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Sample records for gi bleeds due

  1. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  2. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  3. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  4. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  5. Reliability measures in managing GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Amnon

    2012-06-01

    Multiple procedures and devices are used in a complex interplay to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. To model how a large variety of diagnostic and therapeutic components interact in the successful management of GI bleeding. The analysis uses the concept of reliability block diagrams from probability theory to model management outcome. Separate components of the management process are arranged in a serial or parallel fashion. If the outcome depends on the function of each component individually, such components are modeled to be arranged in series. If components complement each other and can mutually compensate for each of their failures, such components are arranged in a parallel fashion. General endoscopy practice. Patients with GI bleeding of unknown etiology. All available endoscopic and radiographic means to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. Process reliability in achieving hemostasis. Serial arrangements tend to reduce process reliability, whereas parallel arrangements increase it. Whenever possible, serial components should be bridged and complemented by additional alternative (parallel) routes of operation. Parallel components with low individual reliability can still contribute to overall process reliability as long as they function independently of other pre-existing alternatives. Probability of success associated with individual components is partly unknown. Modeling management of GI bleeding by a reliability block diagram provides a useful tool in assessing the impact of individual endoscopic techniques and administrative structures on the overall outcome. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemotherapy Used to Halt Lower GI Bleeding in a Rare Case of Metastatic Choriocarcinoma to the GI Tract.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Ralph; Seoud, Talal; Oluwadamilola, Teniola; Karass, Michael; Grossniklaus, Emily; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Goldstein, Daniel A; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma, a nonseminomatous germ cell tumor, is a rare type of testicular malignancy that tends to occur in young males. It is, however, exceedingly rare for choriocarcinoma to involve the GI tract. In this article, we present a rare case of a 31-year-old male, diagnosed with choriocarcinoma of the left testes, along with several metastases to distant sites. The patient presented with headaches and severe lower GI bleeding due to metastases to the GI tract, which was eventually controlled with systemic chemotherapy, while requiring several units of packed RBCs during his admission to the hospital. An extensive literature review found very few cases of the occurrence of GI bleeding as a consequence of choriocarcinoma due to metastases to the GI tract.

  7. [Severe lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to diverticulosis].

    PubMed

    Ríos Zambudio, Antonio; Montoya Tabares, Mariano J; Rodríguez González, José Manuel; Febrero Sánchez, Beatriz; Albaladejo Meroño, Aquilino; Molina, Joaquin; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2010-05-01

    Diverticulosis is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in adults in western countries. The aims of the present study were to analyze: 1) the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis; 2) associated morbidity and mortality; 3) the need for surgery, and 4) bleeding recurrence rates after hospital discharge. Were retrospectively reviewed 42 patients with severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis. Patients with rectorrhagia requiring transfusion of at least three packed red blood cell units and those with a decrease in hematocrit of 10 points or more were included. As a control group, we used 133 patients with severe lower GI hemorrhage due to causes other than colonic diverticular disease. All patients were stabilized with conservative measures except one who required emergency surgery. Colonoscopy was performed in 39 patients and the most frequent finding consisted of recent signs of bleeding independently of whether colonoscopy was performed early or was delayed. Endoscopic treatment with Argon laser electrocoagulation was performed in one patient. Bleeding recurrence after hospital discharge occurred in 13 patients (31%); of these, seven (16%) required hospital readmission. Severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis can usually be resolved with conservative treatment although the percentage of bleeding recurrence is high. Early endoscopy is not as important as in the remaining causes of severe lower GI bleeding.

  8. Immediate Unprepped Hydroflush Colonoscopy for Severe Lower GI Bleeding: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Repaka, Aparna; Atkinson, Matthew R.; Faulx, Ashley L.; Isenberg, Gerard A.; Cooper, Gregory S.; Chak, Amitabh; Wong, Richard C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Urgent colonoscopy is not always the preferred initial intervention in severe lower GI bleeding due to the need for a large volume of oral bowel preparation, the time required for administering the preparation, and concern regarding adequate visualization. Objective To evaluate feasibility, safety, and outcomes of immediate unprepped hydroflush colonoscopy for severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Prospective feasibility study of immediate colonoscopy after tap-water enema without oral bowel preparation, aided by water jet pumps and mechanical suction devices in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a primary diagnosis of severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding Setting Tertiary referral center Main outcome measurements Primary outcome measurement was the percentage of colonoscopies where the preparation permitted satisfactory evaluation of the entire length of the colon suspected to contain the source of bleeding. Secondary outcome measurements were visualization of a definite source of bleeding, length of hospital and ICU stays, re-bleeding rates, and transfusion requirements. Results Thirteen procedures were performed in 12 patients. Complete colonoscopy to the cecum was performed in 9/13 patients (69.2 %). However, endoscopic visualization was felt to be adequate to definitively or presumptively identify the source of bleeding in all procedures, with no colonoscopy repeated due to inadequate preparation. A definite source of bleeding was identified in 5/13 procedures (38.5%). Median length of ICU stay was 1.5 days and hospital stay was 4.3 days. Recurrent bleeding during the same hospitalization, requiring repeat endoscopy, surgery or angiotherapy was seen in 3/12 patients (25%). Limitations Uncontrolled feasibility study of selected patients. Conclusion Immediate unprepped hydroflush colonoscopy in patients with severe lower GI bleeding is feasible with the hydroflush technique. PMID:22658390

  9. Management of GI emergencies: peptic ulcer acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2013-10-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common medical emergency. Management of acute ulcer bleeding requires prompt assessment for risk stratification, evaluation for early endoscopy, initiation of pharmacotherapy and treatment of co-morbid diseases. Tremendous advances in endoscopic technique and pharmacotherapy in the past few decades have reduced recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality of the disease. Strategies to minimize recurrence have been defined for various types of peptic ulcers. This article reviews the current management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Esophageal Dieulafoy's lesion: an exceedingly rare cause of massive upper GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, George P; Carollo, Andrea; Bogen, Gregg

    2016-06-14

    Dieulafoy's lesion, a dilated aberrant submucosal vessel which erodes the overlying epithelium, is a relatively rare but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. The esophagus is a very rare location for the lesion. Here we present a case of massive upper GI bleeding, secondary to this remarkably rare occurrence, which was amendable to endoscopic intervention.

  11. Metastatic Testicular Choriocarcinoma: A Rare Cause of Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jacqueline; Armstrong, Sharon; Walsh, Shaun; Groome, Max; Mowat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old man who presented with melena. Endoscopy revealed an ulcerated mass in the stomach and pathology confirmed this to be a malignant, poorly differentiated choriocarcinoma. Further imaging showed a left testicular mass with evidence of pulmonary, gastric, and brain metastases, and blood tests revealed an hCG level of 32,219 U/L. He was diagnosed with advanced metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma and underwent intensive induction chemotherapy and an orchidectomy. Metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26504875

  12. Postcoital bleeding due to cervical endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Seval, Mehmet Murat; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Atak, Zeliha; Guresci, Servet

    2013-01-01

    Endometriosis of the uterine cervix is a rare lesion that is generally asymptomatic in gynaecological practice. We present a case with postcoital bleeding due to a cervical mass mimicking cervical polyp or fibroma which was histologically proven as cervical endometriosis later. Cervical endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cervical masses with postcoital bleeding. PMID:23376669

  13. Postcoital bleeding due to cervical endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Seval, Mehmet Murat; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Atak, Zeliha; Guresci, Servet

    2013-01-31

    Endometriosis of the uterine cervix is a rare lesion that is generally asymptomatic in gynaecological practice. We present a case with postcoital bleeding due to a cervical mass mimicking cervical polyp or fibroma which was histologically proven as cervical endometriosis later. Cervical endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cervical masses with postcoital bleeding.

  14. Choledochal-duodenal fistula presenting as an upper GI bleed.

    PubMed

    Marsdin, Emma Lucy; Kreckler, Simon; Alzein, Abdulhalim; D'Costa, Horace

    2011-12-01

    Gallstones are common and largely asymptomatic, but can result in significant morbidity in a small proportion of patients. Choledochal-enteric fistulation is one such complication with an associated mortality of 15-18%. The authors present a case of an 88-year-old man admitted to the general medical ward with an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy found a large gallstone impacted in the pylorus and CT scan revealed a choledochal-duodenal fistula. At laparotomy it was found that a 6.2 cm gallstone had fistulated into D1 and the pylorus and impacted there, causing outflow obstruction - Bouveret's syndrome. A subtotal cholecystectomy was performed and the stone was removed by a separate gastrostomy. A radiological follow through study on day 14 showed contrast passing freely through the duodenum with no leak and the patient went on to make a slow, but uneventful recovery.

  15. Artificial neural networks accurately predict mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rotondano, Gianluca; Cipolletta, Livio; Grossi, Enzo; Koch, Maurizio; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo; Marmo, Riccardo

    2011-02-01

    Risk stratification systems that accurately identify patients with a high risk for bleeding through the use of clinical predictors of mortality before endoscopic examination are needed. Computerized (artificial) neural networks (ANNs) are adaptive tools that may improve prognostication. To assess the capability of an ANN to predict mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper GI bleeding and compare the predictive performance of the ANN with that of the Rockall score. Prospective, multicenter study. Academic and community hospitals. This study involved 2380 patients with nonvariceal upper GI bleeding. Upper GI endoscopy. The primary outcome variable was 30-day mortality, defined as any death occurring within 30 days of the index bleeding episode. Other outcome variables were recurrent bleeding and need for surgery. We performed analysis of certified outcomes of 2380 patients with nonvariceal upper GI bleeding. The Rockall score was compared with a supervised ANN (TWIST system, Semeion), adopting the same result validation protocol with random allocation of the sample in training and testing subsets and subsequent crossover. Overall, death occurred in 112 cases (4.70%). Of 68 pre-endoscopic input variables, 17 were selected and used by the ANN versus 16 included in the Rockall score. The sensitivity of the ANN-based model was 83.8% (76.7-90.8) versus 71.4% (62.8-80.0) for the Rockall score. Specificity was 97.5 (96.8-98.2) and 52.0 (49.8 4.2), respectively. Accuracy was 96.8% (96.0-97.5) versus 52.9% (50.8-55.0) (P<.001). The predictive performance of the ANN-based model for prediction of mortality was significantly superior to that of the complete Rockall score (area under the curve 0.95 [0.92-0.98] vs 0.67 [0.65-0.69]; P<.001). External validation on a subsequent independent population is needed, patients with variceal bleeding and obscure GI hemorrhage are excluded. In patients with nonvariceal upper GI bleeding, ANNs are significantly superior to the Rockall

  16. Lower GI bleeding: a review of current management, controversies and advances.

    PubMed

    Moss, Andrew J; Tuffaha, Hussein; Malik, Arshad

    2016-02-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is defined as bleeding distal to the ligament of Treitz. In the UK, it represents approximately 3 % of all surgical referrals to the hospital. This review aims to provide review of the current evidence regarding the management of this condition. Literature was searched using Medline, Pubmed, and Cochrane for relevant evidence by two researchers. This was conducted in a manner that enabled a narrative review of the evidence covering the aetiology, clinical assessment and management options of continuously bleeding patients. The majority of patients with acute lower GI bleeding can be treated conservatively. In cases where ongoing bleeding occurs, colonoscopy is still the first line of investigation and treatment. Failure of endoscopy and persistent instability warrant angiography, possibly preceded by CT angiography and proceeding to superselective embolisation. Failure of embolisation warrants surgical intervention. There are still many unanswered questions. In particular, the development of a more reliable predictive tool for mortality, rebleeding and requirement for surgery needs to be the ultimate priority. There are a small number of encouraging developments on combination therapy with regard to angiography, endoscopy and surgery. Additionally, the increasing use of haemostatic agents provides an additional tool for the management of bleeding endoscopically in difficult situations.

  17. Studies of GI bleeding with scintigraphy and the influence of vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; McLean, G.K.

    1981-07-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding depends on accurate localization of the site of hemorrhage. Endoscopy and arteriography, although successful in achieving this goal in the majority of patients, are invasive and have other shortcomings. The introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique has greatly simplified the evaluation and management of these patients. This test is useful in detecting and localizing the bleeding site in the lower GI tract. Scintigraphy is now used as the initial study of choice in patients with rectal bleeding. Advances made in angiography and nuclear medicine techniques also have resulted in improved management of patients. Conservative approaches succeed in controlling hemorrhage in most patients. Vasopressin is the most widely tested agent and has been adopted by many as the preferred preparation for this purpose. Before the introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique, angiography was used to monitor the effectiveness of this drug, whether administered intravenously or intraarterially. With the use of scintigraphy and intravenous administration of vasopressin, these patients now can be managed noninvasively. Only when the intravenous Pitressin infusion fails to stop hemorrhage, is the intraarterial approach considered. Surgery is used as a last resort when these measures fail to stop the bleeding.

  18. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pham, Toan; Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/- SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization.

  19. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/− SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization. PMID:28210507

  20. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome Causing Life-Threatening GI Bleeding: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yungbluth, Margaret; Vainder, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital syndrome of vascular malformations and soft tissue and bone hypertrophy. Vascular malformations can affect multiple organ systems. Involvement of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is uncommon in KTS, but it can be a source of life-threatening bleeding. We report a case of a 32-year-old male with a known diagnosis of KTS who presented with a life-threatening rectal bleeding and was treated with proctosigmoidectomy and massive blood products transfusion. He expired after a long hospitalization. We then review the literature on KTS and management of some of its complications. PMID:23862081

  1. Unplanned Reoperations in Neurosurgical Patients Due to Postoperative Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin-Rui; Chen, Tao; Yang, Yue-Fan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Guan-Ying; Zhang, Shan-Hong; Fei, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of unplanned reoperations from all causes due to bleeding in neurosurgical patients. The medical records of patients who received neurosurgical procedures at our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and data of patients who received reoperations were extracted and summarized. A literature review was conducted of the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases up to November 2013. The main outcome measure was the rate of unplanned reoperations due to bleeding. At our hospital, 68 patients with a mean age of 41.5 ± 21.5 years (range, 7 months to 76 years) received an unplanned reoperation. More than 70% of the patients were older than 18 years, 64.7% were males, and 94.1% had cranial surgery. Almost 60% of the patients received >1 blood transfusion (58.8%) after the first surgery. Of the 68 patients, 35 (51.5%) received a second operation due to bleeding. Univariate logistic regression analysis only showed that an increasing time interval between the first and second surgery was associated with a decreased chance of the reoperation being performed due to bleeding (odds ratio [OR] = 0.843, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.720–0.987; P = .033). Of 229 studies identified, 5 retrospective reports with a total of 1375 patients were included in the analysis. The rate of reoperations for bleeding in the 5 studies ranged from 4.2% to 31.5%. Employing measures to reduce postoperative bleeding may help reduce the rate of unplanned neurosurgical reoperations. PMID:26061301

  2. hypertensive intracranial bleed due to mid aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poovazhagi, Varadarajan; Pauline, Leema; Balakrishnan, N

    2014-03-01

    The authors describe an 11-y-old child with intracranial bleed due to malignant hypertension. Child presented with hypertension, right hemiparesis, feeble femoral pulses and lower limb blood pressure less than the upper limb. CT angiogram revealed narrowing of the abdominal aorta with thinned out left renal artery and hypoplasia of the left kidney. A diagnosis of Mid aortic syndrome was arrived at. CT brain revealed left ganglio capsular bleed. Child was treated with antihypertensives and steriods in view of suspected Takayasu arteritis. Child recovered with minimal hemiparesis and is being followed up.

  3. A risk score system for identification of patients with upper-GI bleeding suitable for outpatient management.

    PubMed

    Almela, Pedro; Benages, Adolfo; Peiró, Salvador; Añón, Ramón; Pérez, Miguel Minguez; Peña, Andrés; Pascual, Isabel; Mora, Francisco

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a risk score system for identification of patients with upper-GI hemorrhage who are suitable for outpatient management. From a prospective cohort of 983 consecutive patients with upper-GI hemorrhage not associated with portal hypertension, 581 cases that did not meet pre-established criteria for admission were selected, and a logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with two adverse outcomes: recurrent bleeding and/or the need for emergency surgery. The risk score system was developed by using the beta coefficients of the logistic model, and its performance was evaluated. The results of this model were combined with pre-established criteria for admission to build a simplified scoring system for identification of patients who can be managed safely on an outpatient basis. Chronic alcoholism, active malignancy, prior upper digestive tract surgery, wasting syndrome, hemodynamic compromise, duodenal ulcer as the cause of upper-GI hemorrhage, and hemorrhage of unknown cause were independently associated with a greater risk of unfavorable outcomes in the group that did not meet pre-established criteria for admission. The logistic model showed a high capacity for discrimination (C statistic: 0.87) and good calibration (p value for Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, 0.62), with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64%. The simplified score had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 29% for adverse outcomes, and sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 38% for mortality. The score system developed in this study may be helpful in deciding between hospitalization and outpatient management for patients with upper-GI hemorrhage, but it remains to be validated in patient groups other than those used for its development.

  4. Therapeutic endoscopy-related GI bleeding and thromboembolic events in patients using warfarin or direct oral anticoagulants: results from a large nationwide database analysis.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Niikura, Ryota

    2017-09-05

    To compare the risks of postendoscopy outcomes associated with warfarin with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), taking into account heparin bridging and various types of endoscopic procedures. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we identified 16 977 patients who underwent 13 types of high-risk endoscopic procedures and took preoperative warfarin or DOACs from 2014 to 2015. One-to-one propensity score matching was performed to compare postendoscopy GI bleeding and thromboembolism between the warfarin and DOAC groups. In the propensity score-matched analysis involving 5046 pairs, the warfarin group had a significantly higher proportion of GI bleeding than the DOAC group (12.0% vs 9.9%; p=0.002). No significant difference was observed in thromboembolism (5.4% vs 4.7%) or in-hospital mortality (5.4% vs 4.7%). The risks of GI bleeding and thromboembolism were greater in patients treated with warfarin plus heparin bridging or DOACs plus bridging than in patients treated with DOACs alone. Compared with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, patients who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and haemostatic procedures including endoscopic variceal ligation or endoscopic injection sclerotherapy were at the highest risk of GI bleeding among the 13 types of endoscopic procedures, whereas those who underwent lower polypectomy endoscopic sphincterotomy or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration were at moderate risk. The risk of postendoscopy GI bleeding was higher in warfarin than DOAC users. Heparin bridging was associated with an increased risk of bleeding and did not prevent thromboembolism. The bleeding risk varied by the type of endoscopic procedure. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Lower GI bleeding is more common than upper among patients on dual antiplatelet therapy: long-term follow-up of a cohort of patients commonly using PPI co-therapy.

    PubMed

    Casado Arroyo, Rubén; Polo-Tomas, Mónica; Roncalés, Maria P; Scheiman, James; Lanas, Angel

    2012-05-01

    Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention require dual antiplatelet therapy. Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy is recommended for the prevention of upper GI complications. No study has determined the rate and type of GI bleeding events in such patients in routine clinical practice. Observational study with a prospective follow-up to confirm medication use and occurrence of events, which were validated. We have followed up a cohort of 1219 consecutive patients admitted for percutaneous coronary intervention in Zaragoza (Spain). Major GI bleeding and cardiovascular events. At discharge, 96.7% of patients were on dual antiplatelet therapy and 76.6% on PPI therapy, which increased up to 87.9% during follow-up of 2107.6 patient (pt) s-years (1.72±1.07 years/patient). There were eight patients who developed GI bleeding during hospitalisation and 27 patients during follow-up, (1.52 bleeds per 100 pt-years). Most GI bleeding events (81.4%) occurred during the first year (mean time to bleeding event: 7.03±7.65 months) and 84.6% of patients were on long-term PPI at the time of the bleed. Lower GI bleeding occurred more frequently than upper GI bleeding (74% lower vs. 26% upper). Peptic ulcer history and concomitant warfarin therapy were the only risk factors identified for upper or lower GI bleeding respectively. Among patients on dual antiplatelet therapy and PPI co-therapy, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes are more frequent in the lower GI tract. This changing pattern of bleeding may reflect the success of gastroprotection and focuses attention on research to address lower GI bleeding in this population.

  6. Upper GI bleeding in an urban hospital. Etiology, recurrence, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawa, C; Steffes, C P; Nakamura, R; Sferra, J J; Sferra, C S; Sugimura, Y; Fromm, D

    1990-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) continues to be a common cause of hospital admission and morbidity and mortality. This study reviews 469 patients admitted to a surgical service of an urban hospital. There were 562 total admissions because 53 patients were readmitted 93 times (recurrence rate, 20%). The most common causes of bleeding, all endoscopically diagnosed, included acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) (135 patients, 24%), esophageal varices (EV) (121 patients, 22%), gastric ulcer (108 patients, 19%), duodenal ulcer (78 patients, 14%), Mallory-Weiss tear (61 patients, 11%), and esophagitis (15 patients, 3%). Nonoperative therapy was sufficient in 504 cases (89.5%). Endoscopic treatment was used in 144 cases. Operations were performed in 58 cases (10.5%), including 29% of ulcers. Emergency operations to control hemorrhage were required in only 2.5% of all cases. The rate of major surgical complications was 11% and the mortality rate was 5.2%. There were 58 deaths (12.6%), with 36 deaths directly attributable to UGIB. Factors correlating with death include shock at admission (systolic blood pressure less than 80), transfusion requirement of more than five units, and presence of EV (all p less than 0.001). Most cases of UGIB can be treated without operation, including endoscopic treatment, when diagnostic endoscopy establishes the source. Subsequent operation in selected patients can be done with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:2222017

  7. Predicting mortality in patients with in-hospital nonvariceal upper GI bleeding: a prospective, multicenter database study.

    PubMed

    Marmo, Riccardo; Koch, Maurizio; Cipolletta, Livio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Grossi, Enzo; Rotondano, Gianluca

    2014-05-01

    Nonvariceal upper GI bleeding (NVUGIB) that occurs in patients already hospitalized for another condition is associated with increased mortality, but outcome predictors have not been consistently identified. To assess clinical outcomes of NVUGIB and identify predictors of mortality from NVUGIB in patients with in-hospital bleeding compared with outpatients. Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 2 nationwide multicenter databases. Descriptive, inferential, and multivariate logistic regression models were carried out in 338 inpatients (68.6 ± 16.4 years of age, 68% male patients) and 1979 outpatients (67.8 ± 17 years of age, 66% male patients). A predictive model was constructed using the risk factors identified at multivariate analysis, weighted according to the contribution of each factor. A total of 23 Italian community and tertiary care centers. Consecutive patients admitted for acute NVUGIB. Early endoscopy, medical and endoscopic treatment as appropriate. Recurrent bleeding, surgery, and 30-day mortality. The mortality rate in patients with in-hospital bleeding was significantly higher than that in outpatients (8.9% vs 3.8%; odds ratio [OR] 2.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.57-3.79; P < .0001). Hemodynamic instability on presentation (OR 7.31; 95% CI, 2.71-19.65) and the presence of severe comorbidity (OR 6.72; 95% CI, 1.87-24.0) were the strongest predictors of death for in-hospital bleeders. Other independent predictors of mortality were a history of peptic ulcer disease and failed endoscopic treatment. Rebleeding was a strong predictor of death only for outpatients (OR 5.22; 95% CI, 2.45-11.10). Risk factors had a different prognostic impact on the 2 populations, resulting in a significantly different prognostic accuracy of the model (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0-93 vs 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68-0.80; P < .02). Study design not experimental, no data on ward specialty, potential referral bias

  8. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  9. Association of prophylactic endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients with upper GI bleeding and cardiopulmonary unplanned events.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Umar; Lee, Peter J; Ullah, Hamid; Sarvepalli, Shashank; Lopez, Rocio; Vargo, John J

    2017-09-01

    Prophylactic endotracheal intubation (PEI) is often advocated to mitigate the risk of cardiopulmonary adverse events in patients presenting with brisk upper GI bleeding (UGIB). However, the benefit of such a measure remains controversial. Our study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiopulmonary unplanned events between critically ill patients with brisk UGIB who underwent endotracheal intubation versus those who did not. Patients aged 18 years or older who presented at Cleveland Clinic between 2011 and 2014 with hematemesis and/or patients with melena with consequential hypovolemic shock were included. The primary outcome was a composite of several cardiopulmonary unplanned events (pneumonia, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, persistent shock/hypotension after the procedure, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest) occurring within 48 hours of the endoscopic procedure. Propensity score matching was used to match each patient 1:1 in variables that could influence the decision to intubate. These included Glasgow Blatchford Score, Charleston Comorbidity Index, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation scores. Two hundred patients were included in the final analysis. The baseline characteristics, comorbidity scores, and prognostic scores were similar between the 2 groups. The overall cardiopulmonary unplanned event rates were significantly higher in the intubated group compared with the nonintubated group (20% vs 6%, P = .008), which remained significant (P = .012) after adjusting for the presence of esophageal varices. PEI before an EGD for brisk UGIB in critically ill patients is associated with an increased risk of unplanned cardiopulmonary events. The benefits and risks of intubation should be carefully weighed when considering airway protection before an EGD in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... GERD) in Adults Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants ...

  11. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  12. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to multifocal intestinal angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Chagoya, Dolores; Figueroa-Ruiz, Marco; López-Gómez, Javier; Nava-Leyva, Héctor; Álvarez-Ponce, Carlos Eduardo; Guzmán-Sombrero, Gustavo; Velazquez-Garcia, José

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal angiosarcomas are an extremely rare and aggressive vascular tumors, with a few cases reported in the literature. Presentation of case A 45 years-old male arrived to our hospital with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding presenting melena and weight loss, he has antecedent of pelvic radiotherapy ten years before admission for an unknown pelvic tumor. Emergency surgery was required because of uncontrolled bleeding and hemodynamic instability. Histopathological findings revealed a multifocal high-grade epithelioid angiosarcoma, with cells reactive for CD31, keratins CKAE 1/AE3 and factor VIII. Discussion Angiosarcomas are aggressive tumors with a high rate of lymph node metastasis and peripheral organs. The diagnosis is difficult because it present nonspecific clinical presentation, radiological and histopathological findings. There are few reports of angiosarcoma involving the small intestine and the most common presentation are abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. There is not enough information for intestinal angiosarcoma secondary to radiation therapy, but there have been proposed criteria for diagnosis: no microscopic or clinical evidence of antecedent malignant lesion, angiosarcoma presented in the field of irradiation, long latency period between radiation and angiosarcoma and histological confirmation. We suspect our patient course with a secondary form of angiosarcoma. Therapy for bleeding angiosarcoma consists in control of bleeding and medical management to stabilize the patient. Once accomplished surgical resection is required. Conclusion We should keep in mind this tumors as a cause of obscure intestinal bleeding in patients with medical history of radiation therapy. PMID:25853844

  13. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Romero-Espinosa, Larry; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; de la Fuente-Lira, Mauricio; Arellano-Sotelo, Jorge

    The gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common soft tissue sarcomas of the digestive tract. They are usually found in the stomach (60-70%) and small intestine (25-30%) and, less commonly, in the oesophagus, mesentery, colon, or rectum. The symptoms present at diagnosis are, gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain, abdominal mass, or intestinal obstruction. The type of symptomatology will depend on the location and size of the tumour. The definitive diagnosis is histopathological, with 95% of the tumours being positive for CD117. This is an observational and descriptive study of 5cases of small intestinal GIST that presented with gastrointestinal bleeding as the main symptom. The period from the initial symptom to the diagnosis varied from 1 to 84 months. The endoscopy was inconclusive in all of the patients, and the diagnosis was made using computed tomography and angiography. Treatment included resection in all patients. The histopathological results are also described. GIST can have multiple clinical pictures and unusual symptoms, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The use of computed tomography and angiography has shown to be an important tool in the diagnosis with patients with small intestine GISTs. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  14. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... back into place. Cover the injury with a moist cloth or bandage. Apply only very gentle pressure ... the vomit (looks bright red, or brown like coffee-grounds) Vaginal bleeding (heavier than usual or after ...

  15. Overheating Anomalies during Flight Test Due to the Base Bleeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry; Hafiychuck, Halyna; Osipov, Slava; Ponizhovskaya, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Dagostino, Mark; Canabal, Francisco; Mobley, Brandon L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the analytical and numerical studies of the plume interaction with the base flow in the presence of base out-gassing. The physics-based analysis and CFD modeling of the base heating for single solid rocket motor performed in this research addressed the following questions: what are the key factors making base flow so different from that in the Shuttle [1]; why CFD analysis of this problem reveals small plume recirculation; what major factors influence base temperature; and why overheating was initiated at a given time in the flight. To answer these questions topological analysis of the base flow was performed and Korst theory was used to estimate relative contributions of radiation, plume recirculation, and chemically reactive out-gassing to the base heating. It was shown that base bleeding and small base volume are the key factors contributing to the overheating, while plume recirculation is effectively suppressed by asymmetric configuration of the flow formed earlier in the flight. These findings are further verified using CFD simulations that include multi-species gas environment both in the plume and in the base. Solid particles in the exhaust plume (Al2O3) and char particles in the base bleeding were also included into the simulations and their relative contributions into the base temperature rise were estimated. The results of simulations are in good agreement with the temperature and pressure in the base measured during the test.

  16. [Digestive bleeding due to jejunal diverticula: A case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Blake-Siemsen, Jorge Cuauhtémoc; Kortright-Farías, Marisol; Casale-Menier, Dante Rafael; Gámez-Araujo, Jesús

    2017-01-02

    Bleeding from the small bowel is a rare pathology that represents 5-10% of gastrointestinal bleeding; 0.06% to 5% of cases are due to the presence of diverticula of the small intestine. The majority of diverticula are asymptomatic and present symptoms when there is a complication. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with a history of chronic renal failure and hypertension. While he was hospitalized due to cerebrovascular disease he recurrently presented lower gastrointestinal bleeding that required blood transfusion on several occasions. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding and colon bleeding were ruled out by endoscopy. It was not until an arteriography was performed that we identified bleeding at proximal jejunum level, and therefore we performed a laparotomy. We present the studies and management that the patient underwent. Although jejunal diverticula are rare, they must be included in the differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding when present in a patient. Arteriography is a study of great use in locating the site, provided the bleeding is more than 0.5ml/minute. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. A case with life-threatening uterine bleeding due to postmenopausal uterine arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Emi; Nakayama, Kentaro; Nakamura, Kohei; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kyo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation is a rare but life-threatening condition that accounts for 1-2% of massive vaginal bleeding. Uterine arteriovenous malformations are less common after menopause. The condition can be diagnosed using Doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and pelvic angiography. We report a postmenopausal patient with a uterine arteriovenous malformation who underwent emergency hysterectomy for sudden onset of life-threatening uterine bleeding following an initially successful but ultimately failed uterine artery embolization. Interestingly, it was not difficult to ligate and cut the dilated vessels and we were able to safely perform the hysterectomy with little bleeding in the operative field. The hysterectomy was successful, with most of the intraoperative vaginal blood loss due to the ruptured arteriovenous malformation. One year after surgery, the patient has had no vaginal bleeding. We consider hysterectomy to be a comparatively safe and effective therapeutic option for postmenopausal women who suffered from uterine arteriovenous malformations with life-threatening uterine bleeding.

  18. Artificial Neural Networks for Early Prediction of Mortality in Patients with Non Variceal Upper GI Bleeding (UGIB)

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Enzo; Marmo, Riccardo; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Background Mortality for non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is clinically relevant in the first 12–24 hours of the onset of haemorrhage and therefore identification of clinical factors predictive of the risk of death before endoscopic examination may allow for early corrective therapeutic intervention. Aim 1) Identify simple and early clinical variables predictive of the risk of death in patients with non variceal UGIB; 2) assess previsional gain of a predictive model developed with conventional statistics vs. that developed with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Methods and results Analysis was performed on 807 patients with nonvariceal UGIB (527 males, 280 females), as a part of a multicentre Italian study. The mortality was considered “bleeding-related” if occurred within 30 days from the index bleeding episode. A total of 50 independent variables were analysed, 49 of which clinico-anamnestic, all collected prior to endoscopic examination plus the haemoglobin value measured on admission in the emergency department. Death occurred in 42 (5.2%). Conventional statistical techniques (linear discriminant analysis) were compared with ANNs (Twist® system-Semeion) adopting the same result validation protocol with random allocation of the sample in training and testing subsets and subsequent cross-over. ANNs resulted to be significantly more accurate than LDA with an overall accuracy rate near to 90%. Conclusion Artificial neural networks technology is highly promising in the development of accurate diagnostic tools designed to recognize patients at high risk of death for UGIB. PMID:27429551

  19. SU-E-T-41: Analysis of GI Dose Variability Due to Intrafraction Setup Variance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J; Wolfgang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) can be an effective modality for treatment of gastrointestinal tumors, but limited in practice due to sensitivity with respect to variation in the RPL (radiological path length). Small, intrafractional shifts in patient anatomy can lead to significant changes in the dose distribution. This study describes a tool designed to visualize uncertainties in radiological depth in patient CT's and aid in treatment plan design. Methods: This project utilizes the Shadie toolkit, a GPU-based framework that allows for real-time interactive calculations for volume visualization. Current SBRT simulation practice consists of a serial CT acquisition for the assessment of inter- and intra-fractional motion utilizing patient specific immobilization systems. Shadie was used to visualize potential uncertainties, including RPL variance and changes in gastric content. Input for this procedure consisted of two patient CT sets, contours of the desired organ, and a pre-calculated dose. In this study, we performed rigid registrations between sets of 4DCT's obtained from a patient with varying setup conditions. Custom visualizations are written by the user in Shadie, permitting one to create color-coded displays derived from a calculation along each ray. Results: Serial CT data acquired on subsequent days was analyzed for variation in RPB and gastric content. Specific shaders were created to visualize clinically relevant features, including RPL (radiological path length) integrated up to organs of interest. Using pre-calculated dose distributions and utilizing segmentation masks as additional input allowed us to further refine the display output from Shadie and create tools suitable for clinical usage. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a method to visualize potential uncertainty for intrafractional proton radiotherapy. We believe this software could prove a useful tool to guide those looking to design treatment plans least insensitive

  20. 75 FR 64314 - Product Development Program for Interventions in Patients With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to discuss possible... resulting from trauma, has been complicated by the lack of a consensus definition of severe bleeding as...

  1. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  2. The importance of process issues as predictors of time to endoscopy in patients with acute upper-GI bleeding using the RUGBE data.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Eduardo B; Lam, Eric; Martel, Myriam; Bensoussan, Karen; Barkun, Alan N

    2006-09-01

    Early endoscopy has been shown to improve outcomes and optimize cost-effectiveness in nonvariceal upper-GI bleeding (NVUGIB). However, there is little information regarding clinical and process determinants that affect the time from onset of bleeding to performance of the endoscopy. The aim of this study was to identify factors that predict time to endoscopy in patients with new onset NVUGIB. Linear regression models were constructed with time between triage (outpatients) or onset of bleeding (inpatients) and the performance of endoscopy. The RUGBE is a nationwide, multicenter database collected for the purpose of obtaining descriptive data on patients with NVUGIB. The study population consisted of 1500 patients (89.6%) who underwent gastroscopy within 48 hours. Median time to endoscopy was 12 hours (95% CI 11.0, 13.0). Endoscopy after working hours (regression coefficient [beta] -3.52; 95% CI -5.47, -1.58), availability of an endoscopy nurse on-call for the procedure (beta -2.48; 95% CI -3.83, -1.14), and admission to a hospital unit were associated with a shorter interval to endoscopy. In contrast, the presence of chest pain (beta 3.65; 95% CI 1.64, 5.67) or dyspnea (beta 2.79; 95% CI 1.10, 4.48), absence of gross blood on rectal examination (beta 2.20; 95% CI 0.69, 3.71), and inpatient status at onset of bleeding (beta 14.6; 95% CI 8.70, 20.4) were independent predictors of a delayed endoscopy. Subgroup analysis showed that actual time intervals as well as independent predictors of time until endoscopy differed between inpatients and outpatients. Retrospective analysis. The timing of endoscopy in patients with NVUGIB is dependent on both clinical and process parameters, which differ between inpatient and outpatient settings. They bear implications with regards to shaping practice and deciding on resource allocation in order to facilitate an early endoscopy, which is currently recommended for improved patient outcomes.

  3. Therapeutic failure with thalidomide in patients with recurrent intestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Navarro, María Del Carmen; Hernando Verdugo, Mercedes; Cardaba Garcia, Elena; Sanchez Sanchez, M Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Angiodysplasias are one of the reasons of gastrointestinal bleeding, whose origin is usually due to vascular malformations. There are different types of therapies for angiodysplasia such as endoscopic, angiographic and pharmacological techniques. Among the last ones, there is little variety of effective drugs to treat the disease. We describe the therapeutic failure with thalidomide in a male with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasias. A thorough diagnostic work-up, including gastroscopy, enteroscopy, angiography and capsule endoscopy were performed. Despite treatment with high-dose somatostatin analogues and oral iron, the patient continued bleeding. The patient was administered then thalidomide for three months with no clinical response. Thalidomide had to be withdrawn owing to adverse effects.

  4. The use of hemostatic spray as an adjunct to conventional hemostatic measures in high-risk nonvariceal upper GI bleeding (with video).

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rohit; Lockman, Khalida A; Church, Nicholas I; Plevris, John N; Hayes, Peter C

    2016-12-01

    Endoscopic management of nonvariceal upper GI bleed (NVUGIB) can be challenging. Hemospray is a novel endoscopic hemostatic agent for NVUGIB. Its efficacy in attaining hemostasis in NVUGIB is promising, particularly with respect to technically difficult lesions. However, most of the currently available data are focused on its application as monotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate its efficacy as a second agent to adrenaline, or as an addition to the combination of adrenaline with either clips or a thermal device in NVUGIB. Consecutive patients with Forrest 1a and 1b ulcer treated with hemostatic spray as an adjunct to conventional endoscopic hemostatic measures between July 2013 and June 2015 were included in this retrospective analysis. The endpoints were initial hemostasis, 7-day rebleeding, 30-day rebleeding, all-cause, and GI-related 30-day mortality. A total of 20 patients (median age, 75 years, 50% men, 60% Forrest 1a ulcer) were treated with hemostatic spray as a second agent to adrenaline, or as an adjunct to the combination of adrenaline with either clips or a thermal device. Hemostatic spray was used as a second agent to adrenaline in 40% and as a third agent to combined dual therapy in 60%. Initial hemostasis was attained in 95% with an overall rebleeding rate at 7 days of 16%. There was no difference between the 7-day and 30-day rebleeding rates. The combination of hemostatic spray and adrenaline resulted in 100% initial hemostasis and 25% 7-day rebleeding. Similarly, initial hemostasis was achieved in 92% with a 9% rebleeding rate when hemostatic spray was used as the third agent to 2 of the conventional measures. All-cause mortality was 15% with 1 GI-related death (3%). In our single-center retrospective analysis, hemostatic spray appears promising as an adjunct to conventional methods for NVUGIB, although prospective controlled trials are needed to confirm this. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published

  5. Refractory bleeding from intestinal angiodysplasias successfully treated with danazol in three patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Botero, Juliana Perez; Pruthi, Rajiv K

    2013-12-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is associated with development of gastrointestinal (GI) vascular malformations that lead to chronic GI bleeding. Conventional management, including von Willebrand factor concentrate replacement and endoscopic ablation or bowel resection, does not consistently reduce hemorrhage. We describe three patients with VWD for whom conventional management failed to control GI bleeding. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with VWD and GI bleeding. After patients began treatment with danazol, we observed long-term reductions in GI bleeding and packed red blood cell transfusion requirements. One patient had severe liver toxicity and was found to have concomitant primary biliary cirrhosis. Danazol use may be considered in patients with VWD and GI bleeding due to angiodysplasia that otherwise fails to respond to conventional treatment; the primary aim of treatment is to reduce transfusion dependence. The benefits are variable and possibly transient. Monitoring for toxicity is important when this treatment is pursued.

  6. [Peritoneal bleeding due to acquired hemophilia during an abdominal sepsis clinical picture].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, J A; Chiacchiara, D N; Adducci, M C; Pilipec, A E; Leone, G; González, E

    2006-10-01

    Bleeding diatheses are frequent alterations during sepsis and surgical-anesthetic aggression. Generally, the bleeding is related with platelet dysfunction, inadequate surgical hemostasis, vitamin K deficit, etc. We present the case of a patient with no background of coagulopathy who, after two surgical interventions, developed abdominal sepsis and peritoneal hematoma after puncture for drainage of abdominal collection, due to an autoimmune origin factor VIII acquired deficit. The hematoma caused a picture of hypovolemic shock that required transfusion of several units of red blood cells, expansion and drug support. Finally, the bleeding was controlled by treatment with immunosuppressants, recombinant activated factor VII (RFVIIa) and polyvalent gammaglobulin. The peritoneal hematoma was drained surgically and the patient evolved towards improvement until being discharged from the intensive therapy unit.

  7. Management of hematometrocolpos due to dysfunctional uterine bleeding following progestin use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bakacak, Murat; Avci, Fazil; Bostanci, Mehmet Suhha; Bakacak, Zeyneb; Serin, Salih; Ercan, Onder; Kostu, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Hematometrocolpos is accumulation of blood in the vagina and uterine cavity due to intra-uterine hemorrhage. A 20-year-old female presented to our clinic with massive menorrhagia at menarche after progestin usage. Hematometrocolpos was detected by transabdominal ultrasonography. She was pale because of heavy bleeding for 5 days and hemoglobin level was measured as 5.1 g/dl. Initial treatment was blood transfusion and medical drug therapy. After resolution of the hematometrocolpos was shown by transabdominal ultrasound 2 days later, the patient, who was stable, was discharged without complication. Obstruction of the female genital outflow tract is rarely seen. Hematocolpos has been reported in elderly women following vaginal occlusion due to radiotherapy, vaginal fibroma and labial synechiae causing infection or inflammatory conditions. The case is presented here because of the successful management of hematometrocolpos due to massive dysfunctional uterine bleeding in a young virgin patient. PMID:28058301

  8. Cardiac tamponade due to bleeding as a potential lethal complication after surgery for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuhei; Morita, Masaru; Nanbara, Sho; Nakaji, Yu; Ando, Koji; Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade, due to bleeding in the pericardial space after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer, is an extremely rare complication and may be associated with sudden hemodynamic instability that can lead to death unless there is prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. A 76-year-old man underwent sub-total esophagectomy via a cervico-right thoracoabdominal approach and reconstruction with a gastric tube through the retrosternal route. On postoperative day 4, the patient developed hypotension due to cardiac tamponade caused by bleeding into the pericardial space and he had a decreased level of consciousness. Pericardial resection and open drainage via a minimal left anterior thoracotomy was performed that resulted in hemodynamic improvement followed by an uneventful recovery. Cardiac tamponade due to postoperative bleeding, which is a rare but life-threatening complication, should be considered as a cause of hemodynamic instability in the early postoperative period after esophagectomy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, S; Sarkar, S; Verma, R; Dubey, Sk; Roy, Mk

    2010-07-01

    "Haemosuccus pancreaticus" is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  10. Ten Questions to Ask Your GI Endoscopist...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dissection (ESD) Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) Procedures F - Z GI Bleeding Manometry Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) Polypectomy Pseudocyst Drainage ... ASGE Masterclasses Clinical Courses DDW / Digestive Disease Week ® GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Practice Management Courses ...

  11. Hypovolemic shock due to severe gastrointestinal bleeding in a child taking an herbal syrup.

    PubMed

    Moro, Paola Angela; Flacco, Valerio; Cassetti, Federica; Clementi, Valentina; Colombo, Maria Laura; Chiesa, Giulia Maria; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto; Santuccio, Carmela

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-years-old boy who was admitted with hypovolemic shock due to a severe gastrointestinal bleeding. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) showed hiatus hernia, erosions and ulcerations of the lower esophagus, possibly due to a gastroesophageal reflux, and a small duodenal erosion. The child was previously healthy and he had never shown any symptoms related to this condition. The only product taken by the child in the previous days was a syrup containing several herbs, among which Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. and Salix spp. (known to contain salicylates), marketed as food and prescribed by his paediatrician to treat a mild cold accompanied by fever. Quali-quantitative analysis confirmed the presence of salicylates in the syrup. Naranjo algorithm showed a probable correlation between the onset of symptoms and the consumption of the herbal remedy. The child recovered after receiving intensive care. The product was withdrawn from Italian market.

  12. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to 'Dieulafoy's vascular malformation' of the jejunum: case report.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Chatman, D. M.; Kaviani, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Dieulafoy reported three cases of massive gastric hemorrhage due to a dilated submucosal artery in 1898, and since then, more than 100 cases of this gastric vascular malformation have been reported in the literature. These same pathologic lesions are even a rarer occurrence in the small bowel. This article reports a 38-year-old hypotensive male who presented to the hospital after an acute onset of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage; superior mesenteric angiography demonstrated an actively bleeding lesion in a proximal jejunal branch. Intraoperative small bowel endoscopy via an enterotomy demonstrated a 4 mm bleeding submucosal lesion 30 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A literature review revealed six other cases of Dieulafoy's vascular malformation that occurred in the small bowel, with the lesions located in the proximal jejunum between 15 cm and 45 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. The cause of these lesions is unknown. This case demonstrates the importance of preoperative angiography and intraoperative endoscopy when massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is suspected to be from a small bowel source. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7473854

  13. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptation and validation of an adverse drug reaction preventability score for bleeding due to vitamin K antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Liabeuf, Sophie; Masmoudi, Kamel; Scailteux, Lucie-Marie; Moragny, Julien; Masson, Henri; Brnet-Dufour, Valérie; Andrejak, Michel; Gras-Champel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although drug therapy is inherently associated with the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), some of these events are preventable. The estimated proportion of preventable ADRs varies from one study or clinical context to another. Bleeding caused by antithrombotic agents (and particularly vitamin K antagonists, VKAs) constitutes one of the most frequent causes of ADR-related hospitalization. Hence, the objective of the present study was to adapt and validate an ADR preventability score for bleeding due to VKAs and evaluate the preventability of bleeding in 906 consecutive hospitalized, VKA-treated adult patients with a risk of major bleeding (defined as an international normalized ratio ≥5) over a 2-year period. A specific preventability scale for VKA-associated bleeding was developed by adapting a published tool. Overall, 241 of the 906 patients in the study experienced at least 1 VKA-associated bleeding event. The scale's reliability was tested by 2 different evaluators. The inter-rater reliability (evaluated by calculation of Cohen's kappa) ranged from “good” to “excellent.” Lastly, the validated scale was used to assess the preventability of the VKA-associated bleeding. We estimated that bleeding was preventable or potentially preventable in 109 of the 241 affected patients (45.2%). We have developed a useful, reliable tool for evaluating the preventability of VKA-associated bleeding. Application of the scale in a prospective study revealed that a high proportion of VKA-associated bleeding events in hospitalized, at-risk adult patients were preventable or potentially preventable. PMID:27684801

  15. Assessing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Gabrielle; Kruger, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring accurate, prompt, and appropriate patient evaluation and management. Clinicians of all specialties must know the best practices for preventing and managing upper GI bleeding. This article focuses on assessing and managing adults with acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

  16. Practical management of bleeding due to the anticoagulants dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban.

    PubMed

    Fawole, Adewale; Daw, Hamed A; Crowther, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    The new oral anticoagulants dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis) have predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles and are alternatives to warfarin. However, many physicians are wary of these drugs, since there is limited evidence on how to manage bleeding in patients taking them, and since no specific antidote is known to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Management requires careful adherence to first principles of bleeding care. Unapproved and untested reversal strategies may be required in patients with life-threatening bleeding.

  17. Bleeding diathesis due to decreased functional activity of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Schleef, R R; Higgins, D L; Pillemer, E; Levitt, L J

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated an elderly patient with a lifelong history of severe bleeding after surgery or trauma and with evidence of persistent hyperfibrinolysis. Routine coagulation studies were normal. Serum plasminogen (40%, normal 72-128%) and alpha 2-antiplasmin (55%, normal 70-145%) activities were decreased. Euglobulin clot lysis was abnormally shortened (50 min) and normalized in vitro with epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA). The patient was treated with EACA with prompt cessation of bleeding. Patient tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels in serum were normal (4.7 ng/ml, control 3.5-7.2) as detected by a two-site immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Patient fibrinolytic inhibitor activities were assessed by incubating 125I-labeled t-PA with either whole blood or serum followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography to identify the resultant protease/protease inhibitor complexes. In comparison to blood samples obtained from normal donors, patient plasma and serum demonstrated reduced binding of a fast-acting plasminogen activator inhibitor to 125I-labeled t-PA. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated diminished complex formation between type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) in patient serum and 125I-labeled t-PA. Low patient PAI-1 activity was confirmed in serum (0.36 U/ml, control 0.87-1.81; n = 3) and in platelet lysates using a functional IRMA to quantitate PAI-1 binding to immobilized t-PA. However, patient serum PAI-1 antigen was within the normal range when analyzed by IRMA (31.8 ng/ml, control 19.6-42.2); this result was confirmed in both serum and platelets by Western blot (n = 3). Mixing experiments using purified PAI-1 as well as patient and control sera did not show evidence for an inhibitor against PAI-1. We conclude that this patient's bleeding diathesis was due to hyperfibrinolysis and defective PAI-1. This patient provides the first demonstration of a link between decreased in vivo PAI-1 activity and disordered hemostasis, and supports a role for PAI-1

  18. Ileocecal resection for massive rectal bleeding due to Yersinia enterocolitica: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Azghari, Ilham; Bargach, Aicha; Billah, Nabil Moatassim; Essaoudi, Mohamed Amine; Jahid, Ahmed; Kabbaj, Nawal

    2016-01-19

    Massive gastrointestinal bleeding is an emergency that can sometimes require immediate surgery. We report the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of massive rectal bleeding due to Yersinia enterocolitica, requiring ileocecal resection. A 41-year-old North African woman was admitted to our emergency department for massive rectal bleeding. She had a history of an iron deficiency anemia of unknown cause, and diarrhea 2 months before the admission. On admission to our emergency unit, she was in a state of hemodynamic collapse. An examination showed discolored conjunctivas, massive rectal bleeding with clots and no abdominal pain. The first medical treatment included the use of noradrenaline. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed and did not show any lesions. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed significant and hypervascular wall thickening of her terminal ileum suggestive of a tumor. Because her massive rectal bleeding worsened and her collapse persisted, an exploratory laparotomy and ileocecal resection were immediately performed on the patient. Histopathological analysis showed enteritis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. Her outcome was favorable. Enteritis due to Yersinia enterocolitica can take a pseudotumoral form and mislead the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Prognostic factors for recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion.

    PubMed

    Jamanca-Poma, Yuliana; Velasco-Guardado, Antonio; Piñero-Pérez, Concepción; Calderón-Begazo, Renzo; Umaña-Mejía, Josue; Geijo-Martínez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Pérez, Antonio

    2012-10-28

    To analyze the effectiveness of the endoscopic therapy and to identify prognostic factors for recurrent bleeding. Retrospective study of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Dieulafoy's lesion (DL) from 2005 to 2011. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of the patients, risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopic findings, characteristics of the endoscopic treatment, and the recurrence of bleeding. We included cases in which endoscopy described a lesion compatible with Dieulafoy. We excluded patients who had potentially bleeding lesions such as angiodysplasia in other areas or had undergone other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Twenty-nine patients with DL were identified. Most of them were men with an average age of 71.5 years. Fifty-five percent of the patients received antiaggregatory or anticoagulant therapy. The most common location for DL was the stomach (51.7%). The main type of bleeding was oozing in 65.5% of cases. In 27.6% of cases, there was arterial (spurting) bleeding, and 6.9% of the patients presented with an adherent clot. A single endoscopic treatment was applied to nine patients (31%); eight of them with adrenaline and one with argon, while 69% of the patients received combined treatment. Six patients (20.7%) presented with recurrent bleeding at a median of 4 d after endoscopy (interquartile range = 97.75). Within these six patients, the new endoscopic treatment obtained a therapeutic success of 100%. The presence of arterial bleeding at endoscopy was associated with a higher recurrence rate for bleeding (50% vs 33.3% for other type of bleeding) [P = 0.024, odds ratio (OR) = 8.5, 95% CI = 1.13-63.87]. The use of combined endoscopic treatment prevented the recurrence of bleeding (10% vs 44.4% of single treatment) (P = 0.034, OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.19-0.99). Endoscopic treatment of DL is safe and effective. Adrenaline monotherapy and arterial (spurting) bleeding are associated with a high rate of bleeding

  20. Prognostic factors for recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jamanca-Poma, Yuliana; Velasco-Guardado, Antonio; Piñero-Pérez, Concepción; Calderón-Begazo, Renzo; Umaña-Mejía, Josue; Geijo-Martínez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Pérez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effectiveness of the endoscopic therapy and to identify prognostic factors for recurrent bleeding. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL) from 2005 to 2011. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of the patients, risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopic findings, characteristics of the endoscopic treatment, and the recurrence of bleeding. We included cases in which endoscopy described a lesion compatible with Dieulafoy. We excluded patients who had potentially bleeding lesions such as angiodysplasia in other areas or had undergone other gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients with DL were identified. Most of them were men with an average age of 71.5 years. Fifty-five percent of the patients received antiaggregatory or anticoagulant therapy. The most common location for DL was the stomach (51.7%). The main type of bleeding was oozing in 65.5% of cases. In 27.6% of cases, there was arterial (spurting) bleeding, and 6.9% of the patients presented with an adherent clot. A single endoscopic treatment was applied to nine patients (31%); eight of them with adrenaline and one with argon, while 69% of the patients received combined treatment. Six patients (20.7%) presented with recurrent bleeding at a median of 4 d after endoscopy (interquartile range = 97.75). Within these six patients, the new endoscopic treatment obtained a therapeutic success of 100%. The presence of arterial bleeding at endoscopy was associated with a higher recurrence rate for bleeding (50% vs 33.3% for other type of bleeding) [P = 0.024, odds ratio (OR) = 8.5, 95% CI = 1.13-63.87]. The use of combined endoscopic treatment prevented the recurrence of bleeding (10% vs 44.4% of single treatment) (P = 0.034, OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.19-0.99). CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment of DL is safe and effective. Adrenaline monotherapy and arterial (spurting) bleeding are

  1. [Severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIST tumor. Radiological embolization and surgery].

    PubMed

    Navas, Diana; Ríos, Antonio; Febrero, Beatriz; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Lloret, Francisco; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) were identified only recently. These tumors usually have no symptoms, although they are localized, operable and curable. Although rare, if they are not diagnosed and treated early, they become very aggressive. The most common manifestation is gastrointestinal bleeding from mucosal erosion. Their presentation as severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding is exceptional. We report a patient with severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding stabilized by interventional radiology that subsequently required surgery for definitive care. Therapeutic use of radiological embolization is increasingly widespread in bleeding at various levels, achieving hemodynamic stabilization of patients. However, it must be kept in mind that, in cases of unknown etiology of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, possible causes must be investigated.

  2. Prolonged venous bleeding due to traditional treatment with leech bite: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been used in the treatment of many diseases for thousands of years. In Turkey, it is used most commonly in the management of venous diseases of lower extremities. Case presentation A 25-year-old Turkish woman presented to our emergency room with bleeding from her left leg. She had been treated for varicose veins in her lower extremities with leeches about 24 hours before admission to the emergency room. The bleeding was controlled by applying pressure with sterile gauze upon the wound, and she was discharged. She returned after four hours having started bleeding again. Hemostasis was achieved by vein ligation under local anesthesia. Conclusions Leech bite should be evaluated as a special injury. Prolonged bleeding can be seen after leech bites. In such cases, hemostasis either with local pressure or ligation of the bleeding vessel is mandatory. PMID:21548915

  3. Recurrent severe gastrointestinal bleeding and malabsorption due to extensive habitual megacolon

    PubMed Central

    Mecklenburg, Ingo; Leibig, Markus; Weber, Christof; Schmidbauer, Stefan; Folwaczny, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Dilatation of the colon and the rectum, which is not attributable to aganglionosis, is a rare finding and can be the result of intractable chronic constipation. We report a rare case of a 29-year-old male patient with impressive megacolon, in whom Hirschsprung’s or Chagas disease was ruled out. In the present case, dilatation of the colon was most likely due to a behavioral disorder with habitual failure of defecation. Chronic stool retention led to a bizarre bulging of the large bowel with displacement of the other abdominal organs and severe occult blood loss. Because of two episodes of life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding despite conventional treatment of constipation, a surgical approach for bowel restoration was necessary. Temporary loop ileostomy had to be performed for depressurization of the large bowel and the subsequent possibility for effective antegrade colonic lavage to remove impacted stools. Shortly after the operation, the patient was healthy and could easily manage the handling of the ileostomy. However, the course of the megacolon in this young adult cannot be predicted and the follow-up will have to reveal if regression of this extreme colonic distension with reestablishment of regular rectal perception will occur. PMID:16437700

  4. VKORC1 deficiency in mice causes early postnatal lethality due to severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    Spohn, Gabriele; Kleinridders, Andre; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Watzka, Matthias; Zaucke, Frank; Blumbach, Katrin; Geisen, Christof; Seifried, Erhard; Müller, Clemens; Paulsson, Mats; Brüning, Jens C; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2009-06-01

    Vitamin K hydroquinone is oxidised to the epoxide form (K>O) during vitamin K-dependent posttranslational gamma-glutamyl carboxylation resulting in biological active so called vitamin K-dependent proteins. In turn, K>O is reduced by the enzyme VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex component 1) to complete the vitamin K cycle. To investigate the biological role of VKORC1 in vivo, we generated VKORC1 knockout mice. Homozygous VKORC1-deficient mice developed normally until birth. Within 2-20 days after birth, the knockout mice died due to extensive, predominantly intracerebral haemorrhage. Bleeding resulted from a severe deficiency of gamma-carboxylated clotting factors. This lethal phenotype could be rescued by oral administration of vitamin K. Additionally, morphometric analysis of the limbs in VKORC1-deficient animals revealed reduced length of bone calcification relative to wild-type control mice. The observed phenotype of VKORC1 knockout mice excludes the existence of other enzymes with VKOR activity that can substitute to supply vitamin K hydroquinone required for maturation of blood clotting factors. Thus, our study underscores the essential role of VKORC1 in vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylation.

  5. [Bleeding gastric ulcers and acute hepatitis: 2 simultaneous adverse reactions due to nimesulide in a case].

    PubMed

    Tejos, S; Torrejón, N; Reyes, H; Meneses, M

    2000-12-01

    A 66 year-old obese woman with arthrosis, self-medicated with oral nimesulide, 200 mg daily. After 6 weeks she developed nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Two weeks later she had recurrent hematemesis and was hospitalized. Besides obesity and anemia her physical examination was unremarkable. An upper GI endoscopy revealed 3 acute gastric ulcers and a 4th one in the pyloric channel. Abdominal ultrasonogram showed a slightly enlarged liver with diffuse reduction in ecogenicity; the gallbladder and biliary tract were normal. Blood tests demonstrated a conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (maximal total value: 18.4 mg/dl), ALAT 960 U/l, ASAT 850 U/l, GGT 420 U/l, alkaline phosphatases mildly elevated, pro-time 49% and albumin 2.7 mg/dl. Serum markers for hepatitis A, B and C viruses were negative. ANA, AMA, anti-SmA, were negative. Ceruloplasmin was normal. A liver biopsy showed bridging necrosis and other signs of acute toxic liver damage. Gastric ulcers healed after conventional treatment and hepatitis subsided after 2 months leaving no signs of chronic liver damage. The diagnosis of toxic hepatitis due to nimesulide was supported by the time-course of drug usage, sex, age, absence of other causes of liver disease, a compatible liver biopsy and the improvement after drug withdrawal. Peptic ulcers or toxic hepatitis have been previously described as independent adverse reactions in patients taking nimesulide or other NSAIDs but their simultaneous occurrence in a single patient is a unique event that deserves to be reported.

  6. [No clinical evidence for an enhanced bleeding tendency due to perioperative treatment with bromelain].

    PubMed

    Johann, K; Eschmann, K; Meiser, P

    2011-06-01

    Systemic enzyme therapy with bromelain resembles a sensible alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs for the treatment of sports injuries, with particular consideration of therapeutic benefits and possible risks. Beyond aftertreatment of sports injuries, bromelain is used postoperatively as well. Besides the desired effects remission of oedema and pain relief, however, the postoperative use of bromelain raises uncertainty in some patients and physicians since an enhanced bleeding tendency in case of concomitant therapy with anticoagulants was described as a possible interaction. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of this interaction. In two non-interventional studies, altogether 260 patients were peri- or postoperatively (cruciate ligament- or coxarthrosis surgery) treated with bromelain (n = 129, 1000 - 3000 F. I. P. units/day) or diclofenac (n = 131; 150 mg/day) under concomitant thrombosis prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin. Parameters tested were prothrombin time, thrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen and tolerability of the medication. Only marginal changes and a low variability of coagulation parameters were observed in both treatment groups (bromelain vs. diclofenac) in both studies. Elevated laboratory parameters were observed in both treatment groups for thrombin time which is very likely attributable to the therapy with low molecular weight heparin, due to the substantially parallel course of this parameter in both treatment groups. Therapy with bromelain was superior to the treatment with diclofenac concerning the number and the severity of undesirable effects, as was expected. The presented studies therefore support the previous clinical evidence that a perioperative treatment with bromelain is well tolerated and does not lead to an increased risk of haemorrhage when used concomitantly with low molecular weight heparin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New

  7. The natural history of occult or angiodysplastic gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Makris, M; Federici, A B; Mannucci, P M; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Yee, T T; Abshire, T; Berntorp, E

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most challenging complications encountered in the management of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). The commonest cause is angiodysplasia, but often no cause is identified due to the difficulty in making the diagnosis. The optimal treatment to prevent recurrences remains unknown. We performed a retrospective study of VWD patients with occult or angiodysplastic bleeding within the setting of the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN) to describe diagnostic and treatment strategies. Centres participating in the VWD PN recruited subjects under their care with a history of congenital VWD and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplasia, or cases in which the cause was not identified despite investigation. Patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome or those for whom the GI bleeding was due to another cause were excluded. Forty-eight patients from 18 centres in 10 countries were recruited. Seven individuals had a family history of GI bleeding and all VWD types except 2N were represented. Angiodysplasia was confirmed in 38%, with video capsule endoscopy and GI tract endoscopies being the most common methods of making the diagnosis. Recurrent GI bleeding in VWD is associated with significant morbidity and required hospital admission on up to 30 occasions. Patients were treated with multiple pharmacological agents with prophylactic von Willebrand factor concentrate being the most efficient in preventing recurrence of the GI bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of recurrent GI bleeding in congenital VWD remains challenging and is associated with significant morbidity. Prophylactic treatment with von Willebrand factor concentrate was the most effective method of preventing recurrent bleeding but its efficacy remains to be confirmed in a prospective study.

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Recent Trends from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuo, Ryu; Hata, Jun; Kuroda, Junya; Ago, Tetsuro; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tooru; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    deterioration (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.3-6.6, p < 0.001), in-hospital death (OR 6.1, 95% CI 3.1-12.1, p < 0.001), and poor outcome at 3 months (OR 6.8, 95% CI 3.7-12.7, p < 0.001). These associations were significant irrespective of whether patients underwent red blood cell transfusion. Conclusions GI bleeding infrequently occurred in patients with acute ischemic stroke, which was mostly due to etiologies other than peptic ulcer. GI bleeding was associated with poor clinical outcomes including neurologic deterioration, in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome. PMID:25276117

  9. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  10. Persistent intestinal bleeding due to severe CMV-related thrombocytopenia in a preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Spaggiari, Eugenio; Cattelani, Chiara; Roversi, Maria Federica; Pecorari, Monica; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2017-04-11

    The optimal threshold for neonatal platelet transfusions in sick newborns is still uncertain. We report a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in a premature neonate with severe thrombocytopenia who subsequently presented with necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal bleeding. The baby recovered after platelet transfusions were discontinued and the therapy was switched from intravenous ganciclovir to oral valganciclovir. We discuss both measures, speculating on the key role of platelet transfusions.

  11. [Bleeding during central venous catheterization : Cannot intubate, cannot ventilate due to massive cervical hematoma].

    PubMed

    Engelen, C; Trebes, C; Czarnecki, S; Junger, A

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is an invasive procedure which can be associated with severe complications. These include in particular unsuccessful arterial puncture and vascular injuries, which in addition to loss of blood can lead to massive soft tissue swelling. A 63-year-old female patient developed massive cervical bleeding during ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein puncture and the rapidly enlarging hematoma led to compromisation of the airway. A cannot intubate, cannot ventilate situation developed and the subsequent hypoxia led to cardiac arrest that was only resolved after emergency surgical tracheotomy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  12. [Treating severe acute anemia due to vaginal bleeding in the Jehovah's Witness: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gredilla, E; Pérez-Ferrer, A; Canser, E; Alonso, E; Martínez Serrano, B; Gilsanz, F

    2009-12-01

    For reasons of religious belief, Jehova's Witnesses do not accept blood transfusions or the infusion of blood products. In situations in which severe, life-threatening anemia develops, patient refusal to receive a transfusion can create serious ethical and legal problems. The principle of patient autonomy, which implies the freedom to accept or reject treatment, comes into conflict with the physician's obligation to safeguard the patient's life using all means possible. We report 2 cases of severe anemia in Jehova's Witnesses. One was due to menorrhagia and the other to postpartum bleeding. The physician should be aware of alternatives to infusion of blood products and know how to cope with an unexpected critical event in these patients. The measures we took were effective in our patients. In the case of menorrhagia, hormone treatment is effective when the woman wishes to preserve the ability to conceive and avoid surgery (endometrial ablation and hysterectomy). In postpartum bleeding refractory to conservative treatment, selective embolization of bleeding vessels may make it unnecessary to resort to more aggressive treatment, such as obstetric hysterectomy.

  13. Octreotide in the management of recurrent gastrointestinal bleed in patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Hashim, Taimoor; Tallaj, Jose A; Acharya, Deepak; Holman, William; Kirklin, James; Pamboukian, Salpy V

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is the most common cause of readmission in patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVAD). We describe our experience in the off-label use of octreotide in the management of recurrent GI bleed in this population. Of 116 patients implanted with a CF-LVAD at our institution, seven had recurrent GI bleeding unresponsive to conventional management and were started in chronic octreotide injections. Hospitalizations due to GI bleeding, number of packed red blood cells transfused, and number of endoscopic procedures were compared 3 months before and after octreotide treatment. In the overall cohort, there were no differences in these three endpoints. When one patient with differing characteristics was excluded from the analysis there was a trend (p = 0.06) to a reduction of hospitalizations due to GI bleeding, number of blood transfusions, and number of endoscopic procedures. Octreotide exhibit a favorable trend in the frequency of admissions, blood transfusions, and endoscopic procedures in most patients with recurrent GI bleed. Further prospective studies are needed to clarify its benefits in this population.

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Statins and Risk of Bleeding: An Analysis to Evaluate Possible Bias Due to Prevalent Users and Healthy User Aspects.

    PubMed

    van Rein, Nienke; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; le Cessie, Saskia; Rosendaal, Frits R; Reitsma, Pieter H; van der Meer, Felix J M; Lijfering, Willem M

    2016-05-15

    Statins are said to protect against a wide range of diseases. We studied to what extent potential bias influences the results of studies on beneficial side effects of statins. We selected 8,188 atrial fibrillation patients who started treatment with anticoagulants at the Leiden Anticoagulation Clinic in the Netherlands between 2003 and 2009 and experienced 1,683 minor and 451 major bleeds during 18,105 person-years of follow-up. Statins were associated with a risk reduction of 9% for bleeds (hazard ratio = 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 1.00). Additionally, analyses were stratified by age, incident users (patients who started statins during follow-up, i.e., an inception cohort), and prevalent statin users (statin users at baseline), as restriction to incident users avoids overoptimistic risk estimates. After stratification, the protective associations disappeared or reversed (range of hazard ratios = 0.99-3.22), except for patients aged 75 years or older. This remaining association could be due to another bias as, according to guidelines, in the elderly, statins should be prescribed only to those with a reasonable life expectancy. This could have resulted in a comparison of fit statin users with less fit nonstatin users (healthy user effect). The apparent protective association of statins on bleeds may be due to bias. We recommend stratification by age and incident and prevalent statin use when studying associations of statins with disease outcomes to avoid overoptimistic risk estimates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Talking about GI Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders Talking About GI Disorders Personal Stories Social Security Benefits Contact Us About Kids & Teens GI Health ... Disorders Talking About GI Disorders Personal Stories Social Security Benefits Contact Us Talking About GI Disorders Home ...

  17. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular events due to NSAIDs in the diabetic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungmee; Lee, Joongyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and cardiovascular (CV) risks such as myocardial infarction or stroke associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use among elderly patients with diabetes. Methods Using a nationwide claims database covering 2008–2012, we conducted a cohort study of patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years. Among the 117 610 patients, NSAID users and non-users were propensity score matched, excluding any who had experienced a potentially confounding event in the year prior to cohort entry. Multivariate Cox regression models treating death as competing risk were used. Results There were 2184 (1.86%) cases of GIB and NSAID users had an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.68 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.83) of GIB risk after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and recent medications compared to NSAID non-users. There were 9333 (7.94%) cases of myocardial infarction or stroke with an aHR of 1.20 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.25). The risk of GIB was higher in patients with liver disease and renal failure, while that of CV events was higher in patients who received anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, aspirin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The number needed to harm was 111 for GIB and 77 for CV events. Among different NSAIDs, nimesulide increased the risk of GIB and ketorolac increased the risk of CV events compared to celecoxib (aHR 2.60 and 3.13, respectively). Conclusions Elderly patients with diabetes treating NSAIDs had a significantly higher risk of both upper GIB and CV events compared to NSAID non-users, and the risk varied among different NSAIDs regardless of cyclooxygenase-2 activity. PMID:26719806

  18. [Upper gastrointestinal bleeding after cardiac surgery and invasive cardiology procedures--prophylaxis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Davidkov, L; Evstatiev, I; Chirkov, A

    2005-01-01

    The abdominal complications after cardiac surgery prolong the hospitalization and increase the cost. The operative treatment of these complications is having high mortality rate--up to 85%. In this study we investigated the upper gastrointestinal bleeding: the causes, the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and the difficulties of the treatment. From January to December 2003, 724 cardiac operations were performed in University Hospital "Saint Ekaterina", Sofia 2771 angiographies, 594 angioplasties, and 874 stent implantations were done as well. 380 upper GI endoscopies were performed for this period. Upper GI bleeding was found in 27 cases. We used Somatostatin and Omeprasol treatment protocol in the cases of acute upper GI bleeding and for bleeding prophylaxis in patients with previously diagnosed stomach or duodenal erosions and ulcers. Endoscopic sclerotherapy was performed in 9 cases to achieve control of the bleeding. We had no relapses of the bleeding. No open surgical procedures were necessary, and we had no mortalities due to upper GI bleeding during the study period.

  19. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  20. Hysterectomy due to Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in a 15-year Old Girl with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Park, Eun Young; Jung, Sang Woo; Song, Seung Woo; Lim, Hyun Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is characterized by mental retardation, atypical facial features, broad thumbs and toes, and scoliosis. Polycystic ovaries are associated with chronic anovulation and abnormal uterine bleeding. A 15-year old female patient was diagnosed with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome, and had prolonged abnormal uterine bleeding for 2 years, accompanied by a polycystic ovary. As she showed no improvement during hormonal therapy or medical treatment, a hysterectomy was performed to control the bleeding. PMID:27924288

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Gastrointestinal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Shin, Ji Hoon; Han, Kichang; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Shin, Jong-Soo; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by GI lymphoma. The medical records of 11 patients who underwent TAE for GI bleeding caused by GI lymphoma between 2001 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 20 TAE procedures were performed. On angiography, contrast extravasation, and both contrast extravasation and tumor staining were seen in 95 % (19/20) and 5 % (1/20) of the procedures, respectively. The most frequently embolized arteries were jejunal (n = 13) and ileal (n = 5) branches. Technical and clinical success rates were 100 % (20/20) and 27 % (3/11), respectively. The causes of clinical failure in eight patients were rebleeding at new sites. In four patients who underwent repeat angiography, the bleeding focus was new each time. Three patients underwent small bowel resection due to rebleeding after one (n = 2) or four (n = 1) times of TAEs. Another two patients underwent small bowel resection due to small bowel ischemia/perforation after three or four times of TAEs. The 30-day mortality rate was 18 % due to hypovolemic shock (n = 1) and multiorgan failure (n = 1). Angiogram with TAE shows limited therapeutic efficacy to manage GI lymphoma-related bleeding due to high rebleeding at new sites. Although TAE can be an initial hemostatic measure, surgery should be considered for rebleeding due to possible bowel ischemic complication after repeated TAE procedures.

  2. GI Radiographic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic / Radiographic Tests in GI Radiographic Tests in GI Basics Commonly Performed Radiographic Tests in Gastroenterology Gastroenterologists ... January 2009. Updated December 2012. Return to Top GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel ...

  3. Risk Factors for Vascular Occlusive Events and Death Due to Bleeding in Trauma Patients; an Analysis of the CRASH-2 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pealing, Louise; Perel, Pablo; Prieto-Merino, David; Roberts, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular occlusive events can complicate recovery following trauma. We examined risk factors for venous and arterial vascular occlusive events in trauma patients and the extent to which the risk of vascular occlusive events varies with the severity of bleeding. Methods and Findings We conducted a cohort analysis using data from a large international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial (The CRASH-2 trial) [1]. We studied the association between patient demographic and physiological parameters at hospital admission and the risk of vascular occlusive events. To assess the extent to which risk of vascular occlusive events varies with severity of bleeding, we constructed a prognostic model for the risk of death due to bleeding and assessed the relationship between risk of death due to bleeding and risk of vascular occlusive events. There were 20,127 trauma patients with outcome data including 204 (1.01%) patients with a venous event (pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis) and 200 (0.99%) with an arterial event (myocardial infarction or stroke). There were 81 deaths due to vascular occlusive events. Increasing age, decreasing systolic blood pressure, increased respiratory rates, longer central capillary refill times, higher heart rates and lower Glasgow Coma Scores (all p<0.02) were strong risk factors for venous and arterial vascular occlusive events. Patients with more severe bleeding as assessed by predicted risk of haemorrhage death had a greatly increased risk for all types of vascular occlusive event (all p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with severe traumatic bleeding are at greatly increased risk of venous and arterial vascular occlusive events. Older age and blunt trauma are also risk factors for vascular occlusive events. Effective treatment of bleeding may reduce venous and arterial vascular occlusive complications in trauma patients. PMID:23251374

  4. "Downhill" Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Dev, Anil; Kanneganti, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    "Downhill" varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed "downhill" varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare "downhill" varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  5. Comparative study of bipolar eletrocoagulation versus argon plasma coagulation for rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation coloproctopathy.

    PubMed

    Lenz, L; Tafarel, J; Correia, L; Bonilha, D; Santos, M; Rodrigues, R; Gomes, G; Andrade, G; Martins, F; Monaghan, M; Nakao, F; Libera, E; Ferrari, A P; Rohr, R

    2011-08-01

    Chronic radiation coloproctopathy (CRCP) is a well-recognized complication of radiotherapy, with rectal bleeding the most common presentation. It is frequently refractory to conservative management, but the optimal endoscopic treatment of bleeding secondary to CRCP is still controversial. The efficacy and safety of bipolar eletrocoagulation (BEC) and argon plasma coagulation (APC) in the management of bleeding from CRCP were evaluated and compared. 30 patients (mean age 67.4 years) with active and chronic bleeding from telangiectasias, were randomly allocated to BEC or APC and stratified by severity of CRCP according to clinical severity and endoscopic findings (Saunders score). Success was defined as eradication of all telangiectasias, and therapeutic failure as need for more than seven sessions or for other treatment. Complications were categorized as minor (e.g. fever, anal or abdominal pain) or major (hemorrhagic). Both treatments were equally effective for the treatment of CRCP rectal bleeding. Only one failure was observed in each group (P = 1.000). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding number of sessions, minor or major complications, or relapse. However, overall complication rate was significantly higher in the BEC group (P = 0.003). BEC and APC are both effective for the therapy of bleeding telangiectasias from CRCP. There are probably no major differences between them. Although APC seemed safer than BEC in this investigation, further studies, involving a much larger population, are needed to assess the complication rates and determine the best management option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen. PMID:28377935

  7. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason; Lewis, Michele D

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen.

  8. Continued Antiplatelet Therapy and Risk of Bleeding in Gastrointestinal Procedures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Management of perioperative antiplatelet medications in gastrointestinal (GI) surgery is challenging. The risk of intraoperative and postoperative bleeding is associated with perioperative use of antiplatelet medication. However, cessation of these drugs may be unsafe for patients who are required to maintain antiplatelet use due to cardiovascular conditions. The objective of this systematic review was to compare the risk of intraoperative or postoperative bleeding among patients who had GI surgery while on continuous antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, or dual therapy) with the risk among those not taking continuous antiplatelet medication. We reviewed articles published between January 2000 and July 2015 from the Medline Ovid and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. Studies involving any GI procedures were included if the articles met our inclusion criteria (listed in Methods). The following key words were used for the search: clopidogrel, Plavix, aspirin, antiplatelet, bleeding, hemorrhage, and digestive system surgical procedures. Quality of the studies was assessed, depending on their study design, using the Newcastle-Ottawa score or the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Twenty-two studies were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. Five showed that the risk of intraoperative bleeding or postoperative bleeding among patients who had GI surgery while on continuous antiplatelet therapy was higher compared that for those not on continuous therapy. The remaining 17 studies reported that there was no statistically significant difference in the risks of bleeding between the continuous antiplatelet therapy group and the group without continuous antiplatelet therapy. The risk of bleeding associated with GI procedures in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy was not significantly higher than in patients with no antiplatelet or interrupted antiplatelet therapy. Copyright © 2016 American

  9. Ankaferd Blood Stopper for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding due to distinct benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Mevlut; Onal, Ibrahim Koral; Akdogan, Meral; Kekilli, Murat; Arhan, Mehmet; Sayilir, Abdurrahim; Oztas, Erkin; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, Ankaferd Health Products Ltd, Turkey) hemostatic agent for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding associated with various benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures. METHODS: The records of all patients who underwent upper and lower endoscopy procedures at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital (Ankara, Turkey) between April 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed. Patients in whom ABS was used as a primary or adjuvant hemostatic agent were included in the study. Rates of bleeding control and postprocedural complications were documented. RESULTS: Hemostasis with no immediate complications was achieved in all patients within seconds of endoscopic application of ABS. CONCLUSIONS: ABS may have a role as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to conventional modalities used to control gastrointestinal bleeding. Prospective controlled studies are needed to help establish its efficacy and, perhaps, offer a comparison with conventional hemostatic interventions. PMID:20559581

  10. Endoscopic variceal ligation caused massive bleeding due to laceration of an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Qing; Gu, Hua-Ying; Wu, Zhi-E; Miao, Hui-Biao; Wang, Pei-Qi; Wen, Zhuo-Fu; Wu, Bin

    2014-11-14

    Endoscopic variceal obturation of gastric varices with tissue glue is considered the first choice for management of gastric varices, and is usually safe and effective. However, there is still a low incidence of complications and some are even fatal. Here, we present a case in which endoscopic variceal ligation caused laceration of the esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli and massive bleeding after 3 mo. Cessation of bleeding was achieved via variceal sclerotherapy using a cap-fitted gastroscope. Methods of recognizing an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue plug are discussed.

  11. [Cesarean section for case with preoperatively-suspected placenta accrete followed by hysterectomy due to uncontrollable massive bleeding].

    PubMed

    Kono, Yasuo; Sawada, Maiko; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2007-12-01

    A 42-yr-old pregnant woman highly suspicious of the placenta accreta was scheduled for cesarean section (c-section) under general anesthesia. She had received emergency c-section for the placenta previa at 36 years of age and three episodes of intrauterine curettage for spontaneous abortion. While the possibility of placenta accreta was pointed out and the risks accompanying with it were explained at the 7th week of pregnancy, she insisted on having a baby. C-section was intended at around the 30th week of pregnancy and 1,200 ml of autologus blood was stored for the predictable massive bleeding. Bilateral embolization of the internal iliac artery was also planned. The baby was delivered uneventfully. However, the adherence of the placenta was so tight that the placenta could not be separated from the uterine wall. The arterial embolization immediately after the delivery did not work as effectively as to control massive bleeding. It took about 1 hour to control the massive bleeding of up to 9000 ml by difficult hysterectomy. Since we had prepared for such a situation, we could well catch up with the massive bleeding. The mother and baby were discharged well from the hospital 29th day after the c-section.

  12. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  13. Learn About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Learn About GI Motility Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Disorders ... Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us ...

  14. Talking about GI Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Upper GI Aerophagia Dyspepsia Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Gastroparesis GERD Infant Regurgitation Rumination Syndrome Lower GI Bellyaches in Children Childhood Defecation Disorders Diarrhea Hirschsprung's ...

  15. About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Learn About GI Motility Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Disorders ... Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us ...

  16. Learn About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  17. About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  18. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a young patient with Budd Chiari syndrome due to a mutation of factor V Leiden: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dina, Ion; Iacobescu, Claudia; Goldis, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    Budd Chiari syndrome or hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a complex entity with multiple etiologies and various clinical manifestations. It is often difficult to establish the diagnosis. The most common cause is a hypercoagulable state due to either genetic disorders of blood coagulation or several acquired conditions such as hematological diseases, tumors, infections, chronic inflammatory diseases, pregnancy. The most common clinical presentation is hepatomegaly, abdominal pain and ascites, but the onset can also be dramatical and life threatening with upper digestive bleeding due to portal hypertension through postsinusoidal blockage. We report the case of a young patient with a coagulation disorder secondary to a mutation of factor V Leiden, who presented with upper digestive bleeding as the first manifestation of Budd Chiari syndrome and who also was associated with myocardial infarction in his past medical history.

  19. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  20. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Spanish Small Bowel Bleeding (American College of Gastroenterology) Also in Spanish Upper GI Endoscopy (National Institute ... in Spanish Find an Expert American College of Gastroenterology ASGE: Find a Doctor (American Society for Gastrointestinal ...

  1. Why Do Patients Bleed?

    PubMed Central

    Curnow, Jennifer; Pasalic, Leonardo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing surgical procedures can bleed for a variety of reasons. Assuming that the surgical procedure has progressed well and that the surgeon can exclude surgical reasons for the unexpected bleeding, then the bleeding may be due to structural (anatomical) anomalies or disorders, recent drug intake, or disorders of hemostasis, which may be acquired or congenital. The current review aims to provide an overview of reasons that patients bleed in the perioperative setting, and it also provides guidance on how to screen for these conditions, through consideration of appropriate patient history and examination prior to surgical intervention, as well as guidance on investigating and managing the cause of unexpected bleeding. PMID:28824979

  2. Elevated C-reactive protein level predicts lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be caused by colorectal polyps or cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify blood test variables and medications that can predict lower GI bleeding, which would allow for appropriate colonoscopy. The medical records of patients who underwent colonoscopy from September 2014 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The selected patients included 278 men (mean age, 67.0±11.5 years) and 249 women (mean age, 69.6±12.0 years). The diagnosis, medications, and blood test variables were compared between patients with and without bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with lower GI bleeding. The presence of colorectal polyp and cancer was associated with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0044) with an odds ratio of 6.71 (P=0.0148). No lower GI bleeding was observed in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, or anticoagulants. The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0227). The Hb levels were lower in patients with lower GI bleeding, however this finding was not statistically significant (P>0.05). No blood test variable was associated with lower GI bleeding. Elevated CRP was associated with lower GI bleeding, while there was no association between the medications and lower GI bleeding. PMID:27284411

  3. [Clinical analysis of gastrointestinal bleeding after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-ming; Wu, Ruo-bin; Yang, Hong-wei; Zheng, Shao-yi; Fan, Rui-xin; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Jing-fang

    2005-05-15

    To explore early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after cardiac surgery. In the last 13 years, cases complicated with GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries were analyzed retrospectively. Fourty-four GI bleeding occurred post-operatively in (6 +/- 3) d. The mortality was 23% (10/44). Thirty-eight were located in upper GI tract, of them 26 underwent conservative therapy while 4 died of other than GI bleeding cause; six underwent laparotomy while 1 and 3 died of septicemia and multi-organ failure respectively; six underwent gastric endoscopic hemostasis by electrocautery or clipping the bleeding vessel while all survived. Six were located in lower GI tract, and 2 of them underwent laparotomy without finding bleeding section and died of multi-organ failure. By multivariable logistic regression analysis, deaths were highly related to the post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) assisting and laparotomy. The mortality of GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries is very high, early gastrointestinal endoscopic examination and minimally invasive intervention can treat this complication more effectively. GI bleeding must be prevented whenever complicating post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, and IABP assisting after cardiac surgery.

  4. One hundred and one over-the-scope-clip applications for severe gastrointestinal bleeding, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Wedi, Edris; Gonzalez, Susana; Menke, Detlev; Kruse, Elena; Matthes, Kai; Hochberger, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and clinical outcome of patients treated with an over-the-scope-clip (OTSC) system for severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage, perforations and fistulas. METHODS: From 02-2009 to 10-2012, 84 patients were treated with 101 OTSC clips. 41 patients (48.8%) presented with severe upper-gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, 3 (3.6%) patients with lower-GI bleeding, 7 patients (8.3%) underwent perforation closure, 18 patients (21.4%) had prevention of secondary perforation, 12 patients (14.3%) had control of secondary bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and 3 patients (3.6%) had an intervention on a chronic fistula. RESULTS: In 78/84 patients (92.8%), primary treatment with the OTSC was technically successful. Clinical primary success was achieved in 75/84 patients (89.28%). The overall mortality in the study patients was 11/84 (13.1%) and was seen in patients with life threatning upper GI hemorrhage. There was no mortality in any other treatment group. In detail OTSC application lead to a clinical success in 35/41 (85.36%) patients with upper GI bleeding and in 3/3 patients with lower GI bleeding. Technical success of perforation closure was 100% while clinical success was seen in 4/7 cases (57.14%) due to attendant circumstances unrelated to the OTSC. Technical and clinic success was achieved in 18/18 (100%) patients for the prevention of bleeding or perforation after endoscopic mucosal resection and ESD and in 3/3 cases of fistula closure. Two application-related complications were seen (2%). CONCLUSION: This largest single center experience published so far confirms the value of the OTSC for GI emergencies and complications. Further clinical experience will help to identify optimal indications for its targeted and prophylactic use. PMID:26855543

  5. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  6. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Rivaroxaban: A Comparative Study with Warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Tupper, Ruth; Spurr, Charles; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with rivaroxaban has not been studied extensively. The aim of our study was to assess this risk in comparison to warfarin. Methods. We examined the medical records for patients who were started on rivaroxaban or warfarin from April 2011 to April 2013. Results. We identified 300 patients (147 on rivaroxaban versus 153 on warfarin). GI bleeding occurred in 4.8% patients with rivaroxaban when compared to 9.8% patients in warfarin group (p = 0.094). GI bleeding occurred in 8% with therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban (>10 mg/d) compared to 9.8% with warfarin (p = 0.65). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who were on rivaroxaban for ≤40 days had a higher incidence of GI bleeding than those who were on it for >40 days (OR = 2.8, p = 0.023). Concomitant use of dual antiplatelet agents was associated with increased risk of GI bleeding in the rivaroxaban group (OR = 7.4, p = 0.0378). Prior GI bleeding was also a risk factor for GI bleeding in rivaroxaban group (OR = 15.5). Conclusion. The incidence of GI bleeding was similar between rivaroxaban and warfarin. The risk factors for GI bleeding with rivaroxaban were the first 40 days of taking the drug, concomitant dual antiplatelet agents, and prior GI bleeding. PMID:26880901

  7. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  8. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  9. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  10. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  11. Alternative agents to prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Desborough, Michael; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Chaimani, Anna; Trivella, Marialena; Vyas, Paresh; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2016-10-31

    People with thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow failure are vulnerable to bleeding. Platelet transfusions have limited efficacy in this setting and alternative agents that could replace, or reduce platelet transfusion, and are effective at reducing bleeding are needed. To compare the relative efficacy of different interventions for patients with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure and to derive a hierarchy of potential alternative treatments to platelet transfusions. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 27 April 2016. We included randomised controlled trials in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), desmopressin (DDAVP), recombinant factor XIII (rFXIII), recombinant interleukin (rIL)6 or rIL11, or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard of care or platelet transfusion). We excluded people undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transfusion. Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We estimated summary risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We planned to use summary mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes. All summary measures are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI).We could not perform a network meta-analysis because the included studies had important differences in the baseline severity of disease for the participants and in the number of participants undergoing chemotherapy. This raised important concerns about the plausibility of the transitivity assumption in the final dataset and we

  12. Alternative agents to prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Chaimani, Anna; Trivella, Marialena; Vyas, Paresh; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    Background People with thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow failure are vulnerable to bleeding. Platelet transfusions have limited efficacy in this setting and alternative agents that could replace, or reduce platelet transfusion, and are effective at reducing bleeding are needed. Objectives To compare the relative efficacy of different interventions for patients with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure and to derive a hierarchy of potential alternative treatments to platelet transfusions. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 27 April 2016. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure who were allocated to either an alternative to platelet transfusion (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), desmopressin (DDAVP), recombinant factor XIII (rFXIII), recombinant interleukin (rIL)6 or rIL11, or thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics) or a comparator (placebo, standard of care or platelet transfusion). We excluded people undergoing intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transfusion. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We estimated summary risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We planned to use summary mean differences (MD) for continuous outcomes. All summary measures are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We could not perform a network meta-analysis because the included studies had important differences in the baseline severity of disease for the participants and in the number of participants undergoing chemotherapy. This raised important

  13. Balancing efficacy and bleeding risk in the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation with newer oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B; Verma, Subhash; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Tripathi, A K; Bhave, Abhay; Deshpande, Anand; Vora, Amit; Dalal, Jamshed J; Shah, A B; Bichu, S

    2012-09-01

    With the evaluation and approval of newer oral anticoagulants such as the factor IIa inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, strategies for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation need a thorough re-evaluation of current options. Clinicians are naturally excited about the imminent introduction of these newer drugs that do not need international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring, besides having no drug-food and minimal drug-drug interactions. However, as with all new drugs, it is always prudent to use these judiciously so that they stay in our therapeutic armamentarium for a long time. More than 56 years after the introduction of warfarin we now have three drugs, viz., dabigatran 150 mg bid, rivaroxaban 20 mg od, and apixaban 5 mg bid which were effective in comparison with warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and bleeding in the landmark trials, RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, and ARISTOTLE respectively. There is a thin dividing line between physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Routine INR monitoring may not be required but in special situations, such as prior to major surgery, overdose, non-compliance or stroke while on the anticoagulant, one may wish to know whether there are any laboratory measures of efficacy or means of reversal of over anticoagulation. Similar questions may be raised about other situations such as renal dysfunction, cardioversion, ablation procedures, post-stenting, or switch to and from warfarin, heparin or LMWH? This document is an attempt to address these concerns based on available evidence and give physicians a perspective and practice guidelines on how best to use these agents, both old and new, for optimal patient outcomes, maximizing efficacy and minimizing risk.

  14. Lower GI Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... GI series. • an allergic reaction to the barium. • bowel obstruction—partial or complete blockage of the small or large intestine. Although rare, bowel obstruction can be a life-threatening condition that requires ...

  15. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  16. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make

    PubMed Central

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. PMID:28242804

  17. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible. PMID:27281100

  18. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  19. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdomen or ask you to change position several times to evenly coat your upper GI tract with the barium. If you are having a double-contrast study, you will swallow gas-forming crystals that mix with the barium coating your stomach. ...

  20. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; McKusick, K.A.; Froelich, J.W.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    Using a modified in vivo /sup 99m/Tc red cell labeling technique, gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy was performed in 100 patients with GI bleeding. Sixty-two patients with melena or bright red blood per rectum had positive scintiscans. In comparison to results of angiography, endoscopy, surgery and contrast radiography, radionuclide scintigraphy correctly located the site of bleeding in 83% of patients. The procedures could be performed over a 24 hr period which increased the sensitivity of the test since 85% of the scintiscans were positive at one hr or greater after the onset of imaging. The procedure was more sensitive than angiography in detecting sources of GI bleeding. We conclude that GI bleeding scintigraphy /sup 99m/Tc-red cells in an accurate and effective method to detect upper and lower GI bleeding in patients with acute intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ( ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ...

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Treated With Rivaroxaban or Warfarin: ROCKET AF Trial.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew W; Nessel, Christopher C; Hellkamp, Anne S; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Piccini, Jonathan P; Suh, Eun-Young; Becker, Richard C; Singer, Daniel E; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hankey, Graeme J; Berkowitz, Scott D; Fox, Keith A A; Patel, Manesh R

    2015-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common complication of oral anticoagulation. This study evaluated GI bleeding in patients who received at least 1 dose of the study drug in the on-treatment arm of the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation) trial. The primary outcome was adjudicated GI bleeding reported from first to last drug dose + 2 days. Multivariable modeling was performed with pre-specified candidate predictors. Of 14,236 patients, 684 experienced GI bleeding during follow-up. These patients were older (median age 75 years vs. 73 years) and less often female. GI bleeding events occurred in the upper GI tract (48%), lower GI tract (23%), and rectum (29%) without differences between treatment arms. There was a significantly higher rate of major or nonmajor clinical GI bleeding in rivaroxaban- versus warfarin-treated patients (3.61 events/100 patient-years vs. 2.60 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.42; 95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 1.66). Severe GI bleeding rates were similar between treatment arms (0.47 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.41 events/100 patient-years; p = 0.39; 0.01 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.04 events/100 patient-years; p = 0.15, respectively), and fatal GI bleeding events were rare (0.01 events/100 patient-years vs. 0.04 events/100 patient-years; 1 fatal events vs. 5 fatal events total). Independent clinical factors most strongly associated with GI bleeding were baseline anemia, history of GI bleeding, and long-term aspirin use. In the ROCKET AF trial, rivaroxaban increased GI bleeding compared with warfarin. The absolute fatality rate from GI bleeding was low and similar in both treatment arms. Our results further illustrate the need for minimizing modifiable risk factors for GI bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  3. Geography Controls GI Bill Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Stuart F.

    Analyzing FY 74 GI Bill data seems to confirm that a Vietman veteran's chances of using the GI Bill turn on what state he is from. Geography controls opportunities because the formula of today's GI Bill, unlike that of World War II's Bill, ignores state differences in educational costs. This legislative formula inadvertently minimizes veterans'…

  4. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  5. Gastrointestinal bleed induced by a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vishal R; Chandail, Vijant; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. Co-administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been widely suggested as one of the strategies to prevent these GI complications among NSAIDs users. Herein, we present a case of severe GI bleeding in a patient taking fixed dose combination (FDC) of rabeprazole (20 mg) and diclofenac sodium (100 SR).

  6. Gastrointestinal bleed induced by a fixed dose combination of rabeprazole and diclofenac sodium

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vishal R.; Chandail, Vijant; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. Co-administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been widely suggested as one of the strategies to prevent these GI complications among NSAIDs users. Herein, we present a case of severe GI bleeding in a patient taking fixed dose combination (FDC) of rabeprazole (20 mg) and diclofenac sodium (100 SR). PMID:25298591

  7. Middle-term mortality and re-bleeding after initial diverticular bleeding: A nationwide study of 365 mostly elderly French patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Diane; Gallois, Claire; Lahmek, Pierre; Lesgourgues, Bruno; Champion, Christine; Charpignon, Claire; Faroux, Roger; Bour, Bruno; Remy, André-Jean; Naouri, Chantal; Picon, Magali; Poncin, Eric; Macaigne, Gilles; Seyrig, Jacques-Arnaud; Bernardini, David; Bellaïche, Guy; Grasset, Denis; Henrion, Jean; Heluwaert, Frédéric; Piperaud, René; Bordes, Gilbert; Bourhis, Francois; Arpurt, Jean-Pierre; Pariente, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to determine the mortality and re-bleeding rates, and the risk factors involved, in a cohort of patients with previous diverticular bleeding (DB). Methods In 2007, data on 2462 patients with lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding were collected prospectively at several French hospitals. We studied the follow-up of patients with DB retrospectively. The following data were collected: age, mortality rates and re-bleeding rates, drug intake, surgery and comorbidities. Results Data on 365 patients, including 181 women (mean age 83.6 ± 9.8 years) were available. The median follow-up time was 3.9 years (IQR 25–75: 1.7–5.4). Of these, 148 patients died (40.5%). Among the 70 patients (19.2%) who had at least one re-bleeding episode, nine died and three underwent surgical procedures. Anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy was discontinued in 70 cases (19.2%). The independent risk factors contributing to mortality were age > 80 years (HR = 3.18 (2.1–4.9); p < 0.001) and a Charlson comorbidity score > 2 (1.91 (1.31–2.79); p = 0.003). Discontinuation of therapy was not significantly associated with a risk of death due to cardiovascular events. No risk factors responsible for re-bleeding were identified, such as antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in particular. Conclusions In this cohort, the rates of mortality and DB re-bleeding after a median follow-up time of 3.9 years were 19.2% and 40.5%, respectively. The majority of the deaths recorded were not due to re-bleeding. PMID:28405330

  8. Ion channelopathies in functional GI disorders.

    PubMed

    Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2016-10-01

    In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, abnormalities in secretion, absorption, motility, and sensation have been implicated in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Ion channels play important roles in all these GI functions. Disruptions of ion channels' ability to conduct ions can lead to diseases called ion channelopathies. Channelopathies can result from changes in ion channel biophysical function or expression due to mutations, posttranslational modification, and accessory protein malfunction. Channelopathies are strongly established in the fields of cardiology and neurology, but ion channelopathies are only beginning to be recognized in gastroenterology. In this review, we describe the state of the emerging field of GI ion channelopathies. Several recent discoveries show that channelopathies result in alterations in GI motility, secretion, and sensation. In the epithelium, mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or CFTR-associating proteins result in channelopathies with constipation or diarrhea as phenotypes. In the muscle, mutations in the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 are associated with irritable bowel syndrome. In the sensory nerves, channelopathies of voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7 and NaV1.9 (encoded by SCN9A, SCN11A, respectively) manifest by either GI hyper- or hyposensation. Recent advances in structural biology and ion channel biophysics, coupled with personalized medicine, have fueled rapid discoveries of novel channelopathies and direct drug targeting of specific channelopathies. In summary, the emerging field of GI ion channelopathies has significant implications for functional GI disease stratification, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Bevacizumab and gastrointestinal bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Enns, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of severe, refractory gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) whose massive transfusion dependence was lifted shortly after treatment with bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. The patient’s bleeding had been refractory to repeated endoscopic interventions, tranexamic acid, and tamoxifen. However, following treatment with bevacizumab at 5 mg/kg every other week, nearly 300 units of packed red blood cell transfusions were avoided in one year’s time. Despite its relatively high cost, bevacizumab may have a more active role in the management of severe GI bleeding in HHT if such remarkable response can be consistently demonstrated. PMID:28070235

  10. [Gastrointestinal bleeding, NSAIDs, aspirin and anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2014-09-01

    The studies presented at the recent American Congress of Gastroenterology in the field of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (associated or not to NSAIDs or ASA use) have not been numerous but interesting. The key findings are: a) rabeprazole, the only PPI that had few studies in this field, is effective in the prevention of gastric ulcers; b) famotidine could also be effective in the prevention of complications by AAS; c) the new competitive inhibitors of the acid potassium pump are effective (as much as PPIs) on the recurrence of peptic ulcers by ASA; d) early endoscop (<8 h) in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding seems to offer no better results than those made in the first 24 h; e) endoscopic therapy in Forrest 1a ulcers does not obliterate the bleeding artery in 30% of cases and is the cause of bleeding recurrence; f) alternative therapies with glue or clotting products are being increasingly used in endoscopic therapy of gastrointestinal bleeding; g) liberal administration of blood in the GI bleeding is associated with poor prognosis; h) lesions of the small intestine are frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding when upper endoscopy shows no positive stigmata; and i) capsule endoscopy studies have high performance in gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, if performed early in the first two days after the beginning of the bleeding episode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible.

  12. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  13. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent. PMID:24604794

  14. Fatal hemoperitoneum due to bleeding from gallbladder varices in an end-stage cirrhotic patient A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pravisani, Riccardo; Bugiantella, Walter; Lorenzin, Dario; Bresadola, Vittorio; Leo, Cosimo Alex

    2016-03-10

    Gallbladder perforation with hemorrhage may be the source of massive hemoperitoneum under rare and extreme circumstances. In cirrhotic patients the bleeding may be associated with the tearing of gallbladder varices and represents a fatal complication, as reported in all the cases available in literature. The incidence of gallbladder varices in the setting of portal hypertension ranges 12-30%, although literature data are limited. We describe the case of an end-stage cirrhotic patient without portal thrombosis awaiting for orthotopic liver transplantation, who developed a fatal hemoperitoneum caused by massive bleeding from ruptured varices of both gallbladder wall and cholecystic fossa. The review of the literature was also performed. Cirrhosis, Gallbladder, Hemoperitoneum, Perforation, Portal hypertension, Varices.

  15. Femoral neuropathy due to retroperitoneal bleeding. A red herring in medicine complicates anticoagulant therapy and influences the Russian Communist Revolution (Crown Prince Alexis, Rasputin).

    PubMed

    Willbanks, O L; Willbanks, S E

    1983-02-01

    Femoral neuropathy occurs when occult retroperitoneal bleeding impinges on the appropriate nerve roots. The syndrome involves the acute onset of groin and thigh pain with characteristic flexion and external rotation of the hip. It may mimic other conditions such as acute arterial occlusion. Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the femoral nerve explains the clinical features and leads the clinician to suspect the occurrence of this syndrome. Three cases have been reviewed that exhibited this condition as a result of retroperitoneal bleeding, a complication of systemic heparin therapy. The hemophilia that afflicted Alexis, the Crown Prince of Russia and son of Tsar Nicholas and Tsarina Alexandra, resulted in this clinical syndrome. The consequences enabled the sinister starets, Gregory Rasputin, to become intimately involved with the royal family, influencing the response of the Tsar to the political events in Russia, thereby playing an important role in setting the stage for the 1917 Russian communist revolution.

  16. Marked bleeding diathesis in patients with platelet dysfunction due to a novel mutation in RASGRP2, encoding CalDAG-GEFI (p.Gly305Asp).

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Emilse; Alberto, Maria F; Paul, David S; Cook, Aaron A; Nurden, Paquita; Sanchez Luceros, Analia; Nurden, Alan T; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2017-07-20

    Congenital platelet function disorders are often the result of defects in critical signal transduction pathways required for platelet adhesion and clot formation. Mutations affecting RASGRP2, the gene encoding the Rap GTPase activator, CalDAG-GEFI, give rise to a novel, and rare, group of platelet signal transduction abnormalities. We here report platelet function studies for two brothers (P1 and P2) expressing a novel variant of RASGRP2, CalDAG-GEFI(p.Gly305Asp). P1 and P2 have a lifelong history of bleeding with severe epistaxis successfully treated with platelet transfusions or rFVIIa. Other bleedings include extended hemorrhage from minor wounds. Platelet counts and plasma coagulation were normal, as was αIIbβ3 and GPIb expression on the platelet surface. Aggregation of patients' platelets was significantly impaired in response to select agonists including ADP, epinephrine, collagen, and calcium ionophore A23187. Integrin αIIbβ3 activation and granule release were also impaired. CalDAG-GEFI protein expression was markedly reduced but not absent. Homology modeling places the Gly305Asp substitution at the GEF-Rap1 interface, suggesting that the mutant protein has very limited catalytic activity. In summary, we here describe a novel mutation in RASGRP2 that affects both expression and function of CalDAG-GEFI and that causes impaired platelet adhesive function and significant bleeding in humans.

  17. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Toward More GI-Friendly Anti-Inflammatory Medications.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John L; de Nucci, Gilberto; Sulaieva, Oksana

    2015-12-01

    Despite the introduction 20-30 years ago of potent inhibitors of gastric acid secretion and anti-inflammatory drugs that preferentially inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2, the GI adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain a significant clinical concern and a considerable economic burden. Inhibitors of acid secretion and selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce damage only in the proximal GI tract (stomach and proximal duodenum), but NSAIDs produce injury and bleeding throughout the GI tract. The small intestinal damage caused by NSAIDs is common, difficult to diagnose, and there are no proven-effective preventative or curative therapies. There is also emerging evidence that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) exacerbate NSAID-induced small intestinal injury. A new approach to solve this clinical problem is to deliver an endogenous, cytoprotective "rescue molecule" together with a COX inhibitor. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a naturally produced, potent protective agent in the GI tract. H2S-releasing NSAIDs have been synthesized and extensively tested in laboratory animals and humans. They exhibit improved anti-inflammatory activity over the parent NSAID, while causing negligible damage in the GI tract.

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding and possible hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Leisa L

    2012-03-01

    An 88-year-old female, living independently in the community, developed duodenal and gastric ulcers from using overthe-counter naproxen sodium for pain related to a shoulder fracture and arthritis of the knees. She was hospitalized and received packed red blood cells and intravenous proton pump inhibitor therapy. During her hospitalization, she developed atrial fibrillation (AF). Warfarin was not prescribed for stroke prevention because of the gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was initially placed on atenolol, and then amiodarone was added. After a two-week hospital stay she was discharged to a nursing facility to gain strength, further correct her anemia, and receive physical therapy for the shoulder and ambulation problems from arthritis of the knees. The amiodarone was continued in the nursing facility. After 15 days of amiodarone therapy (hospital and nursing facility), a laboratory report indicated an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Levothyroxine was prescribed. The patient was eventually discharged to an assisted living facility once her strength returned and her ambulation improved. GI bleeding with anemia and weakness from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and changes in thyroid function with amiodarone therapy for AF will be discussed.

  20. Duodenal Histoplasmosis Presenting with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in an AIDS Patient

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, Michael A.; Paulin, Heather N.; Wester, C. William

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal histoplasmosis (GIH) is common in patients with disseminated disease but only rarely comes to clinical attention due to the lack of specific signs and symptoms. We report the unusual case of a 33-year-old Caucasian male with advanced AIDS who presented with upper GI bleeding from diffuse erosions throughout the duodenum. Biopsy of the lesions revealed small bowel mucosa with granulomatous inflammation and macrophages with small intracellular yeasts consistent with disseminated histoplasmosis. The patient demonstrated significant clinical improvement following a two-week course of liposomal amphotericin B. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of duodenal histoplasmosis leading to clinically significant bleeding, manifesting with worsening anemia and melanotic stools. Given our findings, we maintain that GIH should be considered on the differential diagnosis for GI bleeding in AIDS patients at risk, specifically those with advanced immunosuppression (i.e., CD4+ cell counts <100 cells/mm3) who reside in endemic areas (Ohio or Mississippi river valleys) and/or have a prior history of histoplasmosis. For diagnostic evaluation, we recommend checking a urine Histoplasma quantitative antigen EIA as well as upper and/or lower endoscopy with biopsy. We recommend treatment with a two-week course of liposomal amphotericin B followed by indefinite itraconazole. PMID:23091745

  1. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Following LVAD Placement from Top to Bottom

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, Kelly; Kushnir, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are an increasingly prevalent form of mechanical support for patients with end-stage heart failure. These devices can be implanted both as a bridge to transplant or definitive/destination therapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common and recalcitrant long-term complications following LVAD implantation, with an incidence approaching 30%. The pathophysiology of bleeding is multifactorial, with hemodynamic alterations, acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency, and coagulopathy being most often implicated. The majority of bleeding events in this population result from angioectasias and gastro-duodenal erosive disease. While these bleeding events are significant and often require transfusion therapy, they are rarely life threatening. Endoscopy remains the standard of care with upper endoscopy offering the highest diagnostic yield in these patients. However, the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis in this population is not well established. A small number of studies have evaluated medical therapy and alterations in LVAD settings as a means of preventing or treating bleeding with variable results. In summary, GI bleeding with LVADs is a common occurrence and will continue to be as more LVADs are being performed for destination therapy. This review will discuss what is known about the pathophysiology of GI bleeding in LVADs and the currently available options for medical and/or endoscopic management. PMID:27017225

  2. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  3. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  4. Predictors of gastrointestinal bleeding among patients with atrial fibrillation after initiating dabigatran therapy.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, Julie C; Rhoney, Denise H; Farley, Joel F; Gehi, Anil K; Fang, Gang

    2015-06-01

    To identify demographic and clinical risk factors associated with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding among a large cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who initiated dabigatran therapy for stroke prevention, and to describe patterns of subsequent anticoagulant use after occurrence of the GI bleeding event. Retrospective cohort study. Large, nationwide United States commercial insurance database. A total of 21,033 patients with nonvalvular AF who initiated dabigatran between October 19, 2010, and December 31, 2012. We used multivariate Cox regression analysis to estimate the effect of baseline demographic and clinical characteristics on the probability of a GI bleeding event. Patterns of anticoagulation use after GI bleeding were also examined descriptively. Of the 21,033 patients receiving dabigatran, 446 (2.1%) experienced a GI bleed during follow-up. GI bleeding rates differed across many baseline characteristics. Male sex was associated with a lower risk (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.95) of GI bleeding. Compared with patients younger than 55 years, those aged 55-64, 65-74, and 75 years or older yielded aHRs of 1.54 (95% CI 0.89-2.68), 2.72 (95% CI 1.59-4.65), and 4.52 (95% CI 2.68-7.64), respectively. Renal impairment (aHR 1.67, 95% CI 1.24-2.25), heart failure (aHR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.56), alcohol abuse (aHR 2.57, 95%CI 1.52-4.35), previous Helicobacter pylori infection (aHR 4.75, 95% CI 1.93-11.68), antiplatelet therapy (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.19-1.88), and digoxin use (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.19-1.88) were also associated with an increased GI bleeding risk. Of the 446 patients who experienced a GI bleed, 193 (43.3%) restarted an anticoagulant, with most (65.8%) filling prescriptions for dabigatran; the mean time was 50.4 days until restarting any subsequent anticoagulant. The risk of GI bleeding in patients receiving dabigatran is highly associated with increased age and cardiovascular, renal, and other comorbidities

  5. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  6. A clinically viable capsule endoscopy video analysis platform for automatic bleeding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Xie, Jean; Mui, Peter; Leighton, Jonathan A.; Pasha, Shabana; Rentz, Lauri; Abedi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic bleeding detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos for GI tract run about 8 hours and are manually reviewed by physicians to locate diseases such as bleedings and polyps. As a result, the process is time consuming and is prone to disease miss-finding. While researchers have made efforts to automate this process, however, no clinically acceptable software is available on the marketplace today. Working with our collaborators, we have developed a clinically viable software platform called GISentinel for fully automated GI tract bleeding detection and classification. Major functional modules of the SW include: the innovative graph based NCut segmentation algorithm, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant features, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling various GI tract scenes (e.g. normal tissue, food particles, bubbles, fluid, and specular reflection). Initial evaluation results on the SW have shown zero bleeding instance miss-finding rate and 4.03% false alarm rate. This work is part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. While the overall SW framework is designed for intelligent finding and classification of major GI tract diseases such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos, this paper will focus on the automatic bleeding detection functional module.

  7. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  8. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  9. Topical tranexamic acid as a novel treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Shoaran, Maryam; Ghergherechi, Robabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcers are among the most common causes of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children. The standard care for GI bleeding is endoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We aimed to assess the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) via endoscopic procedures in children with GI bleeding caused by bleeding ulcers. Procedure: In this randomised controlled trial, 120 children were evaluated by diagnostic procedures for GI bleeding, of which 63 (30 girls, 33 boys) aged 1-month to 15 years were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. In the case group, TXA was administered directly under endoscopic therapy. In the control group, epinephrine (1/10,000) was submucosally injected to the four quadrants of ulcer margins as the routine endoscopic therapy. In both groups, the patients received supportive medical therapy with intravenous fluids and proton pump inhibitor drugs. Results: The mean ± standard deviation age of the children was 5 ± 2.03 years. Rebleeding occurred in 15 (11.4%) and 21 (9.8%) patients in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.50). The frequency of blood transfusion episodes (P = 0.06) and duration of hospital stay (P = 0.07) were not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion: Using topical TXA via endoscopic procedures may be effective in cases of GI bleedings caused by active bleeding ulcers. In order to establish this therapeutic effect, a large number of clinical studies are needed. PMID:27251517

  10. A novel approach to assess the spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents using Apc(min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huijun; Shang, Jin; Keohane, CarolAnn; Wang, Min; Li, Qiu; Ni, Weihua; O'Neill, Kim; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents is usually performed in healthy animals with some form of vascular injury to peripheral organs to induce bleeding. However, bleeding observed in patients with currently marketed antithrombotic drugs is typically spontaneous in nature such as intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which happens most frequently on top of preexisting pathologies such as GI ulcerations and polyps. Apc(min/+) mice are reported to develop multiple adenomas through the entire intestinal tract and display progressive anaemia.In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Apc(min/+) mice as a model for assessing spontaneous GI bleeding with antithrombotic agents. Apc(min/+) mice exhibited progressive blood loss starting at the age of nine weeks. Despite the increase in bleeding, Apc(min/+) mice were in a hypercoagulable state and displayed an age-dependent increase in thrombin generation and circulating fibrinogen as well as a significant decrease in clotting times. We evaluated the effect of warfarin, dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and clopidogrel in this model by administering them in diet or in the drinking water to mice for 1-4 weeks. All of these marketed drugs significantly increased GI bleeding in Apc(min/+) mice, but not in wild-type mice. Although different exposure profiles of these antithrombotic agents make it challenging to compare the bleeding risk of compounds, our results indicate that the Apc(min/+) mouse may be a sensitive preclinical model for assessing the spontaneous GI bleeding risk of novel antithrombotic agents.

  11. Arteriojejunal Fistula Presenting with Recurrent Obscure GI Hemorrhage in a Patient with a Failed Pancreas Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Nirmit; Patel, Sagar; Nwosu, Chinyere; Sung, Lok; Buscaglia, Jonathan M.; Nord, Edward P.; Wadhwa, Nand K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with a failed pancreaticoduodenal allograft with exocrine enteric-drainage who developed catastrophic gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage. Over the course of a week, she presented with recurrent GI bleeds of obscure etiology. Multiple esophago-gastro-duodenoscopic (EGD) and colonoscopic evaluations failed to reveal the source of the hemorrhage. A capsule endoscopy and a technetium-labeled red blood cells (RBC) imaging study were similarly unrevealing for source of bleeding. She subsequently developed hemorrhagic shock requiring emergent superior mesenteric arteriography. Run off images revealed an external iliac artery aneurysm with fistulization into the jejunum. Coiled embolization was attempted but abandoned because of hemodynamic instability. Deployment of a covered endovascular stent into the right external iliac artery over the fistula site resulted in immediate hemodynamic stabilization. A high index of suspicion for arterioenteric fistulae is needed for diagnosis of this uncommon but eminently treatable form of GI hemorrhage in this patient population. PMID:24455393

  12. Intractable Hematuria After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Can Lessons Learned from Gastrointestinal Bleeding Be Applied?

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Zhao, Lee; Reyentovich, Alex; Deanda, Abe; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) are at increased risk of bleeding. We reviewed our institutional experience with bleeding in the urinary tract after CF-LVAD implantation and quantified the impact on hospital resource utilization in comparison with bleeding in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the most commonly reported mucosal site of bleeding after LVAD implantation. Records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing CF-LVAD implantation at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. Major adverse events of gross hematuria and GI bleeding were identified, and patient demographics and hospital course were reviewed. Gross hematuria occurred in 3 of the 35 patients (8.6%) and in 5.1% of all hospitalizations for CF-LVAD patients. Severe hematuria occurred after traumatic urethral catheterization, urinary retention, or urologic surgery. Hospitalization for hematuria was six times less likely than hospitalization for GI bleeding; however, hematuria hospitalizations lasted 3.2 times longer than GI bleeding hospitalizations (17.0 vs. 5.3 days). Late recurrent gross hematuria occurred in all cases, with rehospitalization occurring after 109 ± 53 days. In conclusion, gross hematuria is an infrequent but morbid bleeding complication in CF-LVAD patients. Strategies to avoid this complication include strict avoidance of traumatic urethral catheterization and urinary retention in high-risk patients.

  13. The economics of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a US managed-care setting: a retrospective, claims-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Cryer, B L; Wilcox, C M; Henk, H J; Zlateva, G; Chen, L; Zarotsky, V

    2010-03-01

    To assess 12-month healthcare resource utilization and costs associated with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding events. Patients hospitalized with a UGI bleeding event were identified in US national health-plan claims data (1999-2003) and propensity matched to control patients without UGI bleeding in the same health plan. Matching criteria included age, gender, index date, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, geographic region, and prior medical utilization. A total of 9,033 UGI-bleed patients and 579,018 control patients met the inclusion criteria, yielding 4,651 matched pairs. After matching, differences between the UGI bleed and general population cohorts remained for office visits, ER visits, and ER costs during the 6-month baseline period prior to the index date. During the 12 months following the index date, both UGI-related healthcare utilization and total healthcare, medical, and pharmacy costs incurred by the UGI-bleed cohort were significantly greater (p< 0.0001) than those incurred by the general population cohort (mean of $20,405 vs. 3,652), even after excluding the initial hospitalization costs (mean of $11,228 vs. 3,652). Costs were primarily due to inpatient hospitalizations (mean of $13,059 for the UGI-bleed cohort vs. $729 for the general population cohort) and ambulatory services (mean of $4,037 for the UGI-bleed cohort vs. $1,537 for the general population cohort). Sixteen percent of the UGI-bleed cohort had a GI-related hospitalization, and about 40% of total costs occurred after the initial hospitalization. Patients with UGI bleeds experienced significantly higher (p< 0.0001) 12-month health-resource utilization and costs than patients without UGI bleeds. This study provides empirical evidence of the long-term economic burden associated with UGI bleeding. Interpretation of the results should take into account the lack of available information in claims data that could have an effect on study outcomes, such as particular clinical and disease

  14. The significance and work-up of minor gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitalized nursing home patients.

    PubMed Central

    Suatengco, R.; Posner, G. L.; Marsh, F.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive admissions from nursing homes who underwent a gastrointestinal (GI) consult for coffee ground vomitus or occult GI bleeding to evaluate the outcome were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether a GI work-up was or would have been useful. There were 15 deaths, all associated with severe infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy, barium studies, and a history of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use or peptic ulcer disease did not affect the management or outcome. No patient developed major GI bleeding. When nursing home patients present with coffee ground vomitus or newly found occult blood in the stool, efforts should be made to identify and vigorously treat any acute underlying infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy is not helpful in this clinical situation. Both the primary care physician and the GI consultant should be aware of these associations and should focus on the underlying etiology. PMID:7473849

  15. Prevention of acrylonitrile-induced gastrointestinal bleeding by sulfhydryl compounds, atropine and cimetidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Ahmed, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that acrylonitrile (VCN) causes acute gastric hemorrhage and mucosal erosions. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of the sulfhydryl-containing compounds, cysteine and cysteamine, the cholinergic blocking agent atropine and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine on the VCN-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in rats. Our data shows that pretreatment with L-cysteine, cysteamine, atropine or cimetidine has significantly protected rats against the VCN-induced GI bleeding. A possible mechanism of the VCN-induced GI bleeding may involve the interaction of VCN with critical sulfhydryl groups that, in turn, causes alteration of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors to lead to gastric hemorrhagic lesions and bleeding.

  16. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partnership Discounts Regulatory Resources Products Recognition Programs Endoscopy Unit Recognition Program (EURP) Excellence in GI Practice Operations Recognition Program (PRP) Tools to Educate Patients Polyp ...

  17. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... throwing up blood or your vomit looks like coffee grounds Long or heavy periods (women) Headaches that do not go away or are very bad Blurry or double vision Abdominal pains Alternative Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow ...

  18. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  19. Brain death due to abdominal compartment syndrome caused by massive venous bleeding in a patient with a stable pelvic fracture: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Fukushima, Hideki; Inoue, Tetsuya; Murata, Atsuo; Shimazaki, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    We report a rare case in which abdominal compartment syndrome resulting from venous hemorrhaging developed in a patient with stable pelvic fractures, resulting in a fatal outcome. An 84-year-old man with mild pelvic fractures developed hypovolemic shock and underwent transcatheter arterial embolization. He became hemodynamically stable after the procedure, but became hypotensive for the second time 11 h after admission. Urinary bladder pressure rose to 32 mmHg from 4-7 mmHg. Rebleeding from the pelvis with the development of abdominal compartment syndrome was suspected. Repeated transcatheter arterial embolization and laparotomy were performed; however, 1 min into the procedure, both pupils symmetrically dilated and the light reflex disappeared. This case suggests that brain death can sometimes occur due to abdominal compartment syndrome.

  20. The STOP the Bleeding Campaign

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, traumatic injuries worldwide are responsible for over 5 million deaths annually. Post-traumatic bleeding caused by traumatic injury-associated coagulopathy is the leading cause of potentially preventable death among trauma patients. Despite these facts, awareness of this problem is insufficient and treatment options are often unclear. The STOP the Bleeding Campaign therefore aims to increase awareness of the phenomenon of post-traumatic coagulopathy and its appropriate management by publishing European guidelines for the management of the bleeding trauma patient, by promoting and monitoring the implementation of these guidelines and by preparing promotional and educational material, organising activities and developing health quality management tools. The campaign aims to reduce the number of patients who die within 24 hours after arrival in the hospital due to exsanguination by a minimum of 20% within the next 5 years. PMID:23635083

  1. Bleeding after expandable nitinol stent placement in patients with esophageal and upper gastrointestinal obstruction: incidence, management, and predictors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Song, Ho-Young; Nam, Deok Ho; Ko, Heung Kyu; Park, Jung-Hoon; Na, Han Kyu; Lee, Jong Jin; Kang, Min Kyoung

    2014-11-01

    Placement of self-expandable nitinol stents is useful for the treatment of esophageal and upper gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction. However, complications such as stent migration, tumor overgrowth, and bleeding occur. Although stent migration and tumor overgrowth are well documented in previous studies, the occurrence of bleeding has not been fully evaluated. To evaluate the incidence, management strategies, and predictors of bleeding after placement of self-expandable nitinol stents in patients with esophageal and upper GI obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and results of computed tomography and endoscopy of 1485 consecutive patients with esophageal and upper GI obstructions who underwent fluoroscopically guided stent placement. Bleeding occurred in 25 of 1485 (1.7%) patients 0 to 348 days after stent placement. Early stent-related bleeding occurred in 10 patients (40%) and angiographic embolization was used for 5/10. Late bleeding occurred in 15 patients (60%) and endoscopic hemostasis was used for 7/15. Twenty-two of 25 (88%) patients with bleeding had received prior radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Bleeding is a rare complication after placement of expandable nitinol stents in patients with esophageal and upper GI obstruction, but patients with early bleeding may require embolization for control. Care must be exercised on placing stents in patients who have received prior radiotherapy or chemotherapy. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  3. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  5. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Rong; Yin, Yan; Qu, Xin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct summary receiver-operating characteristic. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies with 198 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Data were used to form 2 × 2 tables. CT angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 89% (95% CI: 82%-94%) and specificity of 85% (95% CI: 74%-92%), without showing significant heterogeneity (χ2 = 12.5, P = 0.13) and (χ2 = 22.95, P = 0.003), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.9297. CONCLUSION: CT angiography is an accurate, cost-effective tool in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding and can show the precise location of bleeding, thereby directing further management. PMID:20712058

  6. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  7. Infrared endoscopic system for bleeding-point detection after flushing with indocyanine green solution (with videos).

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Ryu; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Kidu, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Miyoshi, Rika; Inoue, Takuya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Tatsuta, Masaharu

    2008-11-01

    Infrared endoscopy is used to visualize vessels in the GI tract. By applying this system, we developed a new method to visualize a bleeding point during endoscopic resection. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of infrared endoscopy to detect a bleeding point during endoscopic resection and to elucidate the mechanism required for clear visualization of a bleeding point by in vitro color analysis. Observational case series. A cancer-referral center. A total of 10 bleeding sites were observed during endoscopic resection of upper-GI cancers by infrared endoscopy after flushing with indocyanine green (ICG) solution (0.125 mg/mL water). Detection of bleeding points. Bleeding points were identified in all bleeding sites by infrared endoscopic viewing. Bleeding points were displayed in white, whereas, an ulcer bed was in blue and pooled blood was a blue-to-gray color. By in vitro color analysis, blood was white, blood twice diluted with ICG solution was dark blue, and blood 4-times diluted with ICG solution was light blue on infrared endoscopic views. Color differences with blood dilution were more obvious in an infrared endoscopic view compared with a conventional endoscopic view. Blood thickness, movement, and clotting did not influence the color differences. Uncontrolled study. We reported a flushing method by which we could detect all bleeding points during endoscopic resection. Clear visualization of bleeding points comes from differences in blood and ICG concentration between spurting and pooled blood.

  8. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  10. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  11. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  13. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding.

  14. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  15. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  16. Wireless capsule endoscopy: Perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology. PMID:25400450

  17. GI tract tumors with melanocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Dipti M; Patil, Deepa T; Goldblum, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract tumors with melanocytic differentiation may present significant diagnostic challenges both for the pathologist and the clinician. This comprehensive review discusses the relatively common as well as rare entities that have melanocytic differentiation in the GI tract. Clinical, histologic, immunohistochemical and molecular features are discussed along with prognosis and differential diagnosis.

  18. Piroxicam-β-cyclodextrin: a GI safer piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C

    2013-01-01

    Although NSAIDs are very effective drugs, their use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse reactions in the liver, kidney, cardiovascular (CV) system, skin and gut. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects are the most common and constitute a wide clinical spectrum ranging from dyspepsia, heartburn and abdominal discomfort to more serious events such as peptic ulcer with life-threatening complications of bleeding and perforation. The appreciation that CV risk is also increased further complicates the choices of physicians prescribing anti-inflammatory therapy. Despite prevention strategies should be implemented in patients at risk, gastroprotection is often underused and adherence to treatment is generally poor. A more appealing approach would be therefore to develop drugs that are devoid of or have reduced GI toxicity. Gastro- duodenal mucosa possesses many defensive mechanisms and NSAIDs have a deleterious effect on most of them. This results in a mucosa less able to cope with even a reduced acid load. NSAIDs cause gastro-duodenal damage, by two main mechanisms: a physiochemical disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier and systemic inhibition of gastric mucosal protection, through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, PG endoperoxide G/H synthase) activity of the GI mucosa. However, against a background of COX inhibition by anti-inflammatory doses of NSAIDs, their physicochemical properties, in particular their acidity, underlie the topical effect leading to short-term damage. It has been shown that esterification of acidic NSAIDs suppresses their gastrotoxicity without adversely affecting anti-inflammatory activity. Another way to develop NSAIDs with better GI tolerability is to complex these molecules with cyclodextrins (CDs), giving rise to so-called "inclusion complexes" that can have physical, chemical and biological properties very different from either those of the drug or the cyclodextrin. Complexation of NSAIDs with β-cyclodextrin potentially leads to a

  19. Piroxicam-β-Cyclodextrin: A GI Safer Piroxicam

    PubMed Central

    Scarpignato, C

    2013-01-01

    Although NSAIDs are very effective drugs, their use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse reactions in the liver, kidney, cardiovascular (CV) system, skin and gut. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects are the most common and constitute a wide clinical spectrum ranging from dyspepsia, heartburn and abdominal discomfort to more serious events such as peptic ulcer with life-threatening complications of bleeding and perforation. The appreciation that CV risk is also increased further complicates the choices of physicians prescribing anti-inflammatory therapy. Despite prevention strategies should be implemented in patients at risk, gastroprotection is often underused and adherence to treatment is generally poor. A more appealing approach would be therefore to develop drugs that are devoid of or have reduced GI toxicity. Gastro-duodenal mucosa possesses many defensive mechanisms and NSAIDs have a deleterious effect on most of them. This results in a mucosa less able to cope with even a reduced acid load. NSAIDs cause gastro-duodenal damage, by two main mechanisms: a physiochemical disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier and systemic inhibition of gastric mucosal protection, through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, PG endoperoxide G/H synthase) activity of the GI mucosa. However, against a background of COX inhibition by anti-inflammatory doses of NSAIDs, their physicochemical properties, in particular their acidity, underlie the topical effect leading to short-term damage. It has been shown that esterification of acidic NSAIDs suppresses their gastrotoxicity without adversely affecting anti-inflammatory activity. Another way to develop NSAIDs with better GI tolerability is to complex these molecules with cyclodextrins (CDs), giving rise to so-called “inclusion complexes” that can have physical, chemical and biological properties very different from either those of the drug or the cyclodextrin. Complexation of NSAIDs with β-cyclodextrin potentially leads

  20. [Risk and prevention of gastrointestinal complications due to low-dose aspirin and other antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François

    2008-09-15

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhages are the main complications associated with low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic drugs. In France, low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic agents use has been found in 30% of upper GI and 40% of lower GI bleeding episodes. Main causes of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and colonic diverticulosis. Recent cohort studies have shown that the relative risk of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was comprised between 2 and 4 and the absolute risk comprised between 1 per 100 and 1 per 1000 aspirin users per year. Main risk factors for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are concomitant antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids use, and recent history of complicated or non-complicated gastroduodenal ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin, but infection should be searched and treated only in patients with peptic ulcer. Despite eradication of H. pylori in the latter patients, gastroprotection with PPI is strongly recommended. In patients presenting with peptic ulcer bleeding with low-dose aspirin, aspirin should be continued in association with PPI rather than replaced with clopidogrel. Discontinuation of low-dose aspirin which exposes to increased cardiovascular complications and mortality should be avoided, even in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding.

  1. Hemostasis Achieved Endoscopically for Diverticular Bleeding from the Horizontal Portion of the Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Matuso, Yasumasa; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Midori; Ishigooka, Shinya; Ozawa, Shun-ichiro; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Diverticulum of the horizontal portion of the duodenum is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Since it is difficult to access the horizontal portion of the duodenum by standard upper GI endoscopy, only a very few cases of endoscopic hemostasis have been reported. Herein, we report a case of diverticular bleeding from the horizontal portion of the duodenum for which hemostasis was achieved using a small-caliber colonoscope, which has an insertion part designed with a passive-bending function/high-force transmission and a transparent tip hood. PMID:26692767

  2. Tips and Tricks on How to Optimally Manage Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Michael W; Ginsberg, Gregory G

    2015-07-01

    Effective endoscopic therapy for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding has been shown to reduce rebleeding, need for surgery, and mortality. Effective endoscopic management of acute upper GI bleeding can be challenging and worrying. This article provides advice that is complementary to the in-depth reviews that accompany it in this issue. Topics include initial management, resuscitation, when and where to scope, benefits and limitations of devices, device selection based on lesion characteristics, improving visualization to localize the lesion, and tips on how to reduce the endoscopist's trepidation about managing these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The wheat TaGI1, involved in photoperiodic flowering, encodes an Arabidopsis GI ortholog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang Yu; Liu, Mao Sen; Li, Jia Rui; Guan, Chun Mei; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2005-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important crop and requires long day and short night to flower. To study the molecular mechanism of photoperiodic regulation of flowering in this species, we isolated a wheat TaGI1 gene, an ortholog of GIGANTEA (GI) in Arabidopsis. RNA blot hybridization revealed that TaGI1 is expressed in leaves in a rhythmic manner under long day and short day conditions and its rhythmic expression is regulated by photoperiods and circadian clocks. Further study demonstrated that the TaGI1 rhythmic expression in the leaves of seedlings is initiated by photoperiods, implying that TaGI1 does not show circadian regulation until after being entrained in a light/dark cycle. Interestingly, TaGI1 mRNA was detected in adaxial epidermal cells right above the vascular bundles of leaves, suggesting that the localization of TaGI1 transcripts in leaves may function to regulate flowering in response to photoperiods. Since overexpression of TaGI1 altered flowering time in wild type and complemented the gi mutant in Arabidopsis, it confirmed that TaGI1 is an ortholog of GI in Arabidopsis.

  4. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    Protect aging skin. Avoid trauma such as bumping or pulling on skin areas. For a cut or scrape, use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. If you have a drug reaction, ask your provider about stopping the drug. Otherwise, follow ...

  5. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove the gauze or bandage. If the bleeding seeps through the gauze or other cloth on the ... up blood Bruising A tender or swollen stomach Cold, clammy skin Thirst Fractures Shock, indicated by a ...

  6. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pregnancy, such as ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage . Pelvic inflammatory disease also can cause heavy menstrual bleeding. Sometimes, the ... A physical examination of a woman’s reproductive organs. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: An infection of the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ...

  7. A typical presentation of a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Bettenworth, Dominik; Mees, Sören Torge; Neumann, Jörg; Beyna, Torsten; Domschke, Wolfram; Wessling, Johannes; Ullerich, Hansjörg

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old white woman had suffered from intermittent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding for one year. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and peroral double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) did not detect any bleeding source, suggesting obscure GI bleeding. However, in videocapsule endoscopy a jejunal ulceration without bleeding signs was suspected and this was endoscopically confirmed by another peroral DBE. After transfusion of packed red blood cells, the patient was discharged from our hospital in good general condition. Two weeks later she was readmitted because of another episode of acute bleeding. Multi-detector row computed tomography with 3D reconstruction was performed revealing a jejunal tumor causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with partial jejunal resection and end-to-end jejunostomy for reconstruction. Histological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Nine days after surgery the patient was discharged in good health. No signs of gastrointestinal rebleeding occurred in a follow-up of eight months. We herein describe the complex presentation and course of this patient with GIST and also review the current approach to treatment. PMID:21403816

  8. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  9. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  10. The aetiology, management and clinical outcome of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among patients admitted at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre in Moshi, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Suba, Mwanahawa; Ayana, Segni Mekonnen; Mtabho, Charles M; Kibiki, Gibson S

    2010-10-01

    Upper gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding is a life-threatening emergency that results in high morbidity and mortality and therefore requires admission to hospital for urgent diagnosis and management. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of upper GI bleeding and clinical outcome of patients admitted to medical department with the diagnosis of upper GI bleeding. A retrospective study of records of all upper GI bleeding patients who were admitted to medical department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) from January 2007 to December 2008 was conducted. A total of 130 patients (13-96 years old) were enrolled in the study, whereby 73 (56.2%) were males. The causes of bleeding, all endoscopically diagnosed included oesophageal varices in 55 (42.3%) cases, followed by duodenal ulcers 20 (15.4%), hemorrhagic/erosive gastritis 10 (7.7%), gastric ulcer 6 (4.6%) and Mallory Weiss tear 2 (1.5%). No cause was identified in the remaining 27 % of cases. Conservative medical therapy alone was carried out in 52.3% of the patients. Endoscopic therapy was used in 61 (46.9%) of patients. Only 2 (1.5%) patients underwent surgical intervention. The overall mortality at discharge was 17%, while 107 (82%) patients were discharged improved. In conclusion, the commonest causes of upper GI bleeding are oesophageal varices and duodenal ulcer. Most cases of upper GI bleeding were successfully treated with pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment. The high mortality may be influenced by delayed presentation to health facilities, and comorbidities. There is a need for strengthening preventive programmes and conducting studies to identify predictors of outcome of upper GI bleeding to develop evidence based management protocols.

  11. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of haemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients.

  12. Is glycaemic index (GI) a valid measure of carbohydrate quality?

    PubMed

    Wolever, T M S

    2013-05-01

    Recent criticisms of the glycaemic index (GI) focus on its validity with assertions that GI methodology is not valid, GI values are inaccurate and imprecise, GI does not predict what foods are healthy and that whole grain and fibre are better markers of carbohydrate quality than GI. None of the critics provide sound reasons for rejecting GI because some of their arguments are based on flagrant errors in understanding and interpretation while others are not supported by current data or are inconsistent with other nutritional recommendations. This paper addresses current criticisms of GI and outlines reasons why GI is valid: (1) GI methodology is accurate and precise enough for practical use; (2) GI is a property of foods; and (3) GI is biologically meaningful and relevant to virtually everyone. Current dietary guidelines recommend increased consumption of whole grains and dietary fibre but do not mention GI. However, this is illogical because the evidence that GI affects health outcomes is at least as good or better than that for whole grains and fibre. GI is a novel concept from a regulatory point of view and a number of problems need to be addressed to successfully translate GI knowledge into practice. The problems are not insurmountable but no progress can be made until bias and misunderstanding about GI can be overcome and there is better agreement about what is the actual state of knowledge on GI so that the real issues can be identified and addressed.

  13. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Gastric Amyloidosis in a Patient with Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Purohit, Treta; Amin, Mitual B.; Kurtin, Paul J.; Cappell, Mitchell S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a common complication of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), and multiple myeloma (MM). This proteinaceous material can be deposited intercellularly in any organ system, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the GI tract, amyloidosis affects the duodenum most commonly, followed by the stomach and colorectum. Gastric amyloidosis causes symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, abdominal pain, and GI bleeding. A case of upper GI bleeding from gastric amyloidosis is presented in a patient with SMM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a gastric mass. Endoscopic biopsies revealed amyloid deposition in the lamina propria, consistent with gastric amyloidosis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry performed on peptides extracted from Congo red-positive microdissected areas of paraffin-embedded stomach specimens revealed a peptide profile consistent with AL- (lambda-) type amyloidosis. Based on this and multiple other case reports, we recommend that patients with GI bleeding and MGUS, SMM, or MM undergo EGD and pathologic examination of endoscopic biopsies of identified lesions using Congo red stains for amyloidosis for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26366309

  14. Post-transfusion hyperhemolysis syndrome following gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prehepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejías Manzano, María de Los Ángeles; Giráldez Gallego, Álvaro; Sánchez Torrijos, Yolanda María

    2017-09-01

    Supportive transfusion represents a basic tool in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. However, the use of hemoderivatives is not exempt from risks such as development of hemolysis. We report a case of post-transfusion hyperhemolysis syndrome in a female patient with prehepatic portal hypertension.

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic.

  16. Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with or without concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Anglin, Rebecca; Yuan, Yuhong; Moayyedi, Paul; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David; Leontiadis, Grigorios I

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging concern that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, and that this risk may be further increased by concurrent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medications. Previous reviews of a relatively small number of studies have reported a substantial risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs; however, more recent studies have produced variable results. The objective of this study was to obtain a more precise estimate of the risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs, with or without concurrent NSAID use. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Cochrane central register of controlled trials (through April 2013), and US and European conference proceedings were searched. Controlled trials, cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies that reported the incidence of upper GI bleeding in adults on SSRIs with or without concurrent NSAID use, compared with placebo or no treatment were included. Data were extracted independently by two authors. Dichotomous data were pooled to obtain odds ratio (OR) of the risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs +/- NSAID, with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The main outcome and measure of the study was the risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRIs compared with placebo or no treatment. Fifteen case-control studies (including 393,268 participants) and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. There was an increased risk of upper GI bleeding with SSRI medications in the case-control studies (OR=1.66, 95% CI=1.44,1.92) and cohort studies (OR=1.68, 95% CI=1.13,2.50). The number needed to harm for upper GI bleeding with SSRI treatment in a low-risk population was 3,177, and in a high-risk population it was 881. The risk of upper GI bleeding was further increased with the use of both SSRI and NSAID medications (OR=4.25, 95% CI=2.82,6.42). SSRI medications are associated with a modest increase in the risk of upper GI bleeding, which is lower than has

  17. Idiopathic omental bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D; Satgunam, S

    2012-01-01

    Omental bleeding without any evidence of trauma, aneurysms, or other pathology has been rarely described in the literature. We report a case of a 24 year-old female on aspirin/acetaminophen/caffeine for migraines who presented with abdominal pain and tachycardia. Computed tomography angiography revealed active extravasation in the right lower quadrant. During exploratory laparotomy, a small bleeding artery within the greater omentum was suture ligated, and two liters of fresh and clotted blood were evacuated. The patient recovered successfully. We review the diagnosis and management of this rare condition. PMID:24960788

  18. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding & Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Benjamin E; Moses, Willieford

    2017-02-01

    Relatively uncommon compared with the adult population, lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children requires expeditious evaluation and management because of the variety of causes ranging from benign to life-threatening conditions. The causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) vary with patient age. This review focuses on the differential diagnosis and management of LGIB in children. Because intussusception is one of the most common sources of LGIB, particular attention will be given to its diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost effectiveness of surveillance for GI cancers.

    PubMed

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Meester, Reinier G S; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are among the leading causes of death in the world. To reduce the burden of GI diseases, surveillance is recommended for some diseases, including for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, Barrett's oesophagus, precancerous gastric lesions, colorectal adenoma, and pancreatic neoplasms. This review aims to provide an overview of the evidence on cost-effectiveness of surveillance of individuals with GI conditions predisposing them to cancer, specifically focussing on the aforementioned conditions. We searched the literature and reviewed 21 studies. Despite heterogeneity of studies in terms of settings, study populations, surveillance strategies and outcomes, most reviewed studies suggested at least some surveillance of patients with these GI conditions to be cost-effective. For some high-risk conditions frequent surveillance with 3-month intervals was warranted, while for other conditions, surveillance may only be cost-effective every 10 years. Further studies based on more robust effectiveness evidence are needed to inform and optimise surveillance programmes for GI cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Small Bowel Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the small bowel, known as the jejunum. X-ray studies X-ray studies are sometimes used in people with bleeding ... that can be seen by standard or specialized x-ray studies, such as tumors. There are three x- ...

  1. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  2. Heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-10-05

    Essential facts Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is defined as excessive menstrual blood loss that interferes with a woman's physical, emotional, social or material quality of life. In England and Wales, around 80,000 women a year will be referred for the first time to secondary care, with 30,000 requiring surgical treatment.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of GI and GII noroviruses in sewage: 1-year surveillance in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; Lin, X; Wang, S; Tao, Z; Xiong, P; Wang, H; Liu, Y; Song, Y; Xu, A

    2016-10-01

    To determine the concentration and molecular epidemiology of GI and GII noroviruses in sewage in China. Twenty-three raw sewage samples were collected in the cities of Jinan and Linyi, eastern China in 2014. GI and GII noroviruses were positive in all samples after TaqMan-based quantitative PCR. The mean concentrations of GI and GII noroviruses were 4·52 × 10(4) and 7·88 × 10(4) genome copies per litre respectively. After reverse transcription-PCR, cloning and sequencing, 16 genotypes were identified. GI.6 (69·6%), GI.2 (65·2%), GII.13 (65·2%), GII.6 (60·9%) and GII.17 (60·9%) were the most common GI and GII genotypes. A recombination event was observed in two GI.6 sequences. GII.4 sequences belonged to Sydney 2012 and Den Haag 2006b variant. Interestingly, the novel GII.17 Kawasaki308 variant was detected. These results reveal that multiple norovirus genotypes cocirculated in the local population. The risk of acute gastroenteritis outbreak is high in the two cities due to the detection of GII.17 Kawasaki308 variant and the high concentration of norovirus in raw sewage. This study demonstrates sewage surveillance can be a useful approach to monitor norovirus circulating in the population. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding Among Dabigatran Users – A Self Controlled Case Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenze; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Zhou, Meijia; Singh, Sonal

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the real world risk of gastrointestinal bleeding among users naïve to dabigatran. We adopted a self-controlled case series design. We sampled 1215 eligible adult participants who were continuous insured users between July 1, 2010 and March 31, 2012 with use of dabigatran and at least one gastrointestinal bleeding episode. We used a conditional Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios. The population consisted of 64.69% of male and 60.25% patients equal to or greater than age 65 at start of observation. After adjustment for time-variant confounders, the incidence rate of gastrointestinal bleeding was similar during dabigatran risk period and non-exposed period (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90, 1.15). There was no significant difference in GI incidence rate between periods of dabigatran and warfarin (IRR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.75–1.31). Among this database of young and healthy participants, dabigatran was not associated with increased incidence rate of GI bleeding compared with non-exposed period among naïve dabigatran users. We did not detect an increased risk of GI bleeding over dabigatran vs warfarin risk period. Along with other studies on safety and effectiveness, this study should help clinicians choose the appropriate anticoagulant for their patients. PMID:28106053

  5. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  7. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  8. Glycaemic index (GI) of an Indian branded thermally treated basmati rice variety: a multi centric study.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Dinesh; Raman, Abhi; Meena, P; Chitale, Geetanjali; Marwahat, Ankita; Jainani, Kiran J

    2013-10-01

    Glycaemic Index (GI) is the classification of carbohydrates based on their ability to raise blood glucose levels and evidence shows that its usage has beneficial health implications. Rice forms a part of the Indian staple diet and one of the major energy contributors. Hence, it is important to establish the Glycaemic Index (GI) value of rice. However, due to availability of different varieties of rice it is important first to identify a lower GI variety and to make it available to the Indian population. Subjecting rice to thermal processing is also known to reduce the GI of rice. An Indian thermally treated basmati rice variety was hypothesised to be low in GI. This multi centric study was conducted to test this hypothesis in healthy volunteers. In this study, out of 83 participants, data points of 70 healthy volunteers were taken into consideration for arriving at the final GI value. The study procedure was similar to the recommendations by FAO/WHO. A multi centric trial was conducted to nullify any regional or genetic variability. It was observed that reference glucose curve had the maximum average peak of 166.37 mg/dL while the basmati sample had a lower peak (136.22 mg/dL). The mean blood glucose incremental area under the curve for reference food was 5969.64 mins.mg/dL (SEM 95.94) and for rice it was 3267.81 mins. mg/dL (SEM 76.21). In this studyThe GI of Indian branded basmati rice was found to < 55 thus, placing it in lower GI category. The Indian basmati rice because of its lower GI can prove to be a healthier rice alternative.

  9. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  10. TRALI Syndrome Complicated by Retroperitoneal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay A; Zeltsman, David

    2011-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underdiagnosed and underreported syndrome which by itself is the third leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The incidence of TRALI is reported to be 1 in 2000 to 5000 transfusions. When combined with uncontrollable bleeding, survival is unachievable. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, who underwent open heart surgery as an infant to correct his congenital heart disease in association with right pulmonary artery atresia. He presented with hemoptysis secondary to aspergilloma and required a pneumonectomy of the nonfunctional right lung. During pneumolysis, significant bleeding occurred from the superior vena cava. The patient required a blood transfusion and was placed on cardiopulmonary bypass to control the bleeding. Simultaneous occurrence of severe pulmonary edema and retroperitoneal bleeding were noted. Approximately 8 L of frothy edema fluid were drained from the only functional left lung starting ~15 minutes after the transfusion and lasting for several hours until the end of the case. It most likely represented TRALI syndrome. Increasing abdominal girth and poor volume return to the pump were consistent with and pathognomonic for retroperitoneal bleeding. Though primary surgical bleeding in the chest was controlled successfully and a pneumonectomy performed without further difficulty, we were unable to separate the patient from cardiopulmonary bypass due to the inability to oxygenate. As a result, we could not reverse the anti-coagulation which potentially exacerbated the retroperitoneal bleeding. After multiple unsuccessful attempts the patient succumbed. This ill-fated case demonstrates the quandary of obtaining vascular access for emergency cardiopulmonary bypass while in the right thoracotomy position. It may be beneficial to have both the femoral artery and vein cannulated before positioning a patient in a lateral decubitus position. In addition, early direct access to the right atrium

  11. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Bleeding with the Over-the-Scope Clip: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar; Goenka, Usha; Tiwary, Indrajit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) is a device used for endoscopic closure of perforations, leaks and fistulas, and for endoscopic hemostasis. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of OTSC. Methods Between October 2013 and November 2015, 12 patients underwent OTSC placement by an experienced endoscopist. OTSC was used for the closure of gastrointestinal (GI) leaks and fistula in six patients, three of which were iatrogenic (esophageal, gastric, and duodenal) and three of which were inflammatory. In six patients, OTSC was used for hemostasis of non-variceal upper GI bleeding. Endoscopic tattooing using India ink was used to assist the accurate placement of the clip. Results All subjects except one with a colonic defect experienced immediate technical success as well as long-term clinical success, during a mean follow-up of 6 weeks. Only one clip was required to close each of the GI defects and to achieve hemostasis in all patients. There were no misfirings or complications of clips. The procedure was well tolerated, and patients were hospitalized for an average of 8 days (range, 3 to 10). Antiplatelet therapy was continued in patients with GI bleeding. Conclusions In our experience, OTSC was safe and effective for the closure of GI defect and to achieve hemostasis of non-variceal GI bleeding. PMID:27802375

  12. Comparison of four technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in a sheep model

    SciTech Connect

    Owunwanne, A.; Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S.; Sadek, S.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Yacoub, T.

    1988-01-01

    Four Tc-99 radiopharmaceuticals, Tc-99m sulphur colloid, Tc-99m red blood cells (RBCs), Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), and Tc-99m DTPA, were studied in an experimental animal model for detection and localization of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. With Tc-99m sulphur colloid and Tc-99m RBCs, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m MAG3, it was possible to visualize the bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. However, Tc-99m MAG3 is partially excreted by the liver into the bile, hence it will be difficult to use Tc-99m MAG3 to localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m DTPA, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site simultaneously in both upper and lower abdomen. The overall background radioactivity was reduced considerably by diuresis with frusemide and catheterization of the urinary bladder.

  13. Serotonin and GI clinical disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2008-11-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the gut within both the enteric nerves and enterochromaffin (EC) cells. EC cells are located in the gut mucosa with maximal numbers in the duodenum and rectum where they act as signal transducers, responding to pressure and luminal substances both bacterial and dietary. Activation leads to serotonin release which acts on a range of receptors on mucosal afferent and myenteric interneurones to initiate secretomotor reflexes. These cause nausea and vomiting as well as intestinal secretion, propulsion and if pronounced, diarrhoea. Inflammation in animal models acts via T lymphocytes to increase EC cell numbers and mucosal serotonin (5-HT) content while inflammatory cytokines decrease serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Inflammation due to coeliac disease and following gastrointestinal infection increases mucosal 5-HT availability by a combination of increased EC cells and depressed SERT. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) developing after gastrointestinal infection and IBS with diarrhoea is associated with excess 5-HT. The associated diarrhoeal symptoms respond well to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. These drugs also inhibit the nausea and vomiting occurring in patients undergoing chemotherapy which cause a marked increase in release of 5-HT as well as other mediators. Other conditions including IBS-C and constipation may have inadequate 5-HT release and benefit from both 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptor agonists.

  14. Adsorption and Aggregation Properties of Norovirus GI and GII Virus-like Particles Demonstrate Differing Responses to Solution Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    DA SILVA, ALLEGRA K.; KAVANAGH, OWEN V.; ESTES, MARY K.; ELIMELECH, MENACHEM

    2014-01-01

    The transport properties (adsorption and aggregation behavior) of virus-like particles (VLPs) of two strains of norovirus (“Norwalk” GI.1 and “Houston” GII.4) were studied in a variety of solution chemistries. GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs were found to be stable against aggregation at pH 4.0–8.0. At pH 9.0, GI.1 VLPs rapidly disintegrated. The attachment efficiencies (α) of GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs to silica increased with increasing ionic strength in NaCl solutions at pH 8.0. The attachment efficiency of GI.1 VLPs decreased as pH was increased above the isoelectric point (pH 5.0), whereas at and below the isoelectric point, the attachment efficiency was erratic. Ca2+ and Mg2+ dramatically increased the attachment efficiencies of GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs, which may be due to specific interactions with the VLP capsids. Bicarbonate decreased attachment efficiencies for both GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs, whereas phosphate decreased the attachment efficiency of GI.1, while increasing GII.4 attachment efficiency. The observed differences in GI.1 and GII.4 VLP attachment efficiencies in response to solution chemistry may be attributed to differential responses of the unique arrangement of exposed amino acid residues on the capsid surface of each VLP strain. PMID:21121659

  15. The GI Bill: Model Program Gone Sour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, J. Michael

    Millions of World War II veterans took advantage of the legislative drive establishing the Serviceman's Readjustment Act of 1944, the GI Bill. A Department of Veterans Affairs report examined how Vietnam veterans fared in higher education. Based on college participation rates (actually, training starts), not completion rates, Vietnam veterans…

  16. Dengue hemorrhagic fever as a rare cause of bleeding following percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Pushkarna, Arawat; Ganesamoni, Raguram; Nanjappa, Bhuvanesh

    2012-04-01

    Post percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) bleeding is an uncommon yet serious complication and is almost always related to a surgical cause. Nevertheless, medical cause of bleeding is rarely encountered as a cause of this dangerous complication. Dengue has been rarely reported as a cause of post operative bleeding. Bleeding diathesis in dengue occurs not only due to thrombocytopenia but also due to dysfunctional surviving platelets and increased fibrinolysis. We report a patient who developed bleeding after an uneventful PNL due to dengue hemorrhagic fever. Medical causes of bleeding such as locally endemic viral hemorrhagic fevers should also be kept in mind and evaluated especially when a surgical cause of the bleed is not found or suspected in bleeding after any surgery.

  17. Multicentre, open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority study to compare the efficacy of octreotide therapy 40 mg monthly versus standard of care in patients with refractory anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from small bowel angiodysplasias: a protocol of the OCEAN trial

    PubMed Central

    van Geenen, E J M; Drenth, J P H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias are an important cause of difficult-to-manage bleeding, especially in older patients. Endoscopic coagulation of angiodysplasias is the mainstay of treatment, but may be difficult for small bowel angiodysplasias because of the inability to reach them for endoscopic intervention. Some patients are red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependent due to frequent rebleeding despite endoscopic treatment. In small cohort studies, octreotide appears to decrease the number of bleeding episodes in patients with RBC transfusion dependency due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasias. This trial will assess the efficacy of octreotide in decreasing the need for RBC transfusions and parenteral iron in patients with anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding of small bowel angiodysplasias despite endoscopic intervention. Study design Randomised controlled, superiority, open-label multicentre trial. Participants 62 patients will be included with refractory anaemia due to small bowel angiodysplasias, who are RBC transfusion or iron infusion dependent despite endoscopic intervention and oral iron supplementation. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or 40 mg long-acting octreotide once every 4 weeks for 52 weeks, in addition to standard care. The follow-up period is 8 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome is the difference in the number of blood and iron infusions between the year prior to inclusion and the treatment period of 1 year. Important secondary outcomes are the per cent change in the number of rebleeds from baseline to end point, adverse events and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The trial received ethical approval from the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects and from the local accredited Medical Research Ethics Committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands (reference number: 2014-1433). Results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and

  18. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  19. Interventions for treating post-extraction bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sumanth, Kumbargere N; Prashanti, Eachempati; Aggarwal, Himanshi; Kumar, Pradeep; Lingappa, Ashok; Muthu, Murugan S; Kiran Kumar Krishanappa, Salian

    2016-06-10

    Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes. To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding. We searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 22 March 2016); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 2); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 22 March 2016); CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 22 March 2016). Due to the ongoing Cochrane project to search EMBASE and add retrieved clinical trials to CENTRAL, we searched only the last 11 months of EMBASE via OVID (1 May 2015 to 22 March 2016). We placed no further restrictions on the language or date of publication. We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/default.aspx). We also checked the reference lists of excluded trials. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment. Three pairs

  20. Relevance of surgery in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dango, S; Beißbarth, T; Weiss, E; Seif Amir Hosseini, A; Raddatz, D; Ellenrieder, V; Lotz, J; Ghadimi, B M; Beham, A

    2017-05-01

    Upper GI bleeding remains one of the most common emergencies with a substantial overall mortality rate of up to 30%. In severe ill patients, death does not occur due to failure of hemostasis, either medical or surgical, but mainly from comorbidities, treatment complications, and decreased tolerated blood loss. Management strategies have changed dramatically over the last two decades and include primarily endoscopic intervention in combination with acid-suppressive therapy and decrease in surgical intervention. Herein, we present one of the largest patient-based analysis assessing clinical parameters and outcome in patients undergoing endoscopy with an upper GI bleeding. Data were further analyzed to identify potential new risk factors and to investigate the role of surgery. In this retrospective study, we aimed to analyze outcome of patients with an UGIB and data were analyzed to identify potential new risk factors and the role of surgery. Data collection included demographic data, laboratory results, endoscopy reports, and details of management including blood administration, and surgery was carried out. Patient events were grouped and defined as "overall" events and "operated," "non-operated," and "operated and death" as well as "non-operated and death" where appropriate. Blatchford, clinical as well as complete Rockall-score analysis, risk stratification, and disease-related mortality rate were calculated for each group for comparison. Overall, 253 patients were eligible for analysis: endoscopy was carried out in 96% of all patients, 17% needed surgical intervention after endoscopic failure of bleeding control due to persistent bleeding, and the remaining 4% of patients were subjected directly to surgery. The median length of stay to discharge was 26 days. Overall mortality was 22%; out of them, almost 5% were operated and died. Anticoagulation was associated with a high in-hospital mortality risk (23%) and was increased once patients were taken to surgery (43

  1. SnapShot: GI tract development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Patrick S; Wells, James M

    2015-03-26

    The endoderm germ layer contributes to the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) lineages during development, giving rise to an array of specialized epithelial cell types lining organs, including the thyroid, thymus, lungs, liver, biliary system, pancreas, and intestines. This SnapShot timelines and summarizes key stages following gastrulation, including endoderm patterning, organ specification, and organogenesis. A lineage tree of the developing endocrine pancreas is outlined to further illustrate this process.

  2. Obesity and Energy Balance in GI Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin C; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2016-12-10

    The prevalence of overweight (body mass index [BMI], 25 to 29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) have increased dramatically in the United States. Because increasing BMI is associated with the development of multiple different cancer types, including most GI cancers, providers will frequently encounter patients with GI cancer who are overweight or obese. Mounting evidence associates overweight and/or obesity with worsened prognosis in multiple GI cancers, including esophageal, gastric, hepatocellular, pancreatic, and colorectal. However, these data are observational and may be subject to bias and/or confounding. Furthermore, in some cancer types, the associations between BMI and outcomes is not linear, where overweight and class I obese patients may have an improvement in outcome. This report provides a brief highlight of existing studies that have linked overweight and/or obesity to prognosis in GI cancer; provides recommendations on best management practices; and discusses limitations, controversies, and future directions in this rapidly evolving area. There are multiple areas of promise that warrant continued investigation: What are the comparative contributions of energy balance, including weight, dietary patterns, and physical activity on cancer prognosis? What are the specific physiologic pathways that mediate the relationship between energy balance and prognosis? What is the relationship between low muscle mass (sarcopenia) or sarcopenic obesity and cancer prognosis? Are there subsets of patients for whom purposefully altering energy balance would be deleterious to prognosis? This area is rich with opportunities to understand how states of energy (im)balance can be favorably altered to promote healthy survivorship.

  3. Obesity and Energy Balance in GI Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight (body mass index [BMI], 25 to 29.9 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) have increased dramatically in the United States. Because increasing BMI is associated with the development of multiple different cancer types, including most GI cancers, providers will frequently encounter patients with GI cancer who are overweight or obese. Mounting evidence associates overweight and/or obesity with worsened prognosis in multiple GI cancers, including esophageal, gastric, hepatocellular, pancreatic, and colorectal. However, these data are observational and may be subject to bias and/or confounding. Furthermore, in some cancer types, the associations between BMI and outcomes is not linear, where overweight and class I obese patients may have an improvement in outcome. This report provides a brief highlight of existing studies that have linked overweight and/or obesity to prognosis in GI cancer; provides recommendations on best management practices; and discusses limitations, controversies, and future directions in this rapidly evolving area. There are multiple areas of promise that warrant continued investigation: What are the comparative contributions of energy balance, including weight, dietary patterns, and physical activity on cancer prognosis? What are the specific physiologic pathways that mediate the relationship between energy balance and prognosis? What is the relationship between low muscle mass (sarcopenia) or sarcopenic obesity and cancer prognosis? Are there subsets of patients for whom purposefully altering energy balance would be deleterious to prognosis? This area is rich with opportunities to understand how states of energy (im)balance can be favorably altered to promote healthy survivorship. PMID:27903148

  4. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P < 0.05). (99m)Tc- RBC SPECT/CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  5. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year and only 6% will make it past 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25585100

  6. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year, which is reduced to 6% after 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25933185

  7. Octreotide in variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A K

    1994-01-01

    Bleeding from oesophageal varices has a high death rate. Injection sclerotherapy is the most appropriate treatment but facilities for this are not always available. Balloon tamponade and vasoactive therapy may be used as stop gap measures. Somatostatin and octreotide are therapeutic candidates for the treatment of variceal bleeding and there are several trials that have compared somatostatin and octreotide with other treatments for this condition. The results of these trials are summarised and discussed. A meta analysis of the group of trials of placebo or H2 antagonists v somatostatin or octreotide showed a significant advantage of somatostatin or octreotide in terms of efficacy, but no difference in mortality. The trials discussed seem to show that somatostatin and octreotide are at least as effective as other treatments, with the benefit of fewer adverse effects, and thus represent the best vasoactive agents. Additionally, they may have a role as adjuvant treatment to emergency sclerotherapy for active bleeders and this must be further investigated. PMID:8206396

  8. Bleeding complications associated with anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Nieto, José Antonio; Ruíz-Gamietea, Angeles; López-Jiménez, Luciano; García-Bragado, Ferran; Quintavalla, Roberto; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) have an increased incidence of bleeding complications while on anticoagulant therapy. RIETE is an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with acute VTE. We tried to identify which cancer patients are at a higher risk for major bleeding. Up to May 2009, 4,709 patients with active cancer had been enrolled in RIETE registry. During the first 3 months of anticoagulant therapy, 200 (4.2%) patients developed major bleeding. Then, 38 (0.8%) further patients bled beyond the first 90 days of therapy, 3 bled after withholding anticoagulant therapy. The most common sites of bleeding were the gastrointestinal tract (118 patients, 49%), genitourinary system (43 patients, 18%) and the brain (27 patients, 11%). In all, 160 patients (66%) died within 30 days after bleeding: 88 (55%) died of bleeding, 3 (1.9%) died of recurrent pulmonary embolism. Major bleeding is a frequent and severe complication in cancer patients with VTE, even beyond the third month. One third of the patients who bled died due the bleeding event.

  9. Comparison of infusion or low-dose proton pump inhibitor treatments in upper gastrointestinal system bleeding.

    PubMed

    Songür, Yildiran; Balkarli, Ayşe; Acartürk, Gürsel; Senol, Altug

    2011-04-01

    The most effective schedule of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration following endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding ulcers remains uncertain. To compare the treatment effects of continuous infusion and low-dose esomeprazole therapies in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. This prospective clinical study compared continuous infusion of esomeprazole (80 mg bolus followed by 8 mg∕h continuous infusion for 72 h) and low-dose esomeprazole (40 mg twice daily IV) treatments in GI bleeding patients with peptic ulcer presenting a high risk of re-bleeding, who were administered a successful endoscopic homeostasis. The primary end point was the occurrence of re-bleeding during hospitalization and within one month of discharge. Secondary outcomes were defined as duration of hospitalization, need of transfusion, surgical treatment, and mortality rate. After 72 h, both groups were switched to oral esomeprazole therapy for one-month. A hundred thirty-two subjects were enrolled. Re-bleeding occurred in 11 (16.7%) patients in the infusion therapy group and in 12 (18.2%) patients in the low-dose group (P=0.819) within the first 72 h. No patient experienced re-bleeding in the first month following discharge. There was no statistical significant difference between the two groups in terms of transfusion need, durations of hospitalization, need for surgery and mortality rate. PPI infusion therapy following endoscopic hemostasis treatment was not found superior to low-dose PPI therapy in the terms of re-bleeding, need of surgery and mortality. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Managing anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications in GI endoscopy: a survey comparing the East and the West.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Tang, Shou-jiang; Rockey, Don C; Weinstein, Douglas; Lara, Luis; Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash; Choi, Kyoo Wan

    2008-06-01

    Anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications may potentiate GI bleeding, and their use may lead to an increased need for a GI endoscopy. We hypothesized that there might be different practice patterns among international endoscopists. To explore the differences in management practices for patients who receive anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications from Eastern and Western endoscopists. International survey study. Academic medical centers and private clinics. Members of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) in Eastern (Korea, Japan, China, India, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, and Philippines) and Western (United States and Canada) countries were invited to complete a Web-site-based questionnaire. In addition, the questionnaire was sent to university hospitals in South Korea and academic institutions in the United States. A survey was administered that contained detailed questions about the use of an endoscopy in patients on anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications. Different opinions and clinical practice patterns regarding the use of anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications by Eastern and Western endoscopists. A total of 105 Eastern and 106 Western endoscopists completed the survey. Western endoscopists experienced more instances of procedure-related bleeding (P = .003) and thromboembolism after withdrawal of medications (P = .016). Eastern endoscopists restarted medications later (1-3 days) than Western endoscopists after a biopsy (same day) (P < .001). Eastern endoscopists withdrew aspirin for more than 7 days before a polypectomy and then restarted it 1 to 3 days after a polypectomy, whereas Western endoscopists performed a polypectomy without withdrawing aspirin (P < .001). ASGE guidelines were followed less often by Eastern than by Western endoscopists (P < .001). Low response rate, heterogeneity of the sample, and recall bias. The opinions and clinical practice patterns for the management of anticoagulation and antiplatelet

  11. A rare case of medullary carcinoma of the colon presenting as intussusception in an adult with rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shilpa; Jain, Ankur; Onizuka, Neil; Boukhar, Sarag A

    2014-11-01

    Medullary carcinoma is a recently recognized rare subtype of colorectal cancer resembling both poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. Medullary carcinoma most commonly presents in the proximal colon and can be differentiated from other right-sided malignant lesions by histology and immunochemical markers. We present here a rare case of an adult patient with rectal bleeding who was found to have an intussusception due to underlying medullary carcinoma of the splenic flexure. A 72-year-old woman presented to our GI clinic with rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a necrotic mass of the sigmoid colon, later determined by CT to be a colo-colonic intussusception at the level of the splenic flexure. Patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with findings of a large splenic flexure mass, which was resected and found to be medullary carcinoma of the colon. The tumor was poorly differentiated and exhibited microsatellite instability but was discovered at an early stage and thus did not require any adjuvant chemotherapy. Unlike most previously reported cases of medullary carcinoma, our patient presented with a left sided tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a medullary colon cancer presenting with intussusception.

  12. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep the blood from soaking your clothes. What Causes Bleeding Later in Pregnancy? When labor begins, the cervix starts to open up more, or dilate. You may notice a small amount of blood mixed in with normal vaginal discharge, or mucus. Mid- or late-term bleeding may also be caused by: Having sex ( ...

  13. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  14. POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING OF NONMALIGNANT ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Bomze, Edward J.

    1954-01-01

    A study was made of the medical records of 102 patients hospitalized because of postmenopausal bleeding. Diagnostic procedures used included vaginal examination, Papanicolaou smears, curettage and cervical biopsy. The major associated pathological conditions (possibly etiological factors) in the series were chronic cervicitis, fibromyoma of the uterus, endometrial polyps, cervical polyps and adenomyosis of the uterus. Sclerosis of the uterine vessels was suggested as another possible cause of this type of bleeding. Neither the amount and type of bleeding nor the pattern of associated symptoms were of diagnostic value. A history of hormonal therapy prior to the onset of bleeding is not sufficient evidence to establish that as the cause of the bleeding and the patient should be as completely investigated as if this history were not present. In over 61 per cent of cases in this series, uterine curettage with or without cervical biopsy, cauterization, conization or trachelorrhaphy, was the only treatment required for both diagnosis and therapy. PMID:13182624

  15. Vitamin K antagonists: beyond bleeding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Floege, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the most widely used oral anticoagulant in clinical use today. Indications range from prosthetic valve replacement to recurrent thromboembolic events due to antiphospholipid syndrome. In hemodialysis (HD) patients, warfarin use is even more frequent than in the nonrenal population due to increased cardiovascular comorbidities. The use of warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation requires particular caution because side effects may outweigh the assumed benefit of reduced stroke rates. Besides increased bleeding risk, coumarins exert side effects which are not in the focus of clinical routine, yet they deserve special consideration in dialysis patients and should influence the decision of whether or not to prescribe vitamin K antagonists in cases lacking clear guidelines. Issues to be taken into consideration in HD patients are the induction or acceleration of cardiovascular calcifications, a 10-fold increased risk of calciphylaxis and problems related to maintaining a target INR range. New anticoagulants like direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but have not yet been approved for ESRD patients. Here, we summarize the nontraditional side effects of coumarins and give recommendations about the use of vitamin K antagonists in ESRD patients.

  16. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic. PMID:28879206

  18. Successful Treatment of Bleeding Duodenal Varix by Percutaneous Transsplenic Embolization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Hun; Park, Ji Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Kwon, Young Seok; Park, Seung Ah; Park, Choong Kee

    2015-11-01

    Variceal bleeding occurs primarily in the esophagus or stomach in patients with liver cirrhosis, but can also occur rarely in the duodenum. Duodenal variceal bleeding has a high mortality and poor prognosis due to heavy blood flow originating from the portal vein (PV) and the technical difficulty of hemostatic procedures. Treatments including endoscopic sclerotherapy, endoscopic ligations, endoscopic clipping and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt have been tried, with only moderate and variable success. A percutaneous transsplenic approach offers another way of accessing the PV. Here we report a case of successfully treated duodenal variceal bleeding by percutaneous transsplenic embolization.

  19. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials to Ascertain Fatal Gastrointestinal Bleeding Events Attributable to Preventive Low-Dose Aspirin: No Evidence of Increased Risk.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Peter C; Morgan, Gareth; Galante, Julieta; Chia, John W K; Dolwani, Sunil; Graziano, J Michael; Kelson, Mark; Lanas, Angel; Longley, Marcus; Phillips, Ceri J; Pickering, Janet; Roberts, Stephen E; Soon, Swee S; Steward, Will; Morris, Delyth; Weightman, Alison L

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Unlike heart attacks, stroke and cancer, GI bleeding is an acute event, usually followed by complete recovery. We propose therefore that a more appropriate evaluation of the risk-benefit balance would be based on fatal adverse events, rather than on the incidence of bleeding. We therefore present a literature search and meta-analysis to ascertain fatal events attributable to low-dose aspirin. In a systematic literature review we identified reports of randomised controlled trials of aspirin in which both total GI bleeding events and bleeds that led to death had been reported. Principal investigators of studies in which fatal events had not been adequately described were contacted via email and asked for further details. A meta-analyses was then performed to estimate the risk of fatal gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to low-dose aspirin. Eleven randomised trials were identified in the literature search. In these the relative risk (RR) of 'major' incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). In all the subjects randomised to aspirin, compared with those randomised not to receive aspirin, there was no significant increase in the risk of a fatal bleed (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.41, 1.43). The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin for ten years. These adverse effects of

  20. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials to Ascertain Fatal Gastrointestinal Bleeding Events Attributable to Preventive Low-Dose Aspirin: No Evidence of Increased Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dolwani, Sunil; Graziano, J. Michael; Lanas, Angel; Longley, Marcus; Phillips, Ceri J.; Roberts, Stephen E.; Soon, Swee S.; Steward, Will

    2016-01-01

    Background Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Unlike heart attacks, stroke and cancer, GI bleeding is an acute event, usually followed by complete recovery. We propose therefore that a more appropriate evaluation of the risk-benefit balance would be based on fatal adverse events, rather than on the incidence of bleeding. We therefore present a literature search and meta-analysis to ascertain fatal events attributable to low-dose aspirin. Methods In a systematic literature review we identified reports of randomised controlled trials of aspirin in which both total GI bleeding events and bleeds that led to death had been reported. Principal investigators of studies in which fatal events had not been adequately described were contacted via email and asked for further details. A meta-analyses was then performed to estimate the risk of fatal gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to low-dose aspirin. Results Eleven randomised trials were identified in the literature search. In these the relative risk (RR) of ‘major’ incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). In all the subjects randomised to aspirin, compared with those randomised not to receive aspirin, there was no significant increase in the risk of a fatal bleed (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.41, 1.43). Conclusions The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin

  1. Effects of GI meals on intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Hulton, A T; Gregson, W; Maclaren, D; Doran, D A

    2012-09-01

    Pre-exercise meals or single foods containing low glycaemic index (LGI) carbohydrates (CHO) have been shown to enhance performance prior to prolonged steady state exercise compared to high glycaemic index (HGI) CHO. This study investigated the impact of HGI and LGI pre-exercise meals on intermittent high intensity exercise. Nine male recreational football players performed a football specific protocol followed by a 1 km time trial 3.5 h after ingesting 1 of 2 isoenergetic test meals (HGI: 870.3 kcal, LGI: 889.5 kcal), which were either HGI (GI: 80) or LGI (GI: 44). Blood glucose, fatty acids (FA), glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate and insulin were assessed before, during, and after the exercise bout, whilst rates of CHO and fat oxidation were determined at 4 time points during the protocol. No significant differences were found for the 1 km time trial (LGI: 210.2 ± 19.1 s: HGI: 215.8 ± 22.6 s) (mean ± SD), nor for any of the other variables measured (P>0.05) apart from a significant condition effect with FA and significant interaction effects observed for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate (P<0.05). These findings suggest that the type of CHO ingested in a pre-match meal has no significant impact on performance or metabolic responses during 90 min of intermittent high intensity exercise.

  2. Vaginal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) Abnormal ... College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) - PDF Also in Spanish Vaginal Bleeding (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  3. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Age and Alarm Symptoms for Upper GI Malignancy in Patients with Dyspepsia in a GI Clinic: A 7-Year Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Hooman; Radmard, Amir-Reza; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Kamangar, Farin; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Johansson, Mattias; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether using demographic characteristics and alarm symptoms can accurately predict cancer in patients with dyspepsia in Iran, where upper GI cancers and H. pylori infection are common. Methods All consecutive patients referred to a tertiary gastroenterology clinic in Tehran, Iran, from 2002 to 2009 were invited to participate in this study. Each patient completed a standard questionnaire and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Alarm symptoms included in the questionnaire were weight loss, dysphagia, GI bleeding, and persistent vomiting. We used logistic regression models to estimate the diagnostic value of each variable in combination with other ones, and to develop a risk-prediction model. Results A total of 2,847 patients with dyspepsia participated in this study, of whom 87 (3.1%) had upper GI malignancy. Patients reporting at least one of the alarm symptoms constituted 66.7% of cancer patients compared to 38.9% in patients without cancer (p<0.001). Esophageal or gastric cancers in patients with dyspepsia was associated with older age, being male, and symptoms of weight loss and vomiting. Each single predictor had low sensitivity and specificity. Using a combination of age, alarm symptoms, and smoking, we built a risk-prediction model that distinguished between high-risk and low-risk individuals with an area under the ROC curve of 0.85 and acceptable calibration. Conclusions None of the predictors demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy. While our risk-prediction model had reasonable accuracy, some cancer cases would have remained undiagnosed. Therefore, where available, low cost endoscopy may be preferable for dyspeptic older patient or those with history of weight loss. PMID:22720064

  5. Role of Osteoblast Gi Signaling in Age-Related Bone Loss in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Millard, Susan M; Wang, Liping; Wattanachanya, Lalita; O'Carroll, Dylan; Fields, Aaron J; Pang, Joyce; Kazakia, Galateia; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Nissenson, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Age-related bone loss is an important risk factor for fractures in the elderly; it results from an imbalance in bone remodeling mainly due to decreased bone formation. We have previously demonstrated that endogenous G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-driven Gi signaling in osteoblasts (Obs) restrains bone formation in mice during growth. Here, we launched a longitudinal study to test the hypothesis that Gi signaling in Obs restrains bone formation in aging mice, thereby promoting bone loss. Our approach was to block Gi signaling in maturing Obs by the induced expression of the catalytic subunit of pertussis toxin (PTX) after the achievement of peak bone mass. In contrast to the progressive cancellous bone loss seen in aging sex-matched littermate control mice, aging female Col1(2.3)+/PTX+ mice showed an age-related increase in bone volume. Increased bone volume was associated with increased bone formation at both trabecular and endocortical surfaces as well as increased bending strength of the femoral middiaphyses. In contrast, male Col1(2.3)+/PTX+ mice were not protected from age-related bone loss. Our results indicate that Gi signaling markedly restrains bone formation at cancellous and endosteal bone surfaces in female mice during aging. Blockade of the relevant Gi-coupled GPCRs represents an approach for the development of osteoporosis therapies-at least in the long bones of aging women.

  6. Fragmentation of polyatomic molecules by grazing incidence surface-induced dissociation (GI-SID).

    PubMed

    Wieghaus, A; Schmidt, L; Popova, A M; Komarov, V V; Jungclas, H

    1999-11-01

    The grazing incidence surface-induced dissociation (GI-SID) of n-hexadecylpyridinium and verapamil ions generated by fission fragment desorption was studied. These molecules show the effect of enhanced surface-induced dissociation at grazing incidence as it was observed in former experiments with metal organic ions. A liquid film of perfluorinated polyether is used as collision surface. Small hydrocarbon fragment ions predominate in the GI-SID spectra. Pyridine ions appear as specific fragment ions in the GI-SID spectrum of n-hexadecylpyridinium. The GI-SID conversion efficiency varies in the range 40-70%. The experimental results are discussed within the scope of a quantum mechanical model which is based on the accumulation of internal molecular energy by resonant excitation of collective vibrational states and energy transfer to a trap bond due to dipole-dipole interactions. In this context the GI-SID spectra of n-hexadecylpyridinium and verapamil ions are compared with the fragmentation occurring in regular (252)Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry.

  7. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-11-02

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Under-diagnosing and under-treating iron deficiency in hospitalized patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El-Halabi, Mustapha M; Green, Michael S; Jones, Christopher; Salyers Jr, William J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether patients hospitalized with gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss anemia are being checked and treated for iron deficiency. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients admitted to a single tertiary care hospital between 11/1/2011 and 1/31/2012 for any type of GI bleeding. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who had their iron studies checked during a hospitalization for GI blood loss anemia. Secondary outcomes included percentage of anemic GI bleeders who had adequate documentation of anemia and iron deficiency, and those who were treated for their iron deficiency. Then we tried to identify possible predictors of checking iron studies in an attempt to understand the thought process that physicians go through when managing these patients. Iron deficiency was defined as Iron saturation less than 15% or ferritin level less than 45 μg/L. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin level less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for females. RESULTS: Three hundred and seven GI bleeders were hospitalized during the study period, and 282 of those (91.9%) had anemia during their hospital stay. Ninety-five patients (30.9%) had iron studies performed during hospitalization, and 45 of those (47.4%) were actually found to be iron deficient. Only 29 of those 45 iron deficient patients were discharged home on iron supplements. Of the 282 patients that had anemia during hospitalization, 50 (17.7%) had no documentation of the anemia in their hospital chart. Of the 45 patients that had lab proven iron deficiency anemia (IDA), only 22 (48.5%) had documentation of IDA in at least one note in their chart. Predictors of checking iron studies in anemic GI bleeders were lower mean corpuscular volume, documentation of anemia, having fecal occult blood testing, not having hematemesis or past history of GI bleeding. There were no significant differences between the teaching and non-teaching services in any patient characteristics or outcomes

  9. Endoscopic versus surgical resection of GI stromal tumors in the upper GI tract.

    PubMed

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Ho; Koh, Jin Sung; Lee, Beom Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Jang, You-Jin; Mok, Young-Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic resection has been performed for treatment of GI stromal tumors (GISTs) in the upper GI tract. However, the therapeutic roles of the endoscopic procedure remain debatable. We aimed in this retrospective study to evaluate the feasibility and long-term follow-up results of endoscopic resection of GISTs in the upper GI tract, compared with surgery. Between March 2005 and August 2014, 130 cases of GIST in the upper GI tract were resected. We compared baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes including R0 resection rate and recurrence rate between the endoscopy group (n = 90) and surgery group (n = 40). The most common location of GIST was the stomach body in the endoscopy group, whereas it was the duodenum in the surgery group (P = .001). Tumor size was significantly smaller (2.3 vs 5.1 cm; P < .001), and procedure time (51.8 ± 36.2 vs 124.6 ± 74.7 minutes; P < .001) and hospital stay (3.3 ± 2.4 vs 8.3 ± 5.4 days; P < .001) were significantly shorter in the endoscopy group than in the surgery group. The R0 resection rate was 25.6% in the endoscopy group, whereas it was 85.0% in the surgery group (P = .001), and 50.0% of resected tumors belonged to a very low-risk group in the endoscopy group, whereas 35.0% and 30.0% belonged to low-risk and high-risk in the surgery group (P = .001). However, during 45.5 months of follow-up, the recurrence rate was not significantly different between the 2 groups (2.2% vs 5.0%; P = .586). Endoscopic resection might be an alternative therapeutic modality for GISTs in the upper GI tract in selective cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Is there still a role for intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Pedro; Almeida, Nuno; Lérias, Clotilde; Figueiredo, Pedro; Gouveia, Hermano; Sofia, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    in 21st century, endoscopic study of the small intestine has undergone a revolution with capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy. The difficulties and morbidity associated with intraoperative enteroscopy, the gold-standard in the 20th century, made this technique to be relegated to a second level. evaluate the actual role and assess the diagnostic and therapeutic value of intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. we conducted a retrospective study of 19 patients (11 males; mean age: 66.5 ± 15.3 years) submitted to 21 IOE procedures for obscure GI bleeding. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy had been performed in 10 and 5 patients, respectively. with intraoperative enteroscopy a small bowel bleeding lesion was identified in 79% of patients and a gastrointestinal bleeding lesion in 94%. Small bowel findings included: angiodysplasia (n = 6), ulcers (n = 4), small bowel Dieulafoy´s lesion (n = 2), bleeding from anastomotic vessels (n = 1), multiple cavernous hemangiomas (n = 1) and bleeding ectopic jejunal varices (n = 1). Agreement between capsule endoscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy was 70%. Endoscopic and/or surgical treatment was used in 77.8% of the patients with a positive finding on intraoperative enteroscopy, with a rebleeding rate of 21.4% in a mean 21-month follow-up period. Procedure-related mortality and postoperative complications have been 5 and 21%, respectively. intraoperative enteroscopy remains a valuable tool in selected patients with obscure GI bleeding, achieving a high diagnostic yield and allowing an endoscopic and/or surgical treatment in most of them. However, as an invasive procedure with relevant mortality and morbidity, a precise indication for its use is indispensable.

  11. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  12. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hepatic cirrhosis: clinical course and mortality prediction.

    PubMed

    Afessa, B; Kubilis, P S

    2000-02-01

    We conducted this study to describe the complications and validate the accuracy of previously reported prognostic indices in predicting the mortality of cirrhotic patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding. This prospective, observational study included 111 consecutive hospitalizations of 85 cirrhotic patients admitted for GI bleeding. Data obtained included intensive care unit (ICU) admission status, Child-Pugh score, the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), organ failure, and inhospital mortality. The performances of Garden's, Gatta's, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II prognostic systems in predicting mortality were assessed. Patients' mean age was 48.7 yr, and the median APACHE II and Child-Pugh scores were 17 and 9, respectively. Their ICU admission rate was 71%. Organ failure developed in 57%, and SIRS in 46% of the patients. Nine patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and three patients had hepatorenal syndrome. The inhospital mortality was 21%. The APACHE II, Garden's, and Gatta' s predicted mortality rates were 39%, 24%, and 20%, respectively, and their areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were 0.78, 0.70, and 0.71, respectively. The AUC for Child-Pugh score was 0.76. SIRS and organ failure develop in many patients with hepatic cirrhosis hospitalized for upper GI bleeding, and are associated with increased mortality. Although the APACHE II prognostic system overestimated the mortality of these patients, the receiver operating characteristic curves did not show significant differences between the various prognostic systems.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  14. Menstrual bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Larsen, Signe Holm; Wilkens, Helena; Jakobsen, Anja; Pedersen, Thais Almeida Lins

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether open-heart surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation has an impact on menstrual bleeding. The menstrual bleeding pattern was registered in fertile women undergoing open-heart surgery in 2010-12. Haematocrit and 24-h postoperative bleeding were compared with those of men undergoing cardiac surgery. Women (n = 22), with mean age of 36 (range 17-60) years, were operated on and hospitalized for 4-5 postoperative days. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 32-60%), and mean haematocrit at discharge was 32% (range 26-37%). Mean postoperative bleeding in the first 24 h was 312 (range 50-1442) ml. They underwent surgery for atrial septal defect (n = 5), composite graft/David procedure (n = 4), pulmonary or aortic valve replacement (n = 6), myxoma (n = 2), mitral valvuloplasty (n = 2), ascending aortic aneurysm (n = 1), aortic coarctation (n = 1) and total cavopulmonary connection (n = 1). Unplanned menstrual bleeding (lasting 2-5 days) was detected in 13 (60%) patients. Of them, 4 were 1-7 days early, 4 were 8-14 days early, 3 were 1-7 days late and 2 had menstruation despite having had menstrual bleeding within the last 2 weeks. None had unusually large or long-lasting menstrual bleeding. Ten women took oral contraceptives, 8 of whom had unexpected menstrual bleeding during admission. Men (n = 22), with a mean age of 35 (range 17-54) years, had mean bleeding of 331 (range 160-796) ml postoperatively, which was not statistically significantly different from the women's. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 29-49%) among men, while haematocrit at discharge was 32% (28-41), not significantly different from that seen in the female subgroup. Menstrual bleeding patterns are disturbed by open-heart surgery in the majority of fertile women. Nevertheless, the unexpected menstrual bleeding is neither particularly long-lasting nor of large quantity, and the postoperative surgical bleeding is unaffected. We recommend that

  15. Current GI endoscope disinfection and QA practices.

    PubMed

    Moses, Frank M; Lee, Jennifer S

    2004-01-01

    High-level disinfection (HLD) of GI endoscopes is readily achieved when published guidelines are observed. Contamination is linked to breakdowns in accepted procedure. However, there is no recognized method of verifying adequacy of endoscope reprocessing in routine practice and no data regarding current quality assurance (QA) practice. Prior reports have demonstrated a wide variation in routine clinical practice of GI endoscopy HLD. The goal of this study was to determine current practice at regional endoscopy centers with regard to endoscope cleaning and HLD, maintenance, and QA practice. An anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire was mailed to 367 SGNA members in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, Maryland, and District of Columbia and completed by 230 (63%). The majority of responders were hospital-based and 59% of the units performed over 3000 procedures per year. After use the endoscope was hand-carried or transported in a dry container (97%) to a separate cleaning room (85%) for HLD by technicians (40%). Wide variations existed in manual step procedures including use of disposable (50%) brushes and number of times channel brushed: once (21%), twice (35%), or three to five times (37%). Soaking duration in disinfectant (70% gluteraldehyde) was for <10 min (8%), 10-20 min (35%), 20-30 min (38%), 30-40 min (7%), and >40 min (3%). Sixty-seven percent had an active unit infection control (IC) service and 98% had a QA program. Monitoring of cleaning effectiveness was by visual inspection (50%) and culturing endoscopes (17%). Culture was done weekly (1%) and

  16. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures. © RSNA, 2013.

  17. Protease inhibition as new therapeutic strategy for GI diseases.

    PubMed

    Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    The GI tract is the most exposed organ to proteases, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. For digestive purposes, the lumen of the upper GI tract contains large amounts of pancreatic proteases, but studies have also demonstrated increased proteolytic activity into mucosal tissues (both in the upper and lower GI tract), associated with pathological conditions. This review aims at outlining the evidences for dysregulated proteolytic homeostasis in GI diseases and the pathogenic mechanisms of increased proteolytic activity. The therapeutic potential of protease inhibition in GI diseases is discussed, with a particular focus on IBDs, functional GI disorders and colorectal cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Crawl on your belly like GI Joe.

    PubMed

    Wade, J; Purdue, G F; Hunt, J L; Childers, L

    1990-01-01

    Many pediatric burns can be prevented. However, education must be presented in an informative and interesting manner to be effective. Is it possible to teach burn safety to elementary school children in four sessions? Sixty-six fourth-grade children were involved in age-appropriate activities, experiments, and discussion that were spaced evenly throughout the school year. Content was based on material furnished by the local fire department with added videos and exercises. By having children crawl blindfolded on their bellies through halls like GI Joe TV characters and by having them watch dry vapors swirl around their faces, boring burn lectures can be turned into challenging and entertaining games. In a game-type testing session, 40 of 49 questions were answered correctly the first time. A community teaching project for interested burn team members is easily planned and implemented. The enthusiastic response of the children and the satisfaction of preventing a possible burn injury promotes continued involvement.

  19. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  20. Enabling interoperability in Geoscience with GI-suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Santoro, Mattia; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    GI-suite is a brokering framework targeting interoperability of heterogeneous systems in the Geoscience domain. The framework is composed by different brokers each one focusing on a specific functionality: discovery, access and semantics (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem). The brokering takes place between a set of heterogeneous publishing services and a set of heterogeneous consumer applications: the brokering target is represented by resources (e.g. coverages, features, or metadata information) required to seamlessly flow from the providers to the consumers. Different international and community standards are now supported by GI-suite, making possible the successful deployment of GI-suite in many international projects and initiatives (such as GEOSS, NSF BCube and several EU funded projects). As for the publisher side more than 40 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. Dublin Core, OAI-PMH, OGC W*S, Geonetwork, THREDDS Data Server, Hyrax Server, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific GI-suite components, called accessors. As for the consumer applications side more than 15 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. ESRI ArcGIS, Openlayers, OGC W*S, OAI-PMH clients, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific profiler components. The GI-suite can be used in different scenarios by different actors: - A data provider having a pre-existent data repository can deploy and configure GI-suite to broker it and making thus available its data resources through different protocols to many different users (e.g. for data discovery and/or data access) - A data consumer can use GI-suite to discover and/or access resources from a variety of publishing services that are already publishing data according to well-known standards. - A community can deploy and configure GI-suite to build a community (or project-specific) broker: GI-suite can broker a set of community related repositories and

  1. Hysterectomy for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Eva; Emanuel, Mark Hans

    2016-01-01

    Hysterectomy is the most frequently performed major surgical intervention in gynecology. Although surgically removing the uterus is invasive, it represents the most definitive treatment option for heavy menstrual bleeding. In this article, we will discuss the indications for hysterectomy as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding, the different approaches to perform the hysterectomy, the complications which may occur during and after this procedure and finally the outcomes in comparison with other treatment options.

  2. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  3. Severe gastric variceal bleeding successfully treated by emergency splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Vea, Romulo; Herbst, John

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices due to splenic vein obstruction is extremely rare in children, but it can be catastrophic. Reported herein is the case of a teenager with splenic vein thrombosis and chronic decompensated liver disease from autoimmune hepatitis who presented with massive gastric variceal bleeding. Standard medical management did not control the bleeding. Due to decompensated liver disease and continuous active bleeding, emergency partial splenic artery embolization was preferred over splenectomy or a shunt procedure. Bleeding was successfully controlled by partial splenic artery embolization by decreasing the inflow of blood into the portal system. It is concluded that emergency partial splenic artery embolization is a safer alternative life-saving procedure to manage severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein obstruction in a patient with high surgical risk. To our knowledge, only one other patient with similar management has been reported in the pediatric age group. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Visceral hypersensitivity is associated with GI symptom severity in functional GI disorders: consistent findings from five different patient cohorts.

    PubMed

    Simrén, Magnus; Törnblom, Hans; Palsson, Olafur S; van Tilburg, Miranda A L; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Tack, Jan; Whitehead, William E

    2017-01-19

    Our aim was to evaluate the association between visceral hypersensitivity and GI symptom severity in large cohorts of patients with functional GI disorder (FGID) and to adjust for psychological factors and general tendency to report symptoms. We included five cohorts of patients with FGIDs (IBS or functional dyspepsia; n=1144), who had undergone visceral sensitivity testing using balloon distensions (gastric fundus, descending colon or rectum) and completed questionnaires to assess GI symptom severity, non-GI somatic symptoms, anxiety and depression. Subjects were divided into sensitivity tertiles based on pain/discomfort thresholds. GI symptom severity was compared between sensitivity tertiles in each cohort and corrected for somatisation, and anxiety and depression. In all five cohorts, GI symptom severity increased gradually with increasing visceral sensitivity, with significant differences in GI symptom severity between the sensitivity tertiles (p<0.0001), with small to medium effect sizes (partial η(2): 0.047-0.11). The differences between sensitivity tertiles remained significant in all cohorts after correction for anxiety and depression, and also after correction for non-GI somatic symptom reporting in all of the cohorts (p<0.05). A gradual increase in GI symptom severity with increasing GI sensitivity was demonstrated in IBS and functional dyspepsia, which was consistent across several large patient groups from different countries, different methods to assess sensitivity and assessments in different parts of the GI tract. This association was independent of tendency to report symptoms or anxiety/depression comorbidity. These findings confirm that visceral hypersensitivity is a contributor to GI symptom generation in FGIDs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Approach to a child with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Jain, Puneet; Jayashree, M; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a potentially life threatening medical emergency requiring an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Therefore, the primary focus in a child with UGIB is resuscitation and stabilization followed by a diagnostic evaluation. The differential diagnosis of UGIB in children is determined by age and severity of bleed. In infants and toddlers mucosal bleed (gastritis and stress ulcers) is a common cause. In children above 2 y variceal bleeding due to Extra-Hepatic Portal Venous Obstruction (EHPVO) is the commonest cause of significant UGIB in developing countries as against peptic ulcer in the developed countries. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most accurate and useful diagnostic tool to evaluate UGIB in children. Parenteral vitamin K (infants, 1-2 mg/dose; children, 5-10 mg) and parenteral Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI's), should be administered empirically in case of a major UGIB. Octreotide infusion is useful in control of significant UGIB due to variceal hemorrhage. A temporarily placed, Sengstaken-Blakemore tube can be life saving if pharmacologic/ endoscopic methods fail to control variceal bleeding. Therapy in patients having mucosal bleed is directed at neutralization and/or prevention of gastric acid release; High dose Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs, Pantoprazole) are more efficacious than H2 receptor antagonists for this purpose.

  6. Similar Efficacy of Proton-Pump Inhibitors vs H2-Receptor Antagonists in Reducing Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding or Ulcers in High-Risk Users of Low-Dose Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Francis K L; Kyaw, Moe; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Cheong, Pui Kuan; Lee, Vivian; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Naito, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Ching, Jessica Y L; Lam, Kelvin; Lo, Angeline; Chan, Heyson; Lui, Rashid; Tang, Raymond S Y; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tse, Yee Kit; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Handa, Osamu; Nebiki, Hiroko; Wu, Justin C Y; Abe, Takashi; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ng, Siew C; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    It is not clear whether H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) reduce the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in aspirin users at high risk. We performed a double-blind randomized trial to compare the effects of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) vs a H2RA antagonist in preventing recurrent upper GI bleeding and ulcers in high-risk aspirin users. We studied 270 users of low-dose aspirin (≤325 mg/day) with a history of endoscopically confirmed ulcer bleeding at 8 sites in Hong Kong and Japan. After healing of ulcers, subjects with negative results from tests for Helicobacter pylori resumed aspirin (80 mg) daily and were assigned randomly to groups given a once-daily PPI (rabeprazole, 20 mg; n = 138) or H2RA (famotidine, 40 mg; n = 132) for up to 12 months. Subjects were evaluated every 2 months; endoscopy was repeated if they developed symptoms of upper GI bleeding or had a reduction in hemoglobin level greater than 2 g/dL and after 12 months of follow-up evaluation. The adequacy of upper GI protection was assessed by end points of recurrent upper GI bleeding and a composite of recurrent upper GI bleeding or recurrent endoscopic ulcers at month 12. During the 12-month study period, upper GI bleeding recurred in 1 patient receiving rabeprazole (0.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-5.1%) and in 4 patients receiving famotidine (3.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-8.1%) (P = .16). The composite end point of recurrent bleeding or endoscopic ulcers at month 12 was reached by 9 patients receiving rabeprazole (7.9%; 95% CI, 4.2%-14.7%) and 13 patients receiving famotidine (12.4%; 95% CI, 7.4%-20.4%) (P = .26). In a randomized controlled trial of users of low-dose aspirin at risk for recurrent GI bleeding, a slightly lower proportion of patients receiving a PPI along with aspirin developed recurrent bleeding or ulcer than of patients receiving an H2RA with the aspirin, although this difference was not statistically significant. ClincialTrials.gov no: NCT01408186. Copyright © 2017 AGA

  7. Obesity and risk of bleeding: the SMART study.

    PubMed

    Braekkan, S K; van der Graaf, Y; Visseren, F L J; Algra, A

    2016-01-01

    Essentials Whether obesity protects against clinically relevant bleeding is unclear. We investigated the risk of bleeding according to various measures of obesity in a cohort of 9736 patients. Obesity was not associated with a lower risk of bleeding. The procoagulant profile in obese subjects may not be enough to protect against clinically relevant bleeding. Background Obesity is associated with increased levels of procoagulant factors and decreased fibrinolytic activity. Whether this hemostatic profile protects against clinically relevant bleeding has been scarcely investigated. Objectives To assess the impact of measures of obesity on the risk of bleeding in a large cohort of patients at increased atherothrombotic risk. Methods The Second Manifestation of ARTerial disease (SMART) study included 9736 patients aged 18-79 years, followed for a median of 5.9 years. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and hip circumference were measured at inclusion. All incident fatal or non-fatal hemorrhagic events were recorded. Results During follow-up, 359 first bleeding events occurred. In quintile-based analyses, the risk of bleeding was highest in the lowest quintile (Q) of BMI (age and sex-adjusted HR Q2 vs. Q1, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50-0.94), but there was a threshold effect at low BMI levels (men, < 23.84 kg m(-2) ; women, < 22.49 kg m(-2) ), and the risk estimates for bleeding did not further change across the remaining quintiles (HR Q3 0.81 and Q5 0.75). For waist circumference the relationship appeared to be U-shaped, with the lowest risk of bleeding in quintile 3 (HR Q3 vs. Q1, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.46-1.04). Adjustments for hypertension, hemoglobin level, renal failure, diabetes and use of oral anticoagulants or platelet inhibitors did not affect the results. Conclusion Obesity was not associated with lower risk of bleeding. Our findings suggest that presumed protection against bleeding due to an apparently efficient hemostatic system may be counterbalanced by other factors

  8. Progress in the treatment of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    The availability of plasma-derived and recombinant coagulation factors has transformed the management of patients with bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia and von Willebrand disease (VWD). However, several important clinical challenges remain that have become the focus of current research in coagulation therapy. Two prospective, non-interventional studies (HyQoL-Europe and HyQoL-Canada) are evaluating the impact of major transitional life events, such as changes in social, work and living situations, on the quality of life of adolescents and young adults with hemophilia A who are treated with the recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) concentrate Helixate®. A better understanding of the impact of these transitional life events on quality of life may help to develop improved interventions and counseling techniques that minimize the negative effects of these events on patients with bleeding disorders. A new clinical development program has been launched to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the low-volume, highly active, plasma-derived von Willebrand factor (VWF)/FVIII concentrate Biostate®. The program, known as SWIFT (Studies with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII) includes four clinical trials involving adult and pediatric patients with hemophilia A or VWD. Lastly, fusion of human recombinant albumin to recombinant coagulation factor IX (rFIX) has created a new fusion protein (rIX-FP) that retains the biological activity of rFIX and has a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile due to the longer half-life. The use of this novel fusion protein may offer several advantages to patients with hemophilia B: less frequent administration, prolonged protection from bleeding and improved compliance--increasing the likelihood of a positive clinical outcome. These examples of current research endeavors are intended to enhance the treatment experience as well as provide new and improved therapies for patients with bleeding disorders.

  9. Beliefs about GI medications and adherence to pharmacotherapy in functional GI disorder outpatients.

    PubMed

    Cassell, Benjamin; Gyawali, C Prakash; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Gott, Britt M; Nix, Billy D; Sayuk, Gregory S

    2015-10-01

    Pharmacotherapy is a mainstay in functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder (FGID) management, but little is known about patient attitudes toward medication regimens. Understanding patient concerns and adherence to pharmacotherapy is particularly important for off-label medication use (e.g., antidepressants) in FGID. Consecutive tertiary GI outpatients completed the Beliefs About Medications questionnaire (BMQ). Subjects were categorized as FGID and structural GI disease (SGID) using clinician diagnoses and Rome criteria; GI-specific medications and doses were recorded, and adherence to medication regimens was determined by patient self-report. BMQ domains (overuse, harm, necessity, and concern) were compared between FGID and SGID, with an interest in how these beliefs affected medication adherence. Psychiatric measures (depression, anxiety, and somatization) were assessed to gauge their influence on medication beliefs. A total of 536 subjects (mean age 54.7±0.7 years, range 22-100 years; n=406, 75.7% female) were enrolled over a 5.5-year interval: 341 (63.6%) with FGID (IBS, 64.8%; functional dyspepsia, 51.0%, ≥2 FGIDs, 38.7%) and 142 (26.5%) with SGID (IBD, 28.9%; GERD, 23.2%). PPIs (n=231, 47.8%), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (n=167, 34.6%), and anxiolytics (n=122, 25.3%) were common medications prescribed. FGID and SGID were similar across all BMQ domains (P>0.05 for overuse, harm, necessity, and concern). SGID subjects had higher necessity-concern framework (NCF) scores compared with FGID subjects (P=0.043). FGID medication adherence correlated negatively with concerns about medication harm (r=-0.24, P<0.001) and overuse (r=-0.15, P=0.001), whereas higher NCF differences predicted medication compliance (P=0.006). Medication concern and overuse scores correlated with psychiatric comorbidity among FGID subjects (P<0.03 for each). FGID patients prescribed TCAs (n=142, 41.6%) expressed a greater medication necessity (17.4±0.4 vs. 16.2±0.4, P=0.024) and

  10. Community Colleges: Key to Vietnam Era GI Bill Shortfall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, J. Michael

    The Vietnam Era GI Bill was clearly influenced by the social and educational success of World War II veterans, but also reflected the policy objectives of equity and access of the 1960's. A 1987 monograph by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs reported that 60% of all Vietnam Era veterans received some training benefit from the GI Bill, but…

  11. GeGI (Germanium Gamma Imager) Performance: Maritime Interdiction Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, Jonathan G.; Burks, Morgan T.; Trombino, Dave

    2014-09-23

    The Gamma Ray Imager (GeGI) was demonstrated during the Maritime Interdiction Operation at Point Alameda, the site of the former Naval Air Station, in Alameda, CA. During this exercise GeGI was used to localize sources within an abandoned building and a cargo ship, the Admiral Callaghan.

  12. Surgical management of presacral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ausobsky, JR; Vowden, P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Presacral venous bleeding is an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication of rectal surgery. During the posterior rectal dissection, it is recommended to proceed into the plane between the fascia propria of the rectum and the presacral fascia. Incorrect mobilisation of the rectum outside the Waldeyer’s fascia can tear out the lower presacral venous plexus or the sacral basivertebral veins, causing what may prove to be uncontrollable bleeding. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE® and Embase™ databases was performed to obtain primary data published in the period between 1 January 1960 and 31 July 2013. Each article describing variables such as incidence of presacral venous bleeding, surgical approach, number of cases treated and success rate was included in the analysis. Results A number of creative solutions have been described that attempt to provide good tamponade of the presacral haemorrhage, eliminating the need for second operation. However, few cases are reported in the literature. Conclusions As conventional haemostatic measures often fail to control this type of haemorrhage, several alternative methods to control bleeding definitively have been described. We propose a practical comprehensive classification of the available techniques for the management of presacral bleeding. PMID:24780015

  13. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Darr, Umar; Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Moslim, Maitham A; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods.

  14. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods. PMID:28261507

  15. Hemodialysis for patients bleeding or at risk for bleeding, can be simple, safe and efficient.

    PubMed

    Stamatiadis, D N; Helioti, H; Mansour, M; Pappas, M; Bokos, J G; Stathakis, C P

    2004-07-01

    Hemodialysis for patients bleeding or at risk for bleeding requires special modalities of treatment that are difficult to perform without potential side effects. A simple, safe and adequate method may be applied. A modified way of extracorporeal circuit preparation, which focuses on minimizing the blood-air interface and negligible saline flushing of 50 ml/h, is applied for a maximum of 3-hour session with routine (not one-to-one) nursing attendance. Data from 16,954 sessions performed with patients bleeding or at risk for bleeding (15,730 retrospectively and 1,224 prospectively collected) were analyzed. Cumulative failure of treatment, as defined by clotting of the extracorporeal circuit requiring termination of the procedure or replacement of the clotted part, was not more than 5% as expected for anticoagulation-free hemodialysis. For the prospectively recorded sessions, blood flow was 234 +/- 30 ml/min with less than 250 ml/min in 42.4% of the sessions. Native blood access was used in 426 (34.8%), double-lumen catheter in 798 (65.2%), 42 were isolated ultrafiltration sessions and 64 blood, 21 plasma, 9 platelet units were transfused. Post/pre urea ratio was 0.50 +/- 0.12. Logistic regression showed that among the following: duration of the session, type of dialysis, ultrafiltration rate, hematocrit, number of platelets, serum total protein, transfusions, blood flow and type of access, only blood flow significantly affected failure incidence (coefficient B = -0.041, exp(B) = 0.96, p = 0.04). No complications due to treatment were noted. In patients with active, or at risk for, bleeding, hemodialysis without systemic anticoagulation can be adequately and safely performed almost as a routine session.

  16. Late Surgical Bleeding Following Total Artificial Heart Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Joshua L; Smith, Jason W; Pal, Jay D; Mahr, Claudius; Masri, S Carolina; Dardas, Todd F; Cheng, Richard K; Mokadam, Nahush A

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical circulatory support for heart failure, including the Total Artificial Heart (TAH, Syncardia, Tucson, AZ, USA) has increased in recent years. This report describes bleeding complications associated with the device. A single institution prospectively maintained quality improvement database was reviewed encompassing the first year of clinical experience with the TAH. Patients who underwent TAH implantation were identified, and a review of complications and outcomes was undertaken. Ten patients underwent TAH implant. Four patients experienced delayed postoperative bleeding. In three patients the manifestation of bleeding was tamponade and evidenced by TAH decreased cardiac output. In two patients, at postoperative days 31 and 137, there was a partial disruption of the aortic anastomosis along the outer curvature with pseudoaneurysm formation. Both were repaired by primary suture closure, without use of cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality attributable to bleeding. TAH patients are at risk for delayed postoperative bleeding, often manifest as an acute decrease in cardiac output. Due to pulsatility and high dP/dT, bleeding from the aortic anastomosis should be considered in the differential of a patient with low flow and/or tamponade. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Risk Factors for Severe Bleeding Complications in Percutaneous Renal Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da-Min; Chen, Min; Zhou, Fu-de; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy is essential for diagnosis of many renal diseases. Previous studies have revealed a variety of factors associated with bleeding complications of renal biopsy; however, data are not sufficient in the Chinese population. We aimed to investigate the risk factors for severe post-biopsy bleeding events in a large cohort of Chinese patients. The data of patients who underwent percutaneous renal biopsy from January 2008 to December 2012 were collected. Severe bleeding complication was defined as requiring intervention, including blood transfusion or an invasive procedure (radiological or surgical) due to bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors. Over the 5-year period, 3,577 native kidney biopsies were performed. Severe bleeding complication occurred in 14 biopsies (0.39%). The patients with complications were older, had higher blood pressure, lower hemoglobin, lower platelet count and worse renal function. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that platelet level and the estimated glomerular filtration rate were independently associated with the risk of complications. Each 10 × 10(9)/L increase of platelet count was associated with an 11% decrease of severe bleeding risk (odds ratio = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80-0.98; P = 0.02). Each 1mL/minute/1.73m(2) increase of the estimated glomerular filtration rate was associated with a 4% decrease of severe bleeding risk (odds ratio = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94-0.99; P = 0.004). Patients with worse renal function and lower platelet counts had a higher risk of developing severe bleeding events after renal biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Methods of reducing peroperative bleeding].

    PubMed

    Brinquin, L; Ozcariz, D; Le Manach, Y; Sourd, J C; Bonsignour, J P

    1992-01-01

    The reduction of bleeding during surgery can be aimed at for two reasons: to facilitate the operation by providing a bloodless field and/or to avoid blood loss requiring compensation by transfusion. These aims can be reached by reducing blood pressure or by acting on blood-clotting. For inducing hypotension sodium nitroprussiate and isoflurane are mainly used. Complex and precise monitoring is required for patient safety. Two drugs have been used to diminish bleeding: desmopressin and aprotinin. With the latter an important reduction (40 to 50%) of the blood loss has been achieved.

  19. Evaluation of iron deficiency anaemia for gastrointestinal causes in patients without GI symptoms in high prevalent GI malignancy zones.

    PubMed

    Kadla, Showkat A; Shah, Nisar A; Bindroo, Muzafar A; Khan, Bilal A; Farooq, Adil; Yousf, Wajeed; Wani, Bilal A

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer is highly prevalent in Kashmir, as are lower gastrointestinal (LGI) malignancies. Colonic cancer, gastric cancer, and coeliac disease are the most important gastrointestinal (GI) causes of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) worldwide. Approximately 9% of patients with IDA present with a suspicious lesion in the GI tract upon examination. However, the absence of GI symptoms and a possible lesion accounting for blood loss in IDA have not been studied in this zone with a high prevalence of GI malignancy. We aimed to examine IDA patients without GI symptoms to determine the most plausible cause of their blood loss. A total of 100 patients with IDA and 250 control subjects without IDA and referred for gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled in a cross-sectional, comparative study. Patients presenting with a significant lesion proportionate to their anaemia in the upper GI tract were not examined further, if no further strong indications were present. Twenty-nine patients (29%) were found to have malignancy: 13 with gastric cancer and 16 with colonic malignancies. Other apparent causes of GI blood loss included peptic ulcer disease in 10 (10%) patients, haemorrhoids in 22 (25%), polyps in eight (three in the upper GI tract and five in the LGI tract), gastric erosions in eight (8%), and angiodysplasia, diverticulitis, and trichuriasis in two (2%) each. In light of the high incidence of GI malignancies in this patient group, a low threshold for GI screening as well as mass screening for IDA is needed. Copyright © 2016 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of hemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients. The aims of the present thesis were: 1. To examine which risk scoring system is best at predicting need of hospital-based intervention, rebleeding, and mortality in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Study I) 2. To evaluate if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) after

  1. Medical and endoscopic treatment in peptic ulcer bleeding: a national German survey.

    PubMed

    Maiss, J; Schwab, D; Ludwig, A; Naegel, A; Ende, A; Hahn, G; Zopf, Y

    2010-02-01

    Peptic ulcers are the leading cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the recent clinical practice in drug therapy and endoscopic treatment of ulcer bleedings in Germany and to compare the results with the medical standard. A structured questionnaire (cross-sectional study) was sent to 1371 German hospitals that provide an emergency service for upper GI bleeding. The project was designed similar to a nationwide inquiry in France in 2001. Forty-four questions concerning the following topics were asked: hospital organisation, organisation of emergency endoscopy service, endoscopic and drug therapy of ulcer bleeding, endoscopic treatment of variceal bleeding. Return of the questionnaires was closed in August 2004. Response rate was 675 / 1371 (49 %). Mean hospitals size was < 200 beds, 49 % (n = 325) had basic care level. 92 % provided a 24-hour endoscopy service, specialized nurses were available in 75 %. Fiberscopes were used only in 15 %. A mean of 10 +/- 12 (range: 0 - 160) bleeding cases/month were treated, 6 +/- 6 cases per month (60 %) were ulcer bleedings. Endoscopy was performed in 72 % immediately after stabilization but in all cases within 24 hours. The Forrest classification was used in 99 % whereas prognostic scores were applied only in 3 %. Forrest Ia,/Ib/IIa/IIb/IIc/III ulcers were indications for endoscopic therapy in 99 %/ 99 %/ 90 %/ 58 %/ 4 %/ 2 % respectively. Favoured initial treatment was injection (diluted epinephrine, mean volume 17 +/- 13 mL/lesion) followed by clipping. In re-bleedings, 93 % tried endoscopic treatment again. Scheduled re-endoscopy was performed in 63 %. PPI were used in 99.6 %, 85 % administered standard dose twice daily. PPI administration was changed from intravenous to oral with the end of fasting in nearly all hospitals. PPI administration schemes can be improved. Indications for Helicobacter pylori eradication followed rational principles. Medical and endoscopic

  2. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  3. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  4. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  5. GiNA, an Efficient and High-Throughput Software for Horticultural Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Schlautman, Brandon; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for trait phenotyping have been a bottleneck for research in many crop species due to their intensive labor, high cost, complex implementation, lack of reproducibility and propensity to subjective bias. Recently, multiple high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed, but most of them are expensive, species-dependent, complex to use, and available only for major crops. To overcome such limitations, we present the open-source software GiNA, which is a simple and free tool for measuring horticultural traits such as shape- and color-related parameters of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. GiNA is multiplatform software available in both R and MATLAB® programming languages and uses conventional images from digital cameras with minimal requirements. It can process up to 11 different horticultural morphological traits such as length, width, two-dimensional area, volume, projected skin, surface area, RGB color, among other parameters. Different validation tests produced highly consistent results under different lighting conditions and camera setups making GiNA a very reliable platform for high-throughput phenotyping. In addition, five-fold cross validation between manually generated and GiNA measurements for length and width in cranberry fruits were 0.97 and 0.92. In addition, the same strategy yielded prediction accuracies above 0.83 for color estimates produced from images of cranberries analyzed with GiNA compared to total anthocyanin content (TAcy) of the same fruits measured with the standard methodology of the industry. Our platform provides a scalable, easy-to-use and affordable tool for massive acquisition of phenotypic data of fruits, seeds, and vegetables. PMID:27529547

  6. GiNA, an Efficient and High-Throughput Software for Horticultural Phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Schlautman, Brandon; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for trait phenotyping have been a bottleneck for research in many crop species due to their intensive labor, high cost, complex implementation, lack of reproducibility and propensity to subjective bias. Recently, multiple high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed, but most of them are expensive, species-dependent, complex to use, and available only for major crops. To overcome such limitations, we present the open-source software GiNA, which is a simple and free tool for measuring horticultural traits such as shape- and color-related parameters of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. GiNA is multiplatform software available in both R and MATLAB® programming languages and uses conventional images from digital cameras with minimal requirements. It can process up to 11 different horticultural morphological traits such as length, width, two-dimensional area, volume, projected skin, surface area, RGB color, among other parameters. Different validation tests produced highly consistent results under different lighting conditions and camera setups making GiNA a very reliable platform for high-throughput phenotyping. In addition, five-fold cross validation between manually generated and GiNA measurements for length and width in cranberry fruits were 0.97 and 0.92. In addition, the same strategy yielded prediction accuracies above 0.83 for color estimates produced from images of cranberries analyzed with GiNA compared to total anthocyanin content (TAcy) of the same fruits measured with the standard methodology of the industry. Our platform provides a scalable, easy-to-use and affordable tool for massive acquisition of phenotypic data of fruits, seeds, and vegetables.

  7. Suspected collagen disorders in the bleeding disorder clinic: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S C; Odiaman, L; Card, R T; van der Bom, J G; Poon, M-C

    2013-03-01

    Disorders of collagen are associated with a mild bleeding tendency because of the potential abnormal interaction of collagen, von Willebrand factor (VWF) and platelets required during primary haemostasis and due to generalized soft tissue fragility. Abnormal collagen may contribute to bleeding in existing mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, but the prevalence in this setting is unknown. Generalized symptomatic joint hypermobility (SJH) is common in collagen disorders and may be objectively measured. To assess the association between symptomatic joint hypermobility and mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, we performed a case-control study in which case subjects were 55 consecutive individuals who had visited our bleeding disorder clinic with a diagnosis of von Willebrand disease, low von Willebrand factor levels, mild platelet function disorder or undefined bleeding disorder. Controls were 50 subjects without a bleeding disorder, and were age and gender matched to the cases. All subjects were assessed with: (i) Beighton score for joint hypermobility, (ii) revised Brighton criteria, (iii) Condensed MCMDM1-VWD bleeding questionnaire, and (iv) haemostasis laboratory studies. The prevalence of SJH/suspected collagen disorder in the bleeding disorder clinic was 24% (13/55) compared with 2% (1/50) in the control population (OR 15, 95% CI 2-121). Seventy-seven per cent of bleeding disorder clinic SJH subjects (10/13) had a prior personal or family history of Ehlers-Danlos, Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). Symptomatic joint hypermobility was associated with increased odds of an underlying mucocutaneous bleeding disorder. These findings suggest that a collagen disorder is common and often unrecognized in the bleeding disorder clinic as a potential contributor to the bleeding symptoms.

  8. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... 7 days after birth Bruising Bleeding from the umbilical cord Late 2-12 weeks after birth is typical, ... head and face Bleeding from the nose or umbilical cord Skin color that is paler than before. ...

  9. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Heinz; Nägel, Andreas; Vitali, Francesco; Vetter, Marcel; Dauth, Christine; Neurath, Markus F.; Raithel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE). Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies). Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males), 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60%) and in 14 (40%) as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%), while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%). Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3%) or salvage therapy (66,7%). Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8%) occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions. PMID:28232848

  10. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  11. The SalGI restriction endonuclease. Purification and properties

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Anthony; Halford, Stephen E.

    1982-01-01

    The type II restriction endonuclease SalGI has been purified to near homogeneity. At least 80% of the protein remaining after the final stage of the preparation is SalGI restriction endonuclease; no contaminating nucleases remain detectable. The principal form of the protein under both native and denaturing conditions is a monomer of Mr about 29000. The optimal conditions for both enzyme stability and enzyme activity have been determined. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:6285898

  12. Fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuang-Hong; Guo, Qin; Liu, Guan J; Wan, Chaomin

    2016-05-19

    Gastrointestinal bleeding refers to loss of blood from any site of the digestive tract. In paediatric clinical practice, it is usually a complaint of children attending the emergency department as a symptom of diseases such as ulcers, gastric or oesophageal varices, gastritis, Mallory-Weiss tears, anorectal fissures, allergic colitis, infectious colitis, intussusception, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, and Meckel's diverticulum; it also occurs with high incidence in critically ill children hospitalised in intensive care units and is caused by stress-induced gastropathy. No matter what the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, fasting is believed to be necessary due to the fear that eating may affect haemostasis or aggravate bleeding. To assess the effects and safety of fasting for haemostasis in gastrointestinal bleeding in children. We searched EBM Reviews - the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (May 2016), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (1946 to 3 May 2016), EMBASE (1980 to 2016 Week 18), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1978 to 3 May 2016), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 3 May 2016), VIP Database (1989 to 4 May 2016) and Wanfang Data (1990 to 4 May 2016). We used no restrictions on language or study setting and limited searches in CNKI and Wanfang Data to the medical field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs in children with gastrointestinal bleeding that compared fasting with feeding. Two review authors independently screened the literature search results, and there were no disagreements. We identified no RCTs or quasi-RCTs that compared the effects and safety of fasting with feeding for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding. No study fulfilled the criteria for considering studies for our review. There is currently no information available from RCTs or quasi-RCTs to support or refute the use of fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Two cases of vaginal bleeding in pet rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadar, Miranda J.; Parker, Dennilyn L.; Burgess, Hilary; Wojnarowicz, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Two unrelated rats were presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine emergency service for vaginal bleeding. Each was taken to surgery due to marked blood loss and suspicion of uterine pathology. Despite similar clinical presentation, gross and histopathologic examination revealed 2 different underlying disease processes, uterine dilatation with mild endometritis and vaginal polyp. PMID:22210942

  14. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  15. Survival of patients with cirrhosis and acute peptic ulcer bleeding compared with variceal bleeding using current first-line therapies.

    PubMed

    Ardevol, Alba; Ibañez-Sanz, Gemma; Profitos, Joaquim; Aracil, Carles; Castellvi, Josep M; Alvarado, Edilmar; Cachero, Alba; Horta, Diana; Miñana, Josep; Gomez-Pastrana, Bárbara; Pavel, Oana; Dueñas, Eva; Casas, Meritxell; Planella, Montserrat; Castellote J, Jose; Villanueva, Candid

    2017-07-17

    The presence of cirrhosis increases the mortality of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). Both acute variceal bleeding (AVB) and PUB are associated with substantial mortality in cirrhosis. This multicenter cohort study was performed to assess whether the mortality of cirrhotic patients with PUB is different from that of those with AVB. Patients with cirrhosis and acute gastrointestinal bleeding were consecutively included and treated with somatostatin and PPI infusion from admission and with antibiotic prophylaxis. Emergency endoscopy with endoscopic therapy was performed within the first 6-hours. 646 patients with AVB and 144 with PUB were included. There were baseline differences between groups, such as use of gastro-erosive drugs or β-blockers. Child-Pugh and MELD scores were similar. Further bleeding was more frequent in AVB-group than in those PUB-group (18% vs 10%; OR= 0.50, 95%CI= 0.29-0.88). However, mortality risk at 45-day was similar in both groups (19% in AVB-group vs 17% in PUB-group; OR= 0.85, 95% CI= 0.55-1.33, P= 0.48). Different parameters, such as Child-Pugh score, AKI, ACLF or presence of shock or bacterial infection, but not the cause of bleeding, were related to the risk of death. Only 2% of PUB-group vs 3% of AVB-group died with uncontrolled bleeding (P= 0.39), while the majority of patients in either group died from liver failure or due to other comorbidities. Using current first-line-therapy, patients with cirrhosis and acute peptic ulcer bleeding have a similar survival than those with variceal bleeding. The risk of further bleeding is higher in patients with variceal hemorrhage. However, few patients in both groups died from uncontrolled bleeding, while the cause of death was usually related to liver failure or co-morbidities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  17. [Three cases of esophageal bleeding after cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhiko; Kosaka, Makoto

    2005-09-01

    Three patients after cardiovascular surgery developed severe esophageal bleeding. All had been diagnosed as having an aberrant subclavian artery (ASCA). ASCA is the commonest congenital anomaly of the aortic arch, which arises from the proximal portion of the descending thoracic aorta and runs across the back side of the esophagus. The patients were intubated with a tracheal, nasogastric or ileus tube for a long time after surgery because of low output syndrome (LOS), delayed awareness, or ileus. The ASCA was compressed by the nasogastric or ileus tube in the esophagus and the patients developed an ASCA-esophageal fistula and bleeding. It should be noted that patients with an ASCA may suffer from esophageal bleeding due to the prolonged use of a nasogastric tube. Prevention is the best way to avoid this serious complication.

  18. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  19. Gi Proteins Regulate Adenylyl Cyclase Activity Independent of Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Melsom, Caroline Bull; Ørstavik, Øivind; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Despite the view that only β2- as opposed to β1-adrenoceptors (βARs) couple to Gi, some data indicate that the β1AR-evoked inotropic response is also influenced by the inhibition of Gi. Therefore, we wanted to determine if Gi exerts tonic receptor-independent inhibition upon basal adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity in cardiomyocytes. Experimental approach We used the Gs-selective (R,R)- and the Gs- and Gi-activating (R,S)-fenoterol to selectively activate β2ARs (β1AR blockade present) in combination with Gi inactivation with pertussis toxin (PTX). We also determined the effect of PTX upon basal and forskolin-mediated responses. Contractility was measured ex vivo in left ventricular strips and cAMP accumulation was measured in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult Wistar rats. Key results PTX amplified both the (R,R)- and (R,S)-fenoterol-evoked maximal inotropic response and concentration-dependent increases in cAMP accumulation. The EC50 values of fenoterol matched published binding affinities. The PTX enhancement of the Gs-selective (R,R)-fenoterol-mediated responses suggests that Gi regulates AC activity independent of receptor coupling to Gi protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, forskolin-evoked cAMP accumulation was increased and inotropic responses to forskolin were potentiated by PTX treatment. In non-PTX-treated tissue, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and 4 inhibition or removal of either constitutive muscarinic receptor activation of Gi with atropine or removal of constitutive adenosine receptor activation with CGS 15943 had no effect upon contractility. However, in PTX-treated tissue, PDE3 and 4 inhibition alone increased basal levels of cAMP and accordingly evoked a large inotropic response. Conclusions and implications Together, these data indicate that Gi exerts intrinsic receptor-independent inhibitory activity upon AC. We propose that PTX treatment shifts the balance of intrinsic Gi and Gs activity upon AC towards Gs

  20. [Albumin and artificial colloids for massive bleeding].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and massive bleeding has to be counteracted by efficient volume restoration against rapid loss of intravascular volume. There are two phases of volume management for massive bleeding, uncontrolled phase and controlled phase. During initial uncontrolled phase, rapid infusion of crystalloid with RCC (red cell concentrate) is the first choice of volume management to prevent shock and profound decline of hemoglobin level. After shifting to the next controlled phase, artificial colloids and RCC become the next choice for efficient volume restoration. Although albumin has not been proven to improve prognosis in clinical studies, anti-inflammatory effect could be expected. Albumin infusion may be followed in this phase, and also albumin concentrate may be beneficial to reduce subsequent tissue edema due to massive infusion of crystalloid and artificial colloid. A new generation of hydroxyethyl starch is a promising blood substitute, designed with minimum side effect. Although renal damage especially in septic patient and coagulation disorder are theoretically suspected, beneficial effect as volume expansion overwhelms these stochastic side effects. Since the side effect depends on the dose and how much it remains in the body, a purposeful use during volume expansion phase should be recommended.

  1. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  2. A fibreoptic endoscopic study of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania: a retrospective review of 240 cases.

    PubMed

    Jaka, Hyasinta; Koy, Mheta; Liwa, Anthony; Kabangila, Rodrick; Mirambo, Mariam; Scheppach, Wolfgang; Mkongo, Eliasa; McHembe, Mabula D; Chalya, Phillipo L

    2012-07-03

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is recognized as a common and potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that needs a prompt assessment and aggressive emergency treatment. A retrospective study was undertaken at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania between March 2010 and September 2011 to describe our own experiences with fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in our setting and compare our results with those from other centers in the world. A total of 240 patients representing 18.7% of all patients (i.e. 1292) who had fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy during the study period were studied. Males outnumbered female by a ratio of 2.1:1. Their median age was 37 years and most of patients (60.0%) were aged 40 years and below. The vast majority of the patients (80.4%) presented with haematemesis alone followed by malaena alone in 9.2% of cases. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking prior to the onset of bleeding was recorded in 7.9%, 51.7% and 38.3% of cases respectively. Previous history of peptic ulcer disease was reported in 22(9.2%) patients. Nine (3.8%) patients were HIV positive. The source of bleeding was accurately identified in 97.7% of patients. Diagnostic accuracy was greater within the first 24 h of the bleeding onset, and in the presence of haematemesis. Oesophageal varices were the most frequent cause of upper GI bleeding (51.3%) followed by peptic ulcers in 25.0% of cases. The majority of patients (60.8%) were treated conservatively. Endoscopic and surgical treatments were performed in 30.8% and 5.8% of cases respectively. 140 (58.3%) patients received blood transfusion. The median length of hospitalization was 8 days and it was significantly longer in patients who underwent surgical treatment and those with higher Rockall scores (P < 0.001). Rebleeding was reported in 3.3% of the patients. The overall mortality rate of 11.7% was significantly

  3. Synergy between Prkdc and Trp53 regulates stem cell proliferation and GI-ARS after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Kay E; Ashley, Amanda K; Moser, Russell D; Kemp, Christopher J

    2017-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is one of the most widely used treatments for cancer. However, acute damage to the gastrointestinal tract or gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome (GI-ARS) is a major dose-limiting side effect, and the mechanisms that underlie this remain unclear. Here we use mouse models to explore the relative roles of DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in radiation response. IR induces DNA double strand breaks and DNA-PK mutant Prkdc(scid/scid) mice are sensitive to GI-ARS due to an inability to repair these breaks. IR also activates the tumor suppressor p53 to trigger apoptotic cell death within intestinal crypt cells and p53 deficient mice are resistant to apoptosis. To determine if DNA-PK and p53 interact to govern radiosensitivity, we compared the response of single and compound mutant mice to 8 Gy IR. Compound mutant Prkdc(scid/scid)/Trp53(-/-)mice died earliest due to severe GI-ARS. While both Prkdc(scid/scid) and Prkdc(scid/scid)/Trp53(-/-)mutant mice had higher levels of IR-induced DNA damage, particularly within the stem cell compartment of the intestinal crypt, in Prkdc(scid/scid)/Trp53(-/-)mice these damaged cells abnormally progressed through the cell cycle resulting in mitotic cell death. This led to a loss of Paneth cells and a failure to regenerate the differentiated epithelial cells required for intestinal function. IR-induced apoptosis did not correlate with radiosensitivity. Overall, these data reveal that DNA repair, mediated by DNA-PK, and cell cycle arrest, mediated by p53, cooperate to protect the stem cell niche after DNA damage, suggesting combination approaches to modulate both pathways may be beneficial to reduce GI-ARS. As many cancers harbor p53 mutations, this also suggests targeting DNA-PK may be effective to enhance sensitivity of p53 mutant tumors to radiation.

  4. eIF4GI links nutrient sensing by mTOR to cell proliferation and inhibition of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valle, Francisco; Braunstein, Steve; Zavadil, Jiri; Formenti, Silvia C; Schneider, Robert J

    2008-04-21

    Translation initiation factors have complex functions in cells that are not yet understood. We show that depletion of initiation factor eIF4GI only modestly reduces overall protein synthesis in cells, but phenocopies nutrient starvation or inhibition of protein kinase mTOR, a key nutrient sensor. eIF4GI depletion impairs cell proliferation, bioenergetics, and mitochondrial activity, thereby promoting autophagy. Translation of mRNAs involved in cell growth, proliferation, and bioenergetics were selectively inhibited by reduction of eIF4GI, as was the mRNA encoding Skp2 that inhibits p27, whereas catabolic pathway factors were increased. Depletion or overexpression of other eIF4G family members did not recapitulate these results. The majority of mRNAs that were translationally impaired with eIF4GI depletion were excluded from polyribosomes due to the presence of multiple upstream open reading frames and low mRNA abundance. These results suggest that the high levels of eIF4GI observed in many breast cancers might act to specifically increase proliferation, prevent autophagy, and release tumor cells from control by nutrient sensing.

  5. The effect of postoperative beam, implant, and combination radiation therapy on GI and bladder toxicities in female Medicare beneficiaries with stage I uterine cancer.

    PubMed

    Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Asem, Humera; Zhang, Dong D; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Hatch, Sandra S; Freeman, Jean L; Berenson, Abbey B

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine the risk of late gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder toxicities in women treated for Stage I uterine cancer with postoperative beam, implant, or combination radiation. METHODS: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registry and Medicare claims were used to estimate the risk of developing late GI and bladder toxicities by type of radiation received. Bladder and GI diagnoses were identified 6-60 months after cancer diagnosis. Cox-proportional hazard models were used to estimate risk of any late GI or bladder toxicity due to type of radiation received. RESULTS: A total of 3,024 women with uterine cancer diagnosed from 1992-2005 were identified for analysis with a mean age of 73.9 (Standard Deviation (SD) ± 6.5). Bladder and GI toxicities occurred most frequently in the combination group, and least in the implant group. After controlling for demographic characteristics, tumor grade, diagnosis year, SEER region, comorbidities, prior GI and bladder diagnosis, and chemotherapy, women receiving implant radiation had a 21% absolute decrease in GI toxicities compared to women receiving combination radiation (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.92). No differences were observed between those receiving beam and combination in GI (HR 1.01 (0.89-1.14)) and bladder (HR 0.95 (0.80-1.11)) toxicities. CONCLUSIONS: Older women receiving combined radiation had the highest rates of GI and bladder toxicities, while women receiving implant radiation alone had the lowest rates. When selecting type of radiation for a patient, these toxicities should be considered. Counseling older women surviving cancer on late toxicities due to radiation must be a priority for physicians caring for them.

  6. Gi proteins regulate adenylyl cyclase activity independent of receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Melsom, Caroline Bull; Ørstavik, Øivind; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the view that only β2- as opposed to β1-adrenoceptors (βARs) couple to G(i), some data indicate that the β1AR-evoked inotropic response is also influenced by the inhibition of Gi. Therefore, we wanted to determine if Gi exerts tonic receptor-independent inhibition upon basal adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity in cardiomyocytes. We used the Gs-selective (R,R)- and the Gs- and G(i)-activating (R,S)-fenoterol to selectively activate β2ARs (β1AR blockade present) in combination with Gi inactivation with pertussis toxin (PTX). We also determined the effect of PTX upon basal and forskolin-mediated responses. Contractility was measured ex vivo in left ventricular strips and cAMP accumulation was measured in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult Wistar rats. PTX amplified both the (R,R)- and (R,S)-fenoterol-evoked maximal inotropic response and concentration-dependent increases in cAMP accumulation. The EC50 values of fenoterol matched published binding affinities. The PTX enhancement of the Gs-selective (R,R)-fenoterol-mediated responses suggests that Gi regulates AC activity independent of receptor coupling to Gi protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, forskolin-evoked cAMP accumulation was increased and inotropic responses to forskolin were potentiated by PTX treatment. In non-PTX-treated tissue, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and 4 inhibition or removal of either constitutive muscarinic receptor activation of Gi with atropine or removal of constitutive adenosine receptor activation with CGS 15943 had no effect upon contractility. However, in PTX-treated tissue, PDE3 and 4 inhibition alone increased basal levels of cAMP and accordingly evoked a large inotropic response. Together, these data indicate that Gi exerts intrinsic receptor-independent inhibitory activity upon AC. We propose that PTX treatment shifts the balance of intrinsic G(i) and Gs activity upon AC towards Gs, enhancing the effect of all cAMP-mediated inotropic agents.

  7. Percutaneous Transcatheter Embolization of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Child with Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Bas, Ahmet; Samanci, Cesur; Numan, Furuzan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Polyarteritis nodosa is a form of necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium-sized arteries. Major gastrointestinal complications are ulceration, perforation, hemorrhage, and obstruction. Case Report We report on a clinical case of a 16-year-old female patient with massive hematemesis, who was successfully treated with embolization with a 1:2 dilution of N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest child reported on with massive GI bleeding secondary to PAN, treated with successful percutaneous transcatheter embolization under emergency conditions. PMID:25512765

  8. Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in the victims of house fire.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Moriya, Fumio; Nakanishi, Akinori

    2003-03-01

    Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue is frequently observed in autopsy cases of house fire victims. The meaning of this finding has not yet been fully discussed. We examined 69 autopsy cases of house fire victims and investigated several factors contributing to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Victims comprised 45 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 1 to 95 years old. Sixty-four cases (93%) involved severely charred bodies, while the remaining five bodies displayed slight burns. Factors studied were age, sex, posture of the body at the scene of the fire, degree of burn injury and carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) levels in blood. CO-Hb level proved to be the only factor relevant to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Of 69 autopsy cases, 23 (33%) demonstrated intramuscular bleeding of the tongue (13 cases of slight bleeding, ten cases of severe bleeding). Low concentrations of CO-Hb (bleeding. Of 46 cases without intramuscular bleeding, ten (22%) displayed low concentrations of CO-Hb. These results may indicate that severe burn injuries occurring before inhaling air containing high levels of carbon monoxide represent the cause of intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in fire victims. The burned regions of the body in the early stage of the fire process were unclear due to severe charring in most victims. However, asphyxiation due to neck compression is known to often induce intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Lack of skin elasticity following burns, particularly in the neck, might act in a similar manner to asphyxial neck compression. In conclusion, intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in fire victims may occur as a vital reaction to burns.

  9. Activation of Gi induces Mechanical Hyperalgesia Post Stress or Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Olayinka A.; Khasar, Sachia G.; Gear, Robert W.; Levine, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    In studies of the role of primary afferent nociceptor plasticity in the transition from acute to chronic pain we recently reported that exposure to unpredictable sound stress or a prior inflammatory response induces long-term changes in the second messenger signaling pathway, in nociceptors, mediating inflammatory hyperalgesia; this change involves a switch from a Gs-cAMP-PKA to a Gi-PKC signaling pathway. To more directly study the role of Gi in mechanical hyperalgesia we evaluated the nociceptive effect of the Gi activator, mastoparan. Intradermal injection of mastoparan in the rat hind paw induces dose-dependent (0.1 ng – 1 μg) mechanical hyperalgesia. The highly selective inhibitor of Gi, Pertussis toxin, and of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), PKCεV1–2, both markedly attenuate mastoparan-induced hyperalgesia in stressed rats but had no effect on mastoparan-induced hyperalgesia in unstressed rats. Similar effects were observed, at the site of nociceptive testing, after recovery from carrageenan-induced inflammation. These studies provide further confirmation for a switch to a Gi-activated and PKCε-dependent signaling pathway in primary mechanical hyperalgesia, induced by stress or inflammation. PMID:19275929

  10. Isolated cavernous haemangioma of the stomach in a 3-year-old child: an unusual cause of upper GI bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Attash, Saad Muwafaq; Ali, Mohammed Sulaiman; Al-Nuaimy, Hatim A

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of a 3-year-old child with a history of recurrent attacks of haematemesis, melena and severe anaemia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a vascular mass at the fundus and greater curvature of the stomach, CT revealed an ill-circumscribed mass of mixed attenuation in the left upper abdomen, which was related to the fundus and greater curvature of the stomach, extending to the spleen, greater omentum and transverse colon with a homogeneous enhancement following contrast injection suggesting the diagnosis of haemangioma. Explorative laparotomy was done and partial gastrectomy together with splenectomy and omentectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous haemangioma. PMID:23045447

  11. GUCY2C Signaling Opposes the Acute Radiation-Induced GI Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wuthrick, Evan; Rappaport, Jeff A; Kraft, Crystal; Lin, Jieru E; Marszalowicz, Glen; Snook, Adam E; Zhan, Tingting; Hyslop, Terry M; Waldman, Scott A

    2017-09-15

    High doses of ionizing radiation induce acute damage to epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, mediating toxicities restricting the therapeutic efficacy of radiation in cancer and morbidity and mortality in nuclear disasters. No approved prophylaxis or therapy exists for these toxicities, in part reflecting an incomplete understanding of mechanisms contributing to the acute radiation-induced GI syndrome (RIGS). Guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) and its hormones guanylin and uroguanylin have recently emerged as one paracrine axis defending intestinal mucosal integrity against mutational, chemical, and inflammatory injury. Here, we reveal a role for the GUCY2C paracrine axis in compensatory mechanisms opposing RIGS. Eliminating GUCY2C signaling exacerbated RIGS, amplifying radiation-induced mortality, weight loss, mucosal bleeding, debilitation, and intestinal dysfunction. Durable expression of GUCY2C, guanylin, and uroguanylin mRNA and protein by intestinal epithelial cells was preserved following lethal irradiation inducing RIGS. Oral delivery of the heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), an exogenous GUCY2C ligand, opposed RIGS, a process requiring p53 activation mediated by dissociation from MDM2. In turn, p53 activation prevented cell death by selectively limiting mitotic catastrophe, but not apoptosis. These studies reveal a role for the GUCY2C paracrine hormone axis as a novel compensatory mechanism opposing RIGS, and they highlight the potential of oral GUCY2C agonists (Linzess; Trulance) to prevent and treat RIGS in cancer therapy and nuclear disasters. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5095-106. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Regulatory mechanisms of cAMP levels as a multiple target for antiplatelet activity and less bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-08-01

    Platelet activation is a critical component of atherothrombosis. The multiple pathways of platelet activation limit the effect of specific receptor/pathway inhibitors, resulting in limited clinical efficacy. Recent research has confirmed that combination therapy results in enhanced antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding risk. In this way, the best-known inhibitor and turn off signaling in platelet activation is cAMP. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of regulation of intraplatelet cAMP levels, a) platelet-dependent pathway: Gi/Gs protein-coupled receptors, phosphodiesterase inhibition and activation of PPARs and b) platelet-independent pathway: inhibition of adenosine uptake by erythrocytes. With respect to the association between intraplatelet cAMP levels and bleeding risk it is possible to establish that compounds/drugs with pleitropic effect for increased intraplatelet cAMP level could have an antithrombotic activity with less risk of bleeding.

  13. Harnessing bacteriocin biology as targeted therapy in the GI tract.

    PubMed

    Kommineni, Sushma; Kristich, Christopher J; Salzman, Nita H

    2016-11-01

    Recently, our laboratory demonstrated that bacteriocins produced by commensal enterococci provide an advantage in niche maintenance in the highly competitive environment of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Bacterial production of bacteriocins is a conserved defense strategy to help establish an ecological niche. Bacteriocin-encoding genes in enterococci are often carried on mobile genetic elements, including conjugative plasmids, enabling the transfer of such traits to other community members in a shared niche. Use of a novel mouse model for enterococcal colonization of the GI tract allowed us to investigate enterococcal dynamics and the role of enterococcal bacteriocins in the mouse GI tract. We examined the role of bacteriocin-21, carried on the pPD1 plasmid, in enterococcal colonization of the gut. We discovered that Enterococcus faecalis (EF) harboring pPD1 effectively colonizes the GI tract by using Bac-21 to eliminate its competition. In our study, we also present evidence for active conjugation in the GI tract, a strategy EF uses to enhance the number of bacteriocin producers in a given niche and eliminate bacteriocin-susceptible populations. Using an engineered strain of EF that is capable of producing Bac-21 but impaired in its conjugation ability, we were able to reduce pre-existing colonization by vancomycin-resistant enterococci in the mouse gut. Thus, our results suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to de-colonize antibiotic-resistant enterococci from the GI tract of patients and thereby prevent the emergence of resistant enterococcal infections that are otherwise difficult, or impossible, to treat.

  14. Mortality from nonulcer bleeding is similar to that of ulcer bleeding in high-risk patients with nonvariceal hemorrhage: a prospective database study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Marmo, Riccardo; Del Piano, Mario; Rotondano, Gianluca; Koch, Maurizio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Zambelli, Alessandro; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Grossi, Enzo; Cipolletta, Livio; Prometeo Investigators

    2012-02-01

    Nonulcer causes of bleeding are often regarded as minor, ie, associated with a lower risk of mortality. To assess the risk of death from nonulcer causes of upper GI bleeding (UGIB). Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 3 national databases. Community and teaching hospitals. Consecutive patients admitted for acute nonvariceal UGIB. Early endoscopy, medical and endoscopic treatment as appropriate. Thirty-day mortality, recurrent bleeding, and need for surgery. A total of 3207 patients (65.8% male), mean (standard deviation) age 68.3 (16.4) years, were analyzed. Overall mortality was 4.45% (143 patients). According to the source of bleeding, mortality was 9.8% for neoplasia, 4.8% for Mallory-Weiss tears, 4.8% for vascular lesions, 4.4% for gastroduodenal erosions, 4.4% for duodenal ulcer, and 3.1% for gastric ulcer. Frequency of death was not different among benign endoscopic diagnoses (overall P = .567). Risk of death was significantly higher in patients with neoplasia compared with benign conditions (odds ratio 2.50; 95% CI, 1.32-4.46; P < .0001). Gastric or duodenal ulcer significantly increased the risk of death, but this was not related to the presence of high-risk stigmata (P = .368). The strongest predictor of mortality for all causes of nonvariceal UGIB was the overall physical status of the patient measured with the American Society of Anesthesiologists score (1-2 vs 3-4, P < .001). No data on the American Society of Anesthesiologists class score in the Prometeo study. Nonulcer causes of nonvariceal UGIB have a risk of death, similar to bleeding peptic ulcers in the clinical context of a high-risk patient. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  16. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  17. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  18. Nonsurgical techniques to control massive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Zentai, Christian; Grottke, Oliver; Spahn, Donat R; Rossaint, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Significant advancements in nonsurgical and surgical approaches to control bleeding in severely injured patients have also improved the treatment of critical trauma-related coagulopathy. Nonsurgical procedures such as angiographic embolization are progressively considered to terminate arterial bleeding from pelvic fractures. The disturbance of coagulation may aggravate bleeding and hamper surgical procedures. The administration of coagulation factors and factor concentrates may be useful for correcting systemic coagulopathy and reducing the need for fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and red blood cell transfusions, which are associated with various adverse outcomes. In this review, nonsurgical management of critical trauma bleeding is discussed.

  19. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  20. Menstrual Bleeding Patterns Among Regularly Menstruating Women

    PubMed Central

    Dasharathy, Sonya S.; Mumford, Sunni L.; Pollack, Anna Z.; Perkins, Neil J.; Mattison, Donald R.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2012-01-01

    Menstrual bleeding patterns are considered relevant indicators of reproductive health, though few studies have evaluated patterns among regularly menstruating premenopausal women. The authors evaluated self-reported bleeding patterns, incidence of spotting, and associations with reproductive hormones among 201 women in the BioCycle Study (2005–2007) with 2 consecutive cycles. Bleeding patterns were assessed by using daily questionnaires and pictograms. Marginal structural models were used to evaluate associations between endogenous hormone concentrations and subsequent total reported blood loss and bleeding length by weighted linear mixed-effects models and weighted parametric survival analysis models. Women bled for a median of 5 days (standard deviation: 1.5) during menstruation, with heavier bleeding during the first 3 days. Only 4.8% of women experienced midcycle bleeding. Increased levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.27) and progesterone (β = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.03, 0.09) throughout the cycle were associated with heavier menstrual bleeding, and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels were associated with longer menses. Bleeding duration and volume were reduced after anovulatory compared with ovulatory cycles (geometric mean blood loss: 29.6 vs. 47.2 mL; P = 0.07). Study findings suggest that detailed characterizations of bleeding patterns may provide more insight than previously thought as noninvasive markers for endocrine status in a given cycle. PMID:22350580

  1. Analysis of GI Community Shifts in Response to Dietary Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    omnivorous and similar to the human diet, pigs recover much more energy from microbial digestion of fiber/cellulose in the lower GI tract (ca. 17-30%). In...similar to the human tract ( omnivorous , non-ruminant but better cellulose utilization), 3) show gut community response to change in diet fiber, 4

  2. GI Bill Offers Military Children Relief from College Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2013-01-01

    As a new GI Bill moved through Congress in 2008, a handful of influential politicians grew concerned. Would such a generous education program trigger an exodus of service members during two wars? At the Pentagon's urging, the lawmakers proposed a fix: Give troops the option to transfer their benefits to a child or spouse. That policy quickly…

  3. Empty Promise: Black American Veterans and the New GI Bill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottley, Alford H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2008 GI Bill offers college funds for veterans. Yet Black male vets are not taking advantage of these benefits. This chapter examines personal and societal problems that hinder access to higher education for Black vets, and suggests some ways adult educators can advocate for these young men.

  4. Genome sequence of Brevibacillus laterosporus strain GI-9.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Pradip K; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Korpole, Suresh; Patil, Prabhu B

    2012-03-01

    We report the 5.18-Mb genome sequence of Brevibacillus laterosporus strain GI-9, isolated from a subsurface soil sample during a screen for novel strains producing antimicrobial compounds. The draft genome of this strain will aid in biotechnological exploitation and comparative genomics of Brevibacillus laterosporus strains.

  5. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-01-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions…

  6. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-01-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions…

  7. GI Bill Offers Military Children Relief from College Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2013-01-01

    As a new GI Bill moved through Congress in 2008, a handful of influential politicians grew concerned. Would such a generous education program trigger an exodus of service members during two wars? At the Pentagon's urging, the lawmakers proposed a fix: Give troops the option to transfer their benefits to a child or spouse. That policy quickly…

  8. The New GI Bill Is No Match for the Original

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Milton

    2008-01-01

    In June, Congress enacted the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act, commonly called the GI Bill of Rights for the 21st Century. Supporters claim that it does for current veterans what was done for those who served in World War II. The expansion of educational benefits to veterans should be applauded. Any attempt to equate the economic and…

  9. Empty Promise: Black American Veterans and the New GI Bill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottley, Alford H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2008 GI Bill offers college funds for veterans. Yet Black male vets are not taking advantage of these benefits. This chapter examines personal and societal problems that hinder access to higher education for Black vets, and suggests some ways adult educators can advocate for these young men.

  10. The New GI Bill Is No Match for the Original

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Milton

    2008-01-01

    In June, Congress enacted the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act, commonly called the GI Bill of Rights for the 21st Century. Supporters claim that it does for current veterans what was done for those who served in World War II. The expansion of educational benefits to veterans should be applauded. Any attempt to equate the economic and…

  11. Improving care and treatment options for women and girls with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Roshni

    2015-12-01

    Women and girls may experience increased bleeding symptoms as carriers of haemophilia. They can also be affected by other hereditary bleeding diatheses such as von Willebrand disease, platelet dysfunction defects or deficiencies of coagulation factors (F) such as FI, FII, FV, FVII, FX, FXI and FXIII. In addition to general bleeding symptoms, such disorders pose unique problems for women due to their impact on reproductive health. Women and adolescent girls with undiagnosed bleeding disorders frequently experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB; menorrhagia), leading to impairment of daily activities. Other gynaecological and obstetric manifestations, for example miscarriage, bleeding during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), can occur. Treatment for HMB should consider patient wishes relating to preservation of fertility, and management options include hormonal measures, desmopressin, antifibrinolytics, platelet concentrate transfusions and clotting factor therapy. During pregnancy, monitoring clotting factor levels informs the need for prophylactic therapy; subsequent haemostatic cover can minimise PPH. Under-recognition of bleeding disorders in females may lead to inappropriate, or lack of, treatment. This may be avoided by increased disease awareness, prompt and accurate diagnosis, and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. This review considers the range of hereditary bleeding disorders that may affect women and adolescent girls, and their evaluation and management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Recombinant activated factor VII in the management of life-threatening bleeding in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hyllner, Monica; Houltz, Erik; Jeppsson, Anders

    2005-08-01

    Massive perioperative bleeding is a potential complication of cardiac surgery, and may persist despite conventional interventions. RFVIIa is being increasingly used as additional therapy, and the aim of the present study was to describe our experience with rFVIIa in the management of life-threatening bleeding in adult cardiac surgery. Retrospective chart review of 24 patients undergoing a variety of cardiac procedures was performed at Sahlgrenska University Hospital between January and August 2004. The patients developed life-threatening bleeding during or after surgery despite conventional medical therapy and transfusion of blood products, and received rFVIIa as additional therapy. RFVIIa was administered as a median bolus dose of 60 microg/kg. Nineteen patients received one dose of rFVIIa; the bleeding stopped or decreased in 18 of them. Five patients received repeated doses of rFVIIa. Fifteen patients were reexplored due to massive postoperative bleeding or cardiac tamponade and a surgical source of bleeding was identified in six of these patients. A statistically significant reduction in chest drain losses after administration of rFVIIa was demonstrated. No adverse reactions were noted. RFVIIa was successfully used as an additional therapy both during and after cardiac surgery, when bleeding was refractory to conventional methods. Bleeding stopped eventually in all patients and none of the patients exsanguinated.

  13. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Tissue vibration pulsatility for arterial bleeding detection using Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Kim, Eung-Hun; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-01-01

    Trauma is the number one cause of death among Americans between 1 and 44 years old, and exsanguination due to internal bleeding resulting from arterial injuries is a major factor in trauma deaths. We have evaluated the feasibility of using tissue vibration pulsatility in arterial bleeding detection. Eight femoral arteries from four juvenile pigs were punctured transcutaneously with a 6 or 9-French catheter. Also, 11 silicone vessels wrapped with turkey breast were placed in a pulsatile flow phantom and penetrated with an 18-gauge needle. The tissue vibration pulsatility was derived as a ratio of the maximum spectral energy from 200 to 2500 Hz of tissue vibration in systole over a baseline value in diastole. Then, the tissue vibration pulsatility index (TVPI) was defined as the maximum tissue vibration pulsatility value for each experimental condition. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed that the TVPI from injured vessels is significantly higher (p<0.005) than that of intact vessels. In addition, we constructed the 2D map of tissue vibration pulsatility during in vitro studies and found that it could be used for spatial localization of the puncture site. Our preliminary results indicate that the tissue vibration pulsatility may be useful for detecting arterial bleeding and localizing the bleeding site.

  15. Fluorophore-conjugated antibodies for imaging and resection of GI tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-03-01

    Negative surgical margins are critical to prevent recurrence in cancer surgery. This is because with current technology in many cases negative margins are impossible due the inability of the surgeon to detect the margin. Our laboratory has developed fluorophore-labeled monoclonal antibodies to aid in cancer visualization in orthotopic nude mouse models of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer in order to achieve negative margins in fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS). The technologies described herein have the potential to change the paradigm of surgical oncology to engender significantly improved outcomes.

  16. In silico predictions of gastrointestinal drug absorption in pharmaceutical product development: application of the mechanistic absorption model GI-Sim.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Westergren, Jan; Grant, Iain; Hanisch, Gunilla; Lindfors, Lennart; Lennernäs, Hans; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Tannergren, Christer

    2013-07-16

    Oral drug delivery is the predominant administration route for a major part of the pharmaceutical products used worldwide. Further understanding and improvement of gastrointestinal drug absorption predictions is currently a highly prioritized area of research within the pharmaceutical industry. The fraction absorbed (fabs) of an oral dose after administration of a solid dosage form is a key parameter in the estimation of the in vivo performance of an orally administrated drug formulation. This study discloses an evaluation of the predictive performance of the mechanistic physiologically based absorption model GI-Sim. GI-Sim deploys a compartmental gastrointestinal absorption and transit model as well as algorithms describing permeability, dissolution rate, salt effects, partitioning into micelles, particle and micelle drifting in the aqueous boundary layer, particle growth and amorphous or crystalline precipitation. Twelve APIs with reported or expected absorption limitations in humans, due to permeability, dissolution and/or solubility, were investigated. Predictions of the intestinal absorption for different doses and formulations were performed based on physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, such as solubility in buffer and simulated intestinal fluid, molecular weight, pK(a), diffusivity and molecule density, measured or estimated human effective permeability and particle size distribution. The performance of GI-Sim was evaluated by comparing predicted plasma concentration-time profiles along with oral pharmacokinetic parameters originating from clinical studies in healthy individuals. The capability of GI-Sim to correctly predict impact of dose and particle size as well as the in vivo performance of nanoformulations was also investigated. The overall predictive performance of GI-Sim was good as >95% of the predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max) and AUC) were within a 2-fold deviation from the clinical observations and the predicted plasma AUC

  17. Common data items in seven European oesophagogastric cancer surgery registries: towards a European upper GI cancer audit (EURECCA Upper GI).

    PubMed

    de Steur, W O; Henneman, D; Allum, W H; Dikken, J L; van Sandick, J W; Reynolds, J; Mariette, C; Jensen, L; Johansson, J; Kolodziejczyk, P; Hardwick, R H; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-03-01

    Seven countries (Denmark, France, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, United Kingdom) collaborated to initiate a EURECCA (European Registration of Cancer Care) Upper GI project. The aim of this study was to identify a core dataset of shared items in the different data registries which can be used for future collaboration between countries. Item lists from all participating Upper GI cancer registries were collected. Items were scored 'present' when included in the registry, or when the items could be deducted from other items in the registry. The definition of a common item was that it was present in at least six of the seven participating countries. The number of registered items varied between 40 (Poland) and 650 (Ireland). Among the 46 shared items were data on patient characteristics, staging and diagnostics, neoadjuvant treatment, surgery, postoperative course, pathology, and adjuvant treatment. Information on non-surgical treatment was available in only 4 registries. A list of 46 shared items from seven participating Upper GI cancer registries was created, providing a basis for future quality assurance and research in Upper GI cancer treatment on a European level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy.

  19. Embolization as treatment of choice for bleeding peptic ulcers in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Raoul; Bosscha, Koop; van Munster, Ivo P; de Jager, Cornelis P C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2009-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are the most common cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings in the digestive tract. Most patients are poor surgical candidates. The aim was to describe the efficacy of embolization as the treatment of choice for bleeding peptic ulcers in high-risk patients when endoscopic treatment failed. All patients who underwent a selective embolization of branches of the superior mesenteric artery and/or branches of the gastroduodenal artery for a bleeding peptic ulcer in the period January 2004 until December 2007 were included in this retrospective descriptive study. We examined the known risk factors for surgery and mortality in upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to peptic ulcers and describe the clinical course and outcome. Primary endpoints were the primary technical success and the clinical success rates. The secondary endpoint was the 30-day mortality. 16 patients were included. All patients had at least two risk factors for surgery and mortality. The clinical success rate was 81% (13/16). The first embolization failed in 3 patients, 1 was successful re-embolized and 2 were operated upon without re-embolization. The primary technical success rate, i.e. bleedings controlled by radiologic intervention, was 88% (14/16). 6 patients died due to non-embolization-related problems; 5 of them developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding during a stay in the hospital. Embolization was a successful, minimal invasive alternative for surgical intervention in high-risk patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding after failure of endoscopic treatment. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Treatment modalities for bleeding esophagogastric varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Masato; Hirakata, Atsushi; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Ueda, Junji; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices (EVs) or gastric varices (GVs) is a catastrophic complication of chronic liver disease. In this paper, we review the management of bleeding EVs and GVs. DIAGNOSIS OF EVS AND GVS: The grading system for esophagogastric varices proposed by the Japan Society for Portal Hypertension classifies GVs into those involving the cardia (Lg-c), the fundus (Lg-f), and both the cardia and the fundus (Lg-cf). In this review, we divide GVs into 2 categories: Lg-c (cardiac varices: CVs) and Lg-cf or Lg-f (fundal varices: FVs). TREATMENT MODALITIES FOR EVS AND GVS: Treatment modalities for EVs and GVs include placement of a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, pharmacologic therapy, surgery, interventional radiology, and endoscopic treatment. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING EVS AND GVS: In Japan, endoscopic treatment has recently become the therapy of choice for bleeding EVs or GVs. In other countries, especially the United States, vasoactive drugs and endoscopic treatment are routinely used to manage variceal hemorrhage. BLEEDING EVS: Endoscopic variceal ligation is useful for controlling bleeding from EVs. However, confirmation of ligation precisely at the site of bleeding is usually difficult in patients with massive variceal bleeding. The site of acute bleeding can generally be identified by means of water instillation and suction. Ligation is then performed at the bleeding point. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube is used as a temporary bridge to other treatments. Transportal obliteration is useful for blocking variceal blood flow. BLEEDING GVS: Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy with a tissue adhesive, such as N-butyl-cyanoacrylate or isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate, is effective for acute bleeding from GVs. However, bleeding from the GV injection site and rebleeding from the rupture point have been reported in patients receiving endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube

  1. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding as the First Manifestation of Wegener’s Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Zobeiri, Mehdi; Salesi, Mansour; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis is an uncommon inflammatory disease that manifests as vasculitis, granulomatosis, and necrosis. It usually involves the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Although it may essentially involve any organ, gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is notably uncommon. A 20-year-old male patient presented with epigastric pain, vomiting, hematemesis, and melena. On physical examination, he was pale. There was no abdominal tenderness or organomegaly. Upper GI endoscopy revealed dark blue-colored infiltrative lesions in prepyloric area. Evaluation of the biopsy sample showed mononuclear cell infiltration in the submucosal area, hyperplastic polyp, and chronic gastritis. High dose proton pump inhibitor and adjunctive supportive measures were given but no change in the follow-up endoscopy was detected. During hospital course, he developed intermittent fever and serum creatinine elevation. 12 days after admission, he developed dyspnea, tachypnea, and painful swelling of metacarpophalangeal joints, and maculopapular rash in extensor surface of the right forearm. Chest radiography showed pulmonary infiltration. Serum c-ANCA titer was strongly positive and skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The patient received methylprednisolone pulse, which resulted in complete recovery of symptoms and gastric lesion. The present case indicates that GI bleeding may be the first manifestation of Wegener’s granulomatosis. Moreover, it should be emphasized that gastric biopsy is not characteristic or diagnostic in such patients. PMID:27698975

  2. Persistent Bleeding After Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sulo, Suela; Miller, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In our clinical experience, there seemed to be a correlation between cervical stump bleeding and adenomyosis. Therefore, we wanted to conduct a study to determine whether there was an actual correlation and to identify other risk factors for persistent bleeding after a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: The study included women who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data were collected on age, postmenopausal status, body mass index (BMI), uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), presence of endometriosis, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, presence of endocervix in the specimen, and postoperative bleeding. Results: The study included 256 patients, of whom 187 had no postoperative bleeding after the operation, 40 had bleeding within 12 weeks, and 29 had bleeding after 12 weeks. The 3 groups were comparable in BMI, postmenopausal status, uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, BSO, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, and the presence of endocervix. However, patients who had postoperative bleeding at more than 12 weeks were significantly younger (P = .002) and had a higher rate of endometriosis (P < .001). Conclusions: Risks factors for postoperative bleeding from the cervical stump include a younger age at the time of hysterectomy and the presence of endometriosis. Therefore, younger patients and those with endometriosis who desire to have no further vaginal bleeding may benefit from total hysterectomy over supracervical hysterectomy. All patients who are undergoing supracervical hysterectomy should be counseled about the possible alternatives, benefits, and risks, including continued vaginal bleeding from the cervical stump and the possibility of requiring future treatment and procedures. PMID:25516706

  3. Persistent bleeding after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kirsten J; Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sulo, Suela; Miller, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    In our clinical experience, there seemed to be a correlation between cervical stump bleeding and adenomyosis. Therefore, we wanted to conduct a study to determine whether there was an actual correlation and to identify other risk factors for persistent bleeding after a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. The study included women who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data were collected on age, postmenopausal status, body mass index (BMI), uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), presence of endometriosis, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, presence of endocervix in the specimen, and postoperative bleeding. The study included 256 patients, of whom 187 had no postoperative bleeding after the operation, 40 had bleeding within 12 weeks, and 29 had bleeding after 12 weeks. The 3 groups were comparable in BMI, postmenopausal status, uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, BSO, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, and the presence of endocervix. However, patients who had postoperative bleeding at more than 12 weeks were significantly younger (P = .002) and had a higher rate of endometriosis (P < .001). Risks factors for postoperative bleeding from the cervical stump include a younger age at the time of hysterectomy and the presence of endometriosis. Therefore, younger patients and those with endometriosis who desire to have no further vaginal bleeding may benefit from total hysterectomy over supracervical hysterectomy. All patients who are undergoing supracervical hysterectomy should be counseled about the possible alternatives, benefits, and risks, including continued vaginal bleeding from the cervical stump and the possibility of requiring future treatment and procedures.

  4. [Interventional Radiological Treatment of Intercostal Artery Bleedings - a Retrospective Analysis].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Patrick; Meyer, Carsten; Thomas, Daniel; Schild, Hans Heinz; Pieper, Claus Christian

    2017-08-01

    Background Intercostal artery bleedings are potentially fatal injuries. Apart from conservative and surgical treatment options, emergency interventional radiological treatment can also be performed. We report our experience with emergency intercostal artery embolisation. Materials and Methods Patients with acute arterial bleedings from the intercostal artery who were treated interventionally over a period of 7 years were identified retrospectively. Technical and clinical success, clinical and procedural parameters as well as overall survival were analysed. Results Between 2010 and 2017, a total of 27 embolisation procedures was performed in 24 patients (14 male, mean age 65.7 ± 13.9 years). The majority of patients suffered from iatrogenic intercostal artery bleedings (n = 17; 70.1%; especially after thoracocentesis). In five cases, thoracoscopic surgery was attempted prior to intervention but was unsuccessful. Primary technical success was obtained in 25/27 interventions. In two cases, there was re-bleeding via collateral arteries so that re-intervention became necessary (secondary technical success). In 15 cases, secondary surgery after successful interventional treatment was necessary to evacuate the haematoma/haemothorax. Intercostal artery embolisation was clinically successful in 23/24 patients. One patient died despite technically successful embolisation, due to extensive haemothorax. One case of spinal ischaemia was observed as a major complication. Conclusion Intercostal artery embolisation is an effective interventional radiological emergency measure in patients with acute bleeding and is an alternative to surgical treatment even after attempted, unsuccessful surgery. Because of potentially severe complications, the interventional procedure should be performed by an experienced interventionalist. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. [Impaired hemostasis as a cause of intensified bleeding after heart surgery with extracorporeal blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Morozov, Iu A; Charnaia, M A; Gladysheva, V G

    2004-01-01

    The paper contains the results of a retrospective analysis of causes for an intensified bleeding in patients operated on the heart with artificial blood circulation. An affected hemostasis plasma chain, i.e. insufficiency of blood coagulation factors due to hemodelution, hypofibrinogenemia etc., provoked the above disorder in 39% of patients with a higher postoperative bleeding. Additional reasons for the impaired hemostasis chain included: the "heparin-rebound" phenomenon (3.4%), activation of the secondary fibrinolysis (3.4%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (0.14%). Finally, an undiagnosed inadequate surgical hemostasis provoked an intense bleeding in 19.5% of cases.

  6. The international normalized ratio does not reflect bleeding risk in esophageal variceal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hshieh, Tammy T; Kaung, Aung; Hussain, Syed; Curry, Michael P; Sundaram, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    The international normalized ratio (INR) has not been validated as a predictor of bleeding risk in cirrhotics. The aim of this study was to determine whether elevation in the INR correlated with risk of esophageal variceal hemorrhage and whether correction of the INR prior to endoscopic therapy affects failure to control bleeding. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. Cases were cirrhotics admitted to the hospital due to bleeding esophageal varices. Controls were cirrhotics with a history of non-bleeding esophageal varices admitted with ascites or encephalopathy. All variceal bleeders were treated with octreotide, antibiotics, and band ligation. Failure to control bleeding was defined according to the Baveno V criteria. We analyzed 74 cases and 74 controls. The mean INR at presentation was lower in those with bleeding varices compared to non-bleeders (1.61 vs 1.74, P = 0.03). Those with bleeding varices had higher serum sodium (136.1 vs 133.8, P = 0.02), lower hemoglobin (9.59 vs 11.0, P < 0.001), and lower total bilirubin (2.47 vs 5.50, P < 0.001). Multivariable logistic regression showed total bilirubin to inversely correlate with bleeding (OR = 0.74). Bleeders received a mean of 1.14 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) prior to endoscopy (range 0-11 units). Of the 14 patients (20%) with failure to control bleeding, median INR (1.8 vs 1.5, P = 0.02) and median units of FFP transfused (2 vs 0, P = 0.01) were higher than those with hemostasis after the initial endoscopy. The INR reflects liver dysfunction, not bleeding risk. Correction of INR with FFP has little effect on hemostasis.

  7. The soil microbiome at the Gi-FACE experiment responds to a moisture gradient but not to CO2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Müller, Christoph; Clipson, Nicholas; Doyle, Evelyn

    2016-09-01

    The soil bacterial community at the Giessen free-air CO2 enrichment (Gi-FACE) experiment was analysed by tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. No substantial effects of CO2 levels on bacterial community composition were detected. However, the soil moisture gradient at Gi-FACE had a significant effect on bacterial community composition. Different groups within the Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia phyla were affected differently by soil moisture content. These results suggest that modest increases in atmospheric CO2 may cause only minor changes in soil bacterial community composition and indicate that the functional responses of the soil community to CO2 enrichment previously reported at Gi-FACE are due to factors other than changes in bacterial community composition. The effects of the moisture gradient revealed new information about the relationships between poorly known Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and soil moisture content. This study contrasts with the relatively small number of other temperate grassland free-air CO2 enrichment microbiome studies in the use of moderate CO2 enrichment and the resulting minor changes in the soil microbiome. Thus, it will facilitate the development of further climate change mitigation studies. In addition, the moisture gradient found at Gi-FACE contributes new knowledge in soil microbial ecology, particularly regarding the abundance and moisture relationships of the soil Verrucomicrobia.

  8. SPECT/CT with a hybrid imaging system in the study of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with technetium-99m red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, O; Spanu, A; Tagliabue, L; Filippi, L; Danieli, R; Palumbo, B; Del Sole, A; Madeddu, G

    2009-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a complex clinical problem that requires disciplined evaluation for successful management. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding undergoing scintigraphy with 99mTc-labelled red blood cells (RBC), and to assess the additional clinical value of fused images when compared to the standard radionuclide scan. Twenty-seven patients presenting with acute lower GI tract hemorrhage were studied with conventional dynamic and planar 99mTc-RBC imaging. In 19 patients with positive findings on scans taken within 6 hours, a SPECT/CT study was immediately performed using a hybrid system composed of a dual-head, variable angle gamma camera and an X-ray tube. The number of patients in whom SPECT/CT changed the scintigraphic interpretation with regard to the presence or site of GI blood loss as confirmed by other diagnostic or therapeutical procedures was recorded. Image fusion was easy and successful in all patients showing perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data and allowing precise anatomical localization of the sites of 99mTc-RBC extravasation. SPECT/CT had significant impact on the scintigraphic results in 7/19 patients (36.8%): in 6 patients it precisely localized the bleeding foci whose location could not be identified in standard scans and in one it excluded the presence of an active GI hemorrhage. SPECT/CT with a hybrid system is feasible and useful for facilitating imaging interpretation and improving the accuracy of 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy in patients with acute lower GI bleeding.

  9. Crystal structures of GI.8 Boxer virus P dimers in complex with HBGAs, a novel evolutionary path selected by the Lewis epitope.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ning; Chen, Yutao; Xia, Ming; Tan, Ming; Liu, Wu; Guan, Xiaotao; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2015-02-01

    Human noroviruses (huNoVs) recognize histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as attachment factors, in which genogroup (G) I and GII huNoVs use distinct binding interfaces. The genetic and evolutionary relationships of GII huNoVs under selection by the host HBGAs have been well elucidated via a number of structural studies; however, such relationships among GI NoVs remain less clear due to the fact that the structures of HBGA-binding interfaces of only three GI NoVs with similar binding profiles are known. In this study the crystal structures of the P dimers of a Lewis-binding strain, the GI.8 Boxer virus (BV) that does not bind the A and H antigens, in complex with the Lewis b (Le(b)) and Le(y) antigens, respectively, were determined and compared with those of the three previously known GI huNoVs, i.e. GI.1 Norwalk virus (NV), GI.2 FUV258 (FUV) and GI.7 TCH060 (TCH) that bind the A/H/Le antigens. The HBGA binding interface of BV is composed of a conserved central binding pocket (CBP) that interacts with the β-galactose of the precursor, and a well-developed Le epitope-binding site formed by five amino acids, including three consecutive residues from the long P-loop and one from the S-loop of the P1 subdomain, a feature that was not seen in the other GI NoVs. On the other hand, the H epitope/acetamido binding site observed in the other GI NoVs is greatly degenerated in BV. These data explain the evolutionary path of GI NoVs selected by the polymorphic human HBGAs. While the CBP is conserved, the regions surrounding the CBP are flexible, providing freedom for changes. The loss or degeneration of the H epitope/acetamido binding site and the reinforcement of the Le binding site of the GI.8 BV is a typical example of such change selected by the host Lewis epitope.

  10. Myths, fallacies and practical pearls in GI lab

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Many prevalent practices and guidelines related to Gastrointestinal endoscopy and procedural sedation are at odds with the widely available scientific-physiological and clinical outcome data. In many institutions, strict policy of pre-procedural extended fasting is still rigorously enforced, despite no evidence of increased incidence of aspiration after recent oral intake prior to sedation. Supplemental oxygen administration in the setting of GI procedural sedation has been increasingly adopted as reported in the medical journals, despite clear evidence that supplemental oxygen blunts the usefulness of pulse oximetry in timely detection of sedation induced hypoventilation, leading to increased number of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes. Use of Propofol by Gastroenterologist-Nurse team is erroneously considered dangerous and often prohibited in various institutions, at the same time worldwide reports of remarkable safety and patient satisfaction continue to be published, dating back more than a decade. Of patient monitoring practices that have been advocated to be standard, many merely add cost, not value. Advances in the technology often are not incorporated in a timely manner in guidelines or clinical practices, e.g., Capsule endoscopy or electrocautery during GI procedures do not interfere with proper functioning of the current pacemakers or defibrillators. Orthopedic surgeons have continued to recommend prophylactic antibiotics for joint replacement patients prior to GI procedures, without any evidence of need. These myths are explored for a succint review to prompt a change in clinical practices and institutional policies. PMID:25512767

  11. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk intensive care unit patients receiving antacid prophylaxis: frequency and significance.

    PubMed

    Derrida, S; Nury, B; Slama, R; Marois, F; Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Sicot, C

    1989-02-01

    Gastroccult reagent was used every 4 h to detect blood in gastric juice in 41 ICU patients at risk of GI bleeding (GB) and receiving antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5). Of the present patients, 27% (11/41) had at least one episode of occult GB (three consecutive positive determinations; a total of 14 episodes). Endoscopy identified acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions (stress ulcers) as the most frequent lesion in this group (eight patients). Sepsis was the most frequent underlying condition associated with occult GB due to stress ulcer. Hematemesis occurred in 36% (4/11) of patients with occult GB and was due to stress ulcer in three patients and to benign gastric tumor in one. No overt GB occurred in the absence of previous occult GB. We conclude that: a) risk of GB persists in critically ill ICU patients in spite of antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5); b) high-risk patients can be identified through periodic testing for the presence of blood in gastric juice using the reagent; c) when occult GB occurs, treatment should be based on the endoscopy results. In the absence of acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions, antacid prophylaxis should not be modified, and specific treatment of the identified lesion(s) should be initiated. In the presence of stress lesions, antacid prophylaxis should be reinforced if the pH of the gastric content is less than 3.5 and a septic complication should be actively sought if the pH is greater than 3.5.

  12. Making decisions using radiology in lower GI hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Assad; Young, Christopher John

    2016-07-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common diagnosis in current practice that may warrant hospitalization and invasive management. There is a shift in the paradigm in the management of this condition away from traditional extensive operative intervention to minimally invasive radiological techniques. These newer modalities offer an opportunity to provide more accurate information on location of bleeding and subsequent management. The increased ease of access to interventional radiology units in major teaching hospitals represents an opportunity to adopt its use in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Further, with technological improvements, it is becoming an increasingly favoured option. Traditional endoscopic techniques have been fraught with poor vision in the acute setting, requiring the colon to be purged to aide in better visualization. The use of these newer technologies have been the subject of many reviews which highlight their efficacy in providing a road map to the bleeding site and eventual intervention. We aim to review the literature regarding the use of radiology in the management of LGIB, to provide surgeons with a discourse with regards to the approach in synthesizing the data and applying it when deciding its use.

  13. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  15. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    SciTech Connect

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  16. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  17. Missed bleeding events after ticagrelor in PEGASUS trial: Massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both?

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor; Tomek, Ales

    2016-07-15

    PEGASUS trial reported reduction of composite primary endpoint after conventional 180mg/daily ticagrelor (CT), and lower 120mg/daily dose ticagrelor (LT) at expense of extra bleeding. Following approval of CT and LT for long-term secondary prevention indication, recent FDA review verified some bleeding outcomes in PEGASUS. To compare the risks after CT and LT against placebo by seven TIMI scale variables, and 9 bleeding categories considered as serious adverse events (SAE) in light of PEGASUS drug discontinuation rates (DDR). The DDR in all PEGASUS arms was high reaching astronomical 32% for CT. The distribution of some outcomes (TIMI major, trauma, epistaxis, iron deficiency, hemoptysis, and anemia) was reasonable. However, the TIMI minor events were heavily underreported when compared to similar trials. Other bleedings (intracranial, spontaneous, hematuria, and gastrointestinal) appear sporadic, lacking expected dose-dependent impact of CT and LT. Few SAE outcomes (fatal, ecchymosis, hematoma, bruises, bleeding) paradoxically reported more bleeding after LT than after CT. Many bleeding outcomes were probably missed in PEGASUS potentially due to massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both. The FDA must improve reporting of trial outcomes especially in the sponsor-controlled environment when DDR and incomplete follow-up rates are high.

  18. Risk factors of late rectal bleeding after carbon ion therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi . E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Kamada, Tadashi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity after hypofractionated carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2000 and November 2003, a Phase II clinical trial of C-ion RT with a total dose of 66 GyE in 20 fractions was performed on 175 patients with prostate cancer, and the correlations of clinical and dosimetric parameters with the incidence of late GI toxicity in 172 patients who survived for more than 18 months were investigated. Results: Although no Grade 3-4 late morbidities of the rectum were observed, Grade 1 and 2 morbidities developed in 23 (13%) and 4 (2%) patients, respectively. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that the percentage of rectal volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V50) was significantly higher in patients with rectal toxicity than without toxicity (13.2 {+-} 5.6% with toxicity; 11.4 {+-} 4.0% without toxicity, p = 0.046). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of anticoagulation therapy (p = 0.010) and rectal V50 (p = 0.012) were significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 1-2 late GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although C-ion RT with hypofractionation yielded favorable results regarding late GI complication, dosimetric parameter was a very important factor in the occurrence of rectal bleeding after C-ion RT as well as photon beam RT. Our results provide useful information for physicians applying charged particle RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Leukemia following radiotherapy for uterine bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Monson, R.R.; Wagoner, J.K.; Stovall, M.; Davis, F.G.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Mortality due to leukemia among 4483 women treated with radiation to control uterine bleeding between 1925 and 1965 was twice as high as expected based on U.S. population rates (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4 to 2.8). Women were followed for an average of 26.4 years. Relative risk was highest 2 to 5 years after treatment (SMR = 8.1) and among women over 55 years at irradiation (SMR = 5.8). The usual method of treatment was intrauterine radium. Average radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated on the basis of original radiotherapy records (median, 53 cGy). A linear dose-response model provided an adequate fit to the data. The average excess relative risk was 1.9% per cGy (95% CI: 0.8 to 3.2), and the average absolute risk was 2.6 excess leukemia deaths per million women per year per cGy (95% CI: 0.9 to 4.8). Chronic myeloid leukemia predominated during the first 15 years following exposure, whereas acute leukemias and chronic lymphatic leukemia were most common thereafter. The radiation doses experienced during treatment of benign gynecologic disease appear to result in greater leukemia risk per cGy average marrow dose than the considerably higher doses used to treat malignant disease, perhaps because of a decreased likelihood of killing potentially leukemic cells.

  20. Bleeding time in uremia: a useful test to assess clinical bleeding.

    PubMed

    Steiner, R W; Coggins, C; Carvalho, A C

    1979-01-01

    Modified Ivy bleeding time (template) and platelet aggregation to ADP, epinephrine, and collagen were studied in 26 uremic patients who had not recently ingested anti-platelet drugs. Regardless of the aggregating agent used, the abnormalities in platelet aggregation were often mild, even with advanced uremia, and frequently less severe than the effects of common anti-platelet drugs. The inhibition of collagen-induced aggregation was significantly correlated with both increased bleeding time and blood urea nitrogen. Platelet aggregation was not discriminative between clinically bleeding and non-bleeding groups of patients, but the bleeding time was helpful in this regard. In certain cases, the aggregometric patterns differed between drug-induced and uremic thrombocytopathies. Platelet aggregometry appears to be of little help clinically in assessing the severity of the uremic bleeding diathesis.

  1. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  3. Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-05-01

    We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

  4. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  5. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre.

  6. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (DAPT) versus No Antiplatelet Therapy and Incidence of Major Bleeding in Patients on Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Dawid L; Biever, Paul M; Benk, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Wengenmayer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding is a frequent complication in patients on venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). An indication for dual antiplatelet therapy due to coronary stent implantation is present in a considerable number of these patients. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate if dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) significantly increases the high intrinsic bleeding risk in patients on VA-ECMO. A total of 93 patients were treated with VA-ECMO between October 2010 and October 2013. Average time on VA-ECMO was 58.9 ± 1.7 hours. Dual antiplatelet therapy was given to 51.6% of all patients. Any bleeding was recorded in 60.2% of all patients. There was no difference in bleeding incidence in patients on DAPT when compared to those without any antiplatelet therapy including any bleeding (66.7% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.35), BARC3 bleeding (43.8% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.31) or pulmonary bleeding (16.7% vs. 19.0%, p = 0.77). This holds true after adjustment for confounders. Rate of transfusion of red blood cells were similar in patients with or without DAPT (35.4% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.488). Bleeding on VA-ECMO is frequent. This registry recorded no statistical difference in bleeding in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy when compared to no antiplatelet therapy. When indicated, DAPT should not be withheld from VA ECMO patients.

  7. Uterine bleeding in postmenopausal women on continuous therapy with estradiol and norethindrone acetate. Endometrium Study Group.

    PubMed

    Archer, D F; Dorin, M H; Heine, W; Nanavati, N; Arce, J C

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the incidence of uterine bleeding during 12 months of treatment with 17beta-estradiol (E2) 1 mg, unopposed or in combination with three doses of norethindrone acetate. This study was a prospective, double-masked, randomized, multicenter trial. A total of 1176 healthy postmenopausal women age 45 years and older without evidence of endometrial abnormalities were randomly assigned to receive either unopposed E2 1 mg, or continuous-combined formulations of E2 1 mg and norethindrone acetate 0.1 mg, 0.25 mg, or 0.5 mg. Any spotting or bleeding episodes during the treatment period were recorded in a daily diary and reported by weekly telephone calls. The incidence of bleeding was low in the combination groups, even during the initial 3 months of treatment (24-28%), after which it decreased with increasing doses of norethindrone acetate. Conversely, the incidence of bleeding increased over time with unopposed E2 1 mg. After the initial 3 months, the incidence of bleeding among the combination groups was lowest in the norethindrone acetate 0.5 mg group. Among women initiating therapy close to menopause, fewer reported bleeding with norethindrone acetate 0.5 mg than with the other combination groups. There was a significantly (P<.05) lower discontinuation rate due to bleeding in the norethindrone acetate 0.5 mg group compared with all other treatment groups. Continuous-combined formulations of E2 1 mg with norethindrone acetate 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 mg are associated with a low incidence of uterine bleeding. After the initial 3 months of treatment, bleeding profiles improved with increasing doses of norethindrone acetate.

  8. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of a bleeding patient.

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, R O

    1989-01-01

    Most causes of abnormal bleeding can be determined from a complete blood count including platelet count and bleeding, prothrombin, activated partial thromboplastin, and thrombin times. Occasionally, further evaluation is necessary, such as tests of factor XIII function, fibrinolysis, and vascular integrity. Possible diagnoses include disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, vitamin K deficiency, von Willebrand's disease, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, acquired inhibitors of factor VIII, lupus anticoagulants, and coagulation disorders related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:2660407

  10. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    PubMed

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  11. Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting as Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Diana T; Kutny, Matthew A; Chewning, Joseph H; Arbuckle, Janeen L

    2017-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Relapse of ALL occurs in 15%-20% of patients, with 2%-6% occurring exclusively in extramedullary sites. Relapse of ALL in gynecologic organs is extremely rare. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a history of ALL who was referred to the pediatric gynecology clinic with abnormal uterine bleeding. She was determined to have an extramedullary uterine relapse of her ALL. Abnormal uterine bleeding in the setting of childhood malignancy is a frequent reason for consultation to pediatric and adolescent gynecology services. This bleeding is commonly attributed to thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow suppressive chemotherapeutic agents. However, as shown in this report, abnormal uterine bleeding might be a manifestation of an extramedullary relapse. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Periesophageal Pseudoaneurysms: Rare Cause of Refractory Bleeding Treated with Transarterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rachit D.; Komorowski, Daniel J.; Smallfield, George B.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus, prior cytomegalovirus esophagitis treated with ganciclovir, and long segment Barrett's esophagus (Prague class C8 M9) with high grade dysplasia treated with radiofrequency ablation presented to the hospital with hematemesis. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed multiple esophageal ulcers with active arterial spurting which could not be controlled with endoscopic interventions including placement of hemostatic clips. An emergent angiogram demonstrated actively bleeding saccular dilations (pseudoaneurysms) in the esophageal branches of the lower thoracic aorta as well as left gastric artery for which gelfoam and coil embolization was initially successful. Due to recurrence of massive bleeding, she subsequently underwent emergent esophagectomy and bipolar exclusion. Pathology demonstrated submucosal hemorrhage, esophagitis with dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, and an ulcer containing cytomegaloviral inclusions. We report the first case of arterial bleeding from periesophageal pseudoaneurysms as well as use of angiographic embolization for arterial bleeding in the esophagus. PMID:27812392

  13. [Thalidomide for recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge; Goecke, Helmuth; Rodríguez, M De Los Ángeles; Vergara, M Teresa

    2011-07-01

    Chronic hemodialysis patients may have recurrent bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, that often is diffusely located in the digestive tract or in places difficult to reach with traditional endoscopes. Therefore, they cannot be locally treated or removed. We report a 70 years old man on chronic hemodialysis, with severe and persistent anemia due to bleeding from angiodysplasia of the small bowel. Despite administration of high doses of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, intravenous iron, folate, B6 and B12 vitamins, his hemoglobin levels were < 6.5 g/dL, becoming totally dependent on transfusions of red blood cells (up to 46 units per year). Recurrent bleeding was refractory to conventional management and we decided to use thalidomide at doses of 50-100 mg/day achieving rapid control of gastrointestinal bleeding and significant increase of hemoglobin levels, not requiring further transfusions.

  14. Abnormal excessive per vagina (PV) bleeding on Esmya-selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) in a symptomatic patient with uterine fibroid.

    PubMed

    Matytsina-Quinlan, Lyubov; Matytsina, Laura

    2015-05-14

    A woman in her late 40s presented with excessive per vagina (PV) bleeding and uterine fibroid. She reported excessive PV bleeding after starting Esmya; she was brought in by ambulance to the emergency department with profuse bleeding. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) developed after selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) administration in this symptomatic patient with uterine fibroid. The drug was withheld and surgical treatment considered. Progressive deterioration of PV bleeding after receiving SPRM led to an urgent laparoscopic total hysterectomy, which had to be postponed due to severe anaemia. Surgery took place regardless because the excessive bleeding continued. Histology revealed a 6 cm submucosal uterine fibroid (SMUF) and adenomyosis. Physicians prescribing SPRMs to stop PV bleeding should be aware of potential AUB, which could lead to urgent hysterectomy. The mechanism of action of SPRMs is not clearly understood. Awareness of the side effects of Esmya, such as AUB, must be kept in mind when administering SPRMs. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. [Thrombocytic alpha-delta-storage-pool-disease: shortening of bleeding time after infusion of 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin].

    PubMed

    Kosch, A; Kehrel, B; Nowak-Göttl, U; Häberle, J; Jürgens, H

    1999-01-01

    The synthetic vasopressin derivate desmopressin (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin) has been reported to shorten the bleeding time in patients with hemophilia A, von Willebrand's disease and several functional platelet disorders. In addition to substitution of platelets, vasopressin is therefore used to prevent bleeding complications. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient with prolonged bleeding time due to the rare thrombocytic alpha-delta-storage-pool-disease. When normal donor platelet substitution alone was ineffective, bleeding time was normalised after infusion of desmopressin and elective wisdom-tooth extraction was performed without significant postoperative bleeding. Infusion of desmopressin appears to be effective in shortening bleeding time in thrombocytic storage-pool-disease. Its use could prevent bleeding complications after trauma and surgical interventions and may possibly help to spare the need for platelet concentrates.

  16. Coagulation factor activity and clinical bleeding severity in rare bleeding disorders: results from the European Network of Rare Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, F; Palla, R; Menegatti, M; Siboni, S M; Halimeh, S; Faeser, B; Pergantou, H; Platokouki, H; Giangrande, P; Peerlinck, K; Celkan, T; Ozdemir, N; Bidlingmaier, C; Ingerslev, J; Giansily-Blaizot, M; Schved, J F; Gilmore, R; Gadisseur, A; Benedik-Dolničar, M; Kitanovski, L; Mikovic, D; Musallam, K M; Rosendaal, F R

    2012-04-01

    The European Network of Rare Bleeding Disorders (EN-RBD) was established to bridge the gap between knowledge and practise in the care of patients with RBDs. To explore the relationship between coagulation factor activity level and bleeding severity in patients with RBDs. Cross-sectional study using data from 489 patients registered in the EN-RBD. Coagulation factor activity levels were retrieved. Clinical bleeding episodes were classified into four categories according to severity. The mean age of patients at data collection was 31 years (range, 7 months to 95 years), with an equal sex distribution. On linear regression analysis, there was a strong association between coagulation factor activity level and clinical bleeding severity for fibrinogen, factor (F) X, FXIII, and combined FV and FVIII deficiencies. A weaker association was present for FV and FVII deficiencies. There was no association between coagulation factor activity level and clinical bleeding severity for FXI. The coagulation factor activity levels that were necessary for patients to remain asymptomatic were: fibrinogen, > 100 mg dL(-1); FV, 12 U dL(-1); combined FV + VIII, 43 U dL(-1); FVII, 25 U dL(-1); FX, 56 U dL(-1) ; FXI, 26 U dL(-1); FXIII, 31 U dL(-1). Moreover, coagulation factor activity levels that corresponded with Grade III bleeding were: undetectable levels for fibrinogen, FV and FXIII, < 15 U dL(-1) for combined FV + VIII; < 8 U dL(-1) for FVI; < 10 U dL(-1) for FX; and < 25 U dL(-1) for FXI. There is a heterogeneous association between coagulation factor activity level and clinical bleeding severity in different RBDs. A strong association is only observed in fibrinogen, FX and FXIII deficiencies. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Training and competence assessment in GI endoscopy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ekkelenkamp, Vivian E; Koch, Arjun D; de Man, Robert A; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2016-04-01

    Training procedural skills in GI endoscopy once focused on threshold numbers. As threshold numbers poorly reflect individual competence, the focus gradually shifts towards a more individual approach. Tools to assess and document individual learning progress are being developed and incorporated in dedicated training curricula. However, there is a lack of consensus and training guidelines differ worldwide, which reflects uncertainties on optimal set-up of a training programme. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the currently available literature for the use of training and assessment methods in GI endoscopy. Second, we aimed to identify the role of simulator-based training as well as the value of continuous competence assessment in patient-based training. Third, we aimed to propose a structured training curriculum based on the presented evidence. A literature search was carried out in the available medical and educational literature databases. The results were systematically reviewed and studies were included using a predefined protocol with independent assessment by two reviewers and a final consensus round. The literature search yielded 5846 studies. Ninety-four relevant studies on simulators, assessment methods, learning curves and training programmes for GI endoscopy met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-seven studies on simulator validation were included. Good validity was demonstrated for four simulators. Twenty-three studies reported on simulator training and learning curves, including 17 randomised control trials. Increased performance on a virtual reality (VR) simulator was shown in all studies. Improved performance in patient-based assessment was demonstrated in 14 studies. Four studies reported on the use of simulators for assessment of competence levels. Current simulators lack the discriminative power to determine competence levels in patient-based endoscopy. Eight out of 14 studies on colonoscopy, endoscopic retrograde

  18. GI-axe: an access broker framework for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Nativi, S.; Santoro, M.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The efficient and effective discovery of heterogeneous geospatial resources (e.g. data and services) is currently addressed by implementing "Discovery Brokering components"—such as GI-cat which is successfully used by the GEO brokering framework. A related (and subsequent) problem is the access of discovered resources. As for the discovery case, there exists a clear challenge: the geospatial Community makes use of heterogeneous access protocols and data models. In fact, different standards (and best practices) are defined and used by the diverse Geoscience domains and Communities of practice. Besides, through a client application, Users want to access diverse data to be jointly used in a common Geospatial Environment (CGE): a geospatial environment characterized by a spatio-temporal CRS (Coordinate Reference System), resolution, and extension. Users want to define a CGE and get the selected data ready to be used in such an environment. Finally, they want to download data according to a common encoding (either binary or textual). Therefore, it is possible to introduce the concept of "Access Brokering component" which addresses all these intermediation needs, in a transparent way for both clients (i.e. Users) and access servers (i.e. Data Providers). This work presents GI-axe: a flexible Access Broker which is capable to intermediate the different access standards and to get data according to a CGE, previously specified by the User. In doing that, GI-axe complements the capabilities of the brokered access servers, in keeping with the brokering principles. Let's consider a sample use case of a User needing to access a global temperature dataset available online on a THREDDS Data Server and a rainfall dataset accessible through a WFS—she/he may have obtained the datasets as a search result from a discovery broker. Distribution information metadata accompanying the temperature dataset further indicate that a given OPeNDAP service has to be accessed to retrieve it

  19. Magnetic hyperthermia controlled drug release in the GI tract: solving the problem of detection

    PubMed Central

    Bear, Joseph C.; Patrick, P. Stephen; Casson, Alfred; Southern, Paul; Lin, Fang-Yu; Powell, Michael J.; Pankhurst, Quentin A.; Kalber, Tammy; Lythgoe, Mark; Parkin, Ivan P.; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly challenging due to the harsh environments any drug- delivery vehicle must experience before it releases it’s drug payload. Effective targeted drug delivery systems often rely on external stimuli to effect release, therefore knowing the exact location of the capsule and when to apply an external stimulus is paramount. We present a drug delivery system for the GI tract based on coating standard gelatin drug capsules with a model eicosane- superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle composite coating, which is activated using magnetic hyperthermia as an on-demand release mechanism to heat and melt the coating. We also show that the capsules can be readily detected via rapid X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vital for progressing such a system towards clinical applications. This also offers the opportunity to image the dispersion of the drug payload post release. These imaging techniques also influenced capsule content and design and the delivered dosage form. The ability to easily change design demonstrates the versatility of this system, a vital advantage for modern, patient-specific medicine. PMID:27671546

  20. Magnetic hyperthermia controlled drug release in the GI tract: solving the problem of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Joseph C.; Patrick, P. Stephen; Casson, Alfred; Southern, Paul; Lin, Fang-Yu; Powell, Michael J.; Pankhurst, Quentin A.; Kalber, Tammy; Lythgoe, Mark; Parkin, Ivan P.; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly challenging due to the harsh environments any drug- delivery vehicle must experience before it releases it’s drug payload. Effective targeted drug delivery systems often rely on external stimuli to effect release, therefore knowing the exact location of the capsule and when to apply an external stimulus is paramount. We present a drug delivery system for the GI tract based on coating standard gelatin drug capsules with a model eicosane- superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle composite coating, which is activated using magnetic hyperthermia as an on-demand release mechanism to heat and melt the coating. We also show that the capsules can be readily detected via rapid X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vital for progressing such a system towards clinical applications. This also offers the opportunity to image the dispersion of the drug payload post release. These imaging techniques also influenced capsule content and design and the delivered dosage form. The ability to easily change design demonstrates the versatility of this system, a vital advantage for modern, patient-specific medicine.

  1. Post-endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy bleeding: an interventional radiology approach.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Ruth; McCarthy, Eoghan; Joyce, Eimear; McEniff, Niall; Guiney, Michael; Ryan, J Mark; Beddy, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is an integral component of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Post-sphincterotomy hemorrhage is a recognized complication. First line treatment involves a variety of endoscopic techniques performed at the time of sphincterotomy. If these are not successful, transcatheter arterial embolization or open surgical vessel ligation are therapeutic considerations. To evaluate the technical and clinical success of transcatheter arterial embolization via micro coils in the management of bleeding post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES). An 8-year retrospective review of all patients referred for transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for management of post-ES bleeding not controlled by endoscopy was performed. We analyzed the findings at endoscopy, angiography, interventional procedure, and the technical and clinical success. Twelve embolization procedures were performed in 11 patients. Technical success was achieved in 11 of 12 procedures. Branches embolized included the gastroduodenal artery (GDA) in 11 cases, the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery (SPDA) in one case, and the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) in four cases. Clinical success was achieved in 10 of 11 patients. One patient was referred for surgical intervention due to rebleeding from the IPDA. Our experience demonstrates that TAE can effectively control bleeding post-ES avoiding the need for invasive surgery in most patients.

  2. Bleed-through and photobleaching correction in multiphoton FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides a tool to visualize the protein with high spatial and temporal resolution. In multi-photon FRET microscopy one experiences considerably less photobleaching compared to one-photon excitation since the illumination is the diffraction limited spot and the excitation is infrared-pulsed laser light. Because of the spectral overlap involved in the selection of the fluorophore pair for FRET imaging, the spectral bleed-through signal in the FRET channel is unavoidable. We describe in this paper the development of dedicated software to correct the bleed-through signal due to donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules. We used living cells expressed with BFP-RFP (DsRed)-C/EBP(alpha) proteins in the nucleus. We acquired images of different combinations like donor alone, acceptor alone, and both acceptor and donor under similar conditions. We statistically evaluated the percentage of bleed-through signal from one channel to the other based on the overlap areas of the spectra. We then reconstructed the images after applying the correction. Characterization of multi-photon FRET imaging system taking into account the intensity, dwell time, concentration of fluorophore pairs, objective lens and the excitation wavelength are described in this paper.

  3. Presacral venous bleeding during mobilization in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casal Núñez, Jose Enrique; Vigorita, Vincenzo; Ruano Poblador, Alejandro; Gay Fernández, Ana María; Toscano Novella, Maria Ángeles; Cáceres Alvarado, Nieves; Pérez Dominguez, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the anatomy of sacral venous plexus flow, the causes of injuries and the methods for controlling presacral hemorrhage during surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS A review of the databases MEDLINE® and Embase™ was conducted, and relevant scientific articles published between January 1960 and June 2016 were examined. The anatomy of the sacrum and its venous plexus, as well as the factors that influence bleeding, the causes of this complication, and its surgical management were defined. RESULTS This is a review of 58 published articles on presacral venous plexus injury during the mobilization of the rectum and on techniques used to treat presacral venous bleeding. Due to the lack of cases published in the literature, there is no consensus on which is the best technique to use if there is presacral bleeding during mobilization in surgery for rectal cancer. This review may provide a tool to help surgeons make decisions regarding how to resolve this serious complication. CONCLUSION A series of alternative treatments are described; however, a conventional systematic review in which optimal treatment is identified could not be performed because few cases were analyzed in most publications. PMID:28321171

  4. Photoacoustic simulation of microvessel bleeding: spectral analysis and its implication for monitoring vascular-targeted treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Hysi, Eno; Zalev, Jason; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    The destruction of blood vessels is a commonly used cancer therapeutic strategy. Bleeding consequently follows and leads to the accumulation of blood in the interstitium. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is well positioned to detect bleeding due to its sensitivity to hemoglobin. After treatment vascular disruption can occur within just a few hours, which leads to bleeding which might be detected using PA to assess therapeutic effectiveness. Deep micro-vessels cannot typically be resolved using acoustic-resolution PA. However, spectral analysis of PA signals may still permit assessment of bleeding. This paper introduces a theoretical model to simulate the PA signals from disrupted vessels using a fractal model. The fractal model uses bifurcated-cylinder bases to represent vascular trees. Vessels have circular absorption cross-sections. To mimic bleeding from blood vessels, the diffusion of hemoglobin from micro-vessels was simulated. The PA signals were computed and in the simulations were detected using a linear array transducer (30 MHz center frequency) for four different vascular trees (at 256 axial spatial locations/tree). The Fourier Transform of each beam-formed PA signal was computed and the power spectra were fitted to a straight line within the -6 dB bandwidth of the receiving transducer. When comparing the power spectra before and after simulated bleeding, the spectral slope and mid-band fit (MBF) parameters decreased by 0.12 dB/MHz and 2.12 dB, while the y-intercept did not change after 1 hour of simulated bleeding. The results suggest that spectral PA analysis is sensitive to changes in the concentration and spatial distribution of hemoglobin in tissue, and changes due to bleeding can be detected without the need to resolve individual vessels. The simulations support the applicability of PA imaging in cancer treatment monitoring by detecting micro-vessel disruption.

  5. THROMBIN GENERATION AND BLEEDING IN HEMOPHILIA A

    PubMed Central

    Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Whelihan, Matthew F.; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth G.; Rivard, Georges E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A displays phenotypic heterogeneity with respect to clinical severity. Aim To determine if tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation profiles in whole blood in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) are predictive of bleeding risk in hemophilia A. Methods We studied factor(F) VIII deficient individuals (11 mild, 4 moderate and 12 severe) with a well-characterized five-year bleeding history that included hemarthrosis, soft tissue hematoma and annual FVIII concentrate usage. This clinical information was used to generate a bleeding score. The bleeding scores (range 0–32) were separated into three groups (bleeding score groupings: 0, 0 and ≤9.6, >9.6), with the higher bleeding tendency having a higher score. Whole blood collected by phlebotomy and contact pathway suppressed by 100μg/mL CTI was stimulated to react by the addition of 5pM TF. Reactions were quenched at 20min by inhibitors. Thrombin generation, determined by ELISA for thrombin – antithrombin was evaluated in terms of clot time (CT), maximum level (MaxL) and maximum rate (MaxR) and compared to the bleeding score. Results Data are shown as the mean±SD. MaxL was significantly different (p<0.001) between the groups: 504±114nM, 315±117nM, and 194±91nM; with higher thrombin concentrations in the groups with lower bleeding scores. MaxR was higher in the groups with a lower bleeding score; 97±51nM/min, 86±60nM/min and 39±16nM/min (p=0.09). No significant difference was detected in CT among the groups, 5.6±1.3min, 4.7±0.7min, 5.6±1.3min. Conclusions Our empirical study in CTI-inhibited whole blood shows that the MaxL of thrombin generation appears to correlate with the bleeding phenotype of hemophilia A. PMID:19563500

  6. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-12-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions of the story are quite inaccurate historically. The reality is more complex than the usual accounts have it. This article sets out to disentangle fact from fiction.

  7. Histopathological Findings of Endometrial Samples and its Correlation Between the Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Women in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Makaju, R; Shrestha, S; Shrestha, A

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is considered as one of the most common problems among women. The therapy is incomplete without knowing the underlying pathology. To determine the types and frequency of endometrial pathologies in patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding at Dhulikhel Hospital Kathmandu university Hospital. This is retrospective study total 100 cases were included over a period of one year of Abnormal Uterine bleeding. Out of 100 cases of Abnormal uterine bleeding, 61% were due to non-organic cause with a commonest histopathological findings proliferative endometrium. 27% cases were due to organic cause with pregnancy related condition as most common finding. 12% were reported as inadequate. The rate of postmenopausal bleeding declined with increasing age in the postmenopausal period and endometritis was the predominant finding. There is an age specific association of Abnormal uterine bleeding with increased incidence in perimenopausal age group. Postmenopausal bleeding declined with increasing with endometritis the most common finding. Dilation and curettage is helpful to exclude other organic pathology. It is useful for diagnosis and to know pathological incidence of organic lesions in cases of Abnormal uterine bleeding prior to surgery.

  8. Temporal Trends in and Factors Associated With Bleeding Complications Among Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Peterson, Eric D.; Dai, David; Thomas, Laine; Messenger, John C.; Xian, Ying; Brindis, Ralph G.; Feldman, Dmitriy N.; Senter, Shaun; Klein, Lloyd W.; Marso, Steven P.; Roe, Matthew T.; Rao, Sunil V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine temporal trends in post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) bleeding among patients with elective PCI, unstable angina (UA)/non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Background The impact of bleeding avoidance strategies on post-PCI bleeding rates over time is unknown. Methods Using the CathPCI Registry, we examined temporal trends in post-PCI bleeding from 2005 to 2009 among patients with elective PCI (n = 599,524), UA/NSTEMI (n = 836,103), and STEMI (n = 267,632). We quantified the linear time trend in bleeding using 3 sequential logistic regression models: 1) clinical factors; 2) clinical + vascular access strategies (femoral vs. radial, use of closure devices); and 3) clinical, vascular strategies + antithrombotic treatments (anticoagulant ± glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor [GPI]). Changes in the odds ratio for time trend in bleeding were compared using bootstrapping and converted to risk ratio. Results An approximate 20% reduction in post-PCI bleeding was seen (elective PCI: 1.4% to 1.1%; UA/NSTEMI: 2.3% to 1.8; STEMI: 4.9% to 4.5%). Radial approach remained low (<3%), and closure device use increased marginally from 44% to 49%. Bivalirudin use increased (17% to 30%), whereas any heparin + GPI decreased (41% to 28%). There was a significant 6% to 8% per year reduction in annual bleeding risk in UA/NSTEMI and elective PCI, but not in STEMI. Antithrombotic strategies were associated with roughly half of the reduction in annual bleeding risk: change in risk ratio from 7.5% to 4% for elective PCI, and 5.7% to 2.8% for UA/NSTEMI (both p <0.001). Conclusions The nearly 20% reduction in post-PCI bleeding over time was largely due to temporal changes in antithrombotic strategies. Further reductions in bleeding complications may be possible as bleeding avoidance strategies evolve, especially in STEMI. PMID:22595404

  9. Bleeding recurrence in patients with gastrointestinal vascular malformation after thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Fu, Sengwang; Feng, Nan; Chen, Huimin; Gao, Yunjie; Zhao, Yunjia; Xue, Hanbing; Zhang, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Dai, Jun; Fang, Jingyuan; Ge, Zhizheng

    2016-08-01

    Thalidomide may be used for the treatment of gastrointestinal vascular malformation (GIVM), but the long-term response and adverse effects are unknown. Aim to study the recurrence rate of GIVM bleeding after thalidomide treatment, the response to treatment, and the adverse effects.This was a retrospective study of 80 patients with GIVM treated with thalidomide between November 2003 and November 2013. Patients received a course of 100 mg/day of thalidomide for 4 months and were followed up for at least 1 year. The response rate during follow-up, the recurrence rate after the 1st course of treatment, and the rate of retreatment were assessed. Comorbidities, the need for blood transfusion, yearly bleeding episodes, hemoglobin levels, hospitalization after thalidomide treatment, and the rate of adverse effects were also examined.The overall response rate during follow-up was 79.5% (62/78). The recurrence rate was 21.0% after the 1st course of thalidomide. The response rate of retreatment was 100%. After thalidomide treatment, yearly blood transfusion amounts, yearly bleeding episodes, and yearly hospitalization numbers were significantly decreased, while hemoglobin levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001). Adverse effects were observed in 60.0% (48/80) of the patients. Serious adverse effects were reported in 31.3% (25/80). The overall response rate was 76.7% (23/30) in 30 patients with comorbidities, while the rate was 78.0% (39/50) in patients without comorbidities (P = 0.55). The rate of serious adverse effects was similar between the comorbidities (33.3%) and no-comorbidities groups (30.0%) (P = 0.76).Thalidomide showed a good response rate and low adverse effect rate in patients with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIVM.

  10. Predicting major bleeding in patients with noncardioembolic stroke on antiplatelets: S2TOP-BLEED.

    PubMed

    Hilkens, Nina A; Algra, Ale; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Reitsma, Johannes B; Bath, Philip M; Csiba, Laszlo; Hacke, Werner; Kappelle, L Jaap; Koudstaal, Peter J; Leys, Didier; Mas, Jean-Louis; Sacco, Ralph L; Amarenco, Pierre; Sissani, Leila; Greving, Jacoba P

    2017-08-29

    To develop and externally validate a prediction model for major bleeding in patients with a TIA or ischemic stroke on antiplatelet agents. We combined individual patient data from 6 randomized clinical trials (CAPRIE, ESPS-2, MATCH, CHARISMA, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS) investigating antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischemic stroke. Cox regression analyses stratified by trial were performed to study the association between predictors and major bleeding. A risk prediction model was derived and validated in the PERFORM trial. Performance was assessed with the c statistic and calibration plots. Major bleeding occurred in 1,530 of the 43,112 patients during 94,833 person-years of follow-up. The observed 3-year risk of major bleeding was 4.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4%-4.9%). Predictors were male sex, smoking, type of antiplatelet agents (aspirin-clopidogrel), outcome on modified Rankin Scale ≥3, prior stroke, high blood pressure, lower body mass index, elderly, Asian ethnicity, and diabetes (S2TOP-BLEED). The S2TOP-BLEED score had a c statistic of 0.63 (95% CI 0.60-0.64) and showed good calibration in the development data. Major bleeding risk ranged from 2% in patients aged 45-54 years without additional risk factors to more than 10% in patients aged 75-84 years with multiple risk factors. In external validation, the model had a c statistic of 0.61 (95% CI 0.59-0.63) and slightly underestimated major bleeding risk. The S2TOP-BLEED score can be used to estimate 3-year major bleeding risk in patients with a TIA or ischemic stroke who use antiplatelet agents, based on readily available characteristics. The discriminatory performance may be improved by identifying stronger predictors of major bleeding. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Factors associated with major bleeding events: insights from the ROCKET AF trial (rivaroxaban once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation).

    PubMed

    Goodman, Shaun G; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Piccini, Jonathan P; White, Harvey D; Paolini, John F; Nessel, Christopher C; Berkowitz, Scott D; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Patel, Manesh R; Sherwood, Matthew W; Becker, Richard C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E; Hankey, Graeme J; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M

    2014-03-11

    This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation: NCT00403767

  12. Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagge, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed is discussed. Present and future jet engine systems are compared. The role of auxiliary power units is evaluated. Details of secondary electric power generation systems with and without auxiliary power units are given. Advanced bleed systems are compared with minimum bleed systems. A cost model of ownership is given. The difference in the cost of ownership between a minimum bleed system and an advanced bleed system is given.

  13. Role of computed tomography angiography on the management of overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chao-Ming; Lin, I-Chang; Chang, Chi-Yang; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Mo, Lein-Ray; Lin, Jaw-Town; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The role of computed tomography angiography (CTA) on the management of acute overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) remains unclear. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of CTA before enteroscopy for acute overt OGIB. Methods All patients undergoing CTA followed by enteroscopy for acute overt OGIB were enrolled in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics and diagnosis were compared between patients with positive and negative CTA findings. We evaluated the impact of CTA on subsequent enteroscopy. Results From February 2008 to March 2015, 71 patients including 25 patients with positive CTA findings and 46 patients with negative CTA findings, were enrolled. All 25 patients with positive CTA findings were confirmed to have mid GI lesions, a significantly higher proportion than among patients with negative CTA findings (100% vs. 52.2%, respectively; P <0.001). CTA had a higher diagnostic yield for bleeding from tumor origin than from non-tumor origin (80.0% vs. 23.7%, respectively; P <0.001). The diagnostic yield of CTA and enteroscopy was 35.2% and 73.2%, respectively. The lesions could be identified by the initial route of enteroscopy in more patients with positive CTA findings than in those with negative CTA findings (92.0% vs. 47.8%, respectively; P <0.001). Lesions could be identified in seven of the 25 patients (28.0%) with positive CTA findings by using only push enteroscopy instead of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE), but all 46 patients with negative CTA findings needed SBE for deep small-bowel examination. Conclusions CTA is useful in the diagnosis of acute overt OGIB, especially in patients with bleeding from tumors. In addition, it also can show the precise location of bleeding, and guide subsequent enteroscopic management. PMID:28248993

  14. Functional GI disorders: from animal models to drug development

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, E A; Bradesi, S; Chang, L; Spiegel, B M R; Bueller, J A; Naliboff, B D

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts by academic researchers and by the pharmaceutical industry, the development of novel pharmacological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders has been slow and disappointing. The traditional approach to identifying and evaluating novel drugs for these symptom-based syndromes has relied on a fairly standard algorithm using animal models, experimental medicine models and clinical trials. In the current article, the empirical basis for this process is reviewed, focusing on the utility of the assessment of visceral hypersensitivity and GI transit, in both animals and humans, as well as the predictive validity of preclinical and clinical models of IBS for identifying successful treatments for IBS symptoms and IBS-related quality of life impairment. A review of published evidence suggests that abdominal pain, defecation-related symptoms (urgency, straining) and psychological factors all contribute to overall symptom severity and to health-related quality of life. Correlations between readouts obtained in preclinical and clinical models and respective symptoms are small, and the ability to predict drug effectiveness for specific as well as for global IBS symptoms is limited. One possible drug development algorithm is proposed which focuses on pharmacological imaging approaches in both preclinical and clinical models, with decreased emphasis on evaluating compounds in symptom-related animal models, and more rapid screening of promising candidate compounds in man. PMID:17965064

  15. Cost varies with procedure type in pediatric GI foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Rachel S; Starker, Rebecca A; Feldman, Kelly A; Tashiro, Jun; Perez, Eduardo A; Mendoza, Fernando G; Sola, Juan E

    2017-03-01

    In pediatric cases of ingested foreign bodies, gastrointestinal foreign bodies (GIFB) have distinct factors contributing to longer and more costly hospitalizations. Patients admitted with ingested foreign bodies were identified in the Kids' Inpatient Database (1997-2009). Overall, 7480 cases were identified. Patients were most commonly <5years of age (44%), male (54%), and Caucasian (57%). A total of 2506 procedures were performed, GI surgical procedures (57%) most frequently, followed by GI endoscopy (24%), esophagoscopy (11%), and bronchoscopy - in cases of inhaled objects (9%). On multivariate analysis, length of stay increased when cases were associated with intestinal obstruction (OR=1.7), esophageal perforation (OR=40.0), intestinal perforation (OR=4.4), exploratory laparotomy (OR=1.9), and gastric (OR=2.9), small bowel (OR=1.5), or colon surgery (OR=2.5), all p<0.02. Higher total charges (TC) were associated with intestinal obstruction (OR=2.0), endoscopy of esophagus (OR=1.8), stomach (OR=2.1), or colon (OR=3.3), and exploratory laparotomy (OR=3.6) or surgery of stomach (OR=5.6), small bowel (OR=6.4), or colon (OR=3.4), all p<0.001. Surgical or endoscopic procedures are performed in approximately one third of GIFB cases. Associated psychiatric disorder or self-inflicted injury is seen in more than 20% of GIFB patients. Resource utilization is determined heavily by associated diagnoses and treatment procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. GiSAO.db: a database for ageing research.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Edith; Laschober, Gerhard T; Hackl, Matthias; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Lepperdinger, Günter; Grillari, Johannes; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2011-05-24

    Age-related gene expression patterns of Homo sapiens as well as of model organisms such as Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster are a basis for understanding the genetic mechanisms of ageing. For an effective analysis and interpretation of expression profiles it is necessary to store and manage huge amounts of data in an organized way, so that these data can be accessed and processed easily. GiSAO.db (Genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and oxidative stress database) is a web-based database system for storing and retrieving ageing-related experimental data. Expression data of genes and miRNAs, annotation data like gene identifiers and GO terms, orthologs data and data of follow-up experiments are stored in the database. A user-friendly web application provides access to the stored data. KEGG pathways were incorporated and links to external databases augment the information in GiSAO.db. Search functions facilitate retrieval of data which can also be exported for further processing. We have developed a centralized database that is very well suited for the management of data for ageing research. The database can be accessed at https://gisao.genome.tugraz.at and all the stored data can be viewed with a guest account.

  17. Duodenal Lipomatosis as a Curious Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed: A Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Majid; Tiwari, Priyanka; Ramaswamy, Palaniswamy Kalipatti; Kumar, Reddy Prasanna

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Duodenal lipomas are incidental and mostly asymptomatic. Tumours may produce symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort or cause bleeding due to ulceration or intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. We describe a 45-year-old man presenting in emergency with 3 days history of melena with normal gastroduodenoscopy and contrast enhanced computed tomography revealing multiple polypoid lesion in duodenum and proximal jejunum suggestive of lipoma. Due to ongoing bleed, he underwent laparotomy with duodenectomy and uneventful postoperative recovery. Our review of cases published in last 67 years indicate that duodenal lipomas are rare to occur but commonly found in second part, they may be seen in third and fourth part of duodenum which may be missed on endoscopy. They can be multiple and may present as severe UGI bleeding which could be managed surgically. Though CT is diagnostic, histopathology confirms the diagnosis which shows lipomatous lesion composed of mature adipose arranged in lobules. PMID:27437304

  18. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  19. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies: Consensus and Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dauerman, Harold L.; Rao, Sunil V.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Applegate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity and one year mortality. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies represent a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggests that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacologic (multiple agents) and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this article, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area. PMID:21700085

  1. Bleeding avoidance strategies. Consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Dauerman, Harold L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Applegate, Robert J

    2011-06-28

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity, and 1-year mortality. Bleeding avoidance strategies is a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggest that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety, and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacological (multiple agents), and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this paper, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area.

  2. Time between First and Second Posttonsillectomy Bleeds

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sheriza; O'Connell Ferster, Ashley P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the time between first and recurrent posttonsillectomy hemorrhages (PTHs) and find factors related to multiple PTHs. Methods Retrospective chart review. Results Of 112 patients, 91 had one PTH, while 21 had recurrent PTHs. Patients with recurrent bleeds had significant differences (P < 0.05) in indication for tonsillectomy (47.6% had recurrent tonsillitis), prior cardiac conditions (28.6%), transfusions (9.5%), and hematology consults during the initial PTH visit (19%). Bleeding occurred at a mean of 6.1 (range 1–13) days for the first episode and 10 (range 9–18) days for the second episode as compared to 6.65 (range 1–18) days for those who bled once. Recurrent PTH patients were less likely to have had surgical control of the initial bleed (P < 0.05). Patients who bled at 7 days or later were more likely to bleed again within one day (OR 23.0, RR 12). Regression analysis showed that age, failure to have operative control of PTH, and surgical indication were most important in predicting recurrent PTH. Conclusions Operative control of PTH is associated with a better outcome than monitoring alone. Patients with PTH within 7 days of tonsillectomy are likely safe to discharge soon after treatment; those who bleed after 7 days should be monitored longer. PMID:28848606

  3. Prevention of Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Holley, Sharon L; Morad, Anna; Collins, Michelle R

    2016-07-07

    The risk that a newborn will develop vitamin K deficiency bleeding is 1700/100,000 (one out of 59) if vitamin K is not administered. When intramuscular vitamin K is administered, the risk of vitamin K deficiency bleeding is reduced to 1/100,000. While women may have misconceptions about vitamin K prophylaxis for their newborns, health care providers should be prepared with factual information. Prophylaxis is needed even for healthy newborns without risk factors for bleeding. Other forms of vitamin K supplementation, including oral administration of Food and Drug Administration-approved vitamin K preparations and maternal supplements during pregnancy or lactation, do not have the same effectiveness as the parenteral form. The formulations of vitamin K approved for use in the United States have not been associated with childhood leukemia or other childhood health problems. Care providers need to give accurate information to families regarding the risks and benefits of vitamin K prophylaxis. An interprofessional approach to education can be effective in increasing acceptance of vitamin K prophylaxis and decreasing the incidence of vitamin K deficiency bleeding. This article uses a case study approach to highlight common misconceptions about vitamin K prophylaxis and discuss a recent interprofessional collaboration to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding.

  4. The GI-CDF module of Arabidopsis affects freezing tolerance and growth as well as flowering.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Fabio; de Montaigu, Amaury; Sánchez-Villarreal, Alfredo; Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Huettel, Bruno; Davis, Seth J; Coupland, George

    2015-03-01

    Plants monitor and integrate temperature, photoperiod and light quality signals to respond to continuous changes in their environment. The GIGANTEA (GI) protein is central in diverse signaling pathways, including photoperiodic, sugar and light signaling pathways, stress responses and circadian clock regulation. Previously, GI was shown to activate expression of the key floral regulators CONSTANS (CO) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) by facilitating degradation of a family of CYCLING DOF FACTOR (CDF) transcriptional repressors. However, whether CDFs are implicated in other processes affected by GI remains unclear. We investigated the contribution of the GI-CDF module to traits that depend on GI. Transcriptome profiling indicated that mutations in GI and the CDF genes have antagonistic effects on expression of a wider set of genes than CO and FT, whilst other genes are regulated by GI independently of the CDFs. Detailed expression studies followed by phenotypic assays showed that the CDFs function downstream of GI, influencing responses to freezing temperatures and growth, but are not necessary for proper clock function. Thus GI-mediated regulation of CDFs contributes to several processes in addition to flowering, but is not implicated in all of the traits influenced by GI. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluating compliance to a low glycaemic index (GI) diet in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A low Glycaemic Index (GI) diet may decrease some long-term health risks in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) such as endometrial cancer. This study was performed to assess compliance to a low GI diet in women with PCOS. Food diaries prospectively collected over 6 months from women on a low GI diet or healthy eating diet were analysed retrospectively. The women were recruited for a pilot randomised control trial investigating whether a low GI diet decreased the risk of Endometrial Cancer. Nine women with PCOS completed 33 food diaries (17 from women on a low GI diet and 16 from women on a healthy eating diet) recording 3023 food items (low GI group:n = 1457; healthy eating group:n = 1566). Data was analysed using Foster-Powell international values inserted into an SPSS database as no scientifically valid established nutrition software was found. The main outcome measures were mean item GI and Glyacemic Load (GL), mean meal GL, percentage high GI foods and mean weight loss. Findings Women allocated the low GI diet had a statistically significant lower GI of food items (33.67 vs 36.91, p < 0.05), lower percentage of high GI foods (4.3% vs 12.1%, p < 0.05) and lower GL of food items and meals. Conclusion Women with PCOS on a low GI diet consumed food items with a significantly lower mean GI and GL compared to the healthy eating diet group. Longer term compliance needs evaluation in subsequent studies to ascertain that this translates to reduced long term health risks. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN86420258 PMID:21385417

  6. High Dose versus Low Dose Intravenous Pantoprazole in Bleeding Peptic Ulcer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Masjedizadeh, Abdol Rahim; Hajiani, Eskandar; Alavinejad, Pezhman; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Jamshidian, Noordin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The appropriate dose of proton pump inhibitors for treatment of patients with upper (GI) bleeding remains controversial. This study compares high-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion for prevention of GI bleeding complications. METHODS A total of 166 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers underwent therapeutic endoscopy using concomitant therapy by argon plasma coagulation (APC) and diluted epinephrine injection. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: high-dose pantoprazole (80 mg bolus, 8 mg per hour) and low-dose pantoprazole (40 mg bolus, 4 mg per hour) infused for three days. Initial outcomes were rebleeding, need for surgery, hemoglobin drop more than two units, and hospitalization for more than five days. Secondary outcome included mortality rate. RESULTS Overall, 166 patients (83 patients per group) enrolled in the study. The average age of patients in the high-dose group was 59.5±15.6 years and 52.3±13.3 years in the low-dose group (p=0.58). Males comprised 69.7% of patients. In the high-dose group, the mean number of units of transfused blood was 3.3±1.71 and in the low-dose group, it was 2.82±1.73 (p=0.50). There were 36 (43.37%) patients in the high-dose group and 40 (48.19%) in the low-dose group who were hospitalized for more than 5 days (p=0.53). Rebleeding was observed in 27 (32.53%) patients in the high-dose group and in 21 (25.30%) in the low-dose group (p=0.30). There were no significant differences observed in drop in hemoglobin of more than two units (p=0.15), mortality (p=0.99) and surgery (p=0.75) between the two groups. CONCLUSION For controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, there is no difference between high dose and low dose pantoprazole infusion. PMID:25093061

  7. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months) the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative. PMID:20515511

  8. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  9. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:26798628

  10. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-16

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

  11. Re-bleeding events in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after negative capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Costa, Pedro; Bispo, Miguel; Santos, Sofia; Couto, Gilberto; Matos, Leopoldo; Chagas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term re-bleeding events after a negative capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and the risk factors associated with the procedure. METHODS: Patients referred to Hospital Egas Moniz (Lisboa, Portugal) between January 2006 and October 2012 with OGIB and a negative capsule endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. The following study variables were included: demographic data, comorbidities, bleeding-related drug use, hemoglobin level, indication for capsule endoscopy, post procedure details, work-up and follow-up. Re-bleeding rates and associated factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years, and the differences between factors were evaluated. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 640 patients referred for OGIB investigation. Wireless capsule endoscopy was deemed negative in 113 patients (17.7%). A total of 64.6% of the population was female, and the median age was 69 years. The median follow-up was forty-eight months (interquartile range 24-60). Re-bleeding occurred in 27.4% of the cases. The median time to re-bleeding was fifteen months (interquartile range 2-33). In 22.6% (n = 7) of the population, small-bowel angiodysplasia was identified as the culprit lesion. A univariate analysis showed that age > 65 years old, chronic kidney disease, aortic stenosis, anticoagulant use and overt OGIB were risk factors for re-bleeding; however, on a multivariate analysis, there were no risk factors for re-bleeding. The cumulative risk of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years of follow-up was 12.9%, 25.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Patients who presented with overt OGIB tended to re-bleed sooner (median time for re-bleeding: 8.5 mo vs 22 mo). CONCLUSION: Patients with OGIB despite a negative capsule endoscopy have a significant re-bleeding risk; therefore, these patients require an extended follow

  12. Expression and characterization of duck enteritis virus gI gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background At present, alphaherpesviruses gI gene and its encoding protein have been extensively studied. It is likely that gI protein and its homolog play similar roles in virions direct cell-to-cell spread of alphaherpesviruses. But, little is known about the characteristics of DEV gI gene. In this study, we expressed and presented the basic properties of the DEV gI protein. Results The special 1221-bp fragment containing complete open reading frame(ORF) of duck enteritis virus(DEV) gI gene was extracted from plasmid pMD18-T-gI, and then cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a(+), resulting in pET-32a(+)-gI. After being confirmed by PCR, restriction endonuclease digestion and sequencing, pET-32a(+)-gI was transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3) competent cells for overexpression. DEV gI gene was successfully expressed by the addition of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside(IPTG). SDS-PAGE showed that the recombinant protein His6-tagged gI molecular weight was about 61 kDa. Subsequently, the expressed product was applied to generate specific antibody against gI protein. The specificity of the rabbit immuneserum was confirmed by its ability to react with the recombinant protein His6-tagged gI. In addition, real time-PCR was used to determine the the levels of the mRNA transcripts of gI gene, the results showed that the DEV gI gene was transcribed most abundantly during the late phase of infection. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence(IIF) was established to study the gI protein expression and localization in DEV-infected duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs), the results confirmed that the protein was expressed and located in the cytoplasm of the infected cells, intensively. Conclusions The recombinant prokaryotic expression vector of DEV gI gene was constructed successfully. The gI protein was successfully expressed by E.coli BL21(DE3) and maintained its antigenicity very well. The basic information of the transcription and intracellular localization of gI gene

  13. Identification and Molecular Characterization of FKF1 and GI Homologous Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Hu, Ruibo; Wu, Faqiang; Ma, Jinhua; Meng, Ying; Fu, YongFu

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, FKF1 (FLAVIN BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F-BOX1) and GI (GIGANTEA) play important roles in flowering pathway through regulating daytime CO (CONSTANS) expression, and such a function is conserved across plants studied. But related reports are limited for soybean. In this study, we cloned FKF1 and GI homologs in soybean, and named as GmFKF1, GmFKF2, GmGI1, GmGI2, and GmGI3, respectively. GmGI1 had two alternative splicing forms, GmGI1α and GmGI1β. GmFKF1/2 transcripts were diurnally regulated, with a peak at zeitgeber time 12 (ZT12) in long days and at ZT10 in short days. The diurnal phases between GmGIs transcript levels greatly differed. GmGI2 expression was regulated by both the circadian clock and photoperiod. But the rhythmic phases of GmGI1 and GmGI3 expression levels were mainly conferred by long days. GmFKFs shared similar spatio-temporal expression profiles with GmGIs in all of the tissue/organs in different developmental stages in both LD and SD. Both GmFKF and GmGI proteins were targeted to the nucleus. Yeast two hybrid assays showed GmFKF1/GmFKF2 interacted with GmGI1/GmGI2/GmCDF1 (CYCLING DOF FACTOR CDF1 homolog in soybean); and the LOV (Light, Oxygen, or Voltage) domain in GmFKF1/GmFKF2 played an important role in these interactions. N-terminus of GmGI2 was sufficient to mediate its interaction with GmCDF1. Interestingly, N-terminus not full of GmGI3 interacted with GmFKF1/GmFKF2/GmCDF1. Ectopic over-expression of the GmFKF1 or GmFKF2 in Arabidopsis enhanced flowering in SD. Collectively, GmFKF and GmGI in soybean had conserved functional domains at DNA sequence level, but specific characters at function level with their homologs in other plants. PMID:24236086

  14. Brush cytology: an adjunct to diagnostic upper GI endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Patwari, A K; Anand, V K; Malhotra, V; Balani, B; Gangil, A; Jain, A; Kapoor, G

    2001-06-01

    Endoscopic brush cytology (EBC) was performed in antral and duodenal brushings of children subjected to upper GI endoscopy for the detection of H. pylori (Hp) and trophozoites of Giardia lamblia (Glt) in addition to routine endoscopic grasp biopsy (EGB). It was hospital based prospective study. EBC was performed in children subjected to upper GI endoscopy with a sheathed cytology brush. Mucosal brushings were collected from antrum, body of the stomach and second or third part of duodenum by gently rubbing the surface of the brush with the mucosal wall in all the directions, brush withdrawn and brushings performed on a glass slide. The smears were placed in 95% ethyl alcohol and later examined for Glt and Hp using Giemsa and Hematoxylin & Eosin stain. EGB was taken from antrum, body of the stomach and duodenum from sites other than those used for brushings. One hundred and seventy children between 1-13 years (median age = 5 years) were subjected to upper GI endoscopy for malabsorption (n = 94), recurrent abdominal pain (n = 49), failure to thrive (n = 16) and recurrent vomiting/regurgitation (n = 11) and EBC was performed in addition to routine EGB. Thirty five children (20.4%) were colonized by Hp, 14 (8.2%) were detected to have Glt and in 6 cases (3.5%) both Hp as well as Glt were detected. Out of 41 cases colonized by Hp, 24 cases (58.5%) were detected by EGB and 27 cases (65.8%) were detected by EBC. Out of 20 children in whom Glt were detected from their duodenum, the detection was by EBG in 12 cases (60%) and by EBC in as many as 19 cases (95%). Comparison of EGB and EBC suggested that detection rates with EBC were higher than EGB. Detection by EBC was significantly higher for Glt than Hp. There were no complications attributed to EBC and procedure time for endoscopy was not significantly prolonged. On the contrary, detection of Hp and particularly Glt in higher proportion of cases with the help of EBC was helpful in their appropriate management. Our results

  15. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected.

  16. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  17. Angiography in gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerovitz, M.F.; Fellows, K.E.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-seven children aged 1 day to 16 years studied arteriographically for acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleeding were reviewed. Children with known esophageal varices and portal hypertension were excluded. Final diagnoses were made in 25 patients by means of surgery, endoscopy, biopsy, laboratory data, and clinical follow-up. Of these 25 cases, arteriography gave a correct diagnosis in 64% and was falsely negative in 36%. The common causes of bleeding in this study were gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastritis, vascular malformations, and typhlitis. Transcatheter therapy was attempted in six acute bleeders, with success in three (50%).

  18. Acid inhibition and peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Štimac, D; Franjić, N; Krznarić, Ž

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common emergency situations in medicine. Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy together with emerging interventional radiological procedures are successfully treating peptic ulcer disease, reserving surgical procedures for only a small portion of patients unresponsive to 'conventional' therapy. Technological advancement has seen a great improvement in the field of endoscopic treatment in the form of various methods of hemostasis. However, pharmacological therapy with proton pump inhibitors still plays the central role in the peptic ulcer bleeding treatment algorithm.

  19. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Balaguer-Martínez, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants published in English up until May 2014. Inclusion criteria: studies in humans subjects with severe bleeding immediately secondary to implant placement, which reported the time until the hemorrhage, the implant lenght, the possible cause of bleeding and the treatment. Exclusion criteria: patients receiving anticoagulation treatment. Results: Fifteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The area with the largest number of bleeding complications corresponded to the mandibular canine. The cause of bleeding was lingual cortical bone perforation during implant placement, with damage to the sublingual artery. The implants associated with bleeding were those measuring 15 mm in length or more. Management focused on securing the airway (with intubation or tracheostomy if necessary), with bleeding control. Conclusions: It’s important to pay special attention when the implants are placed in the mandibular anterior zone, especially if long implants are used. The most frequently cause of bleeding was the perforation of the lingual plate. Treatment involves securing the airway, with bleeding control. Key words:Hemorrhage, complications, immediate, bleeding, dental implants. PMID:25475779

  20. Xenopus as a Model for GI/Pancreas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salanga, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases affecting endodermal organs like the pancreas, lung and gastrointestinal (GI) tract have a substantial impact on human welfare. Since many of these are congenital defects that arise as a result of defects during development broad efforts are focused on understanding the development of these organs so as to better identify risk factors, disease mechanisms and therapeutic targets. Studies implementing model systems, like the amphibian Xenopus, have contributed immensely to our understanding of signaling (e.g. Wnt, FGF, BMP, RA) pathways and gene regulation (e.g. hhex, ptf1a, ngn3) that underlie normal development as well as disease progression. Recent advances in genome engineering further enhance the capabilities of the Xenopus model system for pursuing biomedical research, and will undoubtedly result in a boom of new information underlying disease mechanisms ultimately leading to advancements in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26236566

  1. Low GI Food with Barley in Space Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Naomi; Sugimoto, Manabu; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kihara, Makoto; Yamashita, Masamichi; Space Agriculture Task Force

    The construction of the life-support system to perform space, moon base, Mars emigration is demanded. The space foods will play a very important role of life support on this occasion. Particularly, in environment of the microgravity, our metabolism becomes less than the face of the Earth. The management of the blood sugar level is very important. We need to eat the meal which will be rise in blood sugar level slowly. The barley which includes much water-soluble dietary fibers is helpful to make low GI space food. After eating 30% barley with unpolished rice, blood sugar level was rise slowly. The cooking process is very important to our body in thinking about digestion and absorption. Soft foods, long-heated foods and grind-foods are easy to digest. After eating these-foods, our blood sugar level will rise, easily. We introduce the space foods with 30% wheat that the blood sugar level is hard to rising.

  2. Ventilation monitoring during moderate sedation in GI patients.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas J; Middleton, Austin H; Makhija, Nikhil

    2017-02-01

    Sedation in locations outside the operating room (OR) is common. Guidelines for safe patient monitoring have been updated by the American Society of Anesthesiology to include monitoring of ventilation and/or carbon dioxide (CO2). Although technologies exist to monitor these variables, the quality and/or availability of these measurements in non-OR settings is not optimal. This quality improvement project assessed the value of impedance technology for monitoring minute ventilation (MV) compared to standard end-tidal monitoring of CO2 (ETCO2). Patients undergoing GI exams with moderate sedation provided by anesthesia providers were monitored for MV with a respiratory volume monitor (ExSpiron 1Xi, Respiratory Motion, Waltham, MA) and ETCO2 via nasal cannula (NC). Calibration and baseline data were collected prior to sedation. Continuous MV and ETCO2 data were collected and averaged, providing minute values after sedation medications throughout the procedure. Stable periods of reduced MV were averaged and used in comparison to ETCO2. Data from 20 patients were evaluated. After sedation, the expected decrease in MV after sedation was observed in 18 of 20 patients (average -47.82 %), while an increase in ETCO2 was observed in just 10 of 20 patients (average -5.17 mm Hg). The correlation coefficient between changes in MV and ETCO2 in response to sedation administration was positive and not significant, r = 0.223. Ventilation monitoring may provide an element of safety for earlier and more reliable detection of reduced ventilation compared to a surrogate for hypoventilation, ETCO2, in patients undergoing sedation for GI procedures outside of the OR.

  3. Semi-direct lysis of swabs and evaluation of their efficiencies to recover human noroviruses GI and GII from surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-06-01

    Enteric viruses such as noroviruses (NoVs) continue to be the cause of widespread viral outbreaks due to person-to-person transmission, contaminated food, and contaminated surfaces. In order to optimize swabbing methodology for the detection of viruses on (food) contact surfaces, three swab elution/extraction strategies were compared in part one of this study, out of which, one strategy was based on the recently launched ISO protocol (ISO/TS 15216-1) for the determination of hepatitis A virus and NoV in food using real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). These three swab elution/extraction strategies were tested for the detection of GI.4 and GII.4 NoV on high-density polyethylene (HD-PE) surfaces with the use of cotton swabs. For detection of GI.4 and GII.4, the sample recovery efficiency (SRE) obtained with the direct lysis strategy (based on ISO/TS 15216-1) was significantly lower than the SRE obtained with both other strategies. The semi-direct lysis strategy was chosen to assess the SRE of two common swabs (cotton swab and polyester swab) versus the biowipe (Biomérieux, Lyon, France) on three surfaces (HD-PE, neoprene rubber (NR), and nitrile gloves (GL)). For both surfaces, HD-PE and GL, no significant differences in SREs of GI.4 and GII.4 NoVs were detected between the three different swabs. For the coarser NR, biowipes turned out to be the best option for detecting both GI.4 and GII.4 NoV.

  4. Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device Use in Female Adolescents with Heavy Menstrual Bleeding and Bleeding Disorders: Single Institution Review.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi-Fowode, Oluyemisi A; Santos, Xiomara M; Dietrich, Jennifer E; Srivaths, Lakshmi

    2017-08-01

    To identify complications and efficacy of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNgIUD) in adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and bleeding disorders (BD). A retrospective chart review of 13 postmenarchal adolescent girls with HMB/BD who underwent placement of an LNgIUD. Placement of an LNgIUD. Primary outcome was to identify complications from placement of an LNgIUD. Secondary outcome was to evaluate the efficacy of the LNgIUD in adolescents with BD. Thirteen patients met study criteria. The mean age of diagnosis of HMB was 14.08 ± 1.75 years. BD or bleeding risk factor diagnoses included low von Willebrand (VW) activity in 5, type I VW disease in 5, type IIM VW disease in 1, low VW activity and factor 7 deficiency in 1, and acquired VW disease and factor 7 deficiency in 1. Before LNgIUD placement, other hormonal therapy (n = 13) and hemostatic therapy (antifibrinolytic agents, desmopressin acetate; n = 8) yielded poor control of HMB. The LNgIUD was placed using anesthesia with periprocedure hemostatic therapy with no complications. All patients reported significant improvement in HMB after LNgIUD placement and 60% achieved amenorrhea, with mean time to improvement of 94 ± 69 days. Mean hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased after LNgIUD placement compared with before LNgIUD placement values (P = .02, P = .0085, respectively). Use of supplemental hormonal and hemostatic agents decreased (n = 4) after LNgIUD placement. None required LNgIUD removal; 1 spontaneously expelled the LNgIUD with subsequent replacement. Study results indicated the LNgIUD is an effective therapeutic option in postmenarchal adolescents with HMB due to BD/bleeding risk factor with minimal complications, high compliance rate, improvement in HMB and anemia, and no periprocedural bleeding with hemostatic management. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Results of modified Sugiura operation in variceal bleeding in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Haciyanli, Mehmet; Genc, Hudai; Halici, Hakan; Kumkumoglu, Yusuf; Gur, Ozlem S; Ozturk, Tuncay

    2003-01-01

    Esophageal variceal bleeding is a major complication of portal hypertension and the optimal therapeutic modality for each individual patient differs. We reviewed the results of modified Sugiura procedure in patients with variceal bleeding of esophagus. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 13 patients who were subjected to modified Sugiura procedure (transabdominal esophagogastric devascularization + esophageal stapled transection + splenectomy) for bleeding esophageal varices between 1996 and 2001. Three patients disappeared from routine follow-up and were excluded from the study. Survival, rebleeding and encephalopathy were evaluated. The mean age was 46 (18-56). The etiology of portal hypertension was cirrhosis of liver in six (60%) and portal vein thrombosis in four (40%). One patient had Child-Pugh's Class A, two had Class B and three had Class C cirrhosis. Previous variceal bleeding were confirmed by endoscopy in all patients who had recurrent variceal bleeding despite treatment with beta-blockers (three patients) or endoscopic sclerotherapy +/- band ligation (seven patients). Two were subjected to emergency surgery while the remaining eight were operated on electively. No postoperative mortality was seen. The bleeders were stopped immediately in the emergent cases. During a mean follow-up of 27 (4-53) months, one (10%) patient suffered from encephalopathy and one (10%) from rebleeding at 20th and 28th months after the operation respectively. Three (30%) patients with Child C cirrhosis died due to bleeding (one) and hepatic failure (two) at 4, 25, and 28 months after the surgery. The prognoses of other patients are well at the present time. In our small number of patients, modified Sugiura procedure was found to be a safe and effective procedure for urgent and long-term control of bleeding varices in patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis and noncirrhotic etiology. The outcomes are encouraging in noncirrhotic patients and cirrhotic patients

  6. GPU-based Efficient Realistic Techniques for Bleeding and Smoke Generation in Surgical Simulators

    PubMed Central

    Halic, Tansel; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2010-01-01

    Background In actual surgery, smoke and bleeding due to cautery processes, provide important visual cues to the surgeon which have been proposed as factors in surgical skill assessment. While several virtual reality (VR)-based surgical simulators have incorporated effects of bleeding and smoke generation, they are not realistic due to the requirement of real time performance. To be interactive, visual update must be performed at least 30 Hz and haptic (touch) information must be refreshed at 1 kHz. Simulation of smoke and bleeding is, therefore, either ignored or simulated using highly simplified techniques since other computationally intensive processes compete for the available CPU resources. Methods In this work, we develop a novel low-cost method to generate realistic bleeding and smoke in VR-based surgical simulators which outsources the computations to the graphical processing unit (GPU), thus freeing up the CPU for other time-critical tasks. This method is independent of the complexity of the organ models in the virtual environment. User studies were performed using 20 subjects to determine the visual quality of the simulations compared to real surgical videos. Results The smoke and bleeding simulation were implemented as part of a Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) simulator. For the bleeding simulation, the original implementation using the shader did not incur in noticeable overhead. However, for smoke generation, an I/O (Input/Output) bottleneck was observed and two different methods were developed to overcome this limitation. Based on our benchmark results, a buffered approach performed better than a pipelined approach and could support up to 15 video streams in real time. Human subject studies showed that the visual realism of the simulations were as good as in real surgery (median rating of 4 on a 5-point Likert scale). Conclusions Based on the performance results and subject study, both bleeding and smoke simulations were concluded to be

  7. Prevention of stress-related ulcer bleeding at the intensive care unit: Risks and benefits of stress ulcer prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Buendgens, Lukas; Koch, Alexander; Tacke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Stress-related mucosal disease is a typical complication of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). It poses a risk of clinically relevant upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Therefore, stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is recommended in high-risk patients, especially those mechanically ventilated > 48 h and those with a manifest coagulopathy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and, less effectively, histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) prevent GI bleeding in critically ill patients in the ICU. However, the routine use of pharmacological SUP does not reduce overall mortality in ICU patients. Moreover, recent studies revealed that SUP in the ICU might be associated with potential harm such as an increased risk of infectious complications, especially nosocomial pneumonia and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Additionally, special populations such as patients with liver cirrhosis may even have an increased mortality rate if treated with PPI. Likewise, PPI can be toxic for both the liver and the bone marrow, and some PPI show clinically relevant interactions with important other drugs like clopidogrel. Therefore, the agent of choice, the specific balance of risks and benefits for individual patients as well as the possible dose of PPI has to be chosen carefully. Alternatives to PPI prophylaxis include H2RA and/or sucralfate. Instead of routine SUP, further trials should investigate risk-adjusted algorithms, balancing benefits and threats of SUP medication in the ICU. PMID:26855894

  8. Assessment of effects on health due to consumption of bitter bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) juice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S.K.; Puri, Rajesh; Jain, Ajay; Sharma, M.P.; Sharma, Anita; Bohra, Shravan; Gupta, Y.K.; Saraya, Anoop; Dwivedi, S.; Gupta, K.C.; Prasad, Mahadeo; Pandey, Janardhan; Dohroo, Netar Prakash; Tandon, Neeraj; Sesikeran, B.; Dorle, A.K.; Tandon, Nikhil; Handa, S.S.; Toteja, G.S.; Rao, Spriha; Satyanarayana, K.; Katoch, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: The bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) is popularly known as lauki, ghia or dudhi in India. Its consumption is advocated by traditional healers for controlling diabetes mellitus, hypertension, liver diseases, weight loss and other associated benefits. However, in last few years there have been reports of suspected toxicity due to consumption of its juice. This led to the constitution of an Expert Committee by Department of Health Research at Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India in October 2010. The committee looked into the issues related to safety of consumption of bottle gourd juice, and this paper presents the findings. Methods: Information on cases of suspected toxicity due to consumption of bottle gourd juice was collected by internet search, advertising on website of ICMR and by writing to State and district health authorities as well as to medical colleges, hospitals and private nursing homes across the country. Results: Three deaths were reported, one from Delhi and two from Uttar Pradesh after consumption of extremely bitter bottle gourd juice. Three persons who died after consumption of freshly prepared bottle gourd juice or juice mixed with bitter gourd (karela) juice were over 59 years of age and had diabetes since last 20 years. This juice was reported to be extremely bitter by all three. Twenty six persons were admitted to various hospitals of the country on complaint of abdominal pain and vomiting following consumption of freshly prepared bottle gourd juice. Diarrhoea and vomiting of blood (haematemesis) was reported in 18 (69.2%) and 19 (73.1%) patients, respectively. Biochemical investigations revealed elevated levels of liver enzymes. More than 50 per cent patients had hypotension. Endoscopic findings showed profusely bleeding stomach with excessive ulceration seen in distal oesophagus, stomach and duodenum in most of the cases. All these patients recovered

  9. Assessment of effects on health due to consumption of bitter bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) juice.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) is popularly known as lauki, ghia or dudhi in India. Its consumption is advocated by traditional healers for controlling diabetes mellitus, hypertension, liver diseases, weight loss and other associated benefits. However, in last few years there have been reports of suspected toxicity due to consumption of its juice. This led to the constitution of an Expert Committee by Department of Health Research at Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India in October 2010. The committee looked into the issues related to safety of consumption of bottle gourd juice, and this paper presents the findings. Information on cases of suspected toxicity due to consumption of bottle gourd juice was collected by internet search, advertising on website of ICMR and by writing to State and district health authorities as well as to medical colleges, hospitals and private nursing homes across the country. Three deaths were reported, one from Delhi and two from Uttar Pradesh after consumption of extremely bitter bottle gourd juice. Three persons who died after consumption of freshly prepared bottle gourd juice or juice mixed with bitter gourd (karela) juice were over 59 years of age and had diabetes since last 20 years. This juice was reported to be extremely bitter by all three. Twenty six persons were admitted to various hospitals of the country on complaint of abdominal pain and vomiting following consumption of freshly prepared bottle gourd juice. Diarrhoea and vomiting of blood (haematemesis) was reported in 18 (69.2%) and 19 (73.1%) patients, respectively. Biochemical investigations revealed elevated levels of liver enzymes. More than 50 per cent patients had hypotension. Endoscopic findings showed profusely bleeding stomach with excessive ulceration seen in distal oesophagus, stomach and duodenum in most of the cases. All these patients recovered fully and no sequeale was recorded for any of

  10. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  11. Bleeding Diatheses: Approach to the Patient Who Bleeds or Has Abnormal Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Marcia; Chapin, John

    2016-12-01

    Many complex elements contribute to normal hemostasis, and an imbalance of these elements may lead to abnormal bleeding. In addition to evaluating medication effects, the hematologist must evaluate for congenital or acquired deficiencies in coagulation factors and platelet disorders. This evaluation should include a thorough bleeding history with careful attention to prior hemostatic challenges and common laboratory testing, including coagulation studies and/or functional platelet assays. An accurate diagnosis of a bleeding diathesis and selection of appropriate treatment are greatly aided by a basic understanding of the mechanisms of disease and the tests used to diagnose them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. GiPSiNet: an open source/open architecture network middleware for surgical simulations.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Vincenzo; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk; Cai, Qingbo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and techniques of GiPSiNet, an open source/open architecture network middleware being developed for surgical simulations. GiPSiNet extends GiPSi (General Interactive Physical Simulation Interface), our framework for developing organ level surgical simulations, to network environments. This network extension is non-trivial, since the network settings pose several serious problems for distributed surgical virtual environments such as band-width limit, delays, and packet losses. Our goal is to enhance the quality (fidelity and realism) of networked simulations in the absence of network QoS (Quality of Service) through the GiPSiNet middleware.

  13. Congenital infantile fibrosarcoma: Association with bleeding diathesis

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Mayssaa; Khoury, Nabil J.; Khalifeh, Ibrahim; Abbas, Hussein A.; Majdalani, Marianne; Abboud, Miguel; Muwakkit, Samar; Solh, Hassan El; Saab, Raya

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 2 month Final Diagnosis: Congenital infantile fibrosarcoma Symptoms: Bleeding Medication: Vincristine • actinomycin • cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: Surgical resection Specialty: Pediatric Oncology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Congenital infantile fibrosarcoma (CIF) is a soft-tissue tumor occurring during the first 2 years of life, most commonly in the extremities. CIF is frequently initially misdiagnosed as a vascular tumor, but its association with bleeding and coagulopathy has not been well characterized. Case Reports: We describe 2 infants with CIF presenting with bleeding and coagulopathy, requiring urgent intervention. Both patients did well; one underwent partial resection followed by chemotherapy, and the other received 2 cycles of chemotherapy followed by gross total resection. We also provide a review of all reported cases of coagulopathy in the setting of CIF in the English literature, uncovering an association that seems to be more prevalent in patients diagnosed in the neonatal period, with associated anemia and thrombocytopenia, and a significant mortality rate. Conclusions: CIF needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular congenital tumors, especially when there is evidence of bleeding, anemia, or thrombocytopenia. PMID:24265847

  14. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  15. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  16. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    PubMed

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (p<0,05). The results of this study show that the omeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing.

  17. ENDOSCOPIC THERAPY OF SEVERE ULCER BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Thomas O.G.; Jensen, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding secondary to ulcer disease occurs commonly and results in significant patient morbidity and medical expense. After initial resuscitation, carefully performed endoscopy provides an accurate diagnosis of the source of the UGI hemorrhage and can reliably identify those high-risk subgroups that may benefit most from endoscopic hemostasis. Large channel therapeutic endoscopes are recommended. Endoscopists should be very experienced in management of patients with UGI hemorrhage including the use of various hemostatic devices. For patients with major stigmata of ulcer hemorrhage – active arterial bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel and adherent clot – combination therapy with epinephrine injection and either thermal coaptive coagulation (with multipolar or heater probe), or endoclips is recommended. High dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors are recommended as concomitant therapy with endoscopic hemostasis of major stigmata. Patients with minor stigmata or clean-based ulcers will not benefit from endoscopic therapy and should be triaged to less intensive care and be considered for early discharge. Effective endoscopic hemostasis of ulcer bleeding can significantly improve outcomes by reducing rebleeding, transfusion requirement, and need for surgery, as well as reduce cost of medical care. PMID:21944418

  18. Risk Factors for an Iatrogenic Mallory-Weiss Tear Requiring Bleeding Control during a Screening Upper Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Na, Shin; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Han, Seungbong

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim. In some cases of iatrogenic Mallory-Weiss tears (MWTs), hemostasis is needed due to severe mucosal tearing with bleeding. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for severe iatrogenic MWTs and the methods of endoscopic bleeding control. Materials and Methods. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 426,085 cases of screening upper endoscopy were performed at the Asan Medical Center. We retrospectively analyzed the risk factors for severe iatrogenic MWTs requiring an endoscopic procedure and the treatment modalities of bleeding control. Results. Iatrogenic MWTs occurred in 546 cases (0.13%) of screening upper endoscopy in 539 patients. Bleeding control due to severe bleeding was applied in 71 cases (13.0%), and rebleeding after initial bleeding control occurred in 1 case. Multivariate analysis showed that old age, a history of distal gastrectomy, and a less-experienced endoscopist (fewer than 2,237.5 endoscopic procedures at the time of the MWT) were associated with severe iatrogenic MWTs requiring an endoscopic procedure. Among 71 cases requiring bleeding control, a hemoclip was used in 81.7% (58 cases). Conclusions. Screening endoscopy procedures should be carefully performed when patients are in their old age and have a history of distal gastrectomy, particularly if the endoscopist is less experienced. PMID:28348579

  19. A clinical comparison of the efficacy of an electromechanical flossing device or manual flossing in affecting interproximal gingival bleeding and plaque accumulation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N A; Barnes, C M; Russell, C M; Winchester, K R

    1995-01-01

    This one-month clinical trial was designed to compare the effect of an electromechanical flossing device and manual flossing on reducing interproximal gingival bleeding and plaque accumulation in a cohort of 60 healthy adults. After baseline evaluation of interproximal gingival bleeding, soft tissue trauma and plaque, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups, given flossing instructions, and had their teeth cleaned. At 30 days all three clinical parameters were again evaluated. The results showed a reduction in GI from baseline to follow-up in each group. This effect is significant (p<0.0001) in the analysis of variance. There was no overall difference in the groups (p=0.93). There was no difference in the reduction in GI from baseline to follow-up between the two groups (p=0.91); interaction). As with the GI, there was a significant reduction in PI from baseline to follow-up in each group (p<0.0001). There was no overall difference between the groups (p=0.24). There was no difference in the reduction in PI from baseline to follow-up between the two groups (p=0.59; interaction). No soft tissue trauma was noted at the baseline examination or at the follow-up examination after 30 days.

  20. Severe gingival bleeding in a myelodysplastic patient: management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudio M; Gasparetto, Patrícia F; Coracin, Fábio L; Marquês, José F; Lima, Carmen S P; Corrêa, Maria E P

    2004-03-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of stem cell disorders characterized by a reduction in one or more elements of the peripheral blood. Oral manifestations of the disease and oral complications of medical management may result in significant symptoms and have an impact on the systemic condition of the patient. The removal of the infectious focus, such active teeth infection or severe periodontal disease, remains controversial in these patients, due to the increased risk of bleeding and systemic infection. This paper reports a case of MDS with spontaneous gingival hemorrhage and generalized gingival hyperplasia associated with periodontal disease. This patient underwent several platelet transfusions due to these oral complications. The patient received periodontal therapy, resulting in an improvement of the oral clinical situation and a decrease of gingival hyperplasia. The patient did not present any episode of gingival hemorrhage after the periodontal treatment. The results of this study suggest that periodontal therapy should be performed in MDS patients presenting thrombocytopenia, gingival hyperplasia, and gingival bleeding, with the intent of preventing further hemorrhagic episodes and possible systemic infection.

  1. Structural basis of G protein-coupled receptor-Gi protein interaction: formation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor-Gi protein complex.

    PubMed

    Mnpotra, Jagjeet S; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Cai, Jian; Lynch, Diane L; Grossfield, Alan; Leioatts, Nicholas; Hurst, Dow P; Pitman, Michael C; Song, Zhao-Hui; Reggio, Patricia H

    2014-07-18

    In this study, we applied a comprehensive G protein-coupled receptor-Gαi protein chemical cross-linking strategy to map the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2)-Gαi interface and then used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dynamics of complex formation. Three cross-link sites were identified using LC-MS/MS and electrospray ionization-MS/MS as follows: 1) a sulfhydryl cross-link between C3.53(134) in TMH3 and the Gαi C-terminal i-3 residue Cys-351; 2) a lysine cross-link between K6.35(245) in TMH6 and the Gαi C-terminal i-5 residue, Lys-349; and 3) a lysine cross-link between K5.64(215) in TMH5 and the Gαi α4β6 loop residue, Lys-317. To investigate the dynamics and nature of the conformational changes involved in CB2·Gi complex formation, we carried out microsecond-time scale molecular dynamics simulations of the CB2 R*·Gαi1β1γ2 complex embedded in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer, using cross-linking information as validation. Our results show that although molecular dynamics simulations started with the G protein orientation in the β2-AR*·Gαsβ1γ2 complex crystal structure, the Gαi1β1γ2 protein reoriented itself within 300 ns. Two major changes occurred as follows. 1) The Gαi1 α5 helix tilt changed due to the outward movement of TMH5 in CB2 R*. 2) A 25° clockwise rotation of Gαi1β1γ2 underneath CB2 R* occurred, with rotation ceasing when Pro-139 (IC-2 loop) anchors in a hydrophobic pocket on Gαi1 (Val-34, Leu-194, Phe-196, Phe-336, Thr-340, Ile-343, and Ile-344). In this complex, all three experimentally identified cross-links can occur. These findings should be relevant for other class A G protein-coupled receptors that couple to Gi proteins. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Emily C; Simon, DaJuanicia N; Thomas, Laine E; Hylek, Elaine M; Gersh, Bernard J; Ansell, Jack E; Kowey, Peter R; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C; Pencina, Michael J; Piccini, Jonathan P; Peterson, Eric D

    2015-12-07

    Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6-2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had similar discrimination, but markedly better

  3. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C.; Simon, DaJuanicia N.; Thomas, Laine E.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ansell, Jack E.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Pencina, Michael J.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. Objectives We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. Methods We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6–2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Results Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had

  4. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly menstrual periods ... Laughlin-Tommaso, M.D. Some forms of menopause hormone therapy may cause monthly bleeding. This includes cyclic hormone ...

  5. Cereal Processing Influences Postprandial Glucose Metabolism as Well as the GI Effect

    PubMed Central

    Vinoy, Sophie; Normand, Sylvie; Meynier, Alexandra; Sothier, Monique; Louche-Pelissier, Corinne; Peyrat, Jocelyne; Maitrepierre, Christine; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Brand-Miller, Jeannie; Laville, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Technological processes may influence the release of glucose in starch. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic response and the kinetics of appearance of exogenous glucose from 2 cereal products consumed at breakfast. Methods: Twenty-five healthy men were submitted to a randomized, open, crossover study that was divided into 2 parts: 12 of the 25 subjects were included in the “isotope part,” and the 13 other subjects were included in the “glycemic part.” On test days, subjects received biscuits (low glycemic index [GI], high slowly available glucose [SAG]) or extruded cereals (medium GI, low SAG) as part of a breakfast similar in terms of caloric and macronutrient content. The postprandial phase lasted 270 minutes. Results: The rate of appearance (RaE) of exogenous glucose was significantly lower after consumption of biscuits in the first part of the morning (90–150 minutes) than after consumption of extruded cereals (p ≤ 0.05). Conversely, at 210 minutes, it was significantly higher with biscuits (p ≤ 0.01). For the first 2 hours, plasma glucose and insulin were significantly lower after biscuits during the glycemic part. C-peptide plasma concentrations were significantly lower at 90, 120, and 150 minutes after ingestion of the biscuits (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The consumption of biscuits with a high content of slowly digestible starch reduces the appearance rate of glucose in the first part of the morning and prolongs this release in the late phase of the morning (210 minutes). Our results also emphasize that modulation of glucose availability at breakfast is an important factor for metabolic control throughout the morning in healthy subjects due to the lowering of blood glucose and insulin excursions. PMID:24015715

  6. Late gastrointestinal bleeding after infrarenal aortic grafting: a 16-year experience.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Paolo; Dalainas, Ilias; Ramponi, Fabio; Dell'Aglio, Daniela; Casana, Renato; Nano, Giovanni; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G

    2007-01-01

    To review the manifestation and management of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by secondary aortoenteric fistula (AEF) after infrarenal aortic grafting. Between 1991 and 2006, nine patients underwent emergency treatment for secondary AEF localized in the duodenum (78%), ileum (11%), or sigmoid colon (11%). Three (33%) patients suffered hypovolemic shock. There were two (22%) real fistulas and seven (78%) paraprosthetic fistulas. Graft infection was confirmed in four (45%) patients and four (45%) had proximal sterile pseudoaneurysms. Surgical management consisted of graft removal with (n = 5) or without simultaneous extra-anatomic bypass (n = 1), in situ Dacron graft interposition (n = 3), ileo-duodenorrhaphy (n = 8), sigmoidectomy with colostomy (n = 1), and segmentary ileectomy (n = 1). Endografting was used only as a temporary measure to control bleeding in two patients. The mortality rate was 55% (n = 5). There were no intraoperative deaths, but 75% of the septic patients, 66% of those with preoperative hemodynamic instability, 50% of those with pseudoaneurysms, and 100% of those who required bowel resection died during the early postoperative period. Moreover, all of the surviving patients suffered early postoperative morbidity, resulting in prolonged intensive care unit stay and hospitalization. Secondary AEF is life-threatening, difficult to treat, and associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially in patients with sepsis or hemodynamic instability and those requiring bowel resection.

  7. Comparison of Three Risk Scores to Predict Outcomes of Severe Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M.; Ohning, Gordon V.; Kovacs, Thomas O.; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A.; Machicado, Gustavo A.; Dulai, Gareth S.; Jensen, Mary Ellen; Gornbein, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Improved medical decisions by using a score at the initial patient triage level may lead to improvements in patient management, outcomes, and resource utilization. There is no validated score for management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) unlike for upper GIB. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracies of 3 different prognostic scores (CURE Hemostasis prognosis score, Charlston index and ASA score) for the prediction of 30 day rebleeding, surgery and death in severe LGIB. Methods Data on consecutive patients hospitalized with severe GI bleeding from January 2006 to October 2011 in our two-tertiary academic referral centers were prospectively collected. Sensitivities, specificities, accuracies and area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) were computed for three scores for predictions of rebleeding, surgery and mortality at 30 days. Results 235 consecutive patients with LGIB were included between 2006 and 2011. 23% of patients rebled, 6% had surgery, and 7.7% of patients died. The accuracies of each score never reached 70% for predicting rebleeding or surgery in either. The ASA score had a highest accuracy for predicting mortality within 30 days (83.5%) whereas the CURE Hemostasis prognosis score and the Charlson index both had accuracies less than 75% for the prediction of death within 30 days. Conclusions ASA score could be useful to predict death within 30 days. However a new score is still warranted to predict all 30 days outcomes (rebleeding, surgery and death) in LGIB. PMID:25599218

  8. Life-Threatening Bleeding from Peristomal Varices after Cystoprostatectomy: Multimodal Approach in a Cirrhotic, Encephalopathic Patient with Severe Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Staubli, Sergej E. L.; Gramann, Tobias; Schwab, Christoph; Semela, David; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Engeler, Daniel S.; Abt, Dominik; Mordasini, Livio

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding of peristomal varices due to a portosystemic shunt is rare but potentially life-threatening in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. The scarce case reports in the literature recommend transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to prevent further bleeding. We report on a 72-year-old man who was referred to our hospital because of life-threatening bleeding from peristomal varices, three years after radical cystoprostatectomy for invasive bladder cancer. CT imaging showed liver cirrhosis with a prominent portosystemic shunt leading to massively enlarged peristomal varices. TIPS was taken into consideration, but not possible due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Medical therapy with lactulose and the nonselective beta-blocker carvedilol was initiated to treat HE and portal hypertension. In a second step, the portosystemic shunt was percutaneously embolized. Here, we present a multimodal approach to treat intractable bleeding from peristomal varices in a patient with ileal conduit urinary diversion, not suitable for TIPS. PMID:25709851

  9. Prediction of massive bleeding. Shock index and modified shock index.

    PubMed

    Terceros-Almanza, L J; García-Fuentes, C; Bermejo-Aznárez, S; Prieto-Del Portillo, I J; Mudarra-Reche, C; Sáez-de la Fuente, I; Chico-Fernández, M

    2017-04-08

    To determine the predictive value of the Shock Index and Modified Shock Index in patients with massive bleeding due to severe trauma. Retrospective cohort. Severe trauma patient's initial attention at the intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Patients older than 14 years that were admitted to the hospital with severe trauma (Injury Severity Score >15) form January 2014 to December 2015. We studied the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive and negative predictive value (PV+ and PV-), positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR+ and LR-), ROC curves (Receiver Operating Characteristics) and the area under the same (AUROC) for prediction of massive hemorrhage. 287 patients were included, 76.31% (219) were male, mean age was 43,36 (±17.71) years and ISS was 26 (interquartile range [IQR]: 21-34). The overall frequency of massive bleeding was 8.71% (25). For Shock Index: AUROC was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.84 to 0.94), with an optimal cutoff at 1.11, Se was 91.3% (95% CI: 73.2 to 97.58) and Sp was 79.69% (95% CI: 74.34 to 84.16). For the Modified Shock Index: AUROC was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.86 to 0.95), with an optimal cutoff at 1.46, Se was 95.65% (95% CI: 79.01 to 99.23) and Sp was 75.78% (95% CI: 70.18 to 80.62). Shock Index and Modified Shock Index are good predictors of massive bleeding and could be easily incorporated to the initial workup of patients with severe trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding after acid-corrosive injury.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Wu, Ming-Ho; Lin, Mu-Yen; Lai, Wu-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to delineate the characteristics and outcome of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI) caused by acid-corrosive injury and to determine its management protocol. From June 1988 to June 2000, all patients with the history of acid-corrosive injury at our institution were reviewed. Patients with massive UGI bleeding (hematocrit level <25% or transfusion of three or more units of whole blood required to restore normal vital sign) were enrolled into this study. Altogether, 12 (3.2%) of 378 patients with acid-corrosive injury developed massive bleeding: 8 gastric bleeding, 2 duodenal bleeding, and 2 first gastric and then duodenal bleeding. Gastric bleedings started an average of 12.1 days after the initial injury (range 9-21 days). Duodenal bleeding usually occurred later, at 10.1 days (range 6-18 days) after a gastric or esophagogastric operation. Nine of the ten patients with gastric bleeding underwent surgery during the subacute stage: three esophagogastrectomy, three gastric mucosectomy with gastrostomy and jejunostomy, and three total or subtotal gastrectomy. Operative findings were hemorrhagic gastritis with diffuse mucosal bleeding. Two of four patients with duodenal bleeding underwent duodenotomy with suture-ligation of bleeding vessels, and the other two had conservative treatment. Nine patients (75%) had postoperative complications. One patient (8%) died from complications of surgery performed to stop duodenal bleeding. Massive UGI bleeding rarely occurs after acid-corrosive injury; but when it does, it occurs during the subacute stage. Aggressive surgical treatment is mandatory for gastric bleeding. How duodenal bleeding can be better managed requires further study.

  11. Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Mannucci, P M

    2014-09-02

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common genetic bleeding disorder, is characterised by a quantitative or qualitative defect of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Patients with VWD suffer from mucocutaneous bleeding, of severity usually proportional to the degree of VWF defect. In particular, gastrointestinal bleeding associated with angiodysplasia is often a severe symptom of difficult management. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of VWD-associated gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and related bleeding.

  12. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies.

  13. Clinical Results of the Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) for the Treatment of Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Woo; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Jae-Kyu; Kim, Sei-Jong

    2000-01-01

    Background Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has been popularized for the treatment of refractory variceal bleeding. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and long-term effect of TIPS in the treatment of variceal bleeding that is not controlled with pharmacological and endoscopic treatment. Methods Thirty-six patients who underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) due to refractory variceal bleeding were included in the study. The effectiveness of portal decompression and bleeding control was evaluated. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to analyse the degree of varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) before TIPS procedure and one to three weeks after TIPS. Angiography was performed in surviving patients, if bleeding recurred, or if ultrasonography or endoscopy suggested stent dysfunction. Results TIPS were successfully placed in 36 of 38 patients (94.6%). TIPS achieved hemostasis of variceal bleeding in 34 patients (94.4%). Portal venous pressure decreased from an initial average of 28.7±7.9 to 23.2±9.4 mmHg after TIPS (p < 0.05). The portosystemic pressure gradient was significantly decreased from 15.5±6.3 to 7.8±4.1 mmHg (p < 0.01). The degree of esophagogastric varices and PHG was significantly improved after TIPS. The total length of follow-up was from one day to 54 months (mean: 355 days). The actuarial probability of survival was 83% at one year and 74% at two years. Overall, 16 episodes of stent dysfunction were diagnosed during follow-up. Stent revision by means of angioplasty was successfully performed in 14 of these episodes. Conclusion TIPS is an effective and reliable nonoperative means of lowering portal pressure. This procedure has proved useful in the management of acute variceal bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Surveillance by ultrasonography, endoscopy, and angiographic intervention is useful for the maintenance of shunt patency. PMID:11242805

  14. Visualization of ligand-induced Gi-protein activation in chemotaxing cells.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kazuyuki; Kitakami, Jun-Ichi; Kozasa, Tohru; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Ihara, Sigeo; Hamakubo, Takao

    2017-03-01

    Cell migration to chemoattractants is critically important in both normal physiology and the pathogenesis of many diseases. In GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, GPCRs transduce the gradient of an extracellular chemotactic ligand into intracellular responses via the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins. However, ligand-induced G-protein activation has not been directly imaged as yet in mammalian chemotaxing cells. We developed a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe, R10-Gi, by linking the Gi-protein α subunit to the regulator of G-protein signaling domain. The R10-Gi probe was coupled with a chemoattractant leukotriene B4 (LTB4) receptor 1 (BLT1) that induced the receptor to display a high-affinity ligand binding activity (Kd = 0.91 nM) in HEK293 cells. The R10-Gi probe exhibited an increased FRET signal in accord with the LTB4-dependent activation of Gi Furthermore, neutrophil-like differentiated human leukemia cell line 60 that expressed the intrinsic BLT1 displayed temporal Gi-protein activation in an area localized to the leading edge during chemotaxis in a shallow gradient of LTB4 These findings afford an opportunity to clarify the mechanisms underlying the subcellular regulation of Gi-protein activity, as well as GPCR-mediated ligand sensing, during chemotaxis in mammalian cells.-Masuda, K., Kitakami, J., Kozasa, T., Kodama, T., Ihara, S., Hamakubo, T. Visualization of ligand-induced Gi-protein activation in chemotaxing cells. © FASEB.

  15. Transcription of gD and gI genes in BHV1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sumit; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2012-12-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein I (gI) genes of bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV1) are contiguous genes with 141 bp region between the two open reading frames (ORFs). Expression of gD and gI from a bicistronic construct containing complete gD and gI gene has been reported either through internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-like element or through the scanning and leakage model (Mukhopadhyay 2000). We here show by computational and experimental means that gD is expressed solely as bicistronic transcript comprising gD and gI coding region in BHV1-infected cells. gI ORF was also shown to express separately. An IRES-like element was also predicted by IRES predicting software in the middle of the gD coding region; within that region a putative promoter was also identified by promoterscan. The intergenic region between the two ORF showed extensive secondary structure which brings the stop codon of gD very close to start codon of gI gene. gD gene transcript in BHV1-infected cells was solely bicistronic. gI transcript was also present in the BHV1-infected cells but in low copy number. The results indicate that gI is probably transcribed from its own transcript in BHV1-infected cells.

  16. When Dreams Came True: The GI Bill and the Making of Modern America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael J.

    This history of the GI Bill of Rights, enacted in 1944, describes how its provisions affected 16 million veterans. The legislative history of the Bill reflects how support and criticism grew from the various political views in Congress and the nation during and immediately after World War II. Through the GI Bill, 7.8 million veterans received…

  17. With GI Bill's Billions at Stake, Colleges Compete to Lure Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2012-01-01

    As the Post-9/11 GI Bill nears its fourth year, with more than 550,000 veterans enrolled in thousands of institutions, advocacy groups, lawmakers, and President Obama warn that veterans are vulnerable in a higher-education marketplace eager for their GI Bill dollars--with some purveyors, particularly for-profits, recruiting aggressively. The…

  18. With GI Bill's Billions at Stake, Colleges Compete to Lure Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2012-01-01

    As the Post-9/11 GI Bill nears its fourth year, with more than 550,000 veterans enrolled in thousands of institutions, advocacy groups, lawmakers, and President Obama warn that veterans are vulnerable in a higher-education marketplace eager for their GI Bill dollars--with some purveyors, particularly for-profits, recruiting aggressively. The…

  19. G.I. Bill Benefits and Enrollments: How Did Vietnam Veterans Fare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattila, J. Peter

    1978-01-01

    Compares enrollment and benefit levels among three G.I. Bill programs (World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam veterans) to determine whether veteran enrollments respond positively to increased G.I. benefits. Concludes that Vietnam veterans' benefits have been less than those of other veterans relative to earnings. Consequently, school enrollments…

  20. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The engine must supply bleed air without adverse effect on the engine, excluding reduced thrust or power...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to hazardous...

  2. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The engine must supply bleed air without adverse effect on the engine, excluding reduced thrust or...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to hazardous...

  11. In the workup of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleed, does 64-slice MDCT have a role?

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chinmay; Moorthy, Srikanth; Sreekumar, Kp; Rajeshkannan, R; Nazar, Pk; Sandya, Cj; Sivasubramanian, S; Ramchandran, Pv

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to prospectively determine the sensitivity of 64-slice MDCT in detecting and diagnosing the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB). Our study included 50 patients (male 30, female 20) in the age range of 3-82 years (average age: 58.52 years) who were referred to our radiology department as part of their workup for clinically evident gastrointestinal (GI) bleed or as part of workup for anemia (with and without positive fecal occult blood test). All patients underwent conventional upper endoscopy and colonoscopy before undergoing CT scan. Following a noncontrast scan, all patients underwent triple-phase contrast CT scan using a 64-slice CT scan system. The diagnostic performance of 64-slice MDCT was compared to the results of capsule endoscopy, 99m-technetium-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy (99mTc-RBC scintigraphy), digital subtraction angiography, and surgery whenever available. CT scan showed positive findings in 32 of 50 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of MDCT for detection of bleed were 72.2%, 42.8%, 81.2%, and 44.4%, respectively. Capsule endoscopy was done in 15 patients and was positive in 10 patients; it had a sensitivity of 71.4%. Eleven patients had undergone 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy prior to CT scan, and the result was positive in seven patients (sensitivity 70%). Digital subtraction angiography was performed in only eight patients and among them all except one patient showed findings consistent with the lesions detected on MDCT. MDCT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool that allows rapid detection and localization of OGIB. It can be used as the first-line investigation in patients with negative endoscopy and colonoscopy studies. MDCT and capsule endoscopy have complementary roles in the evaluation of OGIB.

  12. Gastrointestinal (GI)-Specific patient reported outcomes instruments differentiate between renal transplant patients with or without GI symptoms: results from a South American cohort

    PubMed Central

    Machnicki, Gerardo; Pefaur, Jacqueline; Gaite, Luis; Linchenco, Ana M; Raimondi, Clemente; Schiavelli, Ruben; Otero, Alcira; Margolis, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    Background Immunosuppressive therapies have burdensome side effects which may lead to sub-therapeutic dosing and non-compliance. Patients on different immunosuppressant regimens may feel less bothered by Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects or report better health-related quality of life (HRQL). We evaluated the reliability and validity of two GI-specific outcome instruments (Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS; higher scores = increased severity) and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI; higher scores = better GI-specific HRQL)) in renal transplant patients in South America. Methods Data from 5 South American centers participating in an international, longitudinal, observational study were analyzed. Patients were ≥ 1 month post transplant and on mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and a calcineurin inhibitor. Patients completed the GSRS, GIQLI, and Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB; higher scores = better HRQL) Index at baseline and at 4–6 weeks. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct and discriminant validity were assessed. Results Sixty-two participants were enrolled. Mean age was 42 years; mean time since transplant was 3.3 years; 57% were male; 65% received a deceased organ transplant and 68%had GI events. The GSRS and GIQLI demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alphas 0.72–0.96). Test-retest reliability was adequate (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.6) for all GIQLI subscales and all GSRS subscales except Diarrhea and Reflux syndrome. Correlations between the GSRS and PGWB were moderate (range: -0.21 to -0.53, all p < 0.001 except 6 correlations with p < 0.05); correlations between the GIQLI and PGWB were higher (range: 0.36 to 0.71 p < 0.001), indicating good construct validity. The GSRS and GIQLI demonstrated good discriminant validity, as they clinically and statistically distinguished between patients with and without GI complaints and among patients with varying GI complication severity. Patients

  13. Successful endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding gastric varices with combined cyanoacrylate and aethoxysklerol

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Wu, Yun-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension related to hepatitis infection were admitted to Shanghai Ruijin Hospital due to recurrent melena and hematemesis. Isolated gastric varices were observed in the gastric fundus during the retroflexion of gastroscope. We carried out endoscopic sclerotherapy successfully for bleeding gastric varices with combined cyanoacrylate and aethoxysklerol, which disappeared dramatically several months after two courses of sclerotherapy for each patient. No complication and clinical signs of gastrointestinal re-bleeding were observed during the 6-mo endoscopic follow-up. CT portal angiography (CTPA) has been widely used in the assessment of variceal treatment and improves the results of endoscopic injection therapy. PMID:18567095

  14. Isolated Splenic Vein Thrombosis: 8-Year-Old Boy with Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Mazdaee, Behnaz; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Ravari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-year-old boy who was referred to our center with the complaint of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with hypersplenism and progressive esophageal varices. Performing a computerized tomography (CT) scan, we discovered a suspicious finding in the venography phase in favor of thrombosis in the splenic vein. Once complementary examinations were done and due to recurrent bleeding and band ligation failure, the patient underwent splenectomy. And during the one-year follow-up obvious improvement of the esophageal varices was observed in endoscopy.

  15. A stubborn anemia caused by ectopic pancreas bleeding in the jejunum revealed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is extremely rare in clinical setting. Meanwhile, a stubborn anemia without obvious dark bloody stool due to ectopic pancreas diagnosed by capsule endoscopy has not been reported. We reported a case of an ectopic pancreas inducing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a 70-year-old woman presenting as stubborn anemia, which was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy. The patient recovered well after resection the lesion. Diagnosis of ectopic pancreas is extremely difficult with conventional techniques. Endoscopists should pay more attention to the ectopic pancreas as a rare differential consideration for occult intestinal bleeding. PMID:26682148

  16. [Antisecretory therapy as a component of hemostasis in acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings].

    PubMed

    Gostishchev, V K; Evseev, M A

    2005-01-01

    Results of antisecretory therapy (pyrenzepin, H(2)-blockers, inhibitors of proton pump, octreotid) in 962 patients with acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings (AGDUB) were analyzed over 14-years period. Antisecretory treatment in AGDUB has principally different goals and potential depending on risk of bleeding's recurrence and morphological changes in tissue of gastroduodenal ulcer. Antisecretory therapy is the main treatment in high risk of AGDUB recurrence or before urgent surgery. Intravenous infusion of omeprazol has demonstrated the highest clinical efficacy due to maximal inhibition of gastric secretion and absence of negative influences on oxygen regimen in tissue of ulcer.

  17. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Lovinger, David M.; Mathur, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for regulation of information storage and control of actions, as well as synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity; the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a “common pathway” are described. Here, we review the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate if all Gi/o-GPCR are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD. PMID:25160683

  18. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Brady K; Lovinger, David M; Mathur, Brian N

    2014-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for the regulation of information storage and the control of actions, as well as for synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity, the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a 'common pathway' are described. We review here the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate whether all Gi/o-GPCRs are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD.

  19. GI Consequences of Cancer Treatment: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2016-04-01

    In an era when extensive research is being funded to mitigate the radiation risks of a human traveling to Mars or the potential effects of a nuclear detonation in an urban environment, it is difficult to understand why the medical and research community remains largely uninterested in pelvic radiation disease (PRD), a condition that afflicts half a million patients every year after radiotherapy for pelvic cancer. There has been significant progress in understanding the nature of normal tissue injury, especially as it affects the GI tract. Clear clinical data exist on how best to assess and improve symptoms and there are a number of options for how to modulate the underlying progressive pathophysiology of PRD. Annually, there are more patients who develop PRD than inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite the similarity in PRD and IBD symptoms, the same expertise that promotes assessment, treatment and disease-modifying approaches as standard of care in IBD is almost nonexistent for those suffering from PRD, and as a result the unmet need is enormous. Curing or controlling cancer without addressing quality of life is no longer acceptable when half of all patients diagnosed with cancer live for 10 years after treatment. For those patients afflicted with PRD it can cause significant misery, and this situation is unacceptable; investment in training and research cannot be delayed any longer.

  20. Advanced GI Surgery Training-a Roadmap for the Future: the White Paper from the SSAT Task Force on Advanced GI Surgery Training.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Matthew M; Behrns, Kevin E; Soper, Nathaniel J; Michelassi, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    There is the need for well-trained advanced GI surgeons. The super specialization seen in academic and large community centers may not be applicable for surgeons practicing in other settings. The pendulum that has been swinging toward narrow specialization is swinging the other way, as many trained subspecialists are having a harder time finding positions after fellowship, and if they do find a position, the majority of their practice can actually be advanced GI surgery and not exclusively their area of focused expertise. Many hospitals/practices desire surgeons who are competent and specifically credentialed to perform a variety of advanced GI procedures from the esophagus through the anus. Furthermore, broader exposure in training may provide complementary and overlapping skills that may lead to an even better trained GI surgeon compared to someone whose experience is limited to just the liver and pancreas, or to just the colon and rectum, or to only bariatric and foregut surgery. With work hour restrictions and limitations on autonomy for current trainees in residency, many senior trainees have not developed the skills and knowledge to allow them to be competent and comfortable in the broad range of GI surgery. Such training should reflect the needs of the patients and their diseases, and reflect what many practicing surgeons are currently doing, and what many trainees say they would like to do, if there were such fellowship pathways available to them. The goal is to train advanced GI surgeons who are competent and proficient to operate throughout the GI tract and abdomen with open, laparoscopic, and endoscopic techniques in acute and elective situations in a broad variety of complex GI diseases. The program may be standalone, or prepare a surgeon for additional subspecialty training (transition to fellowship and/or to practice). This group of surgeons should be distinguished from subspecialist surgeons who focus in a narrow area of GI surgery. Advanced GI

  1. Early elective surgery for bleeding ulcer in the posterior duodenal bulb. Own results and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mönig, Stefan P; Lübke, Thomas; Baldus, Stefan E; Schäfer, Hartmuth; Hölscher, Arnulf H

    2002-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding represents the major, potentially life-threatening complication of gastroduodenal ulcer disease with an average mortality of 10%. To decrease mortality a risk-dependent combined endoscopic and operative approach for the treatment of bleeding ulcer in the posterior duodenal wall was developed. Between 1998 and 2000 in our hospital a total of 22 patients with bleeding posterior duodenal bulb ulcer were treated following a differentiated endoscopic-surgical concept. High-risk patients with high bleeding activity (n = 8) underwent early elective surgery after primary endoscopic treatment of the bleeding and stabilization of the patient in an intensive care unit. The management of patients presenting a low-risk profile (n = 14) included careful surveillance and a consecutive second endoscopy 24 hours after the initial endoscopy. Patients that underwent surgery showed more severe secondary diseases than patients of the endoscopic group. Hemoglobin concentration in patients requiring surgery was significantly lower, they showed a higher incidence of hypovolemic shock and received more blood transfusions within the first 24 hours. Mortality was 0% in both groups, a relevant rebleeding occurred in one patient after endoscopic therapy, which was successfully treated by reendoscopy with fibrin injection. Due to these results as well as results of other groups we recommend early elective surgery in high-risk patients with bleeding duodenal bulb ulcer after primary endoscopic treatment of the bleeding.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC "SENTINEL CLOT SIGN" TO IDENTIFY BLEEDING ABDOMINAL ORGANS IN DOGS WITH HEMOABDOMEN.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Auriemma, Edoardo; Morabito, Simona; Ferri, Filippo; Zini, Eric; Piola, Valentina; Pey, Pascaline; Rossi, Federica

    2017-01-01

    The CT "sentinel clot sign" has been defined as the highest attenuation hematoma adjacent to a bleeding organ in humans with hemoabdomen. The aims of this retrospective descriptive multicenter study were to describe CT findings in a sample of dogs with surgically or necropsy confirmed intra-abdominal bleeding and determine prevalence of the "sentinel clot sign" adjacent to the location of bleeding. Medical records between 2012 and 2014 were searched for dogs with hemoabdomen and in which the origin of the bleeding was confirmed either with surgery or necropsy. Retrieved CT images were reviewed for the presence and localization of the "sentinel clot sign," HU measurements of the "sentinel clot sign" and hemoabdomen, and presence of extravasation of contrast media within the abdominal cavity. Nineteen dogs were included. Three dogs were excluded due to the low amount of blood that did not allow the identification of a "sentinel clot sign." A "sentinel clot sign" was detected in the proximity of the confirmed bleeding organ in 14/16 (88%) of the patients. The mean HU of the "sentinel clot sign" was 56 (range: 43-70) while that of the hemoabdomen was 34 (range: 20-45). Active hemorrhage was identified as extravasation of contrast medium within the peritoneal cavity from the bleeding organ in three dogs. In conclusion, the CT "sentinel clot sign" may be helpful for identifying the source of bleeding in dogs with hemoabdomen. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  3. [An unusual case of carotid arrosion bleeding].

    PubMed

    Zengel, P; Mees, K; Müller-Schunk, S; Suckfüll, M

    2009-11-01

    Carotid bleeding is one of the most severe complications in ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgery. It is a rare complication in patients with cancer of the head and neck after radiochemotherapy. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who suffered from cancer of the tonsils (pT2pN1M0) and was treated in 1987 with surgery and local chemotherapy. Since then he reported recurrent bleeding in the left cervical region especially during physical exertion. The patient was re-operated and during surgery the tip of a catheter was found in the external carotid artery, obviously a remnant from a catheter for intra-arterial chemotherapy. The tip was removed, the defect closed and covered with a pectoralis major muscle flap.

  4. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  5. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up.

  6. Relationships of Un and Gi seasons of birth to clinical symptoms and signs.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Jae; Kim, Tae-Hee; Jin, Seng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-03-01

    Season of birth (SOB) is a medical term used to describe the relationship between the season in which one is born and his or her physiologic and pathological characteristics. In East Asian medicine, the Un-Gi SOB is based on the Yin-yang-Five Phases theory. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between Un-Gi SOB and a multitude of clinical symptoms and signs, and to examine which of the Un and Gi seasons has the greatest impact on these symptoms and signs. Using the Delphi method, three Un-Gi experts formulated a 26-item questionnaire consisting of clinical symptoms and signs, with each item rated on a Likert 7-point scale. A total of 1057 Korean adolescents (583 males, 474 females) completed the 26-item questionnaire. After identifying the Un and Gi seasons of all subjects, item scores were evaluated to determine whether there was a difference between Un and Gi seasons. For Un seasons, males born in the Wood season had greater indigestion and were less physically active, whereas females born in the Earth season were better able to concentrate but had slower rates of growth. For Gi seasons, males born in the Fire season had greater indigestion and morning fatigue, and males born in the Earth season had higher tension. There was no relationship between symptoms, signs, and the Gi SOB in females. This indicates that males born in Wood Un and Gi seasons are susceptible to Earth-related clinical problems, whereas females born in the Earth Un season are susceptible to Earth-related clinical problems. The study results suggest that Un-Gi seasons based on the Yin-yang-Five Phases are related to clinical symptoms and signs, with significant differences between genders.

  7. Evaluation of patients' attitudes towards stroke prevention and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, S; Regpala, S; Lacombe, S; Sharma, M; Gibbens, S; Ball, D; Francis, K

    2014-03-03

    Patient's values and preferences regarding the relative importance of preventing strokes and avoiding bleeding are now recognised to be of great importance in deciding on therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation (SPAF). We used an iPad questionnaire to determine the minimal clinically important difference (Treatment Threshold) and the maximum number of major bleeding events that a patient would be willing to endure in order to prevent one stroke (Bleeding Ratio) for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy in 172 hospital in-patients with documented non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulant therapy was being considered. Patients expressed strong opinions regarding SPAF. We found that 12% of patients were "medication averse" and were not willing to consider antithrombotic therapy; even if it was 100% effective in preventing strokes. Of those patients who were willing to consider antithrombotic therapy, 42% were identified as "risk averse" and 15% were "risk tolerant". Patients required at least a 0.8% (NNT=125) annual absolute risk reduction and 15% relative risk reduction in the risk of stroke in order to agree to initiate antithrombotic therapy, and patients were willing to endure 4.4 major bleeds in order to prevent one stroke. In conclusion, there was a substantial amount of inter-patient variability, and often extreme differences in opinion regarding tolerance of bleeding risk in the context of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. These findings highlight the importance of considering patient preferences when deciding on SPAF therapy.

  8. Role of red blood cell scintigraphy for determining the localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sanlı, Yasemin; Ozkan, Zeynep Gözde; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Yanar, Hakan; Balık, Emre; Tokmak, Handan; Türkmen, Cüneyt; Adalet, Işık

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the role of Tc-99m labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy for determination of localization of gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. Fifty-seven cases (27 females, 30 males; mean age 43.9±24; range 1 to 91 years) who referred to our clinic between 1995-2010 were evaluated for determination of localization of GIS bleeding with RBC scintigraphy. Prior to scintigraphy, gastroscopy in 51, colonoscopy in 45, and angiography in 9 patients were performed. RBC scintigraphies were positive and negative in 31 and 26 patients, respectively. Positive scintigraphic findings were obtained within the 1st hour of dynamic imaging in 19 patients, within the 1st-4th hour static images in 7, and within the 4th-24th hour images in 5 patients. Fourteen patients underwent surgical exploration. In 13 patients, the surgery confirmed the diagnosis by RBC scintigraphy (accuracy: 92.8%). Of 43 patients without surgical exploration, 12 had anemia due to iron deficiency and their scintigraphic evaluation were negative. Four patients died and in 27 patients, GIS bleeding ceased spontaneously or with conservative measures. Scintigraphy should be the primary tool for accurate diagnosis of patients with active GIS bleeding. Positive dynamic images obtained within the first hour of imaging may be more accurate for demonstrating bleeding localization and a good predictor of requirement of surgical exploration.

  9. Correlating clinical manifestations with factor levels in rare bleeding disorders: a report from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Viswabandya, A; Baidya, S; Nair, S C; Abraham, A; George, B; Mathews, V; Chandy, M; Srivastava, A

    2012-05-01

    Data on the clinical manifestations of patients with clotting factor defects other than Haemophilia A, B and von Willebrand disease are limited because of their rarity. Due to their autosomal recessive nature of inheritance, these diseases are more common in areas where there is higher prevalence of consanguinity. There is no previous large series reported from southern India where consanguinity is common. Our aim was to analyze clinical manifestations of patients with rare bleeding disorders and correlate their bleeding symptoms with corresponding factor level. Data were collected in a standardized format from our centre over three decades on 281 patients who were diagnosed with rare bleeding disorders (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V (FV), FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV or FVIII deficiency). Patients with liver dysfunction or those on medications which can affect factor level were excluded. All patients with <50% factor levels were included in this analysis. Patients were analysed for their salient clinical manifestations and it was correlated with their factor levels. The data shows that FXIII deficiency is the commonest and FXI deficiency is the rarest in Southern India. There was no significant difference in bleeding symptoms among those who were < or >1% factor coagulant activities among all disorders, except for few symptoms in FVII and FX deficiency. An international collaborative study is essential to find out the best way of classifying severity in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

  10. 20-year experience of managing profuse bleeding in gestational trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ka Yu; Chan, Karen K L; Tam, Kar Fai; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung

    2007-05-01

    To review the outcomes of different methods in the treatment of severe bleeding or acute abdomen in gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). In a tertiary referral center, the records of patients diagnosed with GTD and presenting with heavy vaginal bleeding or acute abdomen between January 1986 and December 2005 were retrieved. Seventeen patients presenting with heavy bleeding or acute abdomen and requiring emergency management were identified. Ten patients had heavy vaginal bleeding, and 7 had shock or signs of hemoperitoneum. Eleven patients had total abdominal hysterectomy with or without bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH +/- BSO), 2 had arterial ligation, 3 had embolization, and 1 had suturing of a vaginal defect due to a metastatic nodule. The median ages of the patients having TAH +/- BSO and other conservative treatments were 37 (21-52) and 32.5 (26-48), respectively. Fifteen patients received chemotherapy after surgical treatment. All patients survived except 1, who died of concurrent disease. Profuse bleeding in GTD is rare. Hysterectomy, arterial ligation and angiographic embolization can effectively treat this condition. With more experience, angiographic embolization should be the treatment of choice, especially for those who are hemodynamically stable and wish to retain their fertility potential.

  11. Does the Preoperative Administration of Steroids Reduce Intraoperative Bleeding during Endoscopic Surgery of Nasal Polyps?

    PubMed

    Hwang, Se Hwan; Seo, Jae Hyun; Joo, Young Hoon; Kang, Jun Myung

    2016-12-01

    Corticosteroids are frequently used in a range of otorhinolaryngologic conditions due to their anti-inflammatory and antiedematous properties. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the role of preoperative steroids for attenuating intraoperative bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery among patients with nasal polyps. PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and Cochrane database. Literature was screened from January 1980 to January 2016. Five articles comparing patients who were preoperatively administered steroids (steroid groups) with patients who received a placebo or no treatment (control group) were included for analysis, which encompassed intraoperative bleeding, endoscopic surgical field visibility, operative time, and side effects during endoscopic sinus surgery. Intraoperative bleeding and operative time during endoscopic sinus surgery in the steroid group were significantly reduced as compared with the control group. Additionally, the preoperative administration of steroids had a significant effect on improving endoscopic surgical field visibility during sinus surgery. There were no significant adverse effects reported in the enrolled studies. In subgroup analyses of these results, steroids showed similar effects on intraoperative bleeding regardless of administration type (topical or systemic). This study demonstrated that the preoperative administration of steroids in patients with nasal polyps could effectively reduce intraoperative bleeding. However, the duration of treatment and dosing standard require further investigation, and more trials need to be included. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  12. Fatal Retroperitoneal Bleeding Caused by Neurofibromatosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moerbeek, Patrick R.; van Buijtenen, Jesse M.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.

    2015-01-01

    A young female was brought into the emergency department with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after local resection of neurofibromateous lesions. Chest ultrasonography was normal. Abdominal ultrasonography was not performed. After successful resuscitation a total body CT-scan was performed to rule out potential bleeding sources. However, haemodynamic instability reoccurred and the scan had to be aborted at the thoracoabdominal level. No thoracic abnormalities were found. Resuscitation was reinitiated and abdominal ultrasonography was performed, showing a large amount of abdominal fluid. A progressive fall in haemoglobin was noted. Emergency laparotomy was performed, revealing a large retroperitoneal haematoma. Despite ligation and packing, bleeding continued. Postoperative angiography showed active bleeding from a branch of the left internal iliac artery, which could be successfully coiled. Unfortunately, the patient died five days later due to irreversible brain damage. Revision of an MRI scan made one year earlier showed a 10 cm large retroperitoneal neurofibromatous lesion exactly at the location of the current bleeding. This case shows that patients with neurofibromatosis might develop spontaneous life-threatening bleeding from retroperitoneal located lesions. Furthermore, it points out the necessity of focused assessment with ultrasonography of the abdomen in all patients with PEA of unknown origin. PMID:25688270

  13. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding (p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01–12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98–51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522 PMID:27913777

  14. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  15. Late-onset severe biliary bleeding after endoscopic pigtail plastic stent insertion

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Muneji; Sato, Hideki; Koyama, Yuki; Sakakida, Tomoki; Kawakami, Takumi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Fujii, Hideki; Nakatsugawa, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Shinya; Tomatsuri, Naoya; Okuyama, Yusuke; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ito, Takaaki; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Norimasa

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report our experience with a case of severe biliary bleeding due to a hepatic arterial pseudoaneurysm that had developed 1 year after endoscopic biliary plastic stent insertion. The patient, a 78-year-old woman, presented with hematemesis and obstructive jaundice. Ruptured hepatic arterial pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed, which was suspected to have been caused by long-term placement of an endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD) stent. This episode of biliary bleeding was successfully treated by transarterial embolization (TAE). Pseudoaneurysm leading to hemobilia is a rare but potentially fatal complication in patients with long-term placement of ERBD. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure that offers effective treatment for biliary bleeding. PMID:28216982

  16. Barriers to the implementation of practice guidelines in managing patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sean M; Murray, Suzanne; Dupuis, Martin; Dawes, Martin; Hawes, Ian A; Barkun, Alan N

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Guidelines for the management of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) are inconsistently applied by health care providers, potentially resulting in suboptimal care and patient outcomes. A needs assessment was performed to assess health care providers’ barriers to the implementation of these guidelines in Canada. METHODS: Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted by trained research personnel with 22 selectively sampled health care professionals actively treating and managing NVUGIB patients, including emergency room physicians (ER), intensivists (ICU), gastroenterologists (GI), gastroenterology nurses and hospital administrators. Participants were chosen from a representative sample of six Canadian community- and academic-based hospitals that participated in a national Canadian audit on the management of NVUGIB. RESULTS: Participants reported substantive gaps in the implementation of NVUGIB guidelines that included the following: lack of knowledge of the specifics of the NVUGIB guidelines (ER, ICU, nurses); limited belief in the value of guidelines, especially in areas where evidence is lacking (ER, ICU); limited belief in the value of available tools to support implementation of guidelines (GI); lack of knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of health care professions and disciplines, and lack of effective collaboration skills (ER, ICU and GI); variability of knowledge and skills of health care professionals within professions (eg, variability of nurses’ knowledge and skills in endoscopic procedures); and perceived overuse of intravenous proton pump inhibitor treatment, with limited concern regarding cost or side effect implications (all participants). CONCLUSIONS: In the present study population, ER, ICU and nurses did not adhere to NVUGIB guidelines because they were neither aware of nor familiar with them, whereas the GI lack of adherence to NVUGIB guidelines was influenced more by

  17. Jejunogastric intussusception presenting as tumor bleed

    PubM