova remnant OH maser sites, planetary nebula OH maser sites and unknown maser sites using their accurate positions. Evolved star and star formation OH maser sites in the Galactic Centre region (between Galactic longitudes of -5° to +5° and Galactic latitudes of -2° and +2°) were studied in detail to understand their distributions.

  2. Radiative Instabilities in Three-Dimensional Astrophysical Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Inherent instabilities in the radiative transfer for astrophysical masers have been recognized and calculated in the linear maser idealization in our previous investigations. The same instabilities are now shown to occur in the more realistic, three-dimensional geometries. Fluctuations in the emergent flux result and may be related to the observed fluctuations in the radiative flux from the 1665 MHz OH masers that have been reported to occur on timescales as short as 1000 s. The time-dependent differential equations of radiative transfer are solved numerically for three-dimensional astrophysical masers. Computations are performed for spherical and elongated (rectangular parallelepiped) geometries.

  3. Magnetic refrigeration for maser amplifier cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a multifrequency upconverter-maser system for the DSN has created the need to develop a closed-cycle refrigerator (CCR) capable of providing more than 3 watts of refrigeration capability at 4.5 K. In addition, operating concerns such as the high cost of electrical power consumption and the loss of maser operation due to CCR failures require that improvements be made to increase the efficiency and reliability of the CCR. One refrigeration method considered is the replacement of the Joule-Thomson expansion circuit with a magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigerators can provide potentially reliable and highly efficient refrigeration at a variety of temperature ranges and cooling power. The concept of magnetic refrigeration is summarized and a literature review of existing magnetic refrigerator designs which have been built and tested and that may also be considered as possibilities as a 4 K to 15 K magnetic refrigeration stage for the DSN closed-cycle refrigerator is provided.

  4. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts, with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at gigahertz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1033 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Maser emission is a possibility. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron-stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light-crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability time-scale.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water masers in M31. I. Recombination lines (Darling+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, J.; Gerard, B.; Amiri, N.; Lawrence, K.

    2016-09-01

    We constructed a catalog of 506 unresolved 24um sources from the Spitzer 24um map of M31 (Gordon et al. 2006ApJ...638L..87G); see Figure 1. Darling (2011ApJ...732L...2D) observed 206 24um sources in M31 using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in 2010 October through December. The 616-523 22.23508GHz ortho-water maser line observations were reported in Darling (2011ApJ...732L...2D), but simultaneous observations of the para-ammonia (NH3) rotational ground-state inversion transitions in the metastable states (J,K)=(1,1) and (2,2) at 23.6945 and 23.72263GHz, respectively, and the hydrogen recombination line H66α at 22.36417GHz were not. We subsequently observed all four of these lines toward an additional 300 24um sources in 2011 October through 2012 January. The resolution of the 24um Spitzer image is 6" (Gordon et al. 2006ApJ...638L..87G), so the unresolved IR sources remained within the 33" GBT beam even during the largest pointing drifts. The 33" beam (FWHM) at 22GHz spans 125pc in M31. (1 data file).

  6. MASER OBSERVATIONS OF WESTERLUND 1 AND COMPREHENSIVE CONSIDERATIONS ON MASER PROPERTIES OF RED SUPERGIANTS ASSOCIATED WITH MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Thomas K. T.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Deguchi, Shuji

    2012-11-20

    We report the results of Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the Westerlund 1 (Wd1) region in the SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines, and we also report the analysis of maser properties of red supergiants (RSGs) associated with six massive clusters including Wd1. The primary purpose of this research is to explore possibilities of using maser emission for investigating the nature of massive clusters and associated RSGs. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines are detected toward two of four known RSGs in Wd1. The large velocity ranges of maser emission are consistent with the RSG status. RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit redder log (F {sub 21}/F {sub 12}) and [K-12.13] colors compared to RSGs with no maser emission. The mass-loss rates derived from dust radiative transfer modeling suggest that RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit larger mass-loss rates compared to RSGs with no maser emission. In an extended sample of 57 RSGs in six massive clusters, detections in the SiO line tend to homogeneously distribute in absolute luminosity L, whereas those in the H{sub 2}O line tend to distribute in a region with large L values.

  7. The superconducting cavity stability ruby maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of an application of the rudy maser to a superconducting Cavity Stabilized oscillator shows many attractive features. These derive from the mechancial stability inherent in an all-cryogenic design and from the properties of the ruby maser itself. A multiple-cavity design has been developed to allow physical separation of the high-Q superconducting cavity and the ruby element with its requried applied magnetic field. Mode selection is accomplished in this design by tuning the ruby by means of the applied field. We conclude that such an oscillator would perform well, even with cavity Q's as low as 10 to the 8th power allowing the use of a superconductor-on-sapphire resonator with its greater rigidity and lower thermal expansion. A first test of the Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Maser Oscillator (SCSMO) confirms the efficacy of the multiple-cavity design and the applicability of the ruby maser. Frequency variation less than 4x10 to the minus 11th power was measured in the stabilized mode and is attributed to the reference oscillator and to instabilities in the pump source. Variation of 10 to the minus 10th power was observed in the low-Q unstabilized mode, again attributable to pump fluctuations. Even so, direct scaling to a Q of 10 the 9th power predicts a stability better than 10 to the minus 15th power. Together with results showing the lowest losses to date in sapphire at microwave frequencies, and preliminary experiments on superconductor-on-sapphire resonators, frequency stability, levels as low as 10 to the minus 17th power are indicated.

  8. Hydrogen masers with cavity frequency switching servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Harry E.; Owings, H. B.; Koppang, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of the free-running hydrogen maser is limited by pulling of the unperturbed hydrogen transition frequency due to instability of the cavity resonance frequency. While automatic spin-exchange tuning is in principle the more basic and accurate method, the required beam intensity switching and the long servo time constant result in reduced stability for measuring intervals up to 10(exp 6) seconds. More importantly, the spin-exchange tuning method requires a second stable frequency source as a reference, ideally a second hydrogen maser, to get the best results. The cavity frequency switching servo, on the other hand, has very little effect on the maser short term stability, and is fast enough to correct for cavity drift while maintaining the cavity at the spin-exchange tuned offset required to minimize instability due to beam intensity fluctuations. Not only does the cavity frequency switching servo not require a second stable frequency source, but the frequency reference is the atomic hydrogen radiated beam signal, so that no extra RF connections need be made to the cavity, and externally generated signals that would perturb the hydrogen atom need not be transmitted through the cavity. The operation of the cavity frequency switching stabilization method is discussed and the transient response of the servo and certain other aspects of the technique that have potential for achieving improved basic accuracy are illustrated.

  9. Towards detecting methanol emission in low-mass protoplanetary discs with ALMA: the role of non-LTE excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, S. Yu.; Semenov, D. A.; Sobolev, A. M.; Gray, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    The understanding of organic content of protoplanetary discs is one of the main goals of the planet formation studies. As an attempt to guide the observational searches for weak lines of complex species in discs, we modelled the (sub)millimetre spectrum of gaseous methanol (CH3OH), one of the simplest organic molecules, in the representative T Tauri system. We used 1+1D disc physical model coupled to the gas-grain ALCHEMIC chemical model with and without 2D-turbulent mixing. The computed CH3OH abundances along with the CH3OH scheme of energy levels of ground and excited torsional states were used to produce model spectra obtained with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) 3D line radiative transfer code LIME. We found that the modelled non-LTE intensities of the CH3OH lines can be lower by factor of >10-100 than those calculated under assumption of LTE. Though population inversion occurs in the model calculations for many (sub)millimetre transitions, it does not lead to the strong maser amplification and noticeably high line intensities. We identify the strongest CH3OH (sub)millimetre lines that could be searched for with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in nearby discs. The two best candidates are the CH3OH 50 - 40A+ (241.791 GHz) and 5-1 - 4-1E (241.767 GHz) lines, which could possibly be detected with the ˜5σ signal-to-noise ratio after ˜3 h of integration with the full ALMA array.

  10. Intermittent maser flare around the high-mass young stellar object G353.273+0.641 - I. Data and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, K.; Sorai, K.; Honma, M.; Minamidani, T.; Takekoshi, T.; Akiyama, K.; Tateuchi, K.; Hosaka, K.; Ohishi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Habe, A.; Kobayashi, H.

    2011-10-01

    We have performed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and single-dish monitoring of 22-GHz H2O maser emission from the high-mass young stellar object G353.273+0.641 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) and the Tomakamai 11-m radio telescope. Two maser flares have been detected, separated by almost two years. Frequent VLBI monitoring has revealed that the flare activity has been accompanied by structural change of the prominent shock front traced by H2O maser alignments. We have detected only blueshifted emission and all maser features have been distributed within a very small area of 200 × 200 au2, in spite of a wide velocity range (>100 km s-1). The light curve shows notably intermittent variation and suggests that the H2O masers in G353.273+0.641 are excited by an episodic radio jet. The time-scale of ˜2 yr and characteristic velocity of ˜500 km s-1 also support this interpretation. Two isolated velocity components, C50 (-53 ± 7 km s-1) and C70 (-73 ± 7 km s-1), have shown synchronized linear acceleration of the flux-weighted ? values (˜ -5 km s-1 yr-1) during the flare phase. This can be converted to the lower-limit momentum rate of 1.1 × 10-3 M⊙ km s-1 yr-1. The maser properties are quite similar to those of IRAS 20126+4104 especially. This corroborates the previous suggestion that G353.273+0.641 is a candidate high-mass protostellar object. The possible pole-on geometry of the disc-jet system may be suitable for direct imaging of the accretion disc in this case.

  11. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  12. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  13. Accurate OH Maser Positions from the SPLASH Pilot Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Walsh, Andrew J.; Green, James A.; Breen, Shari L.; Dawson, J. R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Gómez, José F.; Jordan, Christopher H.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Paul A.

    2016-12-01

    We report on high spatial resolution observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), of ground-state OH masers. These observations were carried out toward 196 pointing centers previously identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl (SPLASH) pilot region, between Galactic longitudes of 334° and 344° and Galactic latitudes of ‑2° and +2°. Supplementing our data with data from the MAGMO (Mapping the Galactic Magnetic field through OH masers) survey, we find maser emission toward 175 of the 196 target fields. We conclude that about half of the 21 nondetections were due to intrinsic variability. Due to the superior sensitivity of the followup ATCA observations, and the ability to resolve nearby sources into separate sites, we have identified 215 OH maser sites toward the 175 fields with detections. Among these 215 OH maser sites, 111 are new detections. After comparing the positions of these 215 maser sites to the literature, we identify 122 (57%) sites associated with evolved stars (one of which is a planetary nebula), 64 (30%) with star formation, two sites with supernova remnants, and 27 (13%) of unknown origin. The infrared colors of evolved star sites with symmetric maser profiles tend to be redder than those of evolved star sites with asymmetric maser profiles, which may indicate that symmetric sources are generally at an earlier evolutionary stage.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD KNOWN STELLAR SiO MASER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2012-11-01

    We carried out simultaneous observations of four maser lines, SiO v = 1, 2, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23}, toward 83 known SiO maser sources without H{sub 2}O maser detections using the Korean VLBI Network single dish telescopes. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected from 14 sources, resulting in a detection rate of 16.9%. H{sub 2}O maser emission without SiO maser emission was detected from one source. Therefore, H{sub 2}O maser emission was newly detected from 15 sources. SiO maser emission without H{sub 2}O detection was detected from 55 sources, which gives a total SiO maser detection rate of 83.1% when including sources that have both SiO and H{sub 2}O maser emission detected. SiO v = 2 maser emission was detected from nine sources without v = 1 maser detection. The SiO v = 2 maser sources without the v = 1 maser detections need to be investigated, with a large number of v = 2 only maser sources related to the development of dust shells and their evolutionary sequence from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to post-AGB stars. The average values of the peak and integrated antenna temperature ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers are 0.44 and 0.28 in the 14 sources that have both SiO and H{sub 2}O detections. Observational characteristics of several individual sources are noted and the dependence of the different maser intensity ratios on the stellar phase is discussed. In addition, the observational results of SiO and H{sub 2}O masers are discussed in IRAS two-color diagrams.

  15. Rapid time variations and radiative instabilities of astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The time-varying intensities are obtained for astrophysical masers that are radiatively unstable. Numerical integrations of the time-dependent, nonlinear equations of radiative transfer are performed with the usual approximation of a linear maser. At long times after changes in the physical conditions, the intensity of maser radiation reaches an asymptotic behavior and oscillates permanently in these idealized calculations with a period that is related to the length of the maser divided by the speed of light. The intensity varies by more than a factor of 10. These intensities depend upon the same four parameters as we originally found to determine the regime for radiative instabilities based on a stability analysis of the steady state. A detailed comparison is made between the predictions of the stability analysis and the time variations of the intensities. Calculations are performed for interacting pairs as well as isolated, individual masers.

  16. Shock-excited NH3 (3, 3) masers in the NGC 6334 star-forming region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.

    1995-01-01

    We report the discovery of four NH3 (3, 3) masers in the NGC 6334 star formation region. The masers are found in two of the seven far-infrared continuum sources where high-mass star formation is taking place in this molecular cloud. These masers occur at the ends of high-velocity molecular outflows; no maser emission was found near regions without high-velocity outflows. The NH3 masers are not associated with any other type of maser. These results confirm that the NH3 (3, 3) masers are caused by shocks and probably mark the location where the molecular outflow jet impinges upon the ambient medium.

  17. Methanol as A Tracer of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Reimers, D.

    2011-09-01

    The methanol molecule CH3OH has a complex microwave spectrum with a large number of very strong lines. This spectrum includes purely rotational transitions as well as transitions with contributions of the internal degree of freedom associated with the hindered rotation of the OH group. The latter takes place due to the tunneling of hydrogen through the potential barriers between three equivalent potential minima. Such transitions are highly sensitive to changes in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ = m e/m p, and have different responses to μ-variations. The highest sensitivity is found for the mixed rotation-tunneling transitions at low frequencies. Observing methanol lines provides more stringent limits on the hypothetical variation of μ than ammonia observation with the same velocity resolution. We show that the best-quality radio astronomical data on methanol maser lines constrain the variability of μ in the Milky Way at the level of |Δμ/μ| < 28 × 10-9 (1σ) which is in line with the previously obtained ammonia result, |Δμ/μ| < 29 × 10-9 (1σ). This estimate can be further improved if the rest frequencies of the CH3OH microwave lines will be measured more accurately.

  18. New Maser Emission from Nonmetastable Ammonia in NGC 7538. IV. Coincident Masers in Adjacent States of Para-ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Joyce, Spenser A.

    2014-02-01

    We present the first detection of para-ammonia masers in NGC 7538: multiple epochs of observation of the 14NH3 (J, K) = (10, 8) and (9,8) lines. We detect both thermal absorption and nonthermal emission in the (10,8) and (9,8) transitions and the absence of a maser in the (11,8) transition. The (9,8) maser is observed to increase in intensity by 40% over six months. Using interferometric observations with a synthesized beam of 0.''25, we find that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers originate at the same sky position near IRS 1. With strong evidence that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers arise in the same volume, we discuss the application of pumping models for the simultaneous excitation of nonmetastable (J > K) para-ammonia states having the same value of K and consecutive values of J. We also present detections of thermal absorption in rotational states ranging in energy from E/kB ~ 200 K to 2000 K, and several non-detections in higher-energy states. In particular, we describe the populations in eight adjacent rotational states with K = 6, including two maser transitions, along with the implications for ortho-ammonia pumping models. An existing torus model for molecular gas in the environment of IRS 1 has been applied to the masers; a variety of maser species are shown to agree with the model. Historical and new interferometric observations of 15NH3 (3,3) masers in the region indicate a precession of the rotating torus at a rate comparable to continuum-emission-based models of the region. We discuss the general necessity of interferometric observations for diagnosing the excitation state of the masers and for determining the geometry of the molecular environment.

  19. New maser emission from nonmetastable ammonia in NGC 7538. IV. Coincident masers in adjacent states of para-ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Joyce, Spenser A.

    2014-02-20

    We present the first detection of para-ammonia masers in NGC 7538: multiple epochs of observation of the {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (J, K) = (10, 8) and (9,8) lines. We detect both thermal absorption and nonthermal emission in the (10,8) and (9,8) transitions and the absence of a maser in the (11,8) transition. The (9,8) maser is observed to increase in intensity by 40% over six months. Using interferometric observations with a synthesized beam of 0.''25, we find that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers originate at the same sky position near IRS 1. With strong evidence that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers arise in the same volume, we discuss the application of pumping models for the simultaneous excitation of nonmetastable (J > K) para-ammonia states having the same value of K and consecutive values of J. We also present detections of thermal absorption in rotational states ranging in energy from E/k{sub B} ∼ 200 K to 2000 K, and several non-detections in higher-energy states. In particular, we describe the populations in eight adjacent rotational states with K = 6, including two maser transitions, along with the implications for ortho-ammonia pumping models. An existing torus model for molecular gas in the environment of IRS 1 has been applied to the masers; a variety of maser species are shown to agree with the model. Historical and new interferometric observations of {sup 15}NH{sub 3} (3,3) masers in the region indicate a precession of the rotating torus at a rate comparable to continuum-emission-based models of the region. We discuss the general necessity of interferometric observations for diagnosing the excitation state of the masers and for determining the geometry of the molecular environment.

  20. The turbulent bremsstrahlung (plasma-maser) effect

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimirov, S. V.

    2011-01-04

    Because of nonlinear interaction between particles and waves, energy conversion between waves of large frequency difference can occur without particle population inversion or resonant wave-wave interaction. The effect involves the nonresonant interaction of the plasma particles with a pair of plasma modes of large frequency difference, and wave energy is converted into particle energy. This effect can appear in laboratory as well as astrophysical plasmas and is important in determining the transport properties of weakly turbulent plasmas. Here, the most important aspects of the plasma-maser theory is discussed.

  1. Exploration of Solar Wind Acceleration Region Using Interplanetary Scintillation of Water Vapor Maser Source and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Yamauchi, Yohei; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2001-01-01

    Single-station observations of interplanetary scintillation UPS) at three microwave frequencies 2, 8, and 22GHz, were carried out between 1989 and 1998 using a large (34-micro farad) radio telescope at the Kashima Space Research Center of the Communications Research Laboratory. The aim of these observations was to explore the near-sun solar wind, which is the key region for the study of the solar wind acceleration mechanism. Strong quasars, 3C279 and 3C273B, were used for the Kashima IPS observations at 2 and 8GHz, and a water-vapor maser source, IRC20431, was used for the IPS observations at 22GHz. Solar wind speeds derived from Kashima IPS data suggest that the solar wind acceleration takes place at radial distances between 10 and 30 solar radii (Rs) from the sun. The properties of the turbulence spectrum (e.g. anisotropy, spectral index, inner scale) inferred from the Kashima data were found to change systematically in the solar wind acceleration region. While the solar wind in the maximum phase appears to be dominated by the slow wind, fast and rarefied winds associated with the coronal holes were found to develop significantly at high latitudes as the solar activity declined. Nevertheless, the Kashima data suggests that the location of the acceleration region is stable throughout the solar cycle.

  2. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V.; Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-12

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R and D development.

  3. A reflected-wave ruby maser with K-band tuning range and large instantaneous bandwidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. R.; Clauss, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A novel maser concept is outlined and a unique design described which permits wide bandwidth and waveguide tuning range by employing four stages cascaded via cryogenically cooled circulators. Theoretical considerations for gain, bandwidth, gain ripple, and noise temperature are included. Operated on a closed-cycle helium refrigerator with a superconducting persistence-mode magnet, the four-stage amplifier is tunable from 18.3 to 26.6 GHz with 30 dB of net gain and achieves 240 MHz of 3-dB bandwidth near the center of this band. The measured noise temperature is 13 + or - 2 K referred to the room-temperature input flange. Applications are foreseen utilizing cooled parametric downconverters and upconverters with this amplifier at IF to extend the low-noise performance up to millimeter frequencies and down to L-band for radio astronomy and planetary spacecraft communications.

  4. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  5. High-power, high-frequency, annular-beam free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Fortgang, C.M.; Haynes, W.B.; Haddock, P.C.

    1998-11-01

    The authors have developed a 15--17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) capable of producing high power pulses with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source is a 1 {micro}s, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacts with the TM{sub 02} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. They studied the phase stability by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field was transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories were purely longitudinal. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations demonstrated the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction and explicit calculations of the growing root of the dispersion relation are included to verify the phase stability.

  6. Free-electron maser with high-selectivity Bragg resonator using coupled propagating and trapped modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Golubev, I. I.; Golubykh, S. M.; Zaslavskii, V. Yu.; Zotova, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kozlov, A. P.; Malkin, A. M.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Perel'Shteĭn, É. A.; Sedykh, S. N.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-10-01

    A free-electron maser (FEM) with a double-mirror resonator involving a new modification of Bragg structures operating on coupled propagating and quasi-cutoff (trapped) modes has been studied. The presence of trapped waves in the feedback chain improves the selectivity of Bragg resonators and ensures stable single-mode generation regime at a considerable superdimensionality of the interaction space. The possibility of using the new feedback mechanism has been confirmed by experiments with a 30-GHz FEM pumped by the electron beam of LIU-3000 (JINR) linear induction accelerator, in which narrow-band generation was obtained at a power of ˜10 MW and a frequency close to the cutoff frequency of the trapped mode excited in the input Bragg reflector.

  7. Demonstrating gain in a dielectric Cherenkov maser with a rod slow-wave system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgustinovich, V. A.; Artemenko, S. N.; Mashchenko, A. I.; Shlapakovskii, A. S.; Yushkov, Yu. G.

    2010-03-01

    We report the first results of experiments that demonstrate the amplification of megawatt nanosecond microwave pulses in a Cherenkov maser with a dielectric rod and moderately relativistic annular electric beam generated in a compact linear induction accelerator module. The input signal was generated by a resonant microwave compressor operating in a 3-cm wavelength range. A maximum gain of ˜12.5 dB and a maximum output power of ˜16 MW for a pulse duration of ˜4 ns at a frequency of 9.388 GHz were obtained with a quartz rod. The dependence of the gain on the compressor power was determined for various values of the accelerating voltage and beam current.

  8. Evidence from masers for a rapidly rotating disk at the nucleus of NGC 4258

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William D.; Wallin, Bradley K.

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate how maser emission from a rapidly rotating, thin Keplerian disk viewed edge-on can reproduce the general features of the observed 22 GHz radiation from the nucleus of NGC 4258, including the high-velocity satellites that are Doppler shifted by nearly +/- 1000 km/s from the central emission. Newly reported data about variations in time and space for the Doppler shifts of the central emission features fit especially well into a disk interpretation. We point out that their ratio gives a velocity of 700 km/s for the rotation at the outer edge of the masing ring -- a value that is essentially the same as the rotational velocity inferred from the Doppler shifts of the high-velocity satellites. The radius of the masing ring is 0.1 pc and the central mass at the nucleus of NGC 4258 about which the disk rotates is then 10(exp 7) solar mass.

  9. Research on the Steering Strategy for Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. S.; Zhao, S. H.; Gao, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    In the master clock system, the local standard time UTC(k) with a better short-term stability will be generated, if the hydrogen maser is set as a frequency source of the master clock. But the hydrogen maser always exhibits an apparent frequency drift, thus its long-term stability gets poor with time, therefore the stability and accuracy of UTC(k) become worse. To solve this problem, we compare the performance of hydrogen maser with cesium clocks, and modify the time scale algorithm when the hydrogen maser is involved, we also propose a new steering strategy when hydrogen maser is used as the frequency source of master clock. We set up an experiment system and write programs, and finally the new steering strategy is testified with the laboratory data. Results show that when the hydrogen maser is involved in the atomic time scale calculation, the short-term frequency stability of reference time scale will be improved. Meanwhile, the local time UTC(k) has a better short-term frequency stability when the frequency source of the master clock uses hydrogen maser instead of cesium clock.

  10. Instabilities and the transport of polarized astrophysical maser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallin, Bradley K.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-dependent, radiative instabilities in the creation and transport of polarized astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field are calculated. The instabilities are similar to and occur under the same conditions as those found previously by Scappaticci & Watson for unpolarized maser radiation. The common limits in which the Zeeman splitting is much greater than, and much less than, the spectral line breadths are both considered in the current investigation. The resulting fluctuations in the emergent radiation are potentially relevant for the OH 1665 MHz masers which have been reported to fluctuate on timescales of 1000 s and which tend to be polarized. Instabilities occur and alter the transport of maser radiation only under a quite limited range of conditions. In particular, we find here that the instabilities do not occur for conditions that are appropriate for astrophysical masers with small Zeeman splittings such as the SiO and H2O masers. The time-independent, numerical solutions to the GKK equations of radiative transfer that have been obtained in previous investigations are thus essentially always valid except within a narrow range of conditions relevant for the OH masers.

