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Sample records for giant arachnoid granulation

  1. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis. PMID:28971178

  2. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis.

  3. Brain Herniation into Giant Arachnoid Granulation: An Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gonçalo Roque

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations are structures filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that extend into the venous sinuses through openings in the dura mater and allow the drainage of CSF from subarachnoid space into venous system. Usually they are asymptomatic but can be symptomatic when large enough to cause sinus occlusion. We report a rare case of a brain herniation into a giant arachnoid granulation in an asymptomatic elderly male patient, which was discovered incidentally. PMID:28392955

  4. Giant Arachnoid Granulation Associated with Anomalous Draining Vein: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Giant arachnoid granulations (AG) can mimic intracranial lesions. Knowledge of these structures can help avoid misdiagnosis when interpreting imaging. Here, we report a child who presented with a mass within the superior sagittal sinus and an anomalous draining vein. Herein, the diagnosis of a giant AG was made. Clinicians who view or interpret imaging of the head should be aware of these anatomical variants and though when very large, apparently, do not necessarily result in pathology. Based on our case report, giant AG might also demonstrate anomalous draining veins. PMID:28409066

  5. The function of arachnoid villi/granulations revisited.

    PubMed

    Mawera, G; Asala, S A

    1996-09-01

    To establish the current viewpoint with regards to the role of arachnoid villi/granulations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption. Retrospective study. Journal articles published between 1913 and 1993. The contribution of arachnoid villi/granulations to CSF absorption from the subarachnoid space. From available literature, it is yet to be proved that arachnoid villi/granulations are the major sites for CSF absorption from the subarachnoid space into the venous system. They may, however, play an important role in the absorption of CSF's waste products of neuronal metabolism (mainly CSF proteins) under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, it would appear that, under pathological conditions, the absorption of CSF proteins can take place at other CSF absorption sites. The paucity of data on the relationship between the development of arachnoid villi, the superior sagittal sinus, the superficial cortical vessels and the subarachnoid space warrants that an ontogenic study be conducted in order to achieve a better understanding of the function of arachnoid villi which is currently speculative.

  6. Arachnoid granules: Dandy was Dandy, Cushing and Weed were not.

    PubMed

    Maurizi, Charles P

    2010-08-01

    Errors can be instructive. It seems that Harvey Cushing and Louis Weed provided the medical world with a faulty theory of cerebrospinal fluid absorption. Louis Weed, working in Harvey Cushing's laboratory, initially studied the movement of substances in the cerebrospinal fluid by using low-pressure studies. Results of the low-pressure studies were considered unsatisfactory and high pressure experiments were undertaken and these had results similar to earlier work done by others in human cadavers. High pressure results demonstrating movement of fluid through the arachnoid granules were deemed correct. Because of Cushing's position of authority, the theory became accepted as fact and in time proved to be entrenched dogma. Walter Dandy demonstrated in experiments on hydrocephalus and the surgical removal of the arachnoid granule system that the fluid was produced by the choroid plexuses and not absorbed by the arachnoid granules. His work was dismissed by Weed as unreliable. Examination of the pattern of deposition of corpora amylacea on the surface of the brain provides evidence that cerebrospinal fluid does not pass through arachnoid granules but passes through the choroid fissure and is recycled through choroid plexus portals. The choroid plexus portal theory can explain the findings in the low-pressure experiments of Weed. Bias and pride seem to be the source of the faulty theory. Entrenched dogma is resistant to challenge.

  7. Giant nontraumatic intradiploic arachnoid cyst in a young male*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajesh; Gupta, Puneet; Mahajan, Manik; Sharma, Poonam; Gupta, Anchal; Khurana, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Intradiploic arachnoid cysts have scarcely been reported in the literature, most reported cases being secondary to trauma. Nontraumatic arachnoid cysts are quite rare and have been reported mostly in adults. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old male presenting with a slowly growing mass in the occipital region and intermittent headaches. On the basis of the findings of X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head, the mass was diagnosed as a giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst. PMID:27818549

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid absorption block at the vertex in chronic hydrocephalus: obstructed arachnoid granulations or elevated venous pressure?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of absorption of CSF at the vertex in chronic hydrocephalus has been ascribed to an elevation in the arachnoid granulation outflow resistance (Rout). The CSF infusion studies measuring Rout are dependent on venous sinus pressure but little is known about the changes in pressure which occur throughout life or with the development of hydrocephalus. Methods Twenty patients with chronic hydrocephalus underwent MR venography and MR flow quantification techniques. The venous outflow pressure was estimated from the sinus blood flow and the cross-sectional area of the transverse sinuses. Adult controls as well as a normal young cohort were selected to estimate the change in sinus pressure which occurs throughout life and following the development of hydrocephalus. Significance was tested with a Student’s t-test. Results The size of the transverse sinuses was unchanged from the 1st to the 5th decade of life, indicating a stable outflow resistance. However, the blood flow was reduced by 42%, indicating a likely similar reduction in pressure gradient across the sinuses. The sinuses of hydrocephalus patients were 38% smaller than matched controls, indicating a 2.5 times increase in resistance. Despite the 24% reduction in blood flow, a significant increase in sinus pressure is suggested. Conclusions The size of the venous sinuses normally does not change over the age range investigated but sinus pressure is reduced proportional to an age-related blood flow reduction. Hydrocephalus is associated with much smaller sinuses than normal and an elevation in venous pressure may explain the lack of CSF absorption into the arachnoid granulations in chronic hydrocephalus. PMID:24955236

  9. Extradural Giant Multiloculated Arachnoid Cyst Causing Spinal Cord Compression in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Serdar; Anik, Ihsan; Gocmen, Selcuk; Sirin, Sait

    2008-01-01

    Background: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are rare expanding lesions in the spinal canal. Enlargement may cause progressive signs and symptoms caused by spinal cord compression. They are associated with trauma, surgery, arachnoiditis, and neural tube defects. Most nontraumatic spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are thought to be congenital. Design: Case report and literature review. Findings: A 9-year-old boy with mild paraparesis was found to have an extradural multiloculated arachnoid cyst with fibrous septa at T4-L3 levels and anterior compression and displacement of the spinal cord. Conclusions: Definitive treatment of arachnoid cyst entails radical cyst removal and dura cleft repair. Formation of a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula may require external lumbar drainage. PMID:18795482

  10. Human arachnoid granulations Part I: a technique for quantifying area and distribution on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, Deborah M; Herderick, Edward E; Kapoor, Kapil G; Holman, David W; Katz, Steven E

    2007-01-01

    Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs) are herniations of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses on the surface of the brain. Previous morphological studies of AGs have been limited in scope and only one has mentioned surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to investigate the topographic distribution of AGs on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex. Methods En face images were taken of the superior surface of 35 formalin-fixed human brains. AGs were manually identified using Adobe Photoshop, with a pixel location containing an AG defined as 'positive'. A set of 25 standard fiducial points was marked on each hemisphere for a total of 50 points on each image. The points were connected on each hemisphere to create a segmented image. A standard template was created for each hemisphere by calculating the average position of the 25 fiducial points from all brains. Each segmented image was mapped to the standard template using a linear transformation. A topographic distribution map was produced by calculating the proportion of AG positive images at each pixel in the standard template. The AG surface area was calculated for each hemisphere and for the total brain superior surface. To adjust for different brain sizes, the proportional involvement of AGs was calculated by dividing the AG area by the total area. Results The total brain average surface area of AGs was 78.53 ± 13.13 mm2 (n = 35) and average AG proportional involvement was 57.71 × 10-4 ± 7.65 × 10-4. Regression analysis confirmed the reproducibility of AG identification between independent researchers with r2 = 0.97. The surface AGs were localized in the parasagittal planes that coincide with the region of the lateral lacunae. Conclusion The data obtained on the spatial distribution and en face surface area of AGs will be used in an in vitro model of CSF outflow. With an increase in the number of samples, this analysis technique can be used to study the relationship

  11. Giant cytoplasmic granules in Langerhans cells of Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Gutiérrez-Palomera, G; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Rondán, A; Antuna, S

    1990-02-01

    Giant membrane-bound cytoplasmic granules were found in the epidermal Langerhans cells of a patient with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome. These cells also contained normal-appearing Birbeck granules. The giant granules had a granular or sometimes globular internal structure; they are believed to derive from fusion of lysosomes or some portion of Birbeck granules. It is unclear whether this morphologic change in Langerhans cell interferes with their antigen-presenting function; it may be, in part, responsible for the frequent infections seen in patients with Chediak-Higashi syndrome that are otherwise more clearly related to the abnormalities in neutrophils and lymphocytes. The Langerhans cell is another cellular type in Chediak-Higashi syndrome in which giant cytoplasmic granules are found.

  12. GRANULATION IN RED GIANTS: OBSERVATIONS BY THE KEPLER MISSION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; Garcia, R. A.; Jimenez, A.; Regulo, C.; Mosser, B.; Elsworth, Y.; Chaplin, W. J.; Hale, S. J.; De Ridder, J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Mullally, F.

    2011-11-10

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze {approx}1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale {tau}{sub gran} and power P{sub gran}). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, {nu}{sub max}) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T{sub eff})). We show that {tau}{sub eff}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.89}{sub max} and P{sub gran}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1.90}{sub max}, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T{sub eff}, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  13. Granulation in Red Giants: Observations by the Kepler Mission and Three-dimensional Convection Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; García, R. A.; Huber, D.; Jiménez, A.; Mosser, B.; Bedding, T. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Régulo, C.; Stello, D.; Chaplin, W. J.; De Ridder, J.; Hale, S. J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kjeldsen, H.; Mullally, F.; Thompson, S. E.

    2011-11-01

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze ~1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale τgran and power P gran). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, νmax) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T eff)). We show that τeffvpropν-0.89 max and P granvpropν-1.90 max, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T eff, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  14. THE THIRD SIGNATURE OF GRANULATION IN BRIGHT-GIANT AND SUPERGIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.; Pugh, Teznie

    2012-04-15

    We investigated third-signature granulation plots for 18 bright giants and supergiants and one giant of spectral classes G0 to M3. These plots reveal the net granulation velocities, averaged over the stellar disk, as a function of depth. Supergiants show significant differences from the 'standard' shape seen for lower-luminosity stars. Most notable is a striking reversal of slope seen for three of the nine supergiants, i.e., stronger lines are more blueshifted than weaker lines, opposite the solar case. Changes in the third-signature plot of {alpha} Sco (M1.5 Iab) with time imply granulation cells that penetrate only the lower portion of the photosphere. For those stars showing the standard shape, we derive scaling factors relative to the Sun that serve as a first-order measure of the strength of the granulation relative to the Sun. For G-type stars, the third-signature scale of the bright giants and supergiants is approximately 1.5 times as strong as in dwarfs, but for K stars, there in no discernible difference between higher-luminosity stars and dwarfs. Classical macroturbulence, a measure of the velocity dispersion of the granulation, increases with the third-signature-plot scale factors, but at different rates for different luminosity classes.

  15. Metallicity effect on stellar granulation detected from oscillating red giants in open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, E.; Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Gaulme, P.; Pinsonneault, M.; Stassun, K.; Stello, D.; Tayar, J.; Trampedach, R.; Jiang, C.; Nitschelm, C.; Salabert, D.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The effect of metallicity on the granulation activity in stars, and hence on the convective motions in general, is still poorly understood. Available spectroscopic parameters from the updated APOGEE-Kepler catalog, coupled with high-precision photometric observations from NASA's Kepler mission spanning more than four years of observation, make oscillating red giant stars in open clusters crucial testbeds. Aims: We aim to determine the role of metallicity on the stellar granulation activity by discriminating its effect from that of different stellar properties such as surface gravity, mass, and temperature. We analyze 60 known red giant stars belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811, spanning a metallicity range from [Fe/H] ≃ - 0.09 to 0.32. The parameters describing the granulation activity of these stars and their frequency of maximum oscillation power, νmax, are studied while taking into account different masses, metallicities, and stellar evolutionary stages. We derive new scaling relations for the granulation activity, re-calibrate existing ones, and identify the best scaling relations from the available set of observations. Methods: We adopted the Bayesian code Diamonds for the analysis of the background signal in the Fourier spectra of the stars. We performed a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison to test the different model hypotheses proposed in this work and in the literature. Results: Metallicity causes a statistically significant change in the amplitude of the granulation activity, with a dependency stronger than that induced by both stellar mass and surface gravity. We also find that the metallicity has a significant impact on the corresponding time scales of the phenomenon. The effect of metallicity on the time scale is stronger than that of mass. Conclusions: A higher metallicity increases the amplitude of granulation and meso-granulation signals and slows down their characteristic time scales toward

  16. Bobble-head doll syndrome in an 80-year-old man, associated with a giant arachnoid cyst of the lamina quadrigemina, treated with endoscopic ventriculocystocisternotomy and cystoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Castro, Jorge Octavio; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Sandoval-Bonilla, Bayron; Gallardo-Ceja, David; Venegas-Cruz, Miguel Angel; Estrada-Estrada, Eric Misael; Contreras-Mota, Marisol; Guinto-Balanzar, Gerardo; Garcia-Lopez, Rabindranath

    2017-08-01

    Bobble-head doll syndrome (BHDS) is a rare entity, characterized by antero-posterior head bobbing, which is of the type "yes-yes." Less frequently, having a head movement of the type "no-no" is described. We report an unusual case of an 80-year-old man with a cystic mass of the lamina quadrigemina, extending to the posterior fossa. We conclude that ventriculocystocisternotomy associated with a cystoperitoneal shunt is an effective treatment for a symptomatic giant arachnoid cyst in the lamina quadrigemina.

  17. Thoracic arachnoid cyst resection.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spinal cord may be asymptomatic. In some cases arachnoid cysts may exert mass effect on the thoracic spinal cord and lead to pain and myelopathy symptoms. Arachnoid cysts may be difficult to visualize on an MRI scan because the thin walled arachnoid may not be visible. Focal displacement of the thoracic spinal cord and effacement of the spinal cord with apparent widening of the cerebrospinal fluid space is seen. This video demonstrates surgical techniques to remove a dorsal arachnoid cyst causing spinal cord compression. The surgery involves a thoracic laminectomy. The dura is opened sharply with care taken not to open the arachnoid so that the cyst can be well visualized. The thickened arachnoid walls of the cyst are removed to alleviate the compression caused by the arachnoid cyst. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/pgUrl9xvsD0.

  18. The Orbit, Rotation, and Granulation of the G7 Giant β Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David F.

    2016-11-01

    The G7 IIIa single-lined spectroscopic binary, β Her, is studied with high-resolution, high-signal-to-noise spectra taken over 10 seasons from 23MR2000 to 10MY2009. Absolute radial velocities, corrected for convective blueshifts, are determined and new orbital parameters are derived. Line-depth ratios are used to measure temperature variation ˜2 K. A Fourier analysis is done for the line broadening, yielding a projected rotation velocity of 3.27 ± 0.20 km s-1 and a radial-tangential macroturbulence dispersion of 6.43 ± 0.08 km s-1. The “C” shaped bisector of Fe i λ6253 has its blue-most point at a relative flux level of 0.52, consistent with what is expected from β Her’s absolute magnitude. The third-signature plot indicates granulation velocities 20% larger than the Sun’s. Mapping the λ6253 line bisector onto the third-signature curve results in a flux deficit of 12.6 ± 1.0% that can be interpreted as arising from a temperature difference between granules and inter-granular lanes of 132 K. The flux deficit peaks near 5.5 km s-1 from the line center, suggesting the velocity difference between granules and lanes is ˜20% larger than that found for recently analyzed K giants.

  19. Post traumatic arachnoiditis ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Sunitha P; Gupta, Kanchan; Maddali, Aparna; Viswamitra, Sanjaya

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare chronic disorder characterized by the presence of calcification/ ossification of the spinal arachnoid. We describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of arachnoiditis ossificans as sequelae to trauma in a 30-year-old patient. This imaging diagnosis becomes important to alert the clinician as most of them can be treated by conservative management. PMID:22988405

  20. GRANULATION SIGNATURES IN THE SPECTRUM OF THE VERY METAL-POOR RED GIANT HD 122563

    SciTech Connect

    RamIrez, I.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Lambert, D. L.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2010-12-20

    A very high resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 200, 000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {approx_equal} 340) blue-green spectrum of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -2.6) red giant star HD 122563 has been obtained by us at McDonald Observatory. We measure the asymmetries and core wavelengths of a set of unblended Fe I lines covering a wide range of line strength. Line bisectors exhibit the characteristic C-shape signature of surface convection (granulation) and they span from about 100 m s{sup -1} in the strongest Fe I features to 800 m s{sup -1} in the weakest ones. Core wavelength shifts range from about -100 to -900 m s{sup -1}, depending on line strength. In general, larger blueshifts are observed in weaker lines, but there is increasing scatter with increasing residual flux. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we synthesize the same set of spectral lines using a state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulation for a stellar atmosphere of fundamental parameters similar to those of HD 122563. We find good agreement between model predictions and observations. This allows us to infer an absolute zero point for the line shifts and radial velocity. Moreover, it indicates that the structure and dynamics of the simulation are realistic, thus providing support to previous claims of large 3D-LTE corrections to elemental abundances and fundamental parameters of very metal-poor red giant stars obtained with standard 1D-LTE spectroscopic analyses, as suggested by the hydrodynamic model used here.

  1. [Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, C; Reis, F C

    1998-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis, an inflammatory process involving all three meningeal layers as well as the nerve roots, is a cause of persistent symptoms in 6% to 16% of postoperative patients. Although spinal surgery is the most common antecedent associated with arachnoiditis, multiple causes have been reported, including infection, intrathecal steroids or anesthetic agents, trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and ionic myelographic contrast material--both oil soluble and water soluble. In the past, oil-based intrathecal contrast agents (Pantopaque) were associated with arachnoiditis especially when this material was introduced into the thecal sac and mixed with blood. Arachnoiditis is apparently rarely idiopathic. The pathogenesis of spinal arachnoiditis is similar to the repair process of serous membranes, such as the peritoneum, with a negligible inflammatory cellular exudate and a prominent fibrinous exudate. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis of the lower spine is a myelographic diagnosis. The myelographic findings of arachnoiditis were divided into two types by Jorgensen et al. In type 1, "the empty thecal sac" appearance, there is homogeneous filling of the thecal sac with either absence of or defects involving nerve root sleeve filling. In type 2 arachnoiditis, there are localized or diffuse filling defects within the contrast column. MRI has demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of arachnoiditis. The appearance of arachnoiditis on MRI can be assigned to three main groups. The MRI findings in group I are a conglomeration of adherent roots positioned centrally in the thecal sac. Patients in group II show roots peripherally adherent to the meninges--the so called empty sac. MRI findings in group III are a soft tissue mass within the subarachnoid space. It corresponds to the type 2 categorization defined by Jorgensen et al, where as the MRI imaging types I and II correspond to the myelographic type 1.

  2. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation.

  3. [Intraventricular arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Rico-Cotelo, María; Diaz-Cabanas, Lucía; Allut, Alfredo G; Gelabert-Gonzalez, Miguel

    2013-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. Intracranial arachnoids cysts are considered benign developmental anomalies that occur within the arachnoid membrane and generally contain clear and colourless fluid resembling cerebrospinal fluid. The prevalence of these cysts is higher in the first two decades of life, and the incidence is widely quoted as approximately 1% of all space-occupying intracranial lesions. Arachnoids cysts in the elderly person are a rare occurrence. We report the unusual presentation of a woman with an intraventricular arachnoid cyst treated with endoscopic technique. CASE REPORT. A 75-year-old woman presented with progressive hemiparesis of two years duration. Cranial MR imaging showed a right parieto-occipital intraventricular cyst with local mass effect and moderate dilatation of lateral ventricles. A right-sided burr hole was made and the arachnoids cyst was reached and cysto-ventricle shunting was realized. This was followed by a septum pellucidum fenestration. There were no complications during the surgery and the patient presented no symptoms at time of discharge. CONCLUSIONS. The neuroendoscopic approach to intraventricular arachnoid cysts was effective with few complications.

  4. Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Dolan, R A

    1993-06-01

    Forty-one cases of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis are presented. The key points are, first, that lumbar disc lesions, their investigations and surgical treatment and the use of nonabsorbable contrast materials are the most common etiological factors and, secondly, that operation is the best treatment. It is our contention that the majority of patients so treated do experience some improvement in what otherwise can be an unbearable amount of pain and disability. The use of adsorbable, nonirritative contrast materials such as Iohexol Parenteral will result in a marked reduction in the frequency of occurrence of arachnoiditis.

  5. Syringomyelia and arachnoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, L R; Norohna, A B; Amico, L L

    1990-01-01

    Five patients with chronic arachnoiditis and syringomyelia were studied. Three patients had early life meningitis and developed symptoms of syringomyelia eight, 21, and 23 years after the acute infection. One patient had a spinal dural thoracic AVM and developed a thoracic syrinx 11 years after spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage and five years after surgery on the AVM. A fifth patient had tuberculous meningitis with transient spinal cord dysfunction followed by development of a lumbar syrinx seven years later. Arachnoiditis can cause syrinx formation by obliterating the spinal vasculature causing ischaemia. Small cystic regions of myelomalacia coalesce to form cavities. In other patients, central cord ischaemia mimics syringomyelia but no cavitation is present. Scar formation with spinal block leads to altered dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and contributes to the formation of spinal cord cystic cavities. Images PMID:2313296

  6. [Fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Sadowska, Marta; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare disease with insidious course. It causes damage of the spinal cord and nerve roots. The causes of adhesive arachnoiditis include earlier traumatic injury of the spinal cord, surgery, intrathecal administration of therapeutic substances (e.g. anaesthetics, chemotherapy) or contrast media, bleeding, and inflammation. It can also be idiopathic or iatrogenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old patient with fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis which was provoked by spinal surgery and caused severe neurological disability with profound, progressive, flaccid paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The electromyography (EMG) showed serious damage of nerves of both lower limbs at the level of motor roots L2-S2 and damage of the motor neuron at the level of Th11-Th12 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral and thoracic part of the spinal cord demonstrated cystic liquid spaces in the lumen of the dural sac in the bottom part of the cervical spine and at the Th2-Th10 level, modelling the lateral and anterior surface of the cord. Because of the vast lesions, surgery could not be performed. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation brought only a small clinical improvement.

  7. [Imaging diagnosis of arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, Miguel; Santín-Amo, José María; Aran-Echabe, Eduardo; García-Allut, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are malformed lesions that contain a fluid similar to the cerebrospinal fluid, and are usually located within the arachnoidal membrane. They represent 1% of all intracranial lesions, and in recent years, with the development of radiological techniques, the clinical detectability of arachnoid cysts seems to have increased. Although the majority of diagnosed arachnoid cysts are located in the cranial cavity and especially in the Sylvian fissure, a small number are located at spinal level and they can occur extra- or intra-spinally. An analysis is carried out, detailing the various tests used for the diagnosis of both intracranial and spinal arachnoids cysts, analysing the indications of each one depending on the location of the cysts and patient age. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. [Arachnoid cysts: Embriology and pathology].

    PubMed

    García-Conde, Mario; Martín-Viota, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    There is still great controversy surrounding the origin of the arachnoid cyst. The most accepted theory in the case of congenital cysts explains how they are formed from an anomalous development of the arachnoid membrane, which is unfolded allowing the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside and creating a cyst. This theory seems to explain the origin of convexity and sylvian cistern arachnoid cysts, whereas those in other locations might be due to other mechanisms. In the anatomopathological analysis, the arachnoid cyst wall can be seen as having few differences from normal, although thickened due to an increase quantity of collagenous material. A description of the embryological development of the arachnoid layer and cyst formation is presented, describing the main anatomopathological findings.

  9. [Supratentorial arachnoidal cysts].

    PubMed

    Vizioli, L; Cerillo, A; Falivene, R; Mottolese, C; Tedeschi, G

    1983-01-01

    The AA., after having examined the various hypothesis reported in literature about the etiopathogenesis and the contrasting anatomical and pathological data concerning the arachnoid supratentorial cysts, point out the remarkable frequency of they malformative and above-all post-traumatic genesis. On the formation mechanism of this last type, they agree upon the supposition expressed by Taveras and Ransohoff in 1953. The AA., therefore, after having analysed the principal morphological and topographical aspects, pay attention to the present diagnostic possibilities, above all in radiological range, where the TAC represents, by this time, the examination of election compared with traditional assurances with means of contrast. It follows the analysis of the personal casuistry, consisting in 6 arachnoid supratentorial cysts, two of which clearly post-traumatic and two, very probably, of malformative genesis (for the coexistence of data in favour of both suppositions). The AA. draw these conclusions: the CT Scan is the only diagnostic means which permits an exact pre-operating diagnosis on the nature of the lesion; the surgical and, above all, anatomo-pathological reports assume an essential rule for an exact etiopathogenetic interpretation of the lesion examined.

  10. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Joon Bum; Kang, Kyung Taek; Lee, Jun Seok; Song, Geun Seong; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    A spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) results from a rare small defect of the dura matter that leads to cerebrospinal fluid accumulation and communication defects between the cyst and the subarachnoid space. There is consensus for the treatment of the dural defect, but not for the treatment of the cyst. Some advocate a total resection of the cysts and repair of the communication site to prevent the recurrence of a SEAC, while others recommended more conservative therapy. Here we report the outcomes of selective laminectomy and closure of the dural defect for a 72-year-old and a 33-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance imaging of these patients showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L4 and an arachnoid cyst at the posterior epidural space of T12 to L2. For both patients, we surgically fenestrated the cyst and repaired the dural defect using a partial hemi-laminectomy. The patient’s symptoms dramatically subsided, and follow-up radiological images show a complete disappearance of the cyst in both patients. Our results suggest that fenestration of the cyst can be a safe and effective approach in treating SEACs compared to a classical complete resection of the cyst wall with multilevel laminectomy. PMID:27857934

  11. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1978-03-01

    Late sequelae (adhesive arachnoiditis) have been reported following myelography with the oily contrast medium (Pantopaque) and with the ionic water-soluble contrast media methiodal sodium (Abrodil, Conturex, Kontrast U) meglumine iothalamate (Conray Meglumine) and meglumine iocarmate (Bis-Conray, Dimer-X). Adhesive arachnoiditis has not yet been reported after the use of the nonionic water-soluble contrast medium metrizamide (Amipaque). Thus, this is considered the contrast medium of choice for lumbar myelography. Using the recommended dose of 10 ml with an iodine concentration of 170 mg/ml for this examination, adhesive arachnoiditis is unlikely to occur. Increased osmolality of spinal fluid after injection of contrast medium is related to increased frequency of arachnoiditis.

  12. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Etiologic and pathologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Quiles, M; Marchisello, P J; Tsairis, P

    1978-03-01

    The etiologic factors and pathologic findings in 38 patients with lumbar arachnoiditis are presented. Lumbar spine surgery and the injection of contrast materials prior to the diagnosis of this condition are considered the most important factors in its genesis. In this series, there was microscopic evidence of arachnoiditis ossificans in 3 patients and arachnoiditis calcificans in 1 patient.

  13. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our clinical with left buttock pain and paresthesia for 3 years. A large extradural cyst was found at T1-L2 level on MRI and a communication between the cyst and subarachnoid space was illustrated by CT-myelography. We performed cyst fenestration with primary repair of dural defect. Both patients' symptoms gradually subsided and follow up images taken 1-2 months postoperatively showed nearly disappeared cysts. There has been no documented recurrence in these two cases so far. Tailored laminotomy with cyst fenestration can be a safe and effective alternative choice in treating SEACs compared to traditional complete resection of cyst wall with multi-level laminectomy. PMID:24294463

  14. Adhesive arachnoiditis after lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Suolanen, J

    1977-08-01

    Of 1500 myelographies, 99 patients had subsequent myelographies from which the prevalence of adhesive arachnoiditis caused by the initial investigation could be calculated. Three different water-soluble contrast agents had been used in the initial study: Kontrast U (800 patients), Dimer-X (400 patients), and Conray (300 patients) and the subsets of patients restudied represented 6%, 8% and 8% respectively of the whole series. After the first myelography 68 patients had no operation, 31 patients had hemilaminectomy. Conray produced arachnoid changes in 71% of the nonoperated patients. This differed significantly from the 43% caused by Kontrast U, and the 27% evoked by Dimer-X. The same trend was evident in the operated subset. The severity of the arachnoid changes was greater after Conray. Analysis of the iodine content of the different contrast media and comparison with similar series suggested that hyperosmolarity of the agent was responsible for the changes.

  15. Arachnoid cells on culture plates and collagen scaffolds: phenotype and transport properties.

    PubMed

    Lam, Cornelius H; Hansen, Eric A; Hubel, Allison

    2011-07-01

    The arachnoid tissue is a critical component of cerebrospinal fluid removal. Failure of that function results in hydrocephalus, a serious medical condition. The purpose of this study was to characterize arachnoid cell transport in culture and on three-dimensional collagen scaffold. Arachnoid cells were harvested from rat brainstems and cultured onto bilayered bovine collagen scaffolds. Cell growth and phenotype (protein expression and morphometry) were determined. Permeability and hydraulic conductivity were quantified. Cells harvested from the anterior brainstem surface exhibited arachnoid cell phenotype (positive for vimentin, desmoplakin, and cytokeratin), readily penetrated the collagen scaffold, and doubled approximately every 2-3 days. The transepithelial electrical resistance value for a monolayer of cells was 160 Ω cm(2) and the permeability of indigo carmine was 6.7×10(-6)±1.1×10(-6) cm/s. Hydraulic conductivity of the collagen construct was 6.39 mL/min/mmHg/cm(2). Cells isolated from the anterior brain stem exhibited the same phenotype as those found in the native tissue and exhibited aspects of barrier function found in vivo. These studies suggest that an ex vivo model for the arachnoid granulation can be developed.

  16. Retroclival arachnoid cyst with hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Bonde, V; Muzumdar, D; Goel, A

    2008-10-01

    Arachnoid cysts are rare lesions occurring anywhere in the cerebrospinal axis. The sylvian fissure remains the most favoured site for their occurrence, followed by cerebellopontine angle, suprasellar, and quadrigeminal cisterns. Retroclival arachnoid cysts are very rare. We report a retroclival arachnoid cyst with bilateral cerebellopontine angle extensions with hemifacial spasm in a 26-year-old woman. The patient underwent surgery and her hemifacial spasm improved.

  17. Familial adhesive arachnoiditis associated with syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Pasoglou, V; Janin, N; Tebache, M; Tegos, T J; Born, J D; Collignon, L

    2014-06-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare condition, often complicated by syringomyelia. This pathologic entity is usually associated with prior spinal surgery, spinal inflammation or infection, and hemorrhage. The usual symptoms of arachnoiditis are pain, paresthesia, and weakness of the low extremities due to the nerve entrapment. A few cases have had no obvious etiology. Previous studies have reported one family with multiple cases of adhesive arachnoiditis. We report a second family of Belgian origin with multiple cases of arachnoiditis and secondary syringomyelia in the affected individuals.

  18. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Characteristics of arachnoids from Magellan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, C. B.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    Current high resolution Magellan data enables more detailed geological study of arachnoids, first identified by Barsukov et al. as features characterized by a combination of radar-bright, concentric rings and radiating lineations, named 'arachnoids' on the basis of their spider and web-like appearance. Identification of arachnoids in Magellan data has been based on SAR images, in keeping with the original definition. However, there is some overlap by other workers in identification of arachnoids, corona (predominantly bright rings), and novae (predominantly radiating lineations), as all of these features share some common characteristics. Features used in this survey were chosen based on their classification as arachnoids in Head et al.'s catalog and on SAR characteristics matching Barsukov et al.'s original definition. The 259 arachnoids have been currently identified on Venus, all of which were considered in this study. Fifteen arachnoids from different regions, chosen for their 'type' characteristics and lack of deformation by other regional processes, were studied in depth, using SAR and altimetric data to map and profile these arachnoids in an attempt to better determine their geologic and altimetric characteristics and possible formation sequences.

  20. Characteristics of arachnoids from Magellan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, C. B.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    Current high resolution Magellan data enables more detailed geological study of arachnoids, first identified by Barsukov et al. as features characterized by a combination of radar-bright, concentric rings and radiating lineations, named 'arachnoids' on the basis of their spider and web-like appearance. Identification of arachnoids in Magellan data has been based on SAR images, in keeping with the original definition. However, there is some overlap by other workers in identification of arachnoids, corona (predominantly bright rings), and novae (predominantly radiating lineations), as all of these features share some common characteristics. Features used in this survey were chosen based on their classification as arachnoids in Head et al.'s catalog and on SAR characteristics matching Barsukov et al.'s original definition. The 259 arachnoids have been currently identified on Venus, all of which were considered in this study. Fifteen arachnoids from different regions, chosen for their 'type' characteristics and lack of deformation by other regional processes, were studied in depth, using SAR and altimetric data to map and profile these arachnoids in an attempt to better determine their geologic and altimetric characteristics and possible formation sequences.

  1. Characteristics of arachnoids from Magellan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, C. B.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1993-03-01

    Current high resolution Magellan data enables more detailed geological study of arachnoids, first identified by Barsukov et al. as features characterized by a combination of radar-bright, concentric rings and radiating lineations, named 'arachnoids' on the basis of their spider and web-like appearance. Identification of arachnoids in Magellan data has been based on SAR images, in keeping with the original definition. However, there is some overlap by other workers in identification of arachnoids, corona (predominantly bright rings), and novae (predominantly radiating lineations), as all of these features share some common characteristics. Features used in this survey were chosen based on their classification as arachnoids in Head et al.'s catalog and on SAR characteristics matching Barsukov et al.'s original definition. The 259 arachnoids have been currently identified on Venus, all of which were considered in this study. Fifteen arachnoids from different regions, chosen for their 'type' characteristics and lack of deformation by other regional processes, were studied in depth, using SAR and altimetric data to map and profile these arachnoids in an attempt to better determine their geologic and altimetric characteristics and possible formation sequences.

  2. Arachnoid cyst producing recurrent neurological disturbances.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Fieger, H G

    1978-08-01

    A patient with an arachnoid cyst of the posteriro fossa experienced repeated episodes of transient right upper extremity numbness and weakness. Review of the literature indicates that arachnoid cysts of the posterior fossa and spinal canal as well as extradural spinal cysts may present with symptoms of transient neurological deficit which often suggest the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

  3. Recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis. A case report.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, J P; André, C; Couto, B A

    1988-03-01

    Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis is not an uncommon disease, usually having a monophasic course. We studied an atypical patient with recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis nine years after intrathecal anesthesia and the first attack of the disease. Also noteworthy was the favorable evolution after surgery.

  4. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Barıs; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture. PMID:24197809

  5. Cranial arachnoid membranes: some aspects of microsurgical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jian; Zhu, Xian-Li

    2007-07-01

    Although the arachnoid membranes have been known for more than 300 years, the anatomy of the arachnoid membranes has not been studied in detail. This study was performed to explore the microanatomical features of the cranial arachnoid membranes. The arachnoid membranes and cisterns were observed in eight Han Chinese adult human cadaveric brains with an operating microscope, without staining of intracranial structures or injection of colored material into blood vessels. Twenty seven arachnoid membranes and 21 subarachnoid cisterns were identified. The topographical features of each arachnoid membrane were described. On the basis of the arachnoid membranes we identified, the arachnoidal limits of the cisterns were discussed. The microsurgical anatomical research on the arachnoid membranes is a supplement to the anatomical study of the subarachnoid cisterns. The understanding of the topographical features of the arachnoid membranes is valuable to the reasonable dissection of the cisterns and the minimally invasive manipulations during microsurgical procedures.

  6. Cluster headache and arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Bengt; Persson, Staffan

    2013-12-01

    Cluster headache is a primary headache by definition not caused by any known underlying structural pathology. However, symptomatic cases have been described, e.g. tumours, particularly pituitary adenomas, malformations, and infections/inflammations. The evaluation of cluster headache is an issue unresolved. We present a case of a 43-year-old patient who presented with a 2-month history of side-locked attacks of pain located in the left orbit. He satisfied the revised International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for cluster headache. His medical and family histories were unremarkable. There was no history of headache. A diagnosis of cluster headache was made. The patient responded to symptomatic treatment. Computer tomography and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after 1 month displayed a supra- and intrasellar arachnoid cyst with mass effect on adjacent structures. After operation, the headache attacks resolved completely. Although we cannot exclude an unintentional comorbidity, in our opinion, the co-occurrence of an arachnoid cyst with mass effect with unilateral headache, in a hitherto headache-free man, points toward the fact that in this case the CH was caused or triggered by the AC. The headache attacks resolved completely after the operation and the patient also remained headache free at the follow-up. The response of the headache to sumatriptan and other typical CH medications does not exclude a secondary form. Symptomatic CHs responsive to this therapy have been described. Associated cranial lesions such as tumours have been reported in CH patients and the attacks may be clinically indistinguishable from the primary form. Neuroimaging, preferably contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging should always be considered in patients with cluster headache despite normal neurological examination. Late-onset cluster headache represents a condition that requires careful evaluation. Supra- and intrasellar arachnoid cyst can present as cluster

  7. Suprasellar arachnoid cyst with delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Singhal, Namit

    2007-11-01

    A 15-year-old female presented with primary amenorrhea and delayed onset of secondary sexual characteristics. Earlier she was operated for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for a tense suprasellar arachnoid cyst with obstructive hydrocephalus. MRI revealed recurrence of hydrocephalus. Hormonal levels were suggestive of hypogonadism and deficiency of growth hormone. She was operated for fenestration of cyst. In this case, suprasellar arachnoid cyst presented with delayed puberty, which is unusual.

  8. [Microsurgical treatment of intracraneal arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Saura Rojas, J Enrique; Horcajadas Almansa, Ángel; Ros López, Bienvenido

    2016-01-01

    Craniotomy and fenestration of membranes is one of the main treatment options for symptomatic arachnoid cysts. Open surgery advantages include, direct inspection of the cyst, biopsy sampling, fenestration in multilocular cysts and, in certain locations, cyst communication to basal cisterns. The aim of this paper is to review the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment modality for arachnoid cysts taking into account the different anatomical locations.

  9. Arachnoiditis

    MedlinePlus

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  10. Histopathological study of spinal meningioma originating from the arachnoid villi.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Morii, Eiichi; Kobayashi, Maki; Hori, Yumiko; Moriwaki, Takashi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Umegaki, Masao; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2011-02-01

    Although the histogenesis of meningiomas remains unclear, it is believed that arachnoid cells are the most likely origin of this type of neoplasm. Further, little attention has been paid to the histopathology of spinal meningiomas arising from the arachnoid villi. We came across a case of spinal meningioma that was locally attached to the arachnoid membrane. The associated arachnoid villi were investigated by light microscopy and immunohistochemical analysis. We confirmed the presence of tumor cells under the fibrous capsule that forms the outer component of the arachnoid villi. Tumor cells grew out from the apical portion of the arachnoid villi. Furthermore, immunohistochemical study suggested that arachnoid cells made the transition to tumor cells on the arachnoid cell layer.

  11. Dissapearance of arachnoid cyst after rupturing into subdural space.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, C; Cetinalp, E; Caner, H; Altinors, N

    2007-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are developmental anomalies usually diagnosed in childhood. The most important complications of arachnoid cysts are subdural haematomas and hygromas and intracystic haemorrhage. In our case we present a 7-year-old boy whose arachnoid cyst ruptured into the subdural space following a mild head injury and disappeared after draining the subdural haematoma by burr-holes.

  12. Minimally invasive excision of thoracic arachnoid web.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Pierluigi; Barone, Damiano Giuseppe

    2017-09-23

    Arachnoid webs are rare intradural lesions which can cause direct spinal cord compression and/or alteration of the CSF flow with syringomielia. Surgery has been historically performed via wide open laminectomies. The aim of this study is to prove the feasibility of minimally invasive techniques for the excision of arachnoid webs. A retrospective review of two cases of minimally invasive excision of thoracic arachnoid webs was performed. Surgery was carried out through expandable tubular retractors. Complete excision was achieved through the described approach, with minimal bony removal and soft tissue disruption. There were no intra- or peri- operative complications. Both patients were mobilised early and discharged home within 24hrs post-surgery. Postoperative imaging showed good re-expansion of the spinal cord, with no evidence of residual compression or tethering. For symptomatic arachnoid webs, surgery remains the only definitive treatment. In expert hands, the excision of arachnoid webs can be successfully achieved with tubular retractors and minimally invasive techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  14. [Congenital medulloblastoma associated with intracranial arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Gelabert González, Miguel; Serramito-García, Ramón; Liñares Paz, Mercedes; Aran-Echabe, Eduardo; García-Allut, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are very common lesions in paediatric patients, with treatment depending on their location and symptomatology. They are usually solitary cysts but may be associated with other central nervous system diseases such as tumours and congenital deformities. We describe the case of a neonate diagnosed with an arachnoid cyst of the quadrigeminal cistern treated by endoscopy. After the operation, the child's condition worsened; a CT scan revealed a midline posterior fossa tumour not visible in the preoperative neuroradiological tests. The tumour, a medulloblastoma, was partially removed. Given the child's age and the poor prognosis, oncological treatment was not undertaken. The association between medulloblastoma and arachnoid cyst is very rare, and we could find only one such case in the literature. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Microscopic lysis of lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D; Matheny, J B

    1978-03-01

    The results of a long-term study of 28 patients operated on for adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis are presented. The technique involved was microscopic lysis of adhesions. The first case of surgery was performed in 1966 and the last, in 1970, with followup through 1976. Numerous observations are made regarding the clinical picture and the appearance of arachnoiditis at the time of surgery. Some conclusions are drawn regarding the causes of this condition with some emphasis on the role of Pantopaque, multiple surgeries, and other trauma. The conclusion is that surgical attack on arachnoiditis is a straightforward surgical exercise that, when carried out with appropriate caution, produces no further neurologic deficits and some short-term improvement. However, the authors feel that this procedure should not be performed at the present time because there does not appear to be a method for preventing the reaccumulation of the scar tissue and subsequent recurrence of the symptoms.

  16. Multiple cavernous malformations with supravermian arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation are congenital vascular abnormalities that have been reported in 0.4% of the population; they represent 5-13% of all cerebrovascular malformations. Onset of cerebral cavernous malformations may be associated with seizures, intracranial hemorrhages, focal neurological deficit or migraine-type headaches. Some patients may require surgical intervention due to hemorrhage. Multiple cavernomas in childhood have been reported in the literature, but they are rare. This manuscript presents a 12-year-old girl with multiple cavernomas accompanied by supravermian arachnoid cyst detected by neuroimaging techniques. This is the first report that demonstrates a case of pediatric multiple cavernous malformation coexisting with arachnoid cyst of the supravermian cistern.

  17. Symptomatic lumbar spinal arachnoiditis: fact or fallacy?

    PubMed

    Petty, P G; Hudgson, P; Hare, W S

    2000-09-01

    It is generally accepted that chronic adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis is a cause of symptoms, notably back pain and/or pain (of almost any type, not necessarily 'anatomical') in the lower limbs, although there is no clearly defined clinical pattern which is clearly associated with this syndrome. There is no doubt that arachnoiditis occurs as a pathological and radiological entity due to a number of causes. In the view of the present authors, the nexus between the pathology and radiology on the one hand, and the patients' symptoms on the other hand, has not been demonstrated with any degree of scientific rigor.

  18. Novel surgical management of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis by arachnoid microdissection and ventriculo-subarachnoid shunting.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Asamoto, Shunji; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord tethering and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow disturbance are two major features in the pathophysiology of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis. We hypothesized that insufficient CSF supply to the surgically untethered spinal cord may be one of the causes of the typical post-operative recurrent extensive lesion. We report a patient with extensive spinal adhesive arachnoiditis, who was successfully treated using a novel surgical technique consisting of two procedures. First, microdissection of the thickened adherent arachnoid was performed to resolve spinal cord tethering. Next, a ventriculo-subarachnoid shunt was placed to provide sufficient flow of CSF. Clinical improvement was sustained for at least 22 months after surgery. The present surgical procedure may improve clinical outcome in patients with longitudinally extensive spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

  19. Multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, S; Cassarino, A; Braidotti, P

    1986-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts are a rare cause of compression of the contents of the lumbar spinal canal; in the literature only about 100 cases are reported. The various methods of diagnosis are discussed in the light of a recent case observed by the authors.

  20. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    PubMed Central

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  1. Neurologic deficits and arachnoiditis following neuroaxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    2003-01-01

    Of late, regional anesthesia has enjoyed unprecedented popularity; this increase in cases has brought a higher frequency of instances of neurological deficit and arachnoiditis that may appear as transient nerve root irritation, cauda equina, and conus medullaris syndromes, and later as radiculitis, clumped nerve roots, fibrosis, scarring dural sac deformities, pachymeningitis, pseudomeningocele, and syringomyelia, etc., all associated with arachnoiditis. Arachnoiditis may be caused by infections, myelograms (mostly from oil-based dyes), blood in the intrathecal space, neuroirritant, neurotoxic and/or neurolytic substances, surgical interventions in the spine, intrathecal corticosteroids, and trauma. Regarding regional anesthesia in the neuroaxis, arachnoiditis has resulted from epidural abscesses, traumatic punctures (blood), local anesthetics, detergents, antiseptics or other substances unintentionally injected into the spinal canal. Direct trauma to nerve roots or the spinal cord may be manifested as paraesthesia that has not been considered an injurious event; however, it usually implies dural penetration, as there are no nerve roots in the epidural space posteriorly. Sudden severe headache while or shortly after an epidural block using the loss of resistance to air approach usually suggests pneumocephalus from an intradural injection of air. Burning severe pain in the lower back and lower extremities, dysesthesia and numbness not following the usual dermatome distribution, along with bladder, bowel and/or sexual dysfunction, are the most common symptoms of direct trauma to the spinal cord. Such patients should be subjected to a neurological examination followed by an MRI of the effected area. Further spinal procedures are best avoided and the prompt administration of IV corticosteroids and NSAIDs need to be considered in the hope of preventing the inflammatory response from evolving into the proliferative phase of arachnoiditis.

  2. Arachnoiditis Ossificans - A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O'Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology.

  3. Arachnoiditis Ossificans – A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O’Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology. PMID:26401174

  4. Cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst associated with mirror movements

    PubMed Central

    Gurkas, Esra; Altan, Buket Yucel; Gücüyener, Kıvılcım; Kolsal, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign developmental collections of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). They constitute approximately 1% of intracranial masses. The cerebellopontine angle (CPA) arachnoid cysts are rare and often asymptomatic. The onset of symptoms and signs is usually due to the compression of the brain, cranial nerves and obstruction of CSF circulation. The major clinical symptoms for CPA arachnoid cysts were reported as headache, ataxia and 8th cranial nerve palsy. We report a patient with a CPA arachnoid cyst. He presented with cranial nerve palsies and mirror movements found in upper extremities. We postulated that CPA arachnoid cyst compressing the brain stem and the pyramidal decussation may lead to mirror movements. We conclude that mirror movements can be associated with CPA arachnoid cyst. PMID:26962347

  5. Syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts associated with spinal arachnoiditis following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Shunsuke; Hayashi, Kentaro; Otsuka, Munehiro; Fukuda, Shuji; Tsunoda, Keishi; Ushijima, Ryujiro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2012-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with primary Sjogren syndrome developed syringomyelia following two episodes of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of basilar artery aneurysms. Gait disturbance and abnormal sensation with pain over the foot and abdomen appeared 3 years after the last SAH. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a syringomyelia throughout the thoracic cord, from the T2 to T11 levels. In addition, the thoracic cord was compressed by multiple arachnoid cysts in the ventral side of spinal cord. Computed tomography myelography revealed complete block of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow at the T7 level. Surgery for microlysis of the adhesions and restoration of the CSF flow pathway was performed. Postoperatively, leg motor function slowly improved and she could walk unaided. However, abdominal paresthesia was persisted. Postoperative MR imaging revealed diminished size of the syrinxes. We should recognize syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts due to adhesive arachnoiditis as a late complication of SAH. Microlysis of the adhesions focusing on the lesion thought to be the cause of the symptoms is one of the choices to treat massive syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts associated with arachnoiditis following SAH.

  6. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S. K.; Sundar, I. Vijay; Sharma, Vinod; Goel, Ravishankar S.

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options. PMID:24082689

  7. Bilateral cerebellopontine arachnoid cyst: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anand; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, Radhey S; Gandhi, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cerebellopontine angle (CPA) arachnoid cysts (ACs) are very rare: only one case is reported in literature. Pathogenesis of those cysts is unknown; they are thought to be congenital. The presenting symptoms of CPA AC are frequently nonspecific or otological. The management of ACs of the CPA is controversial. We are reporting two cases of bilateral CPA AC with their pathophysiology and review of literature.

  8. Septooptic Dysplasia with an Associated Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    McLaurin-Jiang, Skyler V.; Wood, Julie K.

    2016-01-01

    A 4-week-old male infant presented with hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and hyperbilirubinemia. His medical history was remarkable for hydrocephalus secondary to an arachnoid cyst, intermittent hypoglycemia, hypothermia, and poor feeding requiring nasogastric tube for nutrition. Physical exam revealed retrognathia, mild hypotonia, micropenis, and clinodactyly. Ophthalmologic exam demonstrated bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH). Laboratory data confirmed inadequate cortisol and growth hormone response to hypoglycemia, a low thyroxine level, and direct hyperbilirubinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain confirmed the known history of arachnoid cyst with hydrocephalus but also revealed anterior pituitary hypoplasia, absence of the posterior pituitary bright spot, a thin pituitary stalk, and bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. A diagnosis of septooptic dysplasia (SOD) was made. Hormone replacement with hydrocortisone and levothyroxine was started with improvement in the infant's glycemic control, thermoregulation, feeding, and cholestasis. This case reinforces the importance of careful physical examination and laboratory review in a patient with known history of arachnoid cyst which has been previously described as an associated feature of optic nerve hypoplasia and hypopituitarism. PMID:27891281

  9. [Flexible endoscopy in surgical treatment of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis and arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, A A; Arestov, S O; Gushcha, A O

    2013-01-01

    Thecaloscopy is less invasive exploration of spinal subarachnoid space with ultra-thin flexible endoscope and endoscopic fenestration of scars and adhesions. Thecalopscopy was used in Russian neurosurgery at the first time. Since 2009 we operated 32 patients with following diagnosis: 17--spinal adhesive arachnoiditis (8--local forms, 9--diffuse forms), 12--spinal arachnoid cysts (7--posstraumatic cysts, 5--idiopathic cysts), 3--extramedullary tumors (thecaloscopic videoassistance and biopsy). In all cases we realized exploration of subarachnoid space and pathologic lesion with endoscopic perforation of cyst or dissection of adhesions using special instrumentation. Mean follow-up in our group was 11.4 months. Neurological improvement (mean 1.4 by modified Frankel scale, 1.8 by Ashworth spasticity scale) was seen in 87% of patients operated for spinal arachnopathies. Temporary neurological deterioration (mild disturbances of deep sensitivity) was seen in 9% of patients and managed successfully with conservative treatment. 1 (3.1%) patient was operated 3 times because of relapse of adhesions. There were no serious intraoperative complications (e.g., serious bleeding, dura perforation etc). Postoperative complications included 1 CSF leakage and 1 postoperative neuralgic pain. Mean term of hospitalization was 7.6 days. According to our data, we suppose that thecaloscopy is efficient and safe method, and should be widely used for spinal arachnopaties, adhesive arachnoiditis and arachnoid cysts. Taking into account that adhesive spinal arachnoiditis is systemic process and spinal arachnoid cysts can be extended as well, thecaloscopy may be regarded as the most radical and less-invasive way of surgical treatment existing currently in neurosurgery.

  10. Granulator Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, T H; Armantrout, G

    1999-08-02

    Following our detailed review of the granulation reports and additional conversations with process and development personnel, we have reached a consensus position regarding granulator selection. At this time, we recommend going forward with implementation of the tumbling granulator approach (GEMCO) based on our assessment of the tested granulation techniques using the established criteria. The basis for this selection is summarized in the following sections, followed by our recommendations for proceeding with implementation of the tumbling granulation approach. All five granulation technologies produced granulated products that can be made into acceptable sintered pucks. A possible exception is the product from the fluidized bed granulator. This material has been more difficult to press into uniform pucks without subsequent cracking of the puck during the sintering cycle for the pucks in this series of tests. This problem may be an artifact of the conditions of the particular granulation demonstration run involved, but earlier results have also been mixed. All granulators made acceptable granulated feed from the standpoint of transfer and press feeding, though the roller compactor and fluidized bed products were dustier than the rest. There was also differentiation among the granulators in the operational areas of (1) potential for process upset, (2) plant implementation and operational complexity, and (3) maintenance concerns. These considerations will be discussed further in the next section. Note that concerns also exist regarding the extension of the granulation processes to powders containing actinides. Only the method that involves tumbling and moisture addition has been tested with uranium, and in that instance, significant differences were found in the granulation behavior of the powders.

  11. [Intrasellar arachnoid cysts. Two case reports and literature review].

    PubMed

    Lorente-Muñoz, Asís; Lisbona-Alquézar, María Pilar; Alberdi-Viñas, Juan; Orduna-Martinez, Javier; González-Martínez, Luis; Fernández-Liesa, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Intrasellar arachnoid cysts are an uncommon pathology, with only a few cases reported in scientific literature. Their physiopathology is still unknown, with different hypothesis about their development. Differential diagnosis with other cystic sellar lesions is difficult. We report two cases of two intrasellar arachnoid cysts that were treated surgically using transsphenoidal approach and present a review of the literature.

  12. Subarachnoid-subarachnoid bypass for spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Toshiya; Moriyama, Tokuhide; Maruo, Keishi; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2014-11-01

    The authors report a case of adhesive arachnoiditis (AA) and arachnoid cyst successfully treated by subarachnoid to subarachnoid bypass (S-S bypass). Arachnoid cysts or syringes sometimes compress the spinal cord and cause compressive myelopathy that requires surgical treatment. However, surgical treatment for AA is challenging. A 57-year-old woman developed leg pain and gait disturbance. A dorsal arachnoid cyst compressed the spinal cord at T7-9, the spinal cord was swollen, and a small syrinx was present at T9-10. An S-S bypass was performed from T6-7 to T11-12. The patient's gait disturbance resolved immediately after surgery. Two years later, a small arachnoid cyst developed. However, there was no neurological deterioration. The myelopathy associated with thoracic spinal AA, subarachnoid cyst, and syrinx improved after S-S bypass.

  13. Why do central arachnoid pouches expand?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bernard; Guthkelch, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Three cases of progressive hydrocephalus, two occurring in infants and one in a 12 year old girl who also exhibited precocious puberty, were found to be associated with large arachnoid pouches originating within the posterior fossa. The pathogenesis of such cysts is discussed with special reference to the possibility that their progressive distension results from CSF pulsations of venous origin. Both a direct method of treatment (opening the cyst into the adjacent subarachnoid space) and an indirect one (insertion of a ventriculo-atrial shunt) have been used with success. Images PMID:4548436

  14. Obstetric epidurals and chronic adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Wee, M Y K; Thomson, K

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that obstetric epidurals lead to chronic adhesive arachnoiditis (CAA). CAA is a nebulous disease entity with much confusion over its symptomatology. This review outlines the pathological, clinical, and radiological features of the disease. The proposed diagnostic criteria for CAA are: back pain that increases on exertion, with or without leg pain; neurological abnormality on examination; and characteristic MRI findings. Using these criteria, there is evidence to show that epidural or subarachnoid placement of some contrast media, preservatives and possibly vasoconstrictors, may lead to CAA. No evidence was found that the preservative-free, low concentration bupivacaine with opioid mixtures or plain bupivacaine currently used in labour lead to CAA.

  15. Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kerr, John M; Ukpeh, Henry; Steinbok, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Spinal arachnoid cysts are an infrequently reported cause of abdominal pain in children. In this report, we describe the unusual case of an extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain in a pediatric patient without any signs of cord or nerve root compression. A 14-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain as the only symptom of a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst is reported. The patient was incidentally diagnosed with an intraspinal mass on abdominal computed tomography (CT) during the course of investigating her abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a T11-L2 extradural arachnoid cyst. After resection of the T11-L2 arachnoid cyst, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing abdominal pain as the sole presenting feature of a spinal arachnoid cyst in the pediatric population. This case illustrates that abdominal pain may be the first and only presentation of spinal arachnoid cysts in children. Spinal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained abdominal pain, even when there are no other symptoms of spinal disease.

  16. Syringomyelia associated with adhesive spinal arachnoiditis: MRI.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Nemoto, Y; Ohata, K; Daikokuya, H; Hakuba, A; Tashiro, T; Shakudo, M; Nagai, K; Nakayama, K; Yamada, R

    2001-04-01

    We reviewed the MRI of seven patients with syringomyelia associated with surgically proven adhesive spinal arachnoiditis to describe clinical and MRI findings in this condition. Using 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 tesla units, we obtained sagittal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo and axial T1-weighted images. Additional sagittal T2-weighted images were obtained without using motion-artefact suppression. Contrast medium was given intravenously to five patients. The syrinx cavities were thoracic in five cases, cervicothoracic in one, and extended from C4 to L1 in one. No Chiari malformation or craniovertebral junction anomaly was demonstrated. Meningeal thickening was seen on T2-weighted sagittal images only in one case. Cord deformity due to adhesion or displacement due to an associated arachnoid cyst was seen in all cases best demonstrated on axial images. Focal blurring of the syrinx wall on axial images was seen in six patients. Flow voids were seen in the syrinx fluid in all cases on T2-weighted images obtained without motion-artefact suppression. No abnormal contrast enhancement was demonstrated.

  17. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts in a kitten and a dog.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott; Cho, Doo Youn; Paulsen, Dan

    2009-09-01

    Two quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts with different pathogenesis are described in 2 different species. A 10-week-old male Persian kitten with a progressively decreasing level of consciousness died spontaneously. At necropsy, mild internal hydrocephalus, caudal cerebellar coning, and cerebellar herniation through the foramen magnum were associated with a congenital quadrigeminal arachnoid cyst compressing the rostral cerebellum and shifting the entire cerebellum caudally. In contrast, a possibly acquired quadrigeminal cyst was observed in a 2-year-old male neutered Yorkshire Terrier in association with necrotizing encephalitis. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts have been rarely reported in dogs and humans.

  18. Post-lumbar puncture arachnoiditis. The need for directed questioning.

    PubMed

    Etchepare, Fabien; Roche, Bruno; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Dion, Elisabeth; Bourgeois, Pierre; Fautrel, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    The inflammation of the arachnoid mater may produce a fibrinous exudate around the roots that causes them to adhere to the dural sheath. We report the case of a man aged 23 years who suffered from acute inflammatory truncated sciatica. The diagnosis of adhesive arachnoiditis was made in front of clinical arguments associated to typical signs on Myelo CT Scan and MRI. The only explanation ever found was a traumatic lumbar puncture at the age of 6 years for suspected meningitis. Sequelae of arachnoiditis are difficult to diagnosis. When MRI or myelography suggests it as a possibility, precise directed questioning is necessary to seek a history, albeit distant, of spinal or meningeal events.

  19. Regulation of secretory granule size by the precise generation and fusion of unit granules.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Lagunoff, David; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-07-01

    Morphometric evidence derived from studies of mast cells, pancreatic acinar cells and other cell types supports a model in which the post-Golgi processes that generate mature secretory granules can be resolved into three steps: (1) fusion of small, Golgi-derived progranules to produce immature secretory granules which have a highly constrained volume; (2) transformation of such immature granules into mature secretory granules, a process often associated with a reduction in the maturing granule's volume, as well as changes in the appearance of its content and (3) fusion of secretory granules of the smallest size, termed 'unit granules', forming granules whose volumes are multiples of the unit granule's volume. Mutations which perturb this process can cause significant pathology. For example, Chediak-Higashi syndrome / lysosomal trafficking regulator (CHS)/(Lyst) mutations result in giant secretory granules in a number of cell types in human beings with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome and in 'beige' (Lyst(bg)/Lyst(bg)) mice. Analysis of the secretory granules of mast cells and pancreatic acinar cells in Lyst-deficient beige mice suggests that beige mouse secretory granules retain the ability to fuse randomly with other secretory granules no matter what the size of the fusion partners. By contrast, in normal mice, the pattern of granule-granule fusion occurs exclusively by the addition of unit granules, either to each other or to larger granules. The normal pattern of fusion is termed unit addition and the fusion evident in cells with CHS/Lyst mutations is called random addition. The proposed model of secretory granule formation has several implications. For example, in neurosecretory cells, the secretion of small amounts of cargo in granules constrained to a very narrow size increases the precision of the information conveyed by secretion. By contrast, in pancreatic acinar cells and mast cells, large granules composed of multiple unit granules permit the cells to store

  20. [Arachnoid cysts. Historical evolution of the concept and pathophysiological theories].

    PubMed

    Conde Sardón, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts of central nervous system are benign collections filled with a liquid that is equal o similar to cerebrospinal fluid, coated with a single layer or flattened arachnoid cells membrane, congenital or secondary to trauma, meningitis or hemorrhage. First described by Bright in 1931, its definition and possible pathophysiology has been debated to date. Our objective is to present a summary of this process.

  1. A Case of Lumbosacral Arachnoiditis Ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Yuichi; Sudo, Takao; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Akeda, Koji; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 13-year-old boy who complained of pain in both buttocks. Plain and reconstructive computed tomography (CT) images showed an ossified lesion within the dura mater at the L5–S2 levels, and arachnoiditis ossificans in the lumbosacral area was suspected. In the operative findings obtained after cutting the dura, a bone fragment 4.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm in size was observed in the center of the strongly adhesive nerve bundle of the cauda equina, which was removed en bloc. The postoperative clinical course of the patient was excellent. The case, along with a review of literature is presented. PMID:28663987

  2. Constitutive modeling of pia-arachnoid complex.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Mao, Haojie; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2014-04-01

    The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain during impact or inertial loading. Recent studies have revealed the complicated material behavior of the PAC. In this study, the nonlinear viscoelastic, transversely isotropic material properties of the PAC were modeled as Mooney-Rivlin ground substance with collagen fibers strengthening within the meningeal plane through an exponential model. The material constants needed were determined using experimental data from in-plane tension, normal traction, and shear tests conducted on bovine specimens. Results from this study provide essential information to properly model the PAC membrane, an important component in the skull/brain interface, in a computational brain model. Such an improved representation of the skull/brain interface will enhance the accuracy of finite element models used in brain injury mechanism studies under various loading conditions.

  3. Spinal arachnoid pseudocysts in 10 rottweilers.

    PubMed

    Jurina, K; Grevel, V

    2004-01-01

    Ten rottweilers presenting with spinal arachnoid pseudocysts were investigated. In six dogs, the lesions were localised dorsally at C2-C3; in three dogs, dorsally and ventrally at C5-C6; and, in one dog, dorsally and ventrally at C6-C7. Clinical signs were consistent with focal compression of the affected spinal cord segments. The animals showed ataxia of all four limbs, with truncal ataxia and marked hypermetria in cases of C2-C3 involvement, or ambulatory tetraparesis in cases of C5-C6 or C6-C7 involvement. Other than signs indicative of spina bifida in one dog, no abnormalities could be detected on plain radiographs. Myelography was used to define the localisation and extent of the pseudocysts. Additional information was obtained using magnetic resonance imaging in five dogs. Five dogs underwent a dorsal laminectomy; in three cases, the pseudocyst was treated by marsupialisation and, in two, by durectomy.

  4. Syringomyelia associated with spinal arachnoiditis treated by partial arachnoid dissection and syrinx-far distal subarachnoid shunt.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Ohkawa, Toshika

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe a new modified surgical approach to minimize the postoperative recurrence of a syrinx after surgery to treat syringomyelia associated with spinal adhesive arachnoiditis in two cases. Both patients presented with progressive gait disturbance without any remarkable history, and spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a syrinx and broad irregular disappearance of the subarachnoid space and/or deformity of the cord. We successfully performed a partial arachnoid dissection and syrinx-far distal subarachnoid shunt for both cases.

  5. Syringomyelia Associated with Spinal Arachnoiditis Treated by Partial Arachnoid Dissection and Syrinx-Far Distal Subarachnoid Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Ohkawa, Toshika

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe a new modified surgical approach to minimize the postoperative recurrence of a syrinx after surgery to treat syringomyelia associated with spinal adhesive arachnoiditis in two cases. Both patients presented with progressive gait disturbance without any remarkable history, and spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a syrinx and broad irregular disappearance of the subarachnoid space and/or deformity of the cord. We successfully performed a partial arachnoid dissection and syrinx-far distal subarachnoid shunt for both cases. PMID:25232285

  6. MRI characteristics of fourth ventricle arachnoid diverticula in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Bazelle, Julien; Caine, Abby; Palus, Viktor; Summers, Brian A; Cherubini, Giunio B

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial arachnoid diverticula (cysts) are rare accumulations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the arachnoid membrane. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of fourth ventricle arachnoid diverticula in a group of dogs. The hospital's medical records were searched for dogs with MRI studies of the brain and a diagnosis of fourth ventricle arachnoid diverticulum. Clinical characteristics were recorded from medical records and MRI studies were reinterpreted by a board-certified veterinary radiologist. Five pediatric dogs fulfilled inclusion criteria. Clinical signs included cervical hyperaesthesia, obtundation, tetraparesis, and/or central vestibular syndrome. In all five dogs, MRI findings were consistent with obstructive hydrocephalus, based on dilation of all ventricles and compression of the cerebellum and brainstem. All five dogs also had cervical syringohydromyelia, with T2-weighted hyperintensity of the gray matter of the cord adjacent to the syringohydromyelia. A signal void, interpreted as flow disturbance, was observed at the mesencephalic aqueduct in all dogs. Four dogs underwent surgical treatment with occipitalectomy and durotomy. A cystic lesion emerging from the fourth ventricle was detected in all four dogs during surgery and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of arachnoid diverticula. Three dogs made excellent recovery but deteriorated shortly after surgery and were euthanized. Repeat MRI in two dogs revealed improved hydrocephalus but worsening of the syringohydromyelia. Findings from the current study supported theories that fourth ventricle arachnoid diverticula are secondary to partial obstruction of the central canal or lateral apertures and that arachnoid diverticula are developmental lesions in dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  7. Arachnoid ossificans of thoracolumbosacral spine in the advanced ankylosing spondylitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Seunghun; Kang, Chang-Nam; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2013-06-01

    Arachnoid ossificans is a rare type of chronic arachnoiditis characterised by the presence of calcification or ossification of the dura and arachnoid. There are a few reports of these findings in relation to various disease entities, but only one case has been reported in relation to ankylosing spondylitis. We describe a 76-year-old man of ankylosing spondylitis with arachnoiditis ossificans, who has suffered from low back pain and neuropathic leg pain.

  8. Regulation of secretory granule size by the precise generation and fusion of unit granules

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Ilan; Lagunoff, David; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Morphometric evidence derived from studies of mast cells, pancreatic acinar cells and other cell types supports a model in which the post-Golgi processes that generate mature secretory granules can be resolved into three steps: (1) fusion of small, Golgi-derived progranules to produce immature secretory granules which have a highly constrained volume; (2) transformation of such immature granules into mature secretory granules, a process often associated with a reduction in the maturing granule’s volume, as well as changes in the appearance of its content and (3) fusion of secretory granules of the smallest size, termed ‘unit granules’, forming granules whose volumes are multiples of the unit granule’s volume. Mutations which perturb this process can cause significant pathology. For example, Chediak–Higashi syndrome / lysosomal trafficking regulator (CHS)/(Lyst) mutations result in giant secretory granules in a number of cell types in human beings with the Chediak–Higashi syndrome and in ‘beige’ (Lystbg/Lystbg) mice. Analysis of the secretory granules of mast cells and pancreatic acinar cells in Lyst-deficient beige mice suggests that beige mouse secretory granules retain the ability to fuse randomly with other secretory granules no matter what the size of the fusion partners. By contrast, in normal mice, the pattern of granule–granule fusion occurs exclusively by the addition of unit granules, either to each other or to larger granules. The normal pattern of fusion is termed unit addition and the fusion evident in cells with CHS/Lyst mutations is called random addition. The proposed model of secretory granule formation has several implications. For example, in neurosecretory cells, the secretion of small amounts of cargo in granules constrained to a very narrow size increases the precision of the information conveyed by secretion. By contrast, in pancreatic acinar cells and mast cells, large granules composed of multiple unit granules

  9. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Ghazali, Faizul H.; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. Case Description: The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. Conclusion: This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome – a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems. PMID:25396073

  10. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri; Ghazali, Faizul H; Abdullah, Jafri M

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome - a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems.

  11. Delayed occurrence of spinal arachnoiditis following a caudal block

    PubMed Central

    Na, Eun Hye; Han, Soo Jeong; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Context Spinal arachnoiditis is a rare disease caused by fibrosis and adhesion of the arachnoid membrane due to chronic inflammation. The causes of arachnoiditis are infection, spinal surgery, intraspinal injection of steroid or myelography dye, and spinal anesthesia. Method Case report. Findings A 60-year-old woman presented with progressive weakness and sensory change of both legs and urinary symptoms. She had received a single caudal block 6 months before symptom onset. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoraco-lumbar spine showed an intradural extramedullary tumor at the T5–T7 level. She underwent laminectomy and tumor resection. The pathological finding was arachnoiditis. After surgery, a rehabilitation program of strengthening exercises of both lower extremities and gait training was started. At 2-month follow-up, she was able to walk with orthoses and performed daily activities with minimal assistance. Conclusion Symptoms of spinal arachnoiditis occurred 6 months after a single caudal block in this woman. Clinicians should be aware of this possible delayed complication. PMID:22330119

  12. Results of surgical lysis of lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, H A; Schuman, N

    1979-05-01

    From a series of 681 patients with lumbar disc disease treated between 1966 and 1978, 17 patients required surgical lysis of lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis, 8 having initially been operated upon by another surgeon. All patients had severe pain as a predominant feature, with pain being bilateral in 9 patients. Pain was the only major symptom in 3; the other 14 exhibited varying combinations of progressive neurological dysfunction. Three patients developed late symptoms after trauma, 8 to 21 years after back surgery. At operation, multisegmental arachnoiditis was found in 5 patients and anular or subtotal adhesions were found in 12. Complete lysis could not be obtained in 4 patients. Fourteen patients were treated with steroids at the time of operation. Follow-up after lysis was less than 1 year for 5 patients but averaged 4.8 years for the remaining 12. During the 1st year after operation, 76% experienced improvement in pain (35%, good to excellent), 71% experienced improvement in neurological status. Follow-up after at least 1 year revealed 50% still enjoying pain relief (25%, good to excellent) and 45% experiencing neurological improvement. Pain relief persisted in 4 of 5 patients followed 5 years or more. The etiological role of myelograpy and lumbar disc surgery in arachnoiditis has probably been over-rated. Arachnoiditis may be symptomatic or asymptomatic and may mask other, treatable lumbar lesions. More frequent intradural exploration for discrepancies between operative and myelographic findings might reveal, and benefit, more cases of spontaneous arachnoiditis mimicking lumbar disc disease.

  13. [The presyrinx state due to adhesive arachnoiditis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yasuhiro; Yagishita, Akira; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2006-06-01

    We report a 66-year-old woman with a presyrinx state due to adhesive arachnoiditis. She had a history of subarachnoid hemorrhage one year ago. She became aware of gait disturbance and abnormal sensation at the chest 6 months ago. Neurological examination revealed weakness of the both lower extremities and sensory disturbance below the T6 level. MR images of the thoracic spine revealed swelling of the thoracic cord at the T3-4 level, with an intramedullary hyperintensity on T2 weighted images (WI) and hypointensity on T1-WI. The intramedullary hypointensity on T1-WI was less than the CSF intensity. In addition, the thoracic cord lower than T5 level was compressed by an arachnoid cyst in the spinal canal. The preoperative diagnosis was the presyrinx state due to adhesive arachnoiditis. An operation for detachment of arachnoidal adhesion and restoration of CSF flow pathway was performed. After one month from the operation, neurological findings were improved. Postoperative MR images revealed improvement of swelling of the thoracic cord and intramedullary abnormal intensity. The arachnoid cyst in the spinal canal was decreased in the size. The presyrinx state is recently recognized condition before the formation of syringomyelia and that is known to resolve with proper treatment. We wish to emphasize we could prevent a progression to syringomyelia by a proper treatment for the presyrinx state.

  14. Communicating hydrocephalus accompanied by arachnoid cyst in aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Seung Heon; Cho, Won Ho; Ko, Jun Kyeung

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe a case of communicating hydrocephalus accompanied by an arachnoid cyst in an aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 69-year-old female was referred to our clinic due to the sudden onset of a headache. A head computed tomography scan demonstrated an arachnoid cyst in the right middle fossa with a mass effect and diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography then revealed a left internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The neck of the aneurysm was clipped successfully and the post-operative period was uneventful. However, two months after discharge, the patient reported that her mental status had declined over previous weeks. A cranial computed tomography scan revealed an interval increase in the size of the ventricle and arachnoid cyst causing a midline shift. Simultaneous navigation guided ventriculoperitoneal shunt and cystoperitoneal shunt placement resulted in remarkable radiological and clinical improvements.

  15. Arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Natarajan; Santhanakrishnan, Alwar Govindan; Sivakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2012-07-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not uncommon. However, lesions masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy are rare. A child with a cervicothoracic arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy is presented, and the relevant literature is reviewed. A girl born by vaginal delivery at full term without any antecedent risk factors for obstetric brachial plexus palsy was noted to have decreased movements of the right upper extremity. After 7 months, there was no improvement. An MRI scan was obtained, which revealed a cervicothoracic spinal extradural arachnoid cyst. During surgery, the cyst was found to communicate with the dura at the axilla of the C-7 nerve root. The cyst was excised in toto. Six months later, there was improvement in the infant's neurological status. This case illustrates that spinal arachnoid cysts should be entertained in the differential diagnosis when a child presents with obstetric brachial plexus palsy without known antecedent risk factors for obstetric palsy.

  16. Surgical management of syringomyelia associated with spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Ohata, K; Gotoh, T; Matsusaka, Y; Morino, M; Tsuyuguchi, N; Sheikh, B; Inoue, Y; Hakuba, A

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe a new surgical technique to minimise the postoperative recurrence of adhesion after microlysis of adhesion to treat syringomyelia associated with spinal adhesive arachnoiditis. A 47 year old male presented with numbness of the lower extremities and urinary disturbance and was demonstrated to have a case of syringomyelia from C1 to T2 which was thought to be secondary to adhesive spinal arachnoiditis related to a history of tuberculous meningitis. Following meticulous microlysis of the adhesions, maximal expansion of a blocked subarachnoid space was performed by expansive duraplasty with a Gore-Tex surgical membrane, expansive laminoplasty and multiple tenting sutures of the Gore-Tex graft. Postoperatively, the syringomyelia had be en completely obliterated and improvement of the symptoms had been also achieved. The technique described may contribute to improvement of the surgical outcome following arachnoid dissection by maintaining continuity of the reconstructed subarachnoid space.

  17. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch.

  18. [Epidemiology and classification of arachnoid cysts in children].

    PubMed

    Candela, Santiago; Puerta, Patricia; Alamar, Mariana; Barcik, Uli; Guillén, Antonio; Muchart, Jordi; García-Fructuoso, Gemma; Ferrer-Rodríguez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of arachnoid cysts in children is 1-3%. They are more frequent in boys. They can be located intracranially or in the spine. Intracranial cysts are classified as supratentorial, infratentorial, and supra-infratentorial (tentorial notch). Supratentorial are divided into middle cranial fossa, convexity, inter-hemisferic, sellar region, and intraventricular. Infratentorial are classified into supracerebellar, infracerebellar, hemispheric, clivus, and cerebellopontine angle. Finally spinal arachnoid cysts are classified taking into account whether they are extra- or intradural, and nerve root involvement. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Case Report: Floating fat globule within an arachnoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, Jayanand; Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Prabhu, Sathia; Chinchure, Swati

    2011-01-01

    Intralesional floating fat globules have been reported in cystic lesions such as teratoma of the ovary and dermoid of the head and neck but not within intracranial lesions. Fat globules dispersed within the subarachnoid space are a known imaging finding of ruptured intracranial dermoid. We report a unique case of an intralesional solitary floating fat globule within a multicompartmental arachnoid cyst, with varying locations on serial imaging. We also put forward a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of fat within an arachnoid cyst. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report in the literature. PMID:22013301

  20. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis following attempted epidural anesthesia--case report.

    PubMed

    Haisa, T; Todo, T; Mitsui, I; Kondo, T

    1995-02-01

    A 30-year-old female experienced a sudden sharp pain radiating down to the left leg from the lower back at epidural intubation for anesthesia at childbirth. She continued to complain of pain in the left leg afterwards. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a conglomeration of adherent nerve roots due to lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Microsurgical dissection of adherent nerve roots was performed. Her symptoms disappeared after surgery, but soon recurred, being less severe and responsive to anti-inflammatory agents. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis should be considered for differential diagnosis in patients presenting with back and leg pain syndrome.

  1. [A case of symptomatic interhemispheric arachnoid cyst in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tomabechi, M; Takano, K; Suzuki, N; Daita, G

    1999-04-01

    The incidence of interhemispheric cyst is rare. There have been only 12 cases reported in adults since the advent of CT. We encountered a case of an interhemispheric arachnoid cyst in a 54-year-old patient who had developed paraparesis. Excision of the cystic wall produced a satisfactory result. The CT and MRI scans were not contributory to histological differentiation of the lesions. According to the literature, however, it is highly likely that these patients are suffering from an arachnoid cyst, when the interhemispheric cyst without agenesis of the corpus callosum occurs in adults.

  2. Thorotrast induced adhesive arachnoiditis associated with meningioma and schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M W; Powell, H C; Wagner, M; Niwayama, G

    1978-05-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis, a meningioma and a schwannoma were found at autopsy in a 56 year old man who had undergone Thorotrast myelography 33 years previously. Thorotrast was demonstrated in tissue sections by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, radioautography, and x-ray spectrometry.

  3. Petrous apex arachnoid cyst extending into Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Batra, Arun; Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad; Singh, Anil Kumar; Tatke, Medha

    2002-09-01

    A rare case of arachnoid cyst involving the petrous apex with an unusual clinical presentation has been described with special emphasis in the imaging features and importance of accurate presurgical diagnosis. Differentiation from the other benign lesions involving the petrous apex and the role of newer MR techniques in the diagnosis of these lesions has been highlighted.

  4. Arachnoid cyst in a patient with psychosis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Alves, Alexandra; Talina, Miguel; Carreiro, Susana; Guimarães, João; Xavier, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Background The aetiology of a psychotic disturbance can be due to a functional or organic condition. Organic aetiologies are diverse and encompass organ failures, infections, nutritional deficiencies and space-occupying lesions. Arachnoid cysts are rare, benign space-occupying lesions formed by an arachnoid membrane containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In most cases they are diagnosed by accident. Until recently, the coexistence of arachnoid cysts with psychiatric disturbances had not been closely covered in the literature. However, the appearance of some references that focus on a possible link between arachnoid cysts and psychotic symptoms has increased the interest in this subject and raised questions about the etiopathogeny and the therapeutic approach involved. Clinical presentation We present the clinical report of a 21-year-old man, characterised by the insidious development of psychotic symptoms of varying intensity, delusional ideas with hypochondriac content, complex auditory/verbal hallucinations in the second and third persons, and aggressive behaviour. The neuroimaging studies revealed a voluminous arachnoid cyst at the level of the left sylvian fissure, with a marked mass effect on the left temporal and frontal lobes and the left lateral ventricle, as well as evidence of hypoplasia of the left temporal lobe. Despite the symptoms and the size of the cyst, the neurosurgical department opted against surgical intervention. The patient began antipsychotic therapy and was discharged having shown improvement (behavioural component), but without a complete remission of the psychotic symptoms. Conclusion It is difficult to be absolutely certain whether the lesion had influence on the patient's psychiatric symptoms or not. However, given the anatomical and neuropsychological changes, one cannot exclude the possibility that the lesion played a significant role in this psychiatric presentation. This raises substantial problems when it comes to choosing a

  5. [Paraplegia due to adhesive arachnoiditis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Luna, José Guadalupe; Sandoval Sánchez, Víctor; Benavides Rodríguez, David; Olivares Camacho, Jorge L; Taboada, Jesús B

    2009-01-01

    Various conditions of the spinal column occur at the lumbar level and new therapeutic surgical techniques have been applied to reduce the length of hospital stay, contribute to a quick return of patients to their activities of daily living, and reduce the postoperative limitations. However, a silent complication, adhesive arachnoiditis, has been reported with a frequency of 6-16% in cases undergoing lumbar surgery or with a history of revision surgery, and thus a second complication may occur, paraplegia, since the common symptom of arachnoiditis is persistent low back pain. The case of a 40-year-old patient is presented herein, who underwent lumbar spine surgery for herniated discs, and developed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina, which was diagnosed with MRI. He had irreversible paraplegia with diffuse involvement of the cauda equina despite the mechanical lavage and surgical debridement performed due to the persistence of serous fluid discharge from the wound. The interbody implant placed during the first surgery was removed and the treatment was completed with posterior stabilization reinstrumentation; the patient had persistent neurologic impairment. There are few reports in the world literature of paraplegia due to non-infectious adhesive arachnoiditis. The remaining reports of paraplegia have been in patients with spinal infection, such as HIV-TB, mycosis, brucellosis or meningeal hemorrhage. It is not easy for patients to understand the very likely irreversible neurologic lesion of his complication. However, it is important for the spine surgeon to bear in mind the occurrence and frequency of adhesive arachnoiditis which could lead to irreversible neurologic deficit in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

  6. Twin screw granulation: steps in granule growth.

    PubMed

    Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2012-11-15

    The present work focuses on the study of the progression of granules in different compartments along the length of screws in a twin screw granulator (TSG). The effects of varying powder feed rate; liquid to solid ratio and viscosity of granulation liquid on properties of granules was studied. The bigger granules produced at the start of the process were found to change in terms of size, shape and strength along the screw length at all the conditions investigated. The granules became more spherical and their strength increased along the screw length. Tracer granules were also introduced in order to understand the role of kneading and conveying elements in the TSG. The kneading elements promoted consolidation and breakage while the conveying elements led to coalescence, breakage and some consolidation. The results presented here help to provide a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the twin screw granulation process.

  7. Arachnoid membranes in the posterior half of the incisural space: an inverted Liliequist membrane-like arachnoid complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-An; Qi, Song-Tao; Fan, Jun; Huang, Guang-Long; Peng, Jun-Xiang

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the similarity of configuration between the arachnoid complex in the posterior half of the incisural space and the Liliequist membrane. Microsurgical dissection and anatomical observation were performed in 20 formalin-fixed adult cadaver heads. The origin, distribution, and configuration of the arachnoid membranes and their relationships with the vascular structures in the posterior half of the incisural space were examined. The posterior perimesencephalic membrane and the cerebellar precentral membrane have a common origin at the tentorial edge and form an arachnoid complex strikingly resembling an inverted Liliequist membrane. Asymmetry between sides is not uncommon. If the cerebellar precentral membrane is hypoplastic on one side or both, the well-developed quadrigeminal membrane plays a prominent part in partitioning the subarachnoid space in the posterior half of the incisural space. The arachnoid complex in the posterior half of the incisural space can be regarded as an inverted Liliequist membrane. This concept can help neurosurgeons to gain better understanding of the surgical anatomy at the level of the tentorial incisura.

  8. Syringomyelia Associated with a Huge Retrocerebellar Arachnoid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hue, Sung Baek; Kwon, Soon Chan; Lyo, In Uk; Sim, Hong Bo

    2015-01-01

    Occasionally, a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst can induce compression of the spinal cord and cause syringomyelia. Here, we report the case of a 29-year-old man with both progressive shoulder pain and gait disturbance, who was found to have a huge retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst associated with syringomyelia. Accordingly, posterior fossa decompression and arachnoid cyst excision were performed. Post-operative MRI showed a marked reduction in the size of the arachnoid cyst and syringomyelia. The patient's symptoms were clearly improved compared to before surgery. In our view, treatment in such patients should focus on decompressing the foramen magnum and include the removal of the coexistent arachnoid cyst walls, which appear to be the crucial factor in development of syringomyelia. In this report, we discuss the pathogenic mechanisms underlying syringomyelia-associated retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst and review the current literature on this topic. PMID:26512273

  9. [Experimental syringomyelia in rabbits and rats after localized spinal arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Tatara, N

    1992-12-01

    In order to produce syringomyelia, localized arachnoiditis was created in adult New Zealand albino rabbits and Wistar rats by the injection of kaolin into the thoracic spinal subarachnoid space and incision of the dura mater of the thoracic spinal cord. The rabbits and rats were divided into 3 groups; the control group, dural incision group (DG) and kaolin injection group (KG). Each rabbit was sacrificed at 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after the operation. Each rat was sacrificed at 8 and 16 weeks after the operation. Cavity formation in the cord of all rabbits was examined by ultrasound. All animals were perfused with 10% neutral beffered formalin at 150 cm H2O pressure, and histological examination was performed with Luxol fast blue (LFB) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains. Results obtained: (1) Cavity formation was noted in 6 of 16 DG of rabbit (37.5%), 5 of 16 KG of rabbit (31.2%) and 2 of 9 KG of rat (22.2%) with histological verification. With use of ultrasound, cavity was noted in 3 of 16 DG rabbits (12.5%) and 2 of 16 KG rabbits (18.8%). (2) Cavity formation was present in the cord adjacent to the marked adhesive arachnoiditis both in rabbits and in rats. (3) Cavity was noted in the ischemic area. (4) In 2 rabbits in which kaolin encircled whole surface of the spinal cord, hydromyelia was formed communicating with enlarged central canal caudad from the kaolin subarachnoid block. (5) Histological examination showed obliteration or narrowing of lumen of the small pial vessels involved in the adhesive arachnoiditis. In the cord parenchyma adjacent to the arachnoiditis, multiple spots of demyelination due secondary to ischemia demonstrated by LFB stain were noted. On the other hand, in the cord with the pia-arachnoid remained uninvolved, no demyelination was observed. (6) Localized adhesive arachnoiditis consisted of proliferation of fibrous tissue, lymphocytic infiltration and obliterating processes of small pial vessels involved in it. These data suggest that

  10. Hemorrhagic infarction following open fenestration of a large intracranial arachnoid cyst in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Auschwitz, Tyler; DeCuypere, Michael; Khan, Nickalus; Einhaus, Stephanie

    2015-02-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts are a rare condition thought to be congenital in nature. Treatment of intracranial arachnoid cysts remains controversial based on their variable presentation. Treatment options include CSF shunting, endoscopic fenestration, or craniotomy and open fenestration for larger cysts. The complications of these procedures can include hydrocephalus, subdural hematomas, hygromas, and--more rarely--intraparenchymal hemorrhage. The authors found very few reports of hemorrhagic infarction as a complication of arachnoid cyst fenestration in the literature. The authors report a case of an 18-year-old female patient who suffered an ipsilateral hemorrhagic infarction after craniotomy for open fenestration of an arachnoid cyst.

  11. Extradural spinal arachnoid cysts associated with spina bifida occulta.

    PubMed

    Apel, K; Sgouros, S

    2006-02-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are an uncommon cause of neural compression in children. Even more uncommon is the association of such cysts with spina bifida occulta. Two girls, 12 and 8-years-old, presented with left leg pain, deteriorating gait, clinical signs of left L5 and S1 root compression, without bladder or bowel symptoms. The first patient had left foot drop. The second patient had muscle wasting and smaller left foot with pes cavus. Radiographs showed spina bifida occulta of S1 in both. MRI revealed an extradural cyst at the S1 level, indenting the thecal sac and the L5 and S1 roots. At operation in both patients a large arachnoid cyst arising from a small dural defect in the axilla of the left S1 root was compressing and displacing it and the dural sac. It was removed and the defect was repaired. The first patient improved with complete recovery of the foot drop. An MRI at 12 months showed no cyst recurrence. The second patient made good recovery initially, but at 10 months developed recurrent symptoms. An MRI scan showed recurrence of the cyst with root compression. On repeat exploration a different dural defect was identified in a more anterior position and was repaired. The coexistence of extradural arachnoid cyst and corresponding bifid spinal segment has not been described previously. It raises the suspicion that the dural defect giving rise to the arachnoid cyst may be due to segmental dural dysgenesis in the context of the dysrhaphic neuroectodermal malformation.

  12. Cystic Meningioma Simulating Arachnoid Cyst: Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Docampo; Nadia, Gonzalez; Claudio, Vazquez; Carlos, Morales; Eduardo, Gonzalez-Toledo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show an unusual case of meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst on CT scan and MRI, diagnosed in a 63-year-old woman evaluated for headache and vision disorders. The meningioma shown is predominantly cystic with a small mural nodule enhancing after gadolinium and exhibiting diffusion restriction. Cystic portion of the tumor is hypodense on CT, and evidences fluid signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. PMID:25057425

  13. Cystic meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst: report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Jorge; Jorge, Docampo; Gonzalez, Nadia; Nadia, Gonzalez; Vazquez, Claudio; Claudio, Vazquez; Morales, Carlos; Carlos, Morales; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo; Eduardo, Gonzalez-Toledo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show an unusual case of meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst on CT scan and MRI, diagnosed in a 63-year-old woman evaluated for headache and vision disorders. The meningioma shown is predominantly cystic with a small mural nodule enhancing after gadolinium and exhibiting diffusion restriction. Cystic portion of the tumor is hypodense on CT, and evidences fluid signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging.

  14. Visualization of regional cerebrospinal fluid flow with a dye injection technique in focal arachnoid pathologies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Takeda, Masaaki; Mitsuhara, Takafumi; Morishige, Mizuki; Yamada, Naoto; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-05-01

    Surgical lysis of the thickened arachnoid membrane is the first choice of treatment in spinal arachnoid pathologies that cause flow disturbances or blockage of CSF. However, it is important to consider that while extensive lysis of the arachnoid may temporarily provide a wide pathway for CSF, an extensive lytic procedure may later cause secondary adhesion. Thus, it is ideal for the proper extent of the arachnoid lysis to be determined after careful analysis of regional CSF flow. The authors report their limited experience with intraoperative visualization of CSF flow in spinal arachnoid pathologies. Two patients with a dorsal arachnoid web (DAW) with cervical syringomyelia and 1 patient with focal adhesive arachnoiditis causing edema of the spinal cord were surgically treated at the authors' institution between 2007 and 2013. In all cases, the presence of a DAW or focal adhesive arachnoiditis was suspected from the findings on MRI, namely 1) an indentation on the upper thoracic spinal cord and 2) syringomyelia and/or edema of the spinal cord above the indentation. Exploratory surgery disclosed a transversely thickened arachnoid septum on the dorsal side of the indented cord. To prove blockage of the CSF by the septum and to decide on the extent of arachnoid lysis, regional CSF flow around the arachnoid septum was visualized by subarachnoid injection of gentian violet solution close to the web. Injected dye stagnated just close to the arachnoid septum in all cases, and these findings documented CSF blockage by the septum. In 2 cases, a 2-minute observation showed that the injected dye stayed close to the web without diffusion. The authors performed not only resection of the web itself but also lysis of the thickened arachnoid on both sides of the spinal cord to make a CSF pathway on the ventral side. In the third case, the dye stagnated close to the web at first but then diffused through the nerve root to the ventral CSF space. The lysis procedure was completed

  15. The next extreme sport? Subdural haematoma in a patient with arachnoid cyst after head shaking competition.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, J; Mamourian, A; Lollis, S; Duhaime, T

    2006-04-01

    A young man, engaged in a head shaking competition presented with headache, nausea and vomiting. Imaging revealed a subdural haematoma and ipsilateral arachnoid cyst. This novel mechanism of trauma underscores the predisposition to haemorrhage in patients with arachnoid cysts, even with minor trauma. Aetiology, imaging and possible treatment options are discussed.

  16. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  17. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes. PMID:25083391

  18. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes.

  19. Intracranial arachnoid cyst on dental radiography: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lisha; Sun, Zhipeng; Ma, Xuchen

    2013-03-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts (IACs) can present as congenital asymptomatic lesions that may predispose them to present as an incidental finding during radiographic examination. On the other hand, IACs may also give rise to a series of neurologic symptoms depending on their size and location, such as vomiting, seizures, headache, and ataxia. Skull deformities, including macrocephaly, may occur and become remarkable on dental radiology. We report 2 patients who were identified with IAC before orthodontic treatment. The dental radiologic appearance of IAC is discussed and may constitute a diagnostic challenge to both the dentist and radiologist.

  20. [medullar adhesive arachnoiditis: a late complication after obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ploteau, S; de Kersaint-Gilly, A; Boog, G

    2004-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman, G3P3, was progressively affected by spastic paraparesis with loss of sensitivity and urinary incontinence due to medullar adhesive arachnoiditis occurring five months after an epidural analgesia for repeat cesarean section. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a voluminous subarachnoid cyst and a septated syringomyelic cavitation attributed to metabisulfite, the preservative of epinephrine and to multiple lidocaine injections through the catheter in the postoperative period. Despite two decompressive neurosurgical operations, the neurological state of the patient continues to worsen.

  1. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  2. Evaluation of tenoxicam on prevention of arachnoiditis in rat laminectomy model.

    PubMed

    Cemil, Berker; Kurt, Gokhan; Aydın, Cansel; Akyurek, Nalan; Erdogan, Bulent; Ceviker, Necdet

    2011-08-01

    Post laminectomy arachnoiditis has been shown by experiments with rats and post operative radiological imaging in humans. The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the efficacy of tenoxicam in preventing arachnoiditis in rats. Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups, and L3 laminectomy was performed. In the tenoxicam group, 0.5 mg/kg tenoxicam was applied intraperitoneally. Normal saline was applied intraperitoneally in the control group. Later, the rats were killed at weeks 3 and 6, and the laminectomy sites were evaluated pathologically for arachnoiditis. The results showed that 6 weeks after surgery, the tenoxicam group showed lowest arachnoiditis grades. However, statistically significant difference was not found in arachnoiditis between the control group and the tenoxicam group. Based on these findings it is concluded that application of the tenoxicam after lumbar laminectomy did not effectively reduce arachnoiditis. Performing the most effective surgical technique without damage around tissue in a small surgical wound and having meticulous hemostasis in surgery seem to be the key for preventing arachnoiditis effectively.

  3. [Arachnoid cyst and tension headache: symptom or accidental finding?].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Niedermaier, N; Lowitzsch, K

    2002-08-01

    We report a 34 year old male patient presenting with occipital headache and bilateral shoulder and neck pain. Cranial MRT discloses a large arachnoid cyst ventral to the medulla oblongata. The cyst displaces the caudal medulla oblongata dorsally to an angle of almost 90 degrees without causing myelopathy. Physical examination reveals normal neurological findings without any sign of brainstem lesions or lesions of the medulla oblongata. Orthopedic evaluation shows mild functional abnormalities as expected in tension headache. Multiple electrophysiologic investigations such as motor-, somatosensory-, and acoustic-evoked potentials, masseter and brain stem reflexes, and electromyography of the left M. trapezius were performed and reveal normal results. MR-angiography discloses displacement of the left vertebral artery to the right without stenosis.We discuss the possibility of a causal connection between the cystic lesion and the reported symptoms. Considering the findings based on a review of the available literature we conclude that the pain syndrome is very likely unrelated to the arachnoid cyst. The latter is herewith an accidental finding in a patient with tension headache, and underlines the importance of thoroughfull clinical examination to avoid unnecessary diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.

  4. Arachnoiditis ossificans associated with syringomyelia: An unusual cause of myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, George M.; Kamali-Nejad, Tara; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) and its association with syringomyelia remains a rare and poorly understood phenomenon. Here, we present a case of AO associated with syringomyelia, a review of literature, and a discussion of current understanding of disease pathophysiology. Methods: A literature review was performed using MEDLINE (January 1900–May 2010) and Embase (January 1900–May 2010) to identify all English-language studies that described AO with syringomyelia. The current report was added to published cases. Results: Over 50 cases of AO are reported in literature, of which only eight are associated with syringomyelia. The various presumptive etiologies of syrinx formation include abnormalities in blood circulation, ischemia, hydrodynamic alternations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, tissue damage, or incidental coexistence. Changing CSF dynamics related to decreased compliance of the subarachnoid space and subsequent paracentral dissection of the spinal cord may be implicated in the disease process. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning may identify the syrinx but fail to diagnose the calcified arachnoid. Five patients, including the current case, improved clinically following laminectomy and decompression. Conclusions: Syringomyelia in association in AO is a rare phenomenon. A high index of suspicion is required and both MRI and computed tomography (CT) are recommended for diagnosis. The pathophysiology of syringomyelia in AO remains an area of ongoing research. PMID:23637667

  5. Coexistence of Epileptic Nocturnal Wanderings and an Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L.; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Ávila-Ordoñez, Mario U.

    2007-01-01

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side. During an all-night polysomnographic recording with audiovisual monitoring, dystonic posture followed by sleepwalking-like behavior was documented. The sleepwalking-like behavior was preceded by a spike discharge over the left frontocentral region with contralateral projection and secondary generalization during stage 2 sleep. Treatment with levetiracetam produced a striking remission of seizures. This supports a conservative management of an AC, considering that it may be an incidental finding. In epileptic patients, an AC may not necessarily be related to the location of the seizure focus. Citation: Jiménez-Genchi A; Díaz-Galviz JL; García-Reyna JC et al. Coexistence of epileptic nocturnal wanderings and an arachnoid cyst. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(4):399-401. PMID:17694730

  6. Hemifacial spasm caused by a cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Vargas, Antonio; González-Rodrigalvarez, Rosario; Garcia-Leal, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts involving the cerebellopontine angle are an unusual cause of hemifacial spasm. The case is reported of a 71-year old woman presenting with a right hemifacial spasm and an ipsilateral arachnoid cyst. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings suggested a neurovascular compression caused by displacement of the facial-acoustic complex and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery by the cyst. Cyst excision and microvascular decompression of the facial nerve achieved permanent relief. The existing cases of arachnoid cysts causing hemifacial spasm are reviewed and the importance of a secondary neurovascular conflict identification and decompression in these cases is highlighted.

  7. Optochiasmatic syndrome from adhesive arachnoiditis with coexisting hypophyseal adenoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Iraci, G; Carteri, A; Marin, G

    1977-03-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is an occasional finding during neurosurgical operations for pituitary adenoma, previously treated by radiation therapy. A case where an arachnoidal process was found in combination with an eosinophilic pituitary adenoma, which had never been treated by irradiation, is reported. A 44-year-old woman at the time of surgery with scarce endocrinologic symptoms had suffered visual loss from 2 episodes, 18 years apart. Analysis of her symptoms, neuro-ophthalmologic findings and neurodadiologic features suggest that her visual damage was due to an optochiasmatic arachnoiditis, rather than to the tumor itself.

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst. Two case histories with pathological observations.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Takeshi; Harada, Kunyu; Nishimura, Shigeru; Onda, Jun; Nishi, Tohru; Takagaki, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are well known to induce chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head injury. However, histological observations of the arachnoid cyst and hematoma membrane have only been rarely described. An 8-year-old boy and a 3-year-old boy presented with CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst. Surgical removal of the hematoma and biopsy of the hematoma membrane and cyst wall were performed. Clinical courses were good and without recurrence more than 1.5 years after surgery. Histological examination suggested that the cysts did not contribute to hematoma development. Pediatric hematoma membranes, similar to adult hematoma membranes, are key in the growth of CSDH. Therefore, simple hematoma evacuation is adequate as a first operation for CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst.

  9. Dual lumbar bronchogenic and arachnoid cyst presenting with sciatica and left foot drop.

    PubMed

    Candy, Nicholas; Young, Adam; Devadass, Abel; Dean, Andrew; McMillen, Jason; Trivedi, Rikin

    2017-07-31

    Spinal bronchogenic cysts are rare findings, with only four cases of lumbar bronchogenic cysts reported in the literature. All of these bronchogenic cysts involved the conus medullaris. We present the first case of a lumbar bronchogenic cyst and arachnoid cyst arising from the cauda equina in a 68-year-old male. Uniquely, this bronchogenic cyst also contained components of an arachnoid cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a compressive cystic lesion at the level of the L3 vertebra splaying the cauda equina. An L3/L4 laminectomy was performed with marsupialisation of the cyst. Histological examination revealed pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium confirming the diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst, as well as a pleated fibrovascular tissue lined by sparsely spaced small monomorphic arachnoidal cells, indicating an arachnoid cyst. We demonstrate that bronchogenic cysts can be successfully treated with marsupialisation.

  10. Cri-du-chat syndrome associated with arachnoid cyst causing triventricular hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Balci, S; Oguz, K K

    2001-10-01

    A male child with cri-du-chat syndrome [46,XY, del (5p13)] together with an arachnoid cyst causing triventricular hydrocephalus by obstruction of the aqueduct of Sylvius is described. This association has not been reported previously.

  11. [«De novo» development of a suprasellar arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, Miguel; Pita-Buezas, Lara; Santín-Amo, José María; Román-Pena, Paula; Serramito-García, Ramón; García-Allut, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts are fluid-filled cavities that arise within the cranial arachnoid, representing approximately 1%-2% of all intracranial lesions among the paediatric population. We present the case of a 2-year-old boy who presented with instability and episodes of ocular deviation. A computed tomography scan (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a suprasellar cyst and obstructive hydrocephalus. At birth a transfontanellar ultrasound was normal. The cyst underwent endoscopic fenestration with complete remission of symptoms. In the review of the literature, we found only 6 previous cases of an intracranial arachnoid cyst whose origin was not clearly congenital or traumatic, and ours is the second case of a suprasellar arachnoid cyst to arise de novo. The clinical features, imaging characteristics and treatment of the previously reported cases are discussed.

  12. [Expansive duralplasty and subarachnoid reconstruction for spinal adhesive arachnoiditis using Gore-Tex surgical membrane].

    PubMed

    Seki, Toshitaka; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2004-12-01

    Effective surgical treatment of adhesive spinal arachnoiditis has not been established because of its complex clinical manifestation. The authors present a new surgical technique to minimize the postoperative recurrence of adhesion after microlysis of adhesion to treat spinal adhesive arachnoiditis. After complete release and reconstruction of the spinal cord, a 0.1 mm Gore-Tex surgical membrane was placed over the cord and fixed to the lateral dural surface with stay sutures. Furthermore, maximal expansion of a subarachnoid space was performed by expansive dural plasty with a 0.3 mm Gore-Tex surgical membrane. We performed this surgical method in tree cases of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis. During a postoperative follow-up period ranging from 2 to 3 years, postoperative neurological deterioration did not occur in all cases, and postoperative MR imaging studied showed no adhesion spinal cord and reconstructed subarachnoid space. The authors believe that this procedure is an effective surgical treatment for spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

  13. Dorsal cervical spinal arachnoid cyst (Type III) presenting with dorsal column dysfunction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Mahesh Krishna

    2017-03-01

    Spinal arachnoid cysts are usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. Expansion of the cyst, whether acute, subacute or chronic, leads to neural compression resulting in radicuopathy and/or myelopathy. This case report is of a patient who presented primarily with posterior column dysfunction,subacute in onset and rapidly progressing. Images of the cervical spine showed a dorsal arachnoid cyst, causing significant cord compression and signal changes in the cord, with no scalloping of the vertebrae. The author explains the mechanism of rapid expansion of an asymptomatic spinal arachnoid cyst, causing neural compression leading to fast progression of neurological deficits. The dorsal location of the cyst, explain the absence of radiculopathy, which is a common presenting feature of ventrally located intradural arachnoid cyst.

  14. Children With Arachnoid Cysts Who Sustain Blunt Head Trauma: Injury Mechanisms and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alexander J; Kuppermann, Nathan; Thelen, Angela E; Stanley, Rachel M; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-03-01

    Arachnoid cysts are abnormal intracranial fluid collections, and there is concern that these cysts may bleed or rupture following blunt head trauma. Our objective was to determine the risk of cyst-related complications in a cohort of children with arachnoid cysts who were evaluated for head trauma. We analyzed the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) head trauma public use data set, which was the product of a study that enrolled children with blunt head trauma from June 2004 to September 2006. We identified children with arachnoid cysts on cranial computed tomography (CT) and described the patient demographics, mechanisms of injury, clinical presentations, CT evidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and clinical outcomes. Clinically important TBI was defined as TBI leading to: 1) death from TBI, 2) neurosurgical intervention, 3) intubation for > 24 hours for the TBI, or 4) hospitalization for 2 or more nights for the head injury in association with TBI on CT. Data were available for 43,399 children who sustained blunt head trauma, of whom 15,899 had cranial CT scans obtained and 68 (0.4%) had arachnoid cysts. Falls were the most common mechanisms of injury (47%) and 87% of children had either moderate or severe injury mechanisms. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores ranged from 6 to 15, with 61 (90%) having GCS scores of 15. Two of the children with arachnoid cysts had TBIs on CT, one of which was clinically important. There were no identified cases of arachnoid cyst-related bleeding or complications. In this cohort of 68 children with arachnoid cysts who sustained head trauma, none demonstrated cyst-related bleeding or complications. This suggests the risk of arachnoid cyst-related complications in children following blunt head trauma is low and evaluation should align with existing clinical decision rules. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. Role of Merlin in the Growth and Transformation of Arachnoidal Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    merlin in arachnoidal and meningioma cells. The focus of year 1 was to characterize and develop meningioma -specific NF2 model systems. We have...successfully generated three additional meningioma cell lines. The expression of merlin was quantitated at the transcript and protein level in these and...to silence merlin. Two siRNAs significantly reduced transcript and protein levels of merlin in arachnoidal cells and the SF6717 meningioma cell line

  16. Characteristics and management of arachnoid cyst in the pediatric headache clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Zeharia, Avi; Cohen, Yishai Haimi; Konen, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are generally identified incidentally on brain imaging, although they occasionally cause symptoms because of expansion or bleeding. This study aims to describe patients in whom an arachnoid cyst was identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study performed for the evaluation of headache in a pediatric headache clinic and to highlight the clinical dilemma posed by this finding. A retrospective descriptive study design was used. The electronic database of a tertiary pediatric headache clinic was searched for all newly admitted patients with headache who underwent MRI evaluation in 2008-2013. The indications for imaging were based on clinical practice parameters recommended by the Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Clinical and imaging parameters were collected from the files. Findings were compared between patients with and without an arachnoid cyst. Of the 250 (31%) of 800 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 11 (4.4%) had an arachnoid cyst. Two patients had a ruptured cyst with midline shifting and a large subdural collection. Both presented with headache, vomiting, phonophobia, and photophobia. In the other 9 asymptomtic patients with an arachnoid cyst, imaging showed only a mild mass effect without midline shifting; their symptoms were considered unrelated to the cyst. The patients with a symptomatic arachnoid cyst were referred for surgery, with good outcome. Arachnoid cysts are found in a small percentage of brain scans performed for evaluation of headache in the setting of a hospital-based pediatric headache clinic. For the long run in these clinical settings, most of the cysts are asymptomatic. Precise anamnesis, neurologic examination, and imaging performed according to accepted practice guidelines may help clinicians determine if the headache and symptoms are caused by the cyst or if they should seek primary headache diagnosis with overlapping symptoms. The clinical distinction between symptomatic and asymptomatic

  17. Postoperative spinal adhesive arachnoiditis presenting with hydrocephalus and cauda equina syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koerts, Guus; Rooijakkers, Herbert; Abu-Serieh, Basel; Cosnard, Guy; Raftopoulos, Christian

    2008-02-01

    To our knowledge, the association between hydrocephalus and postoperative spinal adhesive arachnoiditis (SAA) has never been reported. Herein we describe an unusual case of a 45-year-old man with spinal adhesive arachnoiditis (SAA) who developed delayed-onset hypertensive hydrocephalus and cauda equina syndrome (CES) after multiple low-back surgeries. The patient's clinical presentation, imaging findings, surgical management, and the possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of the present literature.

  18. Adhesive arachnoiditis after lumbar radiculography with Dimer-X and Depo-Medrol.

    PubMed

    Dullerud, R; Morland, T J

    1976-04-01

    Lumbar radiculographs were obtained in 252 patients with suspected disk herniation. Fifteen patients who underwent previous radiculography with Dimer-X plus Depo-Medrol exhibited adhesive arachnoiditis. This was not observed in 6 patients who received Dimer-X alone. No positive correlation between radiological diagnosis of adhesive arachnoiditis and clinical symptoms can be demonstrated. The authors suggest that steroids not be used intrathecally in combination with water-soluble contrast media.

  19. Acquired cervical spinal arachnoid diverticulum in a cat.

    PubMed

    Adams, R J; Garosi, L; Matiasek, K; Lowrie, M

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, female entire, domestic, shorthair cat presented with acute onset non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with a C3-C4 acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion and the cat was treated conservatively. The cat was able to walk after 10 days and was normal 2 months after presentation. The cat was referred five and a half years later for investigation of an insidious onset 3-month history of ataxia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine was repeated, demonstrating a spinal arachnoid diverticulum at C3 causing marked focal compression of the spinal cord. This was treated surgically with hemilaminectomy and durectomy. The cat improved uneventfully and was discharged 12 days later. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Intracranial arachnoid cysts in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Kaneko, Takaaki; Sakai, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akihisa; Watanabe, Akino; Watanabe, Shohei; Maeda, Norihiko; Kumazaki, Kiyonori; Suzuki, Juri; Fujiwara, Reina; Makishima, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Takeshi; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Mikami, Akichika

    2014-01-01

    An intracranial arachnoid cyst was detected in a 32-year-old, 44.6-kg, female chimpanzee at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed and the cognitive studies in which she participated were reviewed. MRI revealed that the cyst was present in the chimpanzee's right occipital convexity, and was located in close proximity to the posterior horn of the right lateral ventricle without ventriculomegaly. CT confirmed the presence of the cyst and no apparent signs indicating previous skull fractures were found. The thickness of the mandible was asymmetrical, whereas the temporomandibular joints and dentition were symmetrical. She showed no abnormalities in various cognitive studies since she was 3 years old, except a different behavioural pattern during a recent study, indicating a possible visual field defect. Detailed cognitive studies, long-term observation of her physical condition and follow-up MRI will be continued.

  1. Spinal arachnoid cysts - our experience and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kanwaljeet; Borkar, Sachin Anil; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2017-04-01

    Arachnoid cysts are discrete pockets of CSF or CSF-like fluid found adjacent to normal CSF spaces, either spinal or cranial. Spinal arachnoid cysts (SAC) are most commonly extradural, however intradural or perineural are also described. All patients admitted to our center and surgically treated with a diagnosis of SAC, were included in the study. The results were analyzed in terms of the clinical symptoms, location of cyst, surgical procedure performed and outcome following surgery. Eleven patients were operated for SAC during the study period and the mean age at surgery was 32.9 ± 20.8 years. Male to female ratio was 2.7:1 in our series. Common presenting complaints were lower limb weakness and pain. The median duration of symptoms before surgery was nine months (mean 21 ± 28 months). Ten patients had extradural cysts while one had intradural cyst. Extradural cysts were managed by laminoplasty and excision of the cyst, except for one patient in whom the SAC extended from C3 to L2 and marsupialization of the cyst was done. The only patient with intradural cyst underwent cyst fenestration. One patient had two communications and both were closed. In our series, at the time of last follow up two patients became completely free of symptoms, while other five reported substantial improvement in their symptoms. Operative complications were noted in two patients. Formation and expansion of SAC is not completely understood. Myelography, CT myelography and cinematic MRI can demonstrate the location of the communication site between the spinal subarachnoid space and the cyst cavity. The usual management of SAC is excision of the cyst with closure of the dural defect in extradural cysts, while in case of intradural cysts, especially the ones located anterior to the cord, fenestration of the cyst is usually performed.

  2. Sacral extradural arachnoid cyst in association with split cord malformation.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Zohreh; Hanaei, Sara; Nejat, Farideh

    2016-09-01

    Split cord malformation (SCM) is a congenital disease that can be associated with other spinal anomalies. Few cases of concurrent intradural arachnoid cyst and SCM have been sporadically reported; however, sacral extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) with SCM is very rare. The report describes our experience with simultaneous surgery in patients with concurrent SEAC and SCM in an effort to document the treatment of the rare spinal concomitant anomalies. The present study is designed as a case series. This is a continuous series of patients with coexisting SCM and SEAC who were presented to our institution. The lower extremities weakness and deformity, radiological imaging, urodynamic tests, and surgical aspects of the patient population are documented. Cases with concomitant anomalies were consecutively enrolled among 73 patients who were operated on for SCM between 2008 and 2014. Clinical data and surgical findings were prospectively filed and retrospectively evaluated. There were seven patients (2 boys and 5 girls), with age ranging from 18 to 119 months (mean: 56.71±39.49). Type I SCM was detected in six cases, and type II SCM was detected in one case. Tethering of the cord was detected in all seven patients, and six patients (85.7%) had syrinx formation rostral to the level of SCM. All patients had at least one kind of urological dysfunctions manifesting as neurogenic bladder. On surgery, fistulous orifice of the meningeal cyst was found and ligated in six cases, and the other one was repaired via sealing the cyst walls as near as possible to the thecal sac. In patients with symptomatic SCM, the signs of concurrent SEAC may be masqueraded by the former condition. It would be impossible to attribute a given sign, particularly urological signs, to either SCM or SEAC. Whatever the sign and nature, both conditions are better to be managed surgically in one session under a single anesthesia to prevent duplicate complications of further anesthesia and interventions in

  3. Craniocervical arachnoid cyst in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome: a unique case: case report.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imad Saeed; Ahmed, Osama; Thakur, Jai Deep; Shorter, Cedric D; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2013-02-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome, or brevicollis, is a complex congenital disorder caused by the improper segmentation of the cervical vertebrae. The authors present the very rare case of a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome who presented with an intradural arachnoid cyst at the craniocervical junction. They also examine possible factors contributing to this association. A 46-year-old woman presented with complaints of progressively worsening headaches and dizziness of 18 months' duration. She also demonstrated mild bilateral upper-extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed fused cervical vertebrae and a dorsal intradural arachnoid cyst at the craniocervical junction, extending down to the fourth cervical level. Because of worsening myelopathy and the presence of brainstem compression, the patient underwent surgical excision of the arachnoid cyst, which was approached via a midline posterior suboccipital/upper cervical route. An endoscope was introduced through a gap between the occiput and fused upper cervical vertebrae, and the arachnoid cyst was widely fenestrated. Postoperatively, the patient has remained symptom free for more than 2 years with evidence of good radiological decompression. The authors report a unique association between craniocervical arachnoid cyst and Klippel-Feil syndrome. To their knowledge, no other cases of this association have been reported in the literature. Arachnoid cysts should be part of the differential diagnosis in the presence of worsening myelopathic symptoms or pain in patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  4. Understanding size enlargement and hardening of granules on tabletability of unlubricated granules prepared by dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Dahiya, Sandeepkumar; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2011-02-01

    The mechanism of loss of "reworkability" or tabletability of dry granulated microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was investigated in relation to both granule size enlargement and granule hardness. Slugs of MCC were prepared under three pressures (12.5, 37.5, and 93.8 MPa) and tabletability (tensile strength vs. pressure) of respective granules (three different sizes) was determined. Nominal single granule fracture strength and granule friability were measured. The reduction in tabletability was profound for harder granules, which were obtained from higher slugging pressure. This is consistent with their ability to resist granule fragmentation during tableting. Variation in granule size exhibits negligible effect on tabletability for the lowest slugging pressure and only a small effect for the middle and highest slugging pressure. This observation is again related to different tendency to granule fragmentation during compaction. The results suggest that granule-hardening negatively affects tensile strength more than that of granule size enlargement for MCC.

  5. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure.

    PubMed

    LaSarge, Candi L; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offsets the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predict a net increase in granule cell innervation of CA3. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell communication with CA3. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offset the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predicts a net increase in granule cell >> CA3 innervation. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell >> CA3 communication. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25600212

  7. Giant intradural extramedullary spinal hydatid cyst--a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muddassir; Kirmani, Sanna; Rashid, Mubashir

    2012-01-01

    The hydatidosis, or echinococcosis, has a characteristic geographic distribution, occurring most frequently in sheep-raising regions in Mediterranean, Central Asian, and South American countries and in Australia. Spinal hydatidosis is very rare, and intradural location is a rarer category of spinal hydatidosis. We report a case of intradural extramedullary spinal hydatid cyst in a 9-year-old boy. On magnetic resonance imaging, an intradural extramedullary giant cystic lesion was seen mimicking an arachnoid cyst. However, endemic origin of the patient and positive serology helped to make the diagnosis of hydatid cyst, which was confirmed on postoperative histopathology. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A comparison of artificial solar granules with real solar granules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woehl, H.; Nordlund, A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of computer-generated images of solar granules were compared with data from the literature and with observations of granules from 1975 and 1979. The lifetimes, shapes, and dimensions of the granules were estimated, and the results are discussed. No significant differences were found between the artificial images and the observed granules. The ratios of width to length among the artificial granules are given in a table.

  9. Individual surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Han, Guoqiang; You, Chao; Liu, Chuangxi; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Yunbiao

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts (IAC) are benign congenital cystic lesions filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This study evaluated microsurgical craniotomy and endoscopy in the surgical treatment of IAC. Eight-one consecutive pediatric patients with IAC were surgically treated between January 2004 and January 2011. The surgical procedures included microsurgical craniotomy and endoscopy. Symptoms at presentation, location of IAC, surgical treatment options, and effectiveness were evaluated. There were 43 males and 38 females and the mean age was 8.7 years (range between 1 month and 14 years) at the time of surgery. The cyst location was supratentorial in 72 patients and infratentorial in 9 patients, arachnoid cyst were identified. Follow-up period ranged between 2 and 8 years. Of the 49 patients with headache 83.67% of patients had cure and 10.2% had significant improvement. Of the eight patients with hydrocephalus and gait disturbances, six (75%) had complete total relief of symptoms and two (25%) patients had significant improvement. Four of the six patients with cognitive decline and weakness showed improvement. Of the 18 patients with epilepsy seizure freedom was: Engle class I grade I in 14 (77.78%) patients; class II in 2 (11.11%) patients; and class III in 2 (11.11%) patients. Follow-up studies from 2 to 8 years showed that headache was cured in 41 of the 49 cases (83.67%), significantly improved in 5 cases (10.20%), and showed no variation in 3 cases (6.12%). Hydrocephalus and gait disturbances were controlled in six of the eight cases (75.00%) and significantly improved in two cases (25.00%). Cognitive decline and weakness were obviously improved in four of the six cases (66.67%) and exhibited no variation in two cases (33.33%). According to the Engle standard, the following results were obtained from 18 patients with epilepsy: Grade I in 14 cases (77.78%); grade II in 2 cases (11.11%); and grade III in 2 cases (11.11%). Eleven cases with local or general

  10. Postoperative arachnoiditis diagnosed by high resolution fast spin-echo MRI of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Fitt, G J; Stevens, J M

    1995-02-01

    Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis is cited as an important cause of recurrent pain and disability after extradural lumbar disc surgery. Myelography using oil-based or ionic water-soluble contrast media was a major contributing factor, and it was not possible to distinguish the prevalence of arachnoiditis probably due to surgery alone. Today it should be possible to make this distinction, which was the purpose of this study. Using high-resolution MRI in 129 patients symptomatic at least 1 year after surgery, a prevalence of arachnoiditis of 20% was found, which dropped to 3% when patients who had undergone oil-based myelography were excluded. Arachnoiditis was diffuse in 88% and focal in 12%. When oil-based media were involved it was focal in 13%, and when not, in one of three cases. It was concluded that arachnoiditis does occur after extradural lumbar disc surgery independently of the use of some myelographic contrast media, and that it may be diffuse or confined only to the operated level. Its prevalence was estimated at 4.6%, four cases focal and two cases diffuse. The causes and clinical significance can only be the subject of speculation.

  11. Biomechanical response of the bovine pia-arachnoid complex to tensile loading at varying strain-rates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Lee, Jong B; Leung, Lai Yee; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2006-11-01

    The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain due to impact or inertial loading. However, the mechanical properties of the pia-arachnoid complex and its influence on the overall response of the brain have not been well characterized. Consequently, finite element (FE) brain models have tended to oversimplify the response of the pia-arachnoid complex, possibly resulting in a loss of accuracy in the model predictions. The aim of this study was to determine, experimentally, the material properties of the pia-arachnoid complex under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Specimens of the pia-arachnoid complex were obtained from the parietal and temporal regions of freshly slaughtered bovine subjects with the specimen orientation recorded. Single-stroke, uniaxial quasi-static and dynamic tensile experiments were performed at strain-rates of 0.05, 0.5, 5 and 100 s(-1) (n = 10 for each strain rate group). Directional differences of the pia-arachnoid complex were also investigated. Results from this study revealed the pia-arachnoid complex was rate-dependent and isotropic, suggesting that the pia-arachnoid complex can provide omnidirectional support and load bearing to the adjacent brain tissue during an impact.

  12. Symptomatic Large Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare cause of compressive myelopathy. SEACs can be either congenital or acquired, but the etiology and the mechanism for their development are still unclear. A number of cases have been reported in the literature, and the one-way valve mechanism is the most widely accepted theory which explains the expansion of cysts and spinal cord compression. We report two cases of SEAC in this article. Patients had intermittent, progressive cord compressing symptoms. MRI image showed large SEAC which caused compression of the spinal cord. Pre-operative cystography and CT myelography were performed to identify the communicating tract. Pre-operative epidural cystography showed a fistulous tract. The patients underwent primary closure of the dural defect which was a communicating tract. The operative finding (nerve root herniation through the tract) suggested that the SEAC developed through a checkvalve mechanism. Postoperatively, the patients had no surgical complications and symptoms were relieved. Based on our experience, preoperative identification of the communicating tract is important in surgical planning. Although surgical excision is the standard surgical treatment, primary closure of the dural defect which was a communicating tract can be an acceptable surgical strategy. PMID:26512289

  13. Neuropsychological improvement after posterior fossa arachnoid cyst drainage.

    PubMed

    Cuny, M L; Pallone, M; Piana, H; Boddaert, N; Sainte-Rose, C; Vaivre-Douret, L; Piolino, P; Puget, S

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa arachnoid cysts (PFAC) are mostly considered as benign lesions of the cerebellum. Although many studies have shown the major role of the cerebellum in modulating movement, language, cognition, and social interaction, there are few studies on the cognitive impact and surgical decompression of PFAC. We present the cases of two brothers successively diagnosed with PFAC and neuropsychological delay. After multidisciplinary discussion with the boys' parents, it was decided to drain these lesions. Clinical signs, cerebral images, and neuropsychological status were assessed on admission and then 1 and 3 years after surgery. At presentation, both children had mild cerebellar signs, associated with cognitive and visual-motor impairments and academic regression. CT scans revealed retrovermian cysts, which were shunted. Post-operatively, both brothers demonstrated improved visual-motor skills and behavior. At follow-up, we observed disappearance of dysarthria and academic delay and significant improvement in cognition especially at the intelligence scale and in language. Fine motor skills had improved but remained slower than the average and writing skills appeared limited. Except for PFAC which impair cerebrospinal fluid circulation or which are responsible for a significant mass effect, most PFAC are usually considered as "asymptomatic" and do not require surgical treatment. The two cases reported herein suggest that these lesions might be responsible for some associated but potentially reversible neuropsychological impairment. In the future, clinical assessment should include neuropsychological evaluation to help inform decision for surgical decompression in these children with PFAC.

  14. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  15. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria Usman; Devlin, James Anthony Joseph; Fraser, Alexander

    2016-12-16

    The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires ongoing surveillance.

  16. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, James Anthony Joseph; Fraser, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires ongoing surveillance. PMID:27986694

  17. Myeloscopic observation of adhesive arachnoiditis in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Y; Yone, K; Sakou, T

    1996-07-01

    In this study a myeloscope was used to assess the influence of adhesive arachnoiditis on the surgical outcome of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). The presence or absence and the degree of the complication of adhesive arachnoiditis were preoperatively determined by myeloscopy in 36 patients with LSS, and these findings were compared with the postoperative results. Various degrees of adhesive changes in the cauda equina were observed in all 36 patients. Patients with marked adhesions, which may indicate a blocked cauda equina, had distinctly worse operative results than did patients with slight or moderate adhesions. Adhesive arachnoiditis was considered to be one of the causes for the poor operative results for LSS. Myeloscopy is useful in diagnosing the morbid condition of the cauda equina in LSS, and for predicting the operative results.

  18. Tuberculous lumbar arachnoiditis mimicking conus cauda tumor: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Subhas K; Rao, KVL Narasinga; Mahadevan, Anita; Devi, B Indira

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis involving cauda equina is rare. A patient with lumbar tuberculous arachnoiditis in the absence of both vertebral and meningeal tuberculosis, which was mimicking spinal intradural extramedullary tumor is described here. Diagnosis was made based on intraoperative findings and was confirmed by histopathology. Surgical decompression along with a combination of steroid and antitubercular therapy resulted in a good outcome. At 3 months follow-up, the patient regained bladder control and was able to walk with support. Clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative findings are described. Pathology and the relevant literature are discussed. Based on the patient's clinical and radiologic findings, it was believed that the patient had a conus cauda tumor and was operated on. Histologic examination of the mass revealed tuberculoma. Surgical decompression followed by antituberculosis medication resulted in good outcome. Hence tuberculous arachnoiditis should be considered in differential diagnosis of conus cauda tumors. PMID:21716842

  19. Microstructural characterization of the pia-arachnoid complex using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory; Coats, Brittany

    2015-01-27

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the world, and is often identified by the presence of subdural and/or subarachnoid hemorrhages that develop from ruptured cortical vessels during brain-skull displacement. The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC), also known as the leptomeninges, is the major mechanical connection between the brain and skull, and influences cortical vessel deformation and rupture following brain trauma. This complex consists of cerebrospinal fluid, arachnoid trabeculae, and subarachnoid vasculature sandwiched between the arachnoid and pia mater membranes. Remarkably, studies of the tissues in the PAC are largely qualitative and do not provide numerical metrics of population density and variability of the arachnoid trabeculae and subarachnoid vasculature. In this study, microstructural imaging was performed on the PAC to numerically quantify these metrics. Five porcine brains were perfusion-fixed and imaged in situ using optical coherence tomography with micrometer resolution. Image processing was performed to estimate the volume fraction (VF) of the arachnoid trabeculae and subarachnoid vasculature in 12 regions of the brain. High regional variability was found within each brain, with individual brains exhibiting up to a 38.4 percentage-point range in VF. Regions with high VF were often next to regions with low VF. This suggests that some areas of the brain may be mechanically weaker, increasing their susceptibility to hemorrhage during TBI events. This study provides the first quantifiable data of arachnoid trabeculae and subarachnoid vasculature distribution within the PAC and will be valuable to understanding brain biomechanics during head trauma.

  20. Extensive spinal intradural arachnoid cyst exhibiting a “double cord sign” on magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    MIN, Woo-Kie; KIM, Ju-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Study design Retrospective case study. Objective To report on a case with an extensive intradural arachnoid cyst that caused left hemiparesis. Summary of background data Intradural arachnoid cysts are not common causes of spinal cord compression and myelopathy. Although arachnoid cysts of the spine have been occasionally reported, cases with extensive intradural arachnoid cysts associated with hemiparesis are rarely reported. Method The patient was a 43-year-old woman who had cervical myelopathy symptoms, including radiating pain and left limb hemiparesis with gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extensive intradural extramedullary multi-septated cyst from the C6–T12, exhibiting a double cord sign on the T2-weighted axial image of the spine. The mass blocked normal cerebrospinal fluid flow, which led to cord compression. Two stages of operations were planned because of the patient's health status. The patient underwent laminectomy and cyst wall resection on the level of the T5–T7, which had the most compressed lesion. From C6–T2, a right side unilateral laminectomy was performed to resolve the right limb's neurology after the first operation. Result Hypoesthesia and the radiating pain were improved immediately postoperatively; however, motor power at the C8–T1 level of the right unaffected side was impaired and included finger abduction and finger flexion, which decreased to 4/5. During the second operation, the arachnoid cyst was exposed by performing a right unilateral laminectomy. The patient's neurologic symptoms were improved without neurologic sequelae. Conclusion In the case of an extensive cyst that exhibits a double cord sign, an intradural arachnoid cyst should be suspected as a differential diagnosis. Without radical excision of all lesions, neurologic symptoms can be recovered by performing selective resection and CSF normalization can be achieved even at extensive levels. PMID:27053833

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with an arachnoid cyst in a juvenile taekwondo athlete: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic subdural hematoma and arachnoid cysts are common lesions in neurosurgical practice. Arachnoid cysts are a well-known predisposing factor for chronic subdural hematoma. Here, we present a 12-year-old taekwondo athlete with chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts. The chronic subdural hematoma was evacuated through 2 burr holes and the patient was discharged in good condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of chronic subdural hematoma with associated arachnoid cysts in a taekwondo athlete. We also review the literature on sports-related chronic subdural hematomas associated with arachnoid cysts in children.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human cranial subarachnoid space: an overlooked mediator of cerebral disease. II. In vitro arachnoid outflow model

    PubMed Central

    Holman, David W.; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Grzybowski, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    The arachnoid membrane (AM) and granulations (AGs) are important in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) homeostasis, regulating intracranial pressure in health and disease. We offer a functional perspective of the human AM's transport mechanism to clarify the role of AM in the movement of CSF and metabolites. Using cultures of human AG cells and a specialized perfusion system, we have shown that this in vitro model mimics the in vivo characteristics of unidirectional fluid transport and we present the first report of serum-free permeability values (92.5 µl min−1 mm Hg−1 cm−2), which in turn are in agreement with the CSF outflow rates derived from a dynamic, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging-based computational model of the subarachnoid cranial space (130.9 µl min−1 mm Hg−1 cm−2). Lucifer yellow permeability experiments have verified the maintenance of tight junctions by the arachnoidal cells with a peak occurring around 21 days post-seeding, which is when all perfusion experiments were conducted. Addition of ruthenium red to the perfusate, and subsequent analysis of its distribution post-perfusion, has verified the passage of perfusate via both paracellular and transcellular mechanisms with intracellular vacuoles of approximately 1 µm in diameter being the predominant transport mechanism. The comparison of the computational and in vitro models is the first report to measure human CSF dynamics functionally and structurally, enabling the development of innovative approaches to modify CSF outflow and will change concepts and management of neurodegenerative diseases resulting from CSF stagnation. PMID:20335192

  3. mRNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules are dynamic, self-assembling structures that harbor non-translating mRNAs bound by various proteins that regulate mRNA translation, localization, and turnover. Their importance in gene expression regulation is far reaching, ranging from precise spatial-temporal control of mRNAs that drive developmental programs in oocytes and embryos, to similarly exquisite control of mRNAs in neurons that underpin synaptic plasticity, and thus, memory formation. Analysis of mRNP granules in their various contexts has revealed common themes of assembly, disassembly, and modes of mRNA regulation, yet new studies continue to reveal unexpected and important findings, such as links between aberrant mRNP granule assembly and neurodegenerative disease. Continued study of these enigmatic structures thus promises fascinating new insights into cellular function, and may also suggest novel therapeutic strategies in various disease states. PMID:25531407

  4. Cauda equina syndrome associated with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts in ankylosing spondylitis: improvement following surgical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, P J; Allcutt, D A; Bates, D; Crawford, P J

    1990-01-01

    A case of cauda equina syndrome with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is described. The value of computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive means of establishing the diagnosis is emphasised. In contrast to previously reported cases the patient showed neurological improvement following surgical therapy. Surgery may be indicated in some patients, particularly when there is nerve root compression by the arachnoid cysts and when the patient is seen early before irreversible damage to the cauda equina has occurred. Images PMID:2292702

  5. Benign occipital unicameral bone cyst causing lower cranial nerve palsies complicated by iophendylate arachnoiditis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, W. G.; Kalbag, R. M.; Ramani, P. S.; Tomlinson, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    A 20 year old girl presented with a history of neck and occipital pain for six weeks, which was found to be due to a unicameral bone cyst of the left occipital condylar region. The differential diagnosis of bone cysts in the skull is discussed. Six months after the operation, the patient again presented with backache due to adhesive arachnoiditis. The latter was believed to have arisen as a result of a combination of spinal infective meningitis and intrathecal ethyl iodophenyl undecylate (iophendylate, Myodil, Pantopaque). The nature of meningeal reactions to iophendylate and the part played by intrathecal corticosteroids in relieving the arachnoiditis in the present case are discussed. Images

  6. Arachnoid Cyst in the Middle Cranial Fossa Presenting with Pulsatile Exophthalmos: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Atsushi; KON, Hiroyuki; HARYU, Shinya; MINO, Masaki; SASAKI, Tatsuya; NISHIJIMA, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman suffered gradual progression of right pulsatile exophthalmos and slight headache. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated outward and downward displacement of the right globe and an arachnoid cyst in the right middle cranial fossa associated with thinned and anterior protrusion of a bony orbit. Microscopic cystocisternotomy was performed and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inside of the cyst communicated into the carotid cistern and cistern in the posterior cranial fossa. Pulsatile exophthalmos improved immediately after surgery. Arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa presenting with exophthalmos is rare. Microscopic cystocisternotomy might successfully improve CSF flow and relieve exophthalmos. PMID:24305013

  7. Arachnoid membrane: the first and probably the last piece of the roadmap.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Most neurosurgical procedures could be performed noninvasively by working through the natural corridors provided by the subarachnoid cisterns. In consequence, the subarachnoid cisterns have been considered as the roadmaps for the microneurosurgeons. The concept and the contents of the cisterns have been well known and described, but the knowledge of the detailed anatomy of the arachnoid membranes, which are the real septa of the cisterns and provide the practical and important landmarks and planes for the dissections during the brain surgeries, is still lacking. The present article reviews the previous reports of the intracranial arachnoid membranes with a special emphasis on the microsurgical anatomy and the clinical significance.

  8. Symptomatic spinal intradural arachnoid cysts in the pediatric age group: description of three new cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Cho, D Y

    2001-10-01

    Spinal arachnoid cysts are a relatively uncommon lesion that may be either intra- or extradural, and intradural spinal arachnoid cysts are even less common. These cysts are usually asymptomatic but may produce symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots suddenly or progressively. We present three cases in the pediatric age group with spinal intradural arachnoid cysts without a preceding history of trauma. Three patients with symptomatic intradural arachnoid cysts were investigated with conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI scans demonstrated the intradural arachnoid cysts with slightly lower CSF signal intensity on the gradient echo images and slightly higher signal intensity on T1-weighted images. The first cyst was located at the level T12-L1 and compressed the conus medullaris, with neurogenic bladder and cauda equina syndrome for 2 months. The second was located at the level C5-T1 ventrally, with spastic gait and neurogenic bladder for 4 years. The other was located at T2-3 ventrally, with sudden onset of quadriplegia after jumping rope. The combined treatment of total resection and wide fenestration in our three patients produced an excellent return of neurologic function in each one, except for residual urinary disturbance in case 2. Intradural spinal arachnoid cysts appear to result from an alteration of the arachnoid trabeculae; some such cysts are ascribed anecdotally to previous trauma or arachnoiditis, whereas the majority are idiopathic and congenital. The majority of intradural spinal arachnoid cysts occur in the thoracic region and most are dorsal to the neural elements. Only 10 cases have been reported in which the intradural arachnoid cysts were located anterior to the cervical spinal cord, of which 8 were in the pediatric age group, like our case 2. Myelography, postcontrast CT myelography and MRI have been demonstrated as useful for the diagnosis of intradural arachnoid cysts. MRI is the imaging

  9. Mechanical properties of bovine pia-arachnoid complex in shear.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2011-02-03

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a major public health and socioeconomic problem that affects 1.5 million Americans annually. Finite element methods have been widely used to investigate TBI mechanisms. The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain during impact or inertial loading. Existing finite element brain models have tended to oversimplify the response of the PAC due to a lack of accurately defined material properties of this structure, possibly resulting in a loss of accuracy in the model predictions. The objectives of this study were to experimentally determine the material properties of the PAC under shear loading. Bovine PAC was selected in the current study in view of its availability and comparability with previous studies. Tangential shear tests were conducted at 0.8, 7.3, and 72 s(-1). The mean shear moduli were 11.73, 20.04, and 22.37 kPa at the three strain rates tested. The ultimate stress, at the three strain rates, was 9.21, 17.01, and 22.26 kPa, while the ultimate strain was 1.52, 1.58, and 1.81. Results from the current study provide essential information to properly model the PAC membrane, an important component in the skull/brain interface, in a computational model of the human/animal head. Such an improved representation of the in vivo skull/brain interface will enhance future studies investigating brain injury mechanisms under various loading conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Apparatus for granulating coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, E.; Harada, K.; Yoshii, N.

    1983-08-30

    A granulating apparatus is disclosed comprising a stirring tank or a duct for containing a slurry particulate to granular coal having a binder incorporated therein, a rotary shaft disposed in the tank or duct and at least one agitating blade made of metal netting and attached to the rotary shaft.

  11. Efficacy of arachnoid plasty with collagen sheets and fibrin glue: An in vitro experiment and a case review

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Junya; Ichinose, Tsutomu; Terakawa, Yuzo; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Tsuruno, Takashi; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative subdural fluid collection sometimes occurs after clipping of cerebral aneurysms. Arachnoid plasty is used to prevent such postoperative complications; however, the optimal materials for arachnoid plasty remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify the optimal materials for arachnoid plasty and report our experience of arachnoid plasty after clipping of unruptured aneurysms. Methods: In an in vitro experiment, adhesive strengths of three materials permitted for use in the intradural space, such as collagen sheets, gelatin sponge, and oxidized cellulose sheets, were measured by assessing their water pressure resistance. Then, 80 consecutive cases surgically treated unruptured cerebral aneurysms were retrospectively reviewed to examine the occurrence rate of postoperative subdural fluid collection. Results: The collagen sheet exhibited the greatest adhesive strength, so we used collagen sheets for the arachnoid plasty procedures. In all of these cases, arachnoid plasty was performed with fibrin glue-soaked collagen sheets. No postoperative subdural fluid collection, inflammation, or allergic reactions occurred in any case. Conclusions: The present study suggests that collagen sheet might be one of the optimal materials for arachnoid plasty. This technique is simple and may be effective to prevent subdural fluid collection after clipping. PMID:26060599

  12. Large/giant meningiomas of posterior third ventricular region: falcotentorial or velum interpositum?

    PubMed

    Behari, Sanjay; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Kumar, Ashish; Mehrotra, Anant; Srivastava, Arun K; Sahu, Rabi N; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K

    2014-01-01

    Surgical excision of rare, large-to-giant posterior third ventricular (PTV) meningiomas [including velum-interpositum meningiomas (VIM; postero-superior venous complex displacement; without falco-tentorial attachment) and falco-tentorial meningiomas (FTM; falco-tentorial attachment; displacing major veins antero-inferiorly)] is extremely challenging. To study the management nuances in the excision of large-to-giant PTV meningiomas. Tertiary care referral center. Four patients with large (>3 cm; n = 2) and giant (>5 cm; n = 2) meningiomas (FTM = 2; VIM = 2, mean tumor size = 4.9 cm) underwent occipital transtentorial approach (OTT) for tumor excision. One also underwent a second-stage supracerebellar infratentorial (SCIT) approach. The side of approach was determined by lateral tumor extension and venous displacement (right = 3, left = 1). Near-total removal or subtotal excision (<10% remaining) with radiotherapy was performed in 2 patients each, respectively. At follow-up (mean: 14.75 months), clinical improvement without tumor recurrence/re-growth was achieved. Extent of excision was determined by position of great vein of Galen; tumor attachment to falco-tentorium or major veins; its consistency; its lateral and inferior extent; and, presence of a good tumor-neuraxial arachnoidal plane. OTT is the preferable approach for large-to-giant meningiomas as it provides a wider corridor and better delineation of tumor-neurovascular arachnoidal interface.

  13. Thoracic spinal cord impingement by an arachnoid web at the level of a hemivertebra: case report.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Molly E; Hunt, Matthew A; Jones, Kristen E; Polly, David W

    2017-09-08

    Congenital scoliosis due to a hemivertebra requires surgical stabilization prior to skeletal maturity if rapidly progressive curve growth occurs. Here the authors present the unique case of a man who, at the age of 12 years, had undergone Harrington rod placement for stabilization of progressive congenital scoliosis due to a T-11 hemivertebra and then, at the age of 53 years, presented with acutely progressive myelopathy due to spinal cord compression from an arachnoid web at T-11 despite a solid fusion mass at the prior surgical site. The patient underwent a posterior midline approach for resection of the T-11 pedicle at the level of the hemivertebra, intradural spinal cord detethering with resection of the arachnoid web at T-11, and T2-L2 instrumented fusion with deformity correction, leading to subsequent resolution of his acute myelopathic symptoms. In conclusion, arachnoid web formation superimposed on preexisting tension on the thoracic spinal cord from congenital scoliosis due to a T-11 hemivertebra caused acute myelopathy in an adult with a previously solid fusion mass from childhood. The resolution of acute myelopathy and halting of further progression occurred with pedicle resection, arachnoid web fenestration, and spinal deformity correction.

  14. Focal adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord: Imaging diagnosis and surgical resolution

    PubMed Central

    Morisako, Hiroki; Takami, Toshihiro; Yamagata, Toru; Chokyu, Isao; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Ohata, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord can cause progressive symptoms associated with syringomyelia or myelomalacia, its surgical resolution based on the imaging diagnosis is not well characterized. This study aims to describe the use of imaging for the diagnosis of focal adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord and its surgical resolution using microsurgical arachnoidolysis. Materials and Methods: Four consecutive patients with symptomatic syringomyelia or myelomalacia caused by focal adhesive arachnoiditis underwent microsurgical arachnoidolysis. Comprehensive imaging evaluation using constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or myelographic MR imaging using true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) sequences was included before surgery to determine the surgical indication. Results: In all four patients a focal adhesion was identified at the cervical or thoracic level of the spinal cord, a consequence of infection or trauma. Three patients showed modest or minor improvement in neurological function, and one patient was unchanged after surgery. The syringomyelia or myelomalacia resolved after surgery and no recurrence was noted within the follow-up period, which ranged from 5 months to 30 months. Conclusions: MRI diagnosis of focal adhesive arachnoiditis is critical to determine the surgical indication. Microsurgical arachnoidolysis appears to be a straightforward method for stabilizing the progressive symptoms, though the procedure is technically demanding. PMID:21572630

  15. Focal adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord: Imaging diagnosis and surgical resolution.

    PubMed

    Morisako, Hiroki; Takami, Toshihiro; Yamagata, Toru; Chokyu, Isao; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Ohata, Kenji

    2010-07-01

    Although adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord can cause progressive symptoms associated with syringomyelia or myelomalacia, its surgical resolution based on the imaging diagnosis is not well characterized. This study aims to describe the use of imaging for the diagnosis of focal adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord and its surgical resolution using microsurgical arachnoidolysis. Four consecutive patients with symptomatic syringomyelia or myelomalacia caused by focal adhesive arachnoiditis underwent microsurgical arachnoidolysis. Comprehensive imaging evaluation using constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or myelographic MR imaging using true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) sequences was included before surgery to determine the surgical indication. In all four patients a focal adhesion was identified at the cervical or thoracic level of the spinal cord, a consequence of infection or trauma. Three patients showed modest or minor improvement in neurological function, and one patient was unchanged after surgery. The syringomyelia or myelomalacia resolved after surgery and no recurrence was noted within the follow-up period, which ranged from 5 months to 30 months. MRI diagnosis of focal adhesive arachnoiditis is critical to determine the surgical indication. Microsurgical arachnoidolysis appears to be a straightforward method for stabilizing the progressive symptoms, though the procedure is technically demanding.

  16. Cervical arachnoidal cyst with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, A; Orrico, D; Polo, A; Gerosa, M; Bricolo, A

    1992-01-01

    A case of cervical spinal arachnoidal cyst is presented. The association with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation is a peculiarity seldom reported. The clinical aspects with remission and exacerbation are discussed. The importance of the neuroradiological findings and the usefulness of the neurophysiological examination (evoked potentials) are suggested.

  17. Penetration of an Optic Nerve by a Sellar/Suprasellar Arachnoid Cyst.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Ross L; Hackney, James R; Riley, Kristen O

    2016-03-01

    Sellar/suprasellar cystic lesions can cause compression of the optic pathways and result in a decline in vision. There have been reports of optic pathways being fenestrated by intracranial aneurysms. This is the first report of a sellar/suprasellar arachnoid cyst causing fenestration of an optic nerve. Our patient presented with an 8-month history of worsening vision. Imaging revealed a sellar/suprasellar cystic lesion with compression of the optic pathways. He was treated surgically via an endoscopic transsphenoidal approach. The left optic nerve was found to have multiple round defects during surgery. Pathology was consistent with an arachnoid cyst. The patient has had progressive improvement in vision up to 6 months after surgery. Sellar/suprasellar arachnoid cysts likely form when a communication exists between the suprasellar arachnoid space and the sella turcica. We believe that our patient's cyst grew slowly enough to allow normal functioning of the optic nerve as it was being penetrated. Though visual symptoms may be gradual and not present until after the optic nerve has been penetrated, these symptoms and signs may still improve with removal of the cyst. Prognosis for visual improvement is difficult to predict with cases of compressive sellar/suprasellar cystic masses. Improvement in the vision examination after surgical resection is possible even when the optic nerve has been penetrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Giant Cell Arteritis Giant Cell Arteritis Fast Facts Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is ... polymyalgia rheumatica (also called PMR). What is giant cell arteritis? GCA is a type of vasculitis or ...

  19. Characterization of canine neutrophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, R T; Andersen, B R

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate distinct populations of canine neutrophil granules and to compare them with neutrophil granules from other species. Size, shape, density, and content of canine neutrophil granules were determined. Neutrophils obtained by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation were homogenized, and granule populations were separated by isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient (rho, 1.14 to 1.22 g/ml). The most dense granule population (rho, 1.197 g/ml) contained all of the myeloperoxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and elastase, more than half of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase, and most of the lysozyme. The population with intermediate density (rho, 1.179 g/ml) contained lactoferrin, vitamin B12-binding protein, and the remainder of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase and lysozyme. The least dense granule population did not contain a major peak of any of the enzymes or binding proteins tested but was distinguished by density and morphology. The size and shape of the granules were determined from scanning electron micrographs and assessment of shape was aided by transmission electron micrographs. By these methods three populations of canine neutrophil granules were characterized and named: myeloperoxidase granules, vitamin B12-binding protein granules, and low-density granules. Images PMID:6292095

  20. Volutin Granules in Zoogloea ramigera

    PubMed Central

    Roinestad, Frank A.; Yall, Irving

    1970-01-01

    Zoogloea ramigera, a gram-negative bacterium found in activated sludge, formed volutin granules when excess orthophosphate was added to a phosphate-starved culture. These volutin granules were stainable by hydrogen sulfide after lead acetate treatment and extractable by N-perchloric acid but were not adsorbed by activated charcoal. They appeared to consist of inorganic polyphosphate. Optimum granule formation in the arginine broth required 10 g of glucose, 3 mg of phosphate, and 1 to 20 mg of magnesium per liter of medium. At an Mg2+ concentration of 1 mg/liter, very large granules appeared which often appeared to fill the cell. An excess of glucose, orthophosphate, or magnesium reduced granule formation. In the absence of sulfate, moderate granulation occurred in arginine broth before the addition of excess orthophosphate; granulation did not increase after the addition of phosphate. Images PMID:4195479

  1. Volutin granules in Zoogloea ramigera.

    PubMed

    Roinestad, F A; Yall, I

    1970-06-01

    Zoogloea ramigera, a gram-negative bacterium found in activated sludge, formed volutin granules when excess orthophosphate was added to a phosphate-starved culture. These volutin granules were stainable by hydrogen sulfide after lead acetate treatment and extractable by N-perchloric acid but were not adsorbed by activated charcoal. They appeared to consist of inorganic polyphosphate. Optimum granule formation in the arginine broth required 10 g of glucose, 3 mg of phosphate, and 1 to 20 mg of magnesium per liter of medium. At an Mg(2+) concentration of 1 mg/liter, very large granules appeared which often appeared to fill the cell. An excess of glucose, orthophosphate, or magnesium reduced granule formation. In the absence of sulfate, moderate granulation occurred in arginine broth before the addition of excess orthophosphate; granulation did not increase after the addition of phosphate.

  2. Guidelines for the management of obstructive hydrocephalus from suprasellar-prepontine arachnoid cysts using endoscopic third ventriculocystocisternostomy.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin; Choi, Jonathan D; Leith-Gray, Linda; Grant, Gerald A; Adamson, D Cory

    2010-09-01

    Intracranial endoscopy has emerged as an innovative surgical tool for various intracranial procedures, but its use remains limited to neurosurgeons trained in this minimally invasive technique. Complex, skull base arachnoid cysts represent one entity that is challenging to treat because of adjacent critical neurovascular structures; however, the advent of intracranial endoscopic techniques has revolutionized treatment. Arachnoid cysts located in the suprasellar-prepontine skull base region can cause obstructive hydrocephalus or symptomatic mass effect and require urgent decompression. These patients may present with nonfocal symptoms that can quickly lead to a life-threatening condition if not accurately diagnosed and treated. The authors present a summary of the world literature of suprasellar-prepontine arachnoid cysts (SPACs) to ascertain clinical presentations and provide class III evidentiary treatment guidelines for this uniquely challenging type of arachnoid cyst. Urgent endoscopic third ventriculostomy results in normalization of intracranial pressure, return of normal CSF flow, and relief of symptoms.

  3. [Advances: granulation mechanism, characteristics and application of aerobic sludge granules].

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong-zhen; Wu, Lei; Ma, Yong; Wang, Shu-ying; Li, Ling-yun

    2010-02-01

    Aerobic sludge granules with compact structure, wide diverse microbial species and excellent settling capabilities have drawn interest of researchers engaging in work in the area of biological wastewater treatment. This review provides recent advances on aerobic biogranulation technology and application. Granulation mechanism, characteristics and its microbial phase, influence of different environmental factors, granulation model and its application in treating the municipal and toxic industrial wastewater were discussed. Then a prospect concerned for future research is also put forward.

  4. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar radiculography with water-soluble contrast agents. A clinical report with special reference to metrizamide.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1976-12-01

    The frequency of adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar radiculography with methiodal sodium (95 patients), methylglucamine iocarmate (20 examinations in 18 patients), and metrizamide (77 examinations in 73 patients) was found to be 29% in patients who were not operated on between methiodal studies and 48% in those who were operated on. With both methylglucamine iocarmate and metrizamide the frequency was very low. No changes indicating adhesive arachnoiditis were seen with these media in patients who were not operated on between radiographic examinations.

  5. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements.

  6. Pharmaceutical standardization of Kamsaharitaki granules.

    PubMed

    Khemuka, Nidhi; Galib, R; Patgiri, Biswa Jyoti; Prajapati, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Kamsaharitaki Avaleha is a well-known ayurvedic preparation. Considering certain inconveniences of Avaleha, an attempt has been made to convert it into granules that are convenient in handling, dispensing, and storage. To convert Kamsaharitaki Avaleha into granules form and develop standard manufacturing procedure. Seven pilot batches were prepared to fix the ratio of formulation composition. The procedure was repeated for 14 times to ensure the process validation. Converting into granules in presence of jaggery and Haritaki pulp is found to be difficult. Replacing these two with Khanda Sharkara and Haritaki powder yielded desired characteristics of granules. This modified proportion of ingredients can be considered as standard in preparing Kamsaharitaki Avaleha granules. As no manufacturing and physicochemical properties are available for Kamsaharitaki granules; the current findings can be considered as standard for future studies.

  7. Pharmaceutical standardization of Kamsaharitaki granules

    PubMed Central

    Khemuka, Nidhi; Galib, R.; Patgiri, Biswa Jyoti; Prajapati, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Kamsaharitaki Avaleha is a well-known ayurvedic preparation. Considering certain inconveniences of Avaleha, an attempt has been made to convert it into granules that are convenient in handling, dispensing, and storage. Aim: To convert Kamsaharitaki Avaleha into granules form and develop standard manufacturing procedure. Materials and Methods: Seven pilot batches were prepared to fix the ratio of formulation composition. The procedure was repeated for 14 times to ensure the process validation. Results: Converting into granules in presence of jaggery and Haritaki pulp is found to be difficult. Replacing these two with Khanda Sharkara and Haritaki powder yielded desired characteristics of granules. Conclusion: This modified proportion of ingredients can be considered as standard in preparing Kamsaharitaki Avaleha granules. As no manufacturing and physicochemical properties are available for Kamsaharitaki granules; the current findings can be considered as standard for future studies. PMID:27833371

  8. Roll compaction/dry granulation: comparison between roll mill and oscillating granulator in dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Sakwanichol, Jarunee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Ingenerf, Gernot; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Different experimental factorial designs were employed to evaluate granule properties obtained from oscillating granulator and roll mill. Four oscillating-granulator parameters were varied, i.e. rotor speed, oscillating angle, aperture of mesh screen and rotor type. Six roll-mill parameters that were throughput, speed ratio in both first and second stages, gap between roll pair in both stages and roll-surface texture were also investigated. Afterwards, the granule properties obtained from two milling types with similar median particle size were compared. All milling parameters in both milling types affected significantly the median particle size, size distribution and amount of fine particles (P < 0.05), except the rotor types of oscillating granulator on fines. Only three milling parameters influenced significantly the flowability (P < 0.05). These were the throughput and the gap size in the first stage of roll mill and the sieve size of oscillating granulator. In comparison between milling types, the differences of granule properties were not practically relevant. However, the roll mill had much higher capacity than the oscillating granulator about seven times, resulting in improving energy savings per unit of product. Consequently, the roll mill can be applied instead of oscillating granulator for roll compaction/dry granulation technique.

  9. Appearance and vanishing of a spinal intradural arachnoid cyst after multiple epidural corticosteroid injections. A spontaneously resolving cause of symptomatic lumbar stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mailleux, P; Milbouw, G; Koerts, G; Verbeek, P; Willems, X

    2014-01-01

    Spinal intradural arachnoid cyst is a rare lesion, sometimes acquired. To describe the appearance and later spontaneous disappearence of a lumbar intradural arachnoid cyst, following perineural corticoid injections. Review of the clinical data and imaging, with final spontaneous return to initial state. Atypical intradural arachnoid cysts can be related to perineural injections and can cause symptoms of spinal stenosis. Its spontaneous vanishing is a very rare event, up to now unreported.

  10. Altered morphology of hippocampal dentate granule cell presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals following conditional deletion of TrkB.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Steve C; Kotloski, Robert J; Walter, Cynthia; Hughes, Maya; McNamara, James O

    2008-01-01

    Dentate granule cells play a critical role in the function of the entorhinal-hippocampal circuitry in health and disease. Dentate granule cells are situated to regulate the flow of information into the hippocampus, a structure required for normal learning and memory. Correspondingly, impaired granule cell function leads to memory deficits, and, interestingly, altered granule cell connectivity may contribute to the hyperexcitability of limbic epilepsy. It is important, therefore, to understand the molecular determinants of synaptic connectivity of these neurons. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor TrkB are expressed at high levels in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and are implicated in regulating neuronal development, neuronal plasticity, learning, and the development of epilepsy. Whether and how TrkB regulates granule cell structure, however, is incompletely understood. To begin to elucidate the role of TrkB in regulating granule cell morphology, here we examine conditional TrkB knockout mice crossed to mice expressing green fluorescent protein in subsets of dentate granule cells. In stratum lucidum, where granule cell mossy fiber axons project, the density of giant mossy fiber boutons was unchanged, suggesting similar output to CA3 pyramidal cell targets. However, filopodial extensions of giant boutons, which contact inhibitory interneurons, were increased in number in TrkB knockout mice relative to wildtype controls, predicting enhanced feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramidal cells. In knockout animals, dentate granule cells possessed fewer primary dendrites and enlarged dendritic spines, indicative of disrupted excitatory synaptic input to the granule cells. Together, these findings demonstrate that TrkB is required for development and/or maintenance of normal synaptic connectivity of the granule cells, thereby implying an important role for TrkB in the function of the granule cells and hippocampal circuitry.

  11. RNA Granules in Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Seydoux, Geraldine; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Nagamori, Ippei

    2011-01-01

    “Germ granules” are cytoplasmic, nonmembrane-bound organelles unique to germline. Germ granules share components with the P bodies and stress granules of somatic cells, but also contain proteins and RNAs uniquely required for germ cell development. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of germ granule assembly, dynamics, and function. One hypothesis is that germ granules operate as hubs for the posttranscriptional control of gene expression, a function at the core of the germ cell differentiation program. PMID:21768607

  12. Nanoimaging granule dynamics and subcellular structures in activated mast cells using soft X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Yuan; Chiang, Dapi Meng-Lin; Lin, Zi-Jing; Hsieh, Chia-Chun; Yin, Gung-Chian; Weng, I.-Chun; Guttermann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Lai, Lee-Jene; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an important role in allergic responses. During activation, these cells undergo degranulation, a process by which various kinds of mediators stored in the granules are released. Granule homeostasis in mast cells has mainly been studied by electron microscopy (EM), where the fine structures of subcellular organelles are partially destroyed during sample preparation. Migration and fusion of granules have not been studied in detail in three dimensions (3D) in unmodified samples. Here, we utilized soft X-ray tomography (SXT) coupled with fluorescence microscopy to study the detailed structures of organelles during mast cell activation. We observed granule fission, granule fusion to plasma membranes, and small vesicles budding from granules. We also detected lipid droplets, which became larger and more numerous as mast cells were activated. We observed dramatic morphological changes of mitochondria in activated mast cells and 3D-reconstruction revealed the highly folded cristae inner membrane, features of functionally active mitochondria. We also observed giant vesicles containing granules, mitochondria, and lipid droplets, which we designated as granule-containing vesicles (GCVs) and verified their presence by EM in samples prepared by cryo-substitution, albeit with a less clear morphology. Thus, our studies using SXT provide significant insights into mast cell activation at the organelle level. PMID:27748356

  13. Intracranial arachnoid cyst associated with traumatic intracystic hemorrhage and subdural haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsopoulos, PP; Pantazis, GC; Syrmou, EC; Tsitsopoulos, PD

    2008-01-01

    Background: Brain arachnoid cysts are fluid collections of developmental origin. They are commonly detected incidentally in patients imaged for unrelated symptoms. Case Description: A 15-year-old healthy boy with a recent history of head trauma experienced headache that gradually worsened over the course of 10 days. He underwent CT and MRI brain scans which revealed the presence of subdural haematoma caused by the rupture of a middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst. This was accompanied by intracystic haemorrhage. The subdural haematoma was removed, while communication of the cyst with the basal cisterns was also performed. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. Conclusions: The annual haemorrhage risk for the patients with middle cranial fossa cysts remains very low. However, when haemorrhage occurs, in most occasions it can be effectively managed only with haematoma evacuation. PMID:18923752

  14. Dura-arachnoid lesions produced by 22 gauge Quincke spinal needles during a lumbar puncture

    PubMed Central

    Reina, M; Lopez, A; Badorrey, V; De Andres, J A; Martin, S

    2004-01-01

    Aims: The dural and arachnoid hole caused by lumbar puncture needles is a determining factor in triggering headaches. The aim of this study is to assess the dimensions and morphological features of the dura mater and arachnoids when they are punctured by a 22 gauge Quincke needle having its bevel either in the parallel or in the transverse position. Methods: Fifty punctures were made with 22 gauge Quincke needles in the dural sac of four fresh cadavers using an "in vitro" model especially designed for this purpose. The punctures were performed by needles with bevels parallel or perpendicular to the spinal axis and studied under scanning electron microscopy. Results: Thirty five of the 50 punctures done by Quincke needles (19 in the external surface and 16 in the internal) were used for evaluation. When the needle was inserted with its bevel parallel to the axis of the dural sac (17 of 35), the size of the dura-arachnoid lesion was 0.032 mm2 in the epidural surface and 0.037 mm2 in the subarachnoid surface of the dural sac. When the needle's bevel was perpendicular to the axis (18 of 35) the measurement of the lesion size was 0.042 mm2 for the external surface and 0.033 mm2 for the internal. There were no statistical significant differences between these results. Conclusions: It is believed that the reported lower frequency of postdural puncture headache when the needle is inserted parallel to the cord axis should be explained by some other factors besides the size of the dura-arachnoid injury. PMID:15146008

  15. The characterization of arachnoid cell transport II: paracellular transport and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Janson, C; Bryan, A; Hubel, A

    2012-10-11

    We used an immortalized arachnoid cell line to test the arachnoid barrier properties and paracellular transport. The permeabilities of urea, mannitol, and inulin through monolayers were 2.9 ± 1.1 × 10(-6), 0.8 ± .18 × 10(-6), 1.0 ± .29 × 10(-6)cm/s. Size differential permeability testing with dextran clarified the arachnoidal blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier limit and established a rate of transcellular transport to be about two orders of magnitude slower than paracellular transport in a polyester membrane diffusion chamber. The theoretical pore size for paracellular space is 11Å and the occupancy to length ratio is 0.8 and 0.72 cm(-1) for urea and mannitol respectively. The permeability of the monolayer was not significantly different from apical to basal and vice versa. Gap junctions may have a role in contributing to barrier formation. Although the upregulation of claudin by dexamethasone did not significantly alter paracellular transport, increasing intracellular cAMP decreased mannitol permeability. Calcium modulated paracellular transport, but only selectively with the ion chelator, EDTA, and with disruption of intracellular stores. The blood-CSF barrier at the arachnoid is anatomically and physiologically different from the vascular-based blood-brain barrier, but is similarly subject to modulation. We describe the basic paracellular transport characteristics of this CSF "sink" of the brain which will allow for a better description of mass and constitutive balance within the intracranial compartment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Role of Merlin in the Growth and Transformation of Arachnoidal Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    14. ABSTRACT This proposal is concerned with the functional role of merlin in arachnoidal and meningioma cells. In year 1, we had developed... meningioma -specific NF2 model systems. Now, we have finished characterizing the phenotypic effects caused by merlin loss in meningioma cell lines. We have...merlin loss also decreases the apoptotic rates in meningioma cell lines. Finally, we have initiated an analysis to identify downstream targets of merlin

  17. Structural Plasticity of Dentate Granule Cell Mossy Fibers During the Development of Limbic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Steve C.; He, Xiaoping; Loepke, Andreas W.; McNamara, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Altered granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic connectivity may contribute to the development of limbic epilepsy. To explore this possibility, granule cell giant mossy fiber bouton plasticity was examined in the kindling and pilocarpine models of epilepsy using green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic mice. These studies revealed significant increases in the frequency of giant boutons with satellite boutons 2 days and 1 month after pilocarpine status epilepticus, and increases in giant bouton area at 1 month. Similar increases in giant bouton area were observed shortly after kindling. Finally, both models exhibited plasticity of mossy fiber giant bouton filopodia, which contact GABAergic interneurons mediating feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramids. In the kindling model, however, all changes were fleeting, having resolved by 1 month after the last evoked seizure. Together, these findings demonstrate striking structural plasticity of granule cell mossy fiber synaptic terminal structure in two distinct models of adult limbic epileptogenesis. We suggest that these plasticities modify local connectivities between individual mossy fiber terminals and their targets, inhibitory interneurons, and CA3 pyramidal cells potentially altering the balance of excitation and inhibition during the development of epilepsy. PMID:19294647

  18. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  19. Supraorbital Keyhole Microsurgical Fenestration of Symptomatic Temporal Arachnoid Cysts in Children: Advantages and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Elkheshin, Sherif; Soliman, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of endoscope-assisted microsurgical fenestration on temporal arachnoid cysts, and to determine the advantages and limitations of the technique. Twenty-five children with symptomatic temporal arachnoid cysts were operated via eyebrow supraorbital keyhole microsurgical fenestration targeting the medial cyst wall. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was done for all patients. Preoperative clinical presentation of the patients included headache (80%), nausea & vomiting (64%), drug resistant epilepsy (52%), macrocephaly (12%) papilledema (28%), motor weakness in the form of right-sided hemiparesis (12%) and cranial nerve palsy. Postoperative complete subsidence of headache was noted in 50%, while 20% remained unchanged. Drug resistant epilepsy improved in 69% of the patients. Postoperative MRI showed initial decrease in cyst volume as early as 3 months, only in a range of 5-12% volume reduction, and the late follow-up done at 6 and 18 months continued to show further reduction reported to be significant (p < 0.001). Transient subgaleal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection was the most common complication (20%). Only 1 patient experienced CSF leak mandating cysto-peritoneal shunting. Conclusıon: Eyebrow supraorbital keyhole microsurgical fenestration for temporal arachnoid cysts can be performed with a fairly low risk of complications and yields a favorable improvement in clinical and neuroimaging outcomes.

  20. Spinal Arachnoiditis as a Complication of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in Non-HIV Previously Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Panackal, Anil A; Komori, Mika; Kosa, Peter; Khan, Omar; Hammoud, Dima A; Rosen, Lindsey B; Browne, Sarah K; Lin, Yen-Chih; Romm, Elena; Ramaprasad, Charu; Fries, Bettina C; Bennett, John E; Bielekova, Bibiana; Williamson, Peter R

    2017-02-01

    Cryptococcus can cause meningoencephalitis (CM) among previously healthy non-HIV adults. Spinal arachnoiditis is under-recognized, since diagnosis is difficult with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) pathology. We describe 6 cases of spinal arachnoiditis among 26 consecutively recruited CM patients with normal CD4 counts who achieved microbiologic control. We performed detailed neurological exams, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping and biomarker analysis before and after adjunctive immunomodulatory intervention with high dose pulse corticosteroids, affording causal inference into pathophysiology. All 6 exhibited severe lower motor neuron involvement in addition to cognitive changes and gait disturbances from meningoencephalitis. Spinal involvement was associated with asymmetric weakness and urinary retention. Diagnostic specificity was improved by MRI imaging which demonstrated lumbar spinal nerve root enhancement and clumping or lesions. Despite negative fungal cultures, CSF inflammatory biomarkers, sCD27 and sCD21, as well as the neuronal damage biomarker, neurofilament light chain (NFL), were elevated compared to healthy donor (HD) controls. Elevations in these biomarkers were associated with clinical symptoms and showed improvement with adjunctive high dose pulse corticosteroids. These data suggest that a post-infectious spinal arachnoiditis is an important complication of CM in previously healthy individuals, requiring heightened clinician awareness. Despite microbiological control, this syndrome causes significant pathology likely due to increased inflammation and may be amenable to suppressive therapeutics. Published by Oxford University Press for the Clinical Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Multiple extradural spinal arachnoid cysts causing diffuse myelomalacia of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Tarkan; Lakadamyali, Hatice

    2009-11-01

    Extradural spinal cyst is a rare cause of compression myelopathy. It is usually solitary and its typical location is posterior to the spinal cord. We present a case of multiple spinal arachnoid cysts causing diffuse myelomalacia secondary to a significant compression of the spinal cord with no symptom relief after surgical decompression. A 35-year-old female patient presented to our hospital complaining of progressive weakness and numbness of both lower extremities for the last 2 months, being more prominent on the right side. Her history was significant for back pain that started after a vaginal delivery 1 year ago. Spinal MRI revealed multiple extradural arachnoid cysts and diffuse myelomalacia. A T4-T6 level laminectomy was performed. The cyst was nearly totally resected. There was partial symptomatic relief after surgery, but 5 months later her symptoms worsened. MRI revealed nodular syringomyelia and atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord. Extradural spinal arachnoid cyst is to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression. Vaginal delivery may accelerate the process and symptoms by a sudden increase in the cyst size. In cases of myelomalacia secondary to cyst pressure postoperative results are quite poor.

  2. [A case of syringomyelia associated with postoperative extradural cyst and adhesive arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Horimoto, C; Ryu, N; Sibata, S; Mori, K

    1989-09-01

    We report a rare case of syringomyelia associated with postoperative adhesive arachnoiditis and an extradural cyst. A 61-year-old male was admitted to our hospital five years after surgical removal of a cervical neurinoma. He complained of progressive quadriparesis and sensory disturbance. A CT scan showed a large cyst posteriorly within the C2, 3, 4 laminectomy area. MRI revealed syringomyelia with an extradural cyst at the C2, 3, 4 level. The operative findings revealed adhesive arachnoiditis on the dorsal surface at the C2, 3, 4 level and an extradural cyst communicating with the subarachnoid space through a dural defect on the left side of the C2 level. By excision of the extradural cyst and placement of a syringo-cisternal shunt, the syringomyelia shrank and the extradural cyst disappeared. It can be speculated that the pathogenesis of syringomyelia in this case was associated with ischemic change of the spinal cord due to compression and constriction caused by the extradural cyst and adhesive arachnoiditis.

  3. Arachnoiditis Following Caudal Epidural Injections for the Lumbo-Sacral Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Yallappa, Sachin; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Caudal epidural steroid injection is a very common intervention in treatment of low back pain and sciatica symptoms. Although extensively used, it is not devoid of complications. A few reports of chemical and infective arachnoiditis exist following lumbar epidural anaesthesia, but none following a caudal epidural steroid injection.We report a case of arachnoiditis following caudal epidural steroid injections for lumbar radiculopathy. The patient presented with contralateral sciatica, worsening low back pain and urinary retention few days following the injection, followed by worsening motor functions in L4/L5/S1 myotomes with resultant dense foot drop. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested infective arachnoiditis with diffuse enhancement and clumping of the nerve roots within the lumbar and sacral thecal sac. As the number of injections in the management of back pain and lumbo-sacral radicular pain is increasing annually, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of this potentially dangerous complication and educate the patients appropriately. PMID:24353855

  4. Spontaneous resolution of a Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst causing sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Maud; Gujar, Sachin; Trobe, Jonathan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2008-09-01

    A 32-year-old pregnant woman developed a progressive right sixth cranial nerve palsy as an isolated finding. Brain MRI disclosed a discrete lobulated lesion centered in the right Meckel's cave with intermediate signal on T1, high signal on T2, and diffusion characteristics similar to those of cerebrospinal fluid on apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. The initial radiologic diagnosis was schwannoma or meningioma. No intervention occurred. Shortly after cesarean delivery, the abduction deficit began to lessen spontaneously. One month later, the abduction deficit had further improved; 7 months later it had completely resolved. Repeat MRI after delivery failed to disclose the lesion, which was now interpreted as consistent with an arachnoid cyst arising within Meckel's cave. Twenty-one similar cases of Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst or meningocele have been reported, 7 found incidentally and 14 causing symptoms, 2 of which produced ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsies. All previously reported symptomatic patients were treated surgically. This is the first report of an arachnoid cyst arising from Meckel's cave in pregnancy and having spontaneous resolution.

  5. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E

    2014-11-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principal types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules, which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P bodies), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts; thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This article discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently, mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three nonexclusive categories: (a) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, (b) regulation of PKR activation, and (c) co-opting of RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral modulation of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene-silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation.

  6. Mesostructure of the Solar Granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussamatov, H. I.

    2000-03-01

    Quasi-periodic variations in the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic fine-structure properties of the granulation field along the photospheric surface are estimated quantitatively. The darkest vast intergranular lanes, called the intergranular knots, are the most important indicator of their physical properties. The formulated new definitions of "granule" and "intergranular lane" require a revision of the previous results. The definition of mesogranulation is given, and the method of its detection in the granulation field is described. The following important quantitative results, which established the extent and nature of the physical relationship between the granulation and mesogranulation fields, have been obtained for the first time: (1) the intensity amplitude of granules in mesogranules (Delta I(gr)/I_0)_msgr = +10.3% is a factor of 1.4 larger than that of granules in intermesogranular regions [(Delta I(gr)/I_0)_imsgr = +7.3%], whereas the intensity amplitude of intergranular lanes in mesogranules [(Delta I(igr)/I_0)_msgr = -6.0%] is a factor of 1.4 smaller than that of intergranular lanes in intermesogranular regions [(Delta I(igr)/I_0)_imsgr = -8.4%]; (2) the mean intensities of photospheric granules and intergranular lanes are (Delta I(gr)/I_0)_phot = +9.2% and (Delta I(igr)/I_0)_phot = -7.5%, respectively; (3) granules cover 59% of the area of mesogranules, 45% of the area of the photosphere, and 31% of the area of intermesogranular regions, while intergranular lanes cover 41, 55, and 69% of these areas, respectively; (4) intergranular knots and bright granules virtually never formed and do not exist in mesogranules and intermesogranular regions, respectively; (5) the amplitudes of intensity fluctuations in mesogranules and intermesogranular regions, as well as the areas occupied by them (49.4 and 50.6%, respectively), essentially level off, Delta I(msgr)/I_0 = +3.6% and Delta I(imsgr)/I_0 = -3.5%, respectively.

  7. Syringomyelia and spinal arachnoiditis resulting from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Taylor J.; Howard, Matthew A.; Menezes, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    Syringomyelia resulting from arachnoiditis secondary to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an extremely rare clinical entity with few cases reported in the literature. The presentation, management, and pathogenesis of syringomyelia in this setting is poorly understood. We describe the presentation, radiology, management, and outcomes in two patients with syringomyelia resulting from arachnoiditis secondary to aneurysmal SAH and review the literature on this rare condition. Case number 1 was treated successfully with syrinx-subarachnoid shunt after extensive lysis of adhesions. Case number 2 was treated with syringoperitoneal shunt. Both patients had radiographic decreased syrinx size postoperatively. These patients add to the small literature on syringomyelia occurring secondary to SAH-associated arachnoiditis. The radiographic outcomes demonstrate that in the appropriately selected patient, syrinx-subarachnoid or syringoperitoneal shunting are viable options. PMID:25013348

  8. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules.

  9. Process optimization for continuous extrusion wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Carella, Anthony J; Ren, Yukun; Lo, Julian B

    2011-08-01

    Three granulating binders in high drug-load acetaminophen blends were evaluated using high shear granulation and extrusion granulation. A polymethacrylate binder enhanced tablet tensile strength with rapid disintegration in simulated gastric fluid, whereas polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroxypropyl cellulose binders produced less desirable tablets. Using the polymethacrylate binder, the extrusion granulation process was studied regarding the effects of granulating liquid, injection rate and screw speed on granule properties. A full factorial experimental design was conducted to allow the statistical analysis of interactions between extrusion process parameters. Response variables considered in the study included extruder power consumption (screw loading), granule bulk/tapped density, particle size distribution, tablet hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution.

  10. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Does degenerative disease of the lumbar spine cause arachnoiditis? A magnetic resonance study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A; Isherwood, I

    1994-09-01

    The magnetic resonance appearances in 165 patients with symptoms suggestive of degenerative lumbar spine disease were reviewed. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between abnormalities of nerve root distribution and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in the absence of other known risk factors for arachnoiditis. Central clumping of nerve roots was present in 16 patients (9.7%) and was associated with spinal stenosis at one of the affected levels in all (p < 0.001). Spinal stenosis was present in 44 patients giving an incidence of abnormal nerve root distribution of 36% in this group. Nerve root clumping occurred in association with pure spinal stenosis (10 cases), stenosis secondary to disc prolapse (four cases) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (two cases). Nerve root clumping was confined to one vertebral level in nine cases and extended over two to four levels in seven. In five of the latter spinal stenosis was present at multiple levels. The appearance of nerve root clumping described here may result entirely from mechanical apposition of nerve roots but is indistinguishable from the central pattern of nerve root adhesions which occurs in adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis. No abnormalities of nerve root distribution were seen in association with any indicator of degenerative disk disease in the absence of stenosis. We have been unable to demonstrate the previously reported relationship between lumbar disk degeneration and arachnoiditis and discuss this with a critical review of the literature. Abnormal central clumping of nerve roots as described in arachnoiditis may occur in association with spinal stenosis in the absence of other risk factors although the cause for this appearance remains unexplained. Arachnoiditis-like changes extending over more than one vertebral level are rare (7%) except in the presence of spinal stenosis at multiple levels (29%). Awareness of this appearance may avoid a possibly incorrect diagnosis of arachnoiditis

  12. Small-sized granules of biphasic bone substitutes support fast implant bed vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Barbeck, M; Dard, M; Kokkinopoulou, M; Markl, J; Booms, P; Sader, RA; Kirkpatrick, CJ; Ghanaati, S

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of granule size of 2 biphasic bone substitutes (BoneCeramic® 400–700 μm and 500–1000 μm) on the induction of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) and implant bed vascularization in a subcutaneous implantation model in rats. Furthermore, degradation mechanisms and particle phagocytosis of both materials were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both granule types induced tissue reactions involving primarily mononuclear cells and only small numbers of MNGCs. Higher numbers of MNGCs were detected in the group with small granules starting on day 30, while higher vascularization was observed only at day 10 in this group. TEM analysis revealed that both mono- and multinucleated cells were involved in the phagocytosis of the materials. Additionally, the results allowed recognition of the MNGCs as the foreign body giant cell phenotype. Histomorphometrical analysis of the size of phagocytosed particles showed no differences between the 2 granule types. The results indicate that granule size seems to have impact on early implant bed vascularization and also on the induction of MNGCs in the late phase of the tissue reaction. Furthermore, the results revealed that a synthetic bone substitute material can induce tissue reactions similar to those of some xenogeneic materials, thus pointing to a need to elucidate their “ideal” physical characteristics. The results also show that granule size in the range studied did not alter phagocytosis by mononuclear cells. Finally, the investigation substantiates the differentiation of material-induced MNGCs, which are of the foreign body giant cell type. PMID:26083163

  13. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  14. Permeability of the arachnoid and pia mater. The role of ion channels in the leptomeningeal physiology.

    PubMed

    Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Ioannou, Maria; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Molyvdas, Paschalis-Adam; Hatzoglou, Chrissi

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the ionic permeability of the leptomeninges related to the effect of ouabain (sodium-potassium-ATPase inhibitor) and amiloride (epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) inhibitor) on the tissue, as well as identify the presence of ion channels. Cranial leptomeningeal samples from 26 adult sheep were isolated. Electrophysiological measurements were performed with Ussing system and transmembrane resistance values (R(TM) in Ω*cm(2)) obtained over time. Experiments were conducted with the application of ouabain 10(-3) M or amiloride 10(-5) M at the arachnoidal and pial sides. Immunohistochemical studies of leptomeningeal tissue were prepared with alpha-1 sodium-potassium-ATPase (ATP1A1), beta-ENaC, and delta-ENaC subunit antibodies. The application of ouabain at the arachnoidal side raised the transmembrane resistance statistically significantly and thus decreased its ionic permeability. The addition of ouabain at the pial side led also to a significant but less profound increment in transmembrane resistance. The addition of amiloride at the arachnoidal or pial side did not produce any statistical significant change in the R(TM) from controls (p > 0.05). Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of the ATP1A1 and beta- and delta-ENaC subunits at the leptomeninges. In summary, leptomeningeal tissue possesses sodium-potassium-ATPase and ENaC ion channels. The application of ouabain alters the ionic permeability of the leptomeninges thus reflecting the role of sodium-potassium-ATPase. Amiloride application did not alter the ionic permeability of leptomeninges possibly due to localization of ENaC channels towards the subarachnoid space, away from the experimental application sites. The above properties of the tissue could potentially be related to cerebrospinal fluid turnover at this interface.

  15. [Syringomyelia secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis: clinical profiles and efficacy of shunt operations].

    PubMed

    Kamada, K; Iwasaki, Y; Hida, K; Abe, H; Isu, T

    1993-02-01

    The authors report nine cases of syringomyelia secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis treated in our institute from 1982 to 1991. Neurological signs, radiological features, and results of surgical treatment were reviewed. Common initial manifestations in association with syringomyelia were spastic paraparesis in 8 patients (88.9%), regional sensory loss in 4 (44.4%), neurogenic bladder in 4 (44.4%), and somatic pain in 2 (22.2%). All the neurological symptoms or signs progressed gradually for years. All the patients were treated with various modes of shunt operations, including syringo-peritoneal shunt in seven patients, syringo-subarachnoid shunt in one, and ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in one, respectively. Three patients who failed to resolve their major complaints after the first surgery further received syringo-peritoneal shunts. Postsurgical follow-up periods ranged from 18 months to 10 years. Serial MR imaging revealed a significant reduction of the size of syringomyelia in 8 of 9 patients. However only 6 patients showed certain improvement of neurological deficits. Three patients who failed to improve clearly had a long (beyond 15 years) history of syringomyelia before the first surgical treatment. A total of 11 syringo-peritoneal shunts were done in 8 patients of whom 5 patients improved neurologically. It was noticed that 4 of 5 successful syringo-peritoneal shunts were placed in the caudal level of the syrinx. In conclusion, syringo-peritoneal shunt may be at present an optimal mode of surgical management for syringomyelia secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis. In addition, we would like to recommend that follow-up serial MR imaging be done for patients having adhesive arachnoiditis in order to detect syringomyelia as early as possible.

  16. A Schizophrenia-Like Psychotic Disorder Secondary to an Arachnoid Cyst Remitted with Neurosurgical Treatment of the Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, G.A.; Molero, P.; Pla, J.; Ortuño, F.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of delusional psychosis that was terminated by neurosurgical removal of a large arachnoid cyst. The patient was suffering his first psychotic episode and had symptoms typical of schizophrenia. The case underscores the importance of considering that an arachnoid cyst can induce psychopathological symptoms, even those of schizophrenia. Indeed, such symptoms may be the cyst's only clinical manifestation. In addition, the case highlights the importance of doing a structural imaging test when confronted with a first episode of psychosis, especially if the episode is relatively late in appearance. Such imaging may lead to a diagnosis that in turn can enable a definitive neurosurgical resolution of the psychosis. PMID:24653786

  17. Transfrontal Transaqueductal, Transtrigonal, and Suboccipital Infratentorial Supracerebellar Endoscopic Fenestration of Posterior Fossa Arachnoid Cysts: Three Surgical Cases.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri; Tan, Yew Chin; Kandasamy, Regunath; Ghani, Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic intracranial arachnoid cysts are commonly treated using neuroendoscopy. Cysts located within the posterior fossa may present a greater surgical challenge to the neurosurgeon due to the numerous vital neurovascular structures located within this confined space. Adding neuronavigation during endoscopy helps a neurosurgeon to visualize and utilize both anterior and posterior corridors safely to access and manage these lesions. We present three symptomatic posterior fossa arachnoid cysts that were treated successfully using minimally invasive neuronavigation-guided endoscopic neurosurgery utilizing the anterior transfrontal transaqueductal, anterior transfrontal transtrigonal, and posterior suboccipital infratentorial supracerebellar approaches.

  18. Scalloping Sacral Arachnoid Cyst as a Cause of Perianal Pain- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Himanshu Ravindra; Kalra, Kashmiri Lal; Acharya, Shankar; Singh, Rupinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Scalloping sacral arachnoid cyst though a rare condition, should be suspected in cases of persistent perianal pain without any obvious urological or anorectal pathology. Such difficult cases justify ordering an M.R.I of spine as plain X-Rays and clinical examination may come out to be inconclusive. X-ray in later stages may show changes corresponding to scalloping of bone due pressure effect of cyst on surrounding tissue. Diagnosis may further be confirmed by doing contrast MRI which differentiates arachnoid cyst from other intradural and extradural pathologies. Though anatomically spinal arachnoid cysts are just an out pouching from the spinal meningeal sac or nerve root sheath they may be extradural or intradural in their location, communicating to main C.S.F column through their pedicle or an ostium leading to continuous enlargement in size. Case Report: A 32 year old female was admitted under our spine unit with 1.5 year history of chronic pain, swelling and reduced sensation in perianal region. On examination she had tenderness and hypoesthesia over lower sacral region. The pain was continuous, dull aching in nature, not related to activity, localized over lower sacrum and perianal area. The neurological examination of her both lower limbs were unremarkable. Anal tone and anal reflex were normal. No sign of inflammation or tenderness was found over coccyx. Since the X-rays were inconclusive an MRI scan was done which showed a cystic lesion in the sacral area extending from S2 to S4 region with mechanical scalloping effect on the surrounding bone. The lesion had same intensity as C.S.F in both T1 &T2 weighted images. The treatment was done by way of surgical decompression with complete excision of cyst and obliteration of space by a posterior midline approach. Presently the patient is 1 year post operative and no sign of recurrence is there. Conclusion: Sacral arachnoid cysts should be considered as a differential diagnosis of perianal pain. Large

  19. Vocal sequential exchanges and intragroup spacing in the Northern Muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Francisco D C; Ades, César

    2004-06-01

    Sequential exchanges of vocalizations (staccatos and neighs) emitted by Northern Muriquis Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus were recorded at the Biological Station of Caratinga, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Staccatos and neighs containing larger proportion of short elements were preferentially produced during short-range exchanges; neighs, produced by a larger number of participants, were typical of long-range exchanges. Staccatos emitted by animals feeding in a dispersed manner contained a larger proportion of tonal elements than those emitted by muriquis feeding in a cohesive manner. Sequential exchanges seem thus to be constituted by two inter-related subsystems of calls that aid muriquis to coordinate intragroup spacing, despite the poor visibility of the habitat.

  20. Intracranial Intra-arachnoid Diverticula and Cyst-like Abnormalities of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Platt, Simon; Hicks, Jill; Matiasek, Lara

    2016-03-01

    Primary intracranial cystic or cyst-like lesions include intra-arachnoid, epidermoid, dermoid, and choroid plexus cysts. Differentiation of these cystic lesions can usually be accomplished by imaging studies alone; however, some cysts are similar in appearance and require histopathology for definitive diagnosis. Clinical signs often reflect the location of the cysts within the intracranial cavity rather than the type of cyst. If clinical signs are significant and progressive, surgical removal is warranted and may be successful, although cystic contents could be harmful if allowed to contact surrounding brain parenchyma or meninges.

  1. Imaging diagnosis--Vertebral canal porcupine quill with presumptive secondary arachnoid diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Adam R; Chen, Annie V; Tucker, Russell L

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year-old Gordon Setter developed cervical hyperesthesia and a stiff gait. Upon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, an arachnoid diverticulum was detected at the C1 level. Upon surgical resection, a porcupine quill was identified within the vertebral canal in the area of the cyst. At a retrospective review of the MR images, the quill appeared as a circular well-demarcated T2-hypointense lesion. Porcupine quill migrations are common in the dog but migration into the central nervous system is rare.

  2. Arachnoid cyst of the cavum velum interpositum in a septuagenarian: radiological features and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, S; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Chauhan, Udit; Gupta, Shailesh; Agarwal, Nitesh; Kasana, Vivek

    2014-04-01

    The cavum velum interpositum (CVI) is a thin, triangular-shaped cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-filled space between the lateral ventricles that lies below the fornices and above the third ventricle. It is a normal variant seen in premature and newborn infants and usually disappears with brain maturation. CVI is rarely seen in adults as a persistent primitive structure. Although moderate cystic dilatation of the CVI may sometimes be observed, a true large cyst is extremely rare with only a handful of reported cases, mostly in children and adolescents. We describe the case of CVI arachnoid cyst diagnosed on imaging in a septuagenarian with the complaint of occasional headaches.

  3. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  4. Surface structure and biocompatibility of demineralized dentin matrix granules soaked in a simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Toshiyuki; Murata, Masaru; Hino, Jun; Nagano, Futami; Shigyo, Tatsuhiro; Nomura, Takafumi; Inano, Hiroyuki; Itabashi, Kohji; Yamagishi, Tohru; Nakamura, Katsuo; Takahashi, Touru; Iida, Shunji; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko

    2012-12-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) granules with excellent biocompatibility were easily prepared using unnecessary human teeth by a new cooling-pulverizing and demineralizing technique. Extracted human teeth were pulverized together with saline ice at 12,000 rpm-rotation number of a ZrO2 blade for 30 s in a ZrO2 vessel. The pulverized granules exhibited the particle size distribution of 0.5-2 mm that was efficient for regeneration of alveolar bone. The (Ca/P) ratios of the granules were 1.60-1.66, which were close to the stoichiometric value of 1.67 for standard hydroxyapatite (HAp). Small amounts of Na+ and Mg2+ ions present at less than 1% were detected. The pulverized granules were dissolved with stirring under 500 rpm for 10-60 min in 2.0%-HNO3 solutions to obtain partial or complete DDM granules. As the dissolution time increased, crystallinity of HAp phase lowered and asperity on surfaces of the granules became outstanding due to elution of mineral components. At the dissolution of 60 min, the pulverizing granules were completely demineralized and the weight decreased to about one-fifth. To improve surface activity of the DDM granules without denaturation of bone growth factors, the DDM granules were soaked at 309.5 K and pH 7.40 in a simulated body fluid (SBF). HAp microcrystals were gradually precipitated on surfaces of the DDM granules with increasing the soaking time. Different morphology of the precipitates was observed, depending on the demineralization situation of the pulverized granules. For the DDM with low dissolution efficiency of 42%, porous bone-like apatites at 24 h after the soaking and fiber-oriented aggregates at 144 h were recognized. The bioactive DDM granules were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of the back region of rats. At 4 weeks after the implantation, bio-absorption by comparatively small amounts of multi-giant cells was recognized around the surface layers of DDM granules.

  5. [Clinical presentation of a dorsal epidural arachnoid cyst after an epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Obil-Chavarría, Claudia Alejandra; García-Ramos, Carla Lisette; Castro-Quiñonez, Sergio Alberto; Huato-Reyes, Raúl; Santillán-Chapa, Concepción Guadalupe; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    Arachnoid cysts are dural diverticula with liquid content similar to cerebrospinal fluid, with 1% occurring in the spinal cord. They locate mainly in the dorsal region of the thoracic spine, and are unusual causes of spinal cord compression. The case is presented of a previously healthy 15-year-old boy, with a 20-month history of spastic paraparesis that started apparently after epidural block for ankle osteosynthesis. There was decreased sensitivity and strength of the pelvic limbs and gradually presented with anaesthesia from T12 to L4 dermatomes, L5 and S1 bilateral hypoaesthesia and 4+/5 bilateral strength, in the L2 root and 2+/5 in L3, L4, L5, S1, hyperreflexia, Babinski and clonus, but with no alteration in the sacral reflexes. In the magnetic resonance it was diagnosed as an extradural arachnoid cyst from T6 to T9. The patient underwent a T6 to T10 laminotomy, cyst resection, dural defect suture, and laminoplasty. One year after surgery, the patient had recovered sensitivity, improvement of muscle strength up to 4+/5 in L2 to S1, and normal reflexes. After the anaesthetic procedure, increased pressure and volume changes within the cyst could cause compression of the spinal cord, leading to symptoms. Despite being a long-term compression, the patient showed noticeable improvement. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Bilateral sensorineural deafness, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, and arachnoid cysts in two sisters.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Y M; Laan, L A; Vielvoye, G J; van Haeringen, A

    1999-09-10

    We describe two sisters (ages 10 and 3 years, respectively) with a normal development and a combination of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, arachnoid cyst, and hydrocephalus. Neither girl has distinctive physical anomalies. In the oldest girl, there was a hearing loss of 80 dB bilaterally, and the most severe loss on audiogram was seen at 2,000-4,000 Hz. In the youngest girl, there was a hearing loss of 100 dB bilaterally. Above 2,000 Hz no neural reactions were seen. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging in one girl and computed tomography in the other showed a partial agenesis of the corpus callosum and a cyst in the pineal region, causing an aqueduct stenosis by compression and consequent hydrocephalus. The parents have normal hearing, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities. They are nonconsanguineous but from the same small village. This is the first report of a combination of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, and an arachnoid cyst. The pattern of inheritance is probably autosomal recessive.

  7. Homicide and subsequent catatonia associated with a large arachnoid cyst: case report.

    PubMed

    Margetić, Branimir; Palijan, Tija Zarković; Kovacević, Drazen

    2013-12-01

    The existence of a focal brain lesion that might be the crucial cause for the development of diverse psychiatric phenomena and certain characteristics of personality is often a controversial issue. The patient was a 29-year-old male when he killed his father with a single knock with the blunt side of an axe. Subsequently to the act, the patient developed a 10-month-long catatonic stupor during which he experienced intensive fear, delusions, and affective symptoms. He was an emotionally blunted person with no medical record and without prior history of aggressive behavior. Magnetic resonance image revealed a large, right-sided arachnoid cyst that was associated with right temporal and frontal lobe hypoplasia and bilateral changes of perfusion in peri-insular regions. The treatment with clozapine and diazepam showed to be therapeutic. This could be the second case of homicide committed by a person with arachnoid cyst and without past history of aggression, and the second description of an adult patient with cyst who developed catatonic stupor. This is the first description of long-lasting organic catatonic stupor treated with clozapine and diazepam. Relevant literature is reviewed and some controversial issues are discussed.

  8. [Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst: A case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Quillo-Reséndiz, Javier; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos-Francisco; Rodríguez-García, Manuel

    2016-10-14

    Arachnoid cysts of spine are a very rare occurrence. The aetiology still remains unclear, but the most accepted explanation is the existence of areas of weakness in the spinal dura. Symptoms depend on the location in the spine. Magnetic resonance imaging is used for its diagnosis. Management depends of clinical presentation, and the surgery is reserved for patients with neurological impairment. A case is described of 67 year-old male with myelopathy and radiculopathy symptoms, both diagnosed simultaneously. The magnetic resonance imaging was used to diagnose a thoracolumbar extradural arachnoid cyst from T12-L2 and lumbar spinal canal stenosis. The patient was treated with a puncture procedure to empty the cyst and decompress the neural elements. There was a clinical improvement of myelopathy syndrome after puncture procedure. One month later, the patient underwent a minimally invasive surgical approach to decompress the neural elements in lumbar spine, achieving improvement of the radiculopathy syndrome and neurogenic claudication in both legs. There is currently no standard minimally invasive approach to surgically treat these cysts, but if the patient has mild symptoms, clinical observation is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-traumatic adhesive arachnoiditis as a cause of spinal cord syndromes. Investigation of 507 patients.

    PubMed

    Jenik, F; Tekle-Haimanot, R; Hamory, B H

    1981-01-01

    Spinal cord syndromes with a mainly syringomyelic pattern of sensory diorders, radiculopathies, mixed paresis of varying degree (without any history of trauma), have been found in 507 out of 1305 new patients referred to out Clinic from January 1976 till 31 October 1977. In 105 randomised and unselected cases with these syndromes, myelographies have disclosed findings compatible with an adhesive spinal and/or cisternal arachnoiditis. A prospective study of the syndromes for evidence of infectious aetiology has been performed, in which tuberculosis, syphilis and other infections appear to be causative agents. A randomised therapeutic trial on a limited number of cases has been evaluated, as well as the results of specific therapy in a larger number of cases. Results of treatment have not been satisfactory. Operations were performed on only five patients and in no case was an autopsy obtained. Spinal cord syndromes due to non-traumatic adhesive arachnoiditis are discussed. The possible pathogenetic mechanisms the predominantly syringomyelic sensory deficits in those syndromes are briefly mentioned.

  10. Severe adhesive arachnoiditis resulting in progressive paraplegia following obstetric spinal anaesthesia: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Killeen, T; Kamat, A; Walsh, D; Parker, A; Aliashkevich, A

    2012-12-01

    A 27-year-old woman developed severe adhesive arachnoiditis after an obstetric spinal anaesthetic with bupivacaine and fentanyl, complicated by back pain and headache. No other precipitating cause could be identified. She presented one week postpartum with communicating hydrocephalus and syringomyelia and underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting and foramen magnum decompression. Two months later, she developed rapid, progressive paraplegia and sphincter dysfunction. Attempted treatments included exploratory laminectomy, external drainage of the syrinx and intravenous steroids, but these were unsuccessful and the patient remains significantly disabled 21 months later. We discuss the pathophysiology of adhesive arachnoiditis following central neuraxial anaesthesia and possible causative factors, including contamination of the injectate, intrathecal blood and local anaesthetic neurotoxicity, with reference to other published cases. In the absence of more conclusive data, practitioners of central neuraxial anaesthesia can only continue to ensure meticulous, aseptic, atraumatic technique and avoid all potential sources of contamination. It seems appropriate to discuss with patients the possibility of delayed, permanent neurological deficit while taking informed consent.

  11. Digital Subtraction Cystography for Detection of Communicating Holes of Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cysts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kyowon; Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of digital subtraction cystography to identify communicating holes between a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) and the subarachnoid space prior to cyst removal and hole closure. Six patients with SEAC were enrolled in this retrospective study. Digital subtraction cystography and subsequent CT myelography were performed for every patient. The presence and location of the communicating holes on cystography were documented. We evaluated the MRI characteristics of the cysts, including location, size, and associated spinal cord compression; furthermore, we reviewed cystographic images, CT myelograms, procedural reports, and medical records for analysis. If surgery was performed after cystography, intraoperative findings were compared with preoperative cystography. The location of the communicating hole between the arachnoid cyst and the subarachnoid space was identified by digital subtraction cystography in all cases (n = 6). Surgical resection of SEAC was performed in 4 patients, and intraoperative location of the communicating hole exactly corresponded to the preoperative identification. Fluoroscopic-guided cystography for SEAC accurately demonstrates the presence and location of dural defects. Preoperative digital subtraction cystography is useful for detection of a communicating hole between a cyst and the subarachnoid space.

  12. The role of visually evoked potentials in the management of hemispheric arachnoid cyst compressing the posterior visual pathways.

    PubMed

    Raja, Vignesh; Kumar, Anupma; Durnian, Jon; Hagan, Richard; Buxton, Neil; Newman, William

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of an occipital arachnoid cyst in an infant, managed on the basis of changes in visually evoked potentials (VEPs). A significant asymmetry of VEP responses prompted neurosurgical intervention, which improved visual behavior and electrical response to both pattern and flash stimuli.

  13. The biosynthesis of starch granules.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M

    2001-01-01

    Although composed simply of glucose polymers, the starch granule is a complex, semicrystalline structure. Much of this complexity arises from the fact that the two primary enzymes of synthesis-starch synthase and starch-branching enzyme-exist as multiple isoforms. Each form has distinct properties and plays a unique role in the synthesis of the two starch polymers, amylose and amylopectin. The debranching enzyme isoamylase also has a profound influence on the synthesis of amylopectin. Despite much speculation, no acceptable model to explain the interactions of all of these enzymes to produce amylose and amylopectin has thus far emerged. The organization of newly synthesized amylopectin to form the semicrystalline matrix of the granule appears to be a physical process, implying the existence of complex interactions between biological and physical processes at the surface of the growing granule. The synthesis of the amylose component occurs within the amylopectin matrix.

  14. Extrusion granulation and high shear granulation of different grades of lactose and highly dosed drugs: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Keleb, E I; Vermeire, A; Vervaet, C; Remon, Jean Paul

    2004-07-01

    Formulations containing different lactose grades, paracetamol, and cimetidine were granulated by extrusion granulation and high shear granulation. Granules were evaluated for yield, friability, and compressibility. Tablets were prepared from those granules and evaluated for tensile strength, friability, disintegration time, and dissolution. The different lactose grades had an important effect on the extrusion granulation process. Particle size and morphology affected powder feeding and power consumption, but had only a minor influence on the granule and tablet properties obtained by extrusion granulation. In contrast, the lactose grades had a major influence on the granule properties obtained by high shear granulation. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was required to process pure paracetamol and cimetidine by high shear granulation, whereas it was feasible to granulate these drugs without PVP by extrusion granulation. Granules prepared by extrusion granulation exhibited a higher yield and a lower friability than those produced by high shear granulation. Paracetamol and cimetidine tablets compressed from granules prepared by extrusion granulation showed a higher tensile strength, lower friability, and lower disintegration time than those prepared from granules produced by high shear granulation. Paracetamol tablets obtained via extrusion granulation exhibited faster dissolution than those obtained via high shear granulation. For all lactose grades studied, extrusion granulation resulted in superior granule and tablet properties in comparison with those obtained by high shear granulation. These results indicate that extrusion granulation is more efficient than high shear granulation.

  15. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  16. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  19. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  20. 21 CFR 520.1468 - Naproxen granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Naproxen granules. 520.1468 Section 520.1468 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1468 Naproxen granules. (a) Specifications. Naproxen granules contain 50 percent naproxen. (b) Sponsor. No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  1. Statistical analysis and comparison of a continuous high shear granulator with a twin screw granulator: Effect of process parameters on critical granule attributes and granulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei; Kotamarthy, Lalith; Panikar, Savitha; Sen, Maitraye; Pradhan, Shankali; Marc, Michaelis; Litster, James D; Muzzio, Fernando J; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2016-11-20

    This study is concerned with identifying the design space of two different continuous granulators and their respective granulation mechanisms. Performance of a continuous high shear granulator and a twin screw granulator with paracetamol formulations were examined by face-centered cubic design, which focused on investigating key performance metrics, namely, granule size, porosity, flowability and particle morphology of granules as a function of essential input process parameters (liquid content, throughput and rotation speed). Liquid and residence time distribution tests were also performed to gain insights into the liquid-powder mixing and flow behavior. The results indicated that continuous high shear granulation was more sensitive to process variation and produced spherical granules with monomodal size distribution and distinct internal structure and strength variation. Twin screw granulation with such a particular screw configuration showed narrower design space and granules were featured with multimodal size distribution, irregular shape, less detectible porosity difference and tighter range of strength. Granulation mechanisms explored on the basis of nucleation and growth regime maps revealed that for most cases liquid binder was uniformly distributed with fast droplet penetration into the powder bed and that granule consolidation and coalescence mainly took place in the nucleation, steady growth and rapid growth regimes.

  2. Adhesive arachnoiditis causing cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: CT and MRI demonstration of dural calcification and a dorsal dural diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, I G; Yunten, N; Ustun, E E; Oksel, F; Gumusdis, G

    1999-07-01

    We present the radiological features of a 42-year-old man with long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS), demonstrating that arachnoiditis is a cause of a cauda equina syndrome (CES) in this disease. CT showed a dorsal arachnoid diverticulum causing scalloped erosion of the laminae, and punctate and curvilinear dural calcification. MRI revealed adhesion and convergence of the cauda equina dorsally into the arachnoid pouch, causing the dural sac to appear empty canal. To the best of our knowledge, dural calcification on CT is a new finding in AS, which may be related to the CES. Our findings support the hypothesis that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis with subsequent loss of meningeal elasticity may be the main cause of CES in AS.

  3. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome Associated with Epidermoid Tumour and Arachnoid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Menekşe, Güner; Özsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Ateş, Tuncay; Ökten, Ali İhsan; Güzel, Aslan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome (DDMS) is a rarely seen clinical entity which is characterised by cerebral hemiatrophy, contralateral hemiparesis and epilepsy. Radiological features are typical, such as unilateral atrophy of the cerebral hemisphere and associated compensatory bone changes in the skull, like thickening, enlargement of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. Case Report: In this article, we report the first case of DDMS associated with epidermoid tumour and arachnoid cyst, who underwent operation for an epidermoid tumour in the inter-hemispheric region. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DDMS associated with multiple intracranial pathologies and this association has not been previously described in the literature. Conclusion: Any patient who receives DDMS in the light of clinical and radiological findings should be investigated for concomitant pathologies. Different sequences of MRI may be useful in the diagnosis of other intracranial lesions. PMID:25207154

  4. Dyke-davidoff-masson syndrome associated with epidermoid tumour and arachnoid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Menekşe, Güner; Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Ateş, Tuncay; Okten, Ali İhsan; Güzel, Aslan

    2013-12-01

    Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome (DDMS) is a rarely seen clinical entity which is characterised by cerebral hemiatrophy, contralateral hemiparesis and epilepsy. Radiological features are typical, such as unilateral atrophy of the cerebral hemisphere and associated compensatory bone changes in the skull, like thickening, enlargement of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. In this article, we report the first case of DDMS associated with epidermoid tumour and arachnoid cyst, who underwent operation for an epidermoid tumour in the inter-hemispheric region. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DDMS associated with multiple intracranial pathologies and this association has not been previously described in the literature. Any patient who receives DDMS in the light of clinical and radiological findings should be investigated for concomitant pathologies. Different sequences of MRI may be useful in the diagnosis of other intracranial lesions.

  5. [Arachnoid cysts of the central nervous system. Algorithms and recommendations for management].

    PubMed

    Ros López, Bienvenido; Martín Gallego, Álvaro; Iglesias Moroño, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The symptoms related to the presence of arachnoid cysts in the Central Nervous System depend on the size of the cyst and its growth rate, its location and, in some cases, the associated CSF dynamic disorder. Sometimes there is acute clinical presentation due to cyst rupture or acute bleeding. Although it is generally accepted that asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic cysts do not require surgical treatment, there is no consensus on the therapeutic approach of choice in symptomatic cases. The aim of this paper is to review the literature, analyzing the pros and cons of the three main surgical options (microsurgery, neuroendoscopy, and CSF shunt) based primarily on the location of the cyst. Although treatment must be always individualized, basic management recommendations may be offered.

  6. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, T; Taoka, T; Nikaido, Y; Shiomi, K; Fujimoto, T; Otsuka, H; Takeuchi, H

    1996-06-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space.

  7. Spinal Arachnoid Diverticula: Outcome in 96 Medically or Surgically Treated Dogs.

    PubMed

    Mauler, D A; De Decker, S; De Risio, L; Volk, H A; Dennis, R; Gielen, I; Van der Vekens, E; Goethals, K; Van Ham, L

    2017-05-01

    Little is reported about the role of medical management in the treatment of spinal arachnoid diverticula (SAD) in dogs. To describe the outcome of 96 dogs treated medically or surgically for SAD. Ninety-six dogs with SAD. Retrospective case series. Medical records were searched for spinal arachnoid diverticula and all dogs with information on treatment were included. Outcome was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Fifty dogs were managed medically and 46 dogs were treated surgically. Dogs that underwent surgery were significantly younger than dogs that received medical management. No other variables, related to clinical presentation, were significantly different between both groups of dogs. The median follow-up time was 16 months (1-90 months) in the medically treated and 23 months (1-94 months) in the surgically treated group. Of the 38 dogs treated surgically with available long-term follow-up, 82% (n = 31) improved, 3% (n = 1) remained stable and 16% (n = 6) deteriorated after surgery. Of the 37 dogs treated medically with available long-term follow-up, 30% (n = 11) improved, 30% (n = 11) remained stable, and 40% (n = 15) deteriorated. Surgical treatment was more often associated with clinical improvement compared to medical management (P = .0002). The results of this study suggest that surgical treatment might be superior to medical treatment in the management of SAD in dogs. Further studies with standardized patient care are warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Differentiation of idiopathic spinal cord herniation from dorsal arachnoid webs on MRI and CT myelography.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Randall; Steven, Andrew; Wessell, Aaron; Fischbein, Nancy; Sansur, Charles A; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Ibrahimi, David; Raghavan, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Dorsal arachnoid webs (DAWs) and spinal cord herniation (SCH) are uncommon abnormalities affecting the thoracic spinal cord that can result in syringomyelia and significant neurological morbidity if left untreated. Differentiating these 2 entities on the basis of clinical presentation and radiological findings remains challenging but is of vital importance in planning a surgical approach. The authors examined the differences between DAWs and idiopathic SCH on MRI and CT myelography to improve diagnostic confidence prior to surgery. METHODS Review of the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) database between 2005 and 2015 identified 6 patients with DAW and 5 with SCH. Clinical data including demographic information, presenting symptoms and neurological signs, and surgical reports were collected from the electronic medical records. Ten of the 11 patients underwent MRI. CT myelography was performed in 3 patients with DAW and in 1 patient with SCH. Imaging studies were analyzed by 2 board-certified neuroradiologists for the following features: 1) location of the deformity; 2) presence or absence of cord signal abnormality or syringomyelia; 3) visible arachnoid web; 4) presence of a dural defect; 5) nature of dorsal cord indentation (abrupt "scalpel sign" vs "C"-shaped); 6) focal ventral cord kink; 7) presence of the nuclear trail sign (endplate irregularity, sclerosis, and/or disc-space calcification that could suggest a migratory path of a herniated disc); and 8) visualization of a complete plane of CSF ventral to the deformity. RESULTS The scalpel sign was positive in all patients with DAW. The dorsal indentation was C-shaped in 5 of 6 patients with SCH. The ventral subarachnoid space was preserved in all patients with DAW and interrupted in cases of SCH. In no patient was a web or a dural defect identified. CONCLUSIONS DAW and SCH can be reliably distinguished on imaging by scrutinizing the nature of the dorsal indentation and the integrity of

  9. Adhesive arachnoiditis after percutaneous fibrin glue treatment of a sacral meningeal cyst.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Nagano, Junji; Hattori, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    The authors present the case of a 64-year-old woman who was referred for severe sacral pain. She reported that her pain had been longstanding, and had greatly increased after percutaneous fibrin glue placement therapy for a sacral meningeal cyst 2 months earlier at a different hospital. An MRI scan obtained immediately after fibrin glue placement at that hospital suggested that fibrin glue had migrated superiorly into the subarachnoid space from the sacral cyst to the level of L-4. On admission to the authors' institution, physical examination demonstrated no abnormal findings except for perianal hypesthesia. An MRI study obtained at admission demonstrated a cystic lesion in the peridural space from the level of S-2 to S-4. Inhomogeneous intensity was identified in this region on T2-weighted images. Because the cauda equina and nerve roots appeared to be compressed by the lesion, total cyst excision was performed. The cyst cavity was filled with fluid that resembled CSF, plus gelatinous material. Histopathological examination revealed that the cyst wall was composed of hyaline connective tissue with some calcification. No nervous tissue or ganglion cells were found in the tissue. The gelatinous material was acellular, and appeared to be degenerated fibrin glue. Sacral pain persisted to some extent after surgery. The authors presumed that migrated fibrin glue caused the development of adhesive arachnoiditis. The risk of adhesive arachnoiditis should be considered when this therapy is planned. Communication between a cyst and the subarachnoid space should be confirmed to be sufficiently narrow to prevent the migration of injected fibrin glue.

  10. PDGF activation in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells induces meningioma formation in mice promoting tumor progression in combination with Nf2 and Cdkn2ab loss.

    PubMed

    Peyre, Matthieu; Salaud, Céline; Clermont-Taranchon, Estelle; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Goutagny, Stephane; Mawrin, Christian; Giovannini, Marco; Kalamarides, Michel

    2015-10-20

    The role of PDGF-B and its receptor in meningeal tumorigenesis is not clear. We investigated the role of PDGF-B in mouse meningioma development by generating autocrine stimulation of the arachnoid through the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) using the RCAStv-a system. To specifically target arachnoid cells, the cells of origin of meningioma, we generated the PGDStv-a mouse (Prostaglandin D synthase). Forced expression of PDGF-B in arachnoid cells in vivo induced the formation of Grade I meningiomas in 27% of mice by 8 months of age. In vitro, PDGF-B overexpression in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells lead to increased proliferation.We found a correlation of PDGFR-B expression and NF2 inactivation in a cohort of human meningiomas, and we showed that, in mice, Nf2 loss and PDGF over-expression in arachnoid cells induced meningioma malignant transformation, with 40% of Grade II meningiomas. In these mice, additional loss of Cdkn2ab resulted in a higher incidence of malignant meningiomas with 60% of Grade II and 30% of Grade III meningiomas. These data suggest that chronic autocrine PDGF signaling can promote proliferation of arachnoid cells and is potentially sufficient to induce meningiomagenesis. Loss of Nf2 and Cdkn2ab have synergistic effects with PDGF-B overexpression promoting meningioma malignant transformation.

  11. PDGF activation in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells induces meningioma formation in mice promoting tumor progression in combination with Nf2 and Cdkn2ab loss

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Matthieu; Salaud, Céline; Clermont-Taranchon, Estelle; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Goutagny, Stephane; Mawrin, Christian; Giovannini, Marco; Kalamarides, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The role of PDGF-B and its receptor in meningeal tumorigenesis is not clear. We investigated the role of PDGF-B in mouse meningioma development by generating autocrine stimulation of the arachnoid through the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) using the RCAStv-a system. To specifically target arachnoid cells, the cells of origin of meningioma, we generated the PGDStv-a mouse (Prostaglandin D synthase). Forced expression of PDGF-B in arachnoid cells in vivo induced the formation of Grade I meningiomas in 27% of mice by 8 months of age. In vitro, PDGF-B overexpression in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells lead to increased proliferation. We found a correlation of PDGFR-B expression and NF2 inactivation in a cohort of human meningiomas, and we showed that, in mice, Nf2 loss and PDGF over-expression in arachnoid cells induced meningioma malignant transformation, with 40% of Grade II meningiomas. In these mice, additional loss of Cdkn2ab resulted in a higher incidence of malignant meningiomas with 60% of Grade II and 30% of Grade III meningiomas. These data suggest that chronic autocrine PDGF signaling can promote proliferation of arachnoid cells and is potentially sufficient to induce meningiomagenesis. Loss of Nf2 and Cdkn2ab have synergistic effects with PDGF-B overexpression promoting meningioma malignant transformation. PMID:26418719

  12. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principle types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules (SGs), which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts, thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This review discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three non-exclusive categories; i) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, ii) regulation of PKR activation and iii) co-opting RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral repression of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation. PMID:26958719

  13. Selective sorting of alpha-granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, J.E.; Battinelli, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary One of the main functions of blood platelets is to secrete a variety of substances that can modify a developing thrombus, regulate the growth of the vasculature, promote wound repair, and contribute to cell-adhesive events. The majority of this vast array of secreted proteins is stored in alpha-granules. Until recently, it was assumed that platelets contained one homogeneous population of alpha-granules that undergo complete de-granulation during platelet activation. This review focuses on the mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis and secretion, with a particular emphasis on recent findings that clearly demonstrate that platelets contain distinct subpopulations of alpha-granules that undergo differential release during activation. We consider the implications of this new paradigm of platelet secretion, discuss mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis, and review the molecular basis of transport and delivery of alpha-granules to assembling platelets. PMID:19630794

  14. Principles and Properties of Stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Protter, David S. W.; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are assemblies of untranslating mRNPs that form from mRNAs stalled in translation initiation. Stress granules form through interactions between mRNA binding proteins that link together populations of mRNPs. Interactions promoting stress granule formation include conventional protein-protein interactions, as well as interactions involving intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Assembly and disassembly of stress granules are modulated by a variety of post-translational modifications as well as a number of ATP dependent RNP or protein remodeling complexes, illustrating that stress granules represent an active liquid wherein energy input maintains their dynamic state. Stress granule formation modulates the stress response, viral infection, and signaling pathways. Persistent or aberrant stress granule formation contributes to neurodegenerative disease and some cancers. PMID:27289443

  15. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Principles and Properties of Stress Granules.

    PubMed

    Protter, David S W; Parker, Roy

    2016-09-01

    Stress granules are assemblies of untranslating messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) that form from mRNAs stalled in translation initiation. Stress granules form through interactions between mRNA-binding proteins that link together populations of mRNPs. Interactions promoting stress granule formation include conventional protein-protein interactions as well as interactions involving intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins. Assembly and disassembly of stress granules are modulated by various post-translational modifications as well as numerous ATP-dependent RNP or protein remodeling complexes, illustrating that stress granules represent an active liquid wherein energy input maintains their dynamic state. Stress granule formation modulates the stress response, viral infection, and signaling pathways. Persistent or aberrant stress granule formation contributes to neurodegenerative disease and some cancers.

  17. Arachnoid Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the brain include headache, nausea and vomiting, seizures, hearing and visual disturbances, vertigo, and difficulties with ... around the brain include headache, nausea and vomiting, seizures, hearing and visual disturbances, vertigo, and difficulties with ...

  18. CYTOPLASMIC GRANULE FORMATION IN MYELOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fedorko, Martha E.; Hirsch, James G.

    1966-01-01

    The intracellular flow of tritiated lysine as revealed by electron microscope radioautography was studied in heterophilic myelocytes of rabbit marrow. Label over the Golgi complex rose to a maximum of 37% of total cytoplasmic grains 30 min after initial exposure to the tracer and fell to 11% after 3 to 4 hr of incubation. Coincident with decrease in label over the Golgi complex, grain counts over granules rose to 32% after 3 to 4 hr. The time sequence of incorporation and flow of tritiated lysine and the per cent distribution of label was similar in bone marrow myelocytes under in vivo and in vitro conditions. The results demonstrate a function of the Golgi complex in incorporating or packaging certain basic amino acids or proteins into cytoplasmic granules of heterophilic myelocytes. PMID:5961343

  19. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  20. Sensory ecology: giant eyes for giant predators?

    PubMed

    Partridge, Julian C

    2012-04-24

    Mathematical models suggest the enormous eyes of giant and colossal squid evolved to see the bioluminescence induced by the approach of predatory whales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein Mobility within Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A.; Holz, Ronald W.; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10−10 cm2/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  2. Petrous apex cephalocele and empty sella/arachnoid cyst coexistence: a clue for cerebrospinal fluid pressure imbalance?

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Hatice Gül; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Gürses, Mehmet Ali; Dağlioğlu, Ergun; Sakman, Bülent; Yüksel, Enis

    2010-03-01

    To reveal the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties of incidental petrous apex cephalocele (PAC) and coexisting empty sella-arachnoid cyst. We reviewed our archive from June 2005 to July 2008. Four patients were diagnosed with PAC (four females; age range, 41-60 years; mean, 48.5). All patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium. We evaluated the lesions for extension into the neighboring structures, content, signal intensity, enhancement, and relation to Meckel's cave, petrous apex and for the presence of empty sella. The presenting symptoms included headache for three patients and diplopia for one patient. All patients had bilateral PAC, more prominent on one side. All lesions were centered posterolateral to the Meckel's cave. They were isointense to cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity and continuous with Meckel's cave on T1W, T2W and FLAIR sequences. In two patients, there was no diffusion restriction on diffusion-weighted MR images and the ADC map. Three patients had empty sella. One patient had arachnoid cyst. Coexistence with empty sella-arachnoid cyst raises the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid inbalance in the etiology.

  3. mRNPs meet stress granules.

    PubMed

    Sheinberger, Jonathan; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2017-09-01

    Stress granules are cytoplasmic structures that form in response to a variety of cellular stresses. They contain mRNAs and many proteins including numerous types of RNA-binding proteins, and have been studied in connection to major cellular events such as protein synthesis as well as disease. Despite the well-known fact that stress granules encapsulate mRNPs (mRNA-protein complexes), much of the research has naturally focused on the protein components of stress granules. The specific details of mRNP entry into and exit from stress granules and the functional reasons for these dynamics are not fully understood. Here, we review studies that have concentrated on the aspects of mRNP accumulation in stress granules and produced quantitative data concerning mRNP/stress granule interactions. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique.

  5. Granulation In and Out of Magnetic Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-25

    Italy. 21-25 June 1988 / edited by Robert J. Rutten and Giuseppe Severino . p. cm. -- (NATO ASI series. Series C, Mathemati-cal and physical sciences...granulation--Congresses. 2. Stellar granulation- -Congresses. I. Rutten. Robert J. II. Severino . Giuseppe. III. North Atlantic Treaty Organization. IV. North...the seeing effects) to correctly 253 R. J. Rutten and G. Severino (eds.), Solar and Stellar Granulation, 253-271.1989 by Klawer Academic Publishers

  6. Numerical Experiments with Flows of Elongated Granules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    NASA AVSCOM Technical Memorandum 105567 Technical Report 91- C- 006 𔃼e- 0ok, Numerical Experiments With Flows of Elongated Granules AD-A251 853 DTIC...EXPERIMENTS WITH FLOWS OF ELONGATED GRANULES H.G. Elrod 14 Cromwell Court Old Saybrook, Connecticut 06475 and D.E. Brewe Propulsion Directorate U.S. Army...granular flows (1) between two infinite, counter-moving, parallel, roughened walls, and (2) for an infinitely-wide slider. Each granule is simulated by a

  7. Balloon-borne imagery of the solar granulation. II - The lifetime of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehltretter, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Phenomenological aspects of the temporal evolution of photospheric granulation are reported as derived from time series of granulation photographs obtained during a flight of a balloon-borne telescope. The distribution of granule lifetime probabilities is determined, and it is found that the data can be represented by an exponential decrease with a 'decay constant' of 5.9 min. The general properties of granular evolution are described along with the way individual granules evolve with time. The most common type of granule is shown to be a medium-sized or small fragment, and it is suggested that all granules are produced by fragmentation of preexisting granules. The relative frequencies of granule destruction by fragmentation, fading, and merging are determined to be 51%, 21%, and 28%, respectively. An average radial velocity of 0.8 km/s is computed for conglomerates with an average diameter of 2.25 arcsec.

  8. Granulation of coal fly ash by using different types of granule agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agusta, H.; Nisya, F. N.; Iman, R. N.; Bilad, D. B. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of coal produces about 5% solid pollutant in the form of ash (fly ash and bottom ash). Of the total ash produced, about 10-20% is bottom ash and 80-90% is fly ash. This study was aimed at obtaining a type of adhesive which could be used as a fly granulation material for soil conditioner. The study was conducted at the pilot plant of Surfactant and Bioenergy Research Center (SBRC) LPPM IPB from April to August 2016. The fly ash used in this study was obtained from Kalimantan. A pan granulator was used in fly ash granule making process. Granule agent materials were diluted in the concentration of 5, 10, and 15%. Different types of granule agents, namely SBRC-M, SBRC-T, and SBRC-SC were used. The formed fly ash granules were then analyzed for their physical properties including particle density, fly ash granule pH, fly ash granule durability, and fly ash granule water holding capacity. Results showed that fly ash granules made from 15% of SBRC-M had the highest particle density (0.75 g/cm3). Fly ash granules made with SBRC-M had higher pH (10) than those made by using SBRC-SC adhesive (9.3) and SBRC-T (9). SBRC-T was found as the granule agent material which produced fly ash granules with the highest durability levels on average. In this study, the use of SBRC-M granule agent resulted in higher water holding capacity (WHC) (40.62%) than did SBRC-SC (38.79%) and SBRC-T (36.85%). As a granule agent, compared to SBRC-SC and SBRC-T, SBRC-M could produce fly ash granules with highest particle density, highest pH, good durability, and best water holding capacity.

  9. Transient fusion ensures granule replenishment to enable repeated release after IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Flores, Juan A; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2016-11-01

    To ensure normal immune function, mast cells employ different pathways to release mediators. Here, we report a thus far unknown capacity of mast cells to recycle and reuse secretory granules after an antigen-evoked degranulation process under physiological conditions; this phenomenon involves the existence of a recycling secretory granule pool that is available for release in a short time scale. Rapid endocytic modes contributed to the recycling of ∼60% of the total secretory granule population, which involved kiss-and-run and cavicapture mechanisms, causing retention of the intragranular matrix. We found the presence of normal-size granules and giant actomyosin- and dynamin-dependent granules, which were characterized by large quantal content. These large structures allowed the recovered mast cells to release a large amount of 5-HT, compensating for the decrease in the number of exocytosed secretory granules. This work uncovers a new physiological role of the exo-endocytosis cycle in the immunological plasticity of mast cells and reveals a new property of their biological secretion. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. [Properties of anaerobic granules developed by bioflocculant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Song

    2009-11-01

    Three identical UASB reactors (labeled R1, R2, R3) were applied to treat synthetic wastewater of COD concentration 5 500-6 500 mg x L(-1). Under the same process conditions, R1 was operated with addition of 7.5 g CaCl2 and 400 mL bioflocculant MBF21 weekly, R2 was operated with addition of 140 mg cationic PAM weekly, R3 was operated without any addition of flocculants served as control. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of bioflocculant MBF21 on development of anaerobic granules and compare it to cationic PAM. The results showed that after 67 days of operation, anaerobic granules developed in these three UASB reactors. The average diameters of granules in R1, R2 and R3 were 1.18, 1.21 and 0.76 mm, respectively, the granulation rates in R1, R2, R3 were 15.37, 15.82 and 9.10 microm x d(-1), respectively, the values of SMA (COD-CH4/VSS x t) of granules were 0.740, 0.657 and 0.558 g x (g x d)(-1), respectively, the VSS/SS of granules were 0.667, 0.629 and 0.607, respectively, the SVI of granules were 14.7, 13.1 and 20.4 mL x g(-1), respectively, the densities of granules were 1.061, 1.064 and 1.054 g x cm(-3), respectively, the integrity coefficients of granules were 92.1, 93.5 and 84.7, respectively. From the photos of SEM, granules developed in R1 and R2 were tighter than those in R3. In the formation of mature granules, all the three reactors showed similar laws, i.e. filamentous microorganisms were predominant on the surface of the seed sludge while bacillus and cocci bacteria were predominant on the surface of the mature granules. This study demonstrated that in the development of anaerobic granules, the effect of bioflocculant MBF21 on enhancement the physical properties of granules was similar to cationic PAM, but the effect of bioflocculant MBF21 on improvement of biochemical and physiological properties of granules was better than cationic PAM.

  11. Regulated protein aggregation: stress granules and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The protein aggregation that occurs in neurodegenerative diseases is classically thought to occur as an undesirable, nonfunctional byproduct of protein misfolding. This model contrasts with the biology of RNA binding proteins, many of which are linked to neurodegenerative diseases. RNA binding proteins use protein aggregation as part of a normal regulated, physiological mechanism controlling protein synthesis. The process of regulated protein aggregation is most evident in formation of stress granules. Stress granules assemble when RNA binding proteins aggregate through their glycine rich domains. Stress granules function to sequester, silence and/or degrade RNA transcripts as part of a mechanism that adapts patterns of local RNA translation to facilitate the stress response. Aggregation of RNA binding proteins is reversible and is tightly regulated through pathways, such as phosphorylation of elongation initiation factor 2α. Microtubule associated protein tau also appears to regulate stress granule formation. Conversely, stress granule formation stimulates pathological changes associated with tau. In this review, I propose that the aggregation of many pathological, intracellular proteins, including TDP-43, FUS or tau, proceeds through the stress granule pathway. Mutations in genes coding for stress granule associated proteins or prolonged physiological stress, lead to enhanced stress granule formation, which accelerates the pathophysiology of protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases. Over-active stress granule formation could act to sequester functional RNA binding proteins and/or interfere with mRNA transport and translation, each of which might potentiate neurodegeneration. The reversibility of the stress granule pathway also offers novel opportunities to stimulate endogenous biochemical pathways to disaggregate these pathological stress granules, and perhaps delay the progression of disease. PMID:23164372

  12. FOXC2 Mutations in Familial and Sporadic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yoji; Yabuki, Shoji; Iida, Aritoshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kano, Hiroki; Shiina, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEDAC) is a cyst in the spinal canal that protrudes into the epidural space from a defect in the dura mater. Most cases are sporadic; however, three familial SEDAC cases have been reported, suggesting genetic etiological factors. All familial cases are associated with lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS), whose causal gene is FOXC2. However, FOXC2 mutation analysis has been performed in only 1 family, and no mutation analysis has been performed on sporadic (non-familial) SEDACs. We recruited 17 SEDAC subjects consisting of 2 familial and 7 sporadic cases and examined FOXC2 mutations by Sanger sequencing and structural abnormalities by TaqMan copy number assay. We identified 2 novel FOXC2 mutations in 2 familial cases. Incomplete LDS penetrance was noted in both families. Four subjects presented with SEDACs only. Thus, SEDAC caused by the heterozygous FOXC2 loss-of-function mutation should be considered a feature of LDS, although it often manifests as the sole symptom. Seven sporadic SEDAC subjects had no FOXC2 mutations, no symptoms of LDS, and showed differing clinical characteristics from those who had FOXC2 mutations, suggesting that other gene(s) besides FOXC2 are likely to be involved in SEDAC. PMID:24278289

  13. [Subdural, extra-arachnoid block as a complication of stellate ganglion block: documentation with ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Kapral, S; Krafft, P; Gosch, M; Fridrich, P; Weinstabl, C

    1997-10-01

    We present a patient who developed a high central neural block after stellate-ganglion-blockade. The underlying pathophysiology was assessed via sonographic imaging. Stellate ganglion block was performed in a 19-year old patient according to the standard technique. Multiple aspiration tests were negative and a test dose of 3 ml bupivacaine 0.25% was injected. After a 3 min interval another 5 ml were injected. Two minutes after the local anaesthetic administration the patient reported nausea and sensations in the upper extremity. Spontaneous respiration efforts stopped, and the patient became unconscious. Tracheal intubation was performed, and the patient was ventilated in a controlled mode for two hours. Heart rate as well as blood pressure remained within the normal range. Neurologic recovery occurred rapidly and extubation was performed about two and a half hours after the event. Our sonographic studies demonstrated a local anaesthetic depot directly at the root of C 6, with a mean diameter of 10 mm and a length of 5 to 6 cm (about a third smaller than expected). Sonographic studies and clinical symptoms of our patient are most likely to occur with a subdural extra-arachnoidal block. Ultrasonographic guided puncture enhances the patient's safety by the opportunity to directly visualise transverse process, nerval root as well as local anaesthetic depot. In case of depot formation directly at the nerval root, injection may be stopped and the needle repositioned. Furthermore, direct visualisation of the great vessels (A. vertebralis) prevents intravascular injection and haematoma formation.

  14. Intraoperative Arachnoid Plasty Has Possibility to Prevent Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Surgery for Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    YAGI, Kenji; IRIE, Shinsuke; INAGAKI, Toru; ISHII, Yosuke; SAITO, Osamu; LEE, Tejin; NAKAGAWA, Hiroshi; SAITO, Koji; NAGAHIRO, Shinji

    Some patients develop chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) after the clipping/coating of unruptured aneurysms. The risk factors are not well understood and while no preventive methods are currently available, arachnoid plasty (ARP) may intercept the development of postoperative CSDH. We investigated the risk factors for CSDH and the usefulness of ARP to prevent postoperative CSDH. Between January 2009 and June 2013, 393 patients underwent 416 aneurysm surgeries via the pterional approach at Kushiro Kojinkai Memorial Hospital. Of these, 394 aneurysms (371 patients) were included in this study. Using multivariate analysis we evaluated the relationship between the patient demographics and clinical characteristics, and the development of postoperative symptomatic CSDH. We also studied the effect of ARP performed during aneurysm surgery. We found that symptomatic CSDH developed after 20 (5.1%) of the 394 operations; it was addressed by burr hole surgery and evacuation/irrigation. Male gender, advanced age, and oral anticoagulant therapy were significant risk factors for CSDH. Additive ARP, performed in the course of 132 surgeries (33.5%) was found to be a significant negative risk factor. The incidence of CSDH was significantly lower in patients who had undergone ARP than in patients who had not undergone it (0.8% vs. 7.3%, p < 0.01). We first report that ARP is useful for the prevention of CSDH in patients treated by aneurysm surgery. PMID:26041629

  15. [Persistent neurological deficit and adhesive arachnoiditis following spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine containing preservatives].

    PubMed

    Uefuji, T

    1999-02-01

    A 75 year-old female with osteoarthritis of bilateral knee joints was scheduled for right total knee replacement. Her medical history included coronary artery disease, bronchial asthma, and previous surgery of lumbar laminectomy, but she had no neurological deficit before the operation. A 22-gauge spinal needle was inserted at the L 4-5 level and 4 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with preservatives (Marcain 0.5%) was administered. The sensory block level was noted to L 1 and motor blockade of bilateral feet was achieved within 10 minutes. Anesthesia and operative courses were uneventful for 1.5 hours, and she complained severe low back pain but she could not move her thigh. Eight hours after administration of the anesthetic, her low back pain improved but the anesthetic effects showed no improvement. MRI showed no abnormality of the spinal cord on the following day, but her sensory loss level to L 1 and flaccid paralysis of bilateral lower extremities continued. Myelogram showed inflammation of cauda equina on the fourth day after the operation. She suffered from hydrocephalus two months later and MRI utilizing gadolinium as a contrast medium was consistent with a diagnosis of adhesive arachnoiditis of thoracolumbar region. Her neurological deficit showed no improvement for two years.

  16. Transsacrococcygeal approach to ganglion impar block for treatment of chronic coccygodynia after spinal arachnoid cyst removal

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Young Deog; Yang, Chun Woo; Han, Jung Uk; Song, Jang Ho; Na, WonJu; Oh, Sora; Kim, Byung-Gun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Coccygodynia is a pain in the region of the coccyx that radiates to the sacral, perineal area. The cause of the pain is often unknown. Coccygodynia is diagnosed through the patient's past history, a physical examination, and dynamic radiographic study, but the injection of local anesthetics or a diagnostic nerve blockade are needed to distinguish between somatic, neuropathic, and combined pain. Ganglion impar is a single retroperitoneal structure made of both paravertebral sympathetic ganglions. Although there are no standard guidelines for the treatment of coccygodynia, ganglion impar blockade is one of the effective options for treatment. Methods: Here, we report a 42-year-old female patient presenting with severe pain in the coccygeal area after spinal arachnoid cyst removal. Results: Treatment involved neurolysis with absolute alcohol on the ganglion impar through the transsacrococcygeal junction. Pain was relieved without any complications. Conclusion: Our case report offers the ganglion impar blockade using the transsacrococcygeal approach with absolute alcohol can improve intractable coccydynia. PMID:27684866

  17. ATPase modulated stress granules contain a diverse proteome and substructure

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saumya; Wheeler, Joshua R.; Walters, Robert W.; Agrawal, Anurag; Barsic, Anthony; Parker, Roy

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Stress granules are mRNA-protein granules that form when translation initiation is limited and are related to pathological granules in various neurodegenerative diseases. Super-resolution microscopy reveals stable substructures referred to as cores within stress granules that can be purified. Proteomic analysis of stress granule cores reveals a dense network of protein-protein interactions, links between stress granules and human diseases, and identifies ATP-dependent helicases and protein remodelers as conserved stress granule components. ATP is required for stress granule assembly and dynamics. Moreover, multiple ATP-driven machines affect stress granules differently; with the CCT complex inhibiting stress granule assembly, while the MCM and RVB complexes promote stress granule persistence. Our observations suggest that stress granules contain a stable core structure surrounded by a dynamic shell with assembly, disassembly and transitions between the core and shell modulated by numerous protein and RNA remodeling complexes. PMID:26777405

  18. Curtain-granulation process. Circular Z-129

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    A curtain granulation process is described for production of urea fertilizer pellets from a melt by spray coating onto seed granules. The process provides a product that is smooth, hard, and almost dust-free. A picture of the pilot plant and a flow sheet of the process are given.

  19. Ceramic granule strength variability and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Readey, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Diametral compression strength distributions and the compaction behavior and of irregular shape 150--200 {mu}m ceramic granules and uniform-size 210 {mu}m glass spheres were measured to determine how granule strength variability relates to compaction behavior of granular assemblies. High variability in strength, represented by low Weibull modulus values (m<3) was observed for ceramic granules having a distribution of sizes and shapes, and for uniform-size glass spheres. Compaction pressure data were also analyzed using a Weibull distribution function, and the results were very similar to those obtained from the diametral compression strength tests for the same material. This similarity suggests that it may be possible to model granule compaction using a weakest link theory, whereby an assemblage of granules is viewed as the links of a chain, and failure of the weakest granule (i.e., the weakest link) leads to rearrangement and compaction. Additionally, with the use of Weibull statistics, it appears to be possible to infer the variability in strength of individual granules from a simple pressure compaction test, circumventing the tedious task of testing individual granules.

  20. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration.

  1. Continuous twin screw granulation: influence of process variables on granule and tablet quality.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Córdoba Díaz, D; Peeters, E; Fonteyne, M; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to screen theophylline (125 mg) tablets manufactured via twin screw granulation in order to improve process understanding and knowledge of process variables that determine granule and tablet quality. A premix of theophylline anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and PVP (ratio: 30/67.5/2.5,w/w) was granulated with demineralized water. Experiments were done using the high-shear wet granulation module (based on twin screw granulation) of the ConsiGma™-25 unit (a continuous tablet manufacturing system) for particle size enlargement. After drying, granules were compressed using a MODUL™ P tablet press (compression force: 10 kN, tablet diameter: 12 mm). Using a D-optimal experimental design, the effect of several process variables (throughput (10-25 kg/h), screw speed (600-950 rpm), screw configuration (number (2, 4, 6 and 12) and angle (30°, 60° and 90°) of kneading elements), barrel temperature (25-40°C) and method of binder addition (dry versus wet)) on the granulation process (torque and temperature increase in barrel wall), granule (particle size distribution, friability and flowability) and tablet (tensile strength, porosity, friability, disintegration time and dissolution) quality was evaluated. The results showed that the quality of granules and tablets can be optimized by adjusting specific process variables (number of kneading elements, barrel temperature and binder addition method) during a granulation process using a continuous twin screw granulator.

  2. [Correlation of dry granulation process parameters and granule quality based on multiple regression analysis].

    PubMed

    Cao, Han-Han; Du, Ruo-Fei; Yang, Jia-Ning; Feng, Yi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, microcrystalline cellulose WJ101 was used as a model material to investigate the effect of various process parameters on granule yield and friability after dry granulation with a single factor and the effect of comprehensive inspection process parameters on the effect of granule yield and friability, then the correlation between process parameters and granule quality was established. The regress equation was established between process parameters and granule yield and friability by multiple regression analysis, the affecting the order of the size of the order of the process parameters on granule yield and friability was: rollers speed > rollers pressure > speed of horizontal feed. Granule yield was positively correlated with pressure and speed of horizontal feed and negatively correlated rollers speed, while friability was on the contrary. By comparison, fitted value and real value, fitted and real value are basically the same of no significant differences (P > 0.05) and with high precision and reliability.

  3. A unique SNARE machinery for exocytosis of cytotoxic granules and platelets granules.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells target infected or transformed cells with perforin-containing cytotoxic granules through immune synapses, while platelets secrete several types of granules which contents are essential for thrombosis and hemostasis. Recent work has culminated in the notion that an exocytic SNARE complex, based on a very similar set of components, is primarily responsible for exocytosis of the diverse granules in these different cell types. Granule exocytosis is, in particular, uniquely dependent on the atypical Q-SNARE syntaxin 11, its interacting partners of the Sec/Munc (SM) family, and is regulated by Rab27a. Mutations in these exocytic components underlie disease manifestations of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) subtypes, characterized by hyperactivation of the immune system, as well as platelet granule secretion defects. Here we discuss the key discoveries that led to the converging notion of the syntaxin 11-based exocytosis machinery for cytotoxic granules and platelet-derived granules.

  4. Granulation effects on the radon emanation rate.

    PubMed

    Bikit, I; Mrda, D; Grujic, S; Kozmidis-Luburic, U

    2011-05-01

    The radon emanation and the granulation effect on the emanation rate of several building materials (ceramic plates, sand, red brick and siporex brick) with different (226)Ra concentrations were investigated. A ball mill was used to achieve different granulations of the materials. The particle size distributions were determined by a particle size analyser (Mastersizer 2000). The increase in the (222)Rn concentration inside a closed chamber (volume ≈5.4 × 10(-3) m(3)) due to emanation from each material with different granulations was measured by an alpha spectrometer (RAD7). Thus, time-dependent curves for radon concentrations were obtained. The highest radon emanation coefficient (27 %) was obtained for the siporex sample with the smallest grain size (0.34 µm). For the ceramic pads, the granulation effect was negligible and the emanation coefficient was very low (∼0.4 %). The strongest influence of granulation on the radon emanation rate was found for the siporex brick sample.

  5. Electrochemical performance of granulated titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, O.; Pratsinis, S. E.; de Chambrier, E.; Crouzet, M.; Exnar, I.

    The electrochemical performance of Li-ion insertion into electrodes made of various sizes of anatase titania nanoparticles embedded in larger granulated entities (1-10 μm) is investigated. The granules are formed by spray drying of a suspension containing titania nanoparticles made by hydrolyzing titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). Depending on the three process steps, i.e. hydrolysis-condensation, hydrothermal processing and spray drying, different properties for the electrode made from these granules can be achieved in terms of phase composition, specific surface area (SSA) and specific charge capacity. Hydrothermally processed (HP) particles are more resistant to calcination than sol-gel precipitated (SGP) ones and have a higher SSA which leads to a better performance with respect to specific charge capacity. Electrodes made from granulated nanoparticles have superior specific charge capacity than from non-granulated ones as the former have more inter-particle contacts.

  6. Magnesium carbonate precipitate strengthened aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Chen, Yu-You

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic granules were precipitated internally with magnesium carbonate to enhance their structural stability under shear. The strengthened granules were tested in continuous-flow reactors for 220 days at organic loadings of 6-39 kg/m(3)/day, hydraulic retention times of 0.44-19 h, and temperatures of 10 or 28°C. The carbonate salt had markedly improved the granule strength without significant changes in granule morphology or microbial communities (with persistent strains Streptomyces sp., Rhizobium sp., Brevundimonas sp., and Nitratireductor sp.), or sacrifice in biological activity for organic degradation. MgCO3 precipitated granules could be used in continuous-flow reactor for wastewater treatment at low cost and with easy processing efforts.

  7. Preparation and evaluation of granules with pH-dependent release by melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Kai; Iwao, Yasunori; Fujinami, Yukari; Itai, Shigeru

    2012-07-15

    This study had two objectives: (1) to prepare, by melt granulation in a high-shear mixer, granules containing acetaminophen (APAP) as a model drug and aminoalkyl methacrylate copolymer E (AMCE) as a pH-sensitive polymer that readily dissolves at pH values lower than 5, and (2) to investigate the effects of AMCE loading (5-15%) on granule properties and the in vitro release profile of drug from the granules. Compared with polymer-free granules, the granules containing 5% and 10% AMCE were found to have higher median diameters and wider particle size distributions. For the formulation containing 15% AMCE, on the other hand, the diameters and distribution were similar to those for polymer-free granules. From compression testing, load-displacement curves revealed that AMCE enhanced particle strength at ambient temperature and induced plastic strain, while suppressing fragmentation of the granules. In addition, from dissolution testing using media with pH 4.0 and pH 6.5, granules containing AMCE, except 15% AMCE loading, exhibited drug release with significant pH dependence. When the pH 4.0 and pH 6.5 dissolution profiles were further compared by calculating the difference factor (f(1)), the 5% AMCE granules showed the strongest pH dependence of drug release among all formulations in this study. Large cracks and breakage were observed on the surface of 10% AMCE granules after they were used in dissolution testing. The obtained results are attributed to the plastic strain properties of AMCE above its glass transition temperature, and to the irregular distribution of AMCE within granules. Hence, this study has demonstrated for the first time that the combination of melt granulation and AMCE incorporation enables the formulation of novel functional granules that exhibit pH-dependent release of the active ingredient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Giant prostatic calculi

    PubMed Central

    Najoui, Mohammed; Qarro, Abdelmounaim; Ammani, Abdelghani; Alami, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic parenchymal calculi are common, usually incidental, findings on morphological examinations. They are typically asymptomatic and may be present in association with normal glands, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and prostate cancer. However giant prostatic calculi are rare. Less than 20 cases have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 35-year-old man with two giant prostatic calculi that replaced the entire gland. He underwent an open cystolithotomy, two giant stones were removed from the prostate, and we used a lithotripsy in situ for extraction of stone fragments. PMID:23565316

  9. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  10. Correlative microscopy of detergent granules.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, G; Nootenboom, P; Heussen, P C M

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure of detergent products for textile cleaning determines to a large extent the physical properties of these products. Correlative microscopy was used to reveal the microstructure by reconciling images obtained by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray microtomography and Fourier transform infrared microscopy. These techniques were applied on the same location of a subsample of a spray-dried detergent base powder embedded in polyacrylate. In this way, the three-dimensional internal and external structure of detergent granules could be investigated from milli to nano scale with detailed spatial information about the components present. This will generate knowledge how to design optimal microstructures for laundry products to obtain product properties demanded by the market. This method is also very useful for other powder systems used in a large variety of industries (e.g. for pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and metal industries). © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Starch granules: structure and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Buléon, A; Colonna, P; Planchot, V; Ball, S

    1998-08-01

    The emphasis of this review is on starch structure and its biosynthesis. Improvements in understanding have been brought about during the last decade through the development of new physicochemical and biological techniques, leading to real scientific progress. All this literature needs to be kept inside the general literature about biopolymers, despite some confusing results or discrepancies arising from the biological variability of starch. However, a coherent picture of starch over all the different structural levels can be presented, in order to obtain some generalizations about its structure. In this review we will focus first on our present understanding of the structures of amylose and amylopectin and their organization within the granule, and we will then give insights on the biosynthetic mechanisms explaining the biogenesis of starch in plants.

  12. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  13. Exploring predictors of surgery and comparing operative treatment approaches for pediatric intracranial arachnoid cysts: a case series of 83 patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohsin; Bennardo, Michael; Almenawer, Saleh A; Zagzoog, Nirmeen; Smith, Alston A; Dao, Dyda; Ajani, Olufemi; Farrokhyar, Forough; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-09-01

    Although intracranial arachnoid cysts are a common incidental finding on pediatric brain imaging, only a subset of patients require surgery for them. For the minority who undergo surgery, the comparative effectiveness of various surgical approaches is debated. The authors explored predictors of surgery and compared operative techniques for pediatric patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst seen at a tertiary care center. The authors reviewed records of pediatric patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst. For each patient, data on baseline characteristics, the method of intervention, and surgical outcomes for the initial surgery were extracted, and cyst size at diagnosis was calculated (anteroposterior × craniocaudal × mediolateral). Baseline variables were analyzed as predictors of surgery by using logistic regression modeling, excluding patients whose surgery was not related to cyst size (i.e., those with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to the cyst compressing a narrow CSF flow pathway or cyst rupture/hemorrhage). Data collected regarding surgical outcomes were analyzed descriptively. Among 83 pediatric patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst seen over a 25-year period (1989-2013), 27 (33%) underwent surgery; all had at least 1 cyst-attributed symptom/finding. In the multivariate model, age at presentation and cyst size at diagnosis were independent predictors of surgery. Cyst size had greater predictive value; specifically, the area under the curve for the receiver-operating-characteristic curve was 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.97), with an ideal cutoff point of ≥ 68 cm(3). This cutoff point had 100% sensitivity (95% CI 79%-100%), 75% specificity (95% CI 61%-85%), a 53% positive predictive value (95% CI 36%-70%), and a 100% negative predictive value (95% CI 91%-100%); the positive likelihood ratio was 4.0 (95% CI 2.5-6.3), and the negative likelihood ratio was 0 (95% CI 0-0.3). Although the multivariate model excluded 7 patients who underwent surgery

  14. Tracks of a Giant

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-25

    The giant, 70-meter-wide antenna at NASA Deep Space Network complex in Goldstone, Calif., tracks a spacecraft on Nov. 17, 2009. This antenna, officially known as Deep Space Station 14, is also nicknamed the Mars antenna.

  15. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  16. Silvics of Giant Sequoia

    Treesearch

    C. Phillip Weatherspoon

    1986-01-01

    Ecological relationships-including habitat and life history---of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) in natural stands are summarized. Such silvical information provides an important foundation for sound management of the species.

  17. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  18. Giant Earlobe Epidermoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Scilletta, Alessandra; Cabrera-Sánchez, Emilio; Rioja, Luis F; Perrotta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts represent the most common cutaneous cysts. They are usually small and benign; however, sometimes they can grow to giant epidermoid cists, and occasionally malignancies develop. Giant epidermoid cysts at the earlobe have never been described but in other locations. We describe a case of a giant epidermoid cyst at the earlobe, a location where such a large cyst has never been reported before. The mass was completely resected and the wound of the pedunculated base was sutured with four stitches of nylon 5/0. Histopathology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. Six months after the resection, the patient did not have any relapse of the epidermoid cyst. The earlobe is a potential location for giant epidermoid cysts. Although the clinical diagnosis could be enough, due to the possibility of malignancy and to ensure appropriate diagnosis, we consider that all cysts should be sent to the anatomic pathology laboratory for histological evaluation. PMID:22557855

  19. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  20. Periventricular nodular heterotopia, frontonasal encephalocele, corpus callosal dysgenesis and arachnoid cyst: A constellation of abnormalities in a child with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prasad; Chattopadhyay, Arijit; Saha, Manash

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old male child presented with poorly controlled generalized tonic-clonic seizures. On examination, he was mentally retarded, deaf and had a swelling at the root on the nose. Computed tomography scan done previously revealed a left temporal arachnoid cyst (AC) due to which he was referred for surgery. However, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a constellation of abnormalities - all of which could be responsible for his seizures. The combination of periventricular nodular heterotopias with encepaholcele is rarely described in the literature, and more infrequently so its combination with AC and callosal dysgenesis - the Chudley-Mccullough syndrome. We describe the case and review relevant literature on this subject.

  1. Architecture of arachnoid trabeculae, pillars, and septa in the subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve: anatomy and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Killer, H E; Laeng, H R; Flammer, J; Groscurth, P

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To describe the anatomy and the arrangement of the arachnoid trabeculae, pillars, and septa in the subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve and to consider their possible clinical relevance for cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and fluid pressure in the subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve. Methods: Postmortem study with a total of 12 optic nerves harvested from nine subjects without ocular disease. All optic nerves used in this study were obtained no later than 7 hours after death, following qualified consent for necropsy. The study was performed with transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: The subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve contains a variety of trabeculae, septa, and stout pillars that are arranged between the arachnoid and the pia layers of the meninges of the nerve. They display a considerable numeric and structural variability depending on their location within the different portions of the optic nerve. In the bulbar segment (ampulla), adjacent to the globe, a dense and highly ramified meshwork of delicate trabeculae is arranged in a reticular fashion. Between the arachnoid trabeculae, interconnecting velum-like processes are observed. In the mid-orbital segment of the orbital portion, the subarachnoid space is subdivided, and can appear even loosely chambered by broad trabeculae and velum-like septa at some locations. In the intracanalicular segment additionally, few stout pillars and single round trabeculae are observed. Conclusion: The subarachnoid space of the human optic nerve is not a homogeneous and anatomically empty chamber filled with cerebrospinal fluid, but it contains a complex system of arachnoid trabeculae and septa that divide the subarachnoid space. The trabeculae, septa, and pillars, as well as their arrangement described in this study, may have a role in the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics between the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve and the chiasmal cistern and may contribute to the

  2. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting.

  3. Granular Data Description: Designing Ellipsoidal Information Granules.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiubin; Pedrycz, Witold; Li, Zhiwu

    2016-10-12

    Granular computing (GrC) has emerged as a unified conceptual and processing framework. Information granules are fundamental constructs that permeate concepts and models of GrC. This paper is concerned with a design of a collection of meaningful, easily interpretable ellipsoidal information granules with the use of the principle of justifiable granularity by taking into consideration reconstruction abilities of the designed information granules. The principle of justifiable granularity supports designing of information granules based on numeric or granular evidence, and aims to achieve a compromise between justifiability and specificity of the information granules to be constructed. A two-stage development strategy behind the construction of justifiable information granules is considered. First, a collection of numeric prototypes is determined with the use of fuzzy clustering. Second, the lengths of the semi-axes of ellipsoidal information granules to be formed around such prototypes are optimized. Two optimization criteria are introduced and studied. Experimental studies involving synthetic data set and data sets coming from the machine learning repository are reported.

  4. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  5. Asymmetric distribution in twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Chan Seem, Tim; Rowson, Neil A; Gabbott, Ian; de Matas, Marcel; Reynolds, Gavin K; Ingram, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) was successfully employed to validate measured transverse asymmetry in material distribution in the conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). Flow asymmetry was established to be a property of the granulator geometry and dependent on fill level. The liquid distribution of granules as a function of fill level was determined. High flow asymmetry at low fill level negatively affects granule nucleation leading to high variance in final uniformity. Wetting of material during nucleation was identified as a critical parameter in determining final granule uniformity and fill level is highlighted as a crucial control factor in achieving this. Flow asymmetry of dry material in conveying zones upstream of binder fluid injection leads to poor non-uniform wetting at nucleation and results in heterogeneous final product. The granule formation mechanism of 60°F kneading blocks is suggested to be primarily breakage of agglomerates formed during nucleation. Optimisation of screw configuration would be required to provide secondary growth. This work shows how fill dependent flow regimes affect granulation mechanisms.

  6. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controlfamilydoctor.org editorial staff Home Diseases and Conditions Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica Condition Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica Share Print Giant ...

  7. Sport-related structural brain injury associated with arachnoid cysts: a systematic review and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Prather, Colin T; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K; Bonfield, Christopher M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are congenital lesions bordered by an arachnoid membrane. Researchers have postulated that individuals with an AC demonstrate a higher rate of structural brain injury after trauma. Given the potential neurological consequences of a structural brain injury requiring neurosurgical intervention, the authors sought to perform a systematic review of sport-related structural-brain injury associated with ACs with a corresponding quantitative analysis. METHODS Titles and abstracts were searched systematically across the following databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. The review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Peer-reviewed case reports, case series, or observational studies that reported a structural brain injury due to a sport or recreational activity (hereafter referred to as sport-related) with an associated AC were included. Patients were excluded if they did not have an AC, suffered a concussion without structural brain injury, or sustained the injury during a non-sport-related activity (e.g., fall, motor vehicle collision). Descriptive statistical analysis and time to presentation data were summarized. Univariate logistic regression models to assess predictors of neurological deficit, open craniotomy, and cystoperitoneal shunt were completed. RESULTS After an initial search of 994 original articles, 52 studies were found that reported 65 cases of sport-related structural brain injury associated with an AC. The median age at presentation was 16 years (range 4-75 years). Headache was the most common presenting symptom (98%), followed by nausea and vomiting in 49%. Thirteen patients (21%) presented with a neurological deficit, most commonly hemiparesis. Open craniotomy was the most common form of treatment (49%). Bur holes and cyst fenestration were performed in 29 (45%) and 31 (48%) patients, respectively. Seven patients (11%) received

  8. Capella: Separating the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.; Dupree, A. K.

    2002-01-01

    Images from the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are used to spatially separate the two giants of Capella (α Aurigae; HD 34029) for the first time at ultraviolet wavelengths. The images were obtained with broadband filters that isolate the wavelength regions 2500-3000 Å and 1300-1500 Å. The cool G8 giant is found to be weaker than the hot G1 giant by factors of around 4 and 17, respectively, in these bands. The latter factor is largely due to the much stronger G1 continuum at short wavelengths. No evidence is found for material lying between the two stars in the images. In addition, the objective prisms of the FOC were used to obtain low-resolution spectra from 1200 to 3000 Å, allowing individual emission lines from each star to be spatially separated. Cool-to-hot star ratios for the emission lines H I Lyα, O I λ1305, Si II λ1816, C II λ1335, He II λ1640, and Si IV λ1393 are presented, showing that the cool giant is weaker than the hot giant by factors of 5-10 in these lines. The O I emission is only a factor of 2.5 weaker in the cool giant, most probably resulting from fluorescence in the extended atmosphere of the cool giant. The line ratios are compared with values derived from International Ultraviolet Explorer and HST/Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph spectra, which could separate the stars spectrally but not spatially. Reasonable agreement is found although the FOC ratios generally imply lower contributions from the cool giant. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  9. Predictors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocephalus following spontaneous aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often associated with unfavorable outcome. This study aimed to determine the potential risk factors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in aneurysmal SAH patients but without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital. Methods One hundred and sixty-eight aneurysmal SAH patients were evaluated. Using functional scores, those without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital were compared to those already with hydrocephalus on admission, those who developed it during hospitalization, and those who did not develop it throughout their hospital stay. The Glasgow Coma Score, modified Fisher SAH grade, and World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade were determined at the emergency room. Therapeutic outcomes immediately after discharge and 18 months after were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Score. Results Hydrocephalus accounted for 61.9% (104/168) of all episodes, including 82 with initial hydrocephalus on admission and 22 with subsequent hydrocephalus. Both the presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage on admission and post-operative intra-cerebral hemorrhage were independently associated with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without hydrocephalus on admission. After a minimum 1.5 years of follow-up, the mean Glasgow outcome score was 3.33 ± 1.40 for patients with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus and 4.21 ± 1.19 for those without. Conclusions The presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage, lower mean Glasgow Coma Scale score, and higher mean scores of the modified Fisher SAH and World Federation of Neurosurgical grading on admission imply risk of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without initial hydrocephalus. These patients have worse short- and long-term outcomes and longer hospitalization. PMID:22765765

  10. Granulation of zeolite-containing aluminosilicate hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Galimov, Z.F.; Vinkel'man, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    The granulation of aluminosilicate hydrogel as an intermediate for the synthesis of cracking catalysts was investigated from the standpoint of eliminating the splitting cone from the granulator and eliminating coagulation directly on the cone surface. A method for forming the gel without a cone was developed by dispersion of jets of sol issuing directly from the mixer. Gel quality was considerably higher in dispersions of time-constant jets of the sol. The experimental mixer can be used as a design basis for a multijet granulator with a capacity equivalent to one or several splitting cones in commercial units.

  11. Induction of multinucleated giant cells in response to small sized bovine bone substitute (Bio-Oss™) results in an enhanced early implantation bed vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Barbeck, M.; Udeabor, S. E.; Lorenz, J.; Kubesch, A.; Choukroun, J.; Sader, R. A.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.; Ghanaati, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The host tissue reaction to the xenogeneic bone substitute Bio-Oss™ (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhousen, Switzerland) was investigated focusing on the participating inflammatory cells and implantation bed vascularization. Materials and Methods: Bio-Oss™ was implanted subcutaneously into CD1 mice for up to 60 days and analyzed by means of specialized histological and histomorphometrical techniques after explantation. Results: Bio-Oss™ induced within the first 15 days an early high vascularization combined with a marked presence of multinucleated giant cells. The latter cells were associated mainly with the smaller sized granules within the implantation bed. Toward the end of the study the number of multinucleated giant cells decreased while the tissue reaction to the larger granules was mainly mononuclear. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that smaller xenogeneic bone substitute granules induce multinucleated giant cells, whereas the larger-sized ones became integrated within the implantation bed by means of a mononuclear cell-triggered granulation tissue. Obviously, the presence of multinucleated giant cells within biomaterial implantation beds is not only related to the type of synthetic bone substitute material, but also to the granule size of the natural-based xenogeneic bone substitute material. PMID:25593863

  12. Application of tumbling melt granulation (TMG) method to prepare controlled-release fine granules.

    PubMed

    Maejima, T; Kubo, M; Osawa, T; Nakajima, K; Kobayashi, M

    1998-03-01

    The tumbling melt granulation (TMG) method was applied to prepare controlled-release fine granules of diltiazem hydrochloride (DH). The entire process, from the preparation of the cores by the adherence of DH to the sucrose crystal to the subsequent coating of the controlled-release layer, was performed without using any solvent. A mixture of meltable material, talc, and ethylcellulose was used for the controlled-release layer and controlled-release fine granules approximately 400 microns in diameter were obtained with excellent producibility. The dissolution rate of DH from these fine granules was similar to that of a once-a-day dosage form obtained in the market; further, the dependency of the dissolution profile on pH of the media was less. Thus, it was concluded that this TMG method was very useful for preparing not only controlled-release beads of granule size (usually 500 to 1400 microns) but also fine granules.

  13. Distribution of binder in granules produced by means of twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Fussell, Andrew Luke; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Strachan, Clare; Rades, Thomas; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-02-28

    According to the quality by design principle processes may not remain black-boxes and full process understanding is required. The granule size distribution of granules produced via twin screw granulation is often found to be bimodal. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of binder distribution within granules produced via twin screw granulation in order to investigate if an inhomogeneous spread of binder is causing this bimodal size distribution. Theophylline-lactose-polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP) (30-67.5-2.5%, w/w) was used as a model formulation. The intra-granular distribution of PVP was evaluated by means of hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. For the evaluated formulation, no PVP rich zones were detected when applying a lateral spatial resolution of 0.5 μm, indicating that PVP is homogenously distributed within the granules.

  14. Granulation Properties in DOT Images from Solar Maximum to Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzi, W.

    DOT granulation filtergrams in the G-Band from solar maximum to solar minimum (1999 to 2007) were investigated for changes of granulation properties like areas, perimeter, fractal dimension, cell sizes, and life times. Granules seem to become larger during solar minimum, whereas the distances between the granule centres stay constant. Nonetheless, the uncertainties are very high.

  15. Cohesive strength of iron ore granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Rafael Jaimes; Berger, Nicolas; Izard, Edouard; Douce, Jean-François; Koltsov, Alexey; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Azema, Emilien; Nezamabadi, Saeid; van Loo, Frédéric; Pellenq, Roland; Radjai, Farhang

    2017-06-01

    We present an experimental and numerical investigation of the mechanical strength of crude iron ore (Hematite) granules in which capillary bonds between primary particles are the source of internal cohesion. The strength is measured by subjecting the granules to vertical compression between two plates. We show that the behavior of the granules is ductile with a well-defined plastic threshold which increases with the amount of water. It is found that the compressive strength scales with capillary cohesion with a pre-factor that is nearly independent of size polydispersity for the investigated range of parameters but increases with friction coefficient between primary particles. This weak dependence may be attributed to the class of fine particles which, due to their large number, behaves as a cohesive matrix that controls the strength of the granule.

  16. Gastroretentive extended-release floating granules prepared using a novel fluidized hot melt granulation (FHMG) technique.

    PubMed

    Zhai, H; Jones, D S; McCoy, C P; Madi, A M; Tian, Y; Andrews, G P

    2014-10-06

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of using a novel granulation technique, namely, fluidized hot melt granulation (FHMG), to prepare gastroretentive extended-release floating granules. In this study we have utilized FHMG, a solvent free process in which granulation is achieved with the aid of low melting point materials, using Compritol 888 ATO and Gelucire 50/13 as meltable binders, in place of conventional liquid binders. The physicochemical properties, morphology, floating properties, and drug release of the manufactured granules were investigated. Granules prepared by this method were spherical in shape and showed good flowability. The floating granules exhibited sustained release exceeding 10 h. Granule buoyancy (floating time and strength) and drug release properties were significantly influenced by formulation variables such as excipient type and concentration, and the physical characteristics (particle size, hydrophilicity) of the excipients. Drug release rate was increased by increasing the concentration of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and Gelucire 50/13, or by decreasing the particle size of HPC. Floating strength was improved through the incorporation of sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Furthermore, floating strength was influenced by the concentration of HPC within the formulation. Granules prepared in this way show good physical characteristics, floating ability, and drug release properties when placed in simulated gastric fluid. Moreover, the drug release and floating properties can be controlled by modification of the ratio or physical characteristics of the excipients used in the formulation.

  17. RNA Granules and Diseases: A Case Study of Stress Granules in ALS and FTLD.

    PubMed

    Fan, Alexander C; Leung, Anthony K L

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are microscopically visible cellular structures that aggregate by protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Using stress granules as an example, we discuss the principles of RNA granule formation, which rely on the multivalency of RNA and multi-domain proteins as well as low-affinity interactions between proteins with prion-like/low-complexity domains (e.g. FUS and TDP-43). We then explore how dysregulation of RNA granule formation is linked to neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and discuss possible strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Effects of cinnamon granules on pharmacokinetics of berberine in Rhizoma Coptidis granules in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhaoyi; Lu, Fu'er; Dong, Hui; Xu, Lijun; Chen, Guang; Zou, Xin; Lei, Hongwei

    2011-06-01

    The effects of Cinnamon granules on pharmacokinetics of berberine in Rhizoma Coptidis granules in healthy male volunteers, and the compatibility mechanism of Jiao-Tai-Wan (JTW) composed of Rhizoma Coptidis granules and Cinnamon granules were investigated. The concentration of berberine in plasma of healthy male volunteers was determined directly by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after an oral administration of Rhizoma Coptidis granules alone or combined with Cinnamon granules (JTW). The plasma concentration-time curves of berberine were plotted. The data were analyzed with Drug and Statistics (DAS) 2.0 pharmacokinetic program (Chinese Pharmacology Society) to obtain the main pharmacokinetic parameters. The results showed that the plasma concentration-time curve of berberine was described by a two-compartment model. The C(max), T(max), t(1/2) and CLz/F of berberine in Rhizoma Coptidis granules were 360.883 μg/L, 2.0 h, 3.882 h, 119.320 L·h(-1)·kg(-1) respectively, and those of berberine in JTW were 396.124 μg/L, 1.5 h, 4.727 h, 57.709 L·h(-1)·kg(-1) respectively. It was suggested that Rhizoma Coptidis granules combined with Cinnamon granules could increase the plasma concentration of berberine, promote berberine absorption and lengthen the detention time of berberine in healthy male volunteers.

  19. RNA Granules and Diseases — A Case Study of Stress Granules in ALS and FTLD

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Alexander C.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2017-01-01

    RNA granules are microscopically visible cellular structures that aggregate by protein–protein and protein-RNA interactions. Using stress granules as an example, we discuss the principles of RNA granule formation, which rely on the multivalency of RNA and multi-domain proteins as well as low-affinity interactions between proteins with prion-like/low-complexity domains (e.g. FUS and TDP-43). We then explore how dysregulation of RNA granule formation is linked to neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and discuss possible strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27256390

  20. Comparative analysis of bleeding risk by the location and shape of arachnoid cysts: a finite element model analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Han, In Seok; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Kim, Young-Eun; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Although arachnoid cysts (ACs) are observed in various locations, only sylvian ACs are mainly regarded to be associated with bleeding. The reason for this selective association of sylvian ACs with bleeding is not understood well. This study is to investigate the effect of the location and shape of ACs on the risk of bleeding. A developed finite element model of the head/brain was modified for models of sylvian, suprasellar, and posterior fossa ACs. A spherical AC was placed at each location to compare the effect of AC location. Bowl-shaped and oval-shaped AC models were developed to compare the effect by shape. The shear force on the spot-weld elements (SFSW) was measured between the dura and the outer wall of the ACs or the comparable arachnoid membrane in the normal model. All AC models revealed higher SFSW than comparable normal models. By location, sylvian AC displayed the highest SFSW for frontal and lateral impacts. By shape, small outer wall AC models showed higher SFSW than large wall models in sylvian area and lower SFSW than large ones in posterior fossa. In regression analysis, the presence of AC was the only independent risk of bleeding. The bleeding mechanism of ACs is very complex, and the risk quantification failed to show a significant role of location and shape of ACs. The presence of AC increases shear force on impact condition and may be a risk factor of bleeding, and sylvian location of AC may not have additive risks of AC bleeding.

  1. Hippocampal granule cells opt for early retirement.

    PubMed

    Alme, C B; Buzzetti, R A; Marrone, D F; Leutgeb, J K; Chawla, M K; Schaner, M J; Bohanick, J D; Khoboko, T; Leutgeb, S; Moser, E I; Moser, M-B; McNaughton, B L; Barnes, C A

    2010-10-01

    Increased excitability and plasticity of adult-generated hippocampal granule cells during a critical period suggests that they may "orthogonalize" memories according to time. One version of this "temporal tag" hypothesis suggests that young granule cells are particularly responsive during a specific time period after their genesis, allowing them to play a significant role in sculpting CA3 representations, after which they become much less responsive to any input. An alternative possibility is that the granule cells active during their window of increased plasticity, and excitability become selectively tuned to events that occurred during that time and participate in later reinstatement of those experiences, to the exclusion of other cells. To discriminate between these possibilities, rats were exposed to different environments at different times over many weeks, and cell activation was subsequently assessed during a single session in which all environments were revisited. Dispersing the initial experiences in time did not lead to the increase in total recruitment at reinstatement time predicted by the selective tuning hypothesis. The data indicate that, during a given time frame, only a very small number of granule cells participate in many experiences, with most not participating significantly in any. Based on these and previous data, the small excitable population of granule cells probably correspond to the most recently generated cells. It appears that, rather than contributing to the recollection of long past events, most granule cells, possibly 90-95%, are effectively "retired." If granule cells indeed sculpt CA3 representations (which remains to be shown), then a possible consequence of having a new set of granule cells participate when old memories are reinstated is that new representations of these experiences might be generated in CA3. Whatever the case, the present data may be interpreted to undermine the standard "orthogonalizer" theory of the role of

  2. Phasins, Multifaceted Polyhydroxyalkanoate Granule-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, Mariela P.

    2016-01-01

    Phasins are the major polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins. They promote bacterial growth and PHA synthesis and affect the number, size, and distribution of the granules. These proteins can be classified in 4 families with distinctive characteristics. Low-resolution structural studies and in silico predictions were performed in order to elucidate the structure of different phasins. Most of these proteins share some common structural features, such as a preponderant α-helix composition, the presence of disordered regions that provide flexibility to the protein, and coiled-coil interacting regions that form oligomerization domains. Due to their amphiphilic nature, these proteins play an important structural function, forming an interphase between the hydrophobic content of PHA granules and the hydrophilic cytoplasm content. Phasins have been observed to affect both PHA accumulation and utilization. Apart from their role as granule structural proteins, phasins have a remarkable variety of additional functions. Different phasins have been determined to (i) activate PHA depolymerization, (ii) increase the expression and activity of PHA synthases, (iii) participate in PHA granule segregation, and (iv) have both in vivo and in vitro chaperone activities. These properties suggest that phasins might play an active role in PHA-related stress protection and fitness enhancement. Due to their granule binding capacity and structural flexibility, several biotechnological applications have been developed using different phasins, increasing the interest in the study of these remarkable proteins. PMID:27287326

  3. Ectopic choroid plexus within a juvenile arachnoid cyst of the cerebellopontine angle: cause of cyst formation or reason of cyst growth.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, M U; Tatagiba, M; Hader, C; Brandis, A; Samii, M

    2000-02-01

    The unusual and rare case of a 6-year-old boy is reported who presented with an arachnoid cyst located in the cerebellopontine angle incorporating an ectopic piece of choroid plexus tissue. A microneurosurgical cyst wall resection was performed and the plexus tissue identified and removed. The rare occurrence of ectopic choroid plexus tissue within cysts of the CNS is discussed.

  4. The stable K0 giant star β Gem

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2014-12-01

    A nine-season spectroscopic study of the photosphere of β Gem (K0 III) shows this low-luminosity giant to be stable, with no effective temperature variations above ∼2 K, and no secular temperature variations over the 2002-2010 time span above 0.2 K per year. The radial-velocity variations are consistent with an orbital variation of ∼40 m s{sup –1}. The projected rotation rate is found to be 1.70 ± 0.20 km s{sup –1} with a macroturbulence dispersion of 4.53 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. The third-signature plot is also invariant and shows a granulation velocity gradient 20% smaller than the solar gradient. The absolute shift of the third-signature plot gives a blueshift-corrected radial velocity of 3385 ± 70 m s{sup –1}. Bisector mapping of the Fe I λ6253 line yields a flux deficit of 12% ± 1% in area, somewhat smaller than for other giants, but the shape and the position of the peak at 4.8 km s{sup –1} is consistent with other giants. All of the investigated photospheric parameters are consistent with β Gem being a low-luminosity giant in agreement with its absolute magnitude.

  5. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  6. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  7. Ectopic Granule Cells of the Rat Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen; Goodman, Jeffrey; McCloskey, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Granule cells of the mammalian dentate gyrus normally form a discrete layer, and virtually all granule cells migrate to this location. Exceptional granule cells that are positioned incorrectly, in ‘ectopic’ locations, are rare. Although the characteristics of such ectopic granule cells appear similar in many respects to granule cells located in the granule cell layer, their rare occurrence has limited a full evaluation of their structure and function. More information about ectopic granule cells has been obtained by studying those that develop after experimental manipulations that increase their number. For example, after severe seizures, the number of ectopic granule cells located in the hilus increases dramatically. These experimentally induced ectopic granule cells may not be equivalent to normal ectopic granule cells necessarily, but the vastly increased numbers have allowed much more information to be obtained. Remarkably, the granule cells that are positioned ectopically develop intrinsic properties and an axonal projection that are similar to granule cells that are located normally, i.e., in the granule cell layer. However, dendritic structure and synaptic structure/function appear to differ. These studies have provided new insight into a rare type of granule cell in the dentate gyrus, and the plastic characteristics of dentate granule cells that appear to depend on the location of the cell body. PMID:17148946

  8. Processing and targeting of granule proteins in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, U; Bengtsson, N; Bülow, E; Garwicz, D; Lindmark, A; Olsson, I

    1999-12-17

    Neutrophils contain an assembly of granules destined for regulated secretion, each granule type with distinct constituents formed before terminal differentiation. The earliest granules are designated azurophil (primary), followed in time by specific (secondary), and gelatinase granules as well as secretory vesicles. Transcription factors regulate the genes for the granule proteins to ensure that expression of the gene products to be stored in different organelles is separated in time. Similar to lysosomal enzymes, many granule proteins, in particular those of the heterogeneous azurophil granules, are trimmed by proteolytic processing into mature proteins. Rodent myeloid cell lines have been utilized for research on the processing and targeting of human granule proteins after transfection of cDNA. Results from extensive work on the hematopoietic serine proteases of azurophil granules, employing in vitro mutagenesis, indicate that both an immature and a mature conformation are compatible with targeting for storage in granules. On the other hand, the amino-terminal propeptide of myeloperoxidase facilitates both the export from the endoplasmic reticulum and targeting for storage in granules. Similarly, targeting of defensins rely on an intact propeptide. The proteolytic processing into mature granule protein is most commonly a post-sorting event. Mis-sorting of specific granule proteins into azurophil or lysosome-like granules can result in premature activation and degradation, but represents a potential for manipulating the composition and function of neutrophil granules.

  9. Giant star seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekker, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2017-06-01

    The internal properties of stars in the red-giant phase undergo significant changes on relatively short timescales. Long near-uninterrupted high-precision photometric timeseries observations from dedicated space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler have provided seismic inferences of the global and internal properties of a large number of evolved stars, including red giants. These inferences are confronted with predictions from theoretical models to improve our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. Our knowledge and understanding of red giants have indeed increased tremendously using these seismic inferences, and we anticipate that more information is still hidden in the data. Unraveling this will further improve our understanding of stellar evolution. This will also have significant impact on our knowledge of the Milky Way Galaxy as well as on exo-planet host stars. The latter is important for our understanding of the formation and structure of planetary systems.

  10. Analysis on clinical characteristics of intracranial Arachnoid Cysts in 488 pediatric cases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Huang; Mei, Wen-Zhong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Jian-Wu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics of intracranial arachnoid cysts (IACs) in pediatric cases. A retrospective analysis was carried out on clinical characteristics of IACs in 488 pediatric cases who were treated at our hospital from January 2003 to September 2013. There were 342 males and 146 females (male-to-female ratio, 2.34:1), aged 5.61±3.25 years on average. 221 cases (45.29%) were diagnosed accidentally, 267 cases had clinical complaints (54.71%), among which relationships between clinical complaints and IACs were identified in 123 (46.07%). Simple IACs occurred in 364 cases (4.59%), and concurrent congenital abnormalities occurred in 124 cases (4.59%). In terms of location, 355 had IACs in middle cranial fossa (72.75%), 82 cases in posterior cranial fossa (16.80%), 20 cases in anterior cranial fossa (4.10%), 12 cases in dorsolateral surface (2.46%), 7 cases in suprasellar cistern (1.43%), 5 cases in cerebral ventricle (1.02%), 5 cases in quadrigeminal cistern (1.02%), and 2 cases in interhemispheric region (0.41%). There were 449 cases with single IAC (92.01%) and 39 cases with multiple IACs (7.99%). On MRI, the cysts produced tension in 127 cases (26.02%), but not in the remaining 361 cases (73.98%). Surgery was performed on 76 of 488 cases (15.57%), while conservative observation was accepted in 412 cases (84.43%). For the former, the symptoms and the cyst volume were improved to varying extent; for the latter, the follow-up lasting for 3-72 months (average 32.43±8.92 months) showed that the cyst volume remained stable in 407 cases (98.78%), enlarged with aggravated symptoms in 3 cases (0.73%), and shrank in 2 cases (0.49%). Clinical complaints of IACs varied in pediatric cases, and the relationships between clinical complaints and IACs were established only partially. Some pediatric cases were combined with other congenital abnormalities. The cyst volume largely remained stable during the disease course, and surgery was required for only a few

  11. Experimental model of posttraumatic syringomyelia: the role of adhesive arachnoiditis in syrinx formation.

    PubMed

    Cho, K H; Iwasaki, Y; Imamura, H; Hida, K; Abe, H

    1994-01-01

    An experimental model was devised to elucidate the role of spinal blockade in posttraumatic syringomyelia. Thirty-eight Japanese White rabbits, each weighing about 3 kg, were used in this study. The animals were divided into four groups: in Group 1, eight animals received traumatic injury only; in Group 2, 12 animals received traumatic injury following injection of 100 mg kaolin suspended in 1 cc normal saline solution into the subarachnoid space at the site of trauma; in Group 3, nine animals received traumatic injury following injection of 200 mg kaolin in 1 cc normal saline solution into the subarachnoid space at the site of trauma; and in Group 4, nine animals without traumatic injury received an injection of 200 mg kaolin in 1 cc normal saline solution into the subarachnoid space. The subjective criteria for syrinx formation were the presence of a definite round cyst having a smooth margin and an upper or lower extension of more than 2 cm from the injured site. Syrinx formation was seen in 12.5% (one of eight rabbits) in Group 1, 41.7% (five of 12 animals) in Group 2, 55.5% (five of nine rabbits) in Group 3 and 0% (none of nine animals) in Group 4 (p < 0.05). There was a tendency for the combined trauma/kaolin injection groups to be more prone to develop a syrinx. In the kaolin injection only group (Group 4), no animal showed a definite cyst or an extending cavity during the experimental period. The results suggest that kaolin enhances the extension of multiple small cavities that have already formed at the time of initial injury. The difference between the frequency of syrinx formation and the time of survival was statistically significant well beyond the 0.05% level. The overall difference, relating to the frequency of syrinx development, group, and duration of survival, was also statistically significant. In summary, subarachnoid block secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis is important in initiating the extension of the syringomyelia cavity.

  12. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  13. Mast cell tumour in a giant Galapagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra vicina).

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Stacy, B A; Morales, J A; Gastezzi-Arias, P; Landazuli, S; Jacobson, E R

    2008-01-01

    A well-differentiated cutaneous mast cell tumour was diagnosed in a subadult female giant Galapagos tortoise. The tumour was a pedunculated, verrucose mass located near the base of the neck. The histological features, which were diagnostic for a mast cell tumour, included abundant intracytoplasmic granules that were stained metachromatically with Giemsa and toluidine blue stains. Mast cell tumours are rare in reptiles, and this is the first description of a mast cell tumour in a chelonian.

  14. Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and ferromagnetic properties of DC and pulse electrodeposited Cu-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, N.; Mohan, S.; Arout chelvane, J.; Jagannathan, R.

    2012-09-01

    Cu-Co ferromagnetic alloys occurring as granular films and exhibiting giant magnetoresistance (GMR) property have been synthesized using both DC and pulse electrodeposition techniques. The growth process of these electrodeposits comprising multiple granules of disparate morphology, magnetic features exhibits critical dependence on electrodeposition conditions. Using ferromagnetic resonance and magnetic hysteresis data, we have attempted a correlation between evolution of these electrodeposits and their ferromagnetic properties with special emphasis on GMR property.

  15. [Study on fluidized melt-granulation. I. Examination of the factors on the granulation].

    PubMed

    Haramiishi, Y; Kitazawa, Y; Sakai, M; Kataoka, K

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new granulation method by using a fluidized-bed granulator, which requires a nucleus with a low melting point as a binder. This method was named as fluidized melt-granulation. The technique is very simple and useful. In this paper, the granulation mechanism and the effect of the physico-chemical properties of raw materials on the growth of the granules were investigated. The results were as follows: (1) The mixture of the nucleus and the other powder particles was heated up to the melting point of the nucleus by hot inlet air, immediately resulting in the generation of the adhesion of the powders on the melted nucleus. The granules grew as the melted material immersed into the void space among the adhered particles. (2) The lower the viscosity of the melted nucleus was, the faster the granule grew. (3) The shape and the size of the nucleus affected those of the products. (4) The optimum mixing ratio between the nucleus and the granulated materials existed and it depended on the ratio between the surface areas of these materials.

  16. Granule size control and targeting in pulsed spray fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Henrik; Liu, Anchang; Räikkönen, Heikki; Hatara, Juha; Antikainen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Sari; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Lou, Honxiang; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-07-30

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effects of pulsed liquid feed on granule size. The secondary aim was to increase knowledge of this technique in granule size targeting. Pulsed liquid feed refers to the pump changing between on- and off-positions in sequences, called duty cycles. One duty cycle consists of one on- and off-period. The study was performed with a laboratory-scale top-spray fluid bed granulator with duty cycle length and atomization pressure as studied variables. The liquid feed rate, amount and inlet air temperature were constant. The granules were small, indicating that the powder has only undergone ordered mixing, nucleation and early growth. The effect of atomizing pressure on granule size depends on inlet air relative humidity, with premature binder evaporation as a reason. The duty cycle length was of critical importance to the end product attributes, by defining the extent of intermittent drying and rewetting. By varying only the duty cycle length, it was possible to control granule nucleation and growth, with a wider granule size target range in increased relative humidity. The present study confirms that pulsed liquid feed in fluid bed granulation is a useful tool in end product particle size targeting.

  17. Investigation of Physicochemical Drug Properties to Prepare Fine Globular Granules Composed of Only Drug Substance in Fluidized Bed Rotor Granulation.

    PubMed

    Mise, Ryohei; Iwao, Yasunori; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Osugi, Yukiko; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of some drug properties (wettability and particle size distribution) on granule properties (mean particle size, particle size distribution, sphericity, and granule strength) were investigated in a high (>97%) drug-loading formulation using fluidized bed rotor granulation. Three drugs: acetaminophen (APAP); ibuprofen (IBU); and ethenzamide (ETZ) were used as model drugs based on their differences in wettability and particle size distribution. Granules with mean particle sizes of 100-200 µm and a narrow particle size distribution (PSD) could be prepared regardless of the drug used. IBU and ETZ granules showed a higher sphericity than APAP granules, while APAP and ETZ granules exhibited higher granule strength than IBU. The relationship between drug and granule properties suggested that the wettability and the PSD of the drugs were critical parameters affecting sphericity and granule strength, respectively. Furthermore, the dissolution profiles of granules prepared with poorly water-soluble drugs (IBU and ETZ) showed a rapid release (80% release in 20 min) because of the improved wettability with granulation. The present study demonstrated for the first time that fluidized bed rotor granulation can prepare high drug-loaded (>97%) globular granules with a mean particle size of less than 200 µm and the relationship between physicochemical drug properties and the properties of the granules obtained could be readily determined, indicating the potential for further application of this methodology to various drugs.

  18. Monitoring high-shear granulation using sound and vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Briens, L; Daniher, D; Tallevi, A

    2007-02-22

    Sound and vibration measurements were investigated as monitoring methods for high-shear granulation. Five microphones and one accelerometer were placed at different locations on a 10 and a 25 l granulator and compared to find the optimum location and the effect of scale. The granulation process could be monitored using the mean frequency and root mean square sound pressure levels from acoustic emissions measured using a microphone in the filtered air exhaust of the granulators. These acoustic monitoring methods were successful for both the 10 and the 25 l granulation scales. The granulation phases, however, were more clearly defined for the larger scale granulation. The root mean square acceleration level from vibration measurements was also able to monitor the granulation, but only for the larger 25 l granulator.

  19. Metal content of neutrophil granules is altered in chronic inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Haellgren, R.F.; Feltelius, N.; Garcia, R.; Venge, P.; Lindh, U. )

    1989-08-01

    The mass fraction of certain elements was measured in isolated granulocytes and isolated granulocyte granule fractions from patients with active inflammatory arthritides (N = 6) and healthy controls (N = 6). The patients had significantly increased amounts of Ca in the granulocytes, in the specific and light azurophil granules, but normal Ca amounts in the dense azurophil granules. Sr was below the detection limit in the granulocytes and granule fraction from controls, but it appeared in high concentrations in the granulocytes and all granule fractions from the patients. The patients had considerably increased granulocyte amounts of Mn but only slightly increased Mn concentrations in the specific granules. Mn was not detectable in azurophil granules from patients and controls. A prominent accumulation of Fe was seen in the granulocytes from the patients, together with an Fe accumulation in the specific granules. Fe was below the detection limit in azurophil granules from patients and controls. The patients had reduced granulocyte Zn and reduced amounts of Zn in the dense and light azurophil granules but normal Zn amounts in the specific granules. The results obtained indicate that the granulocyte accumulation of Ca, Sr, and Fe observed during chronic inflammation is associated with corresponding granule accumulation of these metals; the considerable Mn accumulation in granulocytes during inflammation is not localized in their granules; and the granule subpopulations differ in their capacity to store certain metals.

  20. Granulostasis: Protein Quality Control of RNP Granules.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Simon; Mateju, Daniel; Mediani, Laura; Carra, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules transport, store, or degrade messenger RNAs, thereby indirectly regulating protein synthesis. Normally, RNP granules are highly dynamic compartments. However, because of aging or severe environmental stress, RNP granules, in particular stress granules (SGs), convert into solid, aggregate-like inclusions. There is increasing evidence that such RNA-protein inclusions are associated with several age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, understanding what triggers the conversion of RNP granules into aggregates and identifying the cellular players that control RNP granules will be critical to develop treatments for these diseases. In this review article, we discuss recent insight into RNP and SG formation. More specifically, we examine the evidence for liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) as an organizing principle of RNP granules and the role of aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in this process. We further discuss recent findings that liquid-like SGs can sequester misfolded proteins, which promote an aberrant conversion of liquid SGs into solid aggregates. Importantly, very recent studies show that a specific protein quality control (PQC) process prevents the accumulation of misfolding-prone proteins in SGs and, by doing so, maintains the dynamic state of SGs. This quality control process has been referred to as granulostasis and it relies on the specific action of the HSPB8-BAG3-HSP70 complex. Additional players such as p97/valosin containing protein (VCP) and other molecular chaperones (e.g., HSPB1) participate, directly or indirectly, in granulostasis, and ensure the timely elimination of defective ribosomal products and other misfolded proteins from SGs. Finally, we discuss recent findings that, in the stress recovery phase, SGs are preferentially disassembled with the assistance of chaperones, and we discuss

  1. Granulostasis: Protein Quality Control of RNP Granules

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Simon; Mateju, Daniel; Mediani, Laura; Carra, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules transport, store, or degrade messenger RNAs, thereby indirectly regulating protein synthesis. Normally, RNP granules are highly dynamic compartments. However, because of aging or severe environmental stress, RNP granules, in particular stress granules (SGs), convert into solid, aggregate-like inclusions. There is increasing evidence that such RNA-protein inclusions are associated with several age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, understanding what triggers the conversion of RNP granules into aggregates and identifying the cellular players that control RNP granules will be critical to develop treatments for these diseases. In this review article, we discuss recent insight into RNP and SG formation. More specifically, we examine the evidence for liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) as an organizing principle of RNP granules and the role of aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in this process. We further discuss recent findings that liquid-like SGs can sequester misfolded proteins, which promote an aberrant conversion of liquid SGs into solid aggregates. Importantly, very recent studies show that a specific protein quality control (PQC) process prevents the accumulation of misfolding-prone proteins in SGs and, by doing so, maintains the dynamic state of SGs. This quality control process has been referred to as granulostasis and it relies on the specific action of the HSPB8-BAG3-HSP70 complex. Additional players such as p97/valosin containing protein (VCP) and other molecular chaperones (e.g., HSPB1) participate, directly or indirectly, in granulostasis, and ensure the timely elimination of defective ribosomal products and other misfolded proteins from SGs. Finally, we discuss recent findings that, in the stress recovery phase, SGs are preferentially disassembled with the assistance of chaperones, and we discuss

  2. Amylase activity in substrate deficiency aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chuen-Chi; Lee, Duu-Jong; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining was applied together with the multicolor fluorescent scheme to demonstrate the amylase activity for polysaccharide hydrolysis in stored or starved aerobic granules that are in substrate deficiency. If sufficient nutrients were present, alpha-amylase and beta-amylase were found close to the surface layer of the original granules. Following storage or starvation during which most external nutrients were depleted, the alpha-amylase and beta-amylase were distributed over the entire granule interior, suggesting endogenous respiration at the core of the granule. In particular, the fluorescent intensities of alpha-amylase and beta-amylase were enriched 5-20 microm from the edge of the internal cavity, suggesting the strong correlation between polysaccharide hydrolysis and the formation of interior cavities. The secreted amylase was located near the living cells, suggesting that the polysaccharide hydrolysis is restricted to local environment that occurs near the functional strains. Internal hydrolysis within the core, for the case of both proteins and polysaccharides should correspond in principle to the loss of granule stability.

  3. Denitrification in USB reactor with granulated biomass.

    PubMed

    Pagácová, P; Galbová, K; Drtil, M; Jonatová, I

    2010-01-01

    Denitrification of low concentrations of NO(3)-N (20 mg L(-1)), with methanol as an organic carbon source (COD:NO(3)-N=6) in laboratory upflow sludge bed reactor (USB), was tested as a possibility for wastewater post-treatment. By gradual increase of volumetric loading (Bv) and hydraulic loading (gamma), anoxic biomass spontaneously granulated out even from flocculate activated sludge and from anaerobic granulated sludge as well. Anaerobic granulated biomass derived from high-rate anaerobic IC reactor was a far better inoculum for anoxic granulation and for denitrification in the USB reactor. The maximum level of Bv and gamma was remarkably higher with the use of anaerobic granulated inoculum, (19-22 kg COD m(-3)d(-1); 3.2-3.7 kg NO(3)-Nm(-3)d(-1); 2.8-3.2m(3)m(-2)h(-1); SVI=15 mL g(-1)) in comparison to inoculum from flocculate activated sludge (4.2-8.1 kg CO Dm(-3)d(-1); 0.7-1.4 kg NO(3)-Nm(-3)d(-1); 0.7-1.15m(3)m(-2)h(-1); SVI=40-95 mL g(-1)).

  4. Granulation in saturnian rings and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The third theorem of the wave planetary tectonics [1-3 & others] states: "Celestial bodies are granular". It means that inertia-gravity waves appearing in bodies due to their movements in non-circular keplerian orbits and propagating in them in four interfering orthogonal and diagonal directions produce tectonic granules. They are of three kinds: uprising (+), subsiding (-) and neutral (0). Their sizes are inversely proportional to bodies orbital frequencies. Higher frequency - smaller granule, lower frequency - larger granule. The inertia-gravity waves warp all spheres of celestial bodies: solid, liquid, gaseous, and act in stars, planets, asteroids, comets and satellites. The Cassini data provide numerous excellent images of saturnian rings and show that wave processes are ordinary also in them - in disperse solid environment. To illustrate dependence between orbital frequencies and granule sizes we provide the following geometrical representation of the planetary row starting from the solar photosphere also having a certain orbital frequency about the center of the Solar system (Fig. 1). This row can be extended in domain of the outer planets by the same algorithm: Jupiter 3πR, Saturn 7.5πR, Uranus 21πR, Neptune 41πR, Pluto 62πR. One cannot directly observe these huge waves in the planets but they are needed for wave modulation procedures very important for satellites and rings having two orbital frequencies: around the star and planets. A recent support for the wave structurization in the Solar system came from Saturn where 22 year long ground-based temperature observations discovered a wave-like oscillation: hotcold pattern switches every Saturn half-year = 15 Earth's years [4]. Like in the radio-wave physics the lower orbiting frequency of the Saturn's system around Sun modulates the higher orbiting frequencies of the system satellites, rings and the planet's upper atmosphere about the Saturn `s system center. . The higher frequency is multiplied and

  5. Identification of surfactants emerged in aerobic granulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, aerobic granules were cultivated in sequencing batch reactors with activated sludge as the seed. The reactors were operated for 12 h per cycle with the organic loading rate (OLR) increasing in double stepwise from 0.5 to 4.0 g COD L⁻¹d⁻¹. Within the 40 d running, black granules with regular and smooth morphology were cultivated, which had high wet density and high settling velocity. During the granulation process, foams emerged and disappeared in the reactor, coinciding with the proliferation of filamentous microorganisms in the granules, implying that surfactants might exist and play an important role in the granulation. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, the surfactants were identified as homologous compounds of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with molecular weights ranging mainly from 100 to 500 Da. Their general formulas were proposed as HO-[CH₂-CH₂-O](n)-H. The source of PEG still needs further investigation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Shadows on a Giant

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-02

    Saturn rings cast wide shadows on the planet, and the shadow of a moon also graces the gas giant in this scene from NASA Cassini spacecraft. The moon Enceladus is not shown in this view, but it does cast a small, elongated shadow.

  7. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  8. [Giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma].

    PubMed

    Mezzour, Mohamed Hicham; El Messaoudi, Yasser Arafat; Fekak, Hamid; Rabii, Redouane; Marnissi, Farida; Karkouri, Mehdi; Salam, Siham; Iraki, Moulay Ahmed; Joual, Abdenbi; Meziane, Fathi

    2006-02-01

    The authors report a case of giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma. The diagnosis was suspected after scanography and magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by the histological analysis of the extracted piece after surgical treatment. Postoperative evolution was favourable after one year without recurrence or distant metastasis. The authors discuss the pathologic and therapeutic aspects and the prognosis of retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

  9. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%.

  10. Microbial selection pressure is not a prerequisite for granulation: dynamic granulation and microbial community study in a complete mixing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dandan; Niu, Shu; Xiong, Yongjiao; Yang, Yang; Dong, Shuangshi

    2014-06-01

    Microbial selection pressure is traditionally supposed as a prerequisite for aerobic granulation. This work gives a different insight on this issue. Fluorescent microspheres were used to label the flocculent biomass granulation for a period of 47days in a continuous-flow bioreactor. Analysis of the distribution of fluorescent microspheres in granules revealed that the terminal phase of granulation is in a dynamic steady state, where bioflocs detach, collide and aggregate randomly. This revealed that the un-granulated biomass was the result of the dynamic aggregation and breakage, rather than the microbial species unable to be granulated. Furthermore, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile and UPGMA dendrogram results showed similar microbial communities during the granulation. To sum up, microbial selection pressure was not a prerequisite for aerobic granulation from both of the dynamic granulation steps and molecular biology aspects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The combined effect of wet granulation process parameters and dried granule moisture content on tablet quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, Ian P; Al Husban, Farhan; Reynolds, Gavin K

    2016-09-01

    A pharmaceutical compound was used to study the effect of batch wet granulation process parameters in combination with the residual moisture content remaining after drying on granule and tablet quality attributes. The effect of three batch wet granulation process parameters was evaluated using a multivariate experimental design, with a novel constrained design space. Batches were characterised for moisture content, granule density, crushing strength, porosity, disintegration time and dissolution. Mechanisms of the effect of the process parameters on the granule and tablet quality attributes are proposed. Water quantity added during granulation showed a significant effect on granule density and tablet dissolution rate. Mixing time showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength, and mixing speed showed a significant effect on the distribution of tablet crushing strengths obtained. The residual moisture content remaining after granule drying showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength. The effect of moisture on tablet tensile strength has been reported before, but not in combination with granulation parameters and granule properties, and the impact on tablet dissolution was not assessed. Correlations between the energy input during granulation, the density of granules produced, and the quality attributes of the final tablets were also identified. Understanding the impact of the granulation and drying process parameters on granule and tablet properties provides a basis for process optimisation and scaling.

  12. Antimicrobial-Coated Granules for Disinfecting Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of preparing antimicrobialcoated granules for disinfecting flowing potable water have been developed. Like the methods reported in the immediately preceding article, these methods involve chemical preparation of substrate surfaces (in this case, the surfaces of granules) to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the surfaces via covalent bonds. A variety of granular materials have been coated with a variety of antimicrobial agents that include antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, bactericides, and fungicides. When employed in packed beds in flowing water, these antimicrobial-coated granules have been proven effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Composite beds, consisting of multiple layers containing different granular antimicrobial media, have proven particularly effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. These media have also proven effective in enhancing or potentiating the biocidal effects of in-line iodinated resins and of very low levels of dissolved elemental iodine.

  13. Measuring stellar granulation during planet transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavassa, A.; Caldas, A.; Selsis, F.; Leconte, J.; Von Paris, P.; Bordé, P.; Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Stellar activity and convection-related surface structures might cause bias in planet detection and characterization that use these transits. Surface convection simulations help to quantify the granulation signal. Aims: We used realistic three-dimensional (3D) radiative hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations from the Stagger grid and synthetic images computed with the radiative transfer code Optim3D to model the transits of three prototype planets: a hot Jupiter, a hot Neptune, and a terrestrial planet. Methods: We computed intensity maps from RHD simulations of the Sun and a K-dwarf star at different wavelength bands from optical to far-infrared that cover the range of several ground- and space-based telescopes which observe exoplanet transits. We modeled the transit using synthetic stellar-disk images obtained with a spherical-tile imaging method and emulated the temporal variation of the granulation intensity generating random images covering a granulation time-series of 13.3 h. We measured the contribution of the stellar granulation on the light curves during the planet transit. Results: We identified two types of granulation noise that act simultaneously during the planet transit: (i) the intrinsic change in the granulation pattern with timescale (e.g., 10 min for solar-type stars assumed in this work) is smaller than the usual planet transit ( hours as in our prototype cases); and (ii) the fact that the transiting planet occults isolated regions of the photosphere that differ in local surface brightness as a result of convective-related surface structures. First, we showed that our modeling approach returns granulation timescale fluctuations that are comparable with what has been observed for the Sun. Then, our statistical approach shows that the granulation pattern of solar and K-dwarf-type stars have a non-negligible effect of the light curve depth during the transit, and, consequentially on the determination of the planet transit parameters such as the

  14. Case Series: Long segment extra-arachnoid fluid collections: Role of dynamic CT myelography in diagnosis and treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Ellika, Shehanaz; Marin, Horia; Pace, Mitchell; Newman, Daniel; Abdulhak, Muwaffak; Kole, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    We report five patients in whom spinal MRI revealed extra-arachnoid fluid collections. These spinal fluid collections most likely resulted from accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a dural leak. The patients presented with either compressive myelopathy due to the cyst or superficial siderosis (SS). All of these fluid collections were long segment, and MRI demonstrated the fluid collections but not the exact site of leak. Dynamic CT myelogram demonstrated the site of leak and helped in the management of these complicated cases. Moreover, we also found that the epicenter of the fluid collection on MRI was different from the location of the leak on a dynamic CT myelogram. Knowledge of these associations can be helpful when selecting the imaging studies to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23162252

  15. Case Series: Long segment extra-arachnoid fluid collections: Role of dynamic CT myelography in diagnosis and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Ellika, Shehanaz; Marin, Horia; Pace, Mitchell; Newman, Daniel; Abdulhak, Muwaffak; Kole, Maximilian

    2012-04-01

    We report five patients in whom spinal MRI revealed extra-arachnoid fluid collections. These spinal fluid collections most likely resulted from accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a dural leak. The patients presented with either compressive myelopathy due to the cyst or superficial siderosis (SS). All of these fluid collections were long segment, and MRI demonstrated the fluid collections but not the exact site of leak. Dynamic CT myelogram demonstrated the site of leak and helped in the management of these complicated cases. Moreover, we also found that the epicenter of the fluid collection on MRI was different from the location of the leak on a dynamic CT myelogram. Knowledge of these associations can be helpful when selecting the imaging studies to facilitate diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Chromospheric impact of an exploding solar granule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, C. E.; Bello González, N.; Rezaei, R.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Observations of multi-wavelength and therefore height-dependent information following events throughout the solar atmosphere and unambiguously assigning a relation between these rapidly evolving layers are rare and difficult to obtain. Yet, they are crucial for our understanding of the physical processes that couple the different regimes in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We characterize the exploding granule event with simultaneous observations of Hinode spectroplarimetric data in the solar photosphere and Hinode broadband Ca II H images combined with Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) slit spectra. We follow the evolution of an exploding granule and its connectivity throughout the atmosphere and analyze the dynamics of a magnetic element that has been affected by the abnormal granule. Methods: In addition to magnetic flux maps we use a local correlation tracking method to infer the horizontal velocity flows in the photosphere and apply a wavelet analysis on several IRIS chromospheric emission features such as Mg II k2v and Mg II k3 to detect oscillatory phenomena indicating wave propagation. Results: During the vigorous expansion of the abnormal granule we detect radially outward horizontal flows, causing, together with the horizontal flows from the surrounding granules, the magnetic elements in the bordering intergranular lanes to be squeezed and elongated. In reaction to the squeezing, we detect a chromospheric intensity and velocity oscillation pulse which we identify as an upward traveling hot shock front propagating clearly through the IRIS spectral line diagnostics of Mg II h&k. Conclusions: Exploding granules can trigger upward-propagating shock fronts that dissipate in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. A.1 and A.2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. The granulation of binary mixtures: the effects of the properties of the component powders on granules.

    PubMed

    Opakunle, W O; Spring, M S

    1976-12-01

    Sulphanilamide and citric acid individually and in various proportions with lactose, have been granulated by massing and screening. There was an optimum blend, that produced granules of maximum mean size and strength, for each binary system examined. The proportion of the components of this optimal blend was dependent on the physical properties of the second component in a mixture with lactose. Results from three systems, lactose:boric acid, lactose:sulphanilamide and lactose:citric acid indicate that although part dissolution of powder during granulation is a factor affecting granule properties, in some systems other physical properties of the second component may become dominant. It is suggested that the combined effect of cohesiveness and wettability of the powders may make the major contribution to granule strength with the sulphanilamide systems. The ultimate mean granule size produced is determined by the wettability or solubiluty of the powders, or both, in all cases examined. The great affinity of citric acid for aqueous binder solution was the dominant factor determining the properties of granules prepared from lactose:citric acid mixtures.

  18. Process for producing zirconium based granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jade, S.S.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production f amorphous zirconium based granules. It comprises: adding about 2--15 wt % of a suitable phase stabilizer to an aqueous solutio, based upon the total weight of ZrO{sub 2} in solution, to produce an aqueous solution having a pH in the range of about 4 to 7 comprising a zirconium based complex and phase stabilizer and thereafter; drying the aqueous solution comprising the zirconium based complex and the phase stabilizer at a temperature below about 180{degrees} C. for a time sufficient to evaporate the aqueous solution thereby forming amorphous zirconium based granules containing the phase stabilizer.

  19. Stratospheric aerosols - Undissolved granules and physical state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farlow, N. H.; Hayes, D. M.; Lem, H. Y.

    1977-01-01

    The physical state of stratospheric aerosol particles was studied along with the nature of included undissolved granules. It was found that: (1) undissolved granules are present in only a third of the aerosol particles and are not always associated with a slurry matrix, (2) those undissolved particles usually contain only sulfur and sodium or undetectable light elements, (3) all stratospheric aerosols have a similar appearance: a volatile slurry mixture of crystalline-like material in a liquid matrix, and (4) variations in the relative amounts of liquid and crystalline materials at different times cause variations in particle spreading.

  20. Formulation of custom sized LX-15 granules

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, T.W.

    1980-04-01

    LX-15 is a booster explosive formulation consisting of 95% HNS I and 5% Kel F-800 developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The purpose of this effort was to develop formulation techniques for the production of custom size granules that are amenable for processing in automatic weighing equipment. This report details processes whereby 0.4 and 1.5 kg size batches are produced, meeting those requirements. Efforts to date have found that granule size is dependent on batch/vessel size, water-to-solvent ratio and the degree of vessel agitation.

  1. Continuous melt granulation: Influence of process and formulation parameters upon granule and tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Vancoillie, Jochem; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has a growing interest in alternative manufacturing models allowing automation and continuous production in order to improve process efficiency and reduce costs. Implementing a switch from batch to continuous processing requires fundamental process understanding and the implementation of quality-by-design (QbD) principles. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between formulation-parameters (type binder, binder concentration, drug-binder miscibility), process-parameters (screw speed, powder feed rate and granulation temperature), granule properties (size, size distribution, shape, friability, true density, flowability) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, dissolution rate) of four different drug-binder formulations using Design of experiments (DOE). Two binders (polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Soluplus®) with a different solid state, semi-crystalline vs amorphous respectively, were combined with two model-drugs, metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF), both having a contrasting miscibility with the binders. This research revealed that the granule properties of miscible drug-binder systems depended on the powder feed rate and barrel filling degree of the granulator whereas the granule properties of immiscible systems were mainly influenced by binder concentration. Using an amorphous binder, the tablet tensile strength depended on the granule size. In contrast, granule friability was more important for tablet quality using a brittle binder. However, this was not the case for caffeine-containing blends, since these phenomena were dominated by the enhanced compression properties of caffeine Form I, which was formed during granulation. Hence, it is important to gain knowledge about formulation behavior during processing since this influences the effect of process parameters onto the granule and tablet properties.

  2. Granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation - Do not forget the feeding systems.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Thommes, M; Rasenack, N; Moll, K-P; Krumme, M; Kleinebudde, P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of qualitatively different powder feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation of a highly drug loaded, hydrophobic mixture and a mannitol powder. It was shown that powder feeder related problems usually cannot be identified by trusting in the values given by the feeder. Therefore, a newly developed model for the evaluation of the performance of powder feeders was introduced and it was tried to connect this model to residence time distributions in twin-screw granulation processes. The influence of feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions varied, depending on the applied screw configuration and the used powder. Regarding the hydrophobic and highly drug loaded formulation, which was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.5, a pure conveying screw and a medium kneading configuration, consisting of 60° kneading blocks were negatively influenced by poor feeder settings. For optimal settings more narrow distributions could be obtained. For an extensive kneading configuration good and poor settings resulted in mono-modal granule size distributions but were differing in the overall size. Mannitol, a model substance for a liquid sensitive formulation was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.075. It was even more important to maintain optimal feeding as mannitol was highly affected by poor feeder performances. Even an extensive kneading configuration could not level the errors in powder feeder performance, resulting in qualitatively different granule size distributions. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of detailed knowledge about applied feeding systems to gain optimal performance in twin-screw granulation.

  3. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  4. A simple model to describe intrinsic stellar noise for exoplanet detection around red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Thomas S. H.; Chaplin, William J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Huber, Daniel; Campante, Tiago L.; Handberg, Rasmus; Lund, Mikkel N.; Veras, Dimitri; Kuszlewicz, James S.; Farr, Will M.

    2017-02-01

    In spite of the huge advances in exoplanet research provided by the NASA Kepler Mission, there remain only a small number of transit detections around evolved stars. Here, we present a reformulation of the noise properties of red-giant stars, where the intrinsic stellar granulation and the stellar oscillations described by asteroseismology play a key role. The new noise model is a significant improvement on the current Kepler results for evolved stars. Our noise model may be used to help understand planet detection thresholds for the ongoing K2 and upcoming TESSmissions, and serve as a predictor of stellar noise for these missions. As an application of our noise model, we explore the minimum detectable planet radii for red giant stars, and find that Neptune-sized planets should be detectable around low-luminosity red giant branch stars.

  5. Flow rates and repose angles of wet-processed granulations.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, J T; Chan, P C

    1977-09-01

    The equation of McDougall and Evans was found not to apply to granulations. The functional relationships among volumetric powder flow rates, angles of repose, and particle size were demonstrated to exhibit maxima (rather than minima) in five common pharmaceutical granulations produced by wet processing. The angular behavior of granules (such as the experienced range of angles) is explained via supported stacking geometries, and the shallow maxima in the angle of repose versus granule diameter was derived from this model.

  6. THE NUMBER OF CATECHOLAMINE STORAGE GRANULES IN ADRENAL MEDULLA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A method is described for counting the catecholamine-containing heavy granules of adrenal glands. There are 5.0 ! 0.8 (S. E.) x 10 to the 12th power... granules /gram wet weight of fowl adrenal gland. Individual heavy granules contain about 8 million molecules of catecholamines (1.4 x 10 to the 17th...power mole). Reference to published electron microphotographs of adrenal medulla cells allows estimation of the average volume of heavy granules and

  7. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  8. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  9. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  10. 21 CFR 520.1468 - Naproxen granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1468 Naproxen granules. (a... pain and lameness exhibited with arthritis, as well as myositis and other soft tissue diseases of...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1468 - Naproxen granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1468 Naproxen granules. (a... pain and lameness exhibited with arthritis, as well as myositis and other soft tissue diseases of...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1468 - Naproxen granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1468 Naproxen granules. (a... pain and lameness exhibited with arthritis, as well as myositis and other soft tissue diseases of...

  13. Starch Granule Variability in Wild Solanum Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because most of the dry matter of potato tubers is starch, an understanding of starch properties is important in potato improvement programs. Starch granule size is considered to influence tuber processing quality parameters such as gelatinization temperature, viscosity, and water holding capacity. ...

  14. Microbial degradation of polyacrylamide by aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Wang, Zhiping; Lin, Kuangfei; Cai, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    To deal with polyacrylamide (PAM) wastewater, granular sludge formed in glucose-fed sequencing batch reactors (SBR) was employed to cultivate PAM-degrading granules. Three replicated SBRs were operated with increasing PAM concentration in the influent from 67 to 670 mg L(-1), and the hydraulic retention time was increased at the same time from 1 d to 6 d during the six-phase of the 43 d acclimation period. The well-acclimated PAM-degrading granules were different from the seeding granules in colour, mean diameter, biomass density and settle ability, and could use PAM as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. In the batch experiments, PAM degradation rate by granules was determined as 2.23 mg PAM g(-1) MLSS h(-1). According to the analysis of the intermediates of PAM biodegradation, PAM was degraded initially through hydrolysis of the amide group, and no acrylamide monomer was detected. With the help of LC/MS, the main intermediate was identified as polyacrylic acid with a low molecular weight. Therefore, the PAM-degrading granular sludge may be employed for removing PAM in the wastewater produced from tertiary oil recovery that uses polymeric flooding technology.

  15. Secretory granule biogenesis: rafting to the SNARE.

    PubMed

    Tooze, S A; Martens, G J; Huttner, W B

    2001-03-01

    Regulated secretion of hormones occurs when a cell receives an external stimulus, triggering the secretory granules to undergo fusion with the plasma membrane and release their content into the extracellular milieu. The formation of a mature secretory granule (MSG) involves a series of discrete and unique events such as protein sorting, formation of immature secretory granules (ISGs), prohormone processing and vesicle fusion. Regulated secretory proteins (RSPs), the proteins stored and secreted from MSGs, contain signals or domains to direct them into the regulated secretory pathway. Recent data on the role of specific domains in RSPs involved in sorting and aggregation suggest that the cell-type-specific composition of RSPs in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) has an important role in determining how the RSPs get into ISGs. The realization that lipid rafts are implicated in sorting RSPs in the TGN and the identification of SNARE molecules represent further major advances in our understanding of how MSGs are formed. At the heart of these findings is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms driving protein--lipid and protein--protein interactions specific for secretory granule biogenesis.

  16. 21 CFR 520.2473a - Tioxidazole granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tioxidazole granules. 520.2473a Section 520.2473a... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473a Tioxidazole granules. (a) Specifications. Each gram of granules contains 200 milligrams of tioxidazole. (b) Sponsor. See No...

  17. 21 CFR 520.2473a - Tioxidazole granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tioxidazole granules. 520.2473a Section 520.2473a... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473a Tioxidazole granules. (a) Specifications. Each gram of granules contains 200 milligrams of tioxidazole. (b) Sponsor. See No...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2473a - Tioxidazole granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tioxidazole granules. 520.2473a Section 520.2473a... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473a Tioxidazole granules. (a) Specifications. Each gram of granules contains 200 milligrams of tioxidazole. (b) Sponsor. See No...

  19. 21 CFR 520.2473a - Tioxidazole granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tioxidazole granules. 520.2473a Section 520.2473a... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473a Tioxidazole granules. (a) Specifications. Each gram of granules contains 200 milligrams of tioxidazole. (b) Sponsor. See No...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2473a - Tioxidazole granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tioxidazole granules. 520.2473a Section 520.2473a... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2473a Tioxidazole granules. (a) Specifications. Each gram of granules contains 200 milligrams of tioxidazole. (b) Sponsor. See No...

  1. [Study on fingerprint of xiaochaihu granules sold in the market].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Lin, Long-Fei; Zhang, Hui; Dang, Xiao-Fang; Ni, Jian

    2013-10-01

    To establish a fingerprint of Xiaochaihu granules sold in the market with HPLC method, and study fingerprints of Xiaochaihu granules produced by different manufacturers and in different batches of the same manufacturer. Seven major index components were identified for the first time. The established method provided an all-around analysis on the quality assessment of Xiaochaihu granules.

  2. Motor Speech Apraxia in a 70-Year-Old Man with Left Dorsolateral Frontal Arachnoid Cyst: A [18F]FDG PET-CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Jacob; Kluin, Karen; Kotagal, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Motor speech apraxia is a speech disorder of impaired syllable sequencing which, when seen with advancing age, is suggestive of a neurodegenerative process affecting cortical structures in the left frontal lobe. Arachnoid cysts can be associated with neurologic symptoms due to compression of underlying brain structures though indications for surgical intervention are unclear. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a two-year history of speech changes along with decreased initiation and talkativeness, shorter utterances, and dysnomia. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission and Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed very focal left frontal cortical hypometabolism immediately adjacent to an arachnoid cyst but no specific evidence of a neurodegenerative process. PMID:28003922

  3. Transformation of anaerobic granules into aerobic granules and the succession of bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haohao; Yu, Ping; Li, Qiaoling; Ren, Hongqiang; Liu, Bo; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang

    2017-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrated that anaerobic granular sludge could be successfully transformed into aerobic granular sludge in a continuous up-flow reactor in 45 days. An aerobic microbial community successfully developed in the granules and high organic matter and nitrogen removal performance was achieved. Under an ammonia nitrogen loading rate of 0.8 kg N/(m(3) day), ammonia nitrogen and the total nitrogen removal efficiency of the reactor reached up to 100 and 93%, respectively. An obvious bacterial community shift in granular sludge was observed during the transformation process. By comparing with the bacterial community in aerobic granules cultivated from floccular activated sludge, some bacteria (affiliated with Comamonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodocyclaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Nitrosomonadaceae) playing significant roles in maintaining the structures and functions of aerobic granules were identified. After the transformation, the granules could be clearly separated into the inner core and outer shell. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results indicated many bacterial species present in both the inner core and outer shell; however, their abundance differed significantly. Overall, this study confirms the feasibility of transforming anaerobic granules into aerobic granules and provides novel approaches and insights to understand the microbial ecology in granular sludge.

  4. Aerobic granulation of protein-rich granules from nitrogen-lean wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Ju, Sheau-Pyng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Proteins (PN)-rich granules are stable in structure in long-term reactor operations. This study proposed to cultivate PN-rich granules with PN/polysaccharides (PS) >20 from nitrogen lean wastewater, with ammonia-nitrogen as sole nitrogen source at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N of 153.8. The yielded granules can sustain their structural stability in sequencing batch reactor mode for sufficient treatment of wastewaters up to 7000mg/L COD and with COD/N<500 and in continuous-flow reactor for successful 216-d treatment of wastewaters up to organic loading rate (OLR) of 39kg/m(3)-d. The produced granules were enriched with Firmicutes and β-proteobacteria as dominating strains. More than 58% of the nitrogen fed in the nitrogen-lean wastewater is converted to the PN in the granules. The replacement of ammonia by nitrate as sole nitrogen source led to granules enriched with γ-proteobacteria which are easily deteriorated at low OLR.

  5. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule.

  6. Experimental investigation of granule size and shape dynamics in twin-screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Bellandi, Giacomo; Gernaey, Krist V; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-11-20

    A twin-screw granulator (TSG), a promising equipment for continuous high shear wet granulation (HSWG), achieves the desired level of mixing by a combination of the appropriate screw configuration and a suitable set of process settings (e.g. feed rate, screw speed, etc.), thus producing a certain granule size and shape distribution (GSSD). However, the primary sizing and shaping mechanism behind the resulting distribution is not well understood due to the opacity of the multiphase system in the granulator. This study experimentally characterised the GSSD dynamics along the TSG barrel length in order to understand the function of individual screw modules and process settings, as well as their interaction. Particle size analysis of granules collected at the outlet of the TSG suggested significant interaction between the process and screw configuration parameters influencing the heterogeneity in the GSSD. By characterising the samples collected along the screw length, a variable influence of the screw modules at different process conditions was observed. At low liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S), the first kneading module seemed to play a significant role in mixing, whereas the second kneading module was found to be more involved in reshaping the granules. At high L/S and high throughput, aggregation mainly took place in the second kneading module changing the GSSD. The results obtained from this study will be further used for the calibration and validation of a mechanistic model and, hence, support future development of a more detailed understanding of the HSWG process in a TSG.

  7. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Bello, A.; Maitama, H. Y.; Mbibu, N. H.; Kalayi, G. D.; Ahmed, A.

    2010-01-01

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and bladder outlet obstruction. The clinical presentation, management, and outcome of the giant prostatic urethral calculus are reviewed. PMID:22091328

  8. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance π1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  9. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance ~1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  10. Altered patterning of dentate granule cell mossy fiber inputs onto CA3 pyramidal cells in limbic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, John J.; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Hester, Michael S.; Murphy, Brian L.; Dahlquist-Topalá, Renée; Richards, David A.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2009-01-01

    Impaired gating by hippocampal dentate granule cells may promote the development of limbic epilepsy by facilitating seizure spread through the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit. The second synapse in this circuit, the dentate granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell connection, may be of particular importance because pathological changes occurring within the dentate likely exert their principal effect on downstream CA3 pyramids. Here, we utilized GFP-expressing mice and immunolabeling for the zinc transporter ZnT-3 to reveal the pre- and postsynaptic components of granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell synapses following pilocarpine-epileptogenesis. Confocal analyses of these terminals revealed that while granule cell presynaptic giant boutons increased in size and complexity one month after status epilepticus, individual thorns making up the postsynaptic thorny excrescences of the CA3 pyramidal cells were reduced in number. This reduction, however, was transient, and three months after status, thorn density recovered. This recovery was accompanied by a significant change in the distribution of thorns along pyramidal cells dendrites. While thorns in control animals tended to be tightly clustered, thorns in epileptic animals were more evenly distributed. Computational modeling of thorn distributions predicted an increase in the number of boutons required to cover equivalent numbers of thorns in epileptic vs. control mice. Confirming this prediction, ZnT-3 labeling of presynaptic giant boutons apposed to GFP-expressing thorns revealed a near doubling in bouton density, while the number of individual thorns per bouton was reduced by half. Together, these data provide clear evidence of novel plastic changes occurring within the epileptic hippocampus. PMID:20014385

  11. Giant bulla mimicking tension pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Mertol; Saydam, Ozkan; Altin, Remzi; Kart, Levent

    2009-01-01

    In the chest X-ray, we observe tension pneumothorax (TPX) as wide radiolucent view in a hemithorax and pushing the mediastinal structures contralateral. Giant bulla may mimic TPX with wide radiolucent view and mediastinal shift. The present report includes giant pulmonary bulla in 35-year-old woman. The giant bulla was diagnosed as a TPX in emergency, and chest tube was performed. The differentiation between TPX and a giant bulla may be very difficult. The therapies of these two similar entities are completely different. So that, we must be careful about anamnesis, physical examination and radiology for true diagnosis.

  12. Hydrolysis of native poly(hydroxybutyrate) granules (PHB), crystalline PHB, and artificial amorphous PHB granules by intracellular and extracellular depolymerases.

    PubMed

    Merrick, J M; Steger, R; Dombroski, D

    1999-01-01

    Native poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules, purified PHB and artificial amorphous PHB granules were examined as putative substrates for hydrolysis by the intracellular depolymerase system of Rhodospirillum rubrum and the extracellular depolymerase of Pseudomonas lemoignei. The R. rubrum depolymerizing system requires pretreatment of granules with a heat stable 'activator' fraction; the activator can be replaced by mild trypsin treatment. Artificial granules were prepared with a cationic detergent, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and an anionic detergent, (sodium cholate). Cholate and CTAB PHB granules were hydrolyzed by both enzyme systems; however, some differences were noted. Cholate granules were hydrolyzed in the absence of the R. rubrum activator fraction. Activator was required for the hydrolysis of CTAB granules but could be replaced by heparin in the extracellular depolymerase system but not in the intracellular depolymerase system. A Triton X-114 extract of native PHB granules inhibited the hydrolysis of trypsin-activated granules by the intracellular depolymerase. The inhibition was reversed by the activator fraction. Detergent extracts of granules activated with the R. rubrum activator were unable to inhibit the hydrolysis of trypsin-activated granules. These data suggest that the activator acts to modify an inhibitor present on native granules.

  13. Effect of rotifers on the stability of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Li, Z H; Kuba, T; Kusuda, T; Wang, X C

    2007-02-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of rotifers on the stability of aerobic granules. Two sequence batch reactors (SBRs) with airflow rates of 4 (R1) and 6 (R2) 1 min(-1), respectively, were used to develop aerobic granules. Granules were well developed with excellent settleability in terms of SVI30 (sludge volume index,) of about 50 ml g(-1) in both reactors at the beginning. With the outgrowth of rotifers, granules completely disintegrated in R1 around cycle 500 (a cycle was 3 hours). However, after the rotifers disappeared, i.e. cycle 550, granules re-appeared with a slow settling rate in R1 (SVI30: 200-300 ml g(-1)). The rotifers mechanically damaged the structure of granules, resulting in disintegration. However, granules developed under high shear force seem to have strong resistance to rotifers. During re-granulation, a long time lag between the improvements of morphology and settleability suggested that re-granulation resulted from entanglement more than bio-attachment or bio-growth. Additionally, it was confirmed that the ratio of carbohydrate to protein extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) could well indicate the strength of granules. Protein EPS well correlated with the difference between SVI5 and SVI30 in R1, therefore, decreasing protein EPS would increase the compactness of granules.

  14. Process to manufacture effervescent tablets: air forced oven melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Yanze, F M; Duru, C; Jacob, M

    2000-12-01

    In the present study we apply melt granulation in an air forced oven, called "are forced oven melt granulation" to the single-stage manufacture of effervescent granules consisting of anhydrous citric acid (43.2%) and sodium bicarbonate (56.8%) in order to make tablets. This study established that process parameters such as concentration of PEG 6000, residence time in the air forced oven, fineness of PEG 6000, fineness of the initial effervescent mix and efficiency of two lubricants markedly influenced several granule and tablet characteristics. The granules ready to be compressed into tablets were stable for 7 days at 60% RH/18 degrees C. It is a dry, simple, rapid, effective, economical, reproducible process particularly well suited to the manufacture of effervescent granules which are easily compressed into effervescent tablets. Of all the formulations tested, only formulations B2 and E2 melt granulated for 30 minutes gave tablets which had optimum compression characteristics without processing problems during compression.

  15. Characteristics of aerobic granulation at mesophilic temperatures in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fenghao; Park, Seyong; Kim, Moonil

    2014-01-01

    Compact and structurally stable aerobic granules were developed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) at mesophilic temperatures (35°C). The morphological, biological and chemical characteristics of the aerobic granulation were investigated and a theoretical granulation mechanism was proposed according to the results of the investigation. The mature aerobic granules had compact structure, small size (mean diameter of 0.24 mm), excellent settleability and diverse microbial structures, and were effective for the removal of organics and nitrification. The growth kinetics demonstrated that the biomass growth depended on coexistence and interactions between heterotrophs and autotrophs in the granules. The functions of heterotrophs and autotrophs created a compact and secure layer on the outside of the granules, protecting the inside sludge containing environmentally sensitive and slow growing microorganisms. The mechanism and the reactor performance may promise feasibility and efficiency for treating industry effluents at mesophilic temperatures using aerobic granulation.

  16. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  17. Shigella flexneri modulates stress granule composition and inhibits stress granule aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vonaesch, Pascale; Campbell-Valois, François-Xavier; Dufour, Alexandre; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Schnupf, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Invasion and multiplication of the facultative, cytosolic, enteropathogen Shigella flexneri within the colonic epithelial lining leads to an acute inflammatory response, fever and diarrhea. During the inflammatory process, infected cells are subjected to numerous stresses including heat, oxidative stress and genotoxic stress. The evolutionarily conserved pathway of cellular stress management is the formation of stress granules that store translationally inactive cellular mRNAs and interfere with cellular signalling pathways by sequestering signalling components. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. flexneri-infected cells to form stress granules in response to exogenous stresses. We found that S. flexneri infection inhibits movement of the stress granule markers eIF3 and eIF4B into stress granules and prevents the aggregation of G3BP1 and eIF4G-containing stress granules. This inhibition occurred only with invasive, but not with non-invasive bacteria and occurred in response to stresses that induce translational arrest through the phosphorylation of eIF2α and by treating cells with pateamine A, a drug that induces stress granules by inhibiting the eIF4A helicase. The S. flexneri-mediated stress granule inhibition could be largely phenocopied by the microtubule-destabilizing drug nocodazole and while S. flexneri infection did not lead to microtubule depolymerization, infection greatly enhanced acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Our data suggest that qualitative differences in the microtubule network or subversion of the microtubule-transport machinery by S. flexneri may be involved in preventing the full execution of this cellular stress response.

  18. Giant left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sumi; Garg, Nadish; Xie, Gong-Yuan; Dellsperger, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm (PS) is an uncommon, often fatal complication associated with myocardial infarction, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, and, rarely, infective endocarditis. A 28-year-old man with prior history of bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement presented with congestive heart failure and bacteremia with Abiotrophia granulitica. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed bioprosthesis dysfunction, large vegetations, mitral regurgitation, and probable PS. Cardiac and chest CT confirmed a PS communicating with the left ventricle Patient had pulseless electrical activity and died. Autopsy showed a giant PS with layered thrombus and pseudo-endothelialized cavity. Our case highlights the importance of multimodality imaging as an important tool in management of PS.

  19. Giant mesenteric cyst

    PubMed Central

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Salman, Shaista; Almaramhy, Hamdi H.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon benign abdominal lesions with no classical clinical features. The preoperative diagnosis requires the common imaging modalities but the final diagnosis is established only during surgery or histological analysis. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision. We report an 18-year-old female with a non-specific abdominal pain and discomfort since 3 weeks. Her CT scan showed a huge cystic swelling, which necessitated surgical exploration. Preoperatively, a giant cyst was encountered with displacement of bowel loops. The cyst was completely removed and histology report confirmed mesenteric cyst without evidence of malignancy. PMID:24765349

  20. Giant mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Salman, Shaista; Almaramhy, Hamdi H

    2011-09-28

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon benign abdominal lesions with no classical clinical features. The preoperative diagnosis requires the common imaging modalities but the final diagnosis is established only during surgery or histological analysis. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision. We report an 18-year-old female with a non-specific abdominal pain and discomfort since 3 weeks. Her CT scan showed a huge cystic swelling, which necessitated surgical exploration. Preoperatively, a giant cyst was encountered with displacement of bowel loops. The cyst was completely removed and histology report confirmed mesenteric cyst without evidence of malignancy.

  1. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  2. Process for producing zirconium based granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jada, S.S.

    1991-10-01

    This patent describes a process for the production of amorphous zirconium based granules. It comprises forming a solution comprising Zr(R){sub 4} or zirconyl halide in an alcohol solvent, adding in either order an acid in an amount sufficient to acidify the solution comprising Zr(R){sub 4} or zirconyl halide to a pH in the range of about 2-5 and water in an amount sufficient to hydrolyze the Zr(R){sub 4} or zirconyl halide thereby forming a solution comprising a zirconium based complex; adding about 1-35 wt % of a suitable phase stabilizer to the resulting solution; and drying the solution comprising the zirconium based complex and phase stabilizer at a temperature below about 250{degrees} C. for a time sufficient to evaporate the solution thereby forming zirconium based granules containing the phase stabilizer.

  3. Preventing Effect of L-Type Calcium Channel Blockade on Electrophysiological Alterations in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Induced by Entorhinal Amyloid Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Naderi, Nima; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG) with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1–42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin) accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days), almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25689857

  4. Spiperone: evidence for uptake into secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Dannies, P S; Rudnick, M S; Fishkes, H; Rudnick, G

    1984-01-01

    Spiperone, a dopamine antagonist widely used as a specific ligand for dopamine and serotonin receptors, is actively accumulated into the F4C1 strain of rat pituitary tumor cells. The accumulation of 10 nM [3H]spiperone was linear for 3 min and reached a steady state after 10 min. Spiperone accumulation was reduced 50% by preincubation with 5 microM reserpine, an inhibitor of biogenic amine transport into secretory granules, and was also blocked by monensin and ammonium chloride, both of which increase the pH of intracellular storage organelles. Uptake was not affected by replacing sodium in the buffer with lithium at equimolar concentrations. Spiperone at 1 microM inhibited by over 50% serotonin transport into membrane vesicles isolated from platelet dense granules; this concentration inhibited the Na+-dependent plasma membrane transport system less than 10%. The data indicate spiperone specifically interacts with the secretory granule amine transport system and suggest that this transport system is found in the F4C1 pituitary cell strain as well as in platelets and neurons. The data also suggest that experiments utilizing spiperone to measure dopamine and serotonin receptors be interpreted with caution. PMID:6584920

  5. Inhibition of granulation tissue growth by histamine.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Yokoyama, J; Wake, K

    1975-06-01

    Granulomas were induced in rats by subcutaneous implantation of formalin-soaked filter-paper disks. Daily subcutaneous injection of histamine at doses of two times 0.05 mg/kg and above inhibited the growth of granulation tissue as measured by a marked decrease in the dry-defatted granuloma weight and of the hydroxyproline and hexosamine content. Histological observations of granulation tissue indicated that histamine inhibited the proliferation of fibroblasts and the formation of capillaries. Inhibitory effects were also observed with the histamine releaser, sinomenine, and the histaminase inhibitor, aminoguanidine. These histamine effects seem not to be mediated by glucocorticoid release, since an effective dose level of histamine produced no change in growth or thymus weight. Prednisolone was less potent than histamine in inhibiting Prednisolone was ineffective at the dose tested. Subcutaneous injection of the H2-receptor antagonist, burimamide, blocked these histamine effects and also of sinomeinine and aminoguanidine. The H1-receptor antagonist, mepyramine, did not block these histamine effects. Burimamide alone enhanced the growth of granuloma. These results indicate that granulation-tissue growth in inflammation is affected by the inhibitory effect of endogenous histamine acting through H2-receptors.

  6. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  7. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  8. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  9. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  10. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  11. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  12. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke; Oufiero, Christopher E; Martin, Christopher H; McGee, Matthew D; Gamarra, Ashlee R; Lee, Johanna J; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-02-18

    The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone.

  13. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  14. Second Harmonic Generation Mediated by Aligned Water in Starch Granules.

    PubMed

    Cisek, Richard; Tokarz, Danielle; Krouglov, Serguei; Steup, Martin; Emes, Michael J; Tetlow, Ian J; Barzda, Virginijus

    2014-12-26

    The origin of second harmonic generation (SHG) in starch granules was investigated using ab initio quantum mechanical modeling and experimentally examined using polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) second harmonic generation microscopy. Ab initio calculations revealed that the largest contribution to the SHG signal from A- and B-type allomorphs of starch originates from the anisotropic organization of hydroxide and hydrogen bonds mediated by aligned water found in the polymers. The hypothesis was experimentally tested by imaging maize starch granules under various hydration and heat treatment conditions that alter the hydrogen bond network. The highest SHG intensity was found in fully hydrated starch granules, and heat treatment diminished the SHG intensity. The PIPO SHG imaging showed that dried starch granules have a much higher nonlinear optical susceptibility component ratio than fully hydrated granules. In contrast, deuterated starch granules showed a smaller susceptibility component ratio demonstrating that SHG is highly sensitive to the organization of the hydroxyl and hydrogen bond network. The polarization SHG imaging results of potato starch granules, representing starch allomorph B, were compared to those of maize starch granules representing allomorph A. The results showed that the amount of aligned water was higher in the maize granules. Nonlinear microscopy of starch granules provides evidence that varying hydration conditions leads to significant changes in the nonlinear susceptibility ratio as well as the SHG intensity, supporting the hypothesis from ab initio calculations that the dominant contribution to SHG is due to the ordered hydroxide and hydrogen bond network.

  15. The influence of granulation on super disintegrant performance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Augsburger, Larry L

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the causes of efficiency loss of super disintegrants following granulation or reworking. Two processes, precompression and prewetting, were proposed to simulate the processes during dry and wet granulation, respectively. The disintegration efficiency of the resulting disintegrant granules was tested in model formulations composed of dicalcium phosphate and lactose with the unprocessed disintegrants as controls. No significant difference was shown in the intrinsic swelling and the water uptake abilities of all super disintegrants following dry granulation. However, a significant decrease was observed for both Primojel and Polyplasdone XL10 in the rate of water being absorbed into the tablet matrix following wet granulation, but not for Ac-Di-Sol. United States Pharmacopeia (USP) disintegration testing without disc revealed a significant increase in disintegration time for tablets formulated with dry granulated Primojel and Polyplasdone XL10 and all wet granulated disintegrants. The increase in particle size following granulation appears to be the cause of the loss in disintegration efficiency. In conclusion, Ac-Di-Sol is less affected by both precompression and prewetting. The efficiency of Primojel and Polyplasdone XL10 is highly dependent on their particle size. Descreasing the particle size tends to increase their efficiency. Due to the size increase following granulation, a higher addition level of super disintegrant is required to ensure fast and uniform disintegration of tablets prepared by granulation.

  16. Platelet α–granules: Basic biology and clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Price; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Summary α–Granules are essential to normal platelet activity. These unusual secretory granules derive their cargo from both regulated secretory and endocytotic pathways in megakaryocytes. Rare, inheritable defects of α–granule formation in mice and man have enabled identification of proteins that mediate cargo trafficking and α–granule formation. In platelets, α–granules fuse with the plasma membrane upon activation, releasing their cargo and increasing platelet surface area. The mechanisms that control α–granule membrane fusion have begun to be elucidated at the molecular level. SNAREs and SNARE accessory proteins that control α–granule secretion have been identified. Proteomic studies demonstrate that hundreds of bioactive proteins are released from α–granules. This breadth of proteins implies a versatile functionality. While initially known primarily for their participation in thrombosis and hemostasis, the role of α–granules in inflammation, atherosclerosis, antimicrobial host defense, wound healing, angiogenesis, and malignancy has become increasingly appreciated as the function of platelets in the pathophysiology of these processes has been defined. This review will consider the formation, release, and physiologic roles of α–granules with special emphasis on work performed over the last decade. PMID:19450911

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Zymogen Granules: Identification of New Granule Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rindler, Michael J.; Xu, Chong-feng; Gumper, Iwona; Smith, Nora N.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The composition of zymogen granules from rat pancreas was determined by LC-MS/MS. Enriched intragranular content, peripheral membrane and integral membrane protein fractions were analyzed after one-dimensional SDS/PAGE and tryptic digestion of gel slices. A total of 371 proteins were identified with high confidence, including 84 previously identified granule proteins. The 287 remaining proteins included 37 GTP-binding proteins and effectors, 8 tetraspan membrane proteins, and 22 channels and transporters. Seven proteins – pantophysin, cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, carboxypeptidase D, ecto-nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3, aminopeptidase N, ral, and the potassium channel TWIK-2 – were confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy or by immunoblotting to be new zymogen granule membrane proteins. PMID:17583932

  18. Biomechanical response of the bovine pia-arachnoid complex to normal traction loading at varying strain rates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Ma, Chunsheng; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Dong, Guang; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2007-10-01

    The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain due to impact or inertial loading. The mechanical properties of the bovine PAC under tensile loading have been characterized previously. However, the transverse properties of this structure, such as shear and normal traction which are equally important to understanding the skull/brain interaction under traumatic loading, have not been investigated. These material properties are essential information needed to adequately define the material model of the PAC in a finite element (FE) model of human brain. The purpose of this study was to determine, experimentally, the material properties of the PAC under normal traction loading. PAC Specimens were obtained from freshly slaughtered bovine subjects from various locations. Quasi-static and dynamic tests along the radial direction were performed at four different strain rates (0.36, 2.0, 20.5, and 116.3 s(-1)) to investigate the rate and regional effects. Results suggest that the PAC under traction loading is stiffer than brain tissue, rate dependent, and can be characterized as linearly elastic until failure. However, no regional difference was observed.

  19. Timing of births in sympatric brown howler monkeys (Alouatta fusca clamitans) and northern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus).

    PubMed

    Strier, K B; Mendes, S L; Santos, R R

    2001-10-01

    We monitored the birth patterns of sympatric brown howler monkeys (Alouatta fusca clamitans) and northern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus) during a 4-yr period from October 1996 to August 2000 at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Brown howler monkey births (n = 34) occurred throughout the year, and birth frequencies did not differ between rainy and dry season months. The aseasonal birth patterns of the howler monkeys differed significantly from the dry season concentration and dry month peak in muriqui births (n = 23). We found no effects of infant sex or the number of females on interbirth intervals (IBIs) in our 10 howler monkey study troops. IBIs of brown howler monkeys averaged 21.2 +/- 2.5 mo (n = 8, median = 21.0 mo), and were significantly shorter following dry season births than rainy season births. Their IBIs and yearling survivorship (74%) were similar to those reported for other species of howler monkeys, but yearling survivorship was much lower than that of muriquis (94%), whose IBIs were more than 12 mo longer than those of the howler monkeys. