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Sample records for gi bleeds due

  1. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  2. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  3. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  4. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ...

  5. Esophageal Dieulafoy's lesion: an exceedingly rare cause of massive upper GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, George P; Carollo, Andrea; Bogen, Gregg

    2016-06-14

    Dieulafoy's lesion, a dilated aberrant submucosal vessel which erodes the overlying epithelium, is a relatively rare but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. The esophagus is a very rare location for the lesion. Here we present a case of massive upper GI bleeding, secondary to this remarkably rare occurrence, which was amendable to endoscopic intervention.

  6. Metastatic Testicular Choriocarcinoma: A Rare Cause of Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Jacqueline; Armstrong, Sharon; Walsh, Shaun; Groome, Max; Mowat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old man who presented with melena. Endoscopy revealed an ulcerated mass in the stomach and pathology confirmed this to be a malignant, poorly differentiated choriocarcinoma. Further imaging showed a left testicular mass with evidence of pulmonary, gastric, and brain metastases, and blood tests revealed an hCG level of 32,219 U/L. He was diagnosed with advanced metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma and underwent intensive induction chemotherapy and an orchidectomy. Metastatic testicular choriocarcinoma is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26504875

  7. Studies of GI bleeding with scintigraphy and the influence of vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; McLean, G.K.

    1981-07-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding depends on accurate localization of the site of hemorrhage. Endoscopy and arteriography, although successful in achieving this goal in the majority of patients, are invasive and have other shortcomings. The introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique has greatly simplified the evaluation and management of these patients. This test is useful in detecting and localizing the bleeding site in the lower GI tract. Scintigraphy is now used as the initial study of choice in patients with rectal bleeding. Advances made in angiography and nuclear medicine techniques also have resulted in improved management of patients. Conservative approaches succeed in controlling hemorrhage in most patients. Vasopressin is the most widely tested agent and has been adopted by many as the preferred preparation for this purpose. Before the introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique, angiography was used to monitor the effectiveness of this drug, whether administered intravenously or intraarterially. With the use of scintigraphy and intravenous administration of vasopressin, these patients now can be managed noninvasively. Only when the intravenous Pitressin infusion fails to stop hemorrhage, is the intraarterial approach considered. Surgery is used as a last resort when these measures fail to stop the bleeding.

  8. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pham, Toan; Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/- SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization.

  9. Super-Selective Mesenteric Embolization Provides Effective Control of Lower GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bob Anh; Ooi, Kevin; Mykytowycz, Marcus; McLaughlin, Stephen; Croxford, Matthew; Skinner, Iain; Faragher, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and super-selective mesenteric artery embolization (SMAE) in managing lower GI bleeding (LGIB). Method. A retrospective case series of patients with LGIB treated with SMAE in our health service. Patients with confirmed active LGIB, on either radionuclide scintigraphy (RS) or contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CE-MDCT), were referred for DSA +/− SMAE. Data collected included patient characteristics, screening modality, bleeding territory, embolization technique, technical and clinical success, short-term to medium-term complications, 30-day mortality, and progression to surgery related to procedural failure or complications. Results. There were fifty-five hospital admissions with acute unstable lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were demonstrable on CE-MDCT or RS over a 31-month period. Eighteen patients proceed to embolization, with immediate success in all. Eight patients (44%) had clinical rebleeding after intervention, warranting repeated imaging. Only one case (5.6%) demonstrated radiological rebleeding and was reembolized. Complication rate was excellent: no bowel ischaemia, ischaemic stricture, progression to surgery, or 30-day mortality. Conclusion. SMAE is a viable, safe, and effective first-line management for localised LGIB. Our results overall compare favourably with the published experiences of other institutions. It is now accepted practice at our institution to manage localised LGIB with embolization. PMID:28210507

  10. hypertensive intracranial bleed due to mid aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poovazhagi, Varadarajan; Pauline, Leema; Balakrishnan, N

    2014-03-01

    The authors describe an 11-y-old child with intracranial bleed due to malignant hypertension. Child presented with hypertension, right hemiparesis, feeble femoral pulses and lower limb blood pressure less than the upper limb. CT angiogram revealed narrowing of the abdominal aorta with thinned out left renal artery and hypoplasia of the left kidney. A diagnosis of Mid aortic syndrome was arrived at. CT brain revealed left ganglio capsular bleed. Child was treated with antihypertensives and steriods in view of suspected Takayasu arteritis. Child recovered with minimal hemiparesis and is being followed up.

  11. Upper GI bleeding in an urban hospital. Etiology, recurrence, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawa, C; Steffes, C P; Nakamura, R; Sferra, J J; Sferra, C S; Sugimura, Y; Fromm, D

    1990-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) continues to be a common cause of hospital admission and morbidity and mortality. This study reviews 469 patients admitted to a surgical service of an urban hospital. There were 562 total admissions because 53 patients were readmitted 93 times (recurrence rate, 20%). The most common causes of bleeding, all endoscopically diagnosed, included acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) (135 patients, 24%), esophageal varices (EV) (121 patients, 22%), gastric ulcer (108 patients, 19%), duodenal ulcer (78 patients, 14%), Mallory-Weiss tear (61 patients, 11%), and esophagitis (15 patients, 3%). Nonoperative therapy was sufficient in 504 cases (89.5%). Endoscopic treatment was used in 144 cases. Operations were performed in 58 cases (10.5%), including 29% of ulcers. Emergency operations to control hemorrhage were required in only 2.5% of all cases. The rate of major surgical complications was 11% and the mortality rate was 5.2%. There were 58 deaths (12.6%), with 36 deaths directly attributable to UGIB. Factors correlating with death include shock at admission (systolic blood pressure less than 80), transfusion requirement of more than five units, and presence of EV (all p less than 0.001). Most cases of UGIB can be treated without operation, including endoscopic treatment, when diagnostic endoscopy establishes the source. Subsequent operation in selected patients can be done with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:2222017

  12. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  13. Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... GERD) in Adults Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants ...

  14. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  15. Overheating Anomalies during Flight Test Due to the Base Bleeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry; Hafiychuck, Halyna; Osipov, Slava; Ponizhovskaya, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Dagostino, Mark; Canabal, Francisco; Mobley, Brandon L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the analytical and numerical studies of the plume interaction with the base flow in the presence of base out-gassing. The physics-based analysis and CFD modeling of the base heating for single solid rocket motor performed in this research addressed the following questions: what are the key factors making base flow so different from that in the Shuttle [1]; why CFD analysis of this problem reveals small plume recirculation; what major factors influence base temperature; and why overheating was initiated at a given time in the flight. To answer these questions topological analysis of the base flow was performed and Korst theory was used to estimate relative contributions of radiation, plume recirculation, and chemically reactive out-gassing to the base heating. It was shown that base bleeding and small base volume are the key factors contributing to the overheating, while plume recirculation is effectively suppressed by asymmetric configuration of the flow formed earlier in the flight. These findings are further verified using CFD simulations that include multi-species gas environment both in the plume and in the base. Solid particles in the exhaust plume (Al2O3) and char particles in the base bleeding were also included into the simulations and their relative contributions into the base temperature rise were estimated. The results of simulations are in good agreement with the temperature and pressure in the base measured during the test.

  16. SU-E-T-41: Analysis of GI Dose Variability Due to Intrafraction Setup Variance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J; Wolfgang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) can be an effective modality for treatment of gastrointestinal tumors, but limited in practice due to sensitivity with respect to variation in the RPL (radiological path length). Small, intrafractional shifts in patient anatomy can lead to significant changes in the dose distribution. This study describes a tool designed to visualize uncertainties in radiological depth in patient CT's and aid in treatment plan design. Methods: This project utilizes the Shadie toolkit, a GPU-based framework that allows for real-time interactive calculations for volume visualization. Current SBRT simulation practice consists of a serial CT acquisition for the assessment of inter- and intra-fractional motion utilizing patient specific immobilization systems. Shadie was used to visualize potential uncertainties, including RPL variance and changes in gastric content. Input for this procedure consisted of two patient CT sets, contours of the desired organ, and a pre-calculated dose. In this study, we performed rigid registrations between sets of 4DCT's obtained from a patient with varying setup conditions. Custom visualizations are written by the user in Shadie, permitting one to create color-coded displays derived from a calculation along each ray. Results: Serial CT data acquired on subsequent days was analyzed for variation in RPB and gastric content. Specific shaders were created to visualize clinically relevant features, including RPL (radiological path length) integrated up to organs of interest. Using pre-calculated dose distributions and utilizing segmentation masks as additional input allowed us to further refine the display output from Shadie and create tools suitable for clinical usage. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a method to visualize potential uncertainty for intrafractional proton radiotherapy. We believe this software could prove a useful tool to guide those looking to design treatment plans least insensitive

  17. 75 FR 64314 - Product Development Program for Interventions in Patients With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... With Severe Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Bleeding Due to Trauma or Other Causes.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to discuss possible... resulting from trauma, has been complicated by the lack of a consensus definition of severe bleeding as...

  18. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  19. Therapeutic failure with thalidomide in patients with recurrent intestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo Navarro, María Del Carmen; Hernando Verdugo, Mercedes; Cardaba Garcia, Elena; Sanchez Sanchez, M Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Angiodysplasias are one of the reasons of gastrointestinal bleeding, whose origin is usually due to vascular malformations. There are different types of therapies for angiodysplasia such as endoscopic, angiographic and pharmacological techniques. Among the last ones, there is little variety of effective drugs to treat the disease. We describe the therapeutic failure with thalidomide in a male with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasias. A thorough diagnostic work-up, including gastroscopy, enteroscopy, angiography and capsule endoscopy were performed. Despite treatment with high-dose somatostatin analogues and oral iron, the patient continued bleeding. The patient was administered then thalidomide for three months with no clinical response. Thalidomide had to be withdrawn owing to adverse effects.

  20. [Peritoneal bleeding due to acquired hemophilia during an abdominal sepsis clinical picture].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, J A; Chiacchiara, D N; Adducci, M C; Pilipec, A E; Leone, G; González, E

    2006-10-01

    Bleeding diatheses are frequent alterations during sepsis and surgical-anesthetic aggression. Generally, the bleeding is related with platelet dysfunction, inadequate surgical hemostasis, vitamin K deficit, etc. We present the case of a patient with no background of coagulopathy who, after two surgical interventions, developed abdominal sepsis and peritoneal hematoma after puncture for drainage of abdominal collection, due to an autoimmune origin factor VIII acquired deficit. The hematoma caused a picture of hypovolemic shock that required transfusion of several units of red blood cells, expansion and drug support. Finally, the bleeding was controlled by treatment with immunosuppressants, recombinant activated factor VII (RFVIIa) and polyvalent gammaglobulin. The peritoneal hematoma was drained surgically and the patient evolved towards improvement until being discharged from the intensive therapy unit.

  1. Refractory bleeding from intestinal angiodysplasias successfully treated with danazol in three patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Botero, Juliana Perez; Pruthi, Rajiv K

    2013-12-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is associated with development of gastrointestinal (GI) vascular malformations that lead to chronic GI bleeding. Conventional management, including von Willebrand factor concentrate replacement and endoscopic ablation or bowel resection, does not consistently reduce hemorrhage. We describe three patients with VWD for whom conventional management failed to control GI bleeding. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with VWD and GI bleeding. After patients began treatment with danazol, we observed long-term reductions in GI bleeding and packed red blood cell transfusion requirements. One patient had severe liver toxicity and was found to have concomitant primary biliary cirrhosis. Danazol use may be considered in patients with VWD and GI bleeding due to angiodysplasia that otherwise fails to respond to conventional treatment; the primary aim of treatment is to reduce transfusion dependence. The benefits are variable and possibly transient. Monitoring for toxicity is important when this treatment is pursued.

  2. Management of hematometrocolpos due to dysfunctional uterine bleeding following progestin use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bakacak, Murat; Avci, Fazil; Bostanci, Mehmet Suhha; Bakacak, Zeyneb; Serin, Salih; Ercan, Onder; Kostu, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Hematometrocolpos is accumulation of blood in the vagina and uterine cavity due to intra-uterine hemorrhage. A 20-year-old female presented to our clinic with massive menorrhagia at menarche after progestin usage. Hematometrocolpos was detected by transabdominal ultrasonography. She was pale because of heavy bleeding for 5 days and hemoglobin level was measured as 5.1 g/dl. Initial treatment was blood transfusion and medical drug therapy. After resolution of the hematometrocolpos was shown by transabdominal ultrasound 2 days later, the patient, who was stable, was discharged without complication. Obstruction of the female genital outflow tract is rarely seen. Hematocolpos has been reported in elderly women following vaginal occlusion due to radiotherapy, vaginal fibroma and labial synechiae causing infection or inflammatory conditions. The case is presented here because of the successful management of hematometrocolpos due to massive dysfunctional uterine bleeding in a young virgin patient. PMID:28058301

  3. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, S; Sarkar, S; Verma, R; Dubey, Sk; Roy, Mk

    2010-07-01

    "Haemosuccus pancreaticus" is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes.

  5. Hypovolemic shock due to severe gastrointestinal bleeding in a child taking an herbal syrup.

    PubMed

    Moro, Paola Angela; Flacco, Valerio; Cassetti, Federica; Clementi, Valentina; Colombo, Maria Laura; Chiesa, Giulia Maria; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto; Santuccio, Carmela

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-years-old boy who was admitted with hypovolemic shock due to a severe gastrointestinal bleeding. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) showed hiatus hernia, erosions and ulcerations of the lower esophagus, possibly due to a gastroesophageal reflux, and a small duodenal erosion. The child was previously healthy and he had never shown any symptoms related to this condition. The only product taken by the child in the previous days was a syrup containing several herbs, among which Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. and Salix spp. (known to contain salicylates), marketed as food and prescribed by his paediatrician to treat a mild cold accompanied by fever. Quali-quantitative analysis confirmed the presence of salicylates in the syrup. Naranjo algorithm showed a probable correlation between the onset of symptoms and the consumption of the herbal remedy. The child recovered after receiving intensive care. The product was withdrawn from Italian market.

  6. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to 'Dieulafoy's vascular malformation' of the jejunum: case report.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Chatman, D. M.; Kaviani, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Dieulafoy reported three cases of massive gastric hemorrhage due to a dilated submucosal artery in 1898, and since then, more than 100 cases of this gastric vascular malformation have been reported in the literature. These same pathologic lesions are even a rarer occurrence in the small bowel. This article reports a 38-year-old hypotensive male who presented to the hospital after an acute onset of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage; superior mesenteric angiography demonstrated an actively bleeding lesion in a proximal jejunal branch. Intraoperative small bowel endoscopy via an enterotomy demonstrated a 4 mm bleeding submucosal lesion 30 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A literature review revealed six other cases of Dieulafoy's vascular malformation that occurred in the small bowel, with the lesions located in the proximal jejunum between 15 cm and 45 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. The cause of these lesions is unknown. This case demonstrates the importance of preoperative angiography and intraoperative endoscopy when massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is suspected to be from a small bowel source. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7473854

  7. Adaptation and validation of an adverse drug reaction preventability score for bleeding due to vitamin K antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Liabeuf, Sophie; Masmoudi, Kamel; Scailteux, Lucie-Marie; Moragny, Julien; Masson, Henri; Brnet-Dufour, Valérie; Andrejak, Michel; Gras-Champel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although drug therapy is inherently associated with the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), some of these events are preventable. The estimated proportion of preventable ADRs varies from one study or clinical context to another. Bleeding caused by antithrombotic agents (and particularly vitamin K antagonists, VKAs) constitutes one of the most frequent causes of ADR-related hospitalization. Hence, the objective of the present study was to adapt and validate an ADR preventability score for bleeding due to VKAs and evaluate the preventability of bleeding in 906 consecutive hospitalized, VKA-treated adult patients with a risk of major bleeding (defined as an international normalized ratio ≥5) over a 2-year period. A specific preventability scale for VKA-associated bleeding was developed by adapting a published tool. Overall, 241 of the 906 patients in the study experienced at least 1 VKA-associated bleeding event. The scale's reliability was tested by 2 different evaluators. The inter-rater reliability (evaluated by calculation of Cohen's kappa) ranged from “good” to “excellent.” Lastly, the validated scale was used to assess the preventability of the VKA-associated bleeding. We estimated that bleeding was preventable or potentially preventable in 109 of the 241 affected patients (45.2%). We have developed a useful, reliable tool for evaluating the preventability of VKA-associated bleeding. Application of the scale in a prospective study revealed that a high proportion of VKA-associated bleeding events in hospitalized, at-risk adult patients were preventable or potentially preventable. PMID:27684801

  8. Assessing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Gabrielle; Kruger, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring accurate, prompt, and appropriate patient evaluation and management. Clinicians of all specialties must know the best practices for preventing and managing upper GI bleeding. This article focuses on assessing and managing adults with acute nonvariceal upper GI bleeding.

  9. Hematemesis Due to a Pseudoaneurysm of the Splenic Artery Secondary to Gastric Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Kyu Chung, Seok Kyun; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2005-05-15

    Gastric tuberculosis (TB) is very rare compared with other sites in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and upper GI bleeding is an extremely rare manifestation of gastric TB. Also, a pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon cause of GI bleeding and is often encountered with pancreatitis. To our knowledge, no case of GI bleeding due to a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery secondary to gastric TB has been reported previously. We report a patient who presented with hematemesis due to a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery secondary to gastric TB.

  10. The natural history of occult or angiodysplastic gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Makris, M; Federici, A B; Mannucci, P M; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Yee, T T; Abshire, T; Berntorp, E

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most challenging complications encountered in the management of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). The commonest cause is angiodysplasia, but often no cause is identified due to the difficulty in making the diagnosis. The optimal treatment to prevent recurrences remains unknown. We performed a retrospective study of VWD patients with occult or angiodysplastic bleeding within the setting of the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN) to describe diagnostic and treatment strategies. Centres participating in the VWD PN recruited subjects under their care with a history of congenital VWD and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplasia, or cases in which the cause was not identified despite investigation. Patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome or those for whom the GI bleeding was due to another cause were excluded. Forty-eight patients from 18 centres in 10 countries were recruited. Seven individuals had a family history of GI bleeding and all VWD types except 2N were represented. Angiodysplasia was confirmed in 38%, with video capsule endoscopy and GI tract endoscopies being the most common methods of making the diagnosis. Recurrent GI bleeding in VWD is associated with significant morbidity and required hospital admission on up to 30 occasions. Patients were treated with multiple pharmacological agents with prophylactic von Willebrand factor concentrate being the most efficient in preventing recurrence of the GI bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of recurrent GI bleeding in congenital VWD remains challenging and is associated with significant morbidity. Prophylactic treatment with von Willebrand factor concentrate was the most effective method of preventing recurrent bleeding but its efficacy remains to be confirmed in a prospective study.

  11. Massive Bleeding as the First Clinical Manifestation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer due to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Enhanced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João Madeira; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Meneses Santos, João

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is the most frequent coagulation disorder associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. However, DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as an initial presentation of prostate cancer is extremely rare. The appropriate treatment to control bleeding in these situations is challenging, controversial, and based on isolated case reports in the literature. A 66-year-old male presented at the emergency department with acute severe spontaneous ecchymoses localized to the limbs, laterocervical hematoma, and hemothorax. Prostate specific antigen level was 385 μg/L, bone scintigraphy revealed multiple bone metastases, and prostate biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma (Gleason 9; 4 + 5). Laboratory investigation showed a pattern of enhanced fibrinolysis rather than the more common intravascular coagulation mechanism. Epsilon aminocaproic acid in monotherapy was initiated with a clear and rapid control of bleeding manifestations. This rare case of massive bleeding due to DIC with enhanced fibrinolysis as the first manifestation of prostate cancer suggests that in selected cases where the acute bleeding dyscrasia is clearly associated with a dominant fibrinolysis mechanism it is possible to use an approach of monotherapy with antifibrinolytics. PMID:27803823

  12. [Bleeding during central venous catheterization : Cannot intubate, cannot ventilate due to massive cervical hematoma].

    PubMed

    Engelen, C; Trebes, C; Czarnecki, S; Junger, A

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is an invasive procedure which can be associated with severe complications. These include in particular unsuccessful arterial puncture and vascular injuries, which in addition to loss of blood can lead to massive soft tissue swelling. A 63-year-old female patient developed massive cervical bleeding during ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein puncture and the rapidly enlarging hematoma led to compromisation of the airway. A cannot intubate, cannot ventilate situation developed and the subsequent hypoxia led to cardiac arrest that was only resolved after emergency surgical tracheotomy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  13. [Treating severe acute anemia due to vaginal bleeding in the Jehovah's Witness: a report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gredilla, E; Pérez-Ferrer, A; Canser, E; Alonso, E; Martínez Serrano, B; Gilsanz, F

    2009-12-01

    For reasons of religious belief, Jehova's Witnesses do not accept blood transfusions or the infusion of blood products. In situations in which severe, life-threatening anemia develops, patient refusal to receive a transfusion can create serious ethical and legal problems. The principle of patient autonomy, which implies the freedom to accept or reject treatment, comes into conflict with the physician's obligation to safeguard the patient's life using all means possible. We report 2 cases of severe anemia in Jehova's Witnesses. One was due to menorrhagia and the other to postpartum bleeding. The physician should be aware of alternatives to infusion of blood products and know how to cope with an unexpected critical event in these patients. The measures we took were effective in our patients. In the case of menorrhagia, hormone treatment is effective when the woman wishes to preserve the ability to conceive and avoid surgery (endometrial ablation and hysterectomy). In postpartum bleeding refractory to conservative treatment, selective embolization of bleeding vessels may make it unnecessary to resort to more aggressive treatment, such as obstetric hysterectomy.

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Also in Spanish GI bleeding - slideshow (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Diagnosis and Tests Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Long-Term ( ...

  15. Talking about GI Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders Talking About GI Disorders Personal Stories Social Security Benefits Contact Us About Kids & Teens GI Health ... Disorders Talking About GI Disorders Personal Stories Social Security Benefits Contact Us Talking About GI Disorders Home ...

  16. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular events due to NSAIDs in the diabetic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungmee; Lee, Joongyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and cardiovascular (CV) risks such as myocardial infarction or stroke associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use among elderly patients with diabetes. Methods Using a nationwide claims database covering 2008–2012, we conducted a cohort study of patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years. Among the 117 610 patients, NSAID users and non-users were propensity score matched, excluding any who had experienced a potentially confounding event in the year prior to cohort entry. Multivariate Cox regression models treating death as competing risk were used. Results There were 2184 (1.86%) cases of GIB and NSAID users had an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.68 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.83) of GIB risk after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and recent medications compared to NSAID non-users. There were 9333 (7.94%) cases of myocardial infarction or stroke with an aHR of 1.20 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.25). The risk of GIB was higher in patients with liver disease and renal failure, while that of CV events was higher in patients who received anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, aspirin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The number needed to harm was 111 for GIB and 77 for CV events. Among different NSAIDs, nimesulide increased the risk of GIB and ketorolac increased the risk of CV events compared to celecoxib (aHR 2.60 and 3.13, respectively). Conclusions Elderly patients with diabetes treating NSAIDs had a significantly higher risk of both upper GIB and CV events compared to NSAID non-users, and the risk varied among different NSAIDs regardless of cyclooxygenase-2 activity. PMID:26719806

  17. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  18. Hysterectomy due to Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in a 15-year Old Girl with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Park, Eun Young; Jung, Sang Woo; Song, Seung Woo; Lim, Hyun Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is characterized by mental retardation, atypical facial features, broad thumbs and toes, and scoliosis. Polycystic ovaries are associated with chronic anovulation and abnormal uterine bleeding. A 15-year old female patient was diagnosed with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome, and had prolonged abnormal uterine bleeding for 2 years, accompanied by a polycystic ovary. As she showed no improvement during hormonal therapy or medical treatment, a hysterectomy was performed to control the bleeding. PMID:27924288

  19. Risk Factors for Vascular Occlusive Events and Death Due to Bleeding in Trauma Patients; an Analysis of the CRASH-2 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pealing, Louise; Perel, Pablo; Prieto-Merino, David; Roberts, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular occlusive events can complicate recovery following trauma. We examined risk factors for venous and arterial vascular occlusive events in trauma patients and the extent to which the risk of vascular occlusive events varies with the severity of bleeding. Methods and Findings We conducted a cohort analysis using data from a large international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial (The CRASH-2 trial) [1]. We studied the association between patient demographic and physiological parameters at hospital admission and the risk of vascular occlusive events. To assess the extent to which risk of vascular occlusive events varies with severity of bleeding, we constructed a prognostic model for the risk of death due to bleeding and assessed the relationship between risk of death due to bleeding and risk of vascular occlusive events. There were 20,127 trauma patients with outcome data including 204 (1.01%) patients with a venous event (pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis) and 200 (0.99%) with an arterial event (myocardial infarction or stroke). There were 81 deaths due to vascular occlusive events. Increasing age, decreasing systolic blood pressure, increased respiratory rates, longer central capillary refill times, higher heart rates and lower Glasgow Coma Scores (all p<0.02) were strong risk factors for venous and arterial vascular occlusive events. Patients with more severe bleeding as assessed by predicted risk of haemorrhage death had a greatly increased risk for all types of vascular occlusive event (all p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with severe traumatic bleeding are at greatly increased risk of venous and arterial vascular occlusive events. Older age and blunt trauma are also risk factors for vascular occlusive events. Effective treatment of bleeding may reduce venous and arterial vascular occlusive complications in trauma patients. PMID:23251374

  20. Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Andree; Brauhmbhatt, Bhaumik; Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma to the stomach. Prostate cancer, which is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men, rarely spreads to the stomach, with only 7 cases reported in the English literature. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and GI bleeding. Our patient was treated with epinephrine injection and bipolar cautery, but GI bleeding recurred 7 months later when he had worsening of his thrombocytopenia while using ibuprofen. PMID:28377935

  1. Ankaferd Blood Stopper for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding due to distinct benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Mevlut; Onal, Ibrahim Koral; Akdogan, Meral; Kekilli, Murat; Arhan, Mehmet; Sayilir, Abdurrahim; Oztas, Erkin; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, Ankaferd Health Products Ltd, Turkey) hemostatic agent for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding associated with various benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures. METHODS: The records of all patients who underwent upper and lower endoscopy procedures at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital (Ankara, Turkey) between April 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed. Patients in whom ABS was used as a primary or adjuvant hemostatic agent were included in the study. Rates of bleeding control and postprocedural complications were documented. RESULTS: Hemostasis with no immediate complications was achieved in all patients within seconds of endoscopic application of ABS. CONCLUSIONS: ABS may have a role as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to conventional modalities used to control gastrointestinal bleeding. Prospective controlled studies are needed to help establish its efficacy and, perhaps, offer a comparison with conventional hemostatic interventions. PMID:20559581

  2. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  3. Learn About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  4. About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  5. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a young patient with Budd Chiari syndrome due to a mutation of factor V Leiden: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dina, Ion; Iacobescu, Claudia; Goldis, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    Budd Chiari syndrome or hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a complex entity with multiple etiologies and various clinical manifestations. It is often difficult to establish the diagnosis. The most common cause is a hypercoagulable state due to either genetic disorders of blood coagulation or several acquired conditions such as hematological diseases, tumors, infections, chronic inflammatory diseases, pregnancy. The most common clinical presentation is hepatomegaly, abdominal pain and ascites, but the onset can also be dramatical and life threatening with upper digestive bleeding due to portal hypertension through postsinusoidal blockage. We report the case of a young patient with a coagulation disorder secondary to a mutation of factor V Leiden, who presented with upper digestive bleeding as the first manifestation of Budd Chiari syndrome and who also was associated with myocardial infarction in his past medical history.

  6. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  7. Elevated C-reactive protein level predicts lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be caused by colorectal polyps or cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify blood test variables and medications that can predict lower GI bleeding, which would allow for appropriate colonoscopy. The medical records of patients who underwent colonoscopy from September 2014 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The selected patients included 278 men (mean age, 67.0±11.5 years) and 249 women (mean age, 69.6±12.0 years). The diagnosis, medications, and blood test variables were compared between patients with and without bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with lower GI bleeding. The presence of colorectal polyp and cancer was associated with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0044) with an odds ratio of 6.71 (P=0.0148). No lower GI bleeding was observed in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, or anticoagulants. The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0227). The Hb levels were lower in patients with lower GI bleeding, however this finding was not statistically significant (P>0.05). No blood test variable was associated with lower GI bleeding. Elevated CRP was associated with lower GI bleeding, while there was no association between the medications and lower GI bleeding. PMID:27284411

  8. One hundred and one over-the-scope-clip applications for severe gastrointestinal bleeding, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Wedi, Edris; Gonzalez, Susana; Menke, Detlev; Kruse, Elena; Matthes, Kai; Hochberger, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and clinical outcome of patients treated with an over-the-scope-clip (OTSC) system for severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage, perforations and fistulas. METHODS: From 02-2009 to 10-2012, 84 patients were treated with 101 OTSC clips. 41 patients (48.8%) presented with severe upper-gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, 3 (3.6%) patients with lower-GI bleeding, 7 patients (8.3%) underwent perforation closure, 18 patients (21.4%) had prevention of secondary perforation, 12 patients (14.3%) had control of secondary bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and 3 patients (3.6%) had an intervention on a chronic fistula. RESULTS: In 78/84 patients (92.8%), primary treatment with the OTSC was technically successful. Clinical primary success was achieved in 75/84 patients (89.28%). The overall mortality in the study patients was 11/84 (13.1%) and was seen in patients with life threatning upper GI hemorrhage. There was no mortality in any other treatment group. In detail OTSC application lead to a clinical success in 35/41 (85.36%) patients with upper GI bleeding and in 3/3 patients with lower GI bleeding. Technical success of perforation closure was 100% while clinical success was seen in 4/7 cases (57.14%) due to attendant circumstances unrelated to the OTSC. Technical and clinic success was achieved in 18/18 (100%) patients for the prevention of bleeding or perforation after endoscopic mucosal resection and ESD and in 3/3 cases of fistula closure. Two application-related complications were seen (2%). CONCLUSION: This largest single center experience published so far confirms the value of the OTSC for GI emergencies and complications. Further clinical experience will help to identify optimal indications for its targeted and prophylactic use. PMID:26855543

  9. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  10. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Rivaroxaban: A Comparative Study with Warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Tupper, Ruth; Spurr, Charles; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with rivaroxaban has not been studied extensively. The aim of our study was to assess this risk in comparison to warfarin. Methods. We examined the medical records for patients who were started on rivaroxaban or warfarin from April 2011 to April 2013. Results. We identified 300 patients (147 on rivaroxaban versus 153 on warfarin). GI bleeding occurred in 4.8% patients with rivaroxaban when compared to 9.8% patients in warfarin group (p = 0.094). GI bleeding occurred in 8% with therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban (>10 mg/d) compared to 9.8% with warfarin (p = 0.65). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who were on rivaroxaban for ≤40 days had a higher incidence of GI bleeding than those who were on it for >40 days (OR = 2.8, p = 0.023). Concomitant use of dual antiplatelet agents was associated with increased risk of GI bleeding in the rivaroxaban group (OR = 7.4, p = 0.0378). Prior GI bleeding was also a risk factor for GI bleeding in rivaroxaban group (OR = 15.5). Conclusion. The incidence of GI bleeding was similar between rivaroxaban and warfarin. The risk factors for GI bleeding with rivaroxaban were the first 40 days of taking the drug, concomitant dual antiplatelet agents, and prior GI bleeding. PMID:26880901

  11. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. For blood ... body needs cells called platelets and proteins known as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, ...

  12. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  13. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    SciTech Connect

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  14. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  15. Balancing efficacy and bleeding risk in the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation with newer oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B; Verma, Subhash; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Tripathi, A K; Bhave, Abhay; Deshpande, Anand; Vora, Amit; Dalal, Jamshed J; Shah, A B; Bichu, S

    2012-09-01

    With the evaluation and approval of newer oral anticoagulants such as the factor IIa inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, strategies for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation need a thorough re-evaluation of current options. Clinicians are naturally excited about the imminent introduction of these newer drugs that do not need international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring, besides having no drug-food and minimal drug-drug interactions. However, as with all new drugs, it is always prudent to use these judiciously so that they stay in our therapeutic armamentarium for a long time. More than 56 years after the introduction of warfarin we now have three drugs, viz., dabigatran 150 mg bid, rivaroxaban 20 mg od, and apixaban 5 mg bid which were effective in comparison with warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and bleeding in the landmark trials, RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, and ARISTOTLE respectively. There is a thin dividing line between physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Routine INR monitoring may not be required but in special situations, such as prior to major surgery, overdose, non-compliance or stroke while on the anticoagulant, one may wish to know whether there are any laboratory measures of efficacy or means of reversal of over anticoagulation. Similar questions may be raised about other situations such as renal dysfunction, cardioversion, ablation procedures, post-stenting, or switch to and from warfarin, heparin or LMWH? This document is an attempt to address these concerns based on available evidence and give physicians a perspective and practice guidelines on how best to use these agents, both old and new, for optimal patient outcomes, maximizing efficacy and minimizing risk.

  16. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... barium or flavoring in the barium intestinal obstruction Seek care right away If you have any of the following symptoms after an upper GI series, seek medical attention right away: fever no bowel movement ...

  17. Upper GI Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or IV fluids during or after the procedure. Seek Care Right Away If you have any of the following symptoms after an upper GI endoscopy, seek medical care right away: chest pain problems breathing ...

  18. Lower GI Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... GI series. • an allergic reaction to the barium. • bowel obstruction—partial or complete blockage of the small or large intestine. Although rare, bowel obstruction can be a life-threatening condition that requires ...

  19. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    MedlinePlus

    ... effect of using a nonhormonal intrauterine device for birth control. When an IUD is the cause of excessive menstrual bleeding, you may need to remove it. Pregnancy complications. A single, heavy, late period may be due to a miscarriage. If ...

  20. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  1. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make

    PubMed Central

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. PMID:28242804

  2. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible. PMID:27281100

  3. Lower GI Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... may ask the person to change position several times to evenly coat the large intestine with the barium • if the health care provider has ordered a double-contrast lower GI series, the radiologist will inject air through the tube ...

  4. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; McKusick, K.A.; Froelich, J.W.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    Using a modified in vivo /sup 99m/Tc red cell labeling technique, gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy was performed in 100 patients with GI bleeding. Sixty-two patients with melena or bright red blood per rectum had positive scintiscans. In comparison to results of angiography, endoscopy, surgery and contrast radiography, radionuclide scintigraphy correctly located the site of bleeding in 83% of patients. The procedures could be performed over a 24 hr period which increased the sensitivity of the test since 85% of the scintiscans were positive at one hr or greater after the onset of imaging. The procedure was more sensitive than angiography in detecting sources of GI bleeding. We conclude that GI bleeding scintigraphy /sup 99m/Tc-red cells in an accurate and effective method to detect upper and lower GI bleeding in patients with acute intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Geography Controls GI Bill Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Stuart F.

    Analyzing FY 74 GI Bill data seems to confirm that a Vietman veteran's chances of using the GI Bill turn on what state he is from. Geography controls opportunities because the formula of today's GI Bill, unlike that of World War II's Bill, ignores state differences in educational costs. This legislative formula inadvertently minimizes veterans'…

  6. Middle-term mortality and re-bleeding after initial diverticular bleeding: A nationwide study of 365 mostly elderly French patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Diane; Gallois, Claire; Lahmek, Pierre; Lesgourgues, Bruno; Champion, Christine; Charpignon, Claire; Faroux, Roger; Bour, Bruno; Remy, André-Jean; Naouri, Chantal; Picon, Magali; Poncin, Eric; Macaigne, Gilles; Seyrig, Jacques-Arnaud; Bernardini, David; Bellaïche, Guy; Grasset, Denis; Henrion, Jean; Heluwaert, Frédéric; Piperaud, René; Bordes, Gilbert; Bourhis, Francois; Arpurt, Jean-Pierre; Pariente, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to determine the mortality and re-bleeding rates, and the risk factors involved, in a cohort of patients with previous diverticular bleeding (DB). Methods In 2007, data on 2462 patients with lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding were collected prospectively at several French hospitals. We studied the follow-up of patients with DB retrospectively. The following data were collected: age, mortality rates and re-bleeding rates, drug intake, surgery and comorbidities. Results Data on 365 patients, including 181 women (mean age 83.6 ± 9.8 years) were available. The median follow-up time was 3.9 years (IQR 25–75: 1.7–5.4). Of these, 148 patients died (40.5%). Among the 70 patients (19.2%) who had at least one re-bleeding episode, nine died and three underwent surgical procedures. Anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy was discontinued in 70 cases (19.2%). The independent risk factors contributing to mortality were age > 80 years (HR = 3.18 (2.1–4.9); p < 0.001) and a Charlson comorbidity score > 2 (1.91 (1.31–2.79); p = 0.003). Discontinuation of therapy was not significantly associated with a risk of death due to cardiovascular events. No risk factors responsible for re-bleeding were identified, such as antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in particular. Conclusions In this cohort, the rates of mortality and DB re-bleeding after a median follow-up time of 3.9 years were 19.2% and 40.5%, respectively. The majority of the deaths recorded were not due to re-bleeding.

  7. Bleeding manifestations in snake bite.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, T

    1979-06-01

    Bleeding following bites by the Malayan Pit Viper can either be local or systemic. Bleeding at the site of the bite is due to the local action of the venom as a vasculotoxin. Systemic bleeding occurs with severe poisoning and appears to be mainly dependent on platelet deficiency and the co-existing defibrination syndrome appears to play a minor role in the initiation of bleeding. Thus in the clinical situation non-clotting blood with no overt bleeding can continue up to weeks when specific antivenene is not given. Assessment of the severity of poisoning can easily be made at the bedside. Specific viper antivenene rapidly corrects the spontaneous bleeding and clotting defect of severe systemic poisoning but has no effect on local poisoning.

  8. Bevacizumab and gastrointestinal bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Enns, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of severe, refractory gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) whose massive transfusion dependence was lifted shortly after treatment with bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. The patient’s bleeding had been refractory to repeated endoscopic interventions, tranexamic acid, and tamoxifen. However, following treatment with bevacizumab at 5 mg/kg every other week, nearly 300 units of packed red blood cell transfusions were avoided in one year’s time. Despite its relatively high cost, bevacizumab may have a more active role in the management of severe GI bleeding in HHT if such remarkable response can be consistently demonstrated. PMID:28070235

  9. Bleeding Disorders in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Bleeding Disorders in Women Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... a bleeding disorder. What is excessive bleeding in women? Women with excessive bleeding may experience heavy, hard- ...

  10. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible.

  11. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  12. Femoral neuropathy due to retroperitoneal bleeding. A red herring in medicine complicates anticoagulant therapy and influences the Russian Communist Revolution (Crown Prince Alexis, Rasputin).

    PubMed

    Willbanks, O L; Willbanks, S E

    1983-02-01

    Femoral neuropathy occurs when occult retroperitoneal bleeding impinges on the appropriate nerve roots. The syndrome involves the acute onset of groin and thigh pain with characteristic flexion and external rotation of the hip. It may mimic other conditions such as acute arterial occlusion. Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the femoral nerve explains the clinical features and leads the clinician to suspect the occurrence of this syndrome. Three cases have been reviewed that exhibited this condition as a result of retroperitoneal bleeding, a complication of systemic heparin therapy. The hemophilia that afflicted Alexis, the Crown Prince of Russia and son of Tsar Nicholas and Tsarina Alexandra, resulted in this clinical syndrome. The consequences enabled the sinister starets, Gregory Rasputin, to become intimately involved with the royal family, influencing the response of the Tsar to the political events in Russia, thereby playing an important role in setting the stage for the 1917 Russian communist revolution.

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding and possible hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Leisa L

    2012-03-01

    An 88-year-old female, living independently in the community, developed duodenal and gastric ulcers from using overthe-counter naproxen sodium for pain related to a shoulder fracture and arthritis of the knees. She was hospitalized and received packed red blood cells and intravenous proton pump inhibitor therapy. During her hospitalization, she developed atrial fibrillation (AF). Warfarin was not prescribed for stroke prevention because of the gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was initially placed on atenolol, and then amiodarone was added. After a two-week hospital stay she was discharged to a nursing facility to gain strength, further correct her anemia, and receive physical therapy for the shoulder and ambulation problems from arthritis of the knees. The amiodarone was continued in the nursing facility. After 15 days of amiodarone therapy (hospital and nursing facility), a laboratory report indicated an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Levothyroxine was prescribed. The patient was eventually discharged to an assisted living facility once her strength returned and her ambulation improved. GI bleeding with anemia and weakness from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and changes in thyroid function with amiodarone therapy for AF will be discussed.

  14. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine may be injected into the varices. A rubber band may be placed around the bleeding veins ( ... nadolol that reduce the risk of bleeding. A rubber band can be placed around the bleeding veins ...

  15. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  16. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  17. A clinically viable capsule endoscopy video analysis platform for automatic bleeding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Xie, Jean; Mui, Peter; Leighton, Jonathan A.; Pasha, Shabana; Rentz, Lauri; Abedi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic bleeding detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos for GI tract run about 8 hours and are manually reviewed by physicians to locate diseases such as bleedings and polyps. As a result, the process is time consuming and is prone to disease miss-finding. While researchers have made efforts to automate this process, however, no clinically acceptable software is available on the marketplace today. Working with our collaborators, we have developed a clinically viable software platform called GISentinel for fully automated GI tract bleeding detection and classification. Major functional modules of the SW include: the innovative graph based NCut segmentation algorithm, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant features, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling various GI tract scenes (e.g. normal tissue, food particles, bubbles, fluid, and specular reflection). Initial evaluation results on the SW have shown zero bleeding instance miss-finding rate and 4.03% false alarm rate. This work is part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. While the overall SW framework is designed for intelligent finding and classification of major GI tract diseases such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos, this paper will focus on the automatic bleeding detection functional module.

  18. Topical tranexamic acid as a novel treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Shoaran, Maryam; Ghergherechi, Robabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcers are among the most common causes of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children. The standard care for GI bleeding is endoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We aimed to assess the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) via endoscopic procedures in children with GI bleeding caused by bleeding ulcers. Procedure: In this randomised controlled trial, 120 children were evaluated by diagnostic procedures for GI bleeding, of which 63 (30 girls, 33 boys) aged 1-month to 15 years were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. In the case group, TXA was administered directly under endoscopic therapy. In the control group, epinephrine (1/10,000) was submucosally injected to the four quadrants of ulcer margins as the routine endoscopic therapy. In both groups, the patients received supportive medical therapy with intravenous fluids and proton pump inhibitor drugs. Results: The mean ± standard deviation age of the children was 5 ± 2.03 years. Rebleeding occurred in 15 (11.4%) and 21 (9.8%) patients in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.50). The frequency of blood transfusion episodes (P = 0.06) and duration of hospital stay (P = 0.07) were not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion: Using topical TXA via endoscopic procedures may be effective in cases of GI bleedings caused by active bleeding ulcers. In order to establish this therapeutic effect, a large number of clinical studies are needed. PMID:27251517

  19. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  20. A novel approach to assess the spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents using Apc(min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huijun; Shang, Jin; Keohane, CarolAnn; Wang, Min; Li, Qiu; Ni, Weihua; O'Neill, Kim; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents is usually performed in healthy animals with some form of vascular injury to peripheral organs to induce bleeding. However, bleeding observed in patients with currently marketed antithrombotic drugs is typically spontaneous in nature such as intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which happens most frequently on top of preexisting pathologies such as GI ulcerations and polyps. Apc(min/+) mice are reported to develop multiple adenomas through the entire intestinal tract and display progressive anaemia.In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Apc(min/+) mice as a model for assessing spontaneous GI bleeding with antithrombotic agents. Apc(min/+) mice exhibited progressive blood loss starting at the age of nine weeks. Despite the increase in bleeding, Apc(min/+) mice were in a hypercoagulable state and displayed an age-dependent increase in thrombin generation and circulating fibrinogen as well as a significant decrease in clotting times. We evaluated the effect of warfarin, dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and clopidogrel in this model by administering them in diet or in the drinking water to mice for 1-4 weeks. All of these marketed drugs significantly increased GI bleeding in Apc(min/+) mice, but not in wild-type mice. Although different exposure profiles of these antithrombotic agents make it challenging to compare the bleeding risk of compounds, our results indicate that the Apc(min/+) mouse may be a sensitive preclinical model for assessing the spontaneous GI bleeding risk of novel antithrombotic agents.

  1. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  2. Arteriojejunal Fistula Presenting with Recurrent Obscure GI Hemorrhage in a Patient with a Failed Pancreas Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Nirmit; Patel, Sagar; Nwosu, Chinyere; Sung, Lok; Buscaglia, Jonathan M.; Nord, Edward P.; Wadhwa, Nand K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with a failed pancreaticoduodenal allograft with exocrine enteric-drainage who developed catastrophic gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage. Over the course of a week, she presented with recurrent GI bleeds of obscure etiology. Multiple esophago-gastro-duodenoscopic (EGD) and colonoscopic evaluations failed to reveal the source of the hemorrhage. A capsule endoscopy and a technetium-labeled red blood cells (RBC) imaging study were similarly unrevealing for source of bleeding. She subsequently developed hemorrhagic shock requiring emergent superior mesenteric arteriography. Run off images revealed an external iliac artery aneurysm with fistulization into the jejunum. Coiled embolization was attempted but abandoned because of hemodynamic instability. Deployment of a covered endovascular stent into the right external iliac artery over the fistula site resulted in immediate hemodynamic stabilization. A high index of suspicion for arterioenteric fistulae is needed for diagnosis of this uncommon but eminently treatable form of GI hemorrhage in this patient population. PMID:24455393

  3. Intractable Hematuria After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Can Lessons Learned from Gastrointestinal Bleeding Be Applied?

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Zhao, Lee; Reyentovich, Alex; Deanda, Abe; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) are at increased risk of bleeding. We reviewed our institutional experience with bleeding in the urinary tract after CF-LVAD implantation and quantified the impact on hospital resource utilization in comparison with bleeding in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the most commonly reported mucosal site of bleeding after LVAD implantation. Records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing CF-LVAD implantation at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. Major adverse events of gross hematuria and GI bleeding were identified, and patient demographics and hospital course were reviewed. Gross hematuria occurred in 3 of the 35 patients (8.6%) and in 5.1% of all hospitalizations for CF-LVAD patients. Severe hematuria occurred after traumatic urethral catheterization, urinary retention, or urologic surgery. Hospitalization for hematuria was six times less likely than hospitalization for GI bleeding; however, hematuria hospitalizations lasted 3.2 times longer than GI bleeding hospitalizations (17.0 vs. 5.3 days). Late recurrent gross hematuria occurred in all cases, with rehospitalization occurring after 109 ± 53 days. In conclusion, gross hematuria is an infrequent but morbid bleeding complication in CF-LVAD patients. Strategies to avoid this complication include strict avoidance of traumatic urethral catheterization and urinary retention in high-risk patients.

  4. Bruising and Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, pregnancy, systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus), or kidney failure Prior excessive or unusual bleeding or transfusions Family history of excessive bleeding People are asked about use ...

  5. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. DUB is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause. DUB is unpredictable. The bleeding may be very heavy or light and can occur often or randomly.

  6. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... throwing up blood or your vomit looks like coffee grounds Long or heavy periods (women) Headaches that do not go away or are very bad Blurry or double vision Abdominal pains Alternative Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow ...

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  8. The STOP the Bleeding Campaign

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, traumatic injuries worldwide are responsible for over 5 million deaths annually. Post-traumatic bleeding caused by traumatic injury-associated coagulopathy is the leading cause of potentially preventable death among trauma patients. Despite these facts, awareness of this problem is insufficient and treatment options are often unclear. The STOP the Bleeding Campaign therefore aims to increase awareness of the phenomenon of post-traumatic coagulopathy and its appropriate management by publishing European guidelines for the management of the bleeding trauma patient, by promoting and monitoring the implementation of these guidelines and by preparing promotional and educational material, organising activities and developing health quality management tools. The campaign aims to reduce the number of patients who die within 24 hours after arrival in the hospital due to exsanguination by a minimum of 20% within the next 5 years. PMID:23635083

  9. Prevention of acrylonitrile-induced gastrointestinal bleeding by sulfhydryl compounds, atropine and cimetidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Ahmed, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that acrylonitrile (VCN) causes acute gastric hemorrhage and mucosal erosions. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of the sulfhydryl-containing compounds, cysteine and cysteamine, the cholinergic blocking agent atropine and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine on the VCN-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in rats. Our data shows that pretreatment with L-cysteine, cysteamine, atropine or cimetidine has significantly protected rats against the VCN-induced GI bleeding. A possible mechanism of the VCN-induced GI bleeding may involve the interaction of VCN with critical sulfhydryl groups that, in turn, causes alteration of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors to lead to gastric hemorrhagic lesions and bleeding.

  10. The significance and work-up of minor gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitalized nursing home patients.

    PubMed Central

    Suatengco, R.; Posner, G. L.; Marsh, F.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive admissions from nursing homes who underwent a gastrointestinal (GI) consult for coffee ground vomitus or occult GI bleeding to evaluate the outcome were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether a GI work-up was or would have been useful. There were 15 deaths, all associated with severe infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy, barium studies, and a history of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use or peptic ulcer disease did not affect the management or outcome. No patient developed major GI bleeding. When nursing home patients present with coffee ground vomitus or newly found occult blood in the stool, efforts should be made to identify and vigorously treat any acute underlying infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy is not helpful in this clinical situation. Both the primary care physician and the GI consultant should be aware of these associations and should focus on the underlying etiology. PMID:7473849

  11. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  12. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  13. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  14. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  15. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters.

  16. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations.

  17. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  18. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week ® GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Practice Management Quality & Safety STAR Certificate Programs Trifecta DDW Videos International ... Outlook 2017 (GO): The Practice Management Conference Practice Management Courses Quality & Safety ... Registry MACRA Resource Center Practice Accreditation ...

  19. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  20. Haemosuccus pancreaticus, an uncommon cause of upper gastro intestinal bleeding: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amir Ali; Charon, Jean Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Haemosuccus Pancreaticus is defined as upper gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding from the ampula of vater via the pancreatic duct. It is most commonly associated with pancreatic inflammation, erosion of the pancrease by aneurysm or pseudo-aneurysm of the splenic artery. We report a 69 year old man with previous history of acute pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent haematemesis. Initial upper GI endocopy was normal, while admitted, he collapse with abdominal pain and hypotension. He was resuscitated with blood and intravenous fluid. Repeat upper GI endocopy showed fresh blood in the duodenum, but no active bleeding site was demonstrated. An urgent coeliac axis CT angiogram was done which showed an splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm, which was successfully embolized. Patient is well 9 months after the procedure. This case highlights the importance of considering coeliac axis CT angiogram as part of investigation for obscure GI bleeding.

  1. GI tract tumors with melanocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Dipti M; Patil, Deepa T; Goldblum, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract tumors with melanocytic differentiation may present significant diagnostic challenges both for the pathologist and the clinician. This comprehensive review discusses the relatively common as well as rare entities that have melanocytic differentiation in the GI tract. Clinical, histologic, immunohistochemical and molecular features are discussed along with prognosis and differential diagnosis.

  2. Piroxicam-β-Cyclodextrin: A GI Safer Piroxicam

    PubMed Central

    Scarpignato, C

    2013-01-01

    Although NSAIDs are very effective drugs, their use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse reactions in the liver, kidney, cardiovascular (CV) system, skin and gut. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects are the most common and constitute a wide clinical spectrum ranging from dyspepsia, heartburn and abdominal discomfort to more serious events such as peptic ulcer with life-threatening complications of bleeding and perforation. The appreciation that CV risk is also increased further complicates the choices of physicians prescribing anti-inflammatory therapy. Despite prevention strategies should be implemented in patients at risk, gastroprotection is often underused and adherence to treatment is generally poor. A more appealing approach would be therefore to develop drugs that are devoid of or have reduced GI toxicity. Gastro-duodenal mucosa possesses many defensive mechanisms and NSAIDs have a deleterious effect on most of them. This results in a mucosa less able to cope with even a reduced acid load. NSAIDs cause gastro-duodenal damage, by two main mechanisms: a physiochemical disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier and systemic inhibition of gastric mucosal protection, through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, PG endoperoxide G/H synthase) activity of the GI mucosa. However, against a background of COX inhibition by anti-inflammatory doses of NSAIDs, their physicochemical properties, in particular their acidity, underlie the topical effect leading to short-term damage. It has been shown that esterification of acidic NSAIDs suppresses their gastrotoxicity without adversely affecting anti-inflammatory activity. Another way to develop NSAIDs with better GI tolerability is to complex these molecules with cyclodextrins (CDs), giving rise to so-called “inclusion complexes” that can have physical, chemical and biological properties very different from either those of the drug or the cyclodextrin. Complexation of NSAIDs with β-cyclodextrin potentially leads

  3. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 , bleeding may be a sign of: The placenta separating from the inner wall of the uterus ... the baby is born ( abruptio placentae ) Miscarriage The placenta is covering all or part of the opening ...

  4. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    Protect aging skin. Avoid trauma such as bumping or pulling on skin areas. For a cut or scrape, use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. If you have a drug reaction, ask your provider about stopping the drug. Otherwise, follow ...

  5. Hemostasis Achieved Endoscopically for Diverticular Bleeding from the Horizontal Portion of the Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Matuso, Yasumasa; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Midori; Ishigooka, Shinya; Ozawa, Shun-ichiro; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Diverticulum of the horizontal portion of the duodenum is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Since it is difficult to access the horizontal portion of the duodenum by standard upper GI endoscopy, only a very few cases of endoscopic hemostasis have been reported. Herein, we report a case of diverticular bleeding from the horizontal portion of the duodenum for which hemostasis was achieved using a small-caliber colonoscope, which has an insertion part designed with a passive-bending function/high-force transmission and a transparent tip hood. PMID:26692767

  6. The wheat TaGI1, involved in photoperiodic flowering, encodes an Arabidopsis GI ortholog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang Yu; Liu, Mao Sen; Li, Jia Rui; Guan, Chun Mei; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2005-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important crop and requires long day and short night to flower. To study the molecular mechanism of photoperiodic regulation of flowering in this species, we isolated a wheat TaGI1 gene, an ortholog of GIGANTEA (GI) in Arabidopsis. RNA blot hybridization revealed that TaGI1 is expressed in leaves in a rhythmic manner under long day and short day conditions and its rhythmic expression is regulated by photoperiods and circadian clocks. Further study demonstrated that the TaGI1 rhythmic expression in the leaves of seedlings is initiated by photoperiods, implying that TaGI1 does not show circadian regulation until after being entrained in a light/dark cycle. Interestingly, TaGI1 mRNA was detected in adaxial epidermal cells right above the vascular bundles of leaves, suggesting that the localization of TaGI1 transcripts in leaves may function to regulate flowering in response to photoperiods. Since overexpression of TaGI1 altered flowering time in wild type and complemented the gi mutant in Arabidopsis, it confirmed that TaGI1 is an ortholog of GI in Arabidopsis.

  7. [Risk and prevention of gastrointestinal complications due to low-dose aspirin and other antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François

    2008-09-15

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhages are the main complications associated with low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic drugs. In France, low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic agents use has been found in 30% of upper GI and 40% of lower GI bleeding episodes. Main causes of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and colonic diverticulosis. Recent cohort studies have shown that the relative risk of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was comprised between 2 and 4 and the absolute risk comprised between 1 per 100 and 1 per 1000 aspirin users per year. Main risk factors for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are concomitant antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids use, and recent history of complicated or non-complicated gastroduodenal ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin, but infection should be searched and treated only in patients with peptic ulcer. Despite eradication of H. pylori in the latter patients, gastroprotection with PPI is strongly recommended. In patients presenting with peptic ulcer bleeding with low-dose aspirin, aspirin should be continued in association with PPI rather than replaced with clopidogrel. Discontinuation of low-dose aspirin which exposes to increased cardiovascular complications and mortality should be avoided, even in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding.

  8. A typical presentation of a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Bettenworth, Dominik; Mees, Sören Torge; Neumann, Jörg; Beyna, Torsten; Domschke, Wolfram; Wessling, Johannes; Ullerich, Hansjörg

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old white woman had suffered from intermittent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding for one year. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and peroral double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) did not detect any bleeding source, suggesting obscure GI bleeding. However, in videocapsule endoscopy a jejunal ulceration without bleeding signs was suspected and this was endoscopically confirmed by another peroral DBE. After transfusion of packed red blood cells, the patient was discharged from our hospital in good general condition. Two weeks later she was readmitted because of another episode of acute bleeding. Multi-detector row computed tomography with 3D reconstruction was performed revealing a jejunal tumor causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with partial jejunal resection and end-to-end jejunostomy for reconstruction. Histological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Nine days after surgery the patient was discharged in good health. No signs of gastrointestinal rebleeding occurred in a follow-up of eight months. We herein describe the complex presentation and course of this patient with GIST and also review the current approach to treatment. PMID:21403816

  9. Ten Questions to Ask Your GI Endoscopist...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week ® GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Practice Management Quality & Safety STAR Certificate Programs Trifecta DDW Videos International ... Outlook 2017 (GO): The Practice Management Conference Practice Management Courses Quality & Safety ... Registry MACRA Resource Center Practice Accreditation ...

  10. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  11. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of haemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients.

  12. Idiopathic omental bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D; Satgunam, S

    2012-01-01

    Omental bleeding without any evidence of trauma, aneurysms, or other pathology has been rarely described in the literature. We report a case of a 24 year-old female on aspirin/acetaminophen/caffeine for migraines who presented with abdominal pain and tachycardia. Computed tomography angiography revealed active extravasation in the right lower quadrant. During exploratory laparotomy, a small bleeding artery within the greater omentum was suture ligated, and two liters of fresh and clotted blood were evacuated. The patient recovered successfully. We review the diagnosis and management of this rare condition. PMID:24960788

  13. Rare Jejunal Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Christman, Emily; Hassell, Lewis A.; Kastens, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) secondary to jejunal diverticulosis (JD) is very rare. Delay in establishing a diagnosis is common and GIB from JD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report an illustrative case diagnosed by push enteroscopy and managed with surgery. PMID:27800518

  14. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  15. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  16. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding Among Dabigatran Users – A Self Controlled Case Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenze; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Zhou, Meijia; Singh, Sonal

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the real world risk of gastrointestinal bleeding among users naïve to dabigatran. We adopted a self-controlled case series design. We sampled 1215 eligible adult participants who were continuous insured users between July 1, 2010 and March 31, 2012 with use of dabigatran and at least one gastrointestinal bleeding episode. We used a conditional Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios. The population consisted of 64.69% of male and 60.25% patients equal to or greater than age 65 at start of observation. After adjustment for time-variant confounders, the incidence rate of gastrointestinal bleeding was similar during dabigatran risk period and non-exposed period (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90, 1.15). There was no significant difference in GI incidence rate between periods of dabigatran and warfarin (IRR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.75–1.31). Among this database of young and healthy participants, dabigatran was not associated with increased incidence rate of GI bleeding compared with non-exposed period among naïve dabigatran users. We did not detect an increased risk of GI bleeding over dabigatran vs warfarin risk period. Along with other studies on safety and effectiveness, this study should help clinicians choose the appropriate anticoagulant for their patients. PMID:28106053

  17. TRALI Syndrome Complicated by Retroperitoneal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay A; Zeltsman, David

    2011-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underdiagnosed and underreported syndrome which by itself is the third leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The incidence of TRALI is reported to be 1 in 2000 to 5000 transfusions. When combined with uncontrollable bleeding, survival is unachievable. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, who underwent open heart surgery as an infant to correct his congenital heart disease in association with right pulmonary artery atresia. He presented with hemoptysis secondary to aspergilloma and required a pneumonectomy of the nonfunctional right lung. During pneumolysis, significant bleeding occurred from the superior vena cava. The patient required a blood transfusion and was placed on cardiopulmonary bypass to control the bleeding. Simultaneous occurrence of severe pulmonary edema and retroperitoneal bleeding were noted. Approximately 8 L of frothy edema fluid were drained from the only functional left lung starting ~15 minutes after the transfusion and lasting for several hours until the end of the case. It most likely represented TRALI syndrome. Increasing abdominal girth and poor volume return to the pump were consistent with and pathognomonic for retroperitoneal bleeding. Though primary surgical bleeding in the chest was controlled successfully and a pneumonectomy performed without further difficulty, we were unable to separate the patient from cardiopulmonary bypass due to the inability to oxygenate. As a result, we could not reverse the anti-coagulation which potentially exacerbated the retroperitoneal bleeding. After multiple unsuccessful attempts the patient succumbed. This ill-fated case demonstrates the quandary of obtaining vascular access for emergency cardiopulmonary bypass while in the right thoracotomy position. It may be beneficial to have both the femoral artery and vein cannulated before positioning a patient in a lateral decubitus position. In addition, early direct access to the right atrium

  18. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  19. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  20. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  1. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vitamins ... serious bleeding problems if not supplemented. What is Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding or VKDB? Vitamin K deficiency bleeding or ...

  2. Serotonin and GI clinical disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2008-11-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the gut within both the enteric nerves and enterochromaffin (EC) cells. EC cells are located in the gut mucosa with maximal numbers in the duodenum and rectum where they act as signal transducers, responding to pressure and luminal substances both bacterial and dietary. Activation leads to serotonin release which acts on a range of receptors on mucosal afferent and myenteric interneurones to initiate secretomotor reflexes. These cause nausea and vomiting as well as intestinal secretion, propulsion and if pronounced, diarrhoea. Inflammation in animal models acts via T lymphocytes to increase EC cell numbers and mucosal serotonin (5-HT) content while inflammatory cytokines decrease serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Inflammation due to coeliac disease and following gastrointestinal infection increases mucosal 5-HT availability by a combination of increased EC cells and depressed SERT. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) developing after gastrointestinal infection and IBS with diarrhoea is associated with excess 5-HT. The associated diarrhoeal symptoms respond well to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. These drugs also inhibit the nausea and vomiting occurring in patients undergoing chemotherapy which cause a marked increase in release of 5-HT as well as other mediators. Other conditions including IBS-C and constipation may have inadequate 5-HT release and benefit from both 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptor agonists.

  3. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Bleeding with the Over-the-Scope Clip: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar; Goenka, Usha; Tiwary, Indrajit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) is a device used for endoscopic closure of perforations, leaks and fistulas, and for endoscopic hemostasis. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of OTSC. Methods Between October 2013 and November 2015, 12 patients underwent OTSC placement by an experienced endoscopist. OTSC was used for the closure of gastrointestinal (GI) leaks and fistula in six patients, three of which were iatrogenic (esophageal, gastric, and duodenal) and three of which were inflammatory. In six patients, OTSC was used for hemostasis of non-variceal upper GI bleeding. Endoscopic tattooing using India ink was used to assist the accurate placement of the clip. Results All subjects except one with a colonic defect experienced immediate technical success as well as long-term clinical success, during a mean follow-up of 6 weeks. Only one clip was required to close each of the GI defects and to achieve hemostasis in all patients. There were no misfirings or complications of clips. The procedure was well tolerated, and patients were hospitalized for an average of 8 days (range, 3 to 10). Antiplatelet therapy was continued in patients with GI bleeding. Conclusions In our experience, OTSC was safe and effective for the closure of GI defect and to achieve hemostasis of non-variceal GI bleeding. PMID:27802375

  4. Comparison of four technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in a sheep model

    SciTech Connect

    Owunwanne, A.; Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S.; Sadek, S.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Yacoub, T.

    1988-01-01

    Four Tc-99 radiopharmaceuticals, Tc-99m sulphur colloid, Tc-99m red blood cells (RBCs), Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), and Tc-99m DTPA, were studied in an experimental animal model for detection and localization of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. With Tc-99m sulphur colloid and Tc-99m RBCs, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m MAG3, it was possible to visualize the bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. However, Tc-99m MAG3 is partially excreted by the liver into the bile, hence it will be difficult to use Tc-99m MAG3 to localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m DTPA, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site simultaneously in both upper and lower abdomen. The overall background radioactivity was reduced considerably by diuresis with frusemide and catheterization of the urinary bladder.

  5. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  6. Multicentre, open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority study to compare the efficacy of octreotide therapy 40 mg monthly versus standard of care in patients with refractory anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from small bowel angiodysplasias: a protocol of the OCEAN trial

    PubMed Central

    van Geenen, E J M; Drenth, J P H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias are an important cause of difficult-to-manage bleeding, especially in older patients. Endoscopic coagulation of angiodysplasias is the mainstay of treatment, but may be difficult for small bowel angiodysplasias because of the inability to reach them for endoscopic intervention. Some patients are red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependent due to frequent rebleeding despite endoscopic treatment. In small cohort studies, octreotide appears to decrease the number of bleeding episodes in patients with RBC transfusion dependency due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasias. This trial will assess the efficacy of octreotide in decreasing the need for RBC transfusions and parenteral iron in patients with anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding of small bowel angiodysplasias despite endoscopic intervention. Study design Randomised controlled, superiority, open-label multicentre trial. Participants 62 patients will be included with refractory anaemia due to small bowel angiodysplasias, who are RBC transfusion or iron infusion dependent despite endoscopic intervention and oral iron supplementation. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or 40 mg long-acting octreotide once every 4 weeks for 52 weeks, in addition to standard care. The follow-up period is 8 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome is the difference in the number of blood and iron infusions between the year prior to inclusion and the treatment period of 1 year. Important secondary outcomes are the per cent change in the number of rebleeds from baseline to end point, adverse events and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The trial received ethical approval from the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects and from the local accredited Medical Research Ethics Committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands (reference number: 2014-1433). Results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and

  7. Adsorption and Aggregation Properties of Norovirus GI and GII Virus-like Particles Demonstrate Differing Responses to Solution Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    DA SILVA, ALLEGRA K.; KAVANAGH, OWEN V.; ESTES, MARY K.; ELIMELECH, MENACHEM

    2014-01-01

    The transport properties (adsorption and aggregation behavior) of virus-like particles (VLPs) of two strains of norovirus (“Norwalk” GI.1 and “Houston” GII.4) were studied in a variety of solution chemistries. GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs were found to be stable against aggregation at pH 4.0–8.0. At pH 9.0, GI.1 VLPs rapidly disintegrated. The attachment efficiencies (α) of GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs to silica increased with increasing ionic strength in NaCl solutions at pH 8.0. The attachment efficiency of GI.1 VLPs decreased as pH was increased above the isoelectric point (pH 5.0), whereas at and below the isoelectric point, the attachment efficiency was erratic. Ca2+ and Mg2+ dramatically increased the attachment efficiencies of GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs, which may be due to specific interactions with the VLP capsids. Bicarbonate decreased attachment efficiencies for both GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs, whereas phosphate decreased the attachment efficiency of GI.1, while increasing GII.4 attachment efficiency. The observed differences in GI.1 and GII.4 VLP attachment efficiencies in response to solution chemistry may be attributed to differential responses of the unique arrangement of exposed amino acid residues on the capsid surface of each VLP strain. PMID:21121659

  8. Octreotide in variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A K

    1994-01-01

    Bleeding from oesophageal varices has a high death rate. Injection sclerotherapy is the most appropriate treatment but facilities for this are not always available. Balloon tamponade and vasoactive therapy may be used as stop gap measures. Somatostatin and octreotide are therapeutic candidates for the treatment of variceal bleeding and there are several trials that have compared somatostatin and octreotide with other treatments for this condition. The results of these trials are summarised and discussed. A meta analysis of the group of trials of placebo or H2 antagonists v somatostatin or octreotide showed a significant advantage of somatostatin or octreotide in terms of efficacy, but no difference in mortality. The trials discussed seem to show that somatostatin and octreotide are at least as effective as other treatments, with the benefit of fewer adverse effects, and thus represent the best vasoactive agents. Additionally, they may have a role as adjuvant treatment to emergency sclerotherapy for active bleeders and this must be further investigated. PMID:8206396

  9. SnapShot: GI tract development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Patrick S; Wells, James M

    2015-03-26

    The endoderm germ layer contributes to the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) lineages during development, giving rise to an array of specialized epithelial cell types lining organs, including the thyroid, thymus, lungs, liver, biliary system, pancreas, and intestines. This SnapShot timelines and summarizes key stages following gastrulation, including endoderm patterning, organ specification, and organogenesis. A lineage tree of the developing endocrine pancreas is outlined to further illustrate this process.

  10. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P < 0.05). (99m)Tc- RBC SPECT/CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  11. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year, which is reduced to 6% after 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25933185

  12. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year and only 6% will make it past 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25585100

  13. Vitamin K antagonists: beyond bleeding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Floege, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the most widely used oral anticoagulant in clinical use today. Indications range from prosthetic valve replacement to recurrent thromboembolic events due to antiphospholipid syndrome. In hemodialysis (HD) patients, warfarin use is even more frequent than in the nonrenal population due to increased cardiovascular comorbidities. The use of warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation requires particular caution because side effects may outweigh the assumed benefit of reduced stroke rates. Besides increased bleeding risk, coumarins exert side effects which are not in the focus of clinical routine, yet they deserve special consideration in dialysis patients and should influence the decision of whether or not to prescribe vitamin K antagonists in cases lacking clear guidelines. Issues to be taken into consideration in HD patients are the induction or acceleration of cardiovascular calcifications, a 10-fold increased risk of calciphylaxis and problems related to maintaining a target INR range. New anticoagulants like direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but have not yet been approved for ESRD patients. Here, we summarize the nontraditional side effects of coumarins and give recommendations about the use of vitamin K antagonists in ESRD patients.

  14. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  15. A rare case of medullary carcinoma of the colon presenting as intussusception in an adult with rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shilpa; Jain, Ankur; Onizuka, Neil; Boukhar, Sarag A

    2014-11-01

    Medullary carcinoma is a recently recognized rare subtype of colorectal cancer resembling both poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. Medullary carcinoma most commonly presents in the proximal colon and can be differentiated from other right-sided malignant lesions by histology and immunochemical markers. We present here a rare case of an adult patient with rectal bleeding who was found to have an intussusception due to underlying medullary carcinoma of the splenic flexure. A 72-year-old woman presented to our GI clinic with rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a necrotic mass of the sigmoid colon, later determined by CT to be a colo-colonic intussusception at the level of the splenic flexure. Patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with findings of a large splenic flexure mass, which was resected and found to be medullary carcinoma of the colon. The tumor was poorly differentiated and exhibited microsatellite instability but was discovered at an early stage and thus did not require any adjuvant chemotherapy. Unlike most previously reported cases of medullary carcinoma, our patient presented with a left sided tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a medullary colon cancer presenting with intussusception.

  16. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  17. Vaginal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bleeding (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) Abnormal ... College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) - PDF Also in Spanish Vaginal Bleeding (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  18. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often develops shortly ... Control and Prevention. Notes from the field: late vitamin K deficiency bleeding in infants whose parents declined vitamin K ...

  19. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  20. Effects of GI meals on intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Hulton, A T; Gregson, W; Maclaren, D; Doran, D A

    2012-09-01

    Pre-exercise meals or single foods containing low glycaemic index (LGI) carbohydrates (CHO) have been shown to enhance performance prior to prolonged steady state exercise compared to high glycaemic index (HGI) CHO. This study investigated the impact of HGI and LGI pre-exercise meals on intermittent high intensity exercise. Nine male recreational football players performed a football specific protocol followed by a 1 km time trial 3.5 h after ingesting 1 of 2 isoenergetic test meals (HGI: 870.3 kcal, LGI: 889.5 kcal), which were either HGI (GI: 80) or LGI (GI: 44). Blood glucose, fatty acids (FA), glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate and insulin were assessed before, during, and after the exercise bout, whilst rates of CHO and fat oxidation were determined at 4 time points during the protocol. No significant differences were found for the 1 km time trial (LGI: 210.2 ± 19.1 s: HGI: 215.8 ± 22.6 s) (mean ± SD), nor for any of the other variables measured (P>0.05) apart from a significant condition effect with FA and significant interaction effects observed for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate (P<0.05). These findings suggest that the type of CHO ingested in a pre-match meal has no significant impact on performance or metabolic responses during 90 min of intermittent high intensity exercise.

  1. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials to Ascertain Fatal Gastrointestinal Bleeding Events Attributable to Preventive Low-Dose Aspirin: No Evidence of Increased Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dolwani, Sunil; Graziano, J. Michael; Lanas, Angel; Longley, Marcus; Phillips, Ceri J.; Roberts, Stephen E.; Soon, Swee S.; Steward, Will

    2016-01-01

    Background Aspirin has been shown to lower the incidence and the mortality of vascular disease and cancer but its wider adoption appears to be seriously impeded by concerns about gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Unlike heart attacks, stroke and cancer, GI bleeding is an acute event, usually followed by complete recovery. We propose therefore that a more appropriate evaluation of the risk-benefit balance would be based on fatal adverse events, rather than on the incidence of bleeding. We therefore present a literature search and meta-analysis to ascertain fatal events attributable to low-dose aspirin. Methods In a systematic literature review we identified reports of randomised controlled trials of aspirin in which both total GI bleeding events and bleeds that led to death had been reported. Principal investigators of studies in which fatal events had not been adequately described were contacted via email and asked for further details. A meta-analyses was then performed to estimate the risk of fatal gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to low-dose aspirin. Results Eleven randomised trials were identified in the literature search. In these the relative risk (RR) of ‘major’ incident GI bleeding in subjects who had been randomised to low-dose aspirin was 1.55 (95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and the risk of a bleed attributable to aspirin being fatal was 0.45 (95% CI 0.25, 0.80). In all the subjects randomised to aspirin, compared with those randomised not to receive aspirin, there was no significant increase in the risk of a fatal bleed (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.41, 1.43). Conclusions The majority of the adverse events caused by aspirin are GI bleeds, and there appears to be no valid evidence that the overall frequency of fatal GI bleeds is increased by aspirin. The substantive risk for prophylactic aspirin is therefore cerebral haemorrhage which can be fatal or severely disabling, with an estimated risk of one death and one disabling stroke for every 1,000 people taking aspirin

  2. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Age and Alarm Symptoms for Upper GI Malignancy in Patients with Dyspepsia in a GI Clinic: A 7-Year Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Hooman; Radmard, Amir-Reza; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Kamangar, Farin; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Johansson, Mattias; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether using demographic characteristics and alarm symptoms can accurately predict cancer in patients with dyspepsia in Iran, where upper GI cancers and H. pylori infection are common. Methods All consecutive patients referred to a tertiary gastroenterology clinic in Tehran, Iran, from 2002 to 2009 were invited to participate in this study. Each patient completed a standard questionnaire and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Alarm symptoms included in the questionnaire were weight loss, dysphagia, GI bleeding, and persistent vomiting. We used logistic regression models to estimate the diagnostic value of each variable in combination with other ones, and to develop a risk-prediction model. Results A total of 2,847 patients with dyspepsia participated in this study, of whom 87 (3.1%) had upper GI malignancy. Patients reporting at least one of the alarm symptoms constituted 66.7% of cancer patients compared to 38.9% in patients without cancer (p<0.001). Esophageal or gastric cancers in patients with dyspepsia was associated with older age, being male, and symptoms of weight loss and vomiting. Each single predictor had low sensitivity and specificity. Using a combination of age, alarm symptoms, and smoking, we built a risk-prediction model that distinguished between high-risk and low-risk individuals with an area under the ROC curve of 0.85 and acceptable calibration. Conclusions None of the predictors demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy. While our risk-prediction model had reasonable accuracy, some cancer cases would have remained undiagnosed. Therefore, where available, low cost endoscopy may be preferable for dyspeptic older patient or those with history of weight loss. PMID:22720064

  4. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  5. Under-diagnosing and under-treating iron deficiency in hospitalized patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El-Halabi, Mustapha M; Green, Michael S; Jones, Christopher; Salyers Jr, William J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether patients hospitalized with gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss anemia are being checked and treated for iron deficiency. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients admitted to a single tertiary care hospital between 11/1/2011 and 1/31/2012 for any type of GI bleeding. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who had their iron studies checked during a hospitalization for GI blood loss anemia. Secondary outcomes included percentage of anemic GI bleeders who had adequate documentation of anemia and iron deficiency, and those who were treated for their iron deficiency. Then we tried to identify possible predictors of checking iron studies in an attempt to understand the thought process that physicians go through when managing these patients. Iron deficiency was defined as Iron saturation less than 15% or ferritin level less than 45 μg/L. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin level less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for females. RESULTS: Three hundred and seven GI bleeders were hospitalized during the study period, and 282 of those (91.9%) had anemia during their hospital stay. Ninety-five patients (30.9%) had iron studies performed during hospitalization, and 45 of those (47.4%) were actually found to be iron deficient. Only 29 of those 45 iron deficient patients were discharged home on iron supplements. Of the 282 patients that had anemia during hospitalization, 50 (17.7%) had no documentation of the anemia in their hospital chart. Of the 45 patients that had lab proven iron deficiency anemia (IDA), only 22 (48.5%) had documentation of IDA in at least one note in their chart. Predictors of checking iron studies in anemic GI bleeders were lower mean corpuscular volume, documentation of anemia, having fecal occult blood testing, not having hematemesis or past history of GI bleeding. There were no significant differences between the teaching and non-teaching services in any patient characteristics or outcomes

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  7. Current GI endoscope disinfection and QA practices.

    PubMed

    Moses, Frank M; Lee, Jennifer S

    2004-01-01

    High-level disinfection (HLD) of GI endoscopes is readily achieved when published guidelines are observed. Contamination is linked to breakdowns in accepted procedure. However, there is no recognized method of verifying adequacy of endoscope reprocessing in routine practice and no data regarding current quality assurance (QA) practice. Prior reports have demonstrated a wide variation in routine clinical practice of GI endoscopy HLD. The goal of this study was to determine current practice at regional endoscopy centers with regard to endoscope cleaning and HLD, maintenance, and QA practice. An anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire was mailed to 367 SGNA members in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, Maryland, and District of Columbia and completed by 230 (63%). The majority of responders were hospital-based and 59% of the units performed over 3000 procedures per year. After use the endoscope was hand-carried or transported in a dry container (97%) to a separate cleaning room (85%) for HLD by technicians (40%). Wide variations existed in manual step procedures including use of disposable (50%) brushes and number of times channel brushed: once (21%), twice (35%), or three to five times (37%). Soaking duration in disinfectant (70% gluteraldehyde) was for <10 min (8%), 10-20 min (35%), 20-30 min (38%), 30-40 min (7%), and >40 min (3%). Sixty-seven percent had an active unit infection control (IC) service and 98% had a QA program. Monitoring of cleaning effectiveness was by visual inspection (50%) and culturing endoscopes (17%). Culture was done weekly (1%) and

  8. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  9. Fragmentation of polyatomic molecules by grazing incidence surface-induced dissociation (GI-SID).

    PubMed

    Wieghaus, A; Schmidt, L; Popova, A M; Komarov, V V; Jungclas, H

    1999-11-01

    The grazing incidence surface-induced dissociation (GI-SID) of n-hexadecylpyridinium and verapamil ions generated by fission fragment desorption was studied. These molecules show the effect of enhanced surface-induced dissociation at grazing incidence as it was observed in former experiments with metal organic ions. A liquid film of perfluorinated polyether is used as collision surface. Small hydrocarbon fragment ions predominate in the GI-SID spectra. Pyridine ions appear as specific fragment ions in the GI-SID spectrum of n-hexadecylpyridinium. The GI-SID conversion efficiency varies in the range 40-70%. The experimental results are discussed within the scope of a quantum mechanical model which is based on the accumulation of internal molecular energy by resonant excitation of collective vibrational states and energy transfer to a trap bond due to dipole-dipole interactions. In this context the GI-SID spectra of n-hexadecylpyridinium and verapamil ions are compared with the fragmentation occurring in regular (252)Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry.

  10. Approach to a child with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Jain, Puneet; Jayashree, M; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a potentially life threatening medical emergency requiring an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Therefore, the primary focus in a child with UGIB is resuscitation and stabilization followed by a diagnostic evaluation. The differential diagnosis of UGIB in children is determined by age and severity of bleed. In infants and toddlers mucosal bleed (gastritis and stress ulcers) is a common cause. In children above 2 y variceal bleeding due to Extra-Hepatic Portal Venous Obstruction (EHPVO) is the commonest cause of significant UGIB in developing countries as against peptic ulcer in the developed countries. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most accurate and useful diagnostic tool to evaluate UGIB in children. Parenteral vitamin K (infants, 1-2 mg/dose; children, 5-10 mg) and parenteral Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI's), should be administered empirically in case of a major UGIB. Octreotide infusion is useful in control of significant UGIB due to variceal hemorrhage. A temporarily placed, Sengstaken-Blakemore tube can be life saving if pharmacologic/ endoscopic methods fail to control variceal bleeding. Therapy in patients having mucosal bleed is directed at neutralization and/or prevention of gastric acid release; High dose Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs, Pantoprazole) are more efficacious than H2 receptor antagonists for this purpose.

  11. Progress in the treatment of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    The availability of plasma-derived and recombinant coagulation factors has transformed the management of patients with bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia and von Willebrand disease (VWD). However, several important clinical challenges remain that have become the focus of current research in coagulation therapy. Two prospective, non-interventional studies (HyQoL-Europe and HyQoL-Canada) are evaluating the impact of major transitional life events, such as changes in social, work and living situations, on the quality of life of adolescents and young adults with hemophilia A who are treated with the recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) concentrate Helixate®. A better understanding of the impact of these transitional life events on quality of life may help to develop improved interventions and counseling techniques that minimize the negative effects of these events on patients with bleeding disorders. A new clinical development program has been launched to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the low-volume, highly active, plasma-derived von Willebrand factor (VWF)/FVIII concentrate Biostate®. The program, known as SWIFT (Studies with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII) includes four clinical trials involving adult and pediatric patients with hemophilia A or VWD. Lastly, fusion of human recombinant albumin to recombinant coagulation factor IX (rFIX) has created a new fusion protein (rIX-FP) that retains the biological activity of rFIX and has a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile due to the longer half-life. The use of this novel fusion protein may offer several advantages to patients with hemophilia B: less frequent administration, prolonged protection from bleeding and improved compliance--increasing the likelihood of a positive clinical outcome. These examples of current research endeavors are intended to enhance the treatment experience as well as provide new and improved therapies for patients with bleeding disorders.

  12. Enabling interoperability in Geoscience with GI-suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Santoro, Mattia; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    GI-suite is a brokering framework targeting interoperability of heterogeneous systems in the Geoscience domain. The framework is composed by different brokers each one focusing on a specific functionality: discovery, access and semantics (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem). The brokering takes place between a set of heterogeneous publishing services and a set of heterogeneous consumer applications: the brokering target is represented by resources (e.g. coverages, features, or metadata information) required to seamlessly flow from the providers to the consumers. Different international and community standards are now supported by GI-suite, making possible the successful deployment of GI-suite in many international projects and initiatives (such as GEOSS, NSF BCube and several EU funded projects). As for the publisher side more than 40 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. Dublin Core, OAI-PMH, OGC W*S, Geonetwork, THREDDS Data Server, Hyrax Server, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific GI-suite components, called accessors. As for the consumer applications side more than 15 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. ESRI ArcGIS, Openlayers, OGC W*S, OAI-PMH clients, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific profiler components. The GI-suite can be used in different scenarios by different actors: - A data provider having a pre-existent data repository can deploy and configure GI-suite to broker it and making thus available its data resources through different protocols to many different users (e.g. for data discovery and/or data access) - A data consumer can use GI-suite to discover and/or access resources from a variety of publishing services that are already publishing data according to well-known standards. - A community can deploy and configure GI-suite to build a community (or project-specific) broker: GI-suite can broker a set of community related repositories and

  13. Surgical management of presacral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ausobsky, JR; Vowden, P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Presacral venous bleeding is an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication of rectal surgery. During the posterior rectal dissection, it is recommended to proceed into the plane between the fascia propria of the rectum and the presacral fascia. Incorrect mobilisation of the rectum outside the Waldeyer’s fascia can tear out the lower presacral venous plexus or the sacral basivertebral veins, causing what may prove to be uncontrollable bleeding. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE® and Embase™ databases was performed to obtain primary data published in the period between 1 January 1960 and 31 July 2013. Each article describing variables such as incidence of presacral venous bleeding, surgical approach, number of cases treated and success rate was included in the analysis. Results A number of creative solutions have been described that attempt to provide good tamponade of the presacral haemorrhage, eliminating the need for second operation. However, few cases are reported in the literature. Conclusions As conventional haemostatic measures often fail to control this type of haemorrhage, several alternative methods to control bleeding definitively have been described. We propose a practical comprehensive classification of the available techniques for the management of presacral bleeding. PMID:24780015

  14. GeGI (Germanium Gamma Imager) Performance: Maritime Interdiction Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, Jonathan G.; Burks, Morgan T.; Trombino, Dave

    2014-09-23

    The Gamma Ray Imager (GeGI) was demonstrated during the Maritime Interdiction Operation at Point Alameda, the site of the former Naval Air Station, in Alameda, CA. During this exercise GeGI was used to localize sources within an abandoned building and a cargo ship, the Admiral Callaghan.

  15. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of hemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients. The aims of the present thesis were: 1. To examine which risk scoring system is best at predicting need of hospital-based intervention, rebleeding, and mortality in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Study I) 2. To evaluate if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) after

  16. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Darr, Umar; Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Moslim, Maitham A; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods.

  17. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods. PMID:28261507

  18. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  19. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  20. Vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex? Did you bleed afterward? What is your blood type? Your provider can test your blood type. If it is Rh negative, you will need treatment with a medicine called Rho(D) immune globulin to prevent complications with future pregnancies. ... If something other than blood comes out, call ...

  1. Suspected collagen disorders in the bleeding disorder clinic: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S C; Odiaman, L; Card, R T; van der Bom, J G; Poon, M-C

    2013-03-01

    Disorders of collagen are associated with a mild bleeding tendency because of the potential abnormal interaction of collagen, von Willebrand factor (VWF) and platelets required during primary haemostasis and due to generalized soft tissue fragility. Abnormal collagen may contribute to bleeding in existing mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, but the prevalence in this setting is unknown. Generalized symptomatic joint hypermobility (SJH) is common in collagen disorders and may be objectively measured. To assess the association between symptomatic joint hypermobility and mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, we performed a case-control study in which case subjects were 55 consecutive individuals who had visited our bleeding disorder clinic with a diagnosis of von Willebrand disease, low von Willebrand factor levels, mild platelet function disorder or undefined bleeding disorder. Controls were 50 subjects without a bleeding disorder, and were age and gender matched to the cases. All subjects were assessed with: (i) Beighton score for joint hypermobility, (ii) revised Brighton criteria, (iii) Condensed MCMDM1-VWD bleeding questionnaire, and (iv) haemostasis laboratory studies. The prevalence of SJH/suspected collagen disorder in the bleeding disorder clinic was 24% (13/55) compared with 2% (1/50) in the control population (OR 15, 95% CI 2-121). Seventy-seven per cent of bleeding disorder clinic SJH subjects (10/13) had a prior personal or family history of Ehlers-Danlos, Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). Symptomatic joint hypermobility was associated with increased odds of an underlying mucocutaneous bleeding disorder. These findings suggest that a collagen disorder is common and often unrecognized in the bleeding disorder clinic as a potential contributor to the bleeding symptoms.

  2. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Heinz; Nägel, Andreas; Vitali, Francesco; Vetter, Marcel; Dauth, Christine; Neurath, Markus F.; Raithel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE). Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies). Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males), 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60%) and in 14 (40%) as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%), while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%). Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3%) or salvage therapy (66,7%). Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8%) occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions. PMID:28232848

  3. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  4. Two cases of vaginal bleeding in pet rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadar, Miranda J.; Parker, Dennilyn L.; Burgess, Hilary; Wojnarowicz, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Two unrelated rats were presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine emergency service for vaginal bleeding. Each was taken to surgery due to marked blood loss and suspicion of uterine pathology. Despite similar clinical presentation, gross and histopathologic examination revealed 2 different underlying disease processes, uterine dilatation with mild endometritis and vaginal polyp. PMID:22210942

  5. GiNA, an Efficient and High-Throughput Software for Horticultural Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Schlautman, Brandon; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for trait phenotyping have been a bottleneck for research in many crop species due to their intensive labor, high cost, complex implementation, lack of reproducibility and propensity to subjective bias. Recently, multiple high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed, but most of them are expensive, species-dependent, complex to use, and available only for major crops. To overcome such limitations, we present the open-source software GiNA, which is a simple and free tool for measuring horticultural traits such as shape- and color-related parameters of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. GiNA is multiplatform software available in both R and MATLAB® programming languages and uses conventional images from digital cameras with minimal requirements. It can process up to 11 different horticultural morphological traits such as length, width, two-dimensional area, volume, projected skin, surface area, RGB color, among other parameters. Different validation tests produced highly consistent results under different lighting conditions and camera setups making GiNA a very reliable platform for high-throughput phenotyping. In addition, five-fold cross validation between manually generated and GiNA measurements for length and width in cranberry fruits were 0.97 and 0.92. In addition, the same strategy yielded prediction accuracies above 0.83 for color estimates produced from images of cranberries analyzed with GiNA compared to total anthocyanin content (TAcy) of the same fruits measured with the standard methodology of the industry. Our platform provides a scalable, easy-to-use and affordable tool for massive acquisition of phenotypic data of fruits, seeds, and vegetables. PMID:27529547

  6. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  7. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  8. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  9. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  10. Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in the victims of house fire.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Moriya, Fumio; Nakanishi, Akinori

    2003-03-01

    Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue is frequently observed in autopsy cases of house fire victims. The meaning of this finding has not yet been fully discussed. We examined 69 autopsy cases of house fire victims and investigated several factors contributing to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Victims comprised 45 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 1 to 95 years old. Sixty-four cases (93%) involved severely charred bodies, while the remaining five bodies displayed slight burns. Factors studied were age, sex, posture of the body at the scene of the fire, degree of burn injury and carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) levels in blood. CO-Hb level proved to be the only factor relevant to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Of 69 autopsy cases, 23 (33%) demonstrated intramuscular bleeding of the tongue (13 cases of slight bleeding, ten cases of severe bleeding). Low concentrations of CO-Hb (bleeding. Of 46 cases without intramuscular bleeding, ten (22%) displayed low concentrations of CO-Hb. These results may indicate that severe burn injuries occurring before inhaling air containing high levels of carbon monoxide represent the cause of intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in fire victims. The burned regions of the body in the early stage of the fire process were unclear due to severe charring in most victims. However, asphyxiation due to neck compression is known to often induce intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Lack of skin elasticity following burns, particularly in the neck, might act in a similar manner to asphyxial neck compression. In conclusion, intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in fire victims may occur as a vital reaction to burns.

  11. Percutaneous Transcatheter Embolization of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Child with Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Bas, Ahmet; Samanci, Cesur; Numan, Furuzan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Polyarteritis nodosa is a form of necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium-sized arteries. Major gastrointestinal complications are ulceration, perforation, hemorrhage, and obstruction. Case Report We report on a clinical case of a 16-year-old female patient with massive hematemesis, who was successfully treated with embolization with a 1:2 dilution of N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest child reported on with massive GI bleeding secondary to PAN, treated with successful percutaneous transcatheter embolization under emergency conditions. PMID:25512765

  12. Regulatory mechanisms of cAMP levels as a multiple target for antiplatelet activity and less bleeding risk.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-08-01

    Platelet activation is a critical component of atherothrombosis. The multiple pathways of platelet activation limit the effect of specific receptor/pathway inhibitors, resulting in limited clinical efficacy. Recent research has confirmed that combination therapy results in enhanced antithrombotic efficacy without increasing bleeding risk. In this way, the best-known inhibitor and turn off signaling in platelet activation is cAMP. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of regulation of intraplatelet cAMP levels, a) platelet-dependent pathway: Gi/Gs protein-coupled receptors, phosphodiesterase inhibition and activation of PPARs and b) platelet-independent pathway: inhibition of adenosine uptake by erythrocytes. With respect to the association between intraplatelet cAMP levels and bleeding risk it is possible to establish that compounds/drugs with pleitropic effect for increased intraplatelet cAMP level could have an antithrombotic activity with less risk of bleeding.

  13. eIF4GI links nutrient sensing by mTOR to cell proliferation and inhibition of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valle, Francisco; Braunstein, Steve; Zavadil, Jiri; Formenti, Silvia C; Schneider, Robert J

    2008-04-21

    Translation initiation factors have complex functions in cells that are not yet understood. We show that depletion of initiation factor eIF4GI only modestly reduces overall protein synthesis in cells, but phenocopies nutrient starvation or inhibition of protein kinase mTOR, a key nutrient sensor. eIF4GI depletion impairs cell proliferation, bioenergetics, and mitochondrial activity, thereby promoting autophagy. Translation of mRNAs involved in cell growth, proliferation, and bioenergetics were selectively inhibited by reduction of eIF4GI, as was the mRNA encoding Skp2 that inhibits p27, whereas catabolic pathway factors were increased. Depletion or overexpression of other eIF4G family members did not recapitulate these results. The majority of mRNAs that were translationally impaired with eIF4GI depletion were excluded from polyribosomes due to the presence of multiple upstream open reading frames and low mRNA abundance. These results suggest that the high levels of eIF4GI observed in many breast cancers might act to specifically increase proliferation, prevent autophagy, and release tumor cells from control by nutrient sensing.

  14. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  15. Nonsurgical techniques to control massive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Zentai, Christian; Grottke, Oliver; Spahn, Donat R; Rossaint, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Significant advancements in nonsurgical and surgical approaches to control bleeding in severely injured patients have also improved the treatment of critical trauma-related coagulopathy. Nonsurgical procedures such as angiographic embolization are progressively considered to terminate arterial bleeding from pelvic fractures. The disturbance of coagulation may aggravate bleeding and hamper surgical procedures. The administration of coagulation factors and factor concentrates may be useful for correcting systemic coagulopathy and reducing the need for fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and red blood cell transfusions, which are associated with various adverse outcomes. In this review, nonsurgical management of critical trauma bleeding is discussed.

  16. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  17. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  18. Improving care and treatment options for women and girls with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Roshni

    2015-12-01

    Women and girls may experience increased bleeding symptoms as carriers of haemophilia. They can also be affected by other hereditary bleeding diatheses such as von Willebrand disease, platelet dysfunction defects or deficiencies of coagulation factors (F) such as FI, FII, FV, FVII, FX, FXI and FXIII. In addition to general bleeding symptoms, such disorders pose unique problems for women due to their impact on reproductive health. Women and adolescent girls with undiagnosed bleeding disorders frequently experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB; menorrhagia), leading to impairment of daily activities. Other gynaecological and obstetric manifestations, for example miscarriage, bleeding during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), can occur. Treatment for HMB should consider patient wishes relating to preservation of fertility, and management options include hormonal measures, desmopressin, antifibrinolytics, platelet concentrate transfusions and clotting factor therapy. During pregnancy, monitoring clotting factor levels informs the need for prophylactic therapy; subsequent haemostatic cover can minimise PPH. Under-recognition of bleeding disorders in females may lead to inappropriate, or lack of, treatment. This may be avoided by increased disease awareness, prompt and accurate diagnosis, and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. This review considers the range of hereditary bleeding disorders that may affect women and adolescent girls, and their evaluation and management.

  19. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  20. Analysis of GI Community Shifts in Response to Dietary Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    omnivorous and similar to the human diet, pigs recover much more energy from microbial digestion of fiber/cellulose in the lower GI tract (ca. 17-30%). In...similar to the human tract ( omnivorous , non-ruminant but better cellulose utilization), 3) show gut community response to change in diet fiber, 4

  1. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-01-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions…

  2. Empty Promise: Black American Veterans and the New GI Bill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottley, Alford H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2008 GI Bill offers college funds for veterans. Yet Black male vets are not taking advantage of these benefits. This chapter examines personal and societal problems that hinder access to higher education for Black vets, and suggests some ways adult educators can advocate for these young men.

  3. GI Bill Offers Military Children Relief from College Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2013-01-01

    As a new GI Bill moved through Congress in 2008, a handful of influential politicians grew concerned. Would such a generous education program trigger an exodus of service members during two wars? At the Pentagon's urging, the lawmakers proposed a fix: Give troops the option to transfer their benefits to a child or spouse. That policy quickly…

  4. Genome sequence of Brevibacillus laterosporus strain GI-9.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Pradip K; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Korpole, Suresh; Patil, Prabhu B

    2012-03-01

    We report the 5.18-Mb genome sequence of Brevibacillus laterosporus strain GI-9, isolated from a subsurface soil sample during a screen for novel strains producing antimicrobial compounds. The draft genome of this strain will aid in biotechnological exploitation and comparative genomics of Brevibacillus laterosporus strains.

  5. The New GI Bill Is No Match for the Original

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Milton

    2008-01-01

    In June, Congress enacted the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act, commonly called the GI Bill of Rights for the 21st Century. Supporters claim that it does for current veterans what was done for those who served in World War II. The expansion of educational benefits to veterans should be applauded. Any attempt to equate the economic and…

  6. Treatment modalities for bleeding esophagogastric varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Masato; Hirakata, Atsushi; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Ueda, Junji; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices (EVs) or gastric varices (GVs) is a catastrophic complication of chronic liver disease. In this paper, we review the management of bleeding EVs and GVs. DIAGNOSIS OF EVS AND GVS: The grading system for esophagogastric varices proposed by the Japan Society for Portal Hypertension classifies GVs into those involving the cardia (Lg-c), the fundus (Lg-f), and both the cardia and the fundus (Lg-cf). In this review, we divide GVs into 2 categories: Lg-c (cardiac varices: CVs) and Lg-cf or Lg-f (fundal varices: FVs). TREATMENT MODALITIES FOR EVS AND GVS: Treatment modalities for EVs and GVs include placement of a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, pharmacologic therapy, surgery, interventional radiology, and endoscopic treatment. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING EVS AND GVS: In Japan, endoscopic treatment has recently become the therapy of choice for bleeding EVs or GVs. In other countries, especially the United States, vasoactive drugs and endoscopic treatment are routinely used to manage variceal hemorrhage. BLEEDING EVS: Endoscopic variceal ligation is useful for controlling bleeding from EVs. However, confirmation of ligation precisely at the site of bleeding is usually difficult in patients with massive variceal bleeding. The site of acute bleeding can generally be identified by means of water instillation and suction. Ligation is then performed at the bleeding point. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube is used as a temporary bridge to other treatments. Transportal obliteration is useful for blocking variceal blood flow. BLEEDING GVS: Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy with a tissue adhesive, such as N-butyl-cyanoacrylate or isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate, is effective for acute bleeding from GVs. However, bleeding from the GV injection site and rebleeding from the rupture point have been reported in patients receiving endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube

  7. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy.

  8. Fluorophore-conjugated antibodies for imaging and resection of GI tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-03-01

    Negative surgical margins are critical to prevent recurrence in cancer surgery. This is because with current technology in many cases negative margins are impossible due the inability of the surgeon to detect the margin. Our laboratory has developed fluorophore-labeled monoclonal antibodies to aid in cancer visualization in orthotopic nude mouse models of human gastrointestinal (GI) cancer in order to achieve negative margins in fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS). The technologies described herein have the potential to change the paradigm of surgical oncology to engender significantly improved outcomes.

  9. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding as the First Manifestation of Wegener’s Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Zobeiri, Mehdi; Salesi, Mansour; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis is an uncommon inflammatory disease that manifests as vasculitis, granulomatosis, and necrosis. It usually involves the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Although it may essentially involve any organ, gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is notably uncommon. A 20-year-old male patient presented with epigastric pain, vomiting, hematemesis, and melena. On physical examination, he was pale. There was no abdominal tenderness or organomegaly. Upper GI endoscopy revealed dark blue-colored infiltrative lesions in prepyloric area. Evaluation of the biopsy sample showed mononuclear cell infiltration in the submucosal area, hyperplastic polyp, and chronic gastritis. High dose proton pump inhibitor and adjunctive supportive measures were given but no change in the follow-up endoscopy was detected. During hospital course, he developed intermittent fever and serum creatinine elevation. 12 days after admission, he developed dyspnea, tachypnea, and painful swelling of metacarpophalangeal joints, and maculopapular rash in extensor surface of the right forearm. Chest radiography showed pulmonary infiltration. Serum c-ANCA titer was strongly positive and skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The patient received methylprednisolone pulse, which resulted in complete recovery of symptoms and gastric lesion. The present case indicates that GI bleeding may be the first manifestation of Wegener’s granulomatosis. Moreover, it should be emphasized that gastric biopsy is not characteristic or diagnostic in such patients. PMID:27698975

  10. In silico predictions of gastrointestinal drug absorption in pharmaceutical product development: application of the mechanistic absorption model GI-Sim.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Erik; Westergren, Jan; Grant, Iain; Hanisch, Gunilla; Lindfors, Lennart; Lennernäs, Hans; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Tannergren, Christer

    2013-07-16

    Oral drug delivery is the predominant administration route for a major part of the pharmaceutical products used worldwide. Further understanding and improvement of gastrointestinal drug absorption predictions is currently a highly prioritized area of research within the pharmaceutical industry. The fraction absorbed (fabs) of an oral dose after administration of a solid dosage form is a key parameter in the estimation of the in vivo performance of an orally administrated drug formulation. This study discloses an evaluation of the predictive performance of the mechanistic physiologically based absorption model GI-Sim. GI-Sim deploys a compartmental gastrointestinal absorption and transit model as well as algorithms describing permeability, dissolution rate, salt effects, partitioning into micelles, particle and micelle drifting in the aqueous boundary layer, particle growth and amorphous or crystalline precipitation. Twelve APIs with reported or expected absorption limitations in humans, due to permeability, dissolution and/or solubility, were investigated. Predictions of the intestinal absorption for different doses and formulations were performed based on physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, such as solubility in buffer and simulated intestinal fluid, molecular weight, pK(a), diffusivity and molecule density, measured or estimated human effective permeability and particle size distribution. The performance of GI-Sim was evaluated by comparing predicted plasma concentration-time profiles along with oral pharmacokinetic parameters originating from clinical studies in healthy individuals. The capability of GI-Sim to correctly predict impact of dose and particle size as well as the in vivo performance of nanoformulations was also investigated. The overall predictive performance of GI-Sim was good as >95% of the predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max) and AUC) were within a 2-fold deviation from the clinical observations and the predicted plasma AUC

  11. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  12. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  15. Making decisions using radiology in lower GI hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Assad; Young, Christopher John

    2016-07-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common diagnosis in current practice that may warrant hospitalization and invasive management. There is a shift in the paradigm in the management of this condition away from traditional extensive operative intervention to minimally invasive radiological techniques. These newer modalities offer an opportunity to provide more accurate information on location of bleeding and subsequent management. The increased ease of access to interventional radiology units in major teaching hospitals represents an opportunity to adopt its use in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Further, with technological improvements, it is becoming an increasingly favoured option. Traditional endoscopic techniques have been fraught with poor vision in the acute setting, requiring the colon to be purged to aide in better visualization. The use of these newer technologies have been the subject of many reviews which highlight their efficacy in providing a road map to the bleeding site and eventual intervention. We aim to review the literature regarding the use of radiology in the management of LGIB, to provide surgeons with a discourse with regards to the approach in synthesizing the data and applying it when deciding its use.

  16. Missed bleeding events after ticagrelor in PEGASUS trial: Massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both?

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor; Tomek, Ales

    2016-07-15

    PEGASUS trial reported reduction of composite primary endpoint after conventional 180mg/daily ticagrelor (CT), and lower 120mg/daily dose ticagrelor (LT) at expense of extra bleeding. Following approval of CT and LT for long-term secondary prevention indication, recent FDA review verified some bleeding outcomes in PEGASUS. To compare the risks after CT and LT against placebo by seven TIMI scale variables, and 9 bleeding categories considered as serious adverse events (SAE) in light of PEGASUS drug discontinuation rates (DDR). The DDR in all PEGASUS arms was high reaching astronomical 32% for CT. The distribution of some outcomes (TIMI major, trauma, epistaxis, iron deficiency, hemoptysis, and anemia) was reasonable. However, the TIMI minor events were heavily underreported when compared to similar trials. Other bleedings (intracranial, spontaneous, hematuria, and gastrointestinal) appear sporadic, lacking expected dose-dependent impact of CT and LT. Few SAE outcomes (fatal, ecchymosis, hematoma, bruises, bleeding) paradoxically reported more bleeding after LT than after CT. Many bleeding outcomes were probably missed in PEGASUS potentially due to massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both. The FDA must improve reporting of trial outcomes especially in the sponsor-controlled environment when DDR and incomplete follow-up rates are high.

  17. Myths, fallacies and practical pearls in GI lab

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Many prevalent practices and guidelines related to Gastrointestinal endoscopy and procedural sedation are at odds with the widely available scientific-physiological and clinical outcome data. In many institutions, strict policy of pre-procedural extended fasting is still rigorously enforced, despite no evidence of increased incidence of aspiration after recent oral intake prior to sedation. Supplemental oxygen administration in the setting of GI procedural sedation has been increasingly adopted as reported in the medical journals, despite clear evidence that supplemental oxygen blunts the usefulness of pulse oximetry in timely detection of sedation induced hypoventilation, leading to increased number of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes. Use of Propofol by Gastroenterologist-Nurse team is erroneously considered dangerous and often prohibited in various institutions, at the same time worldwide reports of remarkable safety and patient satisfaction continue to be published, dating back more than a decade. Of patient monitoring practices that have been advocated to be standard, many merely add cost, not value. Advances in the technology often are not incorporated in a timely manner in guidelines or clinical practices, e.g., Capsule endoscopy or electrocautery during GI procedures do not interfere with proper functioning of the current pacemakers or defibrillators. Orthopedic surgeons have continued to recommend prophylactic antibiotics for joint replacement patients prior to GI procedures, without any evidence of need. These myths are explored for a succint review to prompt a change in clinical practices and institutional policies. PMID:25512767

  18. Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-05-01

    We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

  19. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  20. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk intensive care unit patients receiving antacid prophylaxis: frequency and significance.

    PubMed

    Derrida, S; Nury, B; Slama, R; Marois, F; Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Sicot, C

    1989-02-01

    Gastroccult reagent was used every 4 h to detect blood in gastric juice in 41 ICU patients at risk of GI bleeding (GB) and receiving antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5). Of the present patients, 27% (11/41) had at least one episode of occult GB (three consecutive positive determinations; a total of 14 episodes). Endoscopy identified acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions (stress ulcers) as the most frequent lesion in this group (eight patients). Sepsis was the most frequent underlying condition associated with occult GB due to stress ulcer. Hematemesis occurred in 36% (4/11) of patients with occult GB and was due to stress ulcer in three patients and to benign gastric tumor in one. No overt GB occurred in the absence of previous occult GB. We conclude that: a) risk of GB persists in critically ill ICU patients in spite of antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5); b) high-risk patients can be identified through periodic testing for the presence of blood in gastric juice using the reagent; c) when occult GB occurs, treatment should be based on the endoscopy results. In the absence of acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions, antacid prophylaxis should not be modified, and specific treatment of the identified lesion(s) should be initiated. In the presence of stress lesions, antacid prophylaxis should be reinforced if the pH of the gastric content is less than 3.5 and a septic complication should be actively sought if the pH is greater than 3.5.

  1. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  2. Laboratory evaluation of a bleeding patient.

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, R O

    1989-01-01

    Most causes of abnormal bleeding can be determined from a complete blood count including platelet count and bleeding, prothrombin, activated partial thromboplastin, and thrombin times. Occasionally, further evaluation is necessary, such as tests of factor XIII function, fibrinolysis, and vascular integrity. Possible diagnoses include disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, vitamin K deficiency, von Willebrand's disease, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, acquired inhibitors of factor VIII, lupus anticoagulants, and coagulation disorders related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:2660407

  3. Risk factors of late rectal bleeding after carbon ion therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi . E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Kamada, Tadashi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity after hypofractionated carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2000 and November 2003, a Phase II clinical trial of C-ion RT with a total dose of 66 GyE in 20 fractions was performed on 175 patients with prostate cancer, and the correlations of clinical and dosimetric parameters with the incidence of late GI toxicity in 172 patients who survived for more than 18 months were investigated. Results: Although no Grade 3-4 late morbidities of the rectum were observed, Grade 1 and 2 morbidities developed in 23 (13%) and 4 (2%) patients, respectively. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that the percentage of rectal volume receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V50) was significantly higher in patients with rectal toxicity than without toxicity (13.2 {+-} 5.6% with toxicity; 11.4 {+-} 4.0% without toxicity, p = 0.046). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of anticoagulation therapy (p = 0.010) and rectal V50 (p = 0.012) were significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 1-2 late GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although C-ion RT with hypofractionation yielded favorable results regarding late GI complication, dosimetric parameter was a very important factor in the occurrence of rectal bleeding after C-ion RT as well as photon beam RT. Our results provide useful information for physicians applying charged particle RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Periesophageal Pseudoaneurysms: Rare Cause of Refractory Bleeding Treated with Transarterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rachit D.; Komorowski, Daniel J.; Smallfield, George B.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female with history of systemic lupus erythematosus, prior cytomegalovirus esophagitis treated with ganciclovir, and long segment Barrett's esophagus (Prague class C8 M9) with high grade dysplasia treated with radiofrequency ablation presented to the hospital with hematemesis. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed multiple esophageal ulcers with active arterial spurting which could not be controlled with endoscopic interventions including placement of hemostatic clips. An emergent angiogram demonstrated actively bleeding saccular dilations (pseudoaneurysms) in the esophageal branches of the lower thoracic aorta as well as left gastric artery for which gelfoam and coil embolization was initially successful. Due to recurrence of massive bleeding, she subsequently underwent emergent esophagectomy and bipolar exclusion. Pathology demonstrated submucosal hemorrhage, esophagitis with dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, and an ulcer containing cytomegaloviral inclusions. We report the first case of arterial bleeding from periesophageal pseudoaneurysms as well as use of angiographic embolization for arterial bleeding in the esophagus. PMID:27812392

  5. Presacral venous bleeding during mobilization in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casal Núñez, Jose Enrique; Vigorita, Vincenzo; Ruano Poblador, Alejandro; Gay Fernández, Ana María; Toscano Novella, Maria Ángeles; Cáceres Alvarado, Nieves; Pérez Dominguez, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the anatomy of sacral venous plexus flow, the causes of injuries and the methods for controlling presacral hemorrhage during surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS A review of the databases MEDLINE® and Embase™ was conducted, and relevant scientific articles published between January 1960 and June 2016 were examined. The anatomy of the sacrum and its venous plexus, as well as the factors that influence bleeding, the causes of this complication, and its surgical management were defined. RESULTS This is a review of 58 published articles on presacral venous plexus injury during the mobilization of the rectum and on techniques used to treat presacral venous bleeding. Due to the lack of cases published in the literature, there is no consensus on which is the best technique to use if there is presacral bleeding during mobilization in surgery for rectal cancer. This review may provide a tool to help surgeons make decisions regarding how to resolve this serious complication. CONCLUSION A series of alternative treatments are described; however, a conventional systematic review in which optimal treatment is identified could not be performed because few cases were analyzed in most publications. PMID:28321171

  6. Bleed-through and photobleaching correction in multiphoton FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides a tool to visualize the protein with high spatial and temporal resolution. In multi-photon FRET microscopy one experiences considerably less photobleaching compared to one-photon excitation since the illumination is the diffraction limited spot and the excitation is infrared-pulsed laser light. Because of the spectral overlap involved in the selection of the fluorophore pair for FRET imaging, the spectral bleed-through signal in the FRET channel is unavoidable. We describe in this paper the development of dedicated software to correct the bleed-through signal due to donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules. We used living cells expressed with BFP-RFP (DsRed)-C/EBP(alpha) proteins in the nucleus. We acquired images of different combinations like donor alone, acceptor alone, and both acceptor and donor under similar conditions. We statistically evaluated the percentage of bleed-through signal from one channel to the other based on the overlap areas of the spectra. We then reconstructed the images after applying the correction. Characterization of multi-photon FRET imaging system taking into account the intensity, dwell time, concentration of fluorophore pairs, objective lens and the excitation wavelength are described in this paper.

  7. Photoacoustic simulation of microvessel bleeding: spectral analysis and its implication for monitoring vascular-targeted treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Hysi, Eno; Zalev, Jason; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    The destruction of blood vessels is a commonly used cancer therapeutic strategy. Bleeding consequently follows and leads to the accumulation of blood in the interstitium. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is well positioned to detect bleeding due to its sensitivity to hemoglobin. After treatment vascular disruption can occur within just a few hours, which leads to bleeding which might be detected using PA to assess therapeutic effectiveness. Deep micro-vessels cannot typically be resolved using acoustic-resolution PA. However, spectral analysis of PA signals may still permit assessment of bleeding. This paper introduces a theoretical model to simulate the PA signals from disrupted vessels using a fractal model. The fractal model uses bifurcated-cylinder bases to represent vascular trees. Vessels have circular absorption cross-sections. To mimic bleeding from blood vessels, the diffusion of hemoglobin from micro-vessels was simulated. The PA signals were computed and in the simulations were detected using a linear array transducer (30 MHz center frequency) for four different vascular trees (at 256 axial spatial locations/tree). The Fourier Transform of each beam-formed PA signal was computed and the power spectra were fitted to a straight line within the -6 dB bandwidth of the receiving transducer. When comparing the power spectra before and after simulated bleeding, the spectral slope and mid-band fit (MBF) parameters decreased by 0.12 dB/MHz and 2.12 dB, while the y-intercept did not change after 1 hour of simulated bleeding. The results suggest that spectral PA analysis is sensitive to changes in the concentration and spatial distribution of hemoglobin in tissue, and changes due to bleeding can be detected without the need to resolve individual vessels. The simulations support the applicability of PA imaging in cancer treatment monitoring by detecting micro-vessel disruption.

  8. Bleeding recurrence in patients with gastrointestinal vascular malformation after thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Fu, Sengwang; Feng, Nan; Chen, Huimin; Gao, Yunjie; Zhao, Yunjia; Xue, Hanbing; Zhang, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Dai, Jun; Fang, Jingyuan; Ge, Zhizheng

    2016-08-01

    Thalidomide may be used for the treatment of gastrointestinal vascular malformation (GIVM), but the long-term response and adverse effects are unknown. Aim to study the recurrence rate of GIVM bleeding after thalidomide treatment, the response to treatment, and the adverse effects.This was a retrospective study of 80 patients with GIVM treated with thalidomide between November 2003 and November 2013. Patients received a course of 100 mg/day of thalidomide for 4 months and were followed up for at least 1 year. The response rate during follow-up, the recurrence rate after the 1st course of treatment, and the rate of retreatment were assessed. Comorbidities, the need for blood transfusion, yearly bleeding episodes, hemoglobin levels, hospitalization after thalidomide treatment, and the rate of adverse effects were also examined.The overall response rate during follow-up was 79.5% (62/78). The recurrence rate was 21.0% after the 1st course of thalidomide. The response rate of retreatment was 100%. After thalidomide treatment, yearly blood transfusion amounts, yearly bleeding episodes, and yearly hospitalization numbers were significantly decreased, while hemoglobin levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001). Adverse effects were observed in 60.0% (48/80) of the patients. Serious adverse effects were reported in 31.3% (25/80). The overall response rate was 76.7% (23/30) in 30 patients with comorbidities, while the rate was 78.0% (39/50) in patients without comorbidities (P = 0.55). The rate of serious adverse effects was similar between the comorbidities (33.3%) and no-comorbidities groups (30.0%) (P = 0.76).Thalidomide showed a good response rate and low adverse effect rate in patients with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIVM.

  9. GI-axe: an access broker framework for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Nativi, S.; Santoro, M.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The efficient and effective discovery of heterogeneous geospatial resources (e.g. data and services) is currently addressed by implementing "Discovery Brokering components"—such as GI-cat which is successfully used by the GEO brokering framework. A related (and subsequent) problem is the access of discovered resources. As for the discovery case, there exists a clear challenge: the geospatial Community makes use of heterogeneous access protocols and data models. In fact, different standards (and best practices) are defined and used by the diverse Geoscience domains and Communities of practice. Besides, through a client application, Users want to access diverse data to be jointly used in a common Geospatial Environment (CGE): a geospatial environment characterized by a spatio-temporal CRS (Coordinate Reference System), resolution, and extension. Users want to define a CGE and get the selected data ready to be used in such an environment. Finally, they want to download data according to a common encoding (either binary or textual). Therefore, it is possible to introduce the concept of "Access Brokering component" which addresses all these intermediation needs, in a transparent way for both clients (i.e. Users) and access servers (i.e. Data Providers). This work presents GI-axe: a flexible Access Broker which is capable to intermediate the different access standards and to get data according to a CGE, previously specified by the User. In doing that, GI-axe complements the capabilities of the brokered access servers, in keeping with the brokering principles. Let's consider a sample use case of a User needing to access a global temperature dataset available online on a THREDDS Data Server and a rainfall dataset accessible through a WFS—she/he may have obtained the datasets as a search result from a discovery broker. Distribution information metadata accompanying the temperature dataset further indicate that a given OPeNDAP service has to be accessed to retrieve it

  10. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-12-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions of the story are quite inaccurate historically. The reality is more complex than the usual accounts have it. This article sets out to disentangle fact from fiction.

  11. Prevention of Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Holley, Sharon L; Morad, Anna; Collins, Michelle R

    2016-07-07

    The risk that a newborn will develop vitamin K deficiency bleeding is 1700/100,000 (one out of 59) if vitamin K is not administered. When intramuscular vitamin K is administered, the risk of vitamin K deficiency bleeding is reduced to 1/100,000. While women may have misconceptions about vitamin K prophylaxis for their newborns, health care providers should be prepared with factual information. Prophylaxis is needed even for healthy newborns without risk factors for bleeding. Other forms of vitamin K supplementation, including oral administration of Food and Drug Administration-approved vitamin K preparations and maternal supplements during pregnancy or lactation, do not have the same effectiveness as the parenteral form. The formulations of vitamin K approved for use in the United States have not been associated with childhood leukemia or other childhood health problems. Care providers need to give accurate information to families regarding the risks and benefits of vitamin K prophylaxis. An interprofessional approach to education can be effective in increasing acceptance of vitamin K prophylaxis and decreasing the incidence of vitamin K deficiency bleeding. This article uses a case study approach to highlight common misconceptions about vitamin K prophylaxis and discuss a recent interprofessional collaboration to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding.

  12. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies: Consensus and Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dauerman, Harold L.; Rao, Sunil V.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Applegate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity and one year mortality. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies represent a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggests that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacologic (multiple agents) and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this article, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area. PMID:21700085

  13. Bleeding avoidance strategies. Consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Dauerman, Harold L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Applegate, Robert J

    2011-06-28

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity, and 1-year mortality. Bleeding avoidance strategies is a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggest that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety, and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacological (multiple agents), and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this paper, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area.

  14. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  15. Magnetic hyperthermia controlled drug release in the GI tract: solving the problem of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Joseph C.; Patrick, P. Stephen; Casson, Alfred; Southern, Paul; Lin, Fang-Yu; Powell, Michael J.; Pankhurst, Quentin A.; Kalber, Tammy; Lythgoe, Mark; Parkin, Ivan P.; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly challenging due to the harsh environments any drug- delivery vehicle must experience before it releases it’s drug payload. Effective targeted drug delivery systems often rely on external stimuli to effect release, therefore knowing the exact location of the capsule and when to apply an external stimulus is paramount. We present a drug delivery system for the GI tract based on coating standard gelatin drug capsules with a model eicosane- superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle composite coating, which is activated using magnetic hyperthermia as an on-demand release mechanism to heat and melt the coating. We also show that the capsules can be readily detected via rapid X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vital for progressing such a system towards clinical applications. This also offers the opportunity to image the dispersion of the drug payload post release. These imaging techniques also influenced capsule content and design and the delivered dosage form. The ability to easily change design demonstrates the versatility of this system, a vital advantage for modern, patient-specific medicine.

  16. Magnetic hyperthermia controlled drug release in the GI tract: solving the problem of detection

    PubMed Central

    Bear, Joseph C.; Patrick, P. Stephen; Casson, Alfred; Southern, Paul; Lin, Fang-Yu; Powell, Michael J.; Pankhurst, Quentin A.; Kalber, Tammy; Lythgoe, Mark; Parkin, Ivan P.; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly challenging due to the harsh environments any drug- delivery vehicle must experience before it releases it’s drug payload. Effective targeted drug delivery systems often rely on external stimuli to effect release, therefore knowing the exact location of the capsule and when to apply an external stimulus is paramount. We present a drug delivery system for the GI tract based on coating standard gelatin drug capsules with a model eicosane- superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle composite coating, which is activated using magnetic hyperthermia as an on-demand release mechanism to heat and melt the coating. We also show that the capsules can be readily detected via rapid X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vital for progressing such a system towards clinical applications. This also offers the opportunity to image the dispersion of the drug payload post release. These imaging techniques also influenced capsule content and design and the delivered dosage form. The ability to easily change design demonstrates the versatility of this system, a vital advantage for modern, patient-specific medicine. PMID:27671546

  17. Role of computed tomography angiography on the management of overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chao-Ming; Lin, I-Chang; Chang, Chi-Yang; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Mo, Lein-Ray; Lin, Jaw-Town; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The role of computed tomography angiography (CTA) on the management of acute overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) remains unclear. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of CTA before enteroscopy for acute overt OGIB. Methods All patients undergoing CTA followed by enteroscopy for acute overt OGIB were enrolled in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics and diagnosis were compared between patients with positive and negative CTA findings. We evaluated the impact of CTA on subsequent enteroscopy. Results From February 2008 to March 2015, 71 patients including 25 patients with positive CTA findings and 46 patients with negative CTA findings, were enrolled. All 25 patients with positive CTA findings were confirmed to have mid GI lesions, a significantly higher proportion than among patients with negative CTA findings (100% vs. 52.2%, respectively; P <0.001). CTA had a higher diagnostic yield for bleeding from tumor origin than from non-tumor origin (80.0% vs. 23.7%, respectively; P <0.001). The diagnostic yield of CTA and enteroscopy was 35.2% and 73.2%, respectively. The lesions could be identified by the initial route of enteroscopy in more patients with positive CTA findings than in those with negative CTA findings (92.0% vs. 47.8%, respectively; P <0.001). Lesions could be identified in seven of the 25 patients (28.0%) with positive CTA findings by using only push enteroscopy instead of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE), but all 46 patients with negative CTA findings needed SBE for deep small-bowel examination. Conclusions CTA is useful in the diagnosis of acute overt OGIB, especially in patients with bleeding from tumors. In addition, it also can show the precise location of bleeding, and guide subsequent enteroscopic management. PMID:28248993

  18. Duodenal Lipomatosis as a Curious Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed: A Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Majid; Tiwari, Priyanka; Ramaswamy, Palaniswamy Kalipatti; Kumar, Reddy Prasanna

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Duodenal lipomas are incidental and mostly asymptomatic. Tumours may produce symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort or cause bleeding due to ulceration or intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. We describe a 45-year-old man presenting in emergency with 3 days history of melena with normal gastroduodenoscopy and contrast enhanced computed tomography revealing multiple polypoid lesion in duodenum and proximal jejunum suggestive of lipoma. Due to ongoing bleed, he underwent laparotomy with duodenectomy and uneventful postoperative recovery. Our review of cases published in last 67 years indicate that duodenal lipomas are rare to occur but commonly found in second part, they may be seen in third and fourth part of duodenum which may be missed on endoscopy. They can be multiple and may present as severe UGI bleeding which could be managed surgically. Though CT is diagnostic, histopathology confirms the diagnosis which shows lipomatous lesion composed of mature adipose arranged in lobules. PMID:27437304

  19. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  20. Functional GI disorders: from animal models to drug development

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, E A; Bradesi, S; Chang, L; Spiegel, B M R; Bueller, J A; Naliboff, B D

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts by academic researchers and by the pharmaceutical industry, the development of novel pharmacological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders has been slow and disappointing. The traditional approach to identifying and evaluating novel drugs for these symptom-based syndromes has relied on a fairly standard algorithm using animal models, experimental medicine models and clinical trials. In the current article, the empirical basis for this process is reviewed, focusing on the utility of the assessment of visceral hypersensitivity and GI transit, in both animals and humans, as well as the predictive validity of preclinical and clinical models of IBS for identifying successful treatments for IBS symptoms and IBS-related quality of life impairment. A review of published evidence suggests that abdominal pain, defecation-related symptoms (urgency, straining) and psychological factors all contribute to overall symptom severity and to health-related quality of life. Correlations between readouts obtained in preclinical and clinical models and respective symptoms are small, and the ability to predict drug effectiveness for specific as well as for global IBS symptoms is limited. One possible drug development algorithm is proposed which focuses on pharmacological imaging approaches in both preclinical and clinical models, with decreased emphasis on evaluating compounds in symptom-related animal models, and more rapid screening of promising candidate compounds in man. PMID:17965064

  1. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months) the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative. PMID:20515511

  2. High Dose versus Low Dose Intravenous Pantoprazole in Bleeding Peptic Ulcer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Masjedizadeh, Abdol Rahim; Hajiani, Eskandar; Alavinejad, Pezhman; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Jamshidian, Noordin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The appropriate dose of proton pump inhibitors for treatment of patients with upper (GI) bleeding remains controversial. This study compares high-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion for prevention of GI bleeding complications. METHODS A total of 166 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers underwent therapeutic endoscopy using concomitant therapy by argon plasma coagulation (APC) and diluted epinephrine injection. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: high-dose pantoprazole (80 mg bolus, 8 mg per hour) and low-dose pantoprazole (40 mg bolus, 4 mg per hour) infused for three days. Initial outcomes were rebleeding, need for surgery, hemoglobin drop more than two units, and hospitalization for more than five days. Secondary outcome included mortality rate. RESULTS Overall, 166 patients (83 patients per group) enrolled in the study. The average age of patients in the high-dose group was 59.5±15.6 years and 52.3±13.3 years in the low-dose group (p=0.58). Males comprised 69.7% of patients. In the high-dose group, the mean number of units of transfused blood was 3.3±1.71 and in the low-dose group, it was 2.82±1.73 (p=0.50). There were 36 (43.37%) patients in the high-dose group and 40 (48.19%) in the low-dose group who were hospitalized for more than 5 days (p=0.53). Rebleeding was observed in 27 (32.53%) patients in the high-dose group and in 21 (25.30%) in the low-dose group (p=0.30). There were no significant differences observed in drop in hemoglobin of more than two units (p=0.15), mortality (p=0.99) and surgery (p=0.75) between the two groups. CONCLUSION For controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, there is no difference between high dose and low dose pantoprazole infusion. PMID:25093061

  3. Angiography in gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerovitz, M.F.; Fellows, K.E.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-seven children aged 1 day to 16 years studied arteriographically for acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleeding were reviewed. Children with known esophageal varices and portal hypertension were excluded. Final diagnoses were made in 25 patients by means of surgery, endoscopy, biopsy, laboratory data, and clinical follow-up. Of these 25 cases, arteriography gave a correct diagnosis in 64% and was falsely negative in 36%. The common causes of bleeding in this study were gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastritis, vascular malformations, and typhlitis. Transcatheter therapy was attempted in six acute bleeders, with success in three (50%).

  4. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  5. Acid inhibition and peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Štimac, D; Franjić, N; Krznarić, Ž

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common emergency situations in medicine. Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy together with emerging interventional radiological procedures are successfully treating peptic ulcer disease, reserving surgical procedures for only a small portion of patients unresponsive to 'conventional' therapy. Technological advancement has seen a great improvement in the field of endoscopic treatment in the form of various methods of hemostasis. However, pharmacological therapy with proton pump inhibitors still plays the central role in the peptic ulcer bleeding treatment algorithm.

  6. Evaluation for bleeding disorders in suspected child abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James D; Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C

    2013-04-01

    Bruising or bleeding in a child can raise the concern for child abuse. Assessing whether the findings are the result of trauma and/or whether the child has a bleeding disorder is critical. Many bleeding disorders are rare, and not every child with bruising/bleeding concerning for abuse requires an evaluation for bleeding disorders. In some instances, however, bleeding disorders can present in a manner similar to child abuse. The history and clinical evaluation can be used to determine the necessity of an evaluation for a possible bleeding disorder, and prevalence and known clinical presentations of individual bleeding disorders can be used to guide the extent of the laboratory testing. This clinical report provides guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians regarding the evaluation for bleeding disorders when child abuse is suspected.

  7. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:26798628

  8. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-16

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

  9. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  10. Brush cytology: an adjunct to diagnostic upper GI endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Patwari, A K; Anand, V K; Malhotra, V; Balani, B; Gangil, A; Jain, A; Kapoor, G

    2001-06-01

    Endoscopic brush cytology (EBC) was performed in antral and duodenal brushings of children subjected to upper GI endoscopy for the detection of H. pylori (Hp) and trophozoites of Giardia lamblia (Glt) in addition to routine endoscopic grasp biopsy (EGB). It was hospital based prospective study. EBC was performed in children subjected to upper GI endoscopy with a sheathed cytology brush. Mucosal brushings were collected from antrum, body of the stomach and second or third part of duodenum by gently rubbing the surface of the brush with the mucosal wall in all the directions, brush withdrawn and brushings performed on a glass slide. The smears were placed in 95% ethyl alcohol and later examined for Glt and Hp using Giemsa and Hematoxylin & Eosin stain. EGB was taken from antrum, body of the stomach and duodenum from sites other than those used for brushings. One hundred and seventy children between 1-13 years (median age = 5 years) were subjected to upper GI endoscopy for malabsorption (n = 94), recurrent abdominal pain (n = 49), failure to thrive (n = 16) and recurrent vomiting/regurgitation (n = 11) and EBC was performed in addition to routine EGB. Thirty five children (20.4%) were colonized by Hp, 14 (8.2%) were detected to have Glt and in 6 cases (3.5%) both Hp as well as Glt were detected. Out of 41 cases colonized by Hp, 24 cases (58.5%) were detected by EGB and 27 cases (65.8%) were detected by EBC. Out of 20 children in whom Glt were detected from their duodenum, the detection was by EBG in 12 cases (60%) and by EBC in as many as 19 cases (95%). Comparison of EGB and EBC suggested that detection rates with EBC were higher than EGB. Detection by EBC was significantly higher for Glt than Hp. There were no complications attributed to EBC and procedure time for endoscopy was not significantly prolonged. On the contrary, detection of Hp and particularly Glt in higher proportion of cases with the help of EBC was helpful in their appropriate management. Our results

  11. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  12. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    PubMed

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (p<0,05). The results of this study show that the omeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing.

  13. Acute diquat poisoning with intracerebral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, S; Wilks, M; Coupe, M

    2001-01-01

    A case of severe diquat poisoning complicated by the development of aggressive behaviour, oliguric renal failure, and intracerebral bleeding is described. The patient was successfully managed and made a complete recovery. In this paper special attention has been given to the major clinical differences between diquat and paraquat intoxication.


Keywords: poisoning; diquat; paraquat PMID:11320278

  14. Identification and Molecular Characterization of FKF1 and GI Homologous Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Hu, Ruibo; Wu, Faqiang; Ma, Jinhua; Meng, Ying; Fu, YongFu

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, FKF1 (FLAVIN BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F-BOX1) and GI (GIGANTEA) play important roles in flowering pathway through regulating daytime CO (CONSTANS) expression, and such a function is conserved across plants studied. But related reports are limited for soybean. In this study, we cloned FKF1 and GI homologs in soybean, and named as GmFKF1, GmFKF2, GmGI1, GmGI2, and GmGI3, respectively. GmGI1 had two alternative splicing forms, GmGI1α and GmGI1β. GmFKF1/2 transcripts were diurnally regulated, with a peak at zeitgeber time 12 (ZT12) in long days and at ZT10 in short days. The diurnal phases between GmGIs transcript levels greatly differed. GmGI2 expression was regulated by both the circadian clock and photoperiod. But the rhythmic phases of GmGI1 and GmGI3 expression levels were mainly conferred by long days. GmFKFs shared similar spatio-temporal expression profiles with GmGIs in all of the tissue/organs in different developmental stages in both LD and SD. Both GmFKF and GmGI proteins were targeted to the nucleus. Yeast two hybrid assays showed GmFKF1/GmFKF2 interacted with GmGI1/GmGI2/GmCDF1 (CYCLING DOF FACTOR CDF1 homolog in soybean); and the LOV (Light, Oxygen, or Voltage) domain in GmFKF1/GmFKF2 played an important role in these interactions. N-terminus of GmGI2 was sufficient to mediate its interaction with GmCDF1. Interestingly, N-terminus not full of GmGI3 interacted with GmFKF1/GmFKF2/GmCDF1. Ectopic over-expression of the GmFKF1 or GmFKF2 in Arabidopsis enhanced flowering in SD. Collectively, GmFKF and GmGI in soybean had conserved functional domains at DNA sequence level, but specific characters at function level with their homologs in other plants. PMID:24236086

  15. Xenopus as a Model for GI/Pancreas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salanga, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases affecting endodermal organs like the pancreas, lung and gastrointestinal (GI) tract have a substantial impact on human welfare. Since many of these are congenital defects that arise as a result of defects during development broad efforts are focused on understanding the development of these organs so as to better identify risk factors, disease mechanisms and therapeutic targets. Studies implementing model systems, like the amphibian Xenopus, have contributed immensely to our understanding of signaling (e.g. Wnt, FGF, BMP, RA) pathways and gene regulation (e.g. hhex, ptf1a, ngn3) that underlie normal development as well as disease progression. Recent advances in genome engineering further enhance the capabilities of the Xenopus model system for pursuing biomedical research, and will undoubtedly result in a boom of new information underlying disease mechanisms ultimately leading to advancements in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26236566

  16. Low GI Food with Barley in Space Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Naomi; Sugimoto, Manabu; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kihara, Makoto; Yamashita, Masamichi; Space Agriculture Task Force

    The construction of the life-support system to perform space, moon base, Mars emigration is demanded. The space foods will play a very important role of life support on this occasion. Particularly, in environment of the microgravity, our metabolism becomes less than the face of the Earth. The management of the blood sugar level is very important. We need to eat the meal which will be rise in blood sugar level slowly. The barley which includes much water-soluble dietary fibers is helpful to make low GI space food. After eating 30% barley with unpolished rice, blood sugar level was rise slowly. The cooking process is very important to our body in thinking about digestion and absorption. Soft foods, long-heated foods and grind-foods are easy to digest. After eating these-foods, our blood sugar level will rise, easily. We introduce the space foods with 30% wheat that the blood sugar level is hard to rising.

  17. Ventilation monitoring during moderate sedation in GI patients.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Thomas J; Middleton, Austin H; Makhija, Nikhil

    2017-02-01

    Sedation in locations outside the operating room (OR) is common. Guidelines for safe patient monitoring have been updated by the American Society of Anesthesiology to include monitoring of ventilation and/or carbon dioxide (CO2). Although technologies exist to monitor these variables, the quality and/or availability of these measurements in non-OR settings is not optimal. This quality improvement project assessed the value of impedance technology for monitoring minute ventilation (MV) compared to standard end-tidal monitoring of CO2 (ETCO2). Patients undergoing GI exams with moderate sedation provided by anesthesia providers were monitored for MV with a respiratory volume monitor (ExSpiron 1Xi, Respiratory Motion, Waltham, MA) and ETCO2 via nasal cannula (NC). Calibration and baseline data were collected prior to sedation. Continuous MV and ETCO2 data were collected and averaged, providing minute values after sedation medications throughout the procedure. Stable periods of reduced MV were averaged and used in comparison to ETCO2. Data from 20 patients were evaluated. After sedation, the expected decrease in MV after sedation was observed in 18 of 20 patients (average -47.82 %), while an increase in ETCO2 was observed in just 10 of 20 patients (average -5.17 mm Hg). The correlation coefficient between changes in MV and ETCO2 in response to sedation administration was positive and not significant, r = 0.223. Ventilation monitoring may provide an element of safety for earlier and more reliable detection of reduced ventilation compared to a surrogate for hypoventilation, ETCO2, in patients undergoing sedation for GI procedures outside of the OR.

  18. Risk Factors for an Iatrogenic Mallory-Weiss Tear Requiring Bleeding Control during a Screening Upper Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Na, Shin; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Han, Seungbong

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim. In some cases of iatrogenic Mallory-Weiss tears (MWTs), hemostasis is needed due to severe mucosal tearing with bleeding. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for severe iatrogenic MWTs and the methods of endoscopic bleeding control. Materials and Methods. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 426,085 cases of screening upper endoscopy were performed at the Asan Medical Center. We retrospectively analyzed the risk factors for severe iatrogenic MWTs requiring an endoscopic procedure and the treatment modalities of bleeding control. Results. Iatrogenic MWTs occurred in 546 cases (0.13%) of screening upper endoscopy in 539 patients. Bleeding control due to severe bleeding was applied in 71 cases (13.0%), and rebleeding after initial bleeding control occurred in 1 case. Multivariate analysis showed that old age, a history of distal gastrectomy, and a less-experienced endoscopist (fewer than 2,237.5 endoscopic procedures at the time of the MWT) were associated with severe iatrogenic MWTs requiring an endoscopic procedure. Among 71 cases requiring bleeding control, a hemoclip was used in 81.7% (58 cases). Conclusions. Screening endoscopy procedures should be carefully performed when patients are in their old age and have a history of distal gastrectomy, particularly if the endoscopist is less experienced. PMID:28348579

  19. Prevention of stress-related ulcer bleeding at the intensive care unit: Risks and benefits of stress ulcer prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Buendgens, Lukas; Koch, Alexander; Tacke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Stress-related mucosal disease is a typical complication of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). It poses a risk of clinically relevant upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Therefore, stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is recommended in high-risk patients, especially those mechanically ventilated > 48 h and those with a manifest coagulopathy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and, less effectively, histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) prevent GI bleeding in critically ill patients in the ICU. However, the routine use of pharmacological SUP does not reduce overall mortality in ICU patients. Moreover, recent studies revealed that SUP in the ICU might be associated with potential harm such as an increased risk of infectious complications, especially nosocomial pneumonia and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Additionally, special populations such as patients with liver cirrhosis may even have an increased mortality rate if treated with PPI. Likewise, PPI can be toxic for both the liver and the bone marrow, and some PPI show clinically relevant interactions with important other drugs like clopidogrel. Therefore, the agent of choice, the specific balance of risks and benefits for individual patients as well as the possible dose of PPI has to be chosen carefully. Alternatives to PPI prophylaxis include H2RA and/or sucralfate. Instead of routine SUP, further trials should investigate risk-adjusted algorithms, balancing benefits and threats of SUP medication in the ICU. PMID:26855894

  20. The ORBIT bleeding score: a simple bedside score to assess bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C.; Simon, DaJuanicia N.; Thomas, Laine E.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ansell, Jack E.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Chang, Paul; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Pencina, Michael J.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in atrial fibrillation (AF) are often influenced by assessment of bleeding risk. However, existing bleeding risk scores have limitations. Objectives We sought to develop and validate a novel bleeding risk score using routinely available clinical information to predict major bleeding in a large, community-based AF population. Methods We analysed data from Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF), a prospective registry that enrolled incident and prevalent AF patients at 176 US sites. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we identified factors independently associated with major bleeding among patients taking oral anticoagulation (OAC) over a median follow-up of 2 years (interquartile range = 1.6–2.5). We also created a numerical bedside risk score that included the five most predictive risk factors weighted according to their strength of association with major bleeding. The predictive performance of the full model, the simple five-item score, and two existing risk scores (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation and risk factors in atrial fibrillation, ATRIA) were then assessed in both the ORBIT-AF cohort and a separate clinical trial population, Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral direct factor Xa inhibition compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and embolism trial in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET-AF). Results Among 7411 ORBIT-AF patients taking OAC, the rate of major bleeding was 4.0/100 person-years. The full continuous model (12 variables) and five-factor ORBIT risk score (older age [75+ years], reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) both had good ability to identify those who bled vs. not (C-index 0.69 and 0.67, respectively). These scores both had

  1. Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164108.html Stent Patients Face Higher Risk of Death After Bleeding, Clots Prolonged treatment to prevent clots ... some patients are still at increased risk of death if they suffer either blockages or bleeding events, ...

  2. GiPSiNet: an open source/open architecture network middleware for surgical simulations.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Vincenzo; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk; Cai, Qingbo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and techniques of GiPSiNet, an open source/open architecture network middleware being developed for surgical simulations. GiPSiNet extends GiPSi (General Interactive Physical Simulation Interface), our framework for developing organ level surgical simulations, to network environments. This network extension is non-trivial, since the network settings pose several serious problems for distributed surgical virtual environments such as band-width limit, delays, and packet losses. Our goal is to enhance the quality (fidelity and realism) of networked simulations in the absence of network QoS (Quality of Service) through the GiPSiNet middleware.

  3. Semi-direct lysis of swabs and evaluation of their efficiencies to recover human noroviruses GI and GII from surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-06-01

    Enteric viruses such as noroviruses (NoVs) continue to be the cause of widespread viral outbreaks due to person-to-person transmission, contaminated food, and contaminated surfaces. In order to optimize swabbing methodology for the detection of viruses on (food) contact surfaces, three swab elution/extraction strategies were compared in part one of this study, out of which, one strategy was based on the recently launched ISO protocol (ISO/TS 15216-1) for the determination of hepatitis A virus and NoV in food using real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). These three swab elution/extraction strategies were tested for the detection of GI.4 and GII.4 NoV on high-density polyethylene (HD-PE) surfaces with the use of cotton swabs. For detection of GI.4 and GII.4, the sample recovery efficiency (SRE) obtained with the direct lysis strategy (based on ISO/TS 15216-1) was significantly lower than the SRE obtained with both other strategies. The semi-direct lysis strategy was chosen to assess the SRE of two common swabs (cotton swab and polyester swab) versus the biowipe (Biomérieux, Lyon, France) on three surfaces (HD-PE, neoprene rubber (NR), and nitrile gloves (GL)). For both surfaces, HD-PE and GL, no significant differences in SREs of GI.4 and GII.4 NoVs were detected between the three different swabs. For the coarser NR, biowipes turned out to be the best option for detecting both GI.4 and GII.4 NoV.

  4. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies.

  5. Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Mannucci, P M

    2014-09-02

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common genetic bleeding disorder, is characterised by a quantitative or qualitative defect of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Patients with VWD suffer from mucocutaneous bleeding, of severity usually proportional to the degree of VWF defect. In particular, gastrointestinal bleeding associated with angiodysplasia is often a severe symptom of difficult management. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of VWD-associated gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and related bleeding.

  6. Life-Threatening Bleeding from Peristomal Varices after Cystoprostatectomy: Multimodal Approach in a Cirrhotic, Encephalopathic Patient with Severe Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Staubli, Sergej E. L.; Gramann, Tobias; Schwab, Christoph; Semela, David; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Engeler, Daniel S.; Abt, Dominik; Mordasini, Livio

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding of peristomal varices due to a portosystemic shunt is rare but potentially life-threatening in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. The scarce case reports in the literature recommend transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to prevent further bleeding. We report on a 72-year-old man who was referred to our hospital because of life-threatening bleeding from peristomal varices, three years after radical cystoprostatectomy for invasive bladder cancer. CT imaging showed liver cirrhosis with a prominent portosystemic shunt leading to massively enlarged peristomal varices. TIPS was taken into consideration, but not possible due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Medical therapy with lactulose and the nonselective beta-blocker carvedilol was initiated to treat HE and portal hypertension. In a second step, the portosystemic shunt was percutaneously embolized. Here, we present a multimodal approach to treat intractable bleeding from peristomal varices in a patient with ileal conduit urinary diversion, not suitable for TIPS. PMID:25709851

  7. A clinical comparison of the efficacy of an electromechanical flossing device or manual flossing in affecting interproximal gingival bleeding and plaque accumulation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N A; Barnes, C M; Russell, C M; Winchester, K R

    1995-01-01

    This one-month clinical trial was designed to compare the effect of an electromechanical flossing device and manual flossing on reducing interproximal gingival bleeding and plaque accumulation in a cohort of 60 healthy adults. After baseline evaluation of interproximal gingival bleeding, soft tissue trauma and plaque, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups, given flossing instructions, and had their teeth cleaned. At 30 days all three clinical parameters were again evaluated. The results showed a reduction in GI from baseline to follow-up in each group. This effect is significant (p<0.0001) in the analysis of variance. There was no overall difference in the groups (p=0.93). There was no difference in the reduction in GI from baseline to follow-up between the two groups (p=0.91); interaction). As with the GI, there was a significant reduction in PI from baseline to follow-up in each group (p<0.0001). There was no overall difference between the groups (p=0.24). There was no difference in the reduction in PI from baseline to follow-up between the two groups (p=0.59; interaction). No soft tissue trauma was noted at the baseline examination or at the follow-up examination after 30 days.

  8. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  12. Clinical Results of the Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) for the Treatment of Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Woo; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Jae-Kyu; Kim, Sei-Jong

    2000-01-01

    Background Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has been popularized for the treatment of refractory variceal bleeding. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and long-term effect of TIPS in the treatment of variceal bleeding that is not controlled with pharmacological and endoscopic treatment. Methods Thirty-six patients who underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) due to refractory variceal bleeding were included in the study. The effectiveness of portal decompression and bleeding control was evaluated. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to analyse the degree of varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) before TIPS procedure and one to three weeks after TIPS. Angiography was performed in surviving patients, if bleeding recurred, or if ultrasonography or endoscopy suggested stent dysfunction. Results TIPS were successfully placed in 36 of 38 patients (94.6%). TIPS achieved hemostasis of variceal bleeding in 34 patients (94.4%). Portal venous pressure decreased from an initial average of 28.7±7.9 to 23.2±9.4 mmHg after TIPS (p < 0.05). The portosystemic pressure gradient was significantly decreased from 15.5±6.3 to 7.8±4.1 mmHg (p < 0.01). The degree of esophagogastric varices and PHG was significantly improved after TIPS. The total length of follow-up was from one day to 54 months (mean: 355 days). The actuarial probability of survival was 83% at one year and 74% at two years. Overall, 16 episodes of stent dysfunction were diagnosed during follow-up. Stent revision by means of angioplasty was successfully performed in 14 of these episodes. Conclusion TIPS is an effective and reliable nonoperative means of lowering portal pressure. This procedure has proved useful in the management of acute variceal bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Surveillance by ultrasonography, endoscopy, and angiographic intervention is useful for the maintenance of shunt patency. PMID:11242805

  13. Bleeding from duodenal ulcer in a patient with bilio-pancreatic diversion.

    PubMed

    Garancini, Mattia; Luperto, Margherita; Delitala, Alberto; Maternini, Matteo; Uggeri, Franco

    2011-12-01

    Scopinaro's bilio-pancreatic diversion is considered as an acceptable malabsorptive surgical approach for the treatment of morbid obesity. We describe a case of acute recurrent gastro-intestinal bleeding in a patient with a previous Scopinaro's bilio-pancreatic diversion. At the first admission in our department, gastroscopy, colonoscopy, contrast-enhanced computerized tomography and angiography resulted negative for active bleeding. Hypovolemic shock indicated laparotomy and an intraoperative enteroscopy performed through a small enterotomy showed an ulcerative perforation sourced in an ischemic portion of a distended duodenal stump, with a bleeding branch of gastro-duodenal artery at the bottom. Hemorrhage was stopped with stitches. Two years later a new episode of duodenal bleeding associated with severe malnutrition occurred. A covered chronic ischemic perforation sustained by duodenal distension due to biliopancreatic limb sub-obstruction appeared to be the most probable etiology of the recurrent duodenal bleeding. The patient underwent again to laparotomy and adhesiolysis; hemorrhage was stopped by means of ligation of gastroduodenal artery and bilio-pancreatic diversion was converted into a standard Roux-en-Y gastroenterostomy with an entero-entero anastomosis 40 cm from the Treitz ligament in order to restore an anatomo-functional condition guaranteeing normal absorption and intestinal transit. After Scopinaro's bilio-pancreatic diversion duodenal bleeding can represent a rare serious presentation of biliopancreatic limb obstruction; because of the complex anatomical reconstruction performed during this intervention, the duodenum results unavailable during upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy, and if a duodenal bleeding is suspected laparotomy followed by enteroscopy represents an effective diagnostic approach.

  14. Comparison of Three Risk Scores to Predict Outcomes of Severe Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M.; Ohning, Gordon V.; Kovacs, Thomas O.; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A.; Machicado, Gustavo A.; Dulai, Gareth S.; Jensen, Mary Ellen; Gornbein, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Improved medical decisions by using a score at the initial patient triage level may lead to improvements in patient management, outcomes, and resource utilization. There is no validated score for management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) unlike for upper GIB. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracies of 3 different prognostic scores (CURE Hemostasis prognosis score, Charlston index and ASA score) for the prediction of 30 day rebleeding, surgery and death in severe LGIB. Methods Data on consecutive patients hospitalized with severe GI bleeding from January 2006 to October 2011 in our two-tertiary academic referral centers were prospectively collected. Sensitivities, specificities, accuracies and area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) were computed for three scores for predictions of rebleeding, surgery and mortality at 30 days. Results 235 consecutive patients with LGIB were included between 2006 and 2011. 23% of patients rebled, 6% had surgery, and 7.7% of patients died. The accuracies of each score never reached 70% for predicting rebleeding or surgery in either. The ASA score had a highest accuracy for predicting mortality within 30 days (83.5%) whereas the CURE Hemostasis prognosis score and the Charlson index both had accuracies less than 75% for the prediction of death within 30 days. Conclusions ASA score could be useful to predict death within 30 days. However a new score is still warranted to predict all 30 days outcomes (rebleeding, surgery and death) in LGIB. PMID:25599218

  15. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  16. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up.

  17. Systemic Mastocytosis as an Unconventional Cause of Variceal Bleeding: Think Outside the Box

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Mayurathan; Jilani, Basmah N; Ahmed, Saba; Deeb, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is a rare infiltrative disease involving the skin, bone marrow, digestive system, and liver. We report a case of a 59-year-old male who presented with a massive variceal bleed without any evidence of cirrhosis; however was later found to have severe perisinusoidal fibrosis with mast cells in portal tracts on liver biopsy and hypercellular mast cell infiltrated bone marrow. This rare case describes an out-of-the-ordinary reason of variceal bleeding with preserved liver function due to non-cirrhotic portal hypertension.   PMID:27433408

  18. Isolated Splenic Vein Thrombosis: 8-Year-Old Boy with Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Mazdaee, Behnaz; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Ravari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-year-old boy who was referred to our center with the complaint of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with hypersplenism and progressive esophageal varices. Performing a computerized tomography (CT) scan, we discovered a suspicious finding in the venography phase in favor of thrombosis in the splenic vein. Once complementary examinations were done and due to recurrent bleeding and band ligation failure, the patient underwent splenectomy. And during the one-year follow-up obvious improvement of the esophageal varices was observed in endoscopy.

  19. A stubborn anemia caused by ectopic pancreas bleeding in the jejunum revealed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is extremely rare in clinical setting. Meanwhile, a stubborn anemia without obvious dark bloody stool due to ectopic pancreas diagnosed by capsule endoscopy has not been reported. We reported a case of an ectopic pancreas inducing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a 70-year-old woman presenting as stubborn anemia, which was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy. The patient recovered well after resection the lesion. Diagnosis of ectopic pancreas is extremely difficult with conventional techniques. Endoscopists should pay more attention to the ectopic pancreas as a rare differential consideration for occult intestinal bleeding. PMID:26682148

  20. [Antisecretory therapy as a component of hemostasis in acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings].

    PubMed

    Gostishchev, V K; Evseev, M A

    2005-01-01

    Results of antisecretory therapy (pyrenzepin, H(2)-blockers, inhibitors of proton pump, octreotid) in 962 patients with acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleedings (AGDUB) were analyzed over 14-years period. Antisecretory treatment in AGDUB has principally different goals and potential depending on risk of bleeding's recurrence and morphological changes in tissue of gastroduodenal ulcer. Antisecretory therapy is the main treatment in high risk of AGDUB recurrence or before urgent surgery. Intravenous infusion of omeprazol has demonstrated the highest clinical efficacy due to maximal inhibition of gastric secretion and absence of negative influences on oxygen regimen in tissue of ulcer.

  1. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding (p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01–12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98–51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522 PMID:27913777

  2. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  3. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding ( p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01-12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98-51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522.

  4. Jejunogastric intussusception presenting as tumor bleed

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Shiraz Ahmad; Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Wani, Rauf A; Khan, Asima

    2010-01-01

    Jejunogastric intussusception (JGI) is a rare but serious complication of previous gastrectomy or gastrojejunostomy, and a delayed diagnosis can lead to catastrophe. It can present as hematemesis, and an endoscopist aware of the condition can diagnose it early. We present a case of JGI presenting as hematemesis and diagnosed as tumor bleed on endoscopy. Diagnosis of JGI was confirmed on laparotomy, gangrenous efferent limb was resected and a fresh gastrojejunostomy performed. PMID:21063568

  5. Single session treatment for bleeding hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Rypins, E.B.; Houck, J.; Thrower, S.

    1987-12-01

    Fifty consecutive outpatients with bleeding internal hemorrhoids were prospectively treated with a single application of rubber band ligation or infrared coagulation. Complete follow-up observation was obtained in 48 patients (23 underwent rubber band ligation and 25 underwent infrared coagulation). At one month after treatment, 22 patients who underwent rubber band ligation and 16 who underwent infrared coagulation, were symptomatically improved (p less than 0.05). At six months, 15 patients who had undergone rubber band ligation and ten who had infrared coagulation treatment, remained improved (p less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference in the discomfort experienced by either group during or after the procedure as determined by a self-assessment scale. Two patients who underwent rubber band ligation experienced complications--a thrombosed external hemorrhoid developed in one patient and another had delayed rectal bleeding. Although associated with occasional complications after treatment, rubber band ligation is more effective than in infrared coagulation for single session treatment of bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  6. Correlating clinical manifestations with factor levels in rare bleeding disorders: a report from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Viswabandya, A; Baidya, S; Nair, S C; Abraham, A; George, B; Mathews, V; Chandy, M; Srivastava, A

    2012-05-01

    Data on the clinical manifestations of patients with clotting factor defects other than Haemophilia A, B and von Willebrand disease are limited because of their rarity. Due to their autosomal recessive nature of inheritance, these diseases are more common in areas where there is higher prevalence of consanguinity. There is no previous large series reported from southern India where consanguinity is common. Our aim was to analyze clinical manifestations of patients with rare bleeding disorders and correlate their bleeding symptoms with corresponding factor level. Data were collected in a standardized format from our centre over three decades on 281 patients who were diagnosed with rare bleeding disorders (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V (FV), FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV or FVIII deficiency). Patients with liver dysfunction or those on medications which can affect factor level were excluded. All patients with <50% factor levels were included in this analysis. Patients were analysed for their salient clinical manifestations and it was correlated with their factor levels. The data shows that FXIII deficiency is the commonest and FXI deficiency is the rarest in Southern India. There was no significant difference in bleeding symptoms among those who were < or >1% factor coagulant activities among all disorders, except for few symptoms in FVII and FX deficiency. An international collaborative study is essential to find out the best way of classifying severity in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

  7. Fatal Retroperitoneal Bleeding Caused by Neurofibromatosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moerbeek, Patrick R.; van Buijtenen, Jesse M.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.

    2015-01-01

    A young female was brought into the emergency department with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after local resection of neurofibromateous lesions. Chest ultrasonography was normal. Abdominal ultrasonography was not performed. After successful resuscitation a total body CT-scan was performed to rule out potential bleeding sources. However, haemodynamic instability reoccurred and the scan had to be aborted at the thoracoabdominal level. No thoracic abnormalities were found. Resuscitation was reinitiated and abdominal ultrasonography was performed, showing a large amount of abdominal fluid. A progressive fall in haemoglobin was noted. Emergency laparotomy was performed, revealing a large retroperitoneal haematoma. Despite ligation and packing, bleeding continued. Postoperative angiography showed active bleeding from a branch of the left internal iliac artery, which could be successfully coiled. Unfortunately, the patient died five days later due to irreversible brain damage. Revision of an MRI scan made one year earlier showed a 10 cm large retroperitoneal neurofibromatous lesion exactly at the location of the current bleeding. This case shows that patients with neurofibromatosis might develop spontaneous life-threatening bleeding from retroperitoneal located lesions. Furthermore, it points out the necessity of focused assessment with ultrasonography of the abdomen in all patients with PEA of unknown origin. PMID:25688270

  8. Evaluation of patients' attitudes towards stroke prevention and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, S; Regpala, S; Lacombe, S; Sharma, M; Gibbens, S; Ball, D; Francis, K

    2014-03-03

    Patient's values and preferences regarding the relative importance of preventing strokes and avoiding bleeding are now recognised to be of great importance in deciding on therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation (SPAF). We used an iPad questionnaire to determine the minimal clinically important difference (Treatment Threshold) and the maximum number of major bleeding events that a patient would be willing to endure in order to prevent one stroke (Bleeding Ratio) for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy in 172 hospital in-patients with documented non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulant therapy was being considered. Patients expressed strong opinions regarding SPAF. We found that 12% of patients were "medication averse" and were not willing to consider antithrombotic therapy; even if it was 100% effective in preventing strokes. Of those patients who were willing to consider antithrombotic therapy, 42% were identified as "risk averse" and 15% were "risk tolerant". Patients required at least a 0.8% (NNT=125) annual absolute risk reduction and 15% relative risk reduction in the risk of stroke in order to agree to initiate antithrombotic therapy, and patients were willing to endure 4.4 major bleeds in order to prevent one stroke. In conclusion, there was a substantial amount of inter-patient variability, and often extreme differences in opinion regarding tolerance of bleeding risk in the context of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. These findings highlight the importance of considering patient preferences when deciding on SPAF therapy.

  9. Late-onset severe biliary bleeding after endoscopic pigtail plastic stent insertion

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Muneji; Sato, Hideki; Koyama, Yuki; Sakakida, Tomoki; Kawakami, Takumi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Fujii, Hideki; Nakatsugawa, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Shinya; Tomatsuri, Naoya; Okuyama, Yusuke; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ito, Takaaki; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Norimasa

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report our experience with a case of severe biliary bleeding due to a hepatic arterial pseudoaneurysm that had developed 1 year after endoscopic biliary plastic stent insertion. The patient, a 78-year-old woman, presented with hematemesis and obstructive jaundice. Ruptured hepatic arterial pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed, which was suspected to have been caused by long-term placement of an endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD) stent. This episode of biliary bleeding was successfully treated by transarterial embolization (TAE). Pseudoaneurysm leading to hemobilia is a rare but potentially fatal complication in patients with long-term placement of ERBD. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure that offers effective treatment for biliary bleeding. PMID:28216982

  10. GI Consequences of Cancer Treatment: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2016-04-01

    In an era when extensive research is being funded to mitigate the radiation risks of a human traveling to Mars or the potential effects of a nuclear detonation in an urban environment, it is difficult to understand why the medical and research community remains largely uninterested in pelvic radiation disease (PRD), a condition that afflicts half a million patients every year after radiotherapy for pelvic cancer. There has been significant progress in understanding the nature of normal tissue injury, especially as it affects the GI tract. Clear clinical data exist on how best to assess and improve symptoms and there are a number of options for how to modulate the underlying progressive pathophysiology of PRD. Annually, there are more patients who develop PRD than inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite the similarity in PRD and IBD symptoms, the same expertise that promotes assessment, treatment and disease-modifying approaches as standard of care in IBD is almost nonexistent for those suffering from PRD, and as a result the unmet need is enormous. Curing or controlling cancer without addressing quality of life is no longer acceptable when half of all patients diagnosed with cancer live for 10 years after treatment. For those patients afflicted with PRD it can cause significant misery, and this situation is unacceptable; investment in training and research cannot be delayed any longer.

  11. With GI Bill's Billions at Stake, Colleges Compete to Lure Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2012-01-01

    As the Post-9/11 GI Bill nears its fourth year, with more than 550,000 veterans enrolled in thousands of institutions, advocacy groups, lawmakers, and President Obama warn that veterans are vulnerable in a higher-education marketplace eager for their GI Bill dollars--with some purveyors, particularly for-profits, recruiting aggressively. The…

  12. Patterns of bleeding in adolescents with severe haemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Aronstam, A; Rainsford, S G; Painter, M J

    1979-01-01

    Eighty-two boys with severe haemophilia A who spent some time at Lord Mayor Treloar College during 1973-7 were studied. All episodes of bleeding that occurred during term time were recorded, along with the number of transfusions. The bleeding frequency among these boys, most of them aged 10-17 years, increased steadily from 8,31 episodes/100 days in 1973 to 12,63 episodes/100 days in 1977. At the same time there was a steady fall in bleeding frequency with age. Altogether 24% of bleeding episodes were into the elbow joint, 22% into the knee, and 15% into the ankle. As the boys grew older the proportion of bleeding episodes in the legs declined and that in the arms increased. The overall results reflect the fact that special schools now see only the severest cases of haemophilia. The pattern of bleeding during adolescence suggests that concepts of management of arm bleeding need modifying. PMID:427411

  13. Gastrointestinal (GI)-Specific patient reported outcomes instruments differentiate between renal transplant patients with or without GI symptoms: results from a South American cohort

    PubMed Central

    Machnicki, Gerardo; Pefaur, Jacqueline; Gaite, Luis; Linchenco, Ana M; Raimondi, Clemente; Schiavelli, Ruben; Otero, Alcira; Margolis, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    Background Immunosuppressive therapies have burdensome side effects which may lead to sub-therapeutic dosing and non-compliance. Patients on different immunosuppressant regimens may feel less bothered by Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects or report better health-related quality of life (HRQL). We evaluated the reliability and validity of two GI-specific outcome instruments (Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS; higher scores = increased severity) and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI; higher scores = better GI-specific HRQL)) in renal transplant patients in South America. Methods Data from 5 South American centers participating in an international, longitudinal, observational study were analyzed. Patients were ≥ 1 month post transplant and on mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and a calcineurin inhibitor. Patients completed the GSRS, GIQLI, and Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB; higher scores = better HRQL) Index at baseline and at 4–6 weeks. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct and discriminant validity were assessed. Results Sixty-two participants were enrolled. Mean age was 42 years; mean time since transplant was 3.3 years; 57% were male; 65% received a deceased organ transplant and 68%had GI events. The GSRS and GIQLI demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alphas 0.72–0.96). Test-retest reliability was adequate (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.6) for all GIQLI subscales and all GSRS subscales except Diarrhea and Reflux syndrome. Correlations between the GSRS and PGWB were moderate (range: -0.21 to -0.53, all p < 0.001 except 6 correlations with p < 0.05); correlations between the GIQLI and PGWB were higher (range: 0.36 to 0.71 p < 0.001), indicating good construct validity. The GSRS and GIQLI demonstrated good discriminant validity, as they clinically and statistically distinguished between patients with and without GI complaints and among patients with varying GI complication severity. Patients

  14. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Lovinger, David M.; Mathur, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for regulation of information storage and control of actions, as well as synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity; the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a “common pathway” are described. Here, we review the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate if all Gi/o-GPCR are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD. PMID:25160683

  15. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Brady K; Lovinger, David M; Mathur, Brian N

    2014-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for the regulation of information storage and the control of actions, as well as for synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity, the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a 'common pathway' are described. We review here the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate whether all Gi/o-GPCRs are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD.

  16. Advanced GI Surgery Training-a Roadmap for the Future: the White Paper from the SSAT Task Force on Advanced GI Surgery Training.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Matthew M; Behrns, Kevin E; Soper, Nathaniel J; Michelassi, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    There is the need for well-trained advanced GI surgeons. The super specialization seen in academic and large community centers may not be applicable for surgeons practicing in other settings. The pendulum that has been swinging toward narrow specialization is swinging the other way, as many trained subspecialists are having a harder time finding positions after fellowship, and if they do find a position, the majority of their practice can actually be advanced GI surgery and not exclusively their area of focused expertise. Many hospitals/practices desire surgeons who are competent and specifically credentialed to perform a variety of advanced GI procedures from the esophagus through the anus. Furthermore, broader exposure in training may provide complementary and overlapping skills that may lead to an even better trained GI surgeon compared to someone whose experience is limited to just the liver and pancreas, or to just the colon and rectum, or to only bariatric and foregut surgery. With work hour restrictions and limitations on autonomy for current trainees in residency, many senior trainees have not developed the skills and knowledge to allow them to be competent and comfortable in the broad range of GI surgery. Such training should reflect the needs of the patients and their diseases, and reflect what many practicing surgeons are currently doing, and what many trainees say they would like to do, if there were such fellowship pathways available to them. The goal is to train advanced GI surgeons who are competent and proficient to operate throughout the GI tract and abdomen with open, laparoscopic, and endoscopic techniques in acute and elective situations in a broad variety of complex GI diseases. The program may be standalone, or prepare a surgeon for additional subspecialty training (transition to fellowship and/or to practice). This group of surgeons should be distinguished from subspecialist surgeons who focus in a narrow area of GI surgery. Advanced GI

  17. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  18. Activation mechanism of Gi and Go by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Motohiro; Schey, Kevin L; Takagahara, Shuichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagao, Taku; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2002-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species are proposed to work as intracellular mediators. One of their target proteins is the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Galpha(i) and Galpha(o)), leading to activation. H(2)O(2) is one of the reactive oxygen species and activates purified Galpha(i2). However, the activation requires the presence of Fe(2+), suggesting that H(2)O(2) is converted to more reactive species such as c*OH. The analysis with mass spectrometry shows that seven cysteine residues (Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), Cys(287), Cys(326), and Cys(352)) of Galpha(i2) are modified by the treatment with *OH. Among these cysteine residues, Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), and Cys(352) are not involved in *OH-induced activation of Galpha(i2). Although the modification of Cys(287) but not Cys(326) is required for subunit dissociation, the modification of both Cys(287) and Cys(326) is necessary for the activation of Galpha(i2) as determined by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, conformation-dependent change of trypsin digestion pattern or guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding. Wild type Galpha(i2) but not Cys(287)- or Cys(326)-substituted mutants are activated by UV light, singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, and nitric oxide, indicating that these oxidative stresses activate Galpha(i2) by the mechanism similar to *OH-induced activation. Because Cys(287) exists only in G(i) family, this study explains the selective activation of G(i)/G(o) by oxidative stresses.

  19. Managing bleeding, fluid absorption and uterine perforation at hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Istre, Olav

    2009-10-01

    Hysteroscopy is the current gold standard for evaluating intrauterine pathology, including submucous fibroids, polyps, hyperplasia and cancer. However, there are still problems and complications connected to hysteroscopy. Fluid overload of 1-2l occurs in approximately 5.2% and >2l in 1% of cases. This article discusses the physiology, implications and treatment of these cases. Uterine perforation is encountered in nearly 1% of cases. We describe the precautions to avoid this perforation and the methods to treat it. The article also discusses excessive bleeding, which occurs in 3% of operative hysteroscopies and describes strategies to avoid and to deal with this complication. Emergency hysterectomy and other surgical interventions are rarely indicated and are seen in 2% of cases. Finally, death due to septicaemia or fluid overload has been reported only very rarely (0.1%). These different complications are discussed in detail.

  20. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  1. Intra-abdominal bleeding in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, C; Pasa-Arj, S

    1991-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman, gravida 6 with 10 weeks of gestation was admitted because of abdominal pain and fainting. On physical examination she had hypotension, was pale with abdominal tenderness and guarding. Culdocentesis yielded unclotted blood. Immediate laparotomy was performed, because a diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made. About 2,500 ml of fresh blood was found in the abdominal cavity. Appendicular artery tear caused active arterial bleeding. The torn appendicular artery was observed to be the consequence of perforated appendicitis, which, in turn, was caused by a faecalith. Appendectomy was performed and she made a good recovery.

  2. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Methods: Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Conclusion: Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188 PMID:28360438

  3. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up. PMID:26855931

  4. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  5. Rare bleeding disorders in children: identification and primary care management.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Suchitra S

    2013-11-01

    Bleeding symptoms are common in healthy children but occasionally may indicate an underlying congenital or acquired bleeding diathesis. The rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) comprise inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors I (congenital fibrinogen deficiencies), II, V, VII, X, XI, and XIII and combined factor deficiencies, most notably of factors V and VIII and of vitamin K-dependent factors. These disorders often manifest during childhood and may present with recurrent or even serious or life-threatening bleeding episodes, particularly during the neonatal period. Accordingly, primary care and other nonhematologist pediatric providers should be familiar with the clinical presentation and initial evaluation of these rare disorders. Bleeding manifestations generally vary within the same RBD and may be indistinguishable from 1 RBD to another or from other more common bleeding disorders. Serious bleeding events such as intracranial hemorrhage may be heralded by less serious bleeding symptoms. The results of initial coagulation studies, especially prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, are often helpful in narrowing down the potential factor deficiency, with factor XIII deficiency being an exception. Consultation with a hematologist is advised to facilitate accurate diagnosis and to ensure proper management and follow-up. The approach to bleeding episodes and invasive procedures is individualized and depends on the severity, frequency, and, in the case of procedures, likelihood of bleeding. Prophylaxis may be appropriate in children with recurrent serious bleeding and specifically after life-threatening bleeding episodes. When available, specific purified plasma-derived or recombinant factor concentrates, rather than fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate, are the treatment of choice.

  6. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  7. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  8. A randomised clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of alcohol-free or alcohol-containing mouthrinses with chlorhexidine on gingival bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Jose, A.; Butler, A.; Payne, D.; Maclure, R.; Rimmer, P.; Bosma, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gingival bleeding following twice-daily use of 0.2% w/v chlorhexidine digluconate mouthrinse with and without alcohol (0.2% CHX-alcohol; 0.2% CHX-alcohol-free, respectively) and brushing with a standard fluoride toothpaste was compared to brushing alone. Methods Three hundred and nineteen subjects with mild-to-moderate gingivitis (with ≥16 gradable permanent teeth including four molars, bleeding after brushing and ≥20 bleeding sites) completed this randomised, examiner-blinded, parallel-group study. A prophylaxis was performed at baseline. Gingival Severity Index (GSI; primary objective), Gingival Index (GI) and Plaque Index (PI) were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded throughout the study. Results Between treatment differences at week 6 demonstrated significantly lower GSI for the 0.2% CHX-alcohol and 0.2% CHX-alcohol-free groups compared to brushing alone (primary endpoint; treatment difference −0.061 [95% CI −0.081, −0.041] and −0.070 [95% CI −0.090, −0.050], respectively; both p <0.0001). There were also significant reductions in GI and PI for the 0.2% CHX-alcohol and 0.2% CHX-alcohol-free groups compared to brushing alone (all p <0.0001). The proportion of subjects reporting ≥1 treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) was 27.8% (0.2% CHX-alcohol), 24.8% (0.2% CHX-alcohol-free) and 3.7% (brushing alone). Conclusions Chlorhexidine mouthrinse with or without alcohol as an adjunct to brushing with regular fluoride toothpaste significantly reduces bleeding scores, plaque and gingival inflammation compared to brushing alone. TRAEs are characteristic of those associated with the use of chlorhexidine and are similar for both mouthrinses. PMID:26271869

  9. Improvements in Modeling 90 degree Bleed Holes for Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The modeling of porous bleed regions as boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of supersonic inlet flows has been improved through a scaling of sonic flow coefficient data for 90deg bleed holes. The scaling removed the Mach number as a factor in computing the sonic flow coefficient and allowed the data to be fitted with a quadratic equation, with the only factor being the ratio of the plenum static pressure to the surface static pressure. The implementation of the bleed model into the Wind-US CFD flow solver was simplified by no longer requiring the evaluation of the flow properties at the boundary-layer edge. The quadratic equation can be extrapolated to allow the modeling of small amounts of blowing, which can exist when recirculation of the bleed flow occurs within the bleed region. The improved accuracy of the bleed model was demonstrated through CFD simulations of bleed regions on a flat plate in supersonic flow with and without an impinging oblique shock. The bleed model demonstrated good agreement with experimental data and three-dimensional CFD simulations of bleed holes.

  10. Endometrial bleeding in postmenopausal women: with and without hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Archer, David F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present a review of the potential mechanisms involved in the occurrence of endometrial bleeding in postmenopausal women using hormone therapy. Selected literature on the incidence of bleeding in postmenopausal women using estrogen progestogen therapy was reviewed. The incidence of spotting and bleeding in women using continuous-combined hormone therapy was presented. Relevant articles related to the role of angiogenic factors and vasculogenesis in the endometrium, endometrial leukocytes, and endometrial metalloproteinases were used for the review. The cause or etiology of endometrial bleeding with hormone therapy is unknown. Several options are known to alter angiogenesis or be involved in tissue remodeling during normal menstruation. Vascular endothelial growth factor and thrombospondin-1 are proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors that could cause dysfunction in vasculogenesis that could result in blood vessel fragility and bleeding. The role of pericytes in maintaining vessel morphology and integrity is discussed. Endometrial leukocytes and metalloproteinases are involved in normal menstruation, but their role in postmenopausal bleeding is not clear suggesting involvement of mechanisms in the bleeding. There is limited information on clinical investigation into the etiology of postmenopausal bleeding associated with hormone therapy. The major cause of hormone therapy-related bleeding is unknown. Alterations in angiogenic factors that could result in vascular dysfunction and vessel breakdown provide a working hypothesis as to the potential cause of vessel breakdown.

  11. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  12. Modeling of Fixed-Exit Porous Bleed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Saunders, John D.

    2008-01-01

    A model has been developed to simulate a fixed-exit porous bleed system for supersonic inlets. The fixed-exit model allows the amount of bleed flow to vary according to local flow conditions and fixed-exit characteristics of the bleed system. This variation is important for the control of shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions within the inlet. The model computes the bleed plenum static pressure rather than requiring its specification. The model was implemented in the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code. The model was then verified and validated against experimental data for bleed on a flat plate with and without an impinging oblique shock and for bleed in a Mach 3.0 axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet. The model was able to accurately correlate the plenum pressures with bleed rates and simulate the effect of the bleed on the downstream boundary layer. Further, the model provided a realistic simulation of the initiation of inlet unstart. The results provide the most in-depth examination to date of bleed models for use in the simulation of supersonic inlets. The results also highlight the limitations of the models and aspects that require further research.

  13. The Safety of Thoracentesis in Patients with Uncorrected Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracentesis is commonly performed to evaluate pleural effusions. Many medications (warfarin, heparin, clopidogrel) or physiological factors (elevated International Normalized Ratio [INR], thrombocytopenia, uremia) increase the risk for bleeding. Frequently these medications are withheld or transfusions are performed to normalize physiological parameters before a procedure. The safety of performing thoracentesis without correction of these bleeding risks has not been prospectively evaluated. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled 312 patients who underwent thoracentesis. All patients were evaluated for the presence of risk factors for bleeding. Hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postprocedure, and the occurrence of postprocedural hemothorax was evaluated. Measurements and Main Results: Thoracenteses were performed in 312 patients, 42% of whom had a risk for bleeding. Elevated INR, secondary to liver disease or warfarin, and renal disease were the two most common etiologies for bleeding risk, although many patients had multiple potential bleeding risks. There was no significant difference in pre- and postprocedural hematocrit levels in patients with a bleeding risk when compared with patients with no bleeding risk. No patient developed a hemothorax as a result of the thoracentesis. Conclusions: This single-center, observational study suggests that thoracentesis may be safely performed without prior correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, or medication-induced bleeding risk. This may reduce the morbidity associated with transfusions or withholding of medications. PMID:23952852

  14. 77 FR 39344 - Agency Information (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey)] Agency Information (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans.... Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey) in...

  15. 77 FR 22068 - Proposed Information Collection (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey)] Proposed Information Collection (Post-9/11 GI Bill Education Longitudinal Study Survey) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-New (Post-9/11 GI Bill Longitudinal Study Survey)'' in...

  16. 77 FR 76169 - Increase in Maximum Tuition and Fee Amounts Payable under the Post-9/11 GI Bill

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... AFFAIRS Increase in Maximum Tuition and Fee Amounts Payable under the Post-9/11 GI Bill AGENCY: Department... of the increase in the Post-9/11 GI Bill maximum tuition and fee amounts payable and the increase in.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: For the 2011-2012 academic year, the Post-9/ 11 GI Bill allowed VA to pay the...

  17. Optical sensor based on combined GI/DSPI technique for strain monitoring in crucial points of big engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukaszewski, Dariusz; Sałbut, Leszek; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Malowany, Krzysztof

    2011-05-01

    The data from a monitored structure/object should be easy acquired, processed and sent to the user, who can assess the health of a structure in short time and schedule necessary maintenance in order to prevent accidences. Systems which provide such information are fundamental for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). In the paper novel optical sensor designed for in-plane displacement and strain monitoring in crucial points of a big engineering and civil structures is presented. It combines two techniques: Grating Interferometry (GI) and Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI). GI requires specimen grating attached to the surface of an object under test. It is the unique technique which may provide the information about fatigue process and increased residual stresses. DSPI works with a rough object surface but due to differential measurements cannot be simply used for long time monitoring but to explore the actual behavior of a structure. The sensor which combines these techniques provides user with wide possibilities concerning functionality, measuring range, object surface and environmental conditions. The crucial issue in implementation of this sensor is the choice of its location(s) at the investigated structure. Therefore it is proposed to be as one of the elements of hierarchical sensors net, which gives complete information about structure state. As the method for supporting the choice of GI/DSPI sensor location we proposed the system based on 3D digital correlation method. The paper presents mechanical and optical sensor design along with laboratory tests of main component such as sensor heads in form of monolithic (plastic) and cavity waveguides. Finally the possible application of proposed sensor in combination with 3D DIC system is presented.

  18. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  19. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII.

  20. Loss of Gi G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Osteoblasts Accelerates Bone Fracture Healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Hsiao, Edward C; Lieu, Shirley; Scott, Mark; O'Carroll, Dylan; Urrutia, Ashley; Conklin, Bruce R; Colnot, Celine; Nissenson, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of skeletal homeostasis and are likely important in fracture healing. Because GPCRs can activate multiple signaling pathways simultaneously, we used targeted disruption of G(i) -GPCR or activation of G(s) -GPCR pathways to test how each pathway functions in the skeleton. We previously demonstrated that blockade of G(i) signaling by pertussis toxin (PTX) transgene expression in maturing osteoblastic cells enhanced cortical and trabecular bone formation and prevented age-related bone loss in female mice. In addition, activation of G(s) signaling by expressing the G(s) -coupled engineered receptor Rs1 in maturing osteoblastic cells induced massive trabecular bone formation but cortical bone loss. Here, we test our hypothesis that the G(i) and G(s) pathways also have distinct functions in fracture repair. We applied closed, nonstabilized tibial fractures to mice in which endogenous G(i) signaling was inhibited by PTX, or to mice with activated G(s) signaling mediated by Rs1. Blockade of endogenous G(i) resulted in a smaller callus but increased bone formation in both young and old mice. PTX treatment decreased expression of Dkk1 and increased Lef1 mRNAs during fracture healing, suggesting a role for endogenous G(i) signaling in maintaining Dkk1 expression and suppressing Wnt signaling. In contrast, adult mice with activated Gs signaling showed a slight increase in the initial callus size with increased callus bone formation. These results show that G(i) blockade and G(s) activation of the same osteoblastic lineage cell can induce different biological responses during fracture healing. Our findings also show that manipulating the GPCR/cAMP signaling pathway by selective timing of G(s) and G(i) -GPCR activation may be important for optimizing fracture repair.

  1. Stimulation of human thyroid growth via the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein Gi: constitutive expression of the G-protein alpha subunit Gi alpha-1 in autonomous adenoma.

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, E; Wilfing, A; Schiferer, A; Hermann, M; Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Freissmuth, M

    1993-01-01

    The alpha subunits of the stimulatory and inhibitory G proteins, Gs alpha and Gi alpha, activate transmembrane-signaling systems involved in the control of cell proliferation. We have investigated the pattern of expression of Gi alpha subtypes and Gi alpha-mediated proliferative responses in the human thyroid. Human thyroid membranes contain two subtypes of Gi alpha, Gi alpha-1 and Gi alpha-2, as assessed by using specific antibodies. The expression of Gi alpha-1 is under tight control by thyrotropin in vivo and in primary cultures of thyroid epithelial cells. In contrast, Gi alpha-1 is expressed in the absence of thyrotropin in thyroid autonomous adenoma, an endocrine-active tumor, and its levels are not regulated by thyrotropin in thyroid epithelial cells prepared from these tumors. If thyroid epithelial cells are treated with pertussis toxin to block signal transduction via Gi, the mitogenic response to serum factors is reduced. These observations demonstrate that Gi subtypes transmit growth stimuli in the human thyroid. The constitutive expression of Gi alpha-1 in autonomous adenoma may allow for the unregulated stimulation of thyroid cell proliferation by a yet unidentified signaling pathway and, thus, be causally related to autonomous growth of thyroid cells. Images PMID:8434024

  2. Investigating the Effect of Zinc Chloride to Control External Bleeding in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Saeed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite all progresses in surgical science, bleeding caused by traffic accidents is still a challenge for surgeons to save patients’ lives. Therefore, introducing an effective method to control external bleeding is an important research priority. Objectives: This study aimed to compare haemostatic effect of zinc chloride and simple suturing to control external bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this animal model study, 60 male Wistar rats were used. An incision (two cm in length and half a cm in depth) was made on shaved back of rats. The hemostasis time was measured once using zinc chloride with different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) and then using simple suturing. Skin tissue was assessed for pathological changes. Due to abnormal distribution of variables in Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: In all the groups, complete hemostasis occurred. Hemostasis times of different concentrations of zinc chloride were significantly less than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Zinc chloride was effective to control external bleeding in rats. PMID:25699284

  3. Colonoscopic findings and management of patients with outbreak typhoid fever presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Shaikhani, Mohammad A R; Husein, Hiwa A B; Karbuli, Taha A; Mohamed, Mohamed Abdulrahman

    2013-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) along with intestinal perforation is a well-known complication of typhoid fever. Reports of colonoscopic appearance and intervention of typhoid perforation involve only few cases. This series reports the colonoscopic findings and the role of colonoscopic hemostatic interventions in controlling the bleeding ileocolonic lesions. During the typhoid fever outbreak in Sulaymaniyah City in Iraqi Kurdistan Region, we received 52 patients with LGIB manifesting as fresh bleeding per rectum or melena. We performed total colonoscopy with ileal intubation for all cases. The findings were recorded and endoscopic hemostatic intervention with adrenaline-saline injection and argon plasma coagulation was applied to actively bleeding lesion. These patients were young, 11-30 years of age, with female preponderance. Blood culture was positive in 50 %. Colonoscopic findings were mostly located in the ileocecal region, although other areas of the colon were involved in many cases. Twenty-four percent of the cases required endoscopic hemostatic intervention by adrenaline injection with argon plasma coagulation which was effective in all patients except one who died in spite of surgical intervention in addition of endoscopic hemostasis. Dual endoscopic hemostatic intervention can be a safe and effective management option for patients with LGIB due to typhoid fever.

  4. GI-POP: a combinational annotation and genomic island prediction pipeline for ongoing microbial genome projects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe; Yao, Tzu-Jung; Ma, Cheng-Yu; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2013-04-10

    Sequencing of microbial genomes is important because of microbial-carrying antibiotic and pathogenetic activities. However, even with the help of new assembling software, finishing a whole genome is a time-consuming task. In most bacteria, pathogenetic or antibiotic genes are carried in genomic islands. Therefore, a quick genomic island (GI) prediction method is useful for ongoing sequencing genomes. In this work, we built a Web server called GI-POP (http://gipop.life.nthu.edu.tw) which integrates a sequence assembling tool, a functional annotation pipeline, and a high-performance GI predicting module, in a support vector machine (SVM)-based method called genomic island genomic profile scanning (GI-GPS). The draft genomes of the ongoing genome projects in contigs or scaffolds can be submitted to our Web server, and it provides the functional annotation and highly probable GI-predicting results. GI-POP is a comprehensive annotation Web server designed for ongoing genome project analysis. Researchers can perform annotation and obtain pre-analytic information include possible GIs, coding/non-coding sequences and functional analysis from their draft genomes. This pre-analytic system can provide useful information for finishing a genome sequencing project.

  5. Prenatal and Postnatal Epigenetic Programming: Implications for GI, Immune, and Neuronal Function in Autism.

    PubMed

    Waly, Mostafa I; Hornig, Mady; Trivedi, Malav; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Kini, Radhika; Ohta, Akio; Deth, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although autism is first and foremost a disorder of the central nervous system, comorbid dysfunction of the gastrointestinal (GI) and immune systems is common, suggesting that all three systems may be affected by common molecular mechanisms. Substantial systemic deficits in the antioxidant glutathione and its precursor, cysteine, have been documented in autism in association with oxidative stress and impaired methylation. DNA and histone methylation provide epigenetic regulation of gene expression during prenatal and postnatal development. Prenatal epigenetic programming (PrEP) can be affected by the maternal metabolic and nutritional environment, whereas postnatal epigenetic programming (PEP) importantly depends upon nutritional support provided through the GI tract. Cysteine absorption from the GI tract is a crucial determinant of antioxidant capacity, and systemic deficits of glutathione and cysteine in autism are likely to reflect impaired cysteine absorption. Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) provides cysteine uptake for GI epithelial, neuronal, and immune cells, and its activity is decreased during oxidative stress. Based upon these observations, we propose that neurodevelopmental, GI, and immune aspects of autism each reflect manifestations of inadequate antioxidant capacity, secondary to impaired cysteine uptake by the GI tract. Genetic and environmental factors that adversely affect antioxidant capacity can disrupt PrEP and/or PEP, increasing vulnerability to autism.

  6. Prenatal and Postnatal Epigenetic Programming: Implications for GI, Immune, and Neuronal Function in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Mostafa I.; Hornig, Mady; Trivedi, Malav; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Kini, Radhika; Ohta, Akio; Deth, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although autism is first and foremost a disorder of the central nervous system, comorbid dysfunction of the gastrointestinal (GI) and immune systems is common, suggesting that all three systems may be affected by common molecular mechanisms. Substantial systemic deficits in the antioxidant glutathione and its precursor, cysteine, have been documented in autism in association with oxidative stress and impaired methylation. DNA and histone methylation provide epigenetic regulation of gene expression during prenatal and postnatal development. Prenatal epigenetic programming (PrEP) can be affected by the maternal metabolic and nutritional environment, whereas postnatal epigenetic programming (PEP) importantly depends upon nutritional support provided through the GI tract. Cysteine absorption from the GI tract is a crucial determinant of antioxidant capacity, and systemic deficits of glutathione and cysteine in autism are likely to reflect impaired cysteine absorption. Excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) provides cysteine uptake for GI epithelial, neuronal, and immune cells, and its activity is decreased during oxidative stress. Based upon these observations, we propose that neurodevelopmental, GI, and immune aspects of autism each reflect manifestations of inadequate antioxidant capacity, secondary to impaired cysteine uptake by the GI tract. Genetic and environmental factors that adversely affect antioxidant capacity can disrupt PrEP and/or PEP, increasing vulnerability to autism. PMID:22934169

  7. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  8. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  9. Tooth extraction, bleeding and pain control.

    PubMed

    Al-Bahlani, S; Sherriff, A; Crawford, P J

    2001-10-01

    Local anaesthesia is used routinely in dental surgery; it is effective in both pain control and--through the vasoconstrictors often contained within it--the reduction of bleeding. The extraction of deciduous teeth under general anaesthesia is often carried out without these local effects. There are no previous studies to investigate the combined effect of local anaesthesia with general anaesthesia on blood loss and pain control. A randomised, controlled clinical trial was carried out with one hundred children aged 3-5 years. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Surface anaesthetic cream (EMLA) was placed on the hand into which the intravenous access was to be placed. One to two ml of blood was taken at the time of induction as a baseline of the patient's level of haematin pigment. Children in the experimental group were given one quarter of a cartridge (0.5 ml) of local anaesthetic containing epinephrine (1:80,000) in each quadrant before tooth extraction; all blood in swabs, suction equipment and disposables was collected and digested with NaOH. The children were observed for 11 minutes post-operatively for any signs of distress. Total blood loss was calculated by comparison of the baseline sample and the shed blood digests. This study showed that using local anaesthesia for dental extractions under general anaesthesia was associated with decreased blood loss (p = 0.001). The second finding--which has not been reported before--was that this use of local anaesthesia was shown to cause distress to this age group of children upon recovery from the general anaesthetic (p <0.0001). The use of local anaesthetic in this situation provided a useful reduction in post-operative bleeding. However, its use was associated with greater post-operative distress.

  10. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  11. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  12. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  13. Thrombocytosis in a patient with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; De Stefano, Valerio; Shao, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Reported here is a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a peptic ulcer involving an extremely high platelet count of 989 × 109/L. Myeloproliferative neoplasms were ruled out on the basis of gene mutation testing and a bone marrow biopsy. After the cessation of index bleeding, the platelet count decreased markedly. Thus, reactive thrombocytosis was considered as a possibility. PMID:28357187

  14. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  15. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  16. 21 CFR 864.6100 - Bleeding time device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleeding time device. 864.6100 Section 864.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6100 Bleeding time...

  17. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  18. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system....

  19. Study protocol: first nationwide comparative audit of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Kathryn; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Seeney, Frances; Collins, Gary; Grant-Casey, John; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike; Jairath, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common indication for emergency hospitalisation worldwide. In contrast to upper GIB, patient characteristics, modes of investigation, transfusion, treatment and outcomes are poorly described. There are minimal clinical guidelines to inform care pathways and the use of endoscopy, including (diagnostic and therapeutic yields), interventional radiology and surgery are poorly defined. As a result, there is potential for wide variation in practice and clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis The UK Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Audit is a large nationwide audit of adult patients acutely admitted with LGIB or those who develop LGIB while hospitalised for another reason. Consecutive, unselected presentations with LGIB will be enrolled prospectively over a 2-month period at the end of 2015 and detailed data will be collected on patient characteristics, comorbidities, use of anticoagulants, transfusion, timing and modalities of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, clinical outcome, length of stay and mortality. These will be audited against predefined minimum standards of care for LGIB. It is anticipated that over 80% of all acute hospitals in England and some hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will participate. Data will be collected on the availability and organisation of care, provision of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy, interventional radiology, surgery and transfusion protocols. Ethics and dissemination This audit will be conducted as part of the national comparative audit programme of blood transfusion through collaboration with specialists in gastroenterology, surgery and interventional radiology. Individual reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report and disseminated through specialist societies. Results will also be published in peer-reviewed journals. The study has been funded by National Health Services (NHS) Blood and Transplant and the

  20. Crouzon’s Syndrome with Life-Threatening Ear Bleed: Ruptured Jugular Vein Diverticulum Treated by Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar Anand, Sunanda Limaye, Uday S.

    2015-08-15

    Crouzon’s syndrome is the commonest variety of syndromic craniosynostosis. Life-threatening ear bleed due to ruptured jugular venous diverticulum in Crouzon’s syndrome has not been described previously. In patients with syndromic craniosynostosis, definitive repair of jugular diverticulum by open surgery is fraught with high risk of bleeding, poor functional outcomes, and even death. A 24-year-old woman with Crouzon’s syndrome presented with conductive hearing loss and recurrent episodes of torrential bleeding from her left ear. On computed tomography, a defect in the roof of jugular fossa containing jugular venous diverticulum immediately inferior to the bony external auditory canal was seen. The clinical presentation, imaging features, and endovascular management of Crouzon’s syndrome due to a ruptured jugular venous diverticulum is described.

  1. On Supersonic-Inlet Boundary-Layer Bleed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, Gary J.; Smith, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed in supersonic inlets is typically used to avoid separation from adverse shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions and subsequent total pressure losses in the subsonic diffuser and to improve normal shock stability. Methodologies used to determine bleed requirements are reviewed. Empirical sonic flow coefficients are currently used to determine the bleed hole pattern. These coefficients depend on local Mach number, pressure ratio, hole geometry, etc. A new analytical bleed method is presented to compute sonic flow coefficients for holes and narrow slots and predictions are compared with published data to illustrate the accuracy of the model. The model can be used by inlet designers and as a bleed boundary condition for computational fluid dynamic studies.

  2. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem. PMID:25133028

  3. Acoustic resonance phenomena in air bleed channels in aviation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksentsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of axial-radial acoustic resonance oscillations of the basic air flow in bleed channels of aviation engines is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the frequency of acoustic resonance oscillations for the lowest modes of open and closed bleed channels of the PS-90A engine. Experimental investigations reveal new acoustic resonance phenomena arising in the air flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of this engine owing to instability of the basic air flow. The results of numerical, analytical, and experimental studies of the resonance frequencies reached in the flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of the PS-90A engine are found to be in reasonable agreement. As a result, various types of resonance oscillations in bleed channels can be accurately described.

  4. Evaluating for suspected child abuse: conditions that predispose to bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C; Anderst, James D

    2013-04-01

    Child abuse might be suspected when children present with cutaneous bruising, intracranial hemorrhage, or other manifestations of bleeding. In these cases, it is necessary to consider medical conditions that predispose to easy bleeding/bruising. When evaluating for the possibility of bleeding disorders and other conditions that predispose to hemorrhage, the pediatrician must consider the child's presenting history, medical history, and physical examination findings before initiating a laboratory investigation. Many medical conditions can predispose to easy bleeding. Before ordering laboratory tests for a disease, it is useful to understand the biochemical basis and clinical presentation of the disorder, condition prevalence, and test characteristics. This technical report reviews the major medical conditions that predispose to bruising/bleeding and should be considered when evaluating for abusive injury.

  5. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  6. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1%) were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs). The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community. PMID:20822539

  7. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Yvonne V; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van der Bom, Johanna G; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-12-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large cohort of children with moderate and severe VWD. We included 113 children (aged 0-16 years) with Type 1 (n = 60), 2 (n = 44), and 3 (n = 9) VWD with von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen and/or VWF ristocetin cofactor levels ≤ 30 U/dL from a nation-wide cross-sectional study ("Willebrand in the Netherlands" study). Bleeding severity and frequency were determined using the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) with supplementary pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms (umbilical stump bleeding, cephalohematoma, cheek hematoma, conjunctival bleeding, postcircumcision and postvenipuncture bleeding). We found that all 26 postmenarche girls experienced menorrhagia. Other common bleedings were cutaneous (81%), oropharyngeal (64%), prolonged bleeding from minor wounds (58%), and epistaxis (56%). Pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms were present in 44% of patients. ISTH-BAT bleeding score was higher in index cases than in affected family members (median, 12.0 vs. 6.5, P < 0.001), higher in Type 3 VWD than in Type 2 or 1 (17.0 vs. 10.5 or 6.5, P < 0.001) and higher in children with severe (<10 U/dL) than moderate VWD (10-30 U/dL) (11.0 vs. 7.0, P < 0.001). Frequency of any bleeding, epistaxis, and oral cavity was higher in types 2 and 3 than in Type 1 VWD and was associated with VWF levels. We conclude that pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms occurred in a large proportion of children with moderate or severe VWD and should be included when evaluating children for VWD.

  8. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  9. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  10. Protect Your Baby from Bleeds: Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby from VKDB. Protect Your Baby from Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Before having a baby, most parents don’ ... she gets the shot after birth. What is vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB)? Vitamin K deficiency bleeding or VKDB, ...

  11. GeoNetwork powered GI-cat: a geoportal hybrid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Alessio; Boldrini, Enrico; Santoro, Mattia; Mazzetti, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    To the aim of setting up a Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) the creation of a system for the metadata management and discovery plays a fundamental role. An effective solution is the use of a geoportal (e.g. FAO/ESA geoportal), that has the important benefit of being accessible from a web browser. With this work we present a solution based integrating two of the available frameworks: GeoNetwork and GI-cat. GeoNetwork is an opensource software designed to improve accessibility of a wide variety of data together with the associated ancillary information (metadata), at different scale and from multidisciplinary sources; data are organized and documented in a standard and consistent way. GeoNetwork implements both the Portal and Catalog components of a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) defined in the OGC Reference Architecture. It provides tools for managing and publishing metadata on spatial data and related services. GeoNetwork allows harvesting of various types of web data sources e.g. OGC Web Services (e.g. CSW, WCS, WMS). GI-cat is a distributed catalog based on a service-oriented framework of modular components and can be customized and tailored to support different deployment scenarios. It can federate a multiplicity of catalogs services, as well as inventory and access services in order to discover and access heterogeneous ESS resources. The federated resources are exposed by GI-cat through several standard catalog interfaces (e.g. OGC CSW AP ISO, OpenSearch, etc.) and by the GI-cat extended interface. Specific components implement mediation services for interfacing heterogeneous service providers, each of which exposes a specific standard specification; such components are called Accessors. These mediating components solve providers data modelmultiplicity by mapping them onto the GI-cat internal data model which implements the ISO 19115 Core profile. Accessors also implement the query protocol mapping; first they translate the query requests expressed

  12. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Amy M.; Huang, Wanzhi; Kou, Baijun; Estes, Mary K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs)—named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3—that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs) through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD) values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics. PMID:28095447

  13. Flow Coefficient Behavior for Boundary Layer Bleed Holes and Slots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, B. P.; Davis, D. O.; Hingst, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the flow coefficient behavior for nine boundary layer bleed orifice configurations is reported. This test was conducted for the purposes of exploring boundary layer control through mass flow removal and does not address issues of stability bleed. Parametric data consist of bleed region flow coefficient as a function of Mach number, bleed plenum pressure, and bleed orifice geometry. Seven multiple hole configurations and two single slot configurations were tested over a supersonic Mach number range of 1.3 to 2.5 (nominal). Advantages gained by using multiple holes in a bleed region instead of a single spanwise slot are discussed and the issue of modeling an entire array of bleed orifices based on the performance of a single orifice is addressed. Preconditioning the flow approaching a 90 degree inclined (normal) hole configuration resulted in a significant improvement in the performance of the configuration. The same preconditioning caused only subtle changes in performance for a 20 degree inclined (slanted) configuration.

  14. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy.

  15. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  16. Is tranexamic acid effective for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Avilés, Carolina; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-07

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a medical-surgical emergency given its important associated morbidity and mortality. The antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid might help stopping bleeding, but controversy remains about its role in this setting. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded tranexamic acid probably decreases rebleeding and mortality, without increasing thromboembolic adverse effects in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Transvaginal Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Karen C; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Transvaginal ultrasound can be used to diagnose structural causes of abnormal bleeding such as polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyomas, hyperplasia, and malignancy, and can also be beneficial in making the diagnosis of ovulatory dysfunction. Traditional 2-dimensional imaging is often enhanced by the addition of 3-dimension imaging with coronal reconstruction and saline infusion sonohysterography. In this article we discuss specific ultrasound findings and technical considerations useful in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  18. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children.

  19. Assessment of bleeding disorders in Sheehan's syndrome: are bleeding disorders the underlying cause of Sheehan's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Gokalp, Deniz; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Bahceci, Mithat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Alpagat, Gulistan

    2011-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is an adenopituitary insufficiency caused by hypovolemia secondary to excessive blood loss during or after childbirth. However, the mechanism of postpartum hemorrhage and ischemia is not clear. We aimed to evaluate the bleeding disorders among patients with SS, in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, we investigated underlying causes in postpartum hemorrhage that begin the event. The present study was conducted at the Dicle University School of Medicine. Forty-eight patients with SS and 50 age-matched female healthy controls were included. Biochemical and hormonal variables were measured, as was platelet function by means of closure times (PFA-100 testing using collagen plus epinephrine and collagen plus ADP), von Willebrand factor (vWF) level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), international normalized ratio (INR), and coagulation factors. Although PT and INR were significantly higher in patients with SS (both P<0.01), aPTT and levels of fibrinogen, vWF, and factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII did not differ significantly. Closure times with collagen/epinephrine and collagen/ADP also did not differ significantly between patients with SS and control patients. The nonspecific etiology and presence of excessive postpartum hemorrhage in patients with SS suggest that coagulation disorders may play a role in their predisposition to bleeding. The increased PT and INR noted might implicate bleeding diathesis as the underlying etiology, although no significant decreases were noted in factor levels. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex mechanism of this disorder.

  20. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  1. Life-threatening bleeding of a duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a teenager: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Piero V.; Valli, Carlo; Pfammatter, Thomas; Bauerfeind, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are per se infrequent and are exceptional in children or young adults. So far, only 2 cases of pediatric duodenal GISTs have been published. Here we report on the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted in hemorrhagic shock due to arterial bleeding of a duodenal GIST located in immediate proximity to the major duodenal papilla. After several attempts of endoscopic hemostasis failed, the tumor bleeding was controlled with a second coil embolization of the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. PMID:27995183

  2. CD4+ T-cell survival in the GI tract requires dectin-1 during fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, R A; Dambuza, I M; Vautier, S; Taylor, J A; Reid, D M; Bain, C C; Underhill, D M; Masopust, D; Kaplan, D H; Brown, G D

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 is an innate antifungal C-type lectin receptor necessary for protective antifungal immunity. We recently discovered that Dectin-1 is involved in controlling fungal infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but how this C-type lectin receptor mediates these activities is unknown. Here, we show that Dectin-1 is essential for driving fungal-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in the GI tract. Loss of Dectin-1 resulted in abrogated dendritic cell responses in the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) and defective T-cell co-stimulation, causing substantial increases in CD4+ T-cell apoptosis and reductions in the cellularity of GI-associated lymphoid tissues. CD8+ T-cell responses were unaffected by Dectin-1 deficiency. These functions of Dectin-1 have significant implications for our understanding of intestinal immunity and susceptibility to fungal infections. PMID:26349660

  3. The Glycemic Index of Rice and Rice Products: A Review, and Table of GI Values.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the principle staple and energy source for nearly half the world's population and therefore has significant nutrition and health implications. Rice is generally considered a high glycemic index (GI) food, however, this depends on varietal, compositional, processing, and accompaniment factors. Being a major contributor to the glycemic load in rice eating populations, there is increasing concern that the rising prevalence of insulin resistance is as a result of the consumption of large amounts of rice. Devising ways and means of reducing the glycemic impact of rice is therefore imperative. This review gathers studies examining the GI of rice and rice products and provides a critical overview of the current state of the art. A table collating published GI values for rice and rice products is also included.

  4. Simulating magnetospheres with numerical relativity: The GiRaFFE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babiuc-Hamilton, Maria; Etienne, Zach

    2016-01-01

    Numerical Relativity has shown success over the past several years, especially in the simulation of black holes and gravitational waves. In recent years, teams have tackled the problem of the interaction of gravitational and electromagnetic waves. But where there are plasmas, the simulations often have trouble reproducing nature. Neutron stars, black hole accretion disks, astrophysical jets—all of these represent extreme environments both gravitationally and electromagnetically. We are creating the first open-source, dynamical spacetime general relativity force-free electrodynamics code: GiRaFFE.We present here the performance of GiRaFFE in testing. With this code, we will simulate neutron star magnetospheres, collisions between neutron stars and black holes, and particular attention will be paid to the production of jets through the Blandford-Znajek mechanism.GiRaFFE will be made available to the community.

  5. GI Symptoms in Infants Are a Potential Target for Fermented Infant Milk Formulae: A Review

    PubMed Central

    van de Heijning, Bert J. M.; Berton, Amelie; Bouritius, Hetty; Goulet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Besides pre- and pro-biotic-containing infant formulae, fermented infant formulae are commonly used to relieve or prevent symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort in young infants. During the fermentation process in cow’s milk-based formulae, the beneficial bacteria modulate the product by forming several beneficial compounds, which contribute to the alleviation of the symptoms observed. This review summarizes the clinical evidence on the impact of fermented infant formulae on common pediatric GI-symptoms. The potential mechanisms involved are discussed: i.e., the lactose and protein (in-) digestibility, effects on gastric emptying and gut transit and modulation of the colonic microbiota. Although initial evidence indicates a beneficial effect of fermented formulae on GI discomfort in newborns, validation and confirmation of the clinical proof obtained so far is warranted, as well as further research to (more fully) understand the mode of action. PMID:25255831

  6. Bleed cycle propellant pumping in a gas-core nuclear rocket engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.; Easley, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of ideal and real staged primary propellant pumps and bleed-powered turbines was calculated for gas-core nuclear rocket engines over a range of operating pressures from 500 to 5000 atm. This study showed that for a required engine operating pressure of 1000 atm the pump work was about 0.8 hp/(lb/sec), the specific impulse penalty resulting from the turbine propellant bleed flow as about 10 percent; and the heat required to preheat the propellant was about 7.8 MN/(lb/sec). For a specific impulse above 2400 sec, there is an excess of energy available in the moderator due to the gamma and neutron heating that occurs there. Possible alternative pumping cycles are the Rankine or Brayton cycles.

  7. Safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy in management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with a left ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Abhinav; Pham, Donald M.; Nanda, Arjun; Woods, Kevin E.; Keilin, Steven D.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are currently the standard of care in treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure waiting for heart transplant as well as destination therapy for non-transplant candidates. However, patients with LVADs are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to the device’s unique effects on hemodynamics. A major source of gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients are gastrointestinal angioectasias located within the small bowel that can only be reached with deep enteroscopy. The goal of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in treating gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs. Patients and methods We present a retrospective case series performed on patients with LVADs who underwent SBE to treat episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. All procedures were performed at Emory University Hospital by a single endoscopist. Patient demographics, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, episodes of re-bleeding, and procedure-related complications were examined. Results A total of 27 SBE procedures performed in 14 patients were reviewed. SBE was performed in an antegrade approach in 89 % (24/27) of cases. Deep intubation was achieved in all antegrade procedures, with the distal jejunum reached in 79 % (19/24) of cases. The diagnostic yield was 78 %. There were no reported complications associated with the procedures. Conclusions SBE is a safe and effective modality to manage gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs. PMID:28299353

  8. Safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy in management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Koul, Abhinav; Pham, Donald M; Nanda, Arjun; Woods, Kevin E; Keilin, Steven D

    2017-03-01

    Background and study aims Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are currently the standard of care in treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure waiting for heart transplant as well as destination therapy for non-transplant candidates. However, patients with LVADs are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to the device's unique effects on hemodynamics. A major source of gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients are gastrointestinal angioectasias located within the small bowel that can only be reached with deep enteroscopy. The goal of our study was to determine the safety and efficacy of single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in treating gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs. Patients and methods We present a retrospective case series performed on patients with LVADs who underwent SBE to treat episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. All procedures were performed at Emory University Hospital by a single endoscopist. Patient demographics, diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, episodes of re-bleeding, and procedure-related complications were examined. Results A total of 27 SBE procedures performed in 14 patients were reviewed. SBE was performed in an antegrade approach in 89 % (24/27) of cases. Deep intubation was achieved in all antegrade procedures, with the distal jejunum reached in 79 % (19/24) of cases. The diagnostic yield was 78 %. There were no reported complications associated with the procedures. Conclusions SBE is a safe and effective modality to manage gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with LVADs.

  9. Salmonellosis and the GI Tract: More than Just Peanut Butter

    PubMed Central

    Cianflone, Nancy F. Crum

    2009-01-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellosis is the leading cause of foodborne illness in the U.S., causing approximately 1.4 million infections annually. Most cases of salmonellosis are due to ingestion of contaminated food items such as eggs, dairy products, and meats. However, almost any foodstuff can be implicated, including peanut butter, as seen during a recent outbreak of over 600 Salmonella infections. Although outbreaks often gain national media attention, the majority of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in the U.S. occur sporadically. Risk factors for salmonellosis include gastric hypoacidity, recent use of antibiotics, extremes of age, and a variety of immunosuppressive conditions. Clinical manifestations of the infection most commonly involve self-limited gastroenteritis; however, bacteremia, endovascular, and localized infections may occur. Most cases of gastrointestinal involvement are self-limited, with antibiotic therapy reserved among persons at risk for complicated disease. Preventive strategies by both industry and among consumers are advocated to further reduce the occurrence of nontyphoidal salmonellosis. PMID:18627657

  10. Thrombocytopenia in cirrhosis: Impact of fibrinogen on bleeding risk

    PubMed Central

    Thakrar, Sonali V; Mallett, Susan V

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between baseline platelet count, clauss fibrinogen, maximum amplitude (MA) on thromboelastography, and blood loss in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). METHODS A retrospective analysis of our OLT Database (2006-2015) was performed. Baseline haematological indices and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements, as a combination of cell salvage return and estimation of 300 mls/unit of allogenic blood, was noted as a surrogate for intraoperative bleeding. Two groups: Excessive transfusion (> 1200 mL returned) and No excessive transfusion (< 1200 mL returned) were analysed. All data analyses were conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics version 23. RESULTS Of 322 OLT patients, 77 were excluded due to fulminant disease; redo transplant or baseline haemoglobin (Hb) of < 80 g/L. One hundred and fourteen (46.3%) were classified into the excessive transfusion group, 132 (53.7%) in the no excessive transfusion group. Mean age and gender distribution were similar in both groups. Baseline Hb (P ≤ 0.001), platelet count (P = 0.005), clauss fibrinogen (P = 0.004) and heparinase MA (P = 0.001) were all statistically significantly different. Univariate logistic regression with a cut-off of platelets < 50 × 109/L as the predictor and Haemorrhage as the outcome showed an odds ratio of 1.393 (95%CI: 0.758-2.563; P = 0.286). Review of receiver operating characteristic curves showed an area under the curve (AUC) for platelet count of 0.604 (95%CI: 0.534-0.675; P = 0.005) as compared with AUC for fibrinogen level, 0.678 (95%CI: 0.612-0.744; P ≤ 0.001). A multivariate logistic regression shows United Kingdom model for End Stage Liver Disease (P = 0.006), Hb (P = 0.022) and Fibrinogen (P = 0.026) to be statistically significant, whereas Platelet count was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION Platelet count alone does not predict excessive transfusion. Additional investigations, e.g., clauss fibrinogen and viscoelastic tests, provide more

  11. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus; Dall, Michael; Andries, Alin; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other antithrombotic drugs. METHODS A population-based case–control study was conducted in the County of Funen, Denmark. Cases (n = 3652) were all subjects with a first discharge diagnosis of serious UGB from a hospital during the period 1995 to 2006. Age- and gender-matched controls (10 for each case) (n = 36 502) were selected by a risk set sampling. Data on all subjects' drug exposure and past medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and from the County's patient register. Confounders were controlled by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associating use of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78–1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89–2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96–2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18–1.05)]. CONCLUSION Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin. PMID:19371320

  12. Aspirin use and post-operative bleeding from dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M T; Valerin, M A; Noll, J L; Napeñas, J J; Kent, M L; Fox, P C; Sasser, H C; Lockhart, P B

    2008-08-01

    Aspirin is a common, chronically administered preventive treatment for cardiovascular disease, but is often discontinued prior to invasive dental procedures because of concern for bleeding complications. We hypothesized that aspirin does not cause increased bleeding following a single tooth extraction. Thirty-six healthy persons requiring a tooth extraction were randomized to receive 325 mg/day aspirin or placebo for 4 days. Cutaneous bleeding time (BT) and platelet aggregation tests were obtained prior to extraction. The primary outcome measure, oral BT, and secondary bleeding outcomes were evaluated during and following extraction. No significant baseline differences, except for diastolic blood pressure, were found between groups. There were no differences in oral BT, cutaneous BT, secondary outcome measures, or compliance. Whole-blood aggregation results were significantly different between the aspirin and placebo groups. These findings suggest that there is no indication to discontinue aspirin for persons requiring single-tooth extraction.

  13. Study Tracks Bleeding Risk from Common Blood Thinners

    MedlinePlus

    ... as vitamin K antagonists (which includes Coumadin/warfarin); clopidogrel (Plavix); or other blood-thinning medications. Low-dose ... risk of the subdural hematoma bleed; use of clopidogrel plus a second blood-thinning pill was associated ...

  14. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kazimi, Mircelal; Ulas, Murat; Ibis, Cem; Unver, Mutlu; Ozsan, Nazan; Yilmaz, Funda; Ersoz, Galip; Zeytunlu, Murat; Kilic, Murat; Coker, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19178725

  15. Lag model for turbulent boundary layers over rough bleed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Sloan, M. L.; Paynter, G. C.

    1994-07-01

    Boundary-layer mass removal (bleed) through spanwise bands of holes on a surface is used to prevent or control separation and to stabilize the normal shock in supersonic inlets. The addition of a transport equation lag relationship for eddy viscosity to the rough wall algebraic turbulence model of Cebeci and Chang was found to improve agreement between predicted and measured mean velocity distributions downstream of a bleed band. The model was demonstrated for a range of bleed configurations, bleed rates, and local freestream Mach numbers. In addition, the model was applied to the boundary-layer development over acoustic lining materials for the inlets and nozzles of commercial aircraft. The model was found to yield accurate results for integral boundary-layer properties unless there was a strong adverse pressure gradient.

  16. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  17. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced.

  18. Evaluation and Management of Adolescents with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Tanya L Kowalczyk; Miller, Rachel J; Mullins, Eric S

    2015-09-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists support the use of new terminology for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) to consistently categorize AUB by etiology. The term AUB can be further classified as AUB/heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (replacing the term "menorrhagia") or AUB/intermenstrual bleeding (replacing the term "metrorrhagia"). Although many cases of AUB in adolescent women are attributable to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, underlying bleeding disorders should be considered in women with AUB/HMB. This article reviews the new terminology for AUB, discusses important relevant features of history and examination, presents the laboratory evaluation of HMB, and describes hormonal (oral contraceptive pills, progestin-only methods, long-acting reversible contraceptives including intrauterine systems), hematologic (tranexamic acid and desmopressin), and surgical management options for AUB/HMB.

  19. [Fiberendoscopic injection therapy of bleeding gastrointestinal lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Liehr, H; Brunswig, D; Gallenkamp, H; Seez, P; Zilly, W

    1979-06-01

    In 28 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding emergency fiberendoscopy was combined with aethoxysclerole (1%) injection of the bleeding lesion with purpose to controll haemorrhage. In 61% of 31 proceudres done in patients with oesophageal varices (n = 19) haemorrhage was controlled, and in further 16% deminuation of bleeding intensity was noted. In the remaining cases (n = 7) the procedure was ineffective. Only patients with Child C liver cirrhosis having oesophageal varices stages III and IV finally died because of uncontrolled haemorrhage. In 9 patients with bleeding from other lesions (gastric erosions and ulcers, Mallory-Weiss-Syndrome, erosio simplex Dieulafoy) haemorrhage was controlled in 8 patients. The method is practicable and efficient, but does not determine better the final outcome of patients with livercirrhosis Child C having oesophageal varices stages III and IV. In other cases tube treatment was avoided. The operation lethality within the series was 1,5%.

  20. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  1. Unexplained gastrointestinal bleed due to arteriobiliary fistula after percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Smirniotopoulos, John; Barone, Paul; Schiffman, Marc

    We represent a case of a 54-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and melena three weeks after percutaneous liver biopsy. He was found to have anemia secondary to an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, unresponsive to multiple blood transfusions. Angiography later revealed an arteriobiliary fistula with contrast extravasation entering the duodenum. The fistula was successfully embolized and the patient was discharged without complication. This report demonstrates the importance in considering a vascular intrahepatic fistula in patients with right upper quadrant abdominal pain after remote liver biopsy.

  2. Non-invasive assessment of bleeding pulmonary artery aneurysms due to Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Greene, R M; Saleh, A; Taylor, A K; Callaghan, M; Addis, B J; Nzewi, O C; van Zyl, W V

    1998-01-01

    Because of its ability to depict intravascular, intramural, and extramural pathology, non-invasive imaging is well suited to assessing life-threatening hemoptysis that may complicate Behçet disease. We made exclusive use of CT angiography supplemented by MR to identify pulmonary thromboembolism, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms with signs of previous unilateral rupture. Two-dimensional reformatted CT images provided surgeons with a road map of upstream and downstream vascular relationships prior to aneurysm resection. Imaging findings were confirmed by surgery and pathology. Non-invasive imaging proved to be a useful alternative to standard catheter arteriography in the preoperative assessment of hemoptysis in this patient with Behçet disease.

  3. Life-threating upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to a primary aorto-jejunal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Sevilla, Elena; Echeverri, Juan Andrés; Boqué, Miriam; Valverde, Silvia; Ortega, Nuria; Gené, Anna; Rodríguez, Nivardo; Balibrea, José María; Armengol, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary aorto-enteric fistula (AEF) is an uncommon life-threating condition. Only 4% of them involve the jejunum or ileum and its mortality ranges from 33 to 85%. Presentation of case A 54-year-old female was admitted to the Emergency Department with syncope and hematemesis. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy found a pulsatile vessel in the second portion of the duodenum. A computed tomography scan showed an AEF with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery thrombosis. During surgery, an infrarenal aortic aneurysm complicated with an aorto-jejunal fistula was found. An axilo-bifemoral bypass, open repair of the aneurysm and segmental small bowel resection with primary suture of the jejunal defect were performed. Discussion Depending on previous aortic grafting, AEF can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary AEF is usually caused by an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm, commonly presenting an infectious etiology. The main clinical sign is a “herald” hemorrhage. The EGD is considered as the first step in diagnosing AEF. The treatment of choice for AEF is emergent surgery. Use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is mandatory in the postoperative period to avoid fistula recurrence. Conclusion AEF is a rare entity with a high mortality. High clinical suspicion is essential to make a correct diagnosis, which is crucial for the prognosis of these patients, such is the case of our patient. If hemodynamic stability is achieved, it allows to employ surgical strategies in which extra-abdominal bypass is performed before fistula is treated. PMID:25616071

  4. [Severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIST tumor. Radiological embolization and surgery].

    PubMed

    Navas, Diana; Ríos, Antonio; Febrero, Beatriz; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Lloret, Francisco; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal (GIST) se identificaron hace muy poco tiempo. Son tumores que no suelen alertar con síntomas mientras permanecen en fase localizada, operable y curable. Aunque son poco frecuentes, cuando no se diagnostican y tratan oportunamente son muy agresivos. Su manifestación clínica más común es la hemorragia gastrointestinal por erosión de la mucosa, pero su presentación como hemorragia baja del tubo digestivo severa es excepcional. Caso clínico: se comunica un caso de hemorragia baja del tubo digestivo severa estabilizada por radiología intervencionista, que posteriormente requirió cirugía para su tratamiento definitivo. Conclusiones: la embolización radiológica está cada vez más difundida como tratamiento de hemorragias en distintos sitios porque permite la estabilización hemodinámica de los pacientes. No hay que olvidar, sin embargo, que en los casos de hemorragia baja del tubo digestivo, de origen desconocido, es necesario investigar las posibles causas.

  5. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to bleeding from metastatic chondrosarcoma of the skull

    PubMed Central

    Kosugi, Kenzo; Takahashi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Tamura, Ryota; Ohara, Kentaro; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intra or peritumoral hemorrhage of brain and skull tumors sometimes presents as stroke. Skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma is relatively rare, and furthermore, a case of intratumoural hemorrhage of skull metastasis of chondrosarcoma has not been reported. Case Description: A 73-year-old man underwent right lower leg amputation in the past because of chondrosarcoma and was operated for a skull metastasis. He presented with a sudden headache, and head computed tomography revealed a right acute subdural hematoma (SDH) adjacent to the recurrent skull metastatic tumor. The removal of the SDH and tumor resection were performed emergently. The intraoperative findings included metastatic invasion beyond the dura mater to as deep as the subdural space, and the histological diagnosis was metastatic chondrosarcoma. His postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion: In the event of subdural invasion of a metastatic lesion, intratumoral hemorrhage may induce acute SDH, as in the present case. Similar to our case, most previous reports of intracranial chondrosarcoma hemorrhage have had an unclear etiology. Despite the rarity of this event, a patient with a history of malignancy presenting with nontraumatic acute SDH should be examined for the intratumoral hemorrhage of skull metastasis in the differential diagnosis. PMID:28303203

  6. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    PubMed

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  7. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Armen; Mukherjee, Ashis; McHugh, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage. PMID:27551425

  8. Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury Radiology Corner Case 27 Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial ...neck injuries. In particular, this case focuses on an intracranial vascular injury generated by a hand grenade with the diagnosis assisted by...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  9. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  10. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  11. A pediatric case of factitious disorder with unexplained bleeding symptoms.

    PubMed

    Uzuner, Selcuk; Bahali, Kayhan; Kurban, Sema; Erenberk, Ufuk; Cakir, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Factitious disorder is characterized by deliberate production or imitation of physical or psychological symptoms in order to adopt the sick role. The disorder can be seen as factitious bleeding. Factitious bleeding is a rare disorder in pediatric population. The concomitant appearance of hemoptysis and hematuria in the same patient has not been previously reported. In this case report, we present a pediatric case of factitious disorder with both hemoptysis and hematuria.

  12. A SOA broker solution for standard discovery and access services: the GI-cat framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    GI-cat ideal users are data providers or service providers within the geoscience community. The former have their data already available through an access service (e.g. an OGC Web Service) and would have it published through a standard catalog service, in a seamless way. The latter would develop a catalog broker and let users query and access different geospatial resources through one or more standard interfaces and Application Profiles (AP) (e.g. OGC CSW ISO AP, CSW ebRIM/EO AP, etc.). GI-cat actually implements a broker components (i.e. a middleware service) which carries out distribution and mediation functionalities among "well-adopted" catalog interfaces and data access protocols. GI-cat also publishes different discovery interfaces: the OGC CSW ISO and ebRIM Application Profiles (the latter coming with support for the EO and CIM extension packages) and two different OpenSearch interfaces developed in order to explore Web 2.0 possibilities. An extended interface is also available to exploit all available GI-cat features, such as interruptible incremental queries and queries feedback. Interoperability tests performed in the context of different projects have also pointed out the importance to enforce compatibility with existing and wide-spread tools of the open source community (e.g. GeoNetwork and Deegree catalogs), which was then achieved. Based on a service-oriented framework of modular components, GI-cat can effectively be customized and tailored to support different deployment scenarios. In addition to the distribution functionality an harvesting approach has been lately experimented, allowing the user to switch between a distributed and a local search giving thus more possibilities to support different deployment scenarios. A configurator tool is available in order to enable an effective high level configuration of the broker service. A specific geobrowser was also naturally developed, for demonstrating the advanced GI-cat functionalities. This client

  13. Liquefied Bleed for Stability and Efficiency of High Speed Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. David; Davis, David; Barsi, Stephen J.; Deans, Matthew C.; Weir, Lois J.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    2014-01-01

    A mission analysis code was developed to perform a trade study on the effectiveness of liquefying bleed for the inlet of the first stage of a TSTO vehicle. By liquefying bleed, the vehicle weight (TOGW) could be reduced by 7 to 23%. Numerous simplifying assumptions were made and lessons were learned. Increased accuracy in future analyses can be achieved by: Including a higher fidelity model to capture the effect of rescaling (variable vehicle TOGW). Refining specific thrust and impulse models ( T m a and Isp) to preserve fuel-to-air ratio. Implementing LH2 for T m a and Isp. Correlating baseline design to other mission analyses and correcting vehicle design elements. Implementing angle-of-attack effects on inlet characteristics. Refining aerodynamic performance (to improve L/D ratio at higher Mach numbers). Examining the benefit with partial cooling or densification of the bleed air stream. Incorporating higher fidelity weight estimates for the liquefied bleed system (heat exchange and liquid storage versus bleed duct weights) could be added when more fully developed. Adding trim drag or 6-degree-of-freedom trajectory analysis for higher fidelity. Investigating vehicle optimization for each of the bleed configurations.

  14. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  15. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  16. Upper gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding treated with various endoscopic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Choi, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Chang Hwan; Rew, Jong Sun; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Joon; Han, Mingui; Cho, Kyu Man

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ectopic variceal bleeding is a rare (2–5%) but fatal gastrointestinal bleed in patients with portal hypertension. Patients with ectopic variceal bleeding manifest melena, hematochezia, or hematemesis, which require urgent managements. Definitive therapeutic modalities of ectopic varices are not yet standardized because of low incidence. Various therapeutic modalities have been applied on the basis of the experiences of experts or availability of facilities, with varying results. Patient concerns: We have encountered eight cases of gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding in five patients in the last five years. Diagnoses: All patients were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis presenting melena or hematemesis. Interventions: All patients were treated with various endoscopic modalities (endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in five cases, endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) in two cases, hemoclipping in one case). Outcomes: Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved without radiologic interventions in all cases. EVO and EVL each caused one case of portal biliopathy, and EVL induced ulcer bleeding in one case. Lessons: EVO generally accomplished better results of variceal obturations than EVL or hemoclipping, without serious adverse events. EVO may be an effective modality for control of ectopic variceal bleeding without radiologic intervention or surgery. PMID:28072750

  17. Influence of Access, Anticoagulant, and Bleeding Definition on Outcomes of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Early Experience of an US Academic Center.

    PubMed

    Bheemarasetti, M K; Shawar, S; Chithri, S; Khalife, W I; Rangasetty, U M; Fujise, K; Gilani, S A

    2015-03-01

    Background We aimed to carry out comparison of different bleeding avoidance strategies in doing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) using either radial or femoral as access of choice and either bivalirudin or unfractionated heparin as anticoagulant of choice. In this analysis, we analyzed the influence of major bleeding definition on bleeding outcomes as well. Methods We did a retrospective analysis of 139 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had PPCI in our academic center from January 2010 till October 2013. The primary outcome at 30 days was a composite of death from any cause or stent thrombosis or non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) related major bleeding (CathPCI Registry definition) and secondary outcomes were individual components of primary outcome and the hospital length of stay. Results There was no significant difference among different access/anticoagulant combinations with regards to primary outcome (22% in radial/bivalirudin vs. 5% in radial/heparin vs. 17% in femoral/bivalirudin vs. 28% in femoral/heparin group; p = 0.2) as well as its individual components except the hospital length of stay (2.56 vs. 3 vs. 3.97 vs. 4.4 days each; p < 0.0001). The overall rate of major bleeding was 11.5%. When we use HORIZON-AMI bleeding definition, it went up to 25 % due to one particular component (p < 0.004). Conclusions This single center observational study doing PPCI did not show any superiority of one bleeding avoidance strategy over others with regard to primary outcome and its individual components except the hospital length of stay. It also shows the importance of bleeding definition on bleeding outcomes.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid enhanced the angiogenic capability of human chondrocytes by regulating Gi/NF-kB-dependent angiogenic factor expression.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Wen; Chang, Wen-Ming; Chen, Kai-Hua; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chang, Pey-Jium; Hsu, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    the presence of active Gi/NF-kB signaling in CHON-001 and HC cells. The effect of LPA on the angiogenesis-inducing capacity of chondrocytes may be due to the increased angiogenesis factor expression via the Gi/NF-kB signaling pathway.

  19. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI) Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Lisko, Daniel J; Johnston, G Patricia; Johnston, Carl G

    2017-02-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days). We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs), Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study.

  20. Effects of Dietary Yogurt on the Healthy Human Gastrointestinal (GI) Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Lisko, Daniel J.; Johnston, G. Patricia; Johnston, Carl G.

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract performs key functions that regulate the relationship between the host and the microbiota. Research has shown numerous benefits of probiotic intake in the modulation of immune responses and human metabolic processes. However, unfavorable attention has been paid to temporal changes of the microbial composition and diversity of the GI tract. This study aimed to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption on the GI microbiome bacteria community composition, structure and diversity during and after a short-term period (42 days). We used a multi-approach combining classical fingerprinting techniques (T-RFLPs), Sanger analyses and Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to elucidate bacterial communities and Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations within healthy adults that consume high doses of yogurt daily. Results indicated that overall GI microbial community and diversity was method-dependent, yet we found individual specific changes in bacterial composition and structure in healthy subjects that consumed high doses of yogurt throughout the study. PMID:28212267

  1. Identification, Purification and Characterization of Laterosporulin, a Novel Bacteriocin Produced by Brevibacillus sp. Strain GI-9

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pradip Kumar; Chittpurna; Ashish; Sharma, Vikas; Patil, Prabhu B.; Korpole, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides that are produced by bacteria as a defense mechanism in complex environments. Identification and characterization of novel bacteriocins in novel strains of bacteria is one of the important fields in bacteriology. Methodology/Findings The strain GI-9 was identified as Brevibacillus sp. by 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacteriocin produced by strain GI-9, namely, laterosporulin was purified from supernatant of the culture grown under optimal conditions using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The bacteriocin was active against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MALDI-TOF experiments determined the precise molecular mass of the peptide to be of 5.6 kDa and N-terminal sequencing of the thermo-stable peptide revealed low similarity with existing antimicrobial peptides. The putative open reading frame (ORF) encoding laterosporulin and its surrounding genomic region was fished out from the draft genome sequence of GI-9. Sequence analysis of the putative bacteriocin gene did not show significant similarity to any reported bacteriocin producing genes in database. Conclusions We have identified a bacteriocin producing strain GI-9, belonging to the genus Brevibacillus sp. Biochemical and genomic characterization of laterosporulin suggests it as a novel bacteriocin with broad spectrum antibacterial activity. PMID:22403615

  2. Role of Radiotherapy and Newer Techniques in the Treatment of GI Cancers.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-06-01

    The role of radiotherapy in multidisciplinary treatment of GI malignancies is well established. Recent advances in imaging as well as radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques have made it possible to target tumors more accurately while sparing normal tissues. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is an advanced method of delivering radiation using cutting-edge technology to manipulate beams of radiation. The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy is growing for many GI malignancies, such as cancers of the stomach, pancreas, esophagus, liver, and anus. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for some GI tumors such as locally advanced pancreatic cancer and primary or metastatic tumors of the liver. Stereotactic body radiotherapy requires a high degree of confidence in tumor location and subcentimeter accuracy of the delivered dose. New image-guided techniques have been developed to overcome setup uncertainties at the time of treatment, including real-time imaging on the linear accelerator. Modern imaging techniques have also allowed for more accurate pretreatment staging and delineation of the primary tumor and involved sites. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans can be particularly useful in radiotherapy planning and assessing treatment response. Molecular biomarkers are being investigated as predictors of response to radiotherapy with the intent of ultimately moving toward using genomic and proteomic determinants of therapeutic strategies. The role of all of these new approaches in the radiotherapeutic management of GI cancers and the evolving role of radiotherapy in these tumor sites will be highlighted in this review.

  3. Epidemics of GI.2 sapovirus in gastroenteritis outbreaks during 2012-2013 in Osaka City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Seiji P; Abe, Niichiro; Kubo, Hideyuki; Oka, Tomoichiro; Kaida, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Sapovirus (SaV) is a causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans in both sporadic cases and outbreaks. During the period from January 2005 to August 2014, SaV was detected in 30 (5.9%) of 510 gastroenteritis outbreaks in Osaka City, Japan using real-time RT-PCR. Seasonal distribution of SaV-associated outbreaks revealed an increase during the 2011-2012 season and the highest frequency of outbreaks during the 2012-2013 season. Genotyping analysis based on the capsid region demonstrated that the most common genotype was GI.2 (36.7%), in which the strains were closely related. The comparison of complete capsid gene sequences with 18 GI.2 strains (7 strains in this study and 11 from GenBank) between 1990 and 2013 showed that GI.2 strains were classified into at least three genetic clusters (1990-2000, 2004-2007, and 2008-2013) with chronologically unique amino acid residues and accumulation of mutations in the predicted P domain, suggesting the one of the causes of emergence and spread of GI.2 strains. This study will also be helpful for understanding the evolutionary mechanism of the SaV genome.

  4. Impact of food processing on the glycemic index (GI) of potato products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes are one of the most popular carbohydrate foods in industrialized and some developing countries. However, contradicting arguments and misconceptions on potatoes as a high glycemic index (GI) food is directly affecting potato consumption during the past years. Potato varieties, maturity level...

  5. Vitamin D(3) enhances ATRA-mediated neurosteroid biosynthesis in human glioma GI-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Toshiaki; Kushida, Akira; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that vitamin D (VD) is an important modulator of brain development and function. To investigate whether VD modulates neurosteroid biosynthesis in neural cells, we investigated the effect of VD(3) on steroidogenic gene expression in human glioma GI-1 cells. We found that VD(3) enhanced CYP11A1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression. The induction of CYP11A1 gene expression by VD(3) was dose- and incubation time-dependent. Calcipotriol, a VD(3) receptor (VDR) agonist, also induced CYP11A1 gene expression in GI-1 cells, indicating that VDR is involved in this induction. The induction of progesterone (PROG) de novo synthesis was observed along with the induction of steroidogenic genes by VD(3). Furthermore, VD(3) enhanced all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced CYP11A1 gene expression and PROG production. This suggests cooperative regulation of steroidogenic gene expression by the two fat-soluble vitamins, A and D. In addition, a mixed culture of neuronal IMR-32 cells and GI-1 cells treated with ATRA and VD(3) resulted in the induction of PROG-responsive gene expression in the IMR-32 cells. This result shows a paracrine action of PROG that is induced in and released by the GI-1 cells. The relationship between neurological dysfunction associated with VD deficiency and neurosteroid induction by VD is discussed.

  6. The 21st Century GI Bill: What it means for California. Commission Report 08-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, a yearly average of 21,000 veterans and active duty personnel enrolled at public colleges and universities in California. With the 21st Century GI Bill, education benefits will more than double. Commission staff believes these benefits are large enough to encourage a significant increase of enrollments by veterans and active duty…

  7. Update on the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Report 09-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Mallory

    2009-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008, or Post-9/11 GI Bill, becomes effective August 1, 2009. The bill covers in-state graduate and undergraduate fees and vocational and technical training for veterans who served after September 10, 2001. Benefits are available for up to 36 months--equivalent to four academic years--and…

  8. Does a low glycaemic index (GI) diet cost more during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Cleary, Jane; Casey, Shelly; Hofsteede, Clare; Moses, Robert G; Milosavljevic, Marianna; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2012-11-15

     The aim of this study was to examine the monetary cost of dietary change among pregnant women before and after receiving low glycaemic index (GI) dietary advice. The pregnant women in this study were a subgroup of participants in the Pregnancy and Glycaemic Index Outcomes (PREGGIO) study. Twenty women from the low GI dietary advice group, who had completed their pregnancies, were randomly chosen. All these women had completed three day food records at 12–16 weeks and again around 36 weeks of gestation. Consumer food prices were applied to recorded dietary intake data. The mean ± SD GI of the diet reduced from 55.1 ± 4.3 to 51.6 ± 3.9 (p = 0.003). The daily cost of the diet (AUD) was 9.1 ± 2.7 at enrolment and 9.5 ± 2.1 prior to delivery was not significantly different (p = 0.52). There were also no significant differences in the daily energy intake (p = 0.2) or the daily cost per MJ (p = 0.16). Women were able to follow low GI dietary advice during pregnancy with no significant increase in the daily costs.

  9. Does a Low Glycaemic Index (GI) Diet Cost More during Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Jane; Casey, Shelly; Hofsteede, Clare; Moses, Robert G.; Milosavljevic, Marianna; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the monetary cost of dietary change among pregnant women before and after receiving low glycaemic index (GI) dietary advice. The pregnant women in this study were a subgroup of participants in the Pregnancy and Glycaemic Index Outcomes (PREGGIO) study. Twenty women from the low GI dietary advice group, who had completed their pregnancies, were randomly chosen. All these women had completed three day food records at 12–16 weeks and again around 36 weeks of gestation. Consumer food prices were applied to recorded dietary intake data. The mean ± SD GI of the diet reduced from 55.1 ± 4.3 to 51.6 ± 3.9 (p = 0.003). The daily cost of the diet (AUD) was 9.1 ± 2.7 at enrolment and 9.5 ± 2.1 prior to delivery was not significantly different (p = 0.52). There were also no significant differences in the daily energy intake (p = 0.2) or the daily cost per MJ (p = 0.16). Women were able to follow low GI dietary advice during pregnancy with no significant increase in the daily costs. PMID:23201846

  10. redMaGiC: selecting luminous red galaxies from the DES Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Abate, A.; Bonnett, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, C.; Hoyle, B.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, D.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Childress, M. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Davis, T.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; O'Neill, C. R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Uddin, S.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.; da Costa, L. N.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce redMaGiC, an automated algorithm for selecting luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was specifically developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. redMaGiC achieves this by self-training the colour cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sample of constant comoving density. We demonstrate that redMaGiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine learning-based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a redMaGiC catalogue sampling the redshift range z ∈ [0.2, 0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10-3 (h-1 Mpc)-3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec - zphoto) and scatter (σz/(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017, respectively. The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4 per cent. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1 per cent level.

  11. redMaGiC: selecting luminous red galaxies from the DES Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, E.

    2016-05-30

    We introduce redMaGiC, an automated algorithm for selecting Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. redMaGiC achieves this by self-training the color-cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sam- ple of constant comoving density. Additionally, we demonstrate that redMaGiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine-learning based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a redMaGiC catalog sampling the redshift range z ϵ [0.2,0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10-3 (h-1Mpc)-3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec zphoto) and scatter (σz=(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017 respectively.The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4%. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8) and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1% level.

  12. Percutaneous Management of a Hepatic Artery Aneurysm: Bleeding After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Millonig, Gunda; Graziadei, Ivo W. Waldenberger, Peter; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Jaschke, Werner; Vogel, Wolfgang

    2004-09-15

    In this article we present an unusual case of hepatic artery aneurysm bleeding due to a hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation. The patient developed a recurrent hepatic artery thrombosis leading to severe graft failure in four consecutive liver transplantations. While being evaluated for a fifth transplant, stabilization of the clinical situation was attempted by interventional therapy. The first intervention was to place a stent into the hepatic artery to prevent further ischemic damage. This failed to improve graft function, but unfortunately led to the development of a pseudoaneurysm at the distal end with a subsequent rupture into the biliary tree. Bleeding was treated successfully by direct puncture and coil embolization of the aneurysm. In addition, the patient demonstrated a hemodynamically relevant portal vein stenosis on the CT scan. Stenting of the portal vein markedly improved graft function. After extensive investigations, a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria was found to be the underlying cause of the recurrent hepatic artery thrombosis. Here we suggest that hepatic artery aneurysm bleeding is a rare but potentially fatal complication that can be successfully treated by percutaneous coil embolization. Additionally, we propose that stenting of the portal vein can lead to a significant improvement of the graft perfusion even though the hepatic artery remained occluded.

  13. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  14. Carbamazepine co-administration with an oral contraceptive: effects on steroid pharmacokinetics, ovulation, and bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Anne R.; Westhoff, Carolyn L.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purpose Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are widely used in reproductive-age women. The AED carbamazepine (CBZ) induces the hepatic cytochrome p450 system accelerating hormone metabolism. We sought to assess the pharmacodynamic effects of CBZ on breakthrough bleeding and ovulation during OC use. Methods A double-blind, randomized, cross-over study of healthy women ages 18 to 35 years. Participants took an OC containing 20 mcgs ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 100 mcgs levonorgestrel (LNG) for four months. Concurrently, participants took CBZ 600 mgs or a matching placebo for two months each, administered in random order. During the second month of CBZ or placebo, we measured EE and LNG levels twelve times over 24 hours, ovarian follicular diameters with eight bi-weekly vaginal ultrasounds, weekly progesterone levels and bleeding using a diary. Results We enrolled 25 women; 10 completed the study. Five discontinued due to reversible CBZ side effects. Mean area under the curve measurements were lower during CBZ use compared to placebo for EE (1778 versus 986 pg*h/ml, p<0.001) and LNG (24.8 vs. 13.8 pg*h/ml, p=0.04). Ovulation occurred in 5 of 10 CBZ cycles compared to 1 of 10 placebo cycles (p=0.06). Three or more days of breakthrough bleeding occurred during 8 of the 10 CBZ cycles compared to 2 of the 10 placebo cycles (p= 0.07). Discussion A commonly used dose of CBZ decreased levels of contraceptive steroids, increased breakthrough bleeding and permitted ovulation during use of a low-dose OC. Women treated with CBZ are not adequately protected from pregnancy by low-dose OCs. PMID:21204827

  15. The experience of girls and young women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Khair, K; Holland, M; Pollard, D

    2013-09-01

    Haemophilia carriers and women with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) experience menorrhagia, bleed following dentistry, surgery, injury or childbirth. Symptoms are easily treated leading to full and active lives. Nevertheless, some girls and women suffer with abnormal bleeding for many years before diagnosis. We explored the experiences of girls and young women (aged 9-34 years) with IBD by means of focus groups which consisted of moderated discussion addressing specific aspects of bleeding, management and coping strategies. Subsequently, these issues were explored further though a paper-based questionnaire distributed via five specialist haemophilia centres in the UK. The study suggested that young women with IBD who are managed at haemophilia centres receive appropriate care and feel well supported. Although the clinic-based literature available to these women is "fit for purpose", it does not fully address the perceived needs specifically regarding sex, menorrhagia, conception and childbirth, the Pill, tattoos/piercings and so on, leading many to turn to other information sources. Most of those who responded to our survey are confident in their lives, able to manage their IBD and take pragmatic views towards the inherited nature of their condition. But there is a substantial subgroup of women who experience stigmatization, isolation and bullying and express concerns relating to fertility and conception. Overall, this cohort would benefit from opportunities for mutual support. This could be via Internet-based social networking and may be of particular value to those who are unable to seek help from traditional medical services due to religious or other cultural barriers.

  16. Severe Extra-Cerebral Anticoagulant-Related Bleeding in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hauguel, M; Boelle, Py; Pichereau, C; Bourcier, S; Bigé, N; Baudel, JL; Maury, E; Guidet, B; Ait-Oufella, H

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bleeding is the most frequent complication of anticoagulant therapy, responsible for a number of hospitalizations or deaths. However, studies describing the management and prognosis factors of extra-cerebral anticoagulant-related bleedings in intensive care unit (ICU) are lacking. Retrospective observational study in an 18-bed ICU in a tertiary teaching hospital. From January 2000 to December 2013, all consecutive patients, older than 18 years, admitted for severe anticoagulant-related bleeding (SAB) except intracerebral site were included. A total of 100 patients were included, the mean age was 77 ± 11 years and 62% were women. SAB incidence in ICU doubled over 10 years (P = 0.03). In ICU, the average length of stay was 5 ± 6 days and mortality was 30%. Nonsurviving patients had a higher SAPS II (78 ± 24 vs 53 ± 24, P < 0.0001), a higher SOFA (9.0 ± 3.6 vs 4.7 ± 3.4, P < 0.0001) and received more frequently support therapy such as mechanical ventilation (87% vs 16%, P < 0.0001) and vasopressors (90% vs 27%, P < 0.0001). The volume of blood-derived products transfused was more important in nonsurvivors mainly during the first 24 hours of resuscitation. Rapid anticoagulant reversal therapy was associated with better prognosis (ICU survivors 66% vs 39%, Fisher test P = 0.04). Anterior abdominal wall was identified as a frequent site of bleeding (22%) due to epigastric artery injury during subcutaneous injection of heparin and was associated with a large mortality (55%). Extra-cerebral SAB is a life-threatening complication that requires rapid resuscitation and anticoagulant reversal therapy. Injection of heparin should be done carefully in the subcutaneous tissue thereby avoiding artery injury. PMID:26632750

  17. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples.

  18. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  19. The Clinical Outcomes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Are Not Better than Those of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is increasing; however, predictors of outcomes for patients with LGIB are not as well defined as those for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical outcomes and the predictors of poor outcomes for patients with LGIB, compared to outcomes for patients with UGIB. We identified patients with LGIB or UGIB who underwent endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Propensity score matching was used to improve comparability between LGIB and UGIB groups. The clinical outcomes and predictors of 30-day rebleeding and mortality rate were analyzed between the two groups. In total, 601 patients with UGIB (n = 500) or LGIB (n = 101) were included in the study, and 202 patients with UGIB and 101 patients with LGIB were analyzed after 2:1 propensity score matching. The 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates were 9.9% and 4.5% for the UGIB group, and 16.8% and 5.0% for LGIB group, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, the Rockall score (P = 0.013) and C-reactive protein (CRP; P = 0.047) levels were significant predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB; however, we could not identify any predictors of rebleeding in patients with LGIB. The clinical outcomes for patients with LGIB are not better than clinical outcomes for patients with UGIB. The clinical Rockall score and serum CRP levels may be used to predict 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB. PMID:27550490

  20. Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I (gI) identifies a cysteine residue critical for gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI structure, and virulence in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Rajamani, Jaya; Vlaycheva-Beisheim, Leonssia; Stamatis, Shaye; Cheng, Jason; Jones, Carol; Zehnder, James; Arvin, Ann M

    2011-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the alphaherpesvirus that causes chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (zoster). The two VZV glycoproteins gE and gI form a heterodimer that mediates efficient cell-to-cell spread. Deletion of gI yields a small-plaque-phenotype virus, ΔgI virus, which is avirulent in human skin using the xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. In the present study, 10 mutant viruses were generated to determine which residues were required for the typical function of gI. Three phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of gI were not required for VZV virulence in vivo. Two deletion mutants mapped a gE binding region in gI to residues 105 to 125. A glycosylation site, N116, in this region did not affect virulence. Substitution of four cysteine residues highly conserved in the Alphaherpesvirinae established that C95 is required for gE/gI heterodimer formation. The C95A and Δ105-125 (with residues 105 to 125 deleted) viruses had small-plaque phenotypes with reduced replication kinetics in vitro similar to those of the ΔgI virus. The Δ105-125 virus was avirulent for human skin in vivo. In contrast, the C95A mutant replicated in vivo but with significantly reduced kinetics compared to those of the wild-type virus. In addition to abolished gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI from the C95A or the Δ105-125 mutant was not recognized by monoclonal antibodies that detect the canonical conformation of gI, demonstrating structural disruption of gI in these viruses. This alteration prevented gI incorporation into virus particles. Thus, residues C95 and 105 to 125 are critical for gI structure required for gE/gI heterodimer formation, virion incorporation, and ultimately, effective viral spread in human skin.

  1. GI-SVM: A sensitive method for predicting genomic islands based on unannotated sequence of a single genome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingxin; Leong, Hon Wai

    2016-02-01

    Genomic islands (GIs) are clusters of functionally related genes acquired by lateral genetic transfer (LGT), and they are present in many bacterial genomes. GIs are extremely important for bacterial research, because they not only promote genome evolution but also contain genes that enhance adaption and enable antibiotic resistance. Many methods have been proposed to predict GI. But most of them rely on either annotations or comparisons with other closely related genomes. Hence these methods cannot be easily applied to new genomes. As the number of newly sequenced bacterial genomes rapidly increases, there is a need for methods to detect GI based solely on sequences of a single genome. In this paper, we propose a novel method, GI-SVM, to predict GIs given only the unannotated genome sequence. GI-SVM is based on one-class support vector machine (SVM), utilizing composition bias in terms of k-mer content. From our evaluations on three real genomes, GI-SVM can achieve higher recall compared with current methods, without much loss of precision. Besides, GI-SVM allows flexible parameter tuning to get optimal results for each genome. In short, GI-SVM provides a more sensitive method for researchers interested in a first-pass detection of GI in newly sequenced genomes.

  2. 75 FR 66193 - Post-9/11 GI Bill 2010-2011 Tuition and Fee In-State Maximums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... AFFAIRS Post-9/11 GI Bill 2010-2011 Tuition and Fee In-State Maximums AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to advise the public of the Post-9/11 GI Bill tuition and fee in-State maximum rates for the 2010- 2011 academic year. The Post-9/11...

  3. Providing Young Women with Credible Health Information about Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rhynders, Patricia A.; Sayers, Cynthia A.; Presley, Rodney J.; Thierry, JoAnn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1% of U.S. women may have an undiagnosed bleeding disorder, which can diminish quality of life and lead to life-threatening complications during menstruation, childbirth, and surgery. Purpose To understand young women’s knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about bleeding disorders and determine the preferred messaging strategy (e.g., gain- versus loss-framed messages) for presenting information. Methods In September 2010, a web-assisted personal interview of women aged 18–25 years was conducted. Preliminary analyses were conducted in 2011 with final analyses in 2013. In total, 1,243 women participated. Knowledge of blood disorders was tabulated for these respondents. Menstrual experiences of women at risk for a bleeding disorder were compared with those not at risk using chi-square analyses. Perceived influence of gain- versus loss-framed messages also was compared. Results Participants knew that a bleeding disorder is a condition in which bleeding takes a long time to stop (77%) or blood does not clot (66%). Of the women, 57% incorrectly thought that a bleeding disorder is characterized by thin blood; many were unsure if bleeding disorders involve blood types, not getting a period, or mother and fetus having a different blood type. Women at risk for a bleeding disorder were significantly more likely to report that menstruation interfered with daily activities (36% vs 9%); physical or sports activities (46% vs 21%); social activities (29% vs 7%); and school or work activities (20% vs 9%) than women not at risk. Gain-framed messages were significantly more likely to influence women’s decisions to seek medical care than parallel loss-framed messages. Findings suggest that the most influential messages focus on knowing effective treatment is available (86% gain-framed vs 77% loss-framed); preventing pregnancy complications (79% gain- vs 71% loss-framed); and maintaining typical daily activities during menstrual periods. Conclusions Lack

  4. Antiplatelet Drugs: Mechanisms and Risks of Bleeding Following Cardiac Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Saha, Sibu P.

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative antiplatelet drug use is common in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The impact of these drugs on bleeding and blood transfusion varies. We hypothesize that review of available evidence regarding drug-related bleeding risk, underlying mechanisms of platelet dysfunction, and variations in patient response to antiplatelet drugs will aid surgeons as they assess preoperative risk and attempt to limit perioperative bleeding. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine the role that antiplatelet drugs play in excessive postoperative blood transfusion, (2) identify possible mechanisms to explain patient response to antiplatelet drugs, and (3) formulate a strategy to limit excessive blood product usage in these patients. We reviewed available published evidence regarding bleeding risk in patients taking preoperative antiplatelet drugs. In addition, we summarized our previous research into mechanisms of antiplatelet drug-related platelet dysfunction. Aspirin users have a slight but significant increase in blood product usage after CABG (0.5 U of nonautologous blood per treated patient). Platelet adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors are more potent antiplatelet drugs than aspirin but have a half-life similar to aspirin, around 5 to 10 days. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons guidelines recommend discontinuation, if possible, of ADP inhibitors 5 to 7 days before operation because of excessive bleeding risk, whereas aspirin should be continued during the entire perioperative period in most patients. Individual variability in response to aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs is common with both hyper- and hyporesponsiveness seen in 5 to 25% of patients. Use of preoperative antiplatelet drugs is a risk factor for increased perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion. Point-of-care tests can identify patients at high risk for perioperative bleeding and blood

  5. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2014-03-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 who were not, taking anticoagulants. Seventy-one were taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and 32 vitamin K antagonists. Patients were treated according to guidelines developed at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), The Netherlands. The operations studied included surgical extraction (when the surgeon had to incise the gingiva before extraction), non-surgical extraction, apicectomy, and placement of implants. Patients were given standard postoperative care and those taking vitamin K antagonists used tranexamic acid mouthwash postoperatively. No patient developed a severe bleed that required intervention. Seven patients (7%) taking anticoagulants developed mild postoperative bleeds. Patients taking vitamin K antagonists reported 3 episodes (9%) compared with 4 (6%) in the group taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors. Among patients not taking anticoagulants, two (2%) developed mild bleeding. The differences between the groups were not significant. All bleeding was controlled by the patients themselves with compression with gauze. We conclude that dentoalveolar surgery is safe in patients being treated with anticoagulants provided that the conditions described in the ACTA guidelines are met.

  6. Prediction and Reduction of Noise in Pneumatic Bleed Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi Nezhad, Shervin

    This study investigates numerically the fluid mechanics and acoustics of pneumatic bleed valves used in turbofan engines. The goal is to characterized the fundamental processes of noise generation and devise strategies for noise reduction. Three different methods are employed for both analysis and redesign of the bleed valve to reduce noise. The bleed valve noise problem is carefully divided into multiple smaller problems. For large separations and tonal noises, the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) method is utilized. This method is also applied in the re-designing of the bleed valve geometry. For the bleed valve muffler, which is comprised of perforated plates and a honeycomb, a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) method combined with a simplified acoustic analogy is used. The original muffler design is modified to improve noise attenuation. Finally, for sound scattering through perforated plates, a fully implicit linearized Euler solver is developed. The problem of sound interaction with perforated plates is studied from two perspectives. In the first study the effect of high--speed mean flow is considered and it is shown that at Strouhal numbers of around 0.2-0.25 there is an increase in transmitted incident sound. In the second part, the interaction of holes in two--dimensional perforated plates is investigated using three different configurations. The study demonstrates that the hole interaction has a significant impact on sound attenuation, especially at high frequencies.

  7. Endovascular management for significant iatrogenic portal vein bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Jonathan K; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite conservative treatment, hemorrhage from an intrahepatic branch of the portal vein can cause hemodynamic instability requiring urgent intervention. Purpose To retrospectively report the outcomes of hemodynamically significant portal vein bleeding after endovascular management. Material and Methods During a period of 15 years, four patients (2 men, 2 women; median age, 70.5 years) underwent angiography and embolization for iatrogenic portal vein bleeding. Causes of hemorrhage, angiographic findings, endovascular treatment, and complications were reported. Results Portal vein bleeding occurred after percutaneous liver biopsy (n = 2), percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (n = 1), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (n = 1). The median time interval between angiography and percutaneous procedure was 5 h (range, 4-240 h). Common hepatic angiograms including indirect mesenteric portograms showed active portal vein bleeding into the peritoneal cavity with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) an arterioportal (AP) fistula, and portal vein pseudoaneurysm alone with an AP fistula (n = 1). Successful transcatheter arterial embolization (n = 2) or percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (n = 2) was performed. Embolic materials were n-butyl cyanoacrylate alone (n = 2) or in combination with gelatin sponge particles and coils (n = 2). There were no major treatment-related complications or patient mortality within 30 days. Conclusion Patients with symptomatic or life-threatening portal vein bleeding following liver-penetrating procedures can successfully be managed with embolization.

  8. Ameboma: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding during severe leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe leptospirosis occurs mainly in a tropical environment and includes icterus, acute renal failure and hemorrhages. These bleedings, which are mainly a consequence of acute homeostatic disturbances, can also reveal simultaneous diseases. Coinfections with other tropical diseases have been previously reported during leptospirosis. To our knowledge, invasive amebiasis, which can induce gastrointestinal bleedings, has never been described in the course of severe leptospirosis. Case presentation In this report, we describe a case of a 60 year-old man living in Reunion Island (Indian Ocean, France) admitted to our intensive care unit for severe Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae infection with neurological, renal, liver and hematological involvement. Two lower gastrointestinal bleedings occurred 7 and 15 days after admission. The first episode was promoted by hemostatic disturbances while the second bleeding occurred during low-dose heparin therapy. Colonoscopy revealed a pseudo-tumoral inflammatory mass of the recto-sigmoid junction. Histological examination found trophozoites inside mucinous exudate suggestive of Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebic serology was strongly positive whereas careful detection of cysts or trophozoites on saline-wet mount was negative in three consecutive samples of stools. Amoxicillin followed by metronidazole therapy, combined with supportive care, led to an improvement in the clinical and biological patient’s condition and endoscopic appearances. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware that gastrointestinal bleeding during severe leptospirosis could not solely be the consequences of hemostatic disturbances. Careful endoscopic evaluation that may reveal curable coinfections should also be considered. PMID:24894109

  9. [Blood transfusion and adjunctive therapy in the bleeding trauma patient].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2008-11-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage is the most common cause of potentially preventable death in massive trauma. In addition to the early identification of potential bleeding sources and angiographic embolisation or surgical bleeding control, in-hospital management will aim at maintain tissue oxygenation with volume replacement using crystalloids, colloids and RBC. In general, RBC transfusion is recommended to maintain hemoglobin between 7-10g/dL. The complex combination of clotting factors and platelets consumption, loss and dilution, shock, hypothermia, acidosis and colloid-induced hemostatic alterations leads to coagulopathic bleeding. Most guidelines recommend the use of FFP in significant bleeding complicated by coagulopathy (PT, aPTT >1.5 times control). Platelets should be administered to maintain a platelet count above 50 x 10(9)/L (100 x 10(9)/L in patients with traumatic brain injury). However, standard laboratory tests have poor correlation with in vivo coagulopathy and the test results are not rapidly available. Empiric guidelines derived from mathematical hemodilution models developed in elective surgery settings may not be appropriate for trauma settings where significant bleeding may have already occurred. Moreover, coagulopathy is frequently present on admission in severely injured patients. Recent litterature suggests that FFP and platelets should be given early and more often to injured patients requiring massive transfusion. The place of adjunctive hemostatic therapy is discussed.

  10. Management of bleeding following major trauma: an updated European guideline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations are needed to guide the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient, which when implemented may improve patient outcomes. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing a guideline for the management of bleeding following severe injury. This document presents an updated version of the guideline published by the group in 2007. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) hierarchy of evidence and based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key changes encompassed in this version of the guideline include new recommendations on coagulation support and monitoring and the appropriate use of local haemostatic measures, tourniquets, calcium and desmopressin in the bleeding trauma patient. The remaining recommendations have been reevaluated and graded based on literature published since the last edition of the guideline. Consideration was also given to changes in clinical practice that have taken place during this time period as a result of both new evidence and changes in the general availability of relevant agents and technologies. Conclusions This guideline provides an evidence-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of critically injured bleeding trauma patients. PMID:20370902

  11. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    Aero-effected flight control using distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across lifting surface and regulated by integrated louver actuators is investigated in wind tunnel experiments. The interaction between unsteady bleed and the cross flows alters the apparent aerodynamic shape of the lifting surface by regulating the accumulation and shedding of vorticity concentrations, and consequently the distributions of forces and moments. The present experiments are conducted using a 2-D dynamically-pitching VR-7 airfoil model from pre- to post-stall angles of attack. The effects of leading edge bleed at high angles of attack on the formation and evolution of the dynamic stall vorticity concentrations are investigated at high reduced frequencies (k > 0.1) using PIV phase-locked to the airfoil's motion. The time-dependent bleed enables broad-range variation in lift and pitching moment with significant extension of the stall margin. In particular, bleed actuation reduces the extent of ``negative damping'' or pitching moment instability with minimal lift penalty. Supported by NTRC-VLRCOE, monitored by Dr. Mike Rutkowski.

  12. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Endoscopic Hemostasis in Marginal Ulcer Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Takenaka, Ryuta; Hori, Keisuke; Takemoto, Koji; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The usefulness of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding has rarely been studied, and the optimal method for preventing rebleeding is unclear. Here we assessed the efficacy of endoscopy in marginal ulcer bleeding and examined the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention of rebleeding. A total of 28 patients with marginal ulcer bleeding (21 men, 7 women; median age 58.5 years) were treated by endoscopy. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, results of endoscopic therapy, characteristics of rebleeding patients, and relation between the use of PPIs and the duration of rebleeding. Sixteen patients had active bleeding. Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related adverse events. Rebleeding occurred in one patient within the first month and in 7 patients thereafter. There was a significant difference in the rebleeding rate between the patients who received a PPI and those who did not. In a multivariate analysis, the non-use of PPIs was a risk factor for rebleeding (hazard ratio, 6.22). Therapeutic endoscopy is effective in achieving hemostasis from marginal ulcer bleeding. PPIs may prevent rebleeding from marginal ulcers.

  15. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel. PMID:25324920

  16. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  17. Cancer mortality following radium treatment for uterine bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Monson, R.R.; Wagoner, J.K.; Stovall, M.; Davis, F.G.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1990-09-01

    Cancer mortality in relation to radiation dose was evaluated among 4153 women treated with intrauterine radium (226Ra) capsules for benign gynecologic bleeding disorders between 1925 and 1965. Average follow up was 26.5 years (maximum = 59.9 years). Overall, 2763 deaths were observed versus 2687 expected based on U.S. mortality rates (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 1.03). Deaths due to cancer, however, were increased (SMR = 1.30), especially cancers of organs close to the radiation source. For organs receiving greater than 5 Gy, excess mortality of 100 to 110% was noted for cancers of the uterus and bladder 10 or more years following irradiation, while a deficit was seen for cancer of the cervix, one of the few malignancies not previously shown to be caused by ionizing radiation. Part of the excess of uterine cancer, however, may have been due to the underlying gynecologic disorders being treated. Among cancers of organs receiving average or local doses of 1 to 4 Gy, excesses of 30 to 100% were found for leukemia and cancers of the colon and genital organs other than uterus; no excess was seen for rectal or bone cancer. Among organs typically receiving 0.1 to 0.3 Gy, a deficit was recorded for cancers of the liver, gall bladder, and bile ducts combined, death due to stomach cancer occurred at close to the expected rate, a 30% excess was noted for kidney cancer (based on eight deaths), and there was a 60% excess of pancreatic cancer among 10-year survivors, but little evidence of dose-response. Estimates of the excess relative risk per Gray were 0.006 for uterus, 0.4 for other genital organs, 0.5 for colon, 0.2 for bladder, and 1.9 for leukemia. Contrary to findings for other populations treated by pelvic irradiation, a deficit of breast cancer was not observed (SMR = 1.0). Dose to the ovaries may have been insufficient to protect against breast cancer.

  18. Recurrent Epistaxis and Bleeding as the Initial Manifestation of Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Davari, Kambiz; Eftekhari, Kambiz

    2016-03-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia with bleeding is rarely reported in children with brucellosis, and recurrent epistaxis is extremely rare. Brucellosis with hemorrhage should be differentiated from viral hemorrhagic fever, malignancy, and other blood disorders. Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is mandatory to differentiate from other blood diseases. An 8-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent epistaxis, petechiae and purpura on face and extremities and bleeding from the gums. During the hospitalization, he was febrile and complained of muscle pain. Leukopenias associated with thrombocytopenia were observed. BMA showed to be normal. Among the multiple tests requested, only serum agglutination test (SAT) and 2-MercaptoEthanol test (2-ME) were positive. He was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) associated with co-trimoxazole and rifampin. Finally, fever subsided, and he was discharged with good condition and normal platelet count. Brucellosis should be a differential diagnosis in patients with fever and bleeding disorders and a history of consumption of unpasteurized dairy, in endemic areas.

  19. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  20. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-07

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood.

  1. Bedside Bleeding Control, Review Paper and Proposed Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Reynolds, David; Saad, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence in practice, but occasionally it may be challenging issue to overcome. It can come from numerous sources such as, trauma, during or post-surgical intervention, disorders of platelet and coagulation factors and increased fibrinolysis, wounds and cancers. This paper was inspired from our experience with a patient admitted to a local long term acute care facility with a large fungating right breast cancerous wound. During her hospital stay spontaneous bleeding from her breast cancerous mass was encountered and became more frequent and significant over the period of her stay. Different hemostatic technologies were used to control her bleeding. We felt that it was important to share our experience with our colleagues to help with potential similar situation that they may face. PMID:24527382

  2. Primary CNS vasculitis presenting as intraventricular bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Sreeja Hareendranathan; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Menon, Girish; Kannoth, Santhosh; PN, Sylaja

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder affecting both medium- and small-sized vessels. Intracranial haemorrhages though less reported are in the form of parenchymal haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage. We report a case of PACNS with intraventricular haemorrhage due to aneurysms secondary to progression of vasculitis. PMID:27570401

  3. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  4. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  5. Management of adult Jehovah's Witness patients with acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Berend, Kenrick; Levi, Marcel

    2009-12-01

    Because of the firm refusal of transfusion of blood and blood components by Jehovah's Witnesses, the management of Jehovah's Witness patients with severe bleeding is often complicated by medical, ethical, and legal concerns. Because of a rapidly growing and worldwide membership, physicians working in hospitals should be prepared to manage these patients. Appropriate management of a Jehovah's Witness patient with severe bleeding entails understanding of the legal and ethical issues involved, and meticulous medical management, including treatment of hypovolemic shock, local hemostatic interventions, and administration of prohemostatic agents, when appropriate. In addition, high-dose recombinant erythropoietin in combination with supplemental iron may enhance the speed of hemoglobin synthesis.

  6. Life-threatening bleeding from gastric mucosal angiokeratomas during anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eungu; Kim, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Dae-Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Angiokeratomas are the earliest manifestation of Fabry disease (FD), and the extent of their appearance is related to disease severity. Angiokeratomas are mostly found on cutaneous regions. Patient concerns, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes: Here we report an FD patient with widespread gastrointestinal angiokeratomas who developed life-threatening bleeding following anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. Lessons: Careful observation for gastrointestinal bleeding is warranted for patients on anticoagulation with extensive cutaneous angiokeratomas. Furthermore, our experience suggests that surveillance is needed to assess the prevalence and extent of gastrointestinal angiokeratomas in patients with FD. PMID:28178158

  7. [Management of bleeding and coagulopathy following major trauma].

    PubMed

    Etxaniz, A; Pita, E

    2016-05-01

    Bleeding is the most common preventable cause of death in trauma patients. Acute traumatic coagulopathy is a specific condition with a different pathophysiology from other causes of the massive bleeding. An early identification of the coagulopathy is fundamental to implementing rapid treatment. There have been many changes in the management of massive hemorrhage, for example, the administration of the tranexamic acid and the use of balanced transfusion ratio. This review presents these practical points, some of them with scientific evidence, in order to achieve a beneficial effect for patient outcomes.

  8. An unreported complication of intravenously administered ibuprofen: gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sarici, S U; Dabak, O; Erdinc, K; Okutan, V; Lenk, M K

    2012-03-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the closure of ductus arteriosus either intravenously or enterally. Although intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, transient renal failure, oliguria, hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia are reported complications during or after ibuprofen treatment, gastrointestinal bleeding, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. We herein report a premature newborn, in whom ibuprofen was used intravenously for the closure of ductus arteriosus and gastrointestinal bleeding developed as a complication, and aim to discuss this rare adverse effect. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of close follow-up of premature newborns during intravenous ibuprofen treatment considering also the other rare systemic side effects reported in the literature.

  9. War and Marriage: Assortative Mating and the World War II GI Bill.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Matthew F; McCarthy, T J; Moulton, Jeremy G; Page, Marianne E; Patel, Ankur J

    2015-10-01

    World War II and its subsequent GI Bill have been widely credited with playing a transformative role in American society, but there have been few quantitative analyses of these historical events' broad social effects. We exploit between-cohort variation in the probability of military service to investigate how WWII and the GI Bill altered the structure of marriage, and find that it had important spillover effects beyond its direct effect on men's educational attainment. Our results suggest that the additional education received by returning veterans caused them to "sort" into wives with significantly higher levels of education. This suggests an important mechanism by which socioeconomic status may be passed on to the next generation.

  10. What effect does chiropractic treatment have on gastrointestinal (GI) disorders: a narrative review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Katherine; Asgharifar, Sepideh; Gleberzon, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a narrative review of the literature of studies describing the management of disorders of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract using ‘chiropractic therapy’ broadly defined here as spinal manipulation therapy, mobilizations, soft tissue therapy, modalities and stretches. Search limiters include access to full text studies published between 1980 and November 2012 in peer-reviewed journals, English language only involving human subjects. Twenty-one articles were found that met our inclusion criteria. Retrievable articles varied from case reports to clinical trials to review articles of management options. The majority of articles chronicling patient experiences under chiropractic care reported they demonstrated mild to moderate improvements in presenting symptoms. No adverse side effects were reported. This suggests chiropractic care can be considered as an adjunctive therapy for patients with various GI conditions providing there are no co-morbidities. PMID:26136604

  11. Overlap between functional GI disorders and other functional syndromes: what are the underlying mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    KIM, S. E.; CHANG, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome and other gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI disorders such as functional dyspepsia, fibromyalgia, temporomandibular joint disorder, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and chronic fatigue syndrome are known as functional pain syndromes. They commonly coexist within the same individual. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, but it has been hypothesized that they share a common pathogenesis. Purpose The objective of this review is to discuss the proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms, which have been similarly studied in these conditions. These mechanisms include enhanced pain perception, altered regional brain activation, infectious etiologies, dysregulations in immune and neuroendocrine function, and genetic susceptibility. Studies suggest that these functional disorders are multifactorial, but factors which increase the vulnerability of developing these conditions are shared. PMID:22863120

  12. Prospective randomized study of viscous lidocaine versus benzocaine in a GI cocktail for dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Vilke, Gary M; Jin, Albert; Davis, Daniel P; Chan, Theodore C

    2004-07-01

    We hypothesized that Benzocaine (Hurricaine) would work as quickly and effectively as viscous Lidocaine in this preparation. This was a prospective randomized, single-blinded comparison between Benzocaine and Lidocaine as the topical anesthetic in a gastrointestinal (GI) cocktail. Patients 18 years or older were approached for participation when a GI cocktail was ordered by the Emergency Physician. Patients were randomized to equivalent doses of either Benzocaine or viscous Lidocaine in addition to 30 cc of Maalox and 10 cc of Donnatal. Assessment using a visual analog pain scale occurred at time intervals of 0, 5, 15, and 30 min. Eighty-two patients were enrolled (44 to Benzocaine, 38 to viscous Lidocaine), with each group having a statistically significant improvement in pain (p < 0.001). There were no statistical differences between the Benzocaine and viscous Lidocaine groups in terms of the relief of symptoms at each of the assessment times. There were no adverse outcomes in either group.

  13. Orchestrating change: The thyroid hormones and GI-tract development in flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A S; Alves, R N; Rønnestad, I; Power, D M

    2015-09-01

    Metamorphosis in flatfish (Pleuronectiformes) is a late post-embryonic developmental event that prepares the organism for the larval-to-juvenile transition. Thyroid hormones (THs) play a central role in flatfish metamorphosis and the basic elements that constitute the thyroid axis in vertebrates are all present at this stage. The advantage of using flatfish to study the larval-to-juvenile transition is the profound change in external morphology that accompanies metamorphosis making it easy to track progression to climax. This important lifecycle transition is underpinned by molecular, cellular, structural and functional modifications of organs and tissues that prepare larvae for a successful transition to the adult habitat and lifestyle. Understanding the role of THs in the maturation of organs and tissues with diverse functions during metamorphosis is a major challenge. The change in diet that accompanies the transition from a pelagic larvae to a benthic juvenile in flatfish is associated with structural and functional modifications in the gastrointestinal tract (GI-tract). The present review will focus on the maturation of the GI-tract during metamorphosis giving particular attention to organogenesis of the stomach a TH triggered event. Gene transcripts and biological processes that are associated with GI-tract maturation during Atlantic halibut metamorphosis are identified. Gene ontology analysis reveals core biological functions and putative TH-responsive genes that underpin TH-driven metamorphosis of the GI-tract in Atlantic halibut. Deciphering the specific role remains a challenge. Recent advances in characterizing the molecular, structural and functional modifications that accompany the appearance of a functional stomach in Atlantic halibut are considered and future research challenges identified.

  14. A Novel Allosteric Activator of Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor Displays Unique Gi-functional Bias*

    PubMed Central

    Bolognini, Daniele; Moss, Catherine E.; Nilsson, Karolina; Petersson, Annika U.; Donnelly, Iona; Sergeev, Eugenia; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Miller, Ashley; Dekker, Niek; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The short chain fatty acid receptor FFA2 is able to stimulate signaling via both Gi- and Gq/G11-promoted pathways. These pathways are believed to control distinct physiological end points but FFA2 receptor ligands appropriate to test this hypothesis have been lacking. Herein, we characterize AZ1729, a novel FFA2 regulator that acts as a direct allosteric agonist and as a positive allosteric modulator, increasing the activity of the endogenously produced short chain fatty acid propionate in Gi-mediated pathways, but not at those transduced by Gq/G11. Using AZ1729 in combination with direct inhibitors of Gi and Gq/G11 family G proteins demonstrated that although both arms contribute to propionate-mediated regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling in FFA2-expressing 293 cells, the Gq/G11-mediated pathway is predominant. We extend these studies by employing AZ1729 to dissect physiological FFA2 signaling pathways. The capacity of AZ1729 to act at FFA2 receptors to inhibit β-adrenoreceptor agonist-promoted lipolysis in primary mouse adipocytes and to promote chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils confirmed these as FFA2 processes mediated by Gi signaling, whereas, in concert with blockade by the Gq/G11 inhibitor FR900359, the inability of AZ1729 to mimic or regulate propionate-mediated release of GLP-1 from mouse colonic preparations defined this physiological response as an end point transduced via activation of Gq/G11. PMID:27385588

  15. Forskolin-free cAMP assay for Gi-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gilissen, Julie; Geubelle, Pierre; Dupuis, Nadine; Laschet, Céline; Pirotte, Bernard; Hanson, Julien

    2015-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most successful receptor family for treating human diseases. Many are poorly characterized with few ligands reported or remain completely orphans. Therefore, there is a growing need for screening-compatible and sensitive assays. Measurement of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels is a validated strategy for measuring GPCRs activation. However, agonist ligands for Gi-coupled receptors are difficult to track because inducers such as forskolin (FSK) must be used and are sources of variations and errors. We developed a method based on the GloSensor system, a kinetic assay that consists in a luciferase fused with cAMP binding domain. As a proof of concept, we selected the succinate receptor 1 (SUCNR1 or GPR91) which could be an attractive drug target. It has never been validated as such because very few ligands have been described. Following analyses of SUCNR1 signaling pathways, we show that the GloSensor system allows real time, FSK-free detection of an agonist effect. This FSK-free agonist signal was confirmed on other Gi-coupled receptors such as CXCR4. In a test screening on SUCNR1, we compared the results obtained with a FSK vs FSK-free protocol and were able to identify agonists with both methods but with fewer false positives when measuring the basal levels. In this report, we validate a cAMP-inducer free method for the detection of Gi-coupled receptors agonists compatible with high-throughput screening. This method will facilitate the study and screening of Gi-coupled receptors for active ligands.

  16. Using an ‘action set’ for the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Charles; Hamilton, Mark; Epstein, Owen; Negus, Rupert; Peachey, Tim; Kaul, Arvind; O’Beirne, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: We studied the management of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (AUGIB) at the Royal Free Hospital. The aim was to compare our performance with the national standard and determine ways of improving the delivery of care in accordance with the recently published ‘Scope for improvement’ report. Methods: We randomly selected patients who presented with haematemesis, melaena, or both, and had an oesophageogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) between April and October 2009. We developed local guidelines and presented our findings in various forums. We collaborated with the British Medical Journal’s Evidence Centre and Cerner Millennium electronic patient record system to create an electronic ‘Action Set’ for the management of patients presenting with AUGIB. We re-audited using the same standard and target. Results: With the action set, documentation of pre-OGD Rockall scores increased significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). The differences in the calculation and documentation of post-OGD full Rockall scores were also significant between the two audit loops (p = 0.007). Patients who inappropriately received proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) before endoscopy were reduced from 73.8% to 33% (p = 0.02). Patients receiving PPIs after OGD were also reduced from 66% to 50% (p = 0.01). Discharges of patients whose full Rockall score was less than or equal to two increased from 40% to 100% (p = 0.43). Conclusion: The use of the Action Set improved calculation and documentation of risk scores and facilitated earlier hospital discharge for low-risk patients. Significant improvements were also seen in inappropriate use of PPIs. Actions sets can improve guideline adherence and can potentially promote cost-cutting and improve health economics. PMID:24179478

  17. Bromelain-induced apoptosis in GI-101A breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dhandayuthapani, Sivanesan; Perez, Honey Diaz; Paroulek, Alexandra; Chinnakkannu, Panneerselvam; Kandalam, Umadevi; Jaffe, Mark; Rathinavelu, Appu

    2012-04-01

    Bromelain is a proteolytic enzyme extracted from the stems and the immature fruits of pineapple that was found to be antitumorigenic in different in vitro models. Bromelain has been reported to promote apoptosis, particularly in breast cancer cells, with the up-regulation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 kinase. Our study was designed to determine if bromelain could induce apoptosis in GI-101A breast cancer cells. GI-101A cells were treated with increasing concentrations of bromelain for 24 hours. The effect of bromelain for inducing cell death via activation of the apoptosis mechanism in GI-101A cells was further determined by using caspase-9 and caspase-3 assays along with the M30-Apoptosense assay to measure cytokeratin 18 (CK18) levels in the cytoplasm of the cultured cancer cells. A dose-dependent increase in the activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 coinciding with elevation of CK18 levels was found in bromelain-treated cells compared with control cells. Furthermore, the apoptosis induction by bromelain was confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis and 4,6'-diamino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride fluorescence staining of the nucleus. Our results indicate an increase in apoptosis-related cell death in breast cancer cells with increasing concentrations of bromelain.

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of the Sex Determination Gene MeGI in Polyploid Persimmon[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takashi; Tao, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation can add a flexible layer to genetic variation, potentially enabling long-term but reversible cis-regulatory changes to an allele while maintaining its DNA sequence. Here, we present a case in which alternative epigenetic states lead to reversible sex determination in the hexaploid persimmon Diospyros kaki. Previously, we elucidated the molecular mechanism of sex determination in diploid persimmon and demonstrated the action of a Y-encoded sex determinant pseudogene called OGI, which produces small RNAs targeting the autosomal gene MeGI, resulting in separate male and female individuals (dioecy). We contrast these findings with the discovery, in hexaploid persimmon, of an additional layer of regulation in the form of DNA methylation of the MeGI promoter associated with the production of both male and female flowers in genetically male trees. Consistent with this model, developing male buds exhibited higher methylation levels across the MeGI promoter than developing female flowers from either monoecious or female trees. Additionally, a DNA methylation inhibitor induced developing male buds to form feminized flowers. Concurrently, in Y-chromosome-carrying trees, the expression of OGI is silenced by the presence of a SINE (short interspersed nuclear element)-like insertion in the OGI promoter. Our findings provide an example of an adaptive scenario involving epigenetic plasticity. PMID:27956470

  19. Emodin augments calcium activated chloride channel in colonic smooth muscle cells by Gi/Go protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Ting-Lou; Lv, Nonghua; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Youxiang; Yang, Jing

    2009-08-01

    Emodin is a natural anthraquinone in rhubarb. It has been identified as a prokinetic drug for gastrointestinal motility in Chinese traditional medicine. Emodin contracts smooth muscle by increasing the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+). In many smooth muscles, increasing intracellular Ca(2+) activates Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (ClCA). The study was aimed to investigate the effects of emodin on ClCA channels in colonic smooth muscle. 4 channel physiology signal acquire system was used to measure isometric contraction of smooth muscle strips. ClCA currents were recorded by EPC10 with perforated whole cell model. Emodin contracted strips and cells in colonic smooth muscle and augmented ClCA currents. Niflumic acid (NFA) and 4', 4'-diisothiostilbene-2, 2-disulfonic acid (DIDS) blocked the effects. Gi/Go protein inhibits protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), and PKA and PKC reduced ClCA currents. Pertussis toxin (PTX, a special inhibitor of Gi/Go protein), 8-bromoadenosine 38, 58-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, a membrane-permeant protein kinase A activator) and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a membrane-permeant protein kinase C activator) inhibited the effects on ClCA currents significantly. Our findings suggest that emodin augments ClCA channels to contract smooth muscle in colon, and the effect is induced mostly by enhancement of membrane Gi/Go protein signal transducer pathway.

  20. Antifibrinolytics (lysine analogues) for the prevention of bleeding in people with haematological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Desborough, Michael; Brunskill, Susan J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    . Main results We identified three new studies in this update of the review. In total seven studies were eligible for inclusion, three were ongoing RCTs and four were completed studies. The four completed studies were included in the original review and the three ongoing studies were included in this update. We did not identify any RCTs that compared TXA with EACA. Of the four completed studies, one cross-over TXA study (eight participants) was excluded from the outcome analysis because it had very flawed study methodology. Data from the other three studies were all at unclear risk of bias due to lack of reporting of study methodology. Three studies (two TXA (12 to 56 participants), one EACA (18 participants) reported in four articles (published 1983 to 1995) were included in the narrative review. All three studies compared the drug with placebo. All three studies included adults with acute leukaemia receiving chemotherapy. One study (12 participants) only included participants with acute promyelocytic leukaemia. None of the studies included children. One of the three studies reported funding sources and this study was funded by a charity. We are uncertain whether antifibrinolytics reduce the risk of bleeding (three studies; 86 participants; very low-quality evidence). Only one study reported the number of bleeding events per participant and there was no difference in the number of bleeding events seen during induction or consolidation chemotherapy between TXA and placebo (induction; 38 participants; mean difference (MD) 1.70 bleeding events, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.37 to 3.77: consolidation; 18 participants; MD −1.50 bleeding events, 95% CI −3.25 to 0.25; very low-quality evidence). The two other studies suggested bleeding was reduced in the antifibrinolytic study arm, but this was statistically significant in only one of these two studies. Two studies reported thromboembolism and no events occurred (68 participants, very low-quality evidence). All three

  1. Fear of GI Symptoms has an Important Impact on Quality of Life in Patients With Moderate-to-Severe IBS

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Gudleski, Gregory D.; Ma, Chang-Xing; Dewanwala, Akriti; Naliboff, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Because irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional medical condition for which there is no curative therapy, treatment goals emphasize relieving gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and optimizing the quality of life (QOL). This study sought to characterize the magnitude of the associations between QOL impairment, fear of IBS symptoms, and confounding variables. METHODS Subjects included 234 Rome III-diagnosed IBS patients (mean age, 41 years, 79%, female) without comorbid organic GI disease who were referred to two specialty care clinics of an National Institutes of Health trial for IBS. Subjects completed a testing battery that included the IBS-specific QOL (IBS-QOL), SF-12 (generic QOL), the UCLA GI Symptom Severity Scale, the Visceral Sensitivity Index, Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Brief Symptom Inventory. RESULTS Multiple linear regression was used to develop a model for predicting QOL. Data supported an overall model that included sociodemographic, clinical (e.g., current severity of GI symptoms), and psychosocial (e.g., fear of GI symptoms, distress, neuroticism) variables, accounting for 48.7% of the variance in IBS-QOL (F=15.1, P <0.01). GI symptom fear was the most robust predictor of IBS-QOL (β=−0.45 P <0.01), accounting for 14.4% of the total variance. CONCLUSIONS Patients’ fear that GI symptoms have aversive consequences, is a predictor of QOL impairment that cannot be fully explained by the severity of their GI symptoms, overall emotional well-being, neurotic personality style, or other clinical features of IBS. An understanding of the unique impact that GI symptom fears have on QOL can inform treatment planning and help gastroenterologists to better manage more severe IBS patients seen in tertiary care clinics. PMID:25223577

  2. Control of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions by bleed in supersonic mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuda, M. K.; Reshotko, E.; Hingst, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of bleed region geometry and bleed rate on shock wave-boundary layer interactions in an axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet at a Mach number of 2.5. The full realizable reduction in transformed form factor is obtained by bleeding off about half the incident boundary layer mass flow. Bleeding upstream or downstream of the shock-induced pressure rise is preferable to bleeding across the shock-induced pressure rise. Slanted holes are more effective than normal holes. Two different bleed hole sizes were tested without detectable difference in performance.

  3. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-07

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients.

  4. Bleeding Duodenal: Varices Treatment by TIPS and Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Arthurs, Blain; Scheuerman, Christian; Sandoz, Charles; Petersosn, Scott; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wildriodo

    2008-03-15

    We describe our clinical experience in 4 patients with portal hypertension who presented with bleeding mesenteric varices originating from the superior mesenteric vein with retrograde filling of collaterals draining into the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation, imaging findings, and potential therapeutic management are discussed.

  5. Massive posttraumatic bleeding: epidemiology, causes, clinical features, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    Bleeding typically results as a consequence of derangements of primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, or both, and can be dramatically amplified by the presence of other predisposing conditions, especially inherited bleeding disorders. Life-threatening hemorrhages are, however, almost exclusively caused by penetrating wounds, blunt traumas of chest and abdomen, suicide attempts, amputations, bone fractures with concomitant injury to internal organs and blood vessels, and shearing forces from sudden rotation, violent flexion, extension, or deceleration injuries. The pathogenesis of posttraumatic bleeding is complex and multifaceted. The most dramatic phenomenon that always accompanies major hemorrhages is the abrupt and considerable loss of intravascular volume, that further leads to hypovolemic shock, also known as hemorrhagic shock, culminating with peripheral ischemia, especially in those tissues where oxygen delivery is more critical (i.e., central nervous system and myocardium). The mortality rate of severe posttraumatic bleeding can be as high as 50%, especially when an appropriate treatment is not established in a timely manner. The damage control sequence basically entails a four-step approach including damage control surgery, damage control resuscitation with fluid restoration, and hemocomponents administration, as well as correction of the coagulopathy with platelets, antifibrinolytic (e.g., tranexamic acid), and/or procoagulant agents such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrate, or recombinant-activated Factor VII.

  6. The Effect of Ferric Chloride on Superficial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Saeed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Sahba, Sare

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controlling superficial bleeding, despite all the progress in surgical science, is still a challenge in some settings. Objectives: This study assesses the hemostatic effects of ferric chloride and compares it with the standard method (suturing technique) to control superficial bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this animal model study, 60 male Wistar rats were used. An incision, 2 cm long and 0.5 cm deep was made on rat skin and the hemostasis time was recorded using ferric chloride at different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) and then using a control (i.e. control of bleeding by suturing). The skin tissue was examined for pathological changes. Finally, the obtained data were entered into SPSS (ver. 16) and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, and Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: The hemostasis time for the ferric chloride concentration group was significantly less than for the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Ferric chloride may be an effective hemostatic agent to control superficial bleeding in rats. PMID:25825694

  7. Inherited bleeding disorders: a 14-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Eid, Suhair S; Kamal, Nazmi R; Shubeilat, Taisir S; Wael, Abu-Ghoush Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    Congenital bleeding disorders comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that reflect abnormalities of blood vessels, coagulation proteins, and platelets. A 14-year retrospective study (1991-2005) was conducted for patients referred to the coagulation section of the Hematology Department (King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan), who had suffered from bleeding tendencies to assess the prevalence of bleeding disorders among Jordanians and to describe their clinical manifestations. Four hundred and three patients matched our criteria. All patients were screened with routine coagulation assays and a complete blood cell count; a factor assay was performed if indicated by the results of the screening assays. A total of 168 patients (41.6%) were diagnosed with a bleeding disorder caused by a factor deficiency, of which 17.1% were described as hemophilia A (n=69), 6.2% were described as vWD (n=25), and 4.2% were described as hemophilia B (n=17). A subset of the total patient population comprising 14.1% of the patients were diagnosed with a Rare Inherited Coagulation Deficiency (RICD), where 4.0% were FX deficient (n=16), 3.7% were FVII deficient (n=15), 3.7% were FV deficient (n=15), 2.5% were FXI deficient (n=10), and 0.2% were diagnosed with afibrinogenemia (n=1).

  8. Hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding in a trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Laeeq, K.; Cheung, S.; Phillips, B.

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma resulting in rib fractures can be associated with hemothorax, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions or less frequently chest and abdominal wall hematomas. Our case describes the first report of hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding from blunt trauma in a patient on anticoagulation. PMID:28108633

  9. Nasal packing in sphenopalatine artery bleeding: therapeutic or harmful?

    PubMed

    Sireci, F; Speciale, R; Sorrentino, R; Turri-Zanoni, M; Nicolotti, M; Canevari, F R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present our management protocol of sphenopalatine artery bleeding, demonstrating that nasoendoscopic cautery (NC) was a more effective method than the nasal packing, in terms of shorter inpatient stay and reduced complications rate. We present ten posterior epistaxis not resolved by nasal packing. Tabotamp(®) was placed in the area of sphenopalatine foramen and/or in those parts of the posterior nasal cavity, where it was suspected that bleeding origins. In two cases, the bleeding was resolved in this way, instead eight cases needed of subperiosteal cauterization of sphenopalatine artery by Dessi bipolar forceps (MicroFrance(®)). 4 of these 8 patients evidenced a remarkable bleeding removing nasal packing (Hb before-nasal packing = 15 ± 0.69 versus Hb after-nasal packing = 13.3 ± 0.81; t student = 2.94; p value = 0.025). These four patients showed a deviation of the nasal septum ipsilateral to epistaxis, and according our experience, a traumatism of sphenopalatine area can be caused by Merocel(®) nasal packing in this condition. During follow-up, no recurrences of nasal bleeding have been observed in such patients. Nasal packing must be considered if posterior epistaxis is severe, but always taking into account the specific anatomy of patient and in particular septal spurs that can further compromise sphenopalatine artery. In our experience, the endoscopic endonasal cauterization of the sphenopalatine branches represented a safe and effective procedure.

  10. Assessment of multi-modality evaluations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ryan; Varayil, Jithinraj E; WongKeeSong, Louis M; Fidler, Jeff; Fletcher, Joel G; Barlow, John; Alexander, Jeffrey; Rajan, Elizabeth; Hansel, Stephanie; Becker, Brenda; Larson, Joseph J; Enders, Felicity T; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of bleeding source detection in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) after pre-procedure imaging [multiphase computed tomography enterography (MPCTE), video capsule endoscopy (VCE), or both] and assess the impact of imaging on DBE diagnostic yield. METHODS Retrospective cohort study using a prospectively maintained database of all adult patients presenting with OGIB who underwent DBE from September 1st, 2002 to June 30th, 2013 at a single tertiary center. RESULTS Four hundred and ninety five patients (52% females; median age 68 years) underwent DBE for OGIB. AVCE and/or MPCTE performed within 1 year prior to DBE (in 441 patients) increased the diagnostic yield of DBE (67.1% with preceding imaging vs 59.5% without). Using DBE as the gold standard, VCE and MPCTE had a diagnostic yield of 72.7% and 32.5% respectively. There were no increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to VCE (OR = 1.3, P = 0.150). There were increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to MPCTE (OR = 5.9, P < 0.001). In inpatients with overt OGIB, diagnostic yield of DBE was not affected by preceding imaging. CONCLUSION DBE is a safe and well-tolerated procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of OGIB, with a diagnostic yield that may be increased after obtaining a preceding VCE or MPCTE. However, inpatients with active ongoing bleeding may benefit from proceeding directly to antegrade DBE. PMID:28216967

  11. Resuscitation of Polytrauma Patients: The Management of Massive Skeletal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Bertrand, Maria Luisa; Valdes, Luis; Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘severely injured patient’ is often synonymous of polytrauma patient, multiply-injured patient or, in some settings, polyfractured patient. Together with brain trauma, copious bleeding is the most severe complication of polytrauma. Consequently hypotension develop. Then, the perfusion of organs may be compromised, with the risk of organ failure. Treatment of chest bleeding after trauma is essential and is mainly addressed via surgical manoeuvres. As in the case of lesions to the pelvis, abdomen or extremities, this approach demonstrates the application of damage control (DC). The introduction of sonography has dramatically changed the diagnosis and prognosis of abdominal bleeding. In stable patients, a contrast CT-scan should be performed before any x-ray projection, because, in an emergency situation, spinal or pelvic fractures be missed by conventional radiological studies. Fractures or dislocation of the pelvis causing enlargement of the pelvic cavity, provoked by an anteroposterior trauma, and in particular cases presenting vertical instability, are the most severe types and require fast stabilisation by closing the pelvic ring diameter to normal dimensions and by stabilising the vertical shear. Controversy still exists about whether angiography or packing should be used as the first choice to address active bleeding after pelvic ring closure. Pelvic angiography plays a significant complementary role to pelvic packing for final haemorrhage control. Apart from pelvic trauma, fracture of the femur is the only fracture provoking acute life-threatening bleeding. If possible, femur fractures should be immobilised immediately, either by external fixation or by a sheet wrap around both extremities. PMID:26312112

  12. Comparison of Bypassing Agents in Bleeding Reduction in Treatment of Bleeding Episodes in Patients With Haemophilia and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Mina; Eshghi, Peyman; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Cheraghali, Abdol Majid; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Imani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mild-to-moderate bleeding disorders in haemophilia are primarily treated via recombinant activated factor VII a (rFVIIa) or activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC). However, the efficacy of each bypassing agents may vary and none of them is universally effective. Evidence Acquisition: After reviewing the databases of PubMed, Scopus, MD Consult, Ovid, Trip database, Google Scholar, ProQuest and the Cochrane Library, finally, 17 papers published from 2000 to 2013 were extracted. We used as a random effect model in meta-analysis. Comprehensive meta-analysis (CMA) software was used for calculating and estimating the mean of bleeding reduction and performing meta-analysis. Results: The mean of bleeding reduction in aPCC and rFVIIa were 71.2% with CI 95% (lower limit 86.8% and upper limit 82%) and 72.3% with CI 95% (lower limit 57.6% and upper limit 83.4%), respectively. Conclusions: Although differences between the two products were very close to each other, they reported similar effects on joint bleeds. Further clinical studies should be performed by incorporating a standardized measurement in comparative efficacy of aPCC and rFVIIa. PMID:25763245

  13. Endoscopic resection is effective for the treatment of bleeding gastric hyperplastic polyps in patients with and without cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew; Ganger, Daniel; Keswani, Rajesh; Grande, David; Komanduri, Srinadh

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) have been identified as a cause of transfusion-dependent iron-deficiency anemia (tIDA) and transfusion-dependent gastrointestinal bleeding and are commonly identified in the setting of cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endoscopic resection (ER) for the treatment of tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding due to GHP in patients with and without liver disease. Patients and methods: This was a single-center retrospective review. The primary outcome was clinical success of ER (no transfusion or repeat ER in the following 6 months after first ER). Secondary outcomes included technical success, recurrence of GHP with tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding, and adverse events (AEs). Results: Sixty-three patients with GHP were included of whom 20 (31 %) had cirrhosis. The majority with cirrhosis presented with gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 13, 65 %, P = 0.52), whereas the majority of non-cirrhotics presented with tIDA (n = 30, 70 %, P = 0.01). Technical success was 100 % with no AEs. The clinical success rate was 94 % (95 % in cirrhotics, 93 % in non-cirrhotics, P = 0.46). The recurrence rate was 32 % (40 % in cirrhotics and 28 % in non-cirrhotics, P = 0.35) with mean time to recurrence of 17.3 ± 13.9 months (P = 0.22). Of those with recurrence, 75 % had no further tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding after repeat ER (mean follow-up 20 ±11 months). Conclusions: ER is an effective treatment for GHP that causes tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with GHP and cirrhosis tend to present with bleeding rather than anemia and have more frequent recurrence. Symptomatic recurrence of GHP is common and should be recognized early as repeat ER appears to be effective. PMID:27540576

  14. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health.

  15. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health. PMID:23752350

  16. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: recommendations by the Hemostasis Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) and the Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research (GTH).

    PubMed

    Appelmann, Iris; Kreher, Stephan; Parmentier, Stefani; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Bisping, Guido; Kirschner, Martin; Bergmann, Frauke; Schilling, Kristina; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Petrides, Petro E; Tiede, Andreas; Matzdorff, Axel; Griesshammer, Martin; Riess, Hanno; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematologic malignancies. The quality of life, morbidity, and mortality of patients with MPN are primarily affected by disease-related symptoms, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications, and progression to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. Major bleeding represents a common and important complication in MPN, and the incidence of such bleeding events will become even more relevant in the future due to the increasing disease prevalence and survival of MPN patients. This review discusses the causes, differential diagnoses, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in patients with MPN, aiming at defining updated standards of care in these often challenging situations.

  17. Standardizing the descriptive terminology of abnormal menstrual bleeding: it is time we talk the same talk.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Steven R

    2007-03-01

    The movement towards international standardization of the terminology used to describe abnormal uterine bleeding and of the definition that sets the boundaries of normal menstrual bleeding will greatly benefit clinicians and researchers.

  18. Control of shock wave-boundary layer interactions by bleed in supersonic mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuda, M. K.; Hingst, W. G.; Reshotko, E.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of bleed on a shock wave-boundary layer interaction in an axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet. The inlet was designed for a free-stream Mach number of 2.50 with 60-percent supersonic internal area contraction. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The effects of bleed amount and bleed geometry on the boundary layer after a shock wave-boundary layer interaction were studied. The effect of bleed on the transformed form factor is such that the full realizable reduction is obtained by bleeding of a mass flow equal to about one-half of the incident boundary layer mass flow. More bleeding does not yield further reduction. Bleeding upstream or downstream of the shock-induced pressure rise is preferable to bleeding across the shock-induced pressure rise.

  19. Development of an Online Library of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Gastroenterology: The GI-PRO Database

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Puja; Agarwal, Nikhil; Khanna, Dinesh; Hays, Ron D.; Chang, Lin; Bolus, Roger; Melmed, Gil; Whitman, Cynthia B.; Kaplan, Robert M.; Ogawa, Rikke; Snyder, Bradley; Spiegel, Brennan M.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Because gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses can cause physical, emotional, and social distress, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used to guide clinical decision making, conduct research, and seek drug approval. It is important to develop a mechanism for identifying, categorizing, and evaluating the over 100 GI PROs that exist. Here we describe a new, National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported, online PRO clearinghouse—the GI-PRO database. METHODS Using a protocol developed by the NIH Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS®), we performed a systematic review to identify English-language GI PROs. We abstracted PRO items and developed an online searchable item database. We categorized symptoms into content “bins” to evaluate a framework for GI symptom reporting. Finally, we assigned a score for the methodological quality of each PRO represented in the published literature (0–20 range; higher indicates better). RESULTS We reviewed 15,697 titles (κ > 0.6 for title and abstract selection), from which we identified 126 PROs. Review of the PROs revealed eight GI symptom “bins”: (i) abdominal pain, (ii) bloat/gas, (iii) diarrhea, (iv) constipation, (v) bowel incontinence/soilage, (vi) heartburn/reflux, (vii) swallowing, and (viii) nausea/vomiting. In addition to these symptoms, the PROs covered four psychosocial domains: (i) behaviors, (ii) cognitions, (iii) emotions, and (iv) psychosocial impact. The quality scores were generally low (mean 8.88±4.19; 0 (min)−20 (max)). In addition, 51% did not include patient input in developing the PRO, and 41% provided no information on score interpretation. CONCLUSIONS GI PROs cover a wide range of biopsychosocial symptoms. Although plentiful, GI PROs are limited by low methodological quality. Our online PRO library (www.researchcore.org/gipro/) can help in selecting PROs for clinical and research purposes. PMID:24343547

  20. Implementing the Post-9/11 GI Bill: Lessons Learned and Emerging Issues. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    On August 1, 2009, the most generous veterans education benefit program since the original post-World War II GI Bill went into effect. The Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act, popularly known as the Post-9/11 GI Bill, pays for up to 100 percent of a veteran's tuition/required fees at a state college/university depending on the veteran's…

  1. Service Members in School: Military Veterans’ Experiences Using the Post-9/11 GI Bill and Pursuing Postsecondary Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    predictions (Simon, Negrusa, & Warner, 2009; Yeung, Pint, & Williams, 2009), the Post-9/11 GI Bill did appear to influence the higher education choices of...group, because a few participants may inadver- tently dominate or influence the direc- tion of the conversation, resulting in convergence around...quarter of survey respondents (23.5 percent) said the existence of the new GI Bill had been a major influence on their decision to enroll in

  2. Comparison of thrombin generation assay with conventional coagulation tests in evaluation of bleeding risk in patients with rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, Omid R; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Dehghani, Javad; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Peyvandi, Flora; Karimi, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    Based on the premise that the capacity of plasma to generate thrombin in vitro is a comprehensive and precise functional test of the clotting system, we designed a cross-sectional, single-center study involving 83 patients with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) to compare the usefulness of the thrombin generation (TG) assay versus conventional tests including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) in predicting bleeding risk in patients with RBD in southern Iran. The TG parameters consisted of endogenous thrombin potential, lag time, peak, time to peak (ttPeak), and start tail. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed statistically significant associations between bleeding risk and lag time, ttPeak, and start tail. We determined cutoff values for these 3 TG parameters and obtained a negative predictive value of 86% to 90% in patients with RBD who had a bleeding score (BS) ≤13. The ROC curves for the association of PT and aPTT with BS did not indicate any significant association. Correlation analysis supported the results of ROC curve analysis, only lag time, ttPeak, and start tail showed significant positive correlations with BS (P < .05). Disease severity based on plasma factor activity was significantly associated with prolonged lag time and ttPeak and with prolonged PT (P <.05). We suggest that TG assay is a potentially more useful tool for predicting the bleeding risk in patients with RBD. However, the small sample size in different RBD subgroups precluded subgroup analysis. Prospective multicenter studies with larger numbers of patients are therefore advisable.

  3. Risk of bleeding and antibiotic use in patients receiving continuous phenprocoumon therapy. A case-control study nested in a large insurance- and population-based German cohort.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sascha; Ihle, Peter; Harder, Sebastian; Schubert, Ingrid

    2014-05-05

    There is major concern about coumarins interacting with various drug classes and increasing the risk of overanticoagulation. The aim of the study was to assess bleeding risk in patients with concurrent use of antibiotics and phenprocoumon, the most widely prescribed coumarin in many European countries. We conducted a nested-case-control study within a cohort of 513,338 incident and continuous phenprocoumon users ≥ 18 years of age using claims data of the statutory health insurance company AOK, covering 30% of the German population. Bleeding risk associated with current use of antibiotics for systemic use (antibacterials/antimycotics) was calculated using conditional logistic regression in 13,785 cases with a bleeding event and 55,140 risk-set sampling-matched controls. Bleeding risk associated with any antibacterial use in phenprocoumon users was significantly increased [odds ratio (OR) 2.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.20-2.56]. The association was stronger for gastrointestinal than for cerebral bleeding (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.84-2.38 and OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.74, respectively) and highest for other/unspecified bleeding (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.62-3.26). Specific antibiotic classes were strongly associated with bleeding risk, e.g. cotrimoxazole (OR 3.86, 95% CI 3.08-4.84) and fluorquinolones (OR 3.13, 95% CI 2.74-3.59), among those highest for ofloxacin (OR 5.00, 95% CI 3.01-8.32). Combined use of phenprocoumon and antimycotics was not significantly associated with bleeding risk. Risk was not significantly modified by age (pint=0.25) or sex (pint=0.96). The association was stronger the closer the antibiotic exposure was to the bleeding event. Among continuous phenprocoumon users, antibiotics - particularly quinolones and cotrimoxazole - should be prescribed after careful consideration due to an increased bleeding risk. Close monitoring of international normalised ratio levels after prescription is recommended.

  4. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1500 ml; group B, 1500 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1700 ml; group C, 1700 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 2000 ml. Then, coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P < 0.001). Fibrinogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets strikingly decreased, whereas prothrombin time and APTT values significantly increased with bleeding amounts in both quick and slow-bleeding groups. Interestingly, compared with slow-bleeding patients, coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  5. Efficacy of eltrombopag in management of bleeding symptoms associated with chronic immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Michael D; Fogarty, Patrick; Mayer, Bhabita; Vasey, Sandra Y; Brainsky, Andres

    2013-04-01

    Bleeding is of particular clinical importance in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), which involves impaired platelet production and accelerated destruction. We report the first comprehensive analysis of the impact of eltrombopag on bleeding in five clinical studies of adult chronic ITP: two 6-week phase 2 (TRA100773A) and phase 3 (TRA100773B) studies; a 6-month phase 3 study (RAISE); a phase 2 repeat-dose study (REPEAT); and a phase 3 extension study (EXTEND). Bleeding was assessed using the World Health Organization Bleeding Scale and categorized as no bleeding (grade 0), any bleeding (grades 1-4), and clinically significant bleeding (grades 2-4). Bleeding was also assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Across all studies, bleeding at baseline ranged from 50 to 73% for eltrombopag-treated patients; by week 2, bleeding had decreased, ranging from 26 to 39%. This trend was maintained throughout treatment. Similar results were observed for clinically significant bleeding. No such trend was seen in placebo-treated patients for any bleeding or clinically significant bleeding. For TRA100773B and RAISE, the odds of any bleeding across the entire treatment period were 51 and 76% lower for eltrombopag-treated versus placebo-treated patients (P=0.021, P<0.001). The odds of clinically significant bleeding in RAISE were 65% lower (P<0.001). In conclusion, analysis of prospective data from five clinical studies demonstrates that eltrombopag significantly reduces bleeding in adult patients with chronic ITP.

  6. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal iliac artery resulting in massive per-rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, T.I.; Gillespie, C.J.; Butcher, W.; Lu, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is a common reason for presentation to hospital, with large bleeds most commonly caused by diverticular disease and angiodysplasia. Here we present an unusual aetiology of massive per-rectal bleeding attributable to pseudoaneurysm of the internal iliac artery leading to an arterial fistula to the distal large bowel. It is hoped the case will serve as a reminder that rectal bleeding can have a less common aetiology. PMID:24964318

  7. Characterization of the frequency and nature of bleed air contamination events in commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Shehadi, M; Jones, B; Hosni, M

    2016-06-01

    Contamination of the bleed air used to pressurize and ventilate aircraft cabins is of concern due to the potential health and safety hazards for passengers and crew. Databases from the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, and other sources were examined in detail to determine the frequency of bleed air contamination incidents. The frequency was examined on an aircraft model basis with the intent of identifying aircraft make and models with elevated frequencies of contamination events. The reported results herein may help investigators to focus future studies of bleed air contamination incidents on smaller number of aircrafts. Incident frequency was normalized by the number of aircraft, number of flights, and flight hours for each model to account for the large variations in the number of aircraft of different models. The focus of the study was on aircraft models that are currently in service and are used by major airlines in the United States. Incidents examined in this study include those related to smoke, oil odors, fumes, and any symptom that might be related to exposure to such contamination, reported by crew members, between 2007 and 2012, for US-based carriers for domestic flights and all international flights that either originated or terminated in the US. In addition to the reported frequency of incidents for different aircraft models, the analysis attempted to identify propulsion engines and auxiliary power units associated with aircrafts that had higher frequencies of incidents. While substantial variations were found in frequency of incidents, it was found that the contamination events were widely distributed across nearly all common models of aircraft.

  8. Gastrointestinal bleed after left ventricular assist device implantation: incidence, management, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Laura; Holley, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have become the standard of care for patients with end-stage heart failure (HF). While these devices have improved durability compared to earlier generation left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), increased frequency in some complications has been seen, including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), pump thrombosis and hemolysis. We discuss the incidence, management and prevention of GIB after CF-LVAD implantation. Methods We reviewed the current literature available on the incidence, management and prevention of GIB after CF-LVAD implantation with a focus on our experience at the University of Minnesota, with data on nearly 300 patients who received a CF-LVAD from 2005 to 2013. Results The incidence of GIB after CF-LVAD varies between 18-40% in numerous studies. At the University of Minnesota, out of 233 patients who underwent HeartMate II (HMII) implantation between 2005-2013, 60 GIB episodes occurred in 51 patients (22%), with an event rate of 0.17 gastrointestinal bleeds/patient-year of support. The etiology of GIB appears to be multifactorial. The main factors which have been identified include the need for chronic anticoagulation, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, platelet dysfunction and increased incidence of arteriovenous malformations due to chronic low pulse pressure. When managing an LVAD patient with GIB, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed. The main goals of treatment are evaluating the location and severity of the bleed, holding anti-coagulants and resuscitation to maintain stable hemodynamics. Conclusions GIB is a complication with considerable morbidity. Future efforts to further understand the etiology of GIB and optimize anti-coagulation are needed to improve outcomes following CF-LVAD implantation. PMID:25452907

  9. Giα and Gβ subunits both define selectivity of G protein activation by α2-adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Scott K.; Gilman, Alfred G.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of the specificity of receptor interactions with G protein subunits in living cells have relied on measurements of second messengers or other downstream responses. We have examined the selectivity of interactions between α2-adrenergic receptors (α2R) and various combinations of Giα and Gβ subunit isoforms by measuring changes in FRET between Giα–yellow fluorescent protein and cyan fluorescent protein–Gβ chimeras in HeLa cells. All combinations of Giα1, -2, or -3 with Gβ1, -2, or -4 were activated to some degree by endogenous α2Rs as judged by agonist-dependent decreases in FRET. The degree of G protein activation is determined by the combination of Giα and Gβ subunits rather than by the identity of an individual subunit. RT-PCR analysis and small interfering RNA knockdown of α2R subtypes, followed by quantification of radiolabeled antagonist binding, demonstrated that HeLa cells express α2a- and α2b-adrenergic receptor isoforms in a 2:1 ratio. Increasing receptor number by overexpression of the α2aR subtype minimized the differences among coupling preferences for Giα and Gβ isoforms. The molecular properties of each Giα, Gβ, and α2-adrenergic receptor subtype influence signaling efficiency for the α2-adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:16371464

  10. Bleeding risk of terminally ill patients hospitalized in palliative care units: the RHESO study.

    PubMed

    Tardy, B; Picard, S; Guirimand, F; Chapelle, C; Danel Delerue, M; Celarier, T; Ciais, J-F; Vassal, P; Salas, S; Filbet, M; Gomas, J-M; Guillot, A; Gaultier, J-B; Merah, A; Richard, A; Laporte, S; Bertoletti, L

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Bleeding incidence as hemorrhagic risk factors are unknown in palliative care inpatients. We conducted a multicenter observational study (22 Palliative Care Units, 1199 patients). At three months, the cumulative incidence of clinically relevant bleeding was 9.8%. Cancer, recent bleeding, thromboprophylaxis and antiplatelet therapy were independent risk factors.

  11. Protein kinase C involvement in homologous desensitization of delta-opioid receptor coupled to Gi1-phospholipase C activation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Miyamae, T; Hayashi, C; Watanabe, S; Fukushima, N; Sasaki, Y; Iwamura, T; Misu, Y

    1995-11-01

    We have developed the coexpression system of both delta-opioid receptor (DOR1) and M2-muscarinic receptor (M2) which mediate agonist-evoked currents due to common post-receptor mechanisms including Gi1 and phospholipase C (PLC) activation in Xenopus oocytes reconstituted with Gi1 alpha. The DOR1-currents by 100 nM D-Ser2-leu-enkephalin-Thr6 (DSLET) were selectively desensitized by 10 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The PMA-desensitization of DSLET-currents was abolished in the presence of calphostin C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, or reversed by an intracellular injection of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase 2B. When a higher concentration (3 microM) of DSLET was used, DSLET-currents were rapidly desensitized by repeated challenges of DSLET itself. However, repeated challenges of 10 microM ACh caused no influence on such DSLET- or M2-currents. The desensitization of DSLET-currents was selectively reversed by protein kinase C inhibitors. Similar results were also obtained with various delta-opioid agonists. These results suggest that protein kinase C is involved in the homologous desensitization of delta-opioid receptors.

  12. Psychological Factors in 155 Patients with Functional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, W. A.

    1965-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-five women with functional uterine bleeding were studied to evaluate the importance of concomitant psychological disorders. Psychological illnesses were diagnosed in 128 patients (82.6%), most of which arose from problems directly related to sexual or reproductive functions. The remaining 27 patients (17.4%) were different in that they were psychologically stable and all but two were at puberty or approaching the menopause. Histological studies of endometrial samples from 135 of these patients indicated little evidence of abnormal sex hormone activity; 77 (57%) showed normal secretory phase endometrium and 32 (23.7%), proliferative phase endometrium. The remaining 26 (19.2%) showed evidence of some endocrine dysfunction, 15 such specimens being obtained from psychologically stable patients. It is probable that psychological disturbances are the principal cause of functional uterine bleeding during the prime reproductive years. The psychological component of the illness is the most important and determines the ultimate prognosis. PMID:14261152

  13. [Bleeding after extracorporeal circulation and epsilon-aminocaproic acid].

    PubMed

    Saussine, M; Delpech, S; Allien, M; Grolleau, D; Daures, M F; Coulon, P; Chaptal, P A

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the efficacy of epsilon aminocaproic acid in reducing bleeding after extracorporeal circulation for aorto-coronary bypass grafting, a double blind study was carried out in 57 patients. The efficiency of epsilon aminocaproic acid was assessed by the fibrinolytic activity as measured by a Von Kaulla test one hour after injection of protamine, by the amount of blood transfusions required and by the measurement of blood losses between the end of the injection of protamine and transfer of the patient to the intensive care unit, and then during the first 24 h following operation. No significant difference (p less than 0.05) between the group of treated patients and the group with placebo could be found concerning the postoperative bleeding, the amount of blood transfusions necessary and the occurrence of fibrinolysis. It was therefore concluded that there was no reason to routinely use epsilon aminocaproic acid after aorto-coronary bypass grafting.

  14. [Massive Upper Airway Bleeding: A Rare Case of Aortobronchial Fistula].

    PubMed

    Gudiel Arriaza, Paola; Sánchez Serrano, Amparo; Marques do Vale, Jorge; Gil Pereira, Isabel; Simões Torres, António; Martín Sánchez, Maria José

    2016-06-01

    Clinical presentation of haemoptysis and haematemesis often generates confusion, becoming a difficult task to determine the source of upper airway bleeding. Aortobronchial fistula is a rare entity, but has been a reported complication in patients that have undergone aortic vascular surgery. A high clinical suspicion is fundamental to making this diagnosis. A 69 year old male, with a previous diagnosis of chronic gastritis, is admitted to the emergency room for vomiting blood. In the first 24 hours after admission, the patient develops respiratory insufficiency after an episode of massive bleeding from his mouth. A computed tomography is performed, which shows a descending thoracic aortic aneurism and signs of aortobronchial fistula. Urgent thoracic endovascular repair was performed. Early symptoms of aortobronchial fistulae are nonspecific which complicates the diagnosis and can lead to treatment delay. The use of bronchoscopy in these cases is controversial.

  15. Abnormal uterine bleeding induced by glucocorticoid treatment for pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaobo; Feng, Hui; Jiang, Lu; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the first-line treatment option for pemphigus. Moreover, abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a rarely reported side effect of glucocorticoid treatment that usually manifests as abnormal and excessive endometrial bleeding; in fact, AUB can be induced by the systemic or topical application of glucocorticoids. In the present report, we describe the cases of 3 patients with pemphigus who developed AUB following glucocorticoid administration. It is important to note that the administration mode of glucocorticoids, and the onset time and duration of AUB differed among these patients. Thus, we propose the following treatment algorithm for AUB following glucocorticoid administration: 1. perform a gynecological and physical examination to exclude organic diseases. 2. continue glucocorticoid treatment. 3. if AUB persists, change the mode of administration of glucocorticoids. 4. if AUB still persists, despite these measures, completely withdraw treatment with glucocorticoids and use non-glucocorticoid treatments. PMID:27570861

  16. Emergency management of bleeding esophageal varices: Drugs, bands or sleep?

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Brian M; Lee, Samuel S

    2006-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of cirrhosis leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding has improved dramatically since the era of the mechanical balloon tamponade. These advances include endoscopic band ligation or sclerotherapy, and vasoactive pharmacological options such as somatostatin, octreotide, vasopressin and terlipressin. Evidence from a multitude of clinical trials and meta-analyses comparing endoscopic and pharmacological treatments suggests near equivalence in efficacy for initial hemostasis, mortality and rate of rebleeding. This raises the question of whether on-call gastroenterologists should be performing emergency endoscopic treatment in the middle of the night or start pharmacological treatment and delay endoscopy until optimal patient and working conditions the next morning. The present review analyzes the available comparative data between endoscopic and pharmacological treatment options. Although the literature cannot yet definitively answer the question posed, the authors suggest that delaying endoscopic treatment until the next morning may be the most reasonable practical approach. PMID:16550260

  17. Are Pediatricians Complicit in Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding?

    PubMed

    Weddle, Melissa; Empey, Allison; Crossen, Eric; Green, Aaron; Green, Joy; Phillipi, Carrie A

    2015-10-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all newborns receive a single dose of intramuscular vitamin K to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding. How should the clinician respond when parents decline vitamin K? Although vitamin K deficiency bleeding can have devastating sequelae, they are uncommon; therefore, parents are generally allowed to decline vitamin K after counseling is provided. When parents ask for a vitamin K preparation of unproven effectiveness, should the clinician honor that request? To address these questions, we present a case of a healthy newborn whose parents declined intramuscular vitamin K and requested an oral preparation. Two general pediatricians discuss the medical and ethical issues these situations pose, and the parents describe their experience.

  18. Hemorrhagic Shock as Complication of Intramural Intestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Mohamed Ali; Mhajba, Walid; Doghri, Hamdi Hamdène; Hassouna, Malek; Hechmi, Youssef Zied El; Jerbi, Zouheir; Ben Hassen, Ines; Daghfous, Mohamed Habib

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Mural intestinal hematoma (MIH) is an uncommon complication of anticoagulant therapy. Hemorrhagic shock has been rarely reported as a revealing modality. Results. We report two cases of shock induced by mural intestinal hematoma in patients under oral anticoagulant for aortic prosthetic valve and atrial fibrillation. Patients were admitted to the ICU for gastrointestinal tract bleeding associated with hemodynamic instability. After resuscitation, an abdominal CT scan has confirmed the diagnosis showing an extensive hematoma. Medical treatment was sufficient and there was no need for surgery. Conclusion. Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with shock in patients treated by oral anticoagulant should alert physicians to research a probable MIH. Urgent diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment can avoid surgical interventions. PMID:28299212

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  20. [Guidelines of treatment for non-bleeding peptic ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Cheung, Dae Young; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Song, Ho June; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2009-11-01

    Over the past century, since the introduction of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), antacid, histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RA), proton pump inhibitors (PPI), and discovery of Helicobacter pylori infection, the paradigm of peptic ulcer disease has changed with marked decrease in morbidity and mortality. However, peptic ulcer disease still occupies a position as a major health problem with increase of aged population and NSAIDs usage. In daily general practice, the management of peptic ulcer disease is directed according to the presence of bleeding or not. For non-bleeding peptic ulcer disease, proper acid suppression and the correction of underlying causes such as Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAID use is the main stay of treatment. Though a complete understanding of pathophysiology and a perfect treatment strategy are still a challenge, this guideline aims to provide practical recommendations based on evidences or consensus of experts through in-depth literature review and expert meeting.

  1. An update on the management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Lourdes; Tandon, Puneeta; Abraldes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    The mortality rate in acute variceal haemorrhage remains high (around 15%). Treatment is based on the combined use of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic band ligation, and prophylactic antibiotics. Effective resuscitation (haemostasis, volume management) is essential to prevent complications. Treatment failure is best managed by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Balloon tamponade or specifically designed covered oesophageal stents can be used as a bridge to definitive therapy in unstable patients. Early, pre-emptive TIPS should be the first choice in patients at high risk of treatment failure (Child-Pugh B with active bleeding or Child-Pugh C<14). This article reviews the most recent advances in the management of variceal bleeding and discusses the recent recommendations of the Baveno VI consensus conference.

  2. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    PubMed

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed.

  3. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  4. Capsule Endoscopy in the Assessment of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palimaka, S; Blackhouse, Gord; Goeree, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Small-bowel capsule endoscopy is a tool used to visualize the small bowel to identify the location of bleeds in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Capsule endoscopy is currently funded in Ontario in cases where there has been a failure to identify a source of bleeding via conventional diagnostic procedures. In Ontario, capsule endoscopy is a diagnostic option for patients whose findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, and push enteroscopy have been negative (i.e., the source of bleeding was not found). Objectives This economic analysis aims to estimate the budget impact of different rates of capsule endoscopy use as a complement to push enteroscopy procedures in patients aged 18 years and older. Data Sources Population-based administrative databases for Ontario were used to identify patients receiving push enteroscopy and small-bowel capsule endoscopy in the fiscal years 2008 to 2012. Review Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify economic evaluations of capsule endoscopy for the investigation of OGIB. Studies were assessed for their methodological quality and their applicability to the Ontarian setting. An original budget impact analysis was performed using data from Ontarian administrative sources and published literature. The budget impact was estimated for different levels of use of capsule endoscopy as a complement to push enteroscopy due to the uncertain clinical utility of the capsule based on current clinical evidence. The analysis was conducted from the provincial public payer perspective. Results With varying rates of capsule endoscopy use, the budgetary impact spans from savings of $510,000,1 when no (0%) push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy, to $2,036,000, when all (100%) push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy. A scenario where 50% of push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy (expected use based on expert opinion

  5. Objectives and Design of BLEEDS: A Cohort Study to Identify New Risk Factors and Predictors for Major Bleeding during Treatment with Vitamin K Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    van Rein, Nienke; Lijfering, Willem M.; Bos, Mettine H. A.; Herruer, Martien H.; Vermaas, Helga W.; van der Meer, Felix J. M.; Reitsma, Pieter H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk scores for patients who are at high risk for major bleeding complications during treatment with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) do not perform that well. BLEEDS was initiated to search for new biomarkers that predict bleeding in these patients. Objectives To describe the outline and objectives of BLEEDS and to examine whether the study population is generalizable to other VKA treated populations. Methods A cohort was created consisting of all patients starting VKA treatment at three Dutch anticoagulation clinics between January-2012 and July-2014. We stored leftover plasma and DNA following analysis of the INR. Results Of 16,706 eligible patients, 16,570 (99%) were included in BLEEDS and plasma was stored from 13,779 patients (83%). Patients had a mean age of 70 years (SD 14), 8713 were male (53%). The most common VKA indications were atrial fibrillation (10,876 patients, 66%) and venous thrombosis (3920 patients, 24%). 326 Major bleeds occurred during 17,613 years of follow-up (incidence rate 1.85/100 person years, 95%CI 1.66–2.06). The risk for major bleeding was highest in the initial three months of VKA treatment and increased when the international normalized ratio increased. These results and characteristics are in concordance with results from other VKA treated populations. Conclusion BLEEDS is generalizable to other VKA treated populations and will permit innovative and unbiased research of biomarkers that may predict major bleeding during VKA treatment. PMID:27935941

  6. Aerothermal characteristics of bleed slot in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, LianJie; Lu, HongBo; Xu, Xiao; Chang, XinYu

    2015-10-01

    Two types of flow configurations with bleed in two-dimensional hypersonic flows are numerically examined to investigate their aerodynamic thermal loads and related flow structures at choked conditions. One is a turbulent boundary layer flow without shock impingement where the effects of the slot angle are discussed, and the other is shock wave boundary layer interactions where the effects of slot angle and slot location relative to shock impingement point are surveyed. A key separation is induced by bleed barrier shock on the upstream slot wall, resulting in a localized maximum heat flux at the reattachment point. For slanted slots, the dominating flow patterns are not much affected by the change in slot angle, but vary dramatically with slot location relative to the shock impingement point. Different flow structures are found in the case of normal slot, such as a flow pattern similar to typical Laval nozzle flow, the largest separation bubble which is almost independent of the shock position. Its larger detached distance results in 20% lower stagnation heat flux on the downstream slot corner, but with much wider area suffering from severe thermal loads. In spite of the complexity of the flow patterns, it is clearly revealed that the heat flux generally rises with the slot location moving downstream, and an increase in slot angle from 20° to 40° reduces 50% the heat flux peak at the reattachment point in the slot passage. The results further indicate that the bleed does not raise the heat flux around the slot for all cases except for the area around the downstream slot corner. Among all bleed configurations, the slot angle of 40° located slightly upstream of the incident shock is regarded as the best.

  7. Gastric Metastases from Lung Adenocarcinoma Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ghanimeh, Mouhanna; Albadarin, Sakher; Yousef, Osama

    2017-01-01

    Metastases to the stomach are rare. They are commonly asymptomatic, and the diagnosis is usually established during autopsy. We present a patient known to have stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who presented with melena and shock. Endoscopy revealed multiple gastric nodules, which were proved to be metastatic deposits from her lung cancer. The possibility of gastric metastases should be kept in mind in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy and biopsy remain the gold standard for diagnostic testing in such patients. PMID:28286791

  8. Pharmacologic Agents in the Management of Bleeding Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    thrombotic complications. The anticoagulant effect of warfarin can be potentiated by dietary vitamin K deficiency or by medications such Anti fibrinolytic...therapeutic anticoagulation in patients who are not ac- igin was stopped in 14 of 15 thrombocytopenic patients tively bleeding. TRANSFUSION 546 BOLAN AND...especially useful in ther- dysfunction8 s and possibly by reducing vitamin K levels apeutically anticoagulated patients who are to undergo through disruption

  9. Trends on gastrointestinal bleeding and mortality: where are we standing?

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2012-03-21

    Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract and its management are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The predisposing factors that led to the occurrence of these hemorrhagic instances are largely linked to the life style of the affected persons. Designing a new strategy aimed at educating the publics and improving their awareness of the problem could effectively help in eradicating this problem with no associated risks and in bringing the mortality rates down to almost zero.

  10. Lung Laceration with Active Bleeding, Contusion and Hemothorax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    para- coronal and para-sagittal reconstructions. History Our patient is a 31 year old active duty male deployed troop suffering a gunshot...the missile path. The Parenchymal tearing is evident by the obliquely oriented, sausage -shaped opacity representing bleeding into a resultant...CXR is confirmed on the above para-axial CT reformatted through the missile path (dotted arrow). Note the sausage -shaped opacity obliquely oriented

  11. No Slackers in Tourniquet Use to Stop Bleeding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    pressure applied to the skin by the tourniquet (mmHg), blood loss volume (ml), and the number of wind- lass turns executed (whole number). The user...plain, strong, and reliably reproduced. The amount of slack is associated positively with the wind- lass turn number, the time to stop bleeding, and... lass turning (and only in slack samples), tertiary twisting occurred as the inner strap twisted into pretzel-like loops while wrapping about

  12. Unusual redo mitral valve replacement for bleeding in Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villarreal, Ovidio A; Fernández-Ceseña, Ernesto; Solano-Ricardi, Mercedes; Aguilar-García, Alma L; Vega-Hernández, Raquel; Del Angel-Soto, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 23-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation and Glanzmann thrombasthenia, who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement. Warfarin therapy was devastating, causing bilateral hemothorax, pericardial effusion, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Redo mitral valve replacement with a biological prosthesis was required to resolve this critical situation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mitral valve replacement in Glanzmann thrombasthenia, highlighting the danger of oral anticoagulation in this pathology.

  13. Rectal bleeding after radiation therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Devarati; Nout, Remi; Catalano, Paul J.; Creutzberg, Carien; Cimbak, Nicole; Lee, Larissa; Viswanathan, Akila

    2015-01-01

    Background & Purpose The goals of this study were to determine the rate and risk factors of rectal bleeding (RB) after external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy (EBRT+VB), and to compare this data to previously unreported RB rates from PORTEC-2 patients receiving EBRT or VB alone. Materials & Methods Retrospective chart review identified 212 endometrial cancer patients receiving adjuvant EBRT+VB between 2006–2013. Patient-reported RB data were also obtained from PORTEC-2 patients randomized to EBRT (n=166) or VB (n=182). The two populations were compared using an RB Scale of symptom severity. Results After a median 35 months, 17.9% of EBRT+VB patients (n=38) experienced any RB with 1.9% (n=4) having bleeding requiring intervention. Age ≤70 years was the only predictor of RB (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.1–8.7; p=0.027). Rates of patient-reported RB after EBRT were similar with 15.0% (n=25) having any RB and 0.6% (n=1) having “very much” bleeding. On regression analysis, any EBRT (either EBRT alone or EBRT+VB) increased the risk of RB compared to those who received VB alone (OR 3.0; p=0.0028; 95% CI 1.4–6.7). The rates of more severe RB were low and did not significantly differ between treatments. Conclusions Significant RB is rare after radiation. The addition of VB to EBRT does not significantly alter bleeding rates. PMID:26003340

  14. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  15. Obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Chi, Claudia; Lee, Christine A; England, Adrian; Hingorani, Jaishree; Paintsil, James; Kadir, Rezan A

    2009-06-01

    A retrospective review was carried out on the methods of obstetric analgesia/anesthesia used in 80 pregnancies amongst 63 women with inherited bleeding disorders (19 factor XI deficiency, 16 carriers of haemophilia, 15 von Willebrand disease, seven platelet function disorders, four factor VII deficiency, one factor VII and XI deficiency and one factor X deficiency). In 72 pregnancies, the woman was seen antenatally in a multidisciplinary clinic to discuss and plan pain relief options. Regional block was performed for 41 pregnancies. The mothers were known to have a bleeding disorder in 35 of these pregnancies. Prophylactic cover was given in 10 pregnancies prior to the insertion of regional block but not required in the remaining 25 pregnancies because the coagulation defects had spontaneously normalised at term. There were six reported adverse effects from regional block similar to that found in the general population: inadequate anesthesia/analgesia (2), bloody tap (2), hypotension and a possible dural puncture which was treated conservatively. There were no reports of long-term complications. The findings show that it is possible to offer women with inherited bleeding disorders the option of regional block provided their coagulation defects have normalised, either spontaneously during pregnancy or following adequate haemostatic cover.

  16. The role of fibrinogen: a new paradigm in the treatment of coagulopathic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Benny; Tang, Mariann; Larsen, Ole H; Laursen, Peter N; Fenger-Eriksen, Christian; Rea, Catherine J

    2011-01-01

    Fibrinogen is involved in both primary and secondary hemostasis, playing an important role in platelet aggregation and the establishment of a fibrin network. Recent evidence suggests that very high levels of fibrinogen act as antithrombin and can reduce endogenous thrombin potential and compromise clot stability, particularly following a low tissue factor stimulus. Several laboratory methods for measuring plasma fibrinogen concentrations are available, but results vary depending on the type of method and the use of artificial colloid plasma expanders. Adopting only the Clauss method can provide erroneously high levels when used in patients who have received colloid plasma expanders. This may contribute to a hazardous delay or complete lack of treatment. Multiple in vitro experiments, animal studies, and proof-of-principle randomized, clinical studies have recently suggested that hemostatic intervention with a fibrinogen concentrate may be efficient and safe in controling perioperative bleeding. In particular, fibrinogen concentrate has a key role in improving clotting function and reducing blood loss in settings such as trauma and cardiothoracic surgery. However, prospective studies are needed to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of fibrinogen concentrate when used as a hemostatic intervention for patients with massive bleeding due to trauma or surgery.

  17. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  18. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding as an early sign of polycystic ovary syndrome during adolescence: an update.

    PubMed

    Deligeoroglou, Efthimios; Karountzos, Vasileios

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a frequent reason for concern between adolescents. The most common cause of AUB in these girls, when other pathologies have been excluded, is dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). The aim of this review is to assess the role of DUB as an early symptom of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis later in life. A review of the literature was performed, using Pubmed and Medline as primary databases, regarding the correlation between DUB cases early after menarche and PCOS diagnosis in the future. The most plausible pathophysiological mechanism in the vast majority of DUB cases is the immaturity of hypothalamic pituitary ovarian (HPO) axis. Similarities between normal changes in puberty and PCOS later in life such as: increased ovarian and adrenal steroidogenesis, hyperpulsatile gonadotropin secretion, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, anovulation and therefore menstrual irregularity, including DUB, have been noted in several studies. Anovulation, which can be first expressed as DUB at perimenarchal age, may persist and strengthen PCOS diagnostic criteria sometime during lifetime. Thorough attention should be paid, by specialized doctors in pediatric and adolescent gynecology, in DUB cases after menarche, while proper follow up of these girls is mandatory, due to their increased risk to manifest PCOS in the near future.

  19. Successful treatment of bleeding large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient under dual antiplatelet therapy after recent drug-eluting coronary stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Keita; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who started dual antiplatelet therapy (APT) with aspirin and clopidogrel after recent implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent and developed massive bleeding due to large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Following endoscopic haemostasis and discontinuation of dual APT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib was started under continuation of ‘single’ APT with aspirin. A good chemotherapeutic response was achieved without recurrence of bleeding, and subsequent less invasive surgical resection of the tumour was performed, while preoperative single APT was continued for prevention of stent thrombosis. The patient recovered well without any thromboembolic or bleeding events. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and subsequent less invasive surgery under continuation of APT is one of the preferred approaches for patients with duodenal GIST with severe thromboembolic comorbidities, as in the current case. PMID:24777088

  20. Airway Management During Upper GI Endoscopic Procedures: State of the Art Review.

    PubMed

    Goudra, Basavana; Singh, Preet Mohinder

    2017-01-01

    With the growing popularity of propofol mediated deep sedation for upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic procedures, challenges are being felt and appreciated. Research suggests that management of the airway is anything but routine in this setting. Although many studies and meta-analyses have demonstrated the safety of propofol sedation administered by registered nurses under the supervision of gastroenterologists (likely related to the lighter degrees of sedation than those provided by anesthesia providers and is under medicolegal controversy in the United States), there is no agreement on the optimum airway management for procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Failure to rescue an airway at an appropriate time has led to disastrous consequences. Inability to evaluate and appreciate the risk factors for aspiration can ruin the day for both the patient and the health care providers. This review apprises the reader of various aspects of airway management relevant to the practice of sedation during upper GI endoscopy. New devices and modification of existing devices are discussed in detail. Recognizing the fact that appropriate monitoring is important for timely recognition and management of potential airway disasters, these issues are explored thoroughly.