  11. Radiative instabilities and 1000 second fluctuations in astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A stability analysis for small (linear) perturbations is presented for the radiation in astrophysical masers treated in the usual, linear maser approximation. Instabilities that oscillate with a period of about L/c, where L is the length of the maser are found. They occur (1) when the maser is partly but not heavily saturated, (2) when the decay rate Gamma for the molecular states is near c/L, and (3) when the product of the brightness temperature T sub 0 of the incident radiation and the angle for the beaming is less than a critical value that depends upon the particular masing transition. A fourth parameter, the fractional inversion in the pumping multiplied by (T sub 0/frequency), determines the importance of spontaneous emission which can eliminate the instabilities. These instabilities are a likely cause for the fluctuations in the radiation from the 18 cm OH masers that have been reported to occur on time scales as short as 1000 s. The calculations are applicable to other types of astrophysical masers as well, and suggest that spontaneous emission will prevent similar instabilities in the H2O and SiO masers.

  12. WATER MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH STAR FORMATION IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, Crystal; Johnson, Kelsey; Darling, Jeremy

    2010-06-10

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) observations with 80 mas resolution ({approx}9 pc) of the recently discovered Galactic-analog (GA)-H{sub 2}O masers in the Antennae interacting galaxies (NGC 4038/NGC 4039; Arp244). Three regions of water maser emission are detected: two in the 'interaction region' (IAR) and the third {approx}5.''6 ({approx_gt}600 pc) west of the NGC 4039 nucleus. The isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosities range from 1.3 to 7.7 L{sub sun}. All three maser regions are mostly obscured in the optical/near-infrared continuum, and are coincident with massive CO-identified molecular clouds. The H{sub 2}O maser velocities are in excellent agreement with those of the molecular gas. We also present archival VLA 3.6 cm data with {approx}0.''28 ({approx}30 pc) and {approx}0.''8 ({approx}90 pc) resolution toward the maser locations. All three maser regions are coincident with compact 3.6 cm radio continuum emission, and two are dominated by thermal ionized gas, suggesting the presence of natal super star clusters containing the equivalent of a few thousand O stars. We also present detailed comparisons between the radio data and existing Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (optical) and NICMOS (near-IR) data and find that both maser regions in the IAR are also associated with Pa{alpha} emission and neither source is detected shortward of 2 {mu}m. These results highlight the potential of using GA-H{sub 2}O masers to pinpoint sites of young super star cluster formation with exquisite angular resolution.

  13. In orbit demonstration of a H-maser clock system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Bernier, Laurent-Guy; Starker, Siegfried K.; Feltham, S.

    1992-01-01

    The ESA/NASA technology demonstration flight of a pair of hydrogen masers on the EURECA 3 mission is planned for 1998. The ESA part of the experiment will have a maser built by Neuchatel Observatory and a microwave time and frequency transfer system derived from the existing Precise Range and Range Rate Equipment (PRARE) system. The NASA part of the experiment will have a maser built by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and a laser time transfer system. The technology demonstration experiment is described with its expected outcomes and applications.

  14. Loss cone-driven cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Yi, Sibaek; Lim, Dayeh; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-11-01

    The weakly (or mildly) relativistic cyclotron maser instability has been successfully applied to explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation and other radio sources in nature and laboratory. Among the most important physical parameters that determine the instability criteria is the ratio of plasma-to-electron cyclotron frequencies, ωp/Ω. It is therefore instructive to consider how the normalized maximum growth rate, γmax/Ω, varies as a function of ωp/Ω. Although many authors have already discussed this problem, in order to complete the analysis, one must also understand how the radiation emission angle corresponding to the maximum growth, θmax, scales with ωp/Ω, since the propagation angle determines the radiation beaming pattern. Also, the behavior of the frequency corresponding to the maximum growth rate at each harmonic, (ωmax-sΩ)/Ω, where s=1,2,3,ċ , as a function of ωp/Ωis of importance for a complete understanding of the maser excitation. The present paper computes these additional quantities for the first time, making use of a model loss cone electron distribution function.

  15. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  16. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  17. Spectra of circularly polarized radiation from astrophysical OH masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    A striking feature of astrophysical masers is the tendency for either one or the other of the circular polarizations to dominate in the radiation from the strong, widely observed masing transitions of OH at 18 cm. Spectral line profiles are calculated for polarized maser radiation due to the combined effects of a velocity gradient and, as is indicated for these transitions, a Zeeman splitting that is at least comparable with the thermal contributions to the breadths of the spectral lines. The resulting spectral features are similar in appearance, including the presence of large net circular polarization and narrow line breadths, to the commonly observed spectra of OH masers in molecular clouds. The calculations presented here are performed as a function of frequency without making the approximations of a large velocity gradient. Rapid cross relaxation, which has been advocated by others for the OH masers, is assumed.

  18. Planar H2O masers in star-forming regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Hollenbach, David J.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines the planar geometry of shocked material, which is the key property in enabling the high brightness temperatures of H2O masers in star-forming regions. The brightness temperature, beaming angle, and the maser spot size are determined for thin, saturated planar masers under the assumption that the velocity change across the maser due to ordered motions is small compared with the thermal or microturbulent line width. For a given set of physical parameters, the brightness temperature is essentially fully determined by the length of the velocity-coherent region in the shocked plane along the line of sight. Effective aspect ratios (about 5-50) are found that are in agreement with values previously inferred from observed brightness temperatures.

  19. The Discovery of New Ammonia Masers in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teachey, Alex; Mills, Elisabeth A.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Juergen; Butterfield, Natalie; Lang, Cornelia C.; Morris, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The ammonia molecule has long been recognized as a reliable gauge of cloud temperatures. Certain ammonia transitions are known to have a potential for masing, but to date only a handful of these masers have been identified. In this work we have examined several Galactic Center clouds using K-band data from the Very Large Array in DnC configuration (resolution ~3" / 0.1 pc) to identify new ammonia masers in the (3,3) metastable line. At present we have found four compact (< 3'') regions -- two in G0.253+0.016 (The Brick) and two near Sagittarius A -- that we can report with high confidence as newly-discovered ammonia (3,3) masers. A total of 16 additional regions are identified as likely maser candidates requiring additional analysis. Our findings suggest that the maser mechanism will preferentially amplify the main ammonia emission line over its hyperfine satellite lines, resulting in artificially low opacities measured from the ratio of these lines. This property can have the effect of partially hiding the signature of the (3,3) maser in opacity-corrected Boltzmann plots. In the highest confidence regions we measure main-to-hyperfine ratios significantly in excess of the maximum theoretical ratio for an optically-thin line, yielding negative opacities, consistent with our hypothesis of main line maser amplification. These results will be of value not only in future ammonia maser searches but also for the reliability of the ammonia molecule as a temperature tracer, and for the determination of ammonia ortho-to-para ratios.

  20. On the line Q degradation in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernier, L. G.; Busca, Giovanni; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    In hydrogen masers, the atomic resonance quality factor is largely determined by the properties of the Teflon coating on the quartz storage bulb. Normally a good Teflon coating will last many years. On the other hand, there may be a relatively fast degradation of the quality factor if the Teflon coating is bad. A series of observations and measurements performed on an hydrogen maser that had successively a bad and a good Teflon coating are discussed.

  1. Timescale algorithms combining cesium clocks and hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakiron, Lee A.

    1992-01-01

    The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) atomic timescale, formerly based on an ensemble of cesium clocks, is now produced by an ensemble of cesium clocks and hydrogen masers. In order to optimize stability and reliability, equal clock weighting has been replaced by a procedure reflecting the relative, time-varying noise characteristics of the two different types of clocks. Correlation of frequency drift is required, and residual drift is avoided by the eventual complete deweighting of the masers.

  2. Graphene based GHz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony K.; El Fatimy, Abdel; Barbara, Paola; Nath, Anindya; Campbell, Paul M.; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, D. Kurt

    Graphene demonstrates great promise as a detector over a wide spectral range especially in the GHz range. This is because absorption is enhanced due to the Drude contribution. In the GHz range there are viable detection mechanisms for graphene devices. With this in mind, two types of GHz detectors are fabricated on epitaxial graphene using a lift off resist-based clean lithography process to produce low contact resistance. Both device types use asymmetry for detection, consistent with recent thoughts of the photothermoelectric effect (PTE) mechanism. The first is an antenna coupled device. It utilizes two dissimilar contact metals and the work function difference produces the asymmetry. The other device is a field effect transistor constructed with an asymmetric top gate that creates a PN junction and facilitates tuning the photovoltaic response. The response of both device types, tested from 100GHz to 170GHz, are reported. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award Number N000141310865).

  3. Molecular catastrophes and circumstellar SiO masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the complex SiO maser regions of highly evolved stars can be improved through multiwavelength studies of 'premaser' stars, such as M0-M4 giants and semiregular variables, which can be placed on normal H-R diagrams unlike most of the OH-IR stars. I argue that SiO masers are a key part of the transformation of hot stellar plasma into cold circumstellar silicate dust, in the outflows from evolved, oxygen rich stars. Evidence for this statement rests on the following: (1) red giant mass loss originates in a stochastic, amsotropic manner; (2) SiO maser maps of Miras and red supergiants show numerous maser spots within a few stellar radii; (3) molecules and dust naturally form in a cooling outflow; (4) the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer provided evidence for diverse and variable 10 micron silicate features in Miras, and these shapes correlate well with the proposed maser chronology, suggesting a formation and annealing sequence. The theory for the occurrence of SiO masers involving thermal instability, related 'new' physics, recent calculations and a prediction are discussed.

  4. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  5. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-23

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  6. A model for extremely powerful extragalactic water masers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ying-Cheng; Alcock, C.

    1988-08-01

    The reasons for the differences between extremely powerful extragalatic water masers (EPEWMs) and strong Galactic H/sub 2/O masers are discussed. This model quite successfully explains many important characteristics of EPEWMs; the rapid time variations, the broad range and random velocity distribution, the extremely high luminosities, the various heights or widths of features in spectra, the strong infrared radiation from the galaxies, how an active nucleus contributes to an EPEWM, how some parts of EPEWMs producing strong features are pumped, why this pump mechanism can work, and why EPEWMs are different from strong Galactic H/sub 2/O masers. Recent observations of extragalactic water masers which have extremely high luminosities raise the possibility that the stimulated emission rate in the maser emission line in these regions is much higher than in Galactic masers. It is possible that the local stimulated emission rate exceeds the local bandwidth for the radiation. In this case the standard expression relating the photon emission rate to the profile averaged mean intensity does not apply. A new expression for the photon emission rate is derived.

  7. Maser cavity servo-tuning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Two collocated, weakly coupled probes, one loop and one dipole, detect the magnetic and electric fields inside a maser cavity. Signals from the probes are compared in phase, and the signal output from the phase detector is applied to a varactor, the reactance of which is coupled into the cavity by a microwave coupler. Alternatively, the varactor may be placed inside the cavity. Any deviation of phase from 90 deg as detected by the phase detector will then produce an error signal that will change the reactance coupled into the resonant cavity to change its reactance, and thus correct its resonance frequency. An alternative to using two probes is to use a single disk probe oriented to detect both the magnetic and electric fields, and thus provide the error signal directly.

  8. Nonlinear theory of a plasma Cherenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.S.; Heo, E.G.; Choi, D.I.

    1995-12-31

    The nonlinear saturation state in a plasma Cherenkov maser (PCM) propagating the intense relativistic electron beam through a circular waveguide partially filled with a dense annular plasma, is analyzed from the nonlinear formulation based on the cold fluid-Maxwell equations. We obtain the nonlinear efficiency and the final operation frequency under consideration of the effects of the beam current, the beam energy and the slow wave structure. We show that the saturation mechanism of a PCM instablity is a close correspondence in that of the relativistic two stream instability by the coherent trapping of electrons in a single most-ustable wave. And the optimal conditions in PCM operation are also obtained from performing our nonliear analysis together with computer simulations.

  9. Cyclotron maser using the anomalous Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, A. N.; Borisov, A. R.; Fomenko, G. P.; Shlapakovskii, A. S.; Shtein, Iu. G.

    1983-11-01

    The operation of an anomalous-Doppler-effect cyclotron-resonance maser using a waveguide partially filled with dielectric as the slow-wave system is reported. The device investigated is similar to that of Didenko et al. (1983) and comprises a 300-mm-long 50-mm-o.d. 30-mm-i.d. waveguide with fabric-laminate dielectric, located 150 mm from the cathode in a 500-mm-long region of uniform 0-20-kG magnetic field, and a coaxial magnetic-insulation gun producing a 13-mm-i.d. 25-mm-o.d. hollow electron beam. Radiation at 12 + or - 1 mm wavelength and optimum power 20 MW is observed using hot-carrier detectors, with a clear peak in the power-versus-magnetic-field curve at about 6.4 kG.

  10. Discovering metal-poor circumstellar OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steve; Green, James; van Loon, Jacco; Wood, Peter; Imai, Hiroshi; Groenewegen, Martin; Nanni, Ambra

    2014-10-01

    OH masers are excellent signposts for a variety of phenomenon including winds of highly-evolved stars (1612 MHz). Using the superior angular resolution and sensitivity of the ATCA, high spectral resolution of the CABB backend, and close proximity to the LMC (with half solar metallicity), this observation will allow us to extend an important relation involving the evolution of red giants and supergiants in a lower metallicity (van Loon, 2012). With even fewer detections with clear double-peaked profiles, indicating an expansion velocity of the circumstellar envelope, successful observation is vital for the advancement of our stellar mass-loss models. By refining the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss of highly-evolved red giants and supergiants in their superwind phase, we can better understand the evolution of these stars and their feedback within galaxies.

  11. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD KNOWN STELLAR SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASER SOURCES. I

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Oh, Chung Sik; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: cho@kasi.re.k E-mail: bdy@kasi.re.k

    2010-05-15

    We present the results of simultaneous observations of both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers toward 166 known SiO and H{sub 2}O maser sources using the Korean VLBI Network Yonsei 21 m radio telescope during 2009 June. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O maser emission were detected from 112 sources giving a detection rate of 67% at one epoch observation. SiO-only maser emission was detected from 42 sources, while H{sub 2}O-only maser emission was detected from four sources. Most of the SiO masers appear around the stellar velocity, while H{sub 2}O masers show different characteristics compared with SiO masers. There are more than 20 sources that show a one-way peak or double peaks with respect to the stellar velocity and SiO maser peak velocity. The H{sub 2}O maser peak and integrated intensity ratios with respect to those of SiO (v = 1) show increasingly larger values from Mira variables, to OH/IR stars, to semi-regular variables. In addition, the IRAS two-color diagram of SiO and H{sub 2}O maser observational results is discussed.

  12. A New Cryogenically Cooled 8.4 GHZ Traveling Wave Maser For The Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovatch, Jason J.; Trowbridge, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This design has recently been adapted for operation in a 1.6K liquid helium bath with a cryogenic feed system on a 34 meter beam waveguide antenna and has achieved an input noise temperature of 1.7 K at the feedhorn aperture.

  13. Detection of a weak maser emission pedestal associated with the SiO maser. [in variable late stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, L. E.; Dickinson, D. F.; Brown, L. W.; Buhl, D.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for high-spectral-resolution observations of the v = 1, J = 1-0 SiO maser sources at 43,122.027 MHz (6.95 mm wavelength) associated with the variable stars Omega Cet, NML Tau, VY CMa, R Leo, W Hya, VX Sgr, NML Cyg, and R Cas. A weak underlying maser emission pedestal is clearly observed in the spectra of all but NML Cyg and R Cas. The data indicate that the underlying pedestal of SiO emission appears to originate in a shell-like region around the star, has a thermal appearance even though it must be due to weak maser emission, and appears to be part of the spectral signature of SiO maser emission from late-type stars. It is found that the center velocities of the pedestals may be used to determine stellar radial velocities. Observations of large-scale time variations in the intensity of the Ori A SiO maser and the detection of weak maser pedestals associated with each of the two strong emission-feature groups in Orion are also discussed. It is suggested that the Orion molecular cloud might contain two late-type long-period variable stars that may be semiregular variables.

  14. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  15. Microwave Spectrum of the Ethanol-Methanol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, Ian A.; Carroll, Brandon; Mead, Griffin; Blake, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen bond donor/acceptor competition in mixed alcohol clusters remains a fundamental question in physical chemistry. Previous theoretical work on the prototype ethanol-methanol dimer has been inconclusive in predicting the energetically preferred structure. Here, we report the microwave spectrum of the ethanol-methanol dimer between 8-18 GHz, using a chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. With the aid of ab initio calculations, 36 transitions have been fit and assigned to a t-ethanol-acceptor, methanol-donor structure in an argon-backed expansion. In a helium-backed expansion, a second excited conformer has been observed, and tentatively assigned to a g-ethanol-acceptor, methanol-donor structure. No ethanol-donor, methanol-acceptor structures have been found, suggesting such structures are energetically disfavored.

  16. Detection of the torsionally excited state of methanol in Orion A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovas, F. J.; Suenram, R. D.; Snyder, L. E.; Hollis, J. M.; Lees, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    Torsionally excited methanol has been detected in Orion A, where three emission lines observed in the region of 93-100 GHz coincide with laboratory measurements of three methanol transitions. Torsionally excited methanol may therefore be used as a novel temperature probe, since this state lies near 200 per cm above the ground state, or about 290 K. No emission was detected from the transition arising from levels near 300 per cm, or approximately 430 K above the ground state.

  17. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  18. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2003-01-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) was designed to be functionally similar to SAO room temperature hydrogen masers with appropriate modifications made for operation at cryogenic temperatures. A schematic of the SAO CHM is shown in Figure 1, and a description of this device and its operation follows. A beam of molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atoms at room temperature. The resultant beam of atomic hydrogen is then cooled, magnetically state selected, and focused into a quartz storage bulb centered inside of a microwave cavity resonant with the hydrogen hyperfine transition at 1420 MHz. The quartz storage bulb is coated with a superfluid He-4 film, and both the bulb and cavity are maintained near 0.5 K. The maser signal is coupled out inductively and carried to room temperature via semi-rigid coaxial cable. After passing through a room temperature isolator and preamp, the maser signal is detected with a low-noise heterodyne receiver as used in the room temperature SAO hydrogen masers. The maser temperature is lowered to 0.5 K using a recirculating He-3 refrigerator. This refrigerator consists of several cooling stages: a liquid nitrogen stage at 77 K, a liquid 4He bath at 4.2 K, a pumped He-4 pot at approximately 1.7 K, and the pumped, recirculating He-3 stage at 0.5 K. The atomic hydrogen beam, state selector, storage bulb and cavity are all connected inside a single, maser vacuum chamber (MVC). This space is pumped out from below by a turbo pump. Above the MVC, an inlet to the space allows for the input of flowing superfluid 4He film. External to the MVC is a second, outer vacuum chamber (OVC), maintained for operation of the cryostat and also pumped by a turbo pump. Inside the OVC, there is radiation shielding at 77 K and 1.7 K.

  19. How to Detect Inclined Water Maser Disks (and Possibly Measure Black Hole Masses)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy

    2017-03-01

    We describe a method for identifying inclined water maser disks orbiting massive black holes and for potentially using them to measure black hole masses. Owing to the geometry of maser amplification pathways, the minority of water maser disks are observable: only those viewed nearly edge-on have been identified, suggesting that an order of magnitude additional maser disks exist. We suggest that inward-propagating masers are gravitationally deflected by the central black hole, thereby scattering water maser emission out of the disk plane and enabling detection. The signature of an inclined water maser disk would be narrow masers near the systemic velocity that appear to emit from the black hole position, as identified by the radio continuum core. To explore this possibility, we present high-resolution (0.″07–0.″17) Very Large Array line and continuum observations of 13 galaxies with narrow water maser emission and show that three are good inclined-disk candidates (five remain ambiguous). For the best case, CGCG 120‑039, we show that the maser and continuum emission are coincident to within 3.5 ± 1.4 pc (6.7 ± 2.7 mas). Subsequent very long baseline interferometric maps can confirm candidate inclined disks and have the potential to show maser rings or arcs that provide a direct measurement of black hole mass, although the mass precision will rely on knowledge of the size of the maser disk.

  20. Simultaneous VLBA polarimetric observations of the v = {1,2} J = 1-0 and v = 1, J = 2-1 SiO maser emission towards VY CMa II: component-level polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Kemball, A.; Jonas, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a component-level comparison of the polarized v = 1 J = 1-0, v = 2 J = 1-0 and v = 1 J = 2-1 SiO maser emission towards the supergiant star VY CMa at milliarcsecond-scale, as observed using the Very Long Baseline Array at λ = 7 and 3 mm. An earlier paper considered overall maser morphology and constraints on SiO maser excitation and pumping derived from these data. The goal of the current paper is to use the measured polarization properties of individual co-spatial components detected across multiple transitions to provide constraints on several competing theories for the transport of polarized maser emission. This approach minimizes the significant effects of spatial blending. We present several diagnostic tests designed to distinguish key features of competing theoretical models for maser polarization. The number of coincident features is limited by sensitivity however, particularly in the v = 1 J = 2-1 transition at 86 GHz, and deeper observations are needed. Preliminary conclusions based on the current data provide some support for: (i) spin-independent solutions for linear polarization; (ii) the influence of geometry on the distribution of fractional linear polarization with intensity; and, (iii) π/2 rotations in linear polarization position angle arising from transitions across the Van Vleck angle (sin 2θ = 2/3) between the maser line of sight and magnetic field. There is weaker evidence for several enumerated non-Zeeman explanations for circular polarization. The expected 2:1 ratio in circular polarization between J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 predicted by standard Zeeman theory cannot unfortunately be tested conclusively due to insufficient coincident components.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD KNOWN STELLAR H{sub 2}O MASER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Sang Joon E-mail: cho@kasi.re.kr

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous observations of SiO v = 1, 2, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines toward 152 known stellar H{sub 2}O maser sources using the Yonsei 21 m radio telescope of the Korean VLBI Network from 2009 June to 2011 January. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected from 62 sources with a detection rate of 40.8%. The SiO-only maser emission without H{sub 2}O maser detection was detected from 27 sources, while the H{sub 2}O-only maser without SiO maser detection was detected from 22 sources. Therefore, the overall SiO maser emission was detected from 89 sources, resulting in a detection rate of 58.6%. We have identified 70 new detections of the SiO maser emission. For both H{sub 2}O and SiO maser detected sources, the peak and integrated antenna temperatures of SiO masers are stronger than those of H{sub 2}O masers in both Mira variables and OH/IR stars and the relative intensity ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers in OH/IR stars are larger than those in Mira variables. In addition, distributions of 152 observed sources were investigated in the IRAS two-color diagram.

  2. Development of the maser-caviton ball lightning theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter H.; Leitner, Jean-Francois

    1994-05-01

    The maser-caviton ball lightning theory is briefly described, is compared with the available observations of ball lightning, and is further developed on the basis of the rate equations governing the evolution of the photon number in a single-mode maser. The focus of this paper is on the explosive growth of the photon number at the premature demise of a large atmospheric maser. Ball lightning is a localized high-field soliton forming a cavity surrounded by plasma in this theory. The source of VHF energy is a large atmospheric maser occupying a volume of serveral cubic miles for the case of open air ball lightning, and occupying the volume of the room in electrically shielded confined ball lightning cases. The main, well-known features of ball lightning, including its appearance right after a strong electric field pulse usually caused by lightning, its passage through closed windows and other dielectrics, its always harmless existence in electrically shielded (e.g., metallic) enclosures, without the possibility of electrostatic-explosive demise, its total absence in the vicinity of high peaks or lightning observation stations, as well as the character of its positioning and motion with respect to conducting bodies, and its apparent lack of buoyancy in the air can all be explained consistently only with the help of this theory as far as we can see. The explosive demise of open air ball lightning is described here in terms of maser spiking phonomena with the help of elementary equations.

  3. Pilot Search for 54-MHz Maser Emission from Interstellar Hydroxyl Using LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Heald, G.; Oonk, R.; McKean, J.; Mol, J.; Hessels, J.; Toribio, C.; LOFAR Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the most sensitive search to date for the two 54-MHz spectral lines of the hydroxyl (OH) molecule. These are the preliminary results of a larger, planned observational campaign. The splitting of the rotational ground state of the hydroxyl molecule gives rise to the four familiar 1.7-GHz transitions by which OH is known in the interstellar medium. There are also two magnetic-dipole transitions among these states at frequencies of 53.2 MHz and 55.1 MHz. These 54-MHz transitions have never been detected astronomically. Because of the relative weakness of the magnetic-dipole emission process, it is expected that only maser emission will generate a detectable 54-MHz signal. Two previous searches have been conducted by other authors with other instruments toward Galactic sources of known 1720-MHz OH maser emission: three sources were searched at 55.1 MHz and two other sources were searched at 53.2 MHz, resulting in upper limits of approximately 30 Jy for spectral channels of 2 km/s in width. In preparation for our future observational campaign that will apply the unprecedented sensitivity of LOFAR to the search for 54-MHz OH emission, we conducted a pilot project using six hours of Commissioning Time. These observations employed 21 48-element stations and produced a spectral resolution of approximately 0.5 km/s for both the 53.2- and 55.1-MHz lines. This spectral resolution is a considerable improvement over previous searches since it is suitable both for resolving the characteristically narrow width of maser lines and for identifying radiofrequency interference. In our pilot observations, no emission was detected at either frequency with an upper limit of approximately 3 Jy. We observed the Galactic sources W75N and W3(OH), neither of which have been searched previously at either frequency. We discuss the astrophysical implications of these sensitive non-detections. LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array designed and constructed by ASTRON, has

  4. Cyclotron autoresonance maser in the millimeter region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, N. A.; Spasovski, I. P.; Kostov, K. G.; Velichkov, J. N.; Spasov, V. A.

    1990-06-01

    This paper investigates the optimal experimental conditions for a cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) regime realized by a nonadiabatic magnetic beam pumping in the millimeter wavelength region. In the experiment, a Blumline-type accelerator with a voltage up to 650 kV and maximal current up to 10 kA is used to generate a hollow beam with a pulse duration of 30 ns. The electron beam, emitted from a graphite cathode with a 10-mm diameter, propagates in a cylindrical drift tube of 56 mm diam and a length of 500 mm. The external magnetic field B, provided by a solenoidal magnet, is homogeneous along the drift tube up to a distance of 300 mm from the cathode. The experiment demonstrated the generation of microwave radiation in the time interval from 0.0016 to 0.0023 sec after the switch-on of the external magnetic field. Two maxima of the output microwave power (8 and 10 MW) at a wavelength of 5 and 5.5 mm, respectively, were observed.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of the Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Ganguly, A.K. )

    1990-10-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Cerenkov maser amplifier is investigated numerically for a configuration that consists of an energetic electron beam propagating through a dielectric-lined cylindrical waveguide. An axial guide magnetic field is included in the formulation in order to improve beam confinement. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is derived in three dimensions that governs the evolution of both the electromagnetic field and the trajectories of an ensemble of electrons. The system is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric, and the electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of the TM{sub 0{ital n}} modes of the vacuum waveguide. The initial conditions are chosen to model the simultaneous injection of either a solid or annular electron beam, and an electromagnetic wave of arbitrary input power. Thermal effects are treated under the assumption that the beam is {ital initially} monoenergetic but exhibits a pitch angle spread; however, the subsequent evolution of the beam is treated in a self-consistent manner. This class of distribution is appropriate to the treatment of diode-produced beams and describes a beam with an initial axial energy spread. This is the crucial determinant in the efficiency, since saturation occurs by means of an axial bunching mechanism that results in the phase trapping of the beam. The specific parameters used in the numerical analysis correspond to experiments conducted at Dartmouth College (J. Appl. Phys. {bold 58}, 627 (1985)), and good agreement is found between theory and experiment.

  6. NASA hydrogen maser accuracy and stability in relation to world standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Percival, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    Frequency comparisons were made among five NASA hydrogen masers in 1969 and again in 1972 to a precision of one part in 10 to the 13th power. Frequency comparisons were also made between these masers and the cesium-beam ensembles of several international standards laboratories. The hydrogen maser frequency stabilities as related to IAT were comparable to the frequency stabilities of individual time scales with respect to IAT. The relative frequency variations among the NASA masers, measured after the three-year interval, were 2 + or - 2 parts in 10 to the 13th power. Thus time scales based on hydrogen masers would have excellent long-term stability and uniformity.

  7. A correlational analysis of the effects of changing environmental conditions on the NR atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragonette, Richard A.; Suter, Joseph J.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive statistical analysis has been undertaken to determine if a correlation exists between changes in an NR atomic hydrogen maser's frequency offset and changes in environmental conditions. Correlation analyses have been performed comparing barometric pressure, humidity, and temperature with maser frequency offset as a function of time for periods ranging from 5.5 to 17 days. Semipartial correlation coefficients as large as -0.9 have been found between barometric pressure and maser frequency offset. Correlation between maser frequency offset and humidity was small compared to barometric pressure and unpredictable. Analysis of temperature data indicates that in the most current design, temperature does not significantly affect maser frequency offset.

  8. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  9. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer that 10(exp 4) seconds is limited at present by systematic processes. Researchers discuss the physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors. Based upon estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, they find that the primary internal mechanisms currently limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level parts in 10(exp 15) per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10(exp 16) to parts in 10(exp 15) per day. They discuss strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations.

  10. The distribution of maser emission in OH/IR stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Fix, John D.; Mutel, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    The 1612 MHz OH emission from five OH/IR stars has been mapped at three epochs over a 2.5 yr period of time. Although the stars were observed at very different phases in the radio light curve of each, there were no remarkable changes in the appearance of the maps. This probably implies that the properties of the masers do not range widely throughout a maser shell. The maps have been used to produce star-centered surface maps of the distribution of maser emission from each star. The surface maps generally are sparsely filled with OH emission and are dominated by relatively few (about 10) major clumps of emission. The presence of large regions of low intensity in the surface maps suggests that the number of individual emitting elements is relatively small or that there are a larger number of elements which are distributed in the shell in a distinctly nonrandom manner.

  11. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer than 10 exp 4 s is currently limited by systematic processes. The physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors are discussed. From estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, it is found that the primary internal mechanisms limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level of parts in 1015 per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10 exp 16 to parts in 10 exp 15 per day. Strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations are discussed.

  12. Water masers in W49N - The youngest stellar jet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, MORDECAI-M.; Elitzur, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Observations by Gwinn et al. (1992) of the proper motions of water masers in W49N show that they have an elongated distribution expanding from a common center. Features with high space velocity only occur far from the center, while low-velocity features occur at all distances. It is proposed that water masers in star-forming regions occur in expanding shells swept up by high-velocity winds from young, massive stars during the early phases of the expansion. In W49N, confinement of the bubble by a density distribution with an axial cavity can explain both the velocity field and the shape of the maser distribution. A fully dynamical calculation of the expanding bubble is presented which provides a satisfactory fit for the observations and suggests that this system is only about 250 yr old. Thus these observations may show the very first stages of the formation of a jet from a young stellar object.

  13. Non-Zeeman circular polarization of molecular maser spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin

    2014-11-01

    We apply the anisotropic resonant scattering model developed to explain the presence of non-Zeeman circular polarization signals recently detected in the {sup 12}CO (J = 2 → 1) and (J = 1 → 0) transitions in molecular clouds to Stokes V spectra of SiO v = 1 and v = 2, (J = 1 → 0) masers commonly observed in evolved stars. It is found that the observed antisymmetric 'S'- and symmetric '∪'- or '∩'-shaped spectral profiles naturally arise when the maser radiation scatters off populations of foreground molecules located outside the velocity range covered by the background maser radiation. Using typical values for the relevant physical parameters, it is estimated that magnetic field strengths on the order of a few times 15 mG are sufficient to explain the observational results found in the literature.

  14. Runaway electrons in a tokamak: A free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzan, B.; Steuer, K.

    1997-04-01

    In ohmic divertor plasma discharges of the ASDEX upgrade tokamak containing a small population of runaway electrons, fluctuating emission in the microwave region with a very narrow bandwidth is observed. The radiation can be explained by relativistic runaway electrons, which are captured in a ripple resonance of the tokamak and are thus made monoenergetic enough that they can undergo the collective instability of a free-electron maser. From the frequency of the maser, the energy of the runaway electrons, and from the linewidth and energy per radiation pulse, the particle density of the runaway electrons is determined locally. Observing this maser radiation is thus a different diagnostic for runaway electrons in tokamaks. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Proper Motions of Water Masers in Circumstellar Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.; Diamond, P. J.; Kemball, A. J.

    We present proper motion measurements of circumstellar water masers obtained with the VLBA. The objects observed include S Persei, VX Sagittarii, U Herculis, VY Canis Majoris, NML Cygni, IK Tauri and RX Bootis. Results of the observations and modeling indicate that the water masers exist in a kinematically complex region of the circumstellar envelope, which is not well fit by the standard model of a uniformly expanding spherical wind. Attempts at fitting an ellipsoidal geometric distribution with a variety of kinematic models are presented. Estimates for the distances of the stars are also discussed. A change in position of the maser spots as a function of velocity has been measured. This effect may be used to place limits on accelerations in the masing gas.

  16. Where do the Nuclear H2O masers in Centaurus A Originate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Juergen; Henkel, Christian; Edwards, Philip; Meier, David; Brunthaler, Andreas; Mao, Minnie; Peck, Alison; Brisken, Walter; Mueller, Cornelia; Impellizzeri, Caterina M. V.; McCoy, Mark

    2013-10-01

    We have recently detected nuclear water maser emission in the closest radio galaxy, Centaurus A, using the ATCA (Ott et al. 2013). Even with a maximum baseline of 6 km, the ATCA lacks the spatial resolution required to pin down the exact location of the maser spots and hence unambiguously determine the origin of the maser emission. The spectral properties suggest a jet maser scenario, a maser that is pumped by the jet colliding with an ambient molecular cloud. However, we cannot exclude a disk maser, ie. a maser excited in the accretion disk of Centaurus A's central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Here we propose to use the LBA to spatially resolve the location of the water maser emission in Centaurus A. For a jet maser we will be able to determine the distance from the SMBH, whether it is located at the receding or approaching jet, and measure any positional offset between the maser and the jet. For a disk maser, we will be able to derive a disk model and thus the mass of the SMBH, as well as a geometric distance to the merely 3.8 Mpc distant Cen A. This would contribute to the calibration of the cosmological distance ladder.

  17. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD SYMBIOTIC STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.k

    2010-08-10

    We present the results of simultaneous observations of SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines performed with the KVN Yonsei 21 m radio telescope from 2009 November to 2010 January. We searched for these masers in 47 symbiotic stars and detected maser emission from 21 stars, giving the first time detection from 19 stars. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected from seven stars of which six were D-type symbiotic stars and one was an S-type star, WRAY 15-1470. In the SiO maser emission, the {sup 28}SiO v = 1 maser was detected from 10 stars, while the v = 2 maser was detected from 15 stars. In particular, the {sup 28}SiO v = 2 maser emission without the v = 1 maser detection was detected from nine stars with a detection rate of 60%, which is much higher than that of isolated Miras/red giants. The {sup 29}SiO v = 0 maser emission was also detected from two stars, H 2-38 and BF Cyg, together with the {sup 28}SiO v = 2 maser. We conclude that these different observational results between isolated Miras/red giants and symbiotic stars may be related with the presence of hot companions in a symbiotic binary system.

  18. N-bursty emission from Uranus: A cyclotron maser source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, D. B.; Menietti, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of RX-mode emission from the north polar regions of Uranus indicate that the n-bursty radio emission may have a source along field lines with footprints near the northern magnetic pole (perhaps in the cusp), but not necessarily associated with regions of strong UV emission. This is in contrast with similar studies for the Uranus nightside smooth radio emission, which are believed to be due to the cyclotron maser instability. Source regions can be found for both hollow and filled emission cones and for frequencies well above the local gyrofreuquency implying that mechanisms other than the cyclotron maser mechanism may be operating.

  19. Cryogenic H maser in a strong B field

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, A.C.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J. )

    1990-03-01

    We study the spin-exchange frequency shift of the cryogenic hydrogen maser for {ital B}{ne}0. A general expression is derived in terms of populations of ground-state hyperfine levels. The coefficients in this expression are calculated in the degenerate-internal-states approximation, as well as to first order in the hyperfine plus Zeeman splitting. Numerical results are compared with rigorous coupled-channel calculations. Some implications are pointed out for the frequency stability of the H maser in a magnetic field.

  20. Magnetic shielding and vacuum test for passive hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.; Wolf, S. A.; Jacoby, A. B.; Jones, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration tests on high permeability magnetic shields used in the SAO-NRL Advanced Development Model (ADM) hydrogen maser were made. Magnetic shielding factors were measured before and after vibration. Preliminary results indicate considerable (25%) degradation. Test results on the NRL designed vacuum pumping station for the ADM hydrogen maser are also discussed. This system employs sintered zirconium carbon getter pumps to pump hydrogen plus small ion pumps to pump the inert gases. In situ activation tests and pumping characteristics indicate that the system can meet design specifications.

  1. X-Band Ultra-Low Noise Maser Amplifier Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, G.; Johnson, D.; Ortiz, G.

    1993-01-01

    Noise temperature measurements of an 8440 MHz ultra-low noise maser amplifier (ULNA) have been performed at sub-atmospheric, liquid helium temperatures. The traveling wave maser operated while immersed in a liquid helium bath. The lowest input noise temperature measured was 1.23 plus or minus 0.16 K at a physical temperature of 1.60 kelvin. At this physical temperature the observed gain per unit length of ruby was 4.6 dB/cm, and the amplifier had a 3 dB-bandwidth of 76 MHz.

  2. X-band ultralow-noise maser amplifier performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, G. W.; Ortiz, G. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Noise temperature measurements of an 8440-MHz ultralow noise maser amplifier (ULNA) have been performed at subatmospheric, liquid-helium temperatures. The traveling-wave maser was operated while immersed in a liquid helium bath. The lowest input noise temperature measured was 1.43 +/- 0.16 K at a physical temperature of 1.60 K. At this physical temperature, the observed gain per centimeter of ruby was 4.9 dB/cm. The amplifier had a 3-dB bandwidth of 76 MHz.

  3. NEW MASER EMISSION FROM NONMETASTABLE AMMONIA IN NGC 7538. II. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS INCLUDING WATER MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Seojin Kim, Stella

    2011-12-15

    We present new maser emission from {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9,6) in NGC 7538. Our observations include the known spectral features near v{sub LSR} = -60 km s{sup -1} and -57 km s{sup -1} and several more features extending to -46 km s{sup -1}. In three epochs of observation spanning two months we do not detect any variability in the ammonia masers, in contrast to the >10-fold variability observed in other {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9,6) masers in the Galaxy over comparable timescales. We also present observations of water masers in all three epochs for which emission is observed over the velocity range -105 km s{sup -1} < v{sub LSR} < -4 km s{sup -1}, including the highest velocity water emission yet observed from NGC 7538. Of the remarkable number of maser species in IRS 1, H{sub 2}O and, now, {sup 14}NH{sub 3} are the only masers known to exhibit emission outside of the velocity range -62 km s{sup -1} < v{sub LSR} < -51 km s{sup -1}. However, we find no significant intensity or velocity correlations between the water emission and ammonia emission. We also present a non-detection in the most sensitive search to date toward any source for emission from the CC{sup 32}S and CC{sup 34}S molecules, indicating an age greater than Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} yr for IRS 1-3. We discuss these findings in the context of embedded stellar cores and recent models of the region.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  5. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  6. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  7. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  8. A beam-maser instability: Direct amplification of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Zhou, G. C.; Yoon, Peter H.; Wu, C. S.

    2002-06-01

    The cyclotron maser instability has been applied in the past to laboratory microwave generation devices, and radiation from planetary magnetospheres, such as Earth's kilometric radiation and Jovian decametric radiation. Recently, the same concept was put forth to explain solar coronal radio bursts. In particular, it was suggested that the ordinary (O) mode propagating in antiparallel direction with respect to the electron beam may be important. For this reason, this article revisits the maser instability theory with a particular emphasis on understanding the key difference between forward- and backward-propagating O-mode masers. It is found that the O-mode maser instability is excited over a significant range of wave phase angle which corresponds to the backward propagation. Of the various physical parameters the average beam speed and the ratio of plasma-to-gyro-frequencies, ωp/Ω, play important roles. Past discussions have emphasized the role of ωp/Ω. The present analysis also includes the effects of average beam speed on the instability. It is shown that there is a critical beam speed for the instability onset, beyond which the growth rate is quasi-independent of the beam speed. Such a finding has not been reported in the literature before.

  9. Study of Improvement of Hydrogen Maser Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The research work dealt primarily with reducing the atom leakage rate using as storage surfaces the FEP Teflon surfaces conventionally used in contemporary hydrogen maser frequency standards. Some work was also done on a possible alternative to the conventional surfaces, but the results here and elsewhere suggest that the alternative surface is not promising enough to warrant much further work.

  10. Improved masers for X-band and Ku band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Quinn, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Slow-wave structure of traveling-wave maser utilizes comb system which is comprised of ruby on one side and alumina on other; alumina also supports isolator material. Radiation at pump frequency is coupled to ruby through shaped alumina strips. Contact between ruby bars and comb completes conductance path for heat transfer.

  11. Runaway electrons in a Tokamak: A free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzan, B.; Steuer, K.; Suttrop, W.

    1997-01-01

    In Ohmic divertor plasma discharges of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak a small population of runaway electrons is purposely generated at the beginning of the discharge. About 1.5 s after the runaways` generation fluctuating emission in the microwave region with a very narrow bandwidth is observed. The radiation can be explained by relativistic runaway electrons forming a free-electron maser in the tokamak: The dynamics of the runaways is simulated by taking into account the acceleration in the electric field, collisions with the plasma particles, synchrotron radiation losses and the resonances between the gyromotion and harmonics of the magnetic ripple field. According to this the runaways reach a final energy determined by the ripple resonance mechanism and are monoenergetic enough to form a cyclotron autoresonance maser. The guiding of the radiation along the bent path of the runaways is accomplished by nearly resonant runaways around the amplifying runaways. The emission frequency depends on the final energy of the runaways and the observed bandwidth via the maser`s gain on their particle density. Analyzing the emitted fluctuating emission is thus a potentially new diagnostic for runaways. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. A shock origin for interstellar H2O masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Elitzur, Moshe; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1993-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model for the powerful H2O masers observed in starforming regions. In this model the masers occur behind dissociative shocks propagating in dense regions. This paper focuses on high-velocity dissociative shocks in which the heat of H2 reformation on dust grains maintains a large column of 300 - 400 K gas, where the chemistry drives a considerable fraction of the oxygen not in CO to form H2O. The H2O column densities, the hydrogen densities, and the warm temperatures produced by these shocks are sufficiently high to enable powerful maser action, where the maser is excited by thermal collisions with H atoms and H2 molecules. A critical ingredient in determining the shock structure is the magnetic pressure, and the fields required by our models are in agreement with recent observations. The observed brightness temperatures are the result of coherent velocity regions which have dimensions in the shock plane that are five to 50 times the postshock thickness.

  13. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  14. An H2O Maser survey towards BGPS sources in the Outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Wu, Gang; He, Yu-Xin; Ji, Wei-Guang; Tang, Xiao-Ke; Yuan, Ye

    2016-06-01

    We performed an H2O maser survey towards 274 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources with 85° < l < 193° using the Nanshan 25 m radio telescope. We detected 25 H2O masers, and five of them are new detections. The detection rate of H2O masers in our sample is 9% which is very low. The detection rate of H2O masers increases as the 1.1 mm flux density of BGPS sources increases, and both the peak flux density and luminosity of H2O masers increase as the sources evolve. The detection rate of H2O masers toward BGPS sources without HCO+ emission is low. The BGPS sources associated with both H2O and CH3OH masers seem to be more compact than those only associated with H2O masers. This indicates that the sources with both masers may be in a relatively later evolutionary stage. The strongest H2O maser source G133.715+01.217, also well known as W3 IRS 5 which has a flux density of 2.9×103 Jy, was detected at eight different nearby positions. By measuring the correlation between the flux densities of these H2O masers and their angular distance from the true source location, we get the influence radius r = \\frac{1}{{0.8}}log ≤ft({\\frac{{F_0}}{{3\\text{rms}}}}\\right). For our observations, strong sources can be detected anywhere within this radius. It is helpful to determine whether or not a weak maser nearby the strong maser is a true detection.

  15. A Water Maser and NH3 Survey of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Koda, J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Towers, S.; Donovan Meyer, J.; Egusa, F.; Momose, R.; Robitaille, T. P.

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H2O maser and NH3 survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 μm emission. We observed the NH3(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms ~ 50 mK). The H2O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms ~ 0.11 Jy). The derived H2O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H2O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH3 transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH3OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H2O (NH3(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH3OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH3OH masers have significantly higher NH3 line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH3OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H2O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H2O maser luminosity and clump number density. H2O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

  16. Thousands of Stellar SiO masers in the Galactic center: The Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamic Evolution (BAaDE) survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Rich, R. Michael; Morris, Mark R.; Claussen, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    A radio survey of red giant SiO sources in the inner Galaxy and bulge is not hindered by extinction. Accurate stellar velocities (<1 km/s) are obtained with minimal observing time (<1 min) per source. Detecting over 20,000 SiO maser sources yields data comparable to optical surveys with the additional strength of a much more thorough coverage of the highly obscured inner Galaxy. Modeling of such a large sample would reveal dynamical structures and minority populations; the velocity structure can be compared to kinematic structures seen in molecular gas, complex orbit structure in the bar, or stellar streams resulting from recently infallen systems. Our Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamic Evolution (BAaDE) survey yields bright SiO masers suitable for follow-up Galactic orbit and parallax determination using VLBI. Here we outline our early VLA observations at 43 GHz in the northern bulge and Galactic plane (0GHz in the southern bulge (250

  17. An SIS Waveguide heterodyne Reciever for 600 GHz - 635 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salez, Morvan; Febvre, Pascal; McGrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    A waveguide SIS heterodyne receiver using a Nb/A10xNb junction has been built for astronomical observations of molecular tranitions in the frequency range 600GHz - 635GHZ, and has been successfully used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO).

  18. 180-GHz Interferometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lim, Boon H.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Gaier, Todd C.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn, H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Ruf, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A 180-GHz interferometric imager uses compact receiver modules, combined high- and low-gain antennas, and ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) correlator technology, enabling continuous, all-weather observations of water vapor with 25-km resolution and 0.3-K noise in 15 minutes of observation for numerical weather forecasting and tropical storm prediction. The GeoSTAR-II prototype instrument is broken down into four major subsystems: the compact, low-noise receivers; sub-array modules; IF signal distribution; and the digitizer/correlator. Instead of the single row of antennas adopted in GeoSTAR, this version has four rows of antennas on a coarser grid. This dramatically improves the sensitivity in the desired field of view. The GeoSTAR-II instrument is a 48-element, synthetic, thinned aperture radiometer operating at 165-183 GHz. The instrument has compact receivers integrated into tiles of 16 elements in a 4x4 arrangement. These tiles become the building block of larger arrays. The tiles contain signal distribution for bias controls, IF signal, and local oscillator signals. The IF signals are digitized and correlated using an ASIC correlator to minimize power consumption. Previous synthetic aperture imagers have used comparatively large multichip modules, whereas this approach uses chip-scale modules mounted on circuit boards, which are in turn mounted on the distribution manifolds. This minimizes the number of connectors and reduces system mass. The use of ASIC technology in the digitizers and correlators leads to a power reduction close to an order of magnitude.

  19. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  20. The Asian methanol market

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-12-31

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future.

  1. A balloon borne maser measurement of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.

    A 24.6 GHz maser served as a low noise front end amplifier for the radiometer. The system noise temperature was 33 K and the bandwidth was 300 MHz. Effects of low frequency drifts were reduced by switching between two horns and by rotating the gondola. A model of galactic radiation was subtracted from the antenna temperature distribution, and the remainder was fit to dipole and quadrupole distributions. The parameters obtained for the dipole distribution are: Tx = 2.9 + or - .13 Ty = .84 + or - .07, Tz = .40 + or - .06 mK antenna temperature, in celestial coordinates. No significant quadrupole was found, but an upper limit of .13 mK was placed on the rms value of a quadrupole distribution. The results are consistent with a model in which the sun is moving 353 + or - 15 km/s towards 11.0 + or - .15 hours right ascension, -7 deg + or - 2 deg declination, in uniform 2.7 K blackbody radiation.

  2. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF WATER MASERS IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CEPHEUS A AND W75 N

    SciTech Connect

    Uscanga, L.; Gomez, J. F.; Anglada, G.; Canto, J.; Curiel, S.; Torrelles, J. M.; Patel, N. A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: jfg@iaa.e E-mail: scuriel@astroscu.unam.m E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-05-20

    We have done a statistical analysis of Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data of water masers in the star-forming regions (SFRs) Cepheus A and W75 N, using correlation functions to study the spatial clustering and Doppler-velocity distribution of these masers. Two-point spatial correlation functions show a characteristic scale size for clusters of water maser spots {approx_lt}1 AU, similar to the values found in other SFRs. This suggests that the scale for water maser excitation tends to be {approx_lt}1 AU. Velocity correlation functions show power-law dependences with indices that can be explained by regular velocity fields, such as expansion and/or rotation. These velocity fields are similar to those indicated by the water maser proper-motion measurements; therefore, the velocity correlation functions appear to reveal the organized motion of water maser spots on scales larger than 1 AU.

  3. The Long-Term Stability of the U.S. Naval Observatory’s Masers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    36th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 1 THE LONG-TERM STABILITY OF THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY’S MASERS Demetrios...Matsakis, Paul Koppang Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC, USA and R. Michael Garvey Symmetricom, Inc. Beverly...1990, and five more masers were delivered in 1992 through 1994. These masers, coupled with the acquisition of cesium-beam standards and improved time

  4. WATER MASERS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY: THE FIRST STEP TOWARD PROPER MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    We have detected and confirmed five water maser complexes in the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) using the Green Bank Telescope. These masers will provide the high brightness temperature point sources needed for proper motion studies of M31, enabling measurement of its full three-dimensional velocity vector and its geometric distance via proper rotation. The motion of M31 is the keystone of Local Group dynamics and a gateway to the dark matter profiles of galaxies in general. Our survey for water masers selected 206 luminous compact 24 {mu}m emitting regions in M31 and was sensitive enough to detect any maser useful for {approx}10 {mu}as yr{sup -1} astrometry. The newly discovered masers span the isotropic luminosity range (0.3-1.9) x 10{sup -3} L{sub sun} in single spectral components and are analogous to luminous Galactic masers. The masers are distributed around the molecular ring, including locations close to the major and minor axes, which is nearly ideal for proper motion studies. We find no correlation between 24 {mu}m luminosity and water maser luminosity, suggesting that while water masers arise in star-forming regions, the nonlinear amplification pathways and beamed nature of the water masers means that they are not predictable based on IR luminosity alone. This suggests that there are additional bright masers to be found in M31. We predict that the geometric distance and systemic proper motion of M31 can be measured in 2-3 years with current facilities. A 'moving cluster' observation of diverging masers as M31 approaches the Galaxy may be possible in the long term.

  5. Light and buffer-gas frequency shifts in the Rb-85 maser frequency standard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, W. A.; Novick, R.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of buffer gas and pumping light on the output frequency of the Rb-85 maser is discussed. In contrast to a primary standard, these frequency shifts can be used to advantage when it is necessary to operate the maser at a frequency which differs from the ground-state hyperfine frequency by a few kilohertz. Using appropriate mixtures of buffer gas and carefully shaped lamp spectral profiles, it is also possible to operate the maser exactly at the ground-state hyperfine frequency. It is pointed out that the short-term phase stability of the maser is not impaired by these shifts.

  6. Two New SiO Maser Sources in High-Mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Yun, Youngjoo; Kim, Jaeheon; Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Choi, Minho

    2016-08-01

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) masers are rare in star-forming regions, with the exception of five known SiO maser sources. However, we detected two new SiO maser sources from infrared-loud clumps of the high-mass star-forming regions G19.61-0.23 and G75.78+0.34. High angular resolution observations toward G19.61-0.23 suggest that the deeply embedded young stellar object (YSO) of SMA1 is powering the SiO masers. In addition, the SiO v = 1, J = 1 \\to 0 line shows four spike features, while the v = 2 maser shows combined features of one spike and broad wing components, implying energetic activities of the YSO of SMA1 in the G19.61-0.23 hot molecular core. The SiO v = 0, J = 2 \\to 1 emission shows bipolar outflows in the NE-SW direction with respect to the center of the SiO maser source. A high angular resolution map of the SiO v = 1, J = 2 \\to 1 maser in G75.78+0.34 shows that the SiO maser is associated with the CORE source at the earliest stage of high-mass star formation. Therefore, the newly detected SiO masers and their associated outflows will provide good probes for investigating this early high-mass star formation.

  7. ON THE USE OF RUTILE AS AN 8MM MASER MATERIAL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MASERS, RUTILE, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING, CHROMIUM, IRON , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, PUMPING(ELECTRONICS), TAPER, BROADBAND, PUSH PULL AMPLIFIERS, REFLECTION.

  8. Asymptotic inference in system identification for the atom maser.

    PubMed

    Catana, Catalin; van Horssen, Merlijn; Guta, Madalin

    2012-11-28

    System identification is closely related to control theory and plays an increasing role in quantum engineering. In the quantum set-up, system identification is usually equated to process tomography, i.e. estimating a channel by probing it repeatedly with different input states. However, for quantum dynamical systems such as quantum Markov processes, it is more natural to consider the estimation based on continuous measurements of the output, with a given input that may be stationary. We address this problem using asymptotic statistics tools, for the specific example of estimating the Rabi frequency of an atom maser. We compute the Fisher information of different measurement processes as well as the quantum Fisher information of the atom maser, and establish the local asymptotic normality of these statistical models. The statistical notions can be expressed in terms of spectral properties of certain deformed Markov generators, and the connection to large deviations is briefly discussed.

  9. CEPHEID VARIABLES IN THE MASER-HOST GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Macri, Lucas M.

    2015-06-15

    We present results of a ground-based survey for Cepheid variables in NGC 4258. This galaxy plays a key role in the Extragalactic Distance Scale due to its very precise and accurate distance determination via very long baseline interferometry observations of water masers. We imaged two fields within this galaxy using the Gemini North telescope and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, obtaining 16 epochs of data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri bands over 4 yr. We carried out point-spread function photometry and detected 94 Cepheids with periods between 7 and 127 days, as well as an additional 215 variables which may be Cepheids or Population II pulsators. We used the Cepheid sample to test the absolute calibration of theoretical gri Period–Luminosity relations and found good agreement with the maser distance to this galaxy. The expected data products from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should enable Cepheid searches out to at least 10 Mpc.

  10. POLARIZED EMISSION FROM SiO MASERS IN IK Tauri

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Danchi, W. C.

    2011-08-01

    We present high spatial and frequency resolution images of the SiO masers in Stokes I, Q, U, and V around the asymptotic giant branch star IK Tau and describe and exploit a new technique for making accurate calibration of Stokes V. This technique also resulted in improved images of Stokes I. An evaluation of the results suggests that the circular polarization is neither the result of Zeeman splitting nor an alternate propagation effect. The pattern of circular and linear polarization across the maser lines shows no tendency toward that expected for simple Zeeman splitting. The fractional circular polarization greatly exceeds that expected from the alternate mechanism. The overall shape of the masing ring has changed from the elliptical form repeatedly observed over the last decade and a half.

  11. Frequency, phase, and amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Diener, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation, which are induced by the modulation of the cavity resonant frequency, are considered. The results obtained apply specifically to one of the H-maser cavity autotuning methods which is actually implemented, namely the cavity frequency-switching method. The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes are analyzed theoretically. The phase and the amplitude variations are measured experimentally. It is shown, in particular, that the phase of oscillation is subjected to abrupt jumps at the times of the cavity frequency switching, whose magnitude is specified. The results given can be used for the design of a phase-locked loop (PLL) aimed at minimizing the transfer of the phase modulation to the slaved VCXO.

  12. The cronos hydrogen maser clock redshift experiment on Radioastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, G.; Bernier, L. G.; Schweda, H.; Kardashev, N.; Andreianov, V.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Polnarev, S.

    2003-10-01

    The Radioastron satellite, having a highly elliptical orbit with a period of 28 hours and a mission duration of more than 3 years, offers the interesting possibility of a redshift experiment. The Space Hydrogen Maser, recently introduced as a new instrument on the satellite in order to be used as local oscillator for the Space VLBI, can in fact be tracked in frequency from the ground stations, implementing only minor modifications in the originally planned frequency transfer system. The modified system allows also the measurements of the geometric and ionospheric Doppler shifts. An analysis of the best strategy for achieving the highest measurement precision is presented. The analysis takes into account the maser frequency stability, its environmental sensitivities, and the other known sources of noise. The error budget of the experiment is established.

  13. Nonlinear saturation characteristics of a dielectric Cherenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.S.; Heo, E.G.; Choi, D.I.

    1995-12-31

    The nonlinear saturation state in a dielectric Cherenkov maser (DCM) with the TM mode and the intense relativistic electron beam is analyzed from the nonlinear formulation based on the cold fluid-Maxwell equations. We obtain the nonlinear efficiency and the final operation frequency under consideration of the effects of the beam current, the beam energy and the dielectric materials and show that the characteristics of a DCM instablity has a strong resemblance to that of the relativistic two stream instability by the coherent trapping of electrons in a single most-ustable wave. Finally, the nonlinear analysis shows that the Cherenkov maser operation with a lower-energy beam can be more efficient in the higher frequency regime for the case of the high power DCM with a high current.

  14. The Water Maser in II Zw 96: Scientific Justification

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Brandon Kerry

    2015-08-06

    We propose a VLBI search to image and locate the water emission in II Zw 96. We propose 3 sites within II Zw 96 for VLBI followup (see the proposed target listing below). We request 2.5 hours of on-source integration time with the VLBA per source. The array will achieve ~ 65µJy sensitivity in K band in this time which will be sufficient to detect luminous water maser features.

  15. An improved storage bulb mount for DSN hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dachel, P. R.; Russell, D. P.; Tucker, T. K.; Stratman, L. B.

    1979-01-01

    The presently used JPL hydrogen maser suspended atomic storage bulb and a rigid, single-plane mounted bulb are compared. The new bulb incorporates three major design changes: (1) mounting design; (2) alterations to the collimator; and (3) decrease in mass. These design changes are expected to increase the long-term stability of the frequency standard by reducing its sensitivity to vibration and thermal effects.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF BURSTING WATER MASER FEATURES IN ORION KL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Tsuboi, Masato; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    In 2011 February, a burst event of the H{sub 2}O maser in Orion KL (Kleinmann-Low object) has started after a 13 year silence. This is the third time such phenomena has been detected in Orion KL, followed by the events in 1979-1985 and 1998. We have carried out astrometric observations of the bursting H{sub 2}O maser features in Orion KL with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA), a Japanese very long baseline interferometry network dedicated for astrometry. The total flux of the bursting feature at the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity of 7.58 km s{sup -1} reaches 4.4 x 10{sup 4} Jy in 2011 March. The intensity of the bursting feature is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the same velocity feature in the quiescent phase in 2006. Two months later, another new feature appears at the LSR velocity of 6.95 km s{sup -1} in 2011 May, separated by 12 mas north of the 7.58 km s{sup -1} feature. Thus, the current burst occurs at two spatially different features. The bursting masers are elongated along the northwest-southeast direction as reported in the previous burst in 1998. We determine the absolute positions of the bursting features for the first time ever with a submilliarcsecond (mas) accuracy. Their positions are coincident with the shocked molecular gas called the Orion Compact Ridge. We tentatively detect the absolute proper motions of the bursting features toward the southwest direction. It is most likely that the outflow from the radio source I or another young stellar object interacting with the Compact Ridge is a possible origin of the H{sub 2}O maser burst.

  17. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  18. The development of an annular-beam, high power free-electron maser for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Fortgang, C.M.; Haddock, P.C.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-09-01

    Work is under way to develop a 17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) for producing a 500 MW output pulse with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. We plan to use a 500 keV, 5 kV, 6 cm diameter annular electron beam to excite a TM{sub 02} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide. The annular beam will run close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields, and to greatly reduce the kinetic energy loss caused by beam potential depression associated with the space charge which is a significant advantage in comparison with conventional solid beam microwave tubes at the same beam current. A key advantage of the annular beam is that the reduced plasma wave number can be tuned to achieve phase stability for an arbitrary correlation on interaction strength with beam velocity. It should be noted that this technique for improving phase stability of an EM in not possible with a solid beam klystron. The annular beam FEM provides the opportunity to extend the output power of sources in the 17 GHz regime by well over an order of magnitude with enhanced phase stability. The design and experimental status are discussed.

  19. The system design of a rubidium maser frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, C. X.

    1984-01-01

    The Rubidium Maser Frequency Standard is a precision frequency source with excellent short-term stability. A type PBR-II Rb maser frequency standard was developed by the Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM). The time-domain frequency stability (two-sample variance) of this frequency standard is less than 1/5 times 10 to the 13th power for t=10ms yields 1.0s, fh=1.0 KHz. Two PBR-II frequency standards were used as reference frequency sources in a frequency stability measurement system. Some important system characteristics for the PBR-II Rb maser frequency standard such as phase noise and frequency stability transfer characteristics are discussed. Furthermore, the design of the frequency standard for optimum frequency stability of the output signal; the choice of a voltage controlled crystal oscillator for the frequency standard; the design of the phase-locked loop; and the frequency stability test results on the PBR-II are discussed.

  20. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2001-01-01

    The room temperature hydrogen maser is an active atomic oscillator used as a high-frequency-stability local oscillator for radio astronomy, metrology, and spacecraft navigation, and in tests of fundamental physics. The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) operates at 0.5 K, employing superfluid helium-coated walls to store the masing hydrogen atoms. We are investigating whether the CHM may provide better frequency stability than the room temperature hydrogen maser: one to three orders of magnitude improvement may be possible because of greatly reduced thermal noise and larger signal power. Exceptional frequency stability will be required for spacecraft tracking in future deep-space missions, for space-based tests of relativity and gravitation, and for local (i.e., flywheel) oscillators used with absolute frequency standards such as laser-cooled atomic fountains and linear ion traps. These new devices are passive high-resolution frequency discriminators. Alone, they cannot function as superior atomic clocks; their effective operation depends on being integrated with an active local oscillator with excellent short term stability - such as that possible with the CHM.

  1. Complete the development and construction of a spaceborne hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective, to complete the development of an engineering model of a spaceborne hydrogen maser, was successfully achieved. A layout of the maser and detail drawings of the physics package was completed during the first 7 months of the contract. A computer model was made for the maser's thermal design. Using numerical computations, heater resistances were established for 7 temperature controlled zones. The physics package includes: a vacuum manifold that houses four sorption pumps capable of scavenging hydrogen for 4 years, a titanium vacuum tank housing the cavity, metallic seals for all vacuum joints, an RF dissociator within the vacuum envelope, a two-layer printed circuit solenoid and four layers of moly-permalloy magnetic shields. Problems were encountered and overcome in the procurements of the PC solenoid and the magnetic shields. After completion of the fabrication of the maser's components, the maser was assembled using these parts and other components made available by SAO, NRL, and NASA from earlier development work. In March, 1990, the vacuum system was assembled, and by May the maser assembly was completed. The magnetic shielding was poor and the shields were removed, reannealed by a local vendor, and the maser was reassembled. The maser began tests in early June and has been oscillating since that time. The test results of the maser are very good and a life test of the maser is being conducted. It is anticipated that the development and construction of a maser to be tested in space under a new contract from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will continue.

  2. Very Large Array Monitoring of 1720 MHz OH Masers toward the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlström, Y. M.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Mesler, R. A.

    2011-10-01

    We present the first variability study of the 1720 MHz OH masers located in the Galactic center. Most of these masers are associated with the interaction between the supernova remnant Sgr A East and the interstellar medium, but a few masers are associated with the circumnuclear disk (CND). The monitoring program covered five epochs and a timescale of 20-195 days, during which no masers disappeared and no new masers appeared. All masers have previously been detected in a single-epoch observation about one year prior to the start of the monitoring experiment, implying relatively stable conditions for the 1720 MHz OH masers. No extreme variability was detected. The masers associated with the northeastern interaction region between the supernova remnant and the +50 km s-1 molecular cloud show the highest level of variability. This can be explained with the +50 km s-1 molecular cloud being located behind the supernova remnant and with a region of high OH absorbing column density along the line of sight. Possibly, the supernova remnant provides additional turbulence to the gas in this region, through which the maser emission must travel. The masers in the southern interaction region are located on the outermost edge of Sgr A East, the line of sight of which is not covered by either absorbing OH gas or a supernova remnant, in agreement with the much lower variability level observed. Similarly, the masers associated with the CND show little variability, consistent with those arising through collisions between relatively large clumps of gas in the CND and no significant amount of turbulent gas along the line of sight.

  3. 30 GHz Commercial Satellite Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's research and development work in satellite communications for the past 10 years has included a major technology thrust aimed at opening the Ka frequency band to commercial exploitation. This has included the development and testing of advanced system network architectures, on-board switching and processing, multibeam and phased array antennas, and satellite and ground terminal RF and digital hardware. Development work in system hardware has focused on critical components including power amplifiers, satellite IF switch matrices, low noise receivers, baseband processors, and high data rate bandwidth efficient modems. This paper describes NASA's work in developing and testing 30 GHz low noise satellite receivers for commercial space communications uplink applications. Frequencies allotted for fixed service commercial satellite communications in the Ka band are 27.5 - 30.0 GHz for uplink transmission and 17.7 - 20.2 GHz for downlink transmission. The relatively large 2.5 GHz bandwidth lends itself to wideband, high data rate digital transmission applications.

  4. HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION IN THE NEAR AND FAR 3 kpc ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Caswell, J. L.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L.

    2009-05-10

    We report on the presence of 6.7 GHz methanol masers, known tracers of high-mass star formation, in the 3 kpc arms of the inner Galaxy. We present 49 detections from the Methanol Multibeam Survey, the largest Galactic plane survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers, which coincide in longitude, latitude, and velocity with the recently discovered far-side 3 kpc arm and the well-known near-side 3 kpc arm. The presence of these masers is significant evidence for high-mass star formation actively occurring in both 3 kpc arms.

  5. Methanol from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  6. Physico-Chemical Research on the Sounding Rocket Maser 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Abrahamsson, Mattias; Florin, Gunnar

    MASER is a sounding rocket platform for short-duration microgravity experiments, providing the scientific community with an excellent microgravity tool. The MASER programme has been running by SSC from 1987 and has up to 2012 provided twelve successful flights for microgravity missions with 6-7 minutes of microgravity, the g-level is normally below 1x10-5 g. The MASER 13 is planned to be launched in spring 2015 from Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden. The rocket will carry four ESA financed experiment modules. The MASER 13 vehicle will be propelled by the 2-stage solid fuel VSB-30 rocket motor, which provided the 390 kg payload with an apogee of 260 km and 6 and a half minutes of microgravity. Swedish Space Corporation carries out the MASER missions for ESA and the program is also available for other customers. The payload comprise four different experiment modules of which three could be defined as physic-chemical research; XRMON-SOL, CDIC-3, MEDI. It also comprises the Maser Service Module and the recovery system. The Service Module provided real-time 5 Mbps down-link of compressed experiment digital video data from the on-board cameras, as well as high-speed housekeeping telemetry data. XRMON-SOL In this experiment the influence of gravity on the formation of an equiaxed microstructure will be investigated. Special attention will be put on the aspect of nucleation, segregation and impingement. The experiment scope is to melt and solidify an AlCu-alloy sample in microgravity. The solidification will be performed in an isothermal environment. The solidification process will be monitored and recorded with X-ray image during the whole flight, images will also be down-linked to ground for real-time monitoring and possible interaction. CDIC-3 The goal is to study in migrogravity the spatio-temporal dynamics of a chemical front travelling in a thin solution layer open to the air and specifically the respective role of Marangoni and density-related hydrodynamic

  7. Recent results on the peformance of EFOS, NP and NX hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.; Ingold, J. S.; Stalder, T.; Saifi, M.; Dachel, P.; Wardrip, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    In response to a NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Work Assignment, Bendix Field Engineering Corporation evaluated the performance of the Oscilloquartz EPOS-2 hydrogen maser along with that of NASA NX-3 and NP-2 hydrogen masers in early 1983. This paper presents the results of that evaluation.

  8. Equivalent circuit model of traveling-wave maser slow-wave structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J.

    1991-01-01

    An approach is presented for deriving transmission line equivalent circuits that can approximately model the S-parameter response of traveling wave maser slow wave structures. The technique is illustrated by computing the S-parameter responses of an X-band and S-band maser slow wave structure and comparing these with experimental measurements.

  9. Variability of Formaldehyde Masers in the Context of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Esteban; Hofner, P.; Goss, W. M.

    2007-12-01

    In the last few years significant progress has been made in the study of formaldehyde (H2CO) 6cm masers. We have discovered four new H2CO maser regions in the Galaxy resulting in a total of seven massive star forming regions where H2CO masers have been detected. In this contribution we discuss one of the aspects of our ongoing research, i.e., variability of H2CO masers and its relation with young regions of massive star formation. In particular, we report the discovery of possible periodic H2CO and CH3OH maser flares in IRAS 18566+0408. E.A. is supported by a NRAO predoctoral fellowship, and P.H. acknowledges partial support by NSF grant AST-0454665.

  10. Atomic velocity distributions out of hydrogen-maser dissociators. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jaduszliwer, B.; Chan, Y.C.

    1990-02-15

    Velocity distributions are determined for atoms effusing out of radio frequency discharge hydrogen dissociators, of the type used in hydrogen masers. This work was motivated by long-term reliability issues related to the possible use of masers as freqency standards for satellites. A primary issue is the maser's hydrogen budget, because many of the common failure modes of a maser involve either the hydrogen source or sink. Because the focusing properties of the state-selecting magnets are velocity dependent, the overall hydrogen budget will depend not only on the dissociation efficiency but also on the velocity distribution of the hydrogen atoms leaving the dissociation. Many times, that distribution has been tacitly assumed to be Maxwellian at wall temperature, but pressure in the dissociator increases. Operating the dissociator to yield a matched to that distribution may significantly improve the efficiency hydrogen use by the maser.

  11. Microarcsecond proper motions of extragalactic water vapor masers in M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Moran, J. M.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    A second-epoch spectral line VLBI synthesis map of the H2O maser associated with the H II region IC 133 in the galaxy M33 is presented. Thirty-two spatially distinct maser features were identified, and a second center of maser activity within the IC 133 complex, IC 133 West, which is displaced about 0.3 arcsec from IC 133 Main, was discovered. A comparison of the two available maps of IC 133 is used to estimate the right ascension components of proper motion over a period of 479 d for five maser features to accuracies of between 7 and 16 micro-as. The dispersions in transverse and radial velocities for the maser features are consistent with the accepted distance to M33 of 720 kpc, where the data admit a fractional uncertainty in distance of 50 percent.

  12. Time Variation of SiO Masers in VX Sagittarii over an Optically Quiescent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamohara, Ryuichi; Deguchi, Shuji; Miyoshi, Makoto; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2005-04-01

    The time variation of SiO masers in a semi-regular variable, VX Sgr, was investigated in the period between 1994 and 2004 when the optical light curve exhibited an ˜6-yr quiescent phase intercepting a regularly pulsating era. The quiescent period occurred with a delay of several years after a decrease in the SiO maser flux. VLBA observations of SiO masers made during this period showed no drastic spatial variation except for emission features being shifted from south-west to north-east. The SiO maser flux decrease, and a succeeding optical quiescent phase, may indicate that the stellar mass-loss rate diminished over a few years around 1994. A SiO maser flare occurring in 1999 may be a reminiscence of a final gas blow, which resulted in the optically quiescent period.

  13. The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C.

    2009-07-01

    In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

  14. 2-GHz frequency-domain fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Laczko, Gabor; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    1986-10-01

    We developed a frequency-domain fluorometer which operates from 4 to 2000 MHz. The modulated excitation is provided by the harmonic content of a laser pulse train (3.76 MHz, 5 ps) from a synchronously pumped and cavity dumped dye laser. The phase angle and modulation of the emission are measured with a microchannel-plate photomultiplier (PMT). Cross-correlation detection is performed outside the PMT. The high-frequency signals for cross correlation were obtained by multiplication of the output from a 500-MHz frequency synthesizer. The performance was verified in several ways, including measurement of known time delays and examination of standard fluorophores. The detector displayed no detectable color effect, with the 300-600-nm difference being less than 5 ps. The precision of the measurements is adequate to detect differences of 20 ps for decay times of 500 ps. A correlation time of 53 ps was found for indole in water at 20 °C. The shortest correlation time we measured was 15 ps for indole in methanol/water (75/25) at 40 °C. Also, the 2-GHz data reveal the time-dependent ((t)1/2) terms found in the presence of collisional quenching. The degree of random error is about 0.3° of phase and 0.005 in modulation throughout the frequency range.

  15. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  16. Two new methanol converters

    SciTech Connect

    Westerterp, K.R.; Bodewes, T.N.; Vrijiand, M.S.A.; Kuczynski, M. )

    1988-11-01

    Two novel converter systems were developed for the manufacture of methanol from synthesis gas: the Gas-Solid-Solid Trickle Flow Reactor (GSSTFR) and the Reactor System with Interstage Product Removal (RSIPR). In the GSSTFR version, the product formed at the catalyst surface is directly removed from the reaction zone by means of a solid adsorbent. This adsorbent continuously trickles over the catalyst bed. High reactant conversions up to 100% can be achieved in a single pass so that the usual recycle loop for the unconverted reactants is absent or greatly reduced in size. In the RSIPR version, high conversions per pass are achieved in a series of adiabatic or isothermal fixed bed reactors with selective product removal in absorbers between the reactor stages. The feasibility and economics of the two systems are discussed on the basis of 1,000 tpd methanol plants compared with a low-pressure Lurgi system.

  17. A WATER MASER AND NH{sub 3} SURVEY OF GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Koda, J.; Towers, S.; Meyer, J. Donovan; Rosolowsky, E.; Egusa, F.; Momose, R.; Robitaille, T. P.

    2013-02-10

    We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H{sub 2}O maser and NH{sub 3} survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 {mu}m emission. We observed the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms {approx} 50 mK). The H{sub 2}O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms {approx} 0.11 Jy). The derived H{sub 2}O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H{sub 2}O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH{sub 3} transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH{sub 3}OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H{sub 2}O (NH{sub 3}(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH{sub 3}OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH{sub 3}OH masers have significantly higher NH{sub 3} line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H{sub 2}O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity and clump number density. H{sub 2}O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

  18. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  19. Laboratory astrophysics: Investigation of planetary and astrophysical maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Speirs, D. C.; Kellett, B. J.; Vorgul, I.; McConville, S. L.; Cairns, R. A.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    This paper describes a model for cyclotron maser emission applicable to planetary auroral radio emission, the stars UV Ceti and CU Virginus, blazar jets and astrophysical shocks. These emissions may be attributed to energetic electrons moving into convergent magnetic fields that are typically found in association with dipole like planetary magnetospheres or shocks. It is found that magnetic compression leads to the formation of a velocity distribution having a horseshoe shape as a result of conservation of the electron magnetic moment. Under certain plasma conditions where the local electron plasma frequency ω pe is much less than the cyclotron frequency ω ce the distribution is found to be unstable to maser type radiation emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution produces cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local electron cyclotron frequency, with polarisation close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the electron beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing radiation escape problems, and relate these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations. The experiments showed strong narrow band EM emissions at frequencies just below the cold-plasma cyclotron frequency as predicted by the theory. Measurements of the conversion efficiency, mode and spectral content were in close agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations undertaken using a particle-in-cell code and also with satellite observations confirming the horseshoe maser as an important emission mechanism in geophysical/astrophysical plasmas. In each case we address how the radiation can escape the plasma without suffering strong absorption at the second harmonic layer.

  20. Laboratory astrophysics: Investigation of planetary and astrophysical maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Speirs, D. C.; Kellett, B. J.; Vorgul, I.; McConville, S. L.; Cairns, R. A.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a model for cyclotron maser emission applicable to planetary auroral radio emission, the stars UV Ceti and CU Virginus, blazar jets and astrophysical shocks. These emissions may be attributed to energetic electrons moving into convergent magnetic fields that are typically found in association with dipole like planetary magnetospheres or shocks. It is found that magnetic compression leads to the formation of a velocity distribution having a horseshoe shape as a result of conservation of the electron magnetic moment. Under certain plasma conditions where the local electron plasma frequency ω pe is much less than the cyclotron frequency ω ce the distribution is found to be unstable to maser type radiation emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution produces cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local electron cyclotron frequency, with polarisation close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the electron beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing radiation escape problems, and relate these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations. The experiments showed strong narrow band EM emissions at frequencies just below the cold-plasma cyclotron frequency as predicted by the theory. Measurements of the conversion efficiency, mode and spectral content were in close agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations undertaken using a particle-in-cell code and also with satellite observations confirming the horseshoe maser as an important emission mechanism in geophysical/astrophysical plasmas. In each case we address how the radiation can escape the plasma without suffering strong absorption at the second harmonic layer.

  1. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  2. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-06-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  3. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  4. The discrete nature of circumstellar OH maser emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Philip J.; Fix, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The Arecibo radio telescope was used to obtain high-resolution, high-SNR 1612-MHz observations of seven circumstellar OH maser sources. Each spectrum displays the double-peaked emission line profile characteristics of an expanding shell. The jaggedness of the spectra, which varies from source to source, is consistent with statistical fluctuations in the number of discrete emitting elements contributing at a given velocity. In particular, it is found that the spectra of WX Psc and OH 53.6-0.2 contain narrow, weak, isolated emission features which may arise from individual emitting elements.

  5. Backward wave cyclotron-maser emission in the auroral magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Speirs, D C; Bingham, R; Cairns, R A; Vorgul, I; Kellett, B J; Phelps, A D R; Ronald, K

    2014-10-10

    In this Letter, we present theory and particle-in-cell simulations describing cyclotron radio emission from Earth's auroral region and similar phenomena in other astrophysical environments. In particular, we find that the radiation, generated by a down-going electron horseshoe distribution is due to a backward-wave cyclotron-maser emission process. The backward wave nature of the radiation contributes to upward refraction of the radiation that is also enhanced by a density inhomogeneity. We also show that the radiation is preferentially amplified along the auroral oval rather than transversely. The results are in agreement with recent Cluster observations.

  6. Origin of water masers in W49N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Elitzur, Moshe

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that H2O masers in star-forming regions occur early in the expansion of thin shells swept up by high-velocity winds from young massive stars. In W49N, confinement of the shell by a density distribution with an axial cavity can explain both the velocity field and the shape of the mass distribution. A modified version of the thin-shell code of Mac Low and McCray (1988), including radiation cooling, is used to model dynamically the expanding shell.

  7. Modeling of the hydrogen maser disk in MWC 349

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Victor O.; Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, Vladimir S.

    1994-01-01

    Maser amplification in a Keplerian circumstellar disk seen edge on-the idea put forward by Gordon (1992), Martin-Pintado, & Serabyn (1992), and Thum, Martin-Pintado, & Bachiller (1992) to explain the millimeter hydrogen recombination lines in MWC 349-is further justified and developed here. The double-peaked (vs. possible triple-peaked) form of the observed spectra is explained by the reduced emission from the inner portion of the disk, the portion responsible for the central ('zero velocity') component of a triple-peaked spectrum. Radial gradient of electron density and/or free-free absorption within the disk are identified as the probable causes of this central 'hole' in the disk and of its opacity. We calculate a set of synthetic maser spectra radiated by a homogeneous Keplerian ring seen edge-on and compare them to the H30-alpha observations of Thum et al., averaged over about 1000 days. We used a simple graphical procedure to solve an inverse problem and deduced the probable values of some basic disk and maser parameters. We find that the maser is essentially unsaturated, and that the most probable values of electron temperature. Doppler width of the microturbulence, and electron density, all averaged along the amplification path are, correspondingly, T(sub e) less than or equal to 11,000 K, V(sub micro) less than or equal to 14 km/s, n(sub e) approx. = (3 +/- 2) x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. The model shows that radiation at every frequency within the spectrum arises in a monochromatic 'hot spot.' The maximum optical depth within the 'hot spot' producing radiation at the spectral peak maximum is tau(sub max) approx. = 6 +/- 1; the effective width of the masing ring is approx. = 0.4-0.7 times its outer diameter; the size of the 'hot spot' responsible for the radiation at the spectral peak frequency is approx. = 0.2-0.3 times the distance between the two 'hot spots' corresponding to two peaks. An important derivation of our model is the dynamical mass of the central star

  8. Kinetic analysis of two dimensional metallic grating Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ding

    2011-08-15

    The dispersion relation of two dimensional metallic grating Cerenkov maser has been given by using kinetic analysis, in which the influence of electron movement is directly considered without using an equivalent dielectric medium assumption. The effects of structural parameters and beam state on the interaction gain and synchronous frequency have also been investigated in detail by numerical calculations. To an illustrative case, the quantitative relations produced from varying the gap distance between electron beam and metallic grating, beam current, electron transverse to axial velocity ratio, and electron axial velocity spread have been obtained. The developed method can be used to predict the real interaction system performances.

  9. Using Two-Dimensional Distributed Feedback for Synchronization of Radiation from Two Parallel-Sheet Electron Beams in a Free-Electron Maser.

    PubMed

    Arzhannikov, A V; Ginzburg, N S; Kalinin, P V; Kuznetsov, S A; Malkin, A M; Peskov, N Yu; Sergeev, A S; Sinitsky, S L; Stepanov, V D; Thumm, M; Zaslavsky, V Yu

    2016-09-09

    A spatially extended planar 75 GHz free-electron maser with a hybrid two-mirror resonator consisting of two-dimensional upstream and traditional one-dimensional downstream Bragg reflectors and driven by two parallel-sheet electron beams 0.8  MeV/1  kA has been elaborated. For the highly oversized interaction space (cross section 45×2.5 vacuum wavelengths), the two-dimensional distributed feedback allowed realization of stable narrow-band generation that includes synchronization of emission from both electron beams. As a result, spatially coherent radiation with the output power of 30-50 MW and a pulse duration of ∼100  ns was obtained in each channel.

  10. Using Two-Dimensional Distributed Feedback for Synchronization of Radiation from Two Parallel-Sheet Electron Beams in a Free-Electron Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Kalinin, P. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Malkin, A. M.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Stepanov, V. D.; Thumm, M.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A spatially extended planar 75 GHz free-electron maser with a hybrid two-mirror resonator consisting of two-dimensional upstream and traditional one-dimensional downstream Bragg reflectors and driven by two parallel-sheet electron beams 0.8 MeV /1 kA has been elaborated. For the highly oversized interaction space (cross section 45 ×2.5 vacuum wavelengths), the two-dimensional distributed feedback allowed realization of stable narrow-band generation that includes synchronization of emission from both electron beams. As a result, spatially coherent radiation with the output power of 30-50 MW and a pulse duration of ˜100 ns was obtained in each channel.

  11. Accelerating a water maser face-on jet from a high mass young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Kazuhito; Sorai, Kazuo; Honma, Mareki; Hirota, Tomoya; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Niinuma, Kotaro; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Fujisawa, Kenta

    2016-10-01

    We report on long-term single-dish and VLBI monitoring for intermittent flare activities of a dominant blue-shifted H2O maser associated with a southern high mass young stellar object, G353.273+0.641. Bi-weekly single-dish monitoring using the Hokkaido University Tomakomai 11 m radio telescope has shown that a systematic acceleration continues over four years beyond the lifetime of individual maser features. This fact suggests that the H2O maser traces a region where molecular gas is steadily accelerated. There were five maser flares during the five years of monitoring, and maser distributions in four of them were densely monitored by VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The overall distribution of the maser features suggests the presence of a bipolar jet, with the 3D kinematics indicating that it is almost face-on (inclination angle of ˜ 8°-17° from the line of sight). Most maser features were recurrently excited within a region of 100×100 au2 around the radio continuum peak, while their spatial distributions significantly varied between each flare. This confirms that episodic propagations of outflow shocks recurrently invoke intermittent flare activities. We also measured annual parallax, deriving a source distance of 1.70^{+0.19}_{-0.16} kpc that is consistent with the commonly used photometric distance.

  12. Cosmic Fire Hydrants: The nature of 11 high-velocity water masers in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Walsh, Andrew; Breen, Shari; Green, jimi; Purcell, Cormac; Longmore, Steve N.

    2015-08-01

    Water masers act as excellent cosmic markers for the motion of dynamic astronomical regions such as young massive circumstellar disks and outflows from evolved stars. Studying fast water masers gives us a very rare insight into two very a significant stages of stellar evolution.In high-mass star forming regions, water masers are formed in the walls of conical outflows, in collimated jets and in some cases under the influence of a circumstellar disk wind. High-resolution studies of these masers therefore enable us to probe the accretion mechanism for massive star formation. Water masers in post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars probe the very brief phase of aspherical mass-loss before the outer layers of the circumstellar envelope are ionised and the star becomes a Planetary Nebula. The process of aspherical Planetary Nebula formation is still the subject of considerable debate, with the binary hypothesis and magnetic collimation of fast winds being the leading explanations at present.We selected the eleven water maser sites from the H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey that have differential radial velocities greater than 200 km/s. The water maser sites were subsequently re-observed at higher angular resolution to localise the maser positions with respect to other astronomical emission in the vicinity and where possible, to probe the internal velocity gradients. We conducted a multi-wavelength study of these sites of water masers to determine the stage of stellar evolution, their physical size and a number of other attributes. We present several significant new results and open questions that demand further investigation.

  13. A 20-GHz IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. L.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band. The development effort involved a variety of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, simple and multiple diode circuits designs, and amplifier integration and test.

  14. Water Maser Kinematics in the Jet of OH 12.8-0.9

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-10

    They exhibit both H2O and OH maser emission ; how- ever, the relative characteristics of the two maser species differ from those of the typical AGB star...12 and 60 m. Other 25 m peakers include young PNs and carbon stars with circumstellar silicate emission features (Kwok et al. 1997). OH 12.80.9 has...2004). H2O maser emission from OH 12.80.9 was first detected by Engels et al. (1986), who noted the fact that the H2O emission peaks are outside

  15. Historical cost curves for hydrogen masers and cesium beam frequency and timing standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-02-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  16. Investigation of low temperature atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C.; Silvera, I.F.

    1993-05-01

    We have used a cryogenic hydrogen maser to study ground state atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions at temperatures near 0.5 K. Recent quantum-mechanical treatments of low energy atomic collisions predict that hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shifts will become large at low temperatures, and will affect the performance of new atomic frequency standards such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser and the cesium fountain. We have measured the effects of low temperature spin-exchange collisions on maser line-broadening and frequency, and in particular the hyperfine-induced frequency shift.

  17. Historical Cost Curves for Hydrogen Masers and Cesium Beam Frequency and Timing Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  18. Van Der Pol model of a Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, M.; Ron, A.; Botton, M.

    1995-12-31

    A non-linear analysis of a Cerenkov maser is presented. The system consists of a ring configuration of a cylindrical waveguide filled with a dielectric material. A single transverse-magnetic mode is assumed to propagate in the system. A low-density pencil electron beam travels in part of the ring, confined by a strong axial magnetic field. Using the single-particle description for the beam and the wave equation for the field, we obtain a set of two coupled non-linear differential equations describing the slowly varying amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic mode. The gain per path is assumed to be small and the spatial growth of the field is neglected. The resulting time dependent amplitude includes the exponential gain of the linear stage and the saturation to its maximum value. The time dependent frequency is also calculated. The two equations are combined to a single Van Der Pol equation with a non-linear restoring force. This description demonstrates the similarities and differences between the Cerenkov maser and other lasing systems.

  19. Comparison of Three Statistical Classification Techniques for Maser Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Ellen M.; Holland, Barbara R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Chen, Xi; Humphries, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    We applied three statistical classification techniques-linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression, and random forests-to three astronomical datasets associated with searches for interstellar masers. We compared the performance of these methods in identifying whether specific mid-infrared or millimetre continuum sources are likely to have associated interstellar masers. We also discuss the interpretability of the results of each classification technique. Non-parametric methods have the potential to make accurate predictions when there are complex relationships between critical parameters. We found that for the small datasets the parametric methods logistic regression and LDA performed best, for the largest dataset the non-parametric method of random forests performed with comparable accuracy to parametric techniques, rather than any significant improvement. This suggests that at least for the specific examples investigated here accuracy of the predictions obtained is not being limited by the use of parametric models. We also found that for LDA, transformation of the data to match a normal distribution led to a significant improvement in accuracy. The different classification techniques had significant overlap in their predictions; further astronomical observations will enable the accuracy of these predictions to be tested.

  20. Methanol-Air Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Cells charged with 120 ml of anolyte , consisting of 6 M methanol in 11 M KOH, have operated for 2,230 hours under cyclic load drains of 50 mA for 13...minutes and 2 A for 1 second. One cell operated for more than 8,000 hours with periodic refilling of fresh anolyte , demonstrating the long serviceable...life of the electrode components. Fuel utilization efficiencies as high as 84% have been obtained from cells charged with an anolyte solution of

  1. THE SPATIOKINEMATICAL STRUCTURE OF H{sub 2}O AND OH MASERS IN THE ''WATER FOUNTAIN'' SOURCE IRAS 18460-0151

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Shuji; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Diamond, Philip J. E-mail: deguchishuji60@gmail.com E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2013-08-20

    Using the Very Long Baseline Array and the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network, we have observed 22.2 GHz H{sub 2}O and 1612 MHz OH masers in the water fountain source IRAS 18460-0151. The H{sub 2}O maser spectrum has a very wide line-of-sight velocity range ( Almost-Equal-To 310 km s{sup -1}) and consists of three groups of emission features at the blueshifted (-68 km s{sup -1}{approx}< V{sub LSR} {approx}< -17 km s{sup -1}) and redshifted (V{sub LSR} {approx_equal} 240 km s{sup -1}) edges as well as around the systemic velocity (112 km s{sup -1} {approx}< V{sub LSR} {approx}< 133 km s{sup -1}). The first two H{sub 2}O spectral components exhibit a highly collimated high-velocity bipolar jet on the sky, with an angular separation of Almost-Equal-To 120 milliarcsec (mas) (240 AU in linear length) and a three-dimensional flow velocity of Almost-Equal-To 160 km s{sup -1}. The flow dynamical age is estimated to be only Almost-Equal-To 6 yr (at the time of the observation epochs of 2006-2007). Interestingly, the systemic velocity component clearly exhibits a spherically expanding outflow with a radius of Almost-Equal-To 36 AU and a flow velocity of Almost-Equal-To 9 km s{sup -1}. On the other hand, the OH maser spectrum shows double peaks with a velocity separation of Almost-Equal-To 25 km s{sup -1} (V{sub LSR} = 111-116 and 138-141 km s{sup -1}), as typically seen in circumstellar envelopes of OH/IR stars. The angular offset between the velocity-integrated brightness peaks of the two high-velocity H{sub 2}O components is Almost-Equal-To 25 mas (50 AU). The offset direction and the alignment of the redshifted maser spots are roughly perpendicular to the axis of the H{sub 2}O maser flow. High-accuracy astrometry for the H{sub 2}O and OH masers demonstrates that the collimated fast jet and the slowly expanding outflow originate from a single or multiple sources which are located within 15 mas (30 AU). On the other hand, the estimated systemic velocity of

  2. Transport of methanol by pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report examines and evaluates the problems and considerations that could affect the feasibility of transporting methanol by pipeline. The following are the major conclusions: Though technical problems, such as methanol water contamination and materials incompatibility, remain to be solved, none appears insolvable. Methanol appears to be less toxic, and therefore to represent less of a health hazard, than gasoline, the fuel for which methanol is expected to substitute. The primary safety hazards of methanol, fire and explosion, are no worse than those of gasoline. The environmental hazards that can be associated with methanol are not as significant as those of petroleum. Provided quantities of throughput sufficient to justify pipeline transport are available, there appear to be no economic impediments to the transport of methanol by pipeline. Based on these, it appears that it can be concluded that the pipelining of methanol, whether via an existing petroleum pipeline or a new methanol-dedicated pipeline, is indeed feasible. 66 refs., 3 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Statistical studies based on simultaneous SiO and H{sub 2}O maser surveys toward evolved stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Sang Joon E-mail: cho@kasi.re.kr

    2014-01-01

    Based on the simultaneous observational results of SiO and H{sub 2}O masers toward 401 evolved stars, we have performed statistical analyses. We find that the peak and integrated intensities of SiO masers are stronger than those of H{sub 2}O masers in both Mira variables and OH/IR stars at most optical phases. However, the relative intensity ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers in OH/IR stars are larger than those in Mira variables. Moreover, the intensity ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers are found to be increased around the optical phases from 0-0.4. The H{sub 2}O photon luminosities also tend to be more dependent on the optical phase compared with those of SiO masers. These facts suggest that H{sub 2}O masers are more sensitive to expanding the motion of circumstellar envelopes and also shock waves arising from the pulsations of the central star compared with SiO masers. This result may also be related to the differences in the maser location and pumping mechanism between H{sub 2}O and SiO masers. The full width at zero power of SiO masers in Mira variables shows similar values to those of OH/IR stars, while those of H{sub 2}O masers in OH/IR stars show larger values than those of Mira variables. These differences may originate from the different mass-loss rates and the different location of the two masers. The mean velocity shift of SiO and H{sub 2}O masers with respect to the stellar velocity was investigated as a function of optical phase. The velocity shift of the H{sub 2}O masers shows that the redshifted emission dominates during the phases from 0.3-0.6, while the blueshifted emission appears at phase 0.6 and coexists with the redshifted emission during other phases. These features show an associated pattern with the CO ΔV = 3 radial velocity curve, which exhibits a typical pulsation motion. On the other hand, the velocity shift of the SiO v = 2 maser shows slightly similar features to the H{sub 2}O maser, while that of SiO v = 1 does not show these similar

  4. State of the art and future directions for the atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The present status of technology development for atomic hydrogen masers (H-masers) is reviewed. The limitations to frequency stability and accuracy are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with cavity resonator instability and the lack of reproducibility and stability of the storage volume wall coating frequency shift. New types of coating developed in the Soviet Union and better, cavity resonator materials, are expected to make possible frequency at the 10(exp -16) level at 10(exp 4) sec. Better control of systematic effects should extend the long-term stability to levels better than 10(exp -15) for intervals beyond one day. Present use of H-masers as flywheel oscillators in timekeeping systems is discussed as is the outlook for the future cryogenic and room temperature H-masers as flywheel oscillators to operate very high resolution frequency discriminators based on the newly evolving technology of trapped and cooled ions and atoms.

  5. The NASA/GSFC hydrogen maser program: A review of recent data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, M.; Bates, A. G.; Rueger, L. J.; Reinhardt, V. S.; Dachel, P.; Kunski, R.; Kruger, R.

    1983-01-01

    Data is presented on the phase and frequency stability, over time periods extending to one week, of the new NR field operable hydrogen masers developed by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and the older NX and NP field operable hydrogen masers developed by Goddard Space Flight Center and maintained and upgraded by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC). Data is presented on the NR masers in the laboratory showing frequency stabilities well into the 10 to the -15th power range and phase stabilities well into the 100 ps range for periods of up to one day. Data is presented on upgraded NP masers in the laboratory showing that the frequency stability has been improved substantially to virtually the NR level. VLBI data is presented on the phase difference between NX-2 at Owens Valley, California and NR-2 at Fort Davis, Texas for a one week period showing, after removal of a constant frequency drift, a 350 ps RMS phase stability.

  6. Hyperfine contribution to spin-exchange frequency shifts in the hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaar, B.J.; Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Luiten, O.J.; Crampton, S.B.

    1987-05-01

    We have rigorously included hyperfine interactions during electron-spin-exchange collisions between ground-state hydrogen atoms and find additional frequency shifts which are significant for low-temperature atomic hydrogen maser oscillators.

  7. The saturation of the electron-cyclotron maser instability and the interpretation of solar millisecond spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent numeric two-dimensional code of the kinetic wave-particle equations developed to investigate the maser dynamics in the solar context is applied to solar millisecond-spike observations in order to improve the diagnostic capabilities of the theory of the electron-cyclotron maser instablitity. Attention is given to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field selecting magneto-ionic modes with relatively short saturation lengths and suppressing mechanisms such as collisional deflection, free-free absorption, and gyroresonance absorption. The time scales of maser saturation in respect to time scales of global particle changes in a magnetic loop are covered, relevant observations of solar millisecond spikes are described, and the interpretation in terms of physical parameters deduced from the quasi-linear maser simulations are presented. It is demonstrated that the quasi-linear simulations make it possible to constrain the physical parameters from the observed time scale and frequency.

  8. Superconductor magnets used for stagger-tuning traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Superconducting materials reduce size and weight of magnets used for stagger-tuning individual traveling-wave maser crystals. The invention is useful in microwave communication systems requiring a high information rate.

  9. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  10. ITEL Experiment Module and its Flight on MASER9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löth, K.; Schneider, H.; Larsson, B.; Jansson, O.; Houltz, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The ITEL (Interfacial Turbulence in Evaporating Liquid) module is built under contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) and is scheduled to fly onboard a Sounding Rocket (MASER 9) in March 2002. The project is conducted by Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) with Lambda-X as a subcontractor responsible for the optical system. The Principle Investigator is Pierre Colinet from Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The experiment in ITEL on Maser 9 is part of a research program, which will make use of the International Space Station. The purpose of the flight on Maser 9 is to observe the cellular convection (Marangoni-Bénard instability) which arise when the surface tension varies with temperature yielding thermocapillary instabilities. During the 6 minutes of microgravity of the ITEL experiment, a highly volatile liquid layer (ethyl alcohol) will be evaporated, and the convection phenomena generated by the evaporation process will be visualized. Due to the cooling by latent heat consumption at the level of the evaporating free surface, a temperature gradient is induced perpendicularly to it. The flight experiment module contains one experiment cell, including a gas system for regulation of nitrogen flow over the evaporating surface and an injection unit that is used for injection of liquid into the cell both initially and during surface regulation. The experiment cell is equipped with pressure and flow sensors as well as thermocouples both inside the liquid and at different positions in the cell. Two optical diagnostic systems have been developed around the experiment cell. An interferometric optical tomograph measures the 3-dimensional distribution of temperature in the evaporating liquid and a Schlieren system visualizes the temperature gradients inside the liquid together with the liquid surface deformation. A PC/104 based electronic system is used for management and control of the experiment. The electronic system handles measurements, housekeeping, image

  11. Design and characterization of the DC acceleration and transport system required for the FOM 1 MW free electron maser experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Urbanus, W.H.; Geer, C. van der

    1995-12-31

    A Free Electron Maser (FEM) has been constructed and is soon to be tested at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz. The design uses a DC beam system in a depressed collector configuration in order to make the overall wall plug efficiency 50%. The high voltage ({approximately} 2 MeV) power supply provides only the body interception current ({approximately} 30 mA) while the 12 amp beam current is supplied by the 100-200 keV collector supplies. Some of the design features to ensure low interception current, which is critical to long pulse (CW) operation are: (1) DC beam in-line transport and acceleration system, (2) emittance conserving solenoid focusing system, (3) halo suppression techniques at cathode edge, and (4) very low beam fill factor (<20%). A relativistic version of the Herman Optical theory developed for microwave tubes is used to determine current distribution functions everywhere along the beam from the electron gun, through the DC accelerator and transport system to the wiggler. This theory takes into account thermals far out on the gaussian tail which translates into beam current far outside the ideal beam edge. This theory is applied to the FOM beam line design to predict a series of beam envelope contours containing various percentages of total beam current up to 99.9%. Predictions of body interception current due to finite emittance (effective temperature) are presented and compared with measured experimental results.

  12. Stäckel-type dynamic model of the Galaxy based on maser kinematic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. O.; Nikiforov, I. I.; Ossipkov, L. P.

    A dynamic model of the Galaxy is constructed based on kinematic data for masers with trigonometric parallaxes. Maser data is used to compute the model potential in the Galactic plane. The potential is then generalized to three dimensions assuming the existence of a third quadratic integral of motion. The resulting Galactic model potential is of Stäckel's type. The corresponding space density function is determined from Poisson's equation.

  13. Ground-State SiO Maser Emission Toward Evolved Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    emulateapj v. 11/12/01 GROUND-STATE SIO MASER EMISSION TOWARD EVOLVED STARS D. A. BOBOLTZ U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave., NW...Accepted by the Astrophysical Journal 2004 February 20 ABSTRACT We have made the first unambiguous detection of vibrational ground-state maser emission ...observed. Ground-state thermal emission was detected for one of the stars, RX Boo, with a peak brightness temperature of 200 K. Comparing the v = 0 and

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ATCA obs. of ground-state OH masers (Qiao+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, H.-H.; Walsh, A. J.; Green, J. A.; Breen, S. L.; Dawson, J. R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gomez, J. F.; Jordan, C. H.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Lowe, V.; Jones, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Observations were conducted with the ATCA from 2013 October 24 to 29, and 2015 January 27. At the frequency of the ground-state OH masers, the 6A array results in a synthesized beam between 4.07"x7.41" and 5.50"x12.53". Observational pointing centers were determined based on the Parkes OH maser detections introduced in Dawson+ (2014MNRAS.439.1596D). (1 data file).

  15. Advances in the development of piezoelectric quartz-crystal oscillators, hydrogen masers, and superconducting frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, Joseph J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes recent research advances made in the development of radiation-hardened piezoelectric quartz oscillators, hydrogen masers, and superconducting oscillators, with emphasis placed on the principles involved in the operation of these oscillators and the factors affecting the operation. Particular attention is given to the radiation-susceptibility studies of quartz-crystal resonators, the hydrogen-maser relaxation process and noise sources, and low-phase-noise superconducting oscillators. Diagrams of these devices and performance graphs are included.

  16. Saturation of cyclotron maser instability driven by an electron loss-cone distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The resonance diffusion of electrons in velocity space caused by the excited EM wave fields is considered to be the dominant saturation process of cyclotron maser instability that is driven by an electron loss-cone distribution. An upper bound of the saturation level is derived analytically. Since the resulting saturation level is low, the resonance diffusion is indeed responsible for the saturation of the cyclotron maser instability.

  17. Weak maser emission of methyl formate toward Sagittarius B2(N) in the green bank telescope PRIMOS survey

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, A.; Wiesenfeld, L.; Szalewicz, K.

    2014-03-10

    A non-LTE radiative transfer treatment of cis-methyl formate (HCOOCH{sub 3}) rotational lines is presented for the first time using a set of theoretical collisional rate coefficients. These coefficients have been computed in the temperature range 5-30 K by combining coupled-channel scattering calculations with a high accuracy potential energy surface for HCOOCH{sub 3}-He. The results are compared to observations toward the Sagittarius B2(N) molecular cloud using the publicly available PRIMOS survey from the Green Bank Telescope. A total of 49 low-lying transitions of methyl formate, with upper levels below 25 K, are identified. These lines are found to probe a presumably cold (∼30 K), moderately dense (∼10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}), and extended region surrounding Sgr B2(N). The derived column density of ∼4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup –2} is only a factor of ∼10 larger than the column density of the trans conformer in the same source. Provided that the two conformers have the same spatial distribution, this result suggests that strongly non-equilibrium processes must be involved in their synthesis. Finally, our calculations show that all detected emission lines with a frequency below 30 GHz are (collisionally pumped) weak masers amplifying the continuum of Sgr B2(N). This result demonstrates the importance and generality of non-LTE effects in the rotational spectra of complex organic molecules at centimeter wavelengths.

  18. Sixty GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. E.; Chen, J.; Benko, E.; Barger, M. J.; Nghiem, H.; Trinh, T. Q.; Kung, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT Diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goal of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10 year life time. During the course of the program, double drift (DD) GaAs IMPATT Diodes have been developed resulting in the state of the art performance at V band frequencies. A CW output power of 1.12 W was demonstrated at 51.9 GHz with 9.7 percent efficiency. The best conversion efficiency achieved was 15.3 percent. V band DD GaAs IMPATTs were developed using both small signal and large signal analyses. GaAs wafers of DD flat, DD hybrid, and DD Read profiles using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were developed with excellent doping profile control. Wafer evaluation was routinely made by the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurement. Ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis was also used for more detailed profile evaluation.

  19. Mid-infrared imaging of Orion BN/KL - Astrometry of IRc2 and the SiO maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.

    1992-01-01

    Array images of Orion BN/KL at nine midinfrared (5-20 microns) wavelengths have revealed a subarcsecond structure near IRc2 which provides new constraints on the relationship between IRc2 and the Orion SiO maser. The infrared source positions have been improved, and IRc2 is found to be displaced 0.8 +/- 0.2 arcsec (at least 400 AU) from the SiO maser, an order of magnitude greater than the separation assumed in the current maser model. The SiO maser and the IRc2 midinfrared source may be physically independent objects. There are indications that IRc2 is eroded on the south side adjacent to the SiO/H2O maser cluster, suggesting that another luminous object near IRc2, most likely a stellar object associated with radio continuum point source 'I', is the host for the Orion SiO maser.

  20. A water-vapour giga-maser in the active galaxy TXFS2226-184.

    PubMed

    Koekemoer, A M; Henkel, C; Greenhill, L J; Dey, A; van Breugel, W; Codella, C; Antonucci, R

    1995-12-14

    Active galactic nuclei are thought to be powered by gas falling into a massive black hole; the different types of active galaxy may arise because we view them through a thick torus of molecular gas at varying angles of inclination. One way to determine whether the black hole is surrounded by a torus, which would obscure the accretion disk around the black hole along certain lines of sight, is to search for water masers, as these exist only in regions with plentiful molecular gas. Since the first detection of an extra-galactic water maser in 1979, they have come to be associated primarily with active galaxies, and have even been used to probe the mass of the central engine. Here we report the detection of a water giga-maser in the radio galaxy TXFS2226-184. The strength of the emission supports a recently proposed theory of maser pumping that allows for even more powerful masers, which might be detectable at cosmological distances. Water masers may accordingly provide a way to determine distances to galaxies outside the usual distance ladder, providing an independent calibration of the Hubble constant.

  1. First images of water vapor masers in the galaxy M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Moran, J. M.; Reid, M. J.; Gwinn, C. R.; Menten, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The first successful VLBI observations of 10 extragalactic H2O masers in the M33 galaxy are reported. A spectral-line VLBI synthesis map is constructed, the first of any extragalactic H2O maser sources. The map has the lowest noise of any K-band spectral line VLBI map yet produced. The maser emission extends over about 300 milliarcseconds and is divided into 14 distinct spatial components, the strongest of which has a correlated flux density of about 0.7 Jy. The relative positions of some of these components are determined accurately enough to provide first-epoch measurements for proper motion studies. The characteristics of the maser are similar to those of the most powerful maser in the Galaxy, W49N. A compact H II region is found close to the maser which is 1 pc in diameter and whose emission measure is about 6 x 10 to the 7th pc/cm exp 6. This region is the compact component of a more extended H II complex that extends over about 100 pc.

  2. Apparent sizes and spectral line profiles for spherical ('three-dimensional') astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmering, Robert T.; Watson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations are performed for the frequency-dependent transport of radiation in a uniform spherical maser. Coupling between the intensities at different frequencies is treated. Spherical masers are commonly utilized as idealized geometries in which to assess possible deviations (sometimes, 'three-dimensional effects') from the approximation of a linear geometry. We find that the spectral line profile rebroadens in approximately the same manner as that for a linear maser so that the relationship between the line breadth and the luminosity, beaming angle, and degree of saturation is essentially unchanged. The variation of the apparent size of a spherical maser with frequency is not found to be significant at frequencies within the line profile at which the intensity is appreciable. The 'standard approximation' is adequate for obtaining most of the basic properties of spherical masers that have been examined including the relationship between the pumping (or molecular populations) and the intensity of maser radiation. The improved methods employed here are, however, necessary to obtain variation of the apparent size with frequency in the saturated regime. These conclusions differ from those of previous investigators. The calculations here are more reliable than those of previous investigators because these are self-consistent and avoid certain inaccurate simplifications.

  3. [Probing Planck-scale Physics with a Ne-21/He-3 Zeeman Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Ne-21/He-3 Zeeman maser is a recently developed device which employs co-located ensembles of Ne-21 and He-3 atoms to provide sensitive differential measurements of the noble gas nuclear Zeeman splittings as a function of time, thereby greatly attenuating common-mode systematic effects such as uniform magnetic field variations. The Ne-21 maser will serve as a precision magnetometer to stabilize the system's static magnetic field, while the He-3 maser is used as a sensitive probe for violations of CPT and Lorentz symmetry by searching for small variations in the 3He maser frequency as the spatial orientation of the apparatus changes due to the rotation of the Earth (or placement on a rotating table). In the context of a general extension of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Ne-21/He-3 maser will provide the most sensitive search to date for CPT and Lorentz violation of the neutron: better than 10(exp -32) GeV, an improvement of more than an order of magnitude over past experiments. This exceptional precision will offer a rare opportunity to probe physics at the Planck scale. A future space-based Ne-21/He-3 maser or related device could provide even greater sensitivity to violations of CPT and Lorentz symmetry, and hence to Planck-scale physics, because of isolation from dominant systematic effects associated with ground-based operation, and because of access to different positions in space-time.

  4. Z45: A new 45-GHz band dual-polarization HEMT receiver for the NRO 45-m radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Kimura, Kimihiko; Okada, Nozomi; Kozu, Minato; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Tokuda, Kazuki; Ochiai, Tetsu; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Kameno, Seiji; Taniguchi, Kotomi; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Takano, Shuro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nakajima, Taku; Iono, Daisuke; Kuno, Nario; Onishi, Toshikazu; Momose, Munetake; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    We developed a dual-linear-polarization HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifier receiver system of the 45-GHz band (hereafter Z45), and installed it in the Nobeyama 45-m radio telescope. The receiver system is designed to conduct polarization observations by taking the cross-correlation of two linearly polarized components, from which we process full Stokes spectroscopy. We aim to measure the magnetic field strength through the Zeeman effect of the emission line of CCS (JN = 43-32) toward pre-protostellar cores. A linear-polarization receiver system has a smaller contribution of instrumental polarization components to the Stokes V spectra than that of the circular polarization system, so that it is easier to obtain the Stokes V spectra. The receiver has an RF frequency of 42-46 GHz and an intermediate frequency (IF) band of 4-8 GHz. The typical noise temperature is about 50 K, and the system noise temperature ranges from 100 to 150 K over the frequency of 42-46 GHz. The receiver system is connected to two spectrometers, SAM45 and PolariS. SAM45 is a highly flexible FX-type digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 3.81 kHz. PolariS is a newly developed digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 60 Hz, and which has a capability to process the full-Stokes spectroscopy. The half-power beam width (HPBW) was measured to be 37″ at 43 GHz. The main beam efficiency of the Gaussian main beam was derived to be 0.72 at 43 GHz. The SiO maser observations show that the beam pattern is reasonably round at about 10% of the peak intensity and the side-lobe level was less than 3% of the peak intensity. Finally, we present some examples of astronomical observations using Z45.

  5. Traveling-wave maser, closed cycle refrigerator automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, J. A.; Petty, S. M.

    1981-10-01

    At the present time all traveling-wave maser and closed-cycle refrigerator system (TWM-CCR) and their power supply and helium compressor assemblies are operated manually. Many man-hours are required of highly trained and experienced operators, resulting in high operator cost. Of greater importance are the problems of unpredictable failure and long downtimes. Since field performance is not monitored, system degradation is detected only when it has progressed to the point of catastrophic failure. Without the aid of performance histories, failure diagnosis is arduous and slow. Rational and functional requirements for the TWM-CCR Automation project are the following: (1) to improve reliability and reduce downtime by providing unattended monitor and control, alarm and fault location, failure prediction and self-corrective action; (2) to reduce operator cost by providing automatic tuning and cooldown procedures; and (3) to improve system operations and development by providing the needed engineering data.

  6. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen maser at the NPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mossavati, R.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Cold Hydrogen Maser (CHM) was being developed for the past year. The features of this CHM, which is designed to operate initially at 4.2 K, are the use of low loss alumina, and later sapphire, in the fabrication of the microwave cavity; possible use of superconductors for shielding; use of a cryogenic amplifier; possible coating material; and a reliable RF discharge circuit for the dissociation of hydrogen. A numerical simulation was performed to find the dimensions of the microwave cavity for the TE011 mode and the model was confirmed experimentally. The system will be used to test various wall coatings adsorbed on top of a PTFE buffer underlayer. The CHM is expected to be used as a flywheel frequency standard at the NPL with medium-term stability of one part in 10(exp 14) or better.

  7. A Study of DSN Traveling Wave Maser System Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Wiggins, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Reliability and availability characteristics of the DSN traveling wave maser (TWM) Assemblies are reported for the years 1981 through 1983, the charcteristics determined are: mean time between failures (MTBF) - 1200 hours; mean time to restore service (MTTRS) - 2.5 hours; and availability - 99.83%. The TWM MTBF is very good as compared to other DSN subsystems and assemblies. The TWM MTTRS is currently about three times as long as the average of other DSN subsystems. The dominant cause of TWM failures is contamination of the helium gas in the closed cycle refrigerators. Station configurations that do not provide TWM redundancy are subject to reception outages for long periods of time. Recommendations are made to improve the TWM Assembly availability characteristics for future mission support operations.

  8. Normal and anomalous Doppler effects in periodic waveguide cyclotron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Korol, M.; Jerby, E.

    1995-12-31

    A linear analysis of the periodic-waveguide cyclotron (PWC) maser shows that the PWC interaction with fast-waves possesses properties of the known anomalous Doppler resonance interaction if the wave impedance of the resonant spatial harmonic, Z{sub n}, is much smaller than the free space impedance, i.e. if Z{sub n} {much_lt} Z{sub 0}. The feasibility of a fast-wave PWC interaction in a low impedance waveguide is examined theoretically in this paper. A practical scheme of a slotted-waveguide PWC operating in the fundamental harmonic near cutoff is proposed for a future experiment. The possible advantages of the quasi-anomalous Doppler effect in the fast-wave-PWC operating regime are the alleviation of the initial electron rotation and a high-efficiency operation.

  9. VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrelles, José M.; Gómez, José F.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Curiel, Salvador; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert

    2012-07-01

    VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations are a powerful tool to study the gas very close to the central engine responsible for the phenomena associated with the early evolution of massive protostars. In this paper we present a summary of the main observational results obtained toward the massive star-forming regions of Cepheus A and W75N. These observations revealed unexpected phenomena in the earliest stages of evolution of massive objects (e.g., non-collimated ``short-lived'' pulsed ejections in different massive protostars), and provided new insights in the study of the dynamic scenario of the formation of high-mass stars (e.g., simultaneous presence of a jet and wide-angle outflow in the massive object Cep A HW2, similar to what is observed in low-mass protostars). In addition, with these observations it has been possible to identify new, previously unseen centers of high-mass star formation through outflow activity.

  10. Entropy production and thermalization in the one-atom maser.

    PubMed

    Solano-Carrillo, E

    2016-12-01

    In the configuration in which two-level atoms with an initial thermal distribution of their states are sent in succession to a cavity sustaining a single mode of electromagnetic radiation, one atom leaving the cavity as the next one enters it (as in the one-atom maser), Jaynes and Cummings showed that the steady state of the field, when many atoms have traversed the cavity, is thermal with a temperature different than that of the atoms in the off-resonant situation. Having an interaction between two subsystems which maintains them at different temperatures was then understood as leading to an apparent violation of energy conservation. Here we show, by calculating the quantum entropy production in the system, that this difference of temperatures is consistent with having the subsystems adiabatically insulated from each other as the steady state is approached. At resonance the insulation is removed and equilibration of the temperatures is achieved.

  11. Kinetic friction attributed to enhanced radiation by cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Wu, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    Along the auroral field lines, a fraction of the energetic electrons injected from the magnetotail is reflected by the earth's convergent geomagnetic field. The reflected loss-cone electrons are unstable with respect to the cyclotron maser instability, resulting in the auroral kilometric radiation. This paper investigates the kinetic friction force exerted on the energetic electrons by the enhanced radiation field. It is found that the enhanced radiation results in a deceleration of reflected electrons, thereby providing an effective resistivity. In addition, the rate of decrease (increase) of effective perpendicular (parallel) kinetic temperatures is also evaluated. The analysis is carried out over various physical parameters such as the degree of loss cone, average particle energy, and the ratio of plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency.

  12. Traveling-wave maser, closed cycle refrigerator automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, J. A.; Petty, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    At the present time all traveling-wave maser and closed-cycle refrigerator system (TWM-CCR) and their power supply and helium compressor assemblies are operated manually. Many man-hours are required of highly trained and experienced operators, resulting in high operator cost. Of greater importance are the problems of unpredictable failure and long downtimes. Since field performance is not monitored, system degradation is detected only when it has progressed to the point of catastrophic failure. Without the aid of performance histories, failure diagnosis is arduous and slow. Rational and functional requirements for the TWM-CCR Automation project are the following: (1) to improve reliability and reduce downtime by providing unattended monitor and control, alarm and fault location, failure prediction and self-corrective action; (2) to reduce operator cost by providing automatic tuning and cooldown procedures; and (3) to improve system operations and development by providing the needed engineering data.

  13. Entropy production and thermalization in the one-atom maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano-Carrillo, E.

    2016-12-01

    In the configuration in which two-level atoms with an initial thermal distribution of their states are sent in succession to a cavity sustaining a single mode of electromagnetic radiation, one atom leaving the cavity as the next one enters it (as in the one-atom maser), Jaynes and Cummings showed that the steady state of the field, when many atoms have traversed the cavity, is thermal with a temperature different than that of the atoms in the off-resonant situation. Having an interaction between two subsystems which maintains them at different temperatures was then understood as leading to an apparent violation of energy conservation. Here we show, by calculating the quantum entropy production in the system, that this difference of temperatures is consistent with having the subsystems adiabatically insulated from each other as the steady state is approached. At resonance the insulation is removed and equilibration of the temperatures is achieved.

  14. OTEC energy via methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.; Richards, D.; Niemeyer, W.G.; Shoemaker, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of an 160 MW/sub e/ OTEC plantship has been documented; it is designed to produce 1000 tonne/day of fuel-grade methanol from coal slurry shipped to the plantship, using oxygen and hydrogen from the on-board electrolysis of water. Data and components are used that were derived by Brown and Root Development, Inc. (BARDI) in designing a barge-mounted plant to make methanol from natural gas for Litton Industries and in the design and construction of a coal-to-ammonia demonstration plant in operation at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The OTEC-methanol plant design is based on the use of the Texaco gasifier and Lurgi synthesis units. The sale price of OTEC methanol delivered to port from this first-of-a-kind plant is estimated to be marginally competitive with methanol from other sources at current market prices.

  15. Cyclotron maser and plasma wave growth in magnetic loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1990-01-01

    Cyclotron maser and plasma wave growth which results from electrons accelerated in magnetic loops are studied. The evolution of the accelerated electron distribution is determined by solving the kinetic equation including Coulomb collisions and magnetic convergence. It is found that for modest values of the column depth of the loop the growth rates of instabilities are significantly reduced and that the reduction is much larger for the cyclotron modes than for the plasma wave modes. The large decrease in the growth rate with column depth suggests that solar coronal densities must be much lower than commonly accepted in order for the cyclotron maser to operate. The density depletion has to be similar to that which occurs during auroral kilometric radiation events in the magnetosphere. The resulting distributions are much more complicated than the idealized distributions used in many theoretical studies, but the fastest growing mode can still simply be determined by the ratio of electron plasma to gyrofrequency, U=omega(sub p)/Omega(sub e). However, the dominant modes are different than for the idealized situations with growth of the z-mode largest for U approximately less than 0.5, and second harmonic x-mode (s=2) or fundamental o-mode (s=1) the dominant modes for 0.5 approximately less than U approximately less than 1. The electron distributions typically contain more than one inverted feature which could give rise to wave growth. It is shown that this can result in simultaneous amplification of more than one mode with each mode driven by a different feature and can be observed, for example, by differences in the rise times of the right and left circularly polarized components of the associated spike bursts.

  16. California methanol assessment. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    The near term methanol industry, the competitive environment, long term methanol market, the transition period, air quality impacts of methanol, roles of the public and private sectors are considered.

  17. Atomic hydrogen for low temperature atomic hydrogen masers and in-vacuum dissociators for VLG-11 series masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1984-01-01

    The operation of a cryogenically-cooled hydrogen maser using an RF plasma dissociator operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (77K) in confunction with a state selector magnet whose dimensions are suitable for slow atoms is studied. The focusing characteristics for a hexapole state selector magnet with maximum fields at the pole tips, provide a maximum acceptance angle for atoms at the most probable velocity in the beam. By thermally isolating the RF circuitry from the dissociator glassware, only dielectric losses in the glass and the energy coupled to the plasma will result in the boil-off of liquid nitrogen. It is estimated that this is about one watt and thus a loss rate of approximately .022 liters pr hour is anticipated.

  18. Magnetic fields around evolved stars: further observations of H2O maser polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.

    2013-06-01

    Context. A low- or intermediate-mass star is believed to maintain a spherical shape throughout the evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. However, many post-AGB objects and planetary nebulae exhibit non-spherical symmetry. Several candidates have been suggested as factors that can play a role in this change of morphology, but the problem is still not well understood. Magnetic fields are one of these possible agents. Aims: We aim to detect the magnetic field and infer its properties around four AGB stars using H2O maser observations. The sample we observed consists of the following sources: the semi-regular variable RT Vir, and the Mira variables AP Lyn, IK Tau, and IRC+60370. Methods: We observed the 61,6 -52,3 H2O maser rotational transition in full-polarization mode to determine its linear and circular polarization. Based on the Zeeman effect, one can infer the properties of the magnetic field from the maser polarization analysis. Results: We detected a total of 238 maser features in three of the four observed sources. No masers were found toward AP Lyn. The observed masers are all located between 2.4 and 53.0 AU from the stars. Linear and circular polarization was found in 18 and 11 maser features, respectively. Conclusions: We more than doubled the number of AGB stars in which a magnetic field has been detected from H2O maser polarization. Our results confirm the presence of fields around IK Tau, RT Vir, and IRC+60370. The strength of the field along the line of sight is found to be between 47 and 331 mG in the H2O maser region. Extrapolating this result to the surface of the stars, assuming a toroidal field (∝ r-1), we find magnetic fields of 0.3-6.9 G on the stellar surfaces. If, instead of a toroidal field, we assume a poloidal field (∝ r-2), then the extrapolated magnetic field strength on the stellar surfaces are in the range between 2.2 and ~115 G. Finally, if a dipole field (∝ r-3) is assumed, the field

  19. 183 GHz water line variation - An energetic outburst in Orion KL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kuiper, E. N. R.; Swanson, P. N.; Dickinson, D. F.; Klein, M. J.; Zimmermann, P.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the 3(13)-2(20) transition of water vapor in the direction of Ori MC1 in 1980 February show a 50 percent flux increase and an apparent additional red shift of approximately 2 km/s relative to the line observed in 1977 December. From a detailed examination of the amplitude and frequency calibration, it appears unlikely that the effect is due to systematic error. The increase is attributed to the appearance of a new component at a velocity of 12 km/s with respect to the local standard of rest. The new component also has broad wings. Increased emission from a region in the high-velocity core of Ori MC1 can be due either to additional far-IR radiation to pump the 1983 GHz transition or to a change in the physical conditions in the gas. Statistical equilibrium calculations using the large-velocity-gradient formalism were carried out to develop a model for the emission. The calculations support a model in which the gas in the region of enhanced emission is hotter than the dust. The temporal coincidence between the 183 GHz increase and the 22 GH1 water maser outburst suggests a common, impulsive cause, which has heated the gas in a part of the HV source, enhancing the emission in both transitions.

  20. 183 GHz water line variation: An energetic outburst in orion KL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kuiper, E. N. R.; Swanson, P. N.; Dickinson, D. F.; Klein, M. J.; Zimmermann, P.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the 3(13)-2(20) transition of water vapor in the direction of Ori MC1 in 1980 February show a 50% flux increase and an apparent additional red shift of approximately 2 km/s relative to the line observed in 1977 December. From a detailed examination of the amplitude and frequency calibration, it appears unlikely that the effect is due to systematic error. The increase is attributed to the appearance of a new component at a velocity of 12 km/s with respect to the local standard of rest. The new component also has broad wings. Increased emission from a region in the high-velocity core of Ori MC1 can be due either to additional far-IR radiation to pump the 1983 GHz transition or to a change in the physical conditions in the gas. Statistical equilibrium calculations using the large-velocity-gradient formalism were carried out to develop a model for the emission. The calculations support a model in which the gas in the region of enhanced emission is hotter than the dust. The temporal coincidence between the 183 GHZ increase and the 22 GH1 water maser outburst suggests a common, impulsive cause, which has heated the gas in a part of the HV source, enhancing the emission in both transitions.

  1. Single passive direct methanol fuel cell supplied with pure methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ligang; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Liang, Liang; Xing, Wei; Liu, Changpeng

    2011-03-01

    A new single passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) supplied with pure methanol is designed, assembled and tested using a pervaporation membrane (PM) to control the methanol transport. The effect of the PM size on the fuel cell performances and the constant current discharge of the fuel cell with one-fueling are studied. The results show that the fuel cell with PM 9 cm2 can yield a maximum power density of about 21 mW cm-2, and a stable performances at a discharge current of 100 mA can last about 45 h. Compared with DMFC supplied with 3 M methanol solution, the energy density provided by this new DMFC has increased about 6 times.

  2. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  3. Properties of Maser-generated Alfvén wave in a Large Laboratory Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ziyan; Dorfman, Seth; Carter, Troy; Morales, George; Clark, Mary; Rossi, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    This research is motivated by the investigations of the natural Alfvén wave maser, which refers to the resonant amplification of Alfvén wave in the earth-surrounding plasmas. A resonant cavity that results from applying a locally non-uniform magnetic field to a plasma source region between the anode and cathode of the Large Plasma Device creates the maser. In this research, a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6)) cathode is used as the plasma source. Above an excitation threshold, selective amplification produces a highly coherent, large amplitude Alfvén wave that propagates out of the resonator through a semitransparent mesh anode into the plasma column where the magnetic field is uniform. The excitation threshold depends on the discharge voltage, and it increases as background magnetic field strength increases; this threshold influences the maser behaviors, including amplitude modulations. The maser with LaB6 source has m = 1 mode and exhibits a right-handed rotation, which is consistent with the electron diamagnetic drift rotation, supporting the possibility of a drift Alfvén wave maser. To distinguish between drift and shear Alfvén waves, a new experiment with the maser cavity excited by a driving circuit was performed. This allows us to access low frequencies (compared to ω*) that cannot be spontaneously driven. The dispersion relation of this driven maser is under investigation. The experimental results will motivate future Alfvén wave study in laboratory devices and thus help better understand space plasma physics such as testing the theory of Alfvén-wave-induced heating of stellar atmosphere. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science.

  4. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  5. Millimeter Wave and Terahertz Spectra of C-13 Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Lees, Ronald M.; Müller, Holger S. P.; Endres, Christian P.; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan; Menten, Karl M.

    2009-06-01

    Methanol is a very ubiquitous molecule in space. A previous combined analysis of microwave and millimeter wave spectra of C-13 methanol together with Fourier transform far-infrared spectra was limited to the first two torsional states (i.e. v_t = 0 and 1 for J values up to 20). We have recently carried out new millimeter and terahertz measurements for ^{13}CH_3OH on several different spectrometers in the Cologne laboratory to overcome the limits in frequency and quantum number coverage. The new measurements have been carried out in the frequency windows 34-70 GHz, 75-120 GHz, 240-340 GHz, 370-500 GHz and 1.12-1.35 THz. With the new data, we are extending our previous global treatment to include the first three torsional states (i.e. v_t = 0, 1 and 2 for J values up to 30). We hope to provide the radio astronomical community with a C-13 methanol database that will have been improved substantially compared to the existing one. The new database will be available in the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in support of present and future astronomical studies associated with the launch of HIFI (Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared) on board the Herschel Space Observatory, the flying of SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) and the commissioning of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array). Li-Hong Xu, M. S. Walsh, R. M. Lees, 1996, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 179, 269-281. Li-Hong Xu, F. J. Lovas, 1997, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 26, 17-156; also available in the CDMS, see ^c. H. S. P. Müller, S. Thorwirth, D. A. Roth, G. Winnewisser, 2001, Astron. Astrophys. 370, L49-L52 H. S. P. Müller, F. Schlöder, J. Stutzki, G. Winnewisser, 2005 J. Mol. Struct. 742, 215-227; web-page: http://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/cdms/.

  6. Methanol unity frays, discounting returns

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1997-02-05

    This article reviews the price variation in methanol for February 1997 and how the company Methanex compares to other producers. The discrepancy between posting prices and transaction prices is noted.

  7. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  8. Indonesia to build methanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-05

    P.T. Kaltim Methanol Industri (Jakarta), a company set up to build a new methanol plant in Indonesia, expects to award contracts for the construction of a new plant, Indonesia's second methanol unit, by the end of this year. P.T. Kaltim Methanol is a private company owned by P.T. Humpuss, an industrial group active in transport, airlines, and shipping of LNG and methanol. The 2,000-m.t./day plant will be built at Bontang, Kalimantan Island, close to the fertilizer producer P.T. Pupuk Kaltim and near the country's largest natural gas reserves. The site is also a deepsea port, handy for transportation of ready product. Three groups are in discussions with the investor on plant supply as well as methanol offtake deals. They are H G/Kockner; John Brown/Davy/Lucky Goldstar, offering the ICI process independently; and Lurgi/Metallgesellschaft (MG), proposing the Lurgi process. At least 60% of the output is expected to be exported, and both ICI and MG are understood to be interested in selling product from the future plant. Japan, Southeast Asia, and the US are targeted.

  9. Acute methanol toxicity in minipigs

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, D.C.; Dye, J.A.; Nassise, M.P.; Ekuta, J.; Bolon, B.

    1993-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a potential animal model for methanol-induced neuro-ocular toxicosis in humans because of its low liver tetrahydrofolate levels and slower rate of formate metabolism compared to those of humans. To examine the validity of this animal model, 12 4-month-old female minipigs (minipig YU) were given a single oral dose of water or methanol at 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 g/kg body wt by gavage (n = 3 pigs/dose). Dose-dependent signs of acute methanol intoxication, which included mild CNS depression, tremors, ataxia, and recumbency, developed within 0.5 to 2.0 hr, and resolved by 52 hr. Methanol- and formate-dosed pigs did not develop optic nerve lesions, toxicologically significant formate accumulation, or metabolic acidosis. Based on results following a single dose, female minipigs do not appear to be overtly sensitive to methanol and thus may not be a suitable animal model for acute methanol-induced neuroocular toxicosis.

  10. OH and H2O maser variations in W33B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colom, P.; Lekht, E. E.; Pashchenko, M. I.; Rudnitskij, G. M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The active star-forming region W33B is a source of OH and H2O maser emission located in distinct zones around the central object. Aims: The aim was to obtain the complete Stokes pattern of polarised OH maser emission and to trace its variability and to investigate flares and long-term variability of the H2O maser and evolution of individual emission features. Methods: Observations in the OH lines at a wavelength of 18 cm were carried out on the Nançay radio telescope (France) at a number of epochs in 2008-2014; H2O line observations (long-term monitoring) at λ = 1.35 cm were performed on the 22 m radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory (Russia) between 1981 and 2014. Results: We have observed strong variability of the emission features in the main 1665- and 1667 MHz OH lines as well as in the 1612 MHz satellite line. Zeeman splitting has been detected in the 1665 MHz OH line at 62 km s-1 and in the 1667 MHz line at 62 and 64 km s-1. The magnetic field intensity was estimated to be from 2 to 3 mG. The H2O emission features form filaments, chains with radial-velocity gradients, or more complicated structures including large-scale ones. Conclusions: Long-term observations of the hydroxyl maser in the W33B region have revealed narrowband polarised emission in the 1612 MHz line with a double-peak profile characteristic of type IIb circumstellar masers. The 30 year monitoring of the water-vapour maser in W33B showed several strong flares of the H2O line. The observed radial-velocity drift of the H2O emission features suggests propagation of an excitation wave in the masering medium with a gradient of radial velocities. In OH and H2O masers some turbulent motions of material are inferred. The spectra of Fig. 7 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A49 or at http://comet.sai.msu.ru/~gmr/Maser_monitoring/W33B

  11. The electron-cyclotron maser instability as a source of plasma radiation. [Solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of continuum bursts from the sun at dm and m wavelengths (in particular, type IV bursts) via the electron-cyclotron-maser instability is examined. The maser instability can be driven by an electron distribution with either a loss-cone anisotropy or a peak at large pitch angles. For omega(p)/Omega(e) much greater than 1, the maser emission is produced by electrons interacting through a harmonic (cyclotron) resonance and is electrostatic, being in the upper hybrid mode at frequencies approximately equal to omega(p). Coalescence processes are required to convert the electrostatic waves into transverse radiation which can escape from the source region. Whether the resultant spectrum is nearly a smooth continuum or has a zebra-stripe pattern (both of which occur in type IV bursts) depends on the form of the electron distribution, inhomogeneities in the density and magnetic field, and whether the maser reaches saturation. For at least the case of some type IV dm bursts with fine structure, comparison with observations seems to indicate that the electrons producing the emission are more likely to have a loss-cone distribution, and that the maser instability is not at saturation.

  12. Progress of the 129Xe EDM search using active feedback nuclear spin maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ohtomo, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Yu; Kojima, Shuichiro; Funayama, Chikako; Suzuki, Takahiro; Chikamori, Masatoshi; Hikota, Eri; Tsuchiya, Masato; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Bidinosti, Christopher; Ino, Takashi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Fukuyama, Takeshi; Asahi, Koichiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is an extremely sensitive probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The objective of the present study is to search for the 129Xe EDM at a level of 10-28 ecm, beyond the current upper limit. In this experiment, an active-feedback nuclear spin maser is employed to achieve a precision measurement. Systematic instability sets a limit on the precision in our study. Co-magnetometry using 3He spin maser was incorporated into the maser system to eliminate the frequency drift caused by magnetic field fluctuations. Moreover, a double-cell geometry with linearly polarized laser was introduced to reduce frequency drifts arising from contact interactions with polarized Rb atoms. Having integrated these improvements, the 3He/129Xe dual spin maser was successfully operated. In the presentation, recent progress will be reported, including an analysis of spin maser frequencies, a study of electrode designs, and an estimation of possible systematic uncertainties.

  13. The Megamaser Cosmology Project. IX. Black Hole Masses for Three Maser Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Braatz, J. A.; Reid, M. J.; Condon, J. J.; Greene, J. E.; Henkel, C.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Lo, K. Y.; Kuo, C. Y.; Pesce, D. W.; Wagner, J.; Zhao, W.

    2017-01-01

    As part of the Megamaser Cosmology Project, we present VLBI maps of nuclear water masers toward five galaxies. The masers originate in sub-parsec circumnuclear disks. For three of the galaxies, we fit Keplerian rotation curves to estimate their supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, and determine (2.9 ± 0.3) × 106 M⊙ for J0437+2456, (1.7 ± 0.1) × 107 M⊙ for ESO 558–G009, and (1.1 ± 0.2) × 107 M⊙ for NGC 5495. In the other two galaxies, Mrk 1029 and NGC 1320, the geometry and dynamics are more complicated and preclude robust black hole mass estimates. Including our new results, we compiled a list of 15 VLBI-confirmed disk maser galaxies with robust SMBH mass measurements. With this sample, we confirm the empirical relation of Rout ∝ 0.3MSMBH reported in Wardle & Yusef-Zadeh. We also find a tentative correlation between maser disk outer radii and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer luminosity. We find no correlations of maser disk size with X-ray 2–10 keV luminosity or [O iii] luminosity.

  14. Hydroxyl Masers From Andromeda To The Peak Of Cosmic Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle William

    2011-05-01

    OH masers are naturally-occurring phenomena powered by stimulated emission, existing in a variety of astrophysical environments. The presence of powerful OH megamasers (OHMs) is associated with merging galaxies and extreme star formation, while the high luminosities and narrow beams of masers make them powerful probes of local physical conditions. I present research on three projects concentrating on observations of extragalactic OH masers. The first project analyzes mid-infrared spectroscopy of OHM host galaxies with data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. I identify several mid-infrared spectral features that signal the presence of an OHM, including deep silicate absorption and steep continuum emission, indicating the presence of large amounts of warm dust. Mid-infrared data are also used to test new OH pumping models, demonstrating that OHM hosts favor a smooth, highly embedded dust geometry. Secondly, I describe results of a radio-wavelength survey using the Green Bank Telescope for new OHMs at redshift z 1. Detections of two new OHMs are included, while statistics of galaxies in which OH was not detected constrain the OHM fraction and overall galaxy merger rate. Finally, I present data from the first OH survey of M31 (the Andromeda galaxy) using the Very Large Array. We found no OH masers above a 5σ = 10 mJy limit in the galaxy. I discuss our results in the context of ongoing efforts to use masers as tools for measuring M31’s proper motion with respect to the Milky Way.

  15. Electric Vector Rotations of π/2 in Polarized Circumstellar SiO Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemball, A. J.; Diamond, P. J.; Richter, L.; Gonidakis, I.; Xue, R.

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines the detailed sub-milliarcsecond polarization properties of an individual SiO maser feature displaying a rotation in polarization electric vector position angle of approximately π/2 across the feature. Such rotations are a characteristic observational signature of circumstellar SiO masers detected toward a number of late-type, evolved stars. We employ a new calibration method for accurate circular very long baseline interferometric polarimetry at millimeter wavelengths to present the detailed Stokes {I, Q, U, V} properties for this feature. We analyze the fractional linear and circular polarization as a function of projected angular distance across the extent of the feature and compare these measurements against several theoretical models proposed for sharp rotations of electric vector position angle in polarized SiO maser emission. We find that the rotation is most likely caused by the angle θ between the line of sight and a projected magnetic field crossing the critical Van Vleck angle for maser propagation. The fractional linear polarization profile ml (θ) is well fitted by standard models for polarized maser transport, but we find less agreement for the fractional circular polarization profile mc (θ).

  16. DISTANCES TO DARK CLOUDS: COMPARING EXTINCTION DISTANCES TO MASER PARALLAX DISTANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Jackson, James M.; Stead, Joseph J.; Hoare, Melvin G.; Benjamin, Robert A. E-mail: jackson@bu.edu E-mail: mgh@ast.leeds.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    We test two different methods of using near-infrared extinction to estimate distances to dark clouds in the first quadrant of the Galaxy using large near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey) surveys. Very long baseline interferometry parallax measurements of masers around massive young stars provide the most direct and bias-free measurement of the distance to these dark clouds. We compare the extinction distance estimates to these maser parallax distances. We also compare these distances to kinematic distances, including recent re-calibrations of the Galactic rotation curve. The extinction distance methods agree with the maser parallax distances (within the errors) between 66% and 100% of the time (depending on method and input survey) and between 85% and 100% of the time outside of the crowded Galactic center. Although the sample size is small, extinction distance methods reproduce maser parallax distances better than kinematic distances; furthermore, extinction distance methods do not suffer from the kinematic distance ambiguity. This validation gives us confidence that these extinction methods may be extended to additional dark clouds where maser parallaxes are not available.

  17. Probing the circumstellar environments of very young low-mass stars using water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, S.; Vogel, S. N.; Myers, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The VLA is used to search nearby very young low-mass stars for water maser emission. The sample consists of 26 low-luminosity IRAS sources embedded in dense molecular cores, a class of sources suspected to be newly forming low-mass stars on the order of a few hundred thousand years old. Three sources were detected. High spatial resolution maps show the region of maser emission is generally confined to an area smaller than about 0.5 arcsec near the star, and the velocities of individual components span intervals ranging from 20 to 40 km/s. It is inferred from the fact that the maser velocities are too large to be due to gravitational motions in at least two of the sources that the masers are associated with the winds from the young low-mass stars. A comparison of the high spatial resolution maser data to lower-resolution CO data shows no evidence for higher collimation close to the star; the stellar wind cavity appears to have similar collimation at 10 exp 15 cm as at 10 exp 7 to 10 exp 18 cm.

  18. ELECTRIC VECTOR ROTATIONS OF {pi}/2 IN POLARIZED CIRCUMSTELLAR SiO MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kemball, A. J.; Xue, R.; Diamond, P. J.; Gonidakis, I.; Richter, L.

    2011-12-10

    This paper examines the detailed sub-milliarcsecond polarization properties of an individual SiO maser feature displaying a rotation in polarization electric vector position angle of approximately {pi}/2 across the feature. Such rotations are a characteristic observational signature of circumstellar SiO masers detected toward a number of late-type, evolved stars. We employ a new calibration method for accurate circular very long baseline interferometric polarimetry at millimeter wavelengths to present the detailed Stokes (I, Q, U, V) properties for this feature. We analyze the fractional linear and circular polarization as a function of projected angular distance across the extent of the feature and compare these measurements against several theoretical models proposed for sharp rotations of electric vector position angle in polarized SiO maser emission. We find that the rotation is most likely caused by the angle {theta} between the line of sight and a projected magnetic field crossing the critical Van Vleck angle for maser propagation. The fractional linear polarization profile m{sub l} ({theta}) is well fitted by standard models for polarized maser transport, but we find less agreement for the fractional circular polarization profile m{sub c} ({theta}).

  19. Solar and stellar radio spikes - Limits on the saturation of the electron-cyclotron maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentzel, Donat G.; Aschwanden, Markus J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar millisecond radio 'spikes' have been explained in terms of X-mode radiation generated by a maser near the electron gyrofrequency, acting on fast coronal electrons with a loss cone. This maser is a phenomenon described by quasi-linear theory. It is sensitive to the small first-relativistic correction to the gyrofrequency. Thus, it might be disrupted rather easily by nonlinear effects. The maximum radiation density that can be reached before the radiation entrains (phase-locks) the electrons and saturates the maser is discussed. If the observed durations of solar radio spikes are a measure of the rate of scattering into the loss-cone, then the inferred energy density is at least two orders of magnitude less than the energy density at which entrainment sets in. Also, maser emission from auroral kilometric radiation does not reach wave energies critical for electron entrainment. Maser emissions from flare stars, however, show 3-4 orders of magnitude higher radio fluxes and brightness temperatures than for the solar case and are likely to be saturated by entrainment.

  20. Physics characterization and frequency stability of the pulsed rubidium maser

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo; Calosso, Claudio

    2006-10-15

    In this paper we report the theoretical and experimental characterization of a pulsed optically pumped vapor-cell frequency standard based on the detection of the free-induction decay microwave signal. The features that make this standard similar to a pulsed passive maser are presented. In order to predict and optimize the frequency stability, thermal and shot noise sources are analyzed, as well as the conversions of the laser and microwave fluctuations into the output frequency. The experimental results obtained with a clock prototype based on {sup 87}Rb in buffer gas are compared with the theoretical predictions, showing the practical possibility to implement a frequency standard limited in the medium term only by thermal drift. The achieved frequency stability is {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=1.2x10{sup -12}{tau}{sup -1/2} for measurement times up to {tau}{approx_equal}10{sup 5} s. It represents one of the best results reported in literature for gas cell frequency standards and is compliant with the present day requirements for on board space applications.

  1. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  2. Spectral dynamics of a collective free electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Eecen, P.J.; Schep, T.J.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A theoretical and numerical study of the nonlinear spectral dynamics of a Free Electron Maser (FEM) is reported. The electron beam is modulated by a step-tapered undulator consisting of two sections with different strengths and lengths. The sections have equal periodicity and are separated by a field-free gap. The millimeter wave beam is guided through a rectangular corrugated waveguide. The electron energy is rather low and the current density is large, therefore, the FEM operates in the collective (Raman) regime. Results of a computational study on the spectral dynamics of the FEM are presented. The numerical code is based on a multifrequency model in the continuous beam limit with a 3D description of the electron beam. Space-charge forces are included by a Fourier expansion. These forces strongly influence the behaviour of the generated spectrum of the FEM. The linear gain of the FEM is high, therefore, the system quickly reaches the nonlinear regime. In saturation the gain is still relatively high and the spectral signal at the resonant frequency of the second undulator is suppressed. The behaviour of the sidebands is analysed and their dependence on mirror reflectivity and undulator parameters will be discussed.

  3. Electron-cyclotron maser and solar microwave millisecond spike emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Qi-Jun

    1986-01-01

    An intense solar microwave millisecond spike emission (SMMSE) event was observed on May 16, 1981 by Zhao and Jin at Beijing Observatory. The peak flux density of the spikes is high to 5 x 100,000 s.f.u. and the corresponding brightness temperature (BT) reaches approx. 10 to the 15th K. In order to explain the observed properties of SMMSE, it is proposed that a beam of electrons with energy of tens KeV injected from the acceleration region downwards into an emerging magnetic arch forms so-called hollow beam distribution and causes electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) instability. The growth rate of second harmonic X-mode is calculated and its change with time is deduced. It is shown that the saturation time of ECM is t sub s approx. equals 0.42 ms and only at last short stage (delta t less than 0.2 t sub s) the growth rate decreases to zero rather rapidly. So a SMMSE with very high BT will be produced if the ratio of number density of nonthermal electrons to that of background electrons, n sub s/n sub e, is larger than 4 x .00001.

  4. Unusual case of methanol poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Henderson, M. . Dept. of Chemical Pathology); Madi, S.; Mellor, L. . Dept. of Medicine, and Pharmacy)

    1993-01-09

    A 31-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse presented to the accident and emergency department complaining of blurred vision. 4 h previously he had drunk 300 mL de-icer fluid. Electrolytes, urea, creatinine, glucose, and blood-gas analysis were normal. Measured osmolality, however, was 368 mosmol/kg with a calculated osmolality of 300 mosmol/kg, which indicated a greatly increased osmolar gap. He was therefore given 150 mL whisky and admitted. Methanol was later reported as 200 mg/dL. Ethylene glycol was not detected, but another glycol, propylene glycol, was present at 47 mg/dL. 10 h after ingestion an intravenous infusion of ethanol was started and he was hemodialysed for 7 h. After dialysis he was given a further 100 mL whisky and the rate of ethanol infusion was reduced to 11 g per h. Methanol and ethanol were measured twice daily until methanol was under 10/mg/dL: The recommendation is that blood ethanol be maintained between 100 and 200 mg/dL during treatment of methanol poisoning. This concentration was not achieved, presumably because of the high rate of ethanol metabolism often found in alcoholics. Antifreeze solutions commonly contain methanol and ethylene glycol. Sometimes propylene glycol is substituted because it has properties similar to those of ethylene glycol but is less toxic. The authors postulate that propylene glycol inhibited the metabolism of methanol in the patient, thus sparing him from the toxic effects of methanol.

  5. High Precision Time Transfer in Space with a Hydrogen Maser on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1996-01-01

    An atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long term operation in space will be installed on the Russian space station Mir, in late 1997. The H-maser's frequency stability will be measured using pulsed laser time transfer techniques. Daily time comparisons made with a precision of better than 100 picoseconds will allow an assessment of the long term stability of the space maser at a level on the order of 1 part in 10(sup 15) or better. Laser pulse arrival times at the spacecraft will be recorded with a resolution of 10 picoseconds relative to the space clock's time scale. Cube corner reflectors will reflect the pulses back to the Earth laser station to determine the propagation delay and enable comparison with the Earth-based time scale. Data for relativistic and gravitational frequency corrections will be obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

  6. Low-cost electron-gun pulser for table-top maser experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, V.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-04-01

    A simple 10 kV electron-gun pulser for small-scale maser experiments is presented. This low-cost pulser has operated successfully in various table-top cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) and free-electron maser (FEM) experiments. It consists of a low-voltage capacitor bank, an SCR control circuit and a transformer bank (car ignition coils) connected directly to the e-gun. The pulser produces a current of 3 A at 10 kV voltage in a Gaussian like shape of 1 ms pulse width. The voltage sweep during the pulse provides a useful tool to locate resonances of CRM and FEM interactions. Analytical expressions for the pulser design and experimental measurements are presented.

  7. Development of cross-correlation spectrometry and the coherent structures of maser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Imai, Hiroshi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new method of data processing for radio telescope observation data to measure time-dependent temporal coherence, and we have named it "cross-correlation spectrometry" (XCS). XCS is an autocorrelation procedure that expands time lags over the integration time and is applied to data obtained from a single-dish observation. The temporal coherence property of received signals is enhanced by XCS. We tested the XCS technique using the data of strong H2O masers in W 3 (H2O), W 49 N, and W 75 N. We obtained the temporal coherent lengths of the maser emission to be 17.95 ± 0.33 μs, 26.89 ± 0.49 μs, and 15.95 ± 0.46 μs for W 3 (H2O), W 49 N, and W 75 N, respectively. These results may indicate the existence of a coherent astrophysical maser.

  8. Progress in Tests of Fundamental Physics Using a Helium-3 and Xenon-129 Zeeman Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenday, Alexander Graham

    We report on improved operation and understanding of the 3He and 129Xe Zeeman maser and its use in testing new theories in fundamental physics. The 3He and 129Xe Zeeman maser can make differential measurements of magnetic field versus new spin dependent forces that couple to the neutron, as 3He and 129Xe have nuclear gyromagnetic ratios that differ by a factor of ˜2.75, but whose spin-1/2 nuclear moments are due almost entirely to unpaired neutrons. Specifically, we evaluate the performance of the 3He and 129Xe maser in terms of searches for Lorentz and CPT symmetry breaking background fields to the universe described by the Standard Model Extension of Kostelecky and coworkers [1] and for placing limits on anomalous spin-spin coupling between neutrons such as those due to spin dependent forces mediated by the proposed axion particle [2]. The 3He and 129Xe maser has previously been used to place a limit on the coupling of the neutron to Lorentz and CPT symmetry violating fields at the level of 10-31 GeV (50 nHz in the 3He Zeeman frequency). Improvements we have made to the maser system have increased our sensitivity by almost a factor of four and we believe reasonable future upgrades could lead to a further order of magnitude improvement. In this work we have also measured the nuclear Zeeman frequencies of a 3He and 129Xe maser while modulating the nuclear spin polarization of a nearby 3He ensemble in a separate glass cell. We place limits on the coupling strength of neutron spin-spin interactions mediated by light pseudoscalar particles like the axion ( gpgp/(4pihc)) at the 3 x 10-7 level for interaction ranges longer than about 40 cm.

  9. Distance and proper motion measurement of water masers in sharpless 269 IRS 2w

    SciTech Connect

    Asaki, Y.; Imai, H.; Sobolev, A. M.; Parfenov, S. Yu. E-mail: hiroimai@sci.kagoshima-u.ac.jp E-mail: Sergey.Parfenov@urfu.ru

    2014-05-20

    We present astrometric analysis of archival data of water masers in the star-forming region Sharpless 269 (S269) IRS 2w, observed with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry. An annual parallax of one of the bright maser features in this region was previously reported to be 0.189 ± 0.008 milliarcsecond (mas) using part of the same archival data as we used. However, we found that this maser feature is not the best to represent the annual parallax to S269 IRS 2w because the morphology is remarkably elongated in the east-west direction. For this study we have selected another maser feature showing simpler morphology. This makes the new annual parallax estimate more credible. Our newly obtained annual parallax is 0.247 ± 0.034 mas, corresponding to 4.05{sub −0.49}{sup +0.65} kpc. This value is well consistent with the 3.7-3.8 kpc obtained using the kinematic distance estimates and photometric distance modulus. We considered two hypotheses for the water-maser spatial distribution, a bipolar outflow and an expanding ring, in a kinematic model fitting analysis with a radially expanding flow. At this stage, any conclusions about the systemic proper motion could not be drawn from the kinematic analysis. Alternatively, we evaluated the mean proper motion to be (0.39 ± 0.92, –1.27 ± 0.90) mas yr{sup –1} eastward and northward, respectively, from the obtained proper motions of the detected water-maser features. The newly obtained annual parallax and mean proper motion give the peculiar motion of S269 IRS 2w to be (U {sub s}, V {sub s}, W {sub s}) of (8 ± 6, –21 ± 17, 1 ± 18) km s{sup –1}.

  10. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  11. Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

  12. ACCRETION DISK WARPING BY RESONANT RELAXATION: THE CASE OF MASER DISK NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, Michal; Alexander, Tal

    2009-08-01

    The maser disk around the massive black hole (MBH) in active galaxy NGC 4258 exhibits an O(10 deg.) warp on the O(0.1 pc) scale. The physics driving the warp is still debated. Suggested mechanisms include torquing by relativistic frame dragging or by radiation pressure. We propose here a new warping mechanism: resonant torquing of the disk by stars in the dense cusp around the MBH. We show that resonant torquing can induce such a warp over a wide range of observed and deduced physical parameters of the maser disk.

  13. Probing Planck-Scale physics with a Ne-21/He-3 Zeeman maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Phillips, David

    2004-01-01

    We completed a search for a sidereal annual variation in the frequency difference between co-located Xe-129 and He-3 Zeeman masers. This search sets a stringent limit of approximately 10(exp -27) GeV on boost-dependent Lorentz and CPT violation involving the neutron. A paper reporting this result has been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters. We also completed detailed modeling and design of the next-generation dual-noble-gas Zeeman maser for an improved test of Lorentz and CPT violation, and begin construction of this device.

  14. Resonant electron diffusion as a saturation process of the synchrotron maser instability. [of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of resonant electron diffusion as an effective saturation process of the auroral kilometric radiation has been formulated. The auroral kilometric radiation is assumed to be amplified by the synchrotron maser instability that is driven by an electron distribution of the loss-cone type. The calculated intensity of the saturated radiation is found to have a significantly lower value in comparison with that caused by the quasi-linear diffusion process as an alternative saturation process. This indicates that resonant electron diffusion dominates over quasi-linear diffusion in saturating the synchrotron maser instability.

  15. Methanol absorption in PKS B1830-211 at milliarcsecond scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Breen, S. L.

    2017-04-01

    Observations of the frequencies of different rotational transitions of the methanol molecule have provided the most sensitive probe to date for changes in the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ, over space and time. Using methanol absorption detected in the gravitational lens system PKS B1830-211, changes in μ over the last 7.5 billion years have been constrained to |Δμ/μ| ≲ 1.1 × 10-7. Molecular absorption systems at cosmological distances present the best opportunity for constraining or measuring changes in the fundamental constants of physics over time; however, we are now at the stage where potential differences in the morphology of the absorbing systems and the background source, combined with their temporal evolution, provide the major source of uncertainty in some systems. Here, we present the first milliarcsecond resolution observations of the molecular absorption system towards PKS B1830-211. We have imaged the absorption from the 12.2-GHz transition of methanol (which is redshifted to 6.45 GHz) towards the southwestern component and show that it is possibly offset from the peak of the continuum emission and partially resolved on milliarcsecond scales. Future observations of other methanol transitions with similar angular resolution offer the best prospects for reducing systematic errors in investigations of possible changes in the proton-to-electron mass ratio on cosmological scales.

  16. Using JVLA Observations of SiO Masers to Probe the Extended Atmosphere of an AGB Star: W Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamieneski, Patrick S.; Matthews, Lynn D.

    2015-01-01

    The Asymptotic Giant Branch star W Hydrae (W Hya) is known to be a strong source of silicon monoxide (SiO) masers in its extended atmosphere. Jansky Very Large Array imaging observations obtained in February 2014 were used to target eleven SiO J=1-0 rotational transitions near 43 GHz. The vibrational ground state (v=0) lines for the 28SiO, 29SiO, and 30SiO isotopologues were successfully detected, as were the v=1,2,3 lines for 28SiO. Non-detections included the v=1,2 transitions for 29SiO and 30SiO, and the v=4 line for 28SiO. We will summarize the relative shape, size, and intensity of the emission regions of the detected transitions. We have discovered spatially extended ground-state 28SiO emission in a region located approximately 300 to 600 milliarcseconds (projected distance of 34 to 69 AU) from the star. We will discuss a saddle-like distribution and a small gradient in the velocity field for the 28SiO v=1 line, which may help to confirm the existence of a bipolar outflow in W Hya. Additionally, our results indicate that the observed transitions have differing spatial distributions. Peak 28SiO v=1,2,3 emission primarily occupies a region 12 - 42 mas (projected distance of 1.4 - 4.8 AU) west of the star, while the 29SiO and 30SiO isotopologues are located in disparate regions around 45 - 70 mas (5.2 - 8.1 AU) to the northwest of the star.This work was sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate program to MIT Haystack Observatory.

  17. A COMPARISON OF THE VELOCITY PARAMETERS OF SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and J = 2-1 MASER EMISSION IN LONG PERIOD VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Gordon; Indermuehle, Balthasar E-mail: balt.indermuehle@csiro.au

    2013-05-15

    We present an analysis of velocity parameters derived from multi-epoch observations of the SiO maser spectra of 47 long period variables (LPVs). The velocity parameters are important to inform and constrain theoretical models of SiO maser emission and to extract information on binary orbits. Mira and R Aquarii (R Aqr) are two known binaries included in the program. The 47 LPVs are among 121 sources of the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra telescope's monitoring program. Observations were carried out several times a year between 2008 and 2012 and are continuing. The SiO spectra are from the v = 1, J = 1-0 (43.122 GHz; hereafter J10) and the v = 1, J = 2-1 (86.2434 GHz; hereafter J21) transitions. For 41 of the 47 LPVs we observed both transitions nearly simultaneously in 457 observations. We have determined and compared the velocity centroids (VCs) and velocity ranges (VRs) of emission suffixed as above (10 and 21) for the two transitions: VC10, VC21, VR10, and VR21. The VCs of the two transitions are, on average, within 0.13 km s{sup -1} of each other but are sometimes separated by a few km s{sup -1}. The VC10s are, on average, slightly more positive than the VC21s. The values of the VCs in the two transitions have been compared to justify using both of these transitions to extract binary star orbital parameters. The arithmetic mean VR10 derived from 635 observations of 47 sources is 6.4 km s{sup -1} with a standard deviation of 3.4 km s{sup -1}, while the mean VR21 derived from 485 observations of 41 sources is 4.2 km s{sup -1} with a standard deviation of 2.8 km s{sup -1}. The number of occurrences of VR10 and VR21 versus VR have different distributions. The differences in the VRs indicate that the J21 and J10 emissions arise from dynamically different regions of the circumstellar environment.

  18. Probing AGN with Masers and X-Rays-SAX Proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have made BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert 2/1.9 galaxy ESO103-G35, which contains a nuclear maser source and is known to be heavily absorbed in the X-rays. Analysis of the X-ray spectra observed by SAX in October 1996 and 1997 yields an energy index = 0.74 +/- 0.07, typical of Seyfert galaxies and consistent with earlier observations of this source. The strong, soft X-ray absorption has a column density, N_H of (1.79 +/- 0.09)E23 cmE-02, again consistent with earlier results. The best fitting spectrum is that of a power law with a high energy cutoff at 29 +/- 10 keV, a cold (E=6.3 +/- 0.1 keV, rest frame), marginally resolved (sigma = 0.35 +/- 0.14 keV, FWHM approximately (31 +/- 12)E03 km/s) FeKalpha line with EW 290 +100 -80 eV (1996) and a mildly ionized Fe K-edge at 7.37 +0.15 -0.21 keV, tau 0.24 +0.06 -0.09. The Fe Kalpha line and cold absorption are consistent with origin in a accretion disk/torus through which our line-of-sight passes at a radial distance of approximately 0.01 pc. The Fe K-edge is mildly ionized suggesting the presence of ionized gas probably in the inner accretion disk, close to the central source or in a separate warm absorber. The data quality is too low to distinguish between these possibilities but the edge-on geometry implied by the water maser emission favors the former. Comparison with earlier observations of ESO103-G35 shows little/no change in spectral parameters while the flux changes by factors of a few on timescales of a few months. The 2-10 keV flux decreased by a factor of approximately 2.7 between Oct 1996 and Oct 1997 with no detectable change in the count rate greater than 20 keV (i.e. the PDS data). Spectral fits to the combined datasets indicate either a significant hardening of the spectrum (energy index approximately 0.5) or an approximate constant or delayed response reflection component. The high energy cutoff (29 +/- 10 keV) is lower than the typical approximately 300 keV values seen in Seyfert galaxies. A

  19. The first simultaneous mapping of four 7 mm SiO maser lines using the OCTAVE system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Tomoaki; Kono, Yusuke; Suzuki, Syunsaku; Kanaguchi, Masahiro; Nishikawa, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Hirota, Tomoya; Nagayama, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Sho; Kano, Amane; Oyadomari, Miyako; Chong, Sze Ning

    2016-12-01

    We report on simultaneous very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) mapping of 28SiO v = 1, 2, 3, and 29SiO v = 0 J = 1 → 0 maser lines at the 7 mm band toward the semi-regular variable star, W Hydrae (W Hya), using the new data acquisition system (OCTAVE-DAS), installed in the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) array and temporarily operated in the 45 m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Although these masers were spatially resolved, their compact maser spots were fortunately detected in the 1000 km baselines of VERA. We found the locations of the v = 3 maser emission which are unexpected from the currently proposed maser pumping models. Mapping of the 29SiO maser line in W Hya is the third result after those in WX Psc and R Leo. This paper shows the scientific implication of simultaneous VLBI observations of multiple SiO maser lines as realized by using the OCTAVE system.

  20. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2011-02-01

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s{sup -1}. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s{sup -1} according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s{sup -1}. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  1. The Future RFI Environment Above 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Andrew W.

    1995-12-01

    Encompassing 30 - 300 GHz, the millimeter wave (mmW) band offers relief from spectrum crowding at lower frequencies, large available bandwidth, favorable propagation characteristics for certain applications, and relatively high directivity with small antennas. The FCC has recently proposed regulatory changes to foster commercial development of the mmW band. Impending actions include: Designating the 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76-77 GHz bands for unlicensed vehicular radar systems. Potentially tens of millions of vehicles will be equipped with radars to provide ``intelligent cruise control" capability and driver blind-spot warnings. Unwanted emissions from vehicular radar systems may produce harmful interference to passive systems operating in protected bands. Opening the 59-64 GHz band, in which propagation is limited to short distances due to high atmospheric attenuation, to general unlicensed devices. A likely application for this band is wireless local area computer networks. The neighboring bands of 58.2 - 59 and 64 - 65 GHz are allocated to the passive services. Changes still under consideration include: Opening the 116 - 117 GHz band, co-located with an existing passive allocation, for licensed (116 - 116.5 GHz) and general unlicensed (116.5 - 117 GHz) devices. The opening (for licensed and unlicensed services) of nearly 5 GHz of additional spectrum space which neighbors passive allocations and poses a potential interference problem from out-of-band emissions. The status of the FCC's actions concerning the mmW band will be updated. An attempt will be made to predict the RFI environment in the mmW band assuming the likely applications for each of the reallocated bands. Particular emphasis will be placed on the impact of the FCC's actions on current and planned remote sensing and radio astronomy operations.

  2. a Chirped-Pulse Fourier Transform Spectrometer Operating from 110 TO 170 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Lauren E.; Shipman, Steven

    2014-06-01

    A chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectrometer operating from 110 - 170 GHz was constructed. The design of this spectrometer is directly adapted from that of the 260 - 295 GHz chirped-pulse spectrometer built by Steber and co-workers at the University of Virginia. In this instrument, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) produces a chirped pulse which is frequency shifted to a range between 9.2 and 14.1 GHz and then multiplied by a factor of 12 via an active multiplier chain to a range between 110 and 170 GHz. As in the Pate lab design, the AWG also serves as a local oscillator (LO) source; this LO is multiplied and used to downconvert the molecular emission, allowing it to be collected by a 40 GS/s digitizer. Benchmark measurements were taken for methanol at room temperature, and details of the instrument's performance will be discussed. A.L. Steber, B.J. Harris, J.L. Neill, and B.H. Pate, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 280, 3 (2012)

  3. Some characteristics of new type of hydrogen maser receiver in Shaanxi Astronomical Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan

    1990-12-01

    Some characteristics of the new type of hydrogen maser receiver in Shaanxi Astronomical Observatory are described, and the methods of noise rejection are presented in detail. The measured results show that the stability is 1.8×10-13s-1.

  4. Water-maser emission from a planetary nebula with a magnetized torus.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L F; Gómez, Y; Anglada, G; Torrelles, J M

    2001-11-15

    A star like the Sun becomes a planetary nebula towards the end of its life, when the envelope ejected during the earlier giant phase becomes photoionized as the surface of the remnant star reaches a temperature of approximately 30,000 K. The spherical symmetry of the giant phase is lost in the transition to a planetary nebula, when non-spherical shells and powerful jets develop. Molecules that were present in the giant envelope are progressively destroyed by the radiation. The water-vapour masers that are typical of the giant envelopes therefore are not expected to persist in planetary nebulae. Here we report the detection of water-maser emission from the planetary nebula K3-35. The masers are in a magnetized torus with a radius of about 85 astronomical units and are also found at the surprisingly large distance of about 5,000 astronomical units from the star, in the tips of bipolar lobes of gas. The precessing jets from K3-35 are probably involved in the excitation of the distant masers, although their existence is nevertheless puzzling. We infer that K3-35 is being observed at the very moment of its transformation from a giant star to a planetary nebula.

  5. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  6. Hot-gas cold-dust pumping for water masers associated with H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deguchi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A collisional pump with an internal sink is proposed for the water masers associated with H II regions, where the population inversion occurs due to the absorption by cold ice-mantle grains in a highly dusty cloud of the far-infrared line radiation of hot water vapor. A new escape probability method is developed to calculate the transfer of line radiation in dusty medium. The pump mechanism explains the power of usual maser sources associated with H II regions and the enormous power of the sources associated with W49 N and external galaxies. Models of maser clouds have a radius of 5 x 10 to the 15th-10 to the 16th cm, an H2 number density of 4 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm, an expansion velocity of 10-30 km/s, a kinetic temperature of 350 K, and a grain temperature of 100 K. Giant maser sources require grains of the size about 1 micron. The apparent size of the emission spots (approximately 10 to the 13th cm) observed by VLBI is interpreted as due to a fluctuation in the cloud, and the assembly of the spots is spread within a size of 10 to the 16th cm. The temperature difference between the dust and gas is due to a relaxation process after an infrared burst accompanying protostar formation.

  7. Hot-gas cold-dust pumping for water masers associated with H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, S.

    1981-10-01

    A collisional pump with an internal sink is proposed for the water masers associated with H II regions, where the population inversion occurs due to the absorption by cold ice-mantle grains in a highly dusty cloud of the far-infrared line radiation of hot water vapor. A new escape probability method is developed to calculate the transfer of line radiation in dusty medium. The pump mechanism explains the power of usual maser sources associated with H II regions and the enormous power of the sources associated with W49 N and external galaxies. Models of maser clouds have a radius of 5 x 10/sup 15/--10/sup 16/ cm, an H/sub 2/ number density of 4 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/, an expansion velocity of 10--30 km s/sup -1/, a kinetic temperature of 350 K, and a grain temperature of 100 K. Giant maser sources require grains of the size about 1 ..mu..m. The apparent size of the emission spots (approx.10/sup 13/ cm) observed by VLBI is interpreted as due to fluctuation in the cloud, and the assembly of the spots is spread within a size of 10/sup 16/ cm. The temperature difference between the dust and gas is due to a relaxation process after an infrared burst accompanying protostar formation.

  8. Hydrogen maser implementation in the Deep Space Network at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhnle, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    The Frequency Standard Test Laboratory and its activities are described. The test laboratory has the capability to measure the frequency stability of five frequency standards including environmental parameters. Nine frequency standards may be evaluated simultaneously upon completion of the current instrumentation expansion program. Frequency stability measurements and environmental data on five H-masers are presented.

  9. Progress Report on the Development of a Laser/Maser Vocabulary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Rita G.

    The development of a laser/maser vocabulary follows the pattern established earlier in two similar projects--(1) Development of a Multi-Coordinate Vocabulary--Chemical Physics, and (2) Development of a Multi-Coordinate Index--Plasma Physics. A set of lists of terms judged to be important to a user of information was developed by a specialist in…

  10. Test of relativistic gravitation with a space-borne hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Levine, M. W.; Mattison, E. M.; Blomberg, E. L.; Hoffman, T. E.; Nystrom, G. U.; Farrel, B. F.; Decher, R.; Eby, P. B.; Baugher, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a test of general relativity with use of a hydrogen-maser frequency standard in a spacecraft launched nearly vertically upward to 10,000 km are reported. The agreement of the observed relativistic frequency shift with prediction is at the 70 x 10 to the -6th level.

  11. Electron cyclotron maser based on the combination two-wave resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    A mechanism of a combination two-wave cyclotron interaction between an electron beam and the forward/backward components of a far-from-cutoff standing wave is analyzed. This regime can be promising for the realization of high-power continuous-wave electron cyclotron masers operating in the THz frequency range.

  12. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  13. Fatal methanol poisoning: features of liver histopathology.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Maryam; Panahianpour, Mohammad Hadi; Bazmi, Elham; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar; Mahdavi, Amirhosein; Nazari, Saeed Hashemi

    2013-03-01

    Methanol poisoning has become a considerable problem in Iran. Liver can show some features of poisoning after methanol ingestion. Therefore, our concern was to examine liver tissue histopathology in fatal methanol poisoning cases in Iranian population. In this study, 44 cases of fatal methanol poisoning were identified in a year. The histological changes of the liver were reviewed. The most striking features of liver damage by light microscopy were micro-vesicular steatosis, macro-vesicular steatosis, focal hepatocyte necrosis, mild intra-hepatocyte bile stasis, feathery degeneration and hydropic degeneration. Blood and vitreous humor methanol concentrations were examined to confirm the proposed history of methanol poisoning. The majority of cases were men (86.36%). In conclusion, methanol poisoning can cause histological changes in liver tissues. Most importantly in cases with mean blood and vitreous humor methanol levels greater than 127 ± 38.9 mg/dL more than one pathologic features were detected.

  14. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  15. A new approach to the maser emission in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régnier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: The electron plasma frequency ωpe and electron gyrofrequency Ωe are two parameters that allow us to describe the properties of a plasma and to constrain the physical phenomena at play, for instance, whether a maser instability develops. In this paper, we aim to show that the maser instability can exist in the solar corona. Methods: We perform an in-depth analysis of the ωpe/Ωe ratio for simple theoretical and complex solar magnetic field configurations. Using the combination of force-free models for the magnetic field and hydrostatic models for the plasma properties, we determine the ratio of the plasma frequency to the gyrofrequency for electrons. For the sake of comparison, we compute the ratio for bipolar magnetic fields containing a twisted flux bundle, and for four different observed active regions. We also study how ωpe/Ωe is affected by the potential and non-linear force-free field models. Results: We demonstrate that the ratio of the plasma frequency to the gyrofrequency for electrons can be estimated by this novel method combining magnetic field extrapolation techniques and hydrodynamic models. Even if statistically not significant, values of ωpe/Ωe≤ 1 are present in all examples, and are located in the low corona near to photosphere below one pressure scale-height and/or in the vicinity of twisted flux bundles. The values of ωpe/Ωe are lower for non-linear force-free fields than potential fields, thus increasing the possibility of maser instability in the corona. Conclusions: From this new approach for estimating ωpe/Ωe, we conclude that the electron maser instability can exist in the solar corona above active regions. The importance of the maser instability in coronal active regions depends on the complexity and topology of the magnetic field configurations.

  16. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CONTINUUM AND WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE IRAS 19217+1651 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A.; Migenes, V. E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx

    2012-12-20

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 19217+1651. We observed the radio continuum (1.3 cm and 3.6 cm) and water maser emission using the Very Large Array (VLA-EVLA) in transition mode (configuration A). Two radio continuum sources were detected at both wavelengths, I19217-A and I19217-B. In addition, 17 maser spots were observed distributed mainly in two groups, M1 and M2, and one isolated maser. This latter could be indicating the relative position of another continuum source which we did not detect. The results indicate that I19217-A appears to be consistent with an ultracompact H II region associated with a zero-age main-sequence B0-type star. Furthermore, the 1.3 cm continuum emission of this source suggests a cometary morphology. In addition, I19217-B appears to be an H II region consisting of at least two stars, which may be contributing to its complex structure. It was also found that the H{sub 2}O masers of the group M1 are apparently associated with the continuum source I19217-A. These are tracing motions which are not gravitationally bound according to their spatial distribution and kinematics. They also seem to be describing outflows in the direction of the elongated cometary region. On the other hand, the second maser group, M2, could be tracing the base of a jet. Finally, infrared data from Spitzer, Midcourse Space Experiment, and IRIS show that IRAS 19217+1651 is embedded inside a large open bubble, like a broken ring, which possibly has affected the morphology of the cometary H II region observed at 1.3 cm.

  17. A NEW RADIO RECOMBINATION LINE MASER OBJECT TOWARD THE MonR2 H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q.; Dierickx, M.; Patel, N.; Baez-Rubio, A.; Rivilla, V. M.; Martin-Pintado, J. E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es

    2013-02-10

    We report the detection of a new radio recombination line (RRL) maser object toward the IRS2 source in the MonR2 ultracompact H II region. The continuum emission at 1.3 mm and 0.85 mm and the H30{alpha} and H26{alpha} lines were observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at angular resolutions of {approx}0.''5-3''. The SMA observations show that the MonR2-IRS2 source is very compact and remains unresolved at spatial scales {<=}400 AU. Its continuum power spectrum at millimeter wavelengths is almost flat ({alpha} = -0.16, with S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}), indicating that this source is dominated by optically thin free-free emission. The H30{alpha} and H26{alpha} RRL emission is also compact and peaks toward the position of the MonR2-IRS2 source. The measured RRL profiles are double peaked with the H26{alpha} line showing a clear asymmetry in its spectrum. Since the derived line-to-continuum flux ratios ({approx}80 and 180 km s{sup -1} for H30{alpha} and H26{alpha}, respectively) exceed the LTE predictions, the RRLs toward MonR2-IRS2 are affected by maser amplification. The amplification factors are, however, smaller than those found toward the emission-line star MWC349A, indicating that MonR2-IRS2 is a weakly amplified maser. Radiative transfer modeling of the RRL emission toward this source shows that the RRL masers arise from a dense and collimated jet embedded in a cylindrical ionized wind, oriented nearly along the direction of the line of sight. High-angular resolution observations at submillimeter wavelengths are needed to unveil weakly amplified RRL masers in very young massive stars.

  18. Fermentation of methanol in the sheep rumen.

    PubMed

    Pol, A; Demeyer, D I

    1988-03-01

    Sheep fed a hay-concentrate diet were adapted to pectin administration and ruminal infusion of methanol. Both treatments resulted in a strong increase in the rate of methanogenesis from methanol. Quantitative data show that methanol was exclusively converted into methane. Treatments did not influence ruminal volatile fatty acid percentages.

  19. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  20. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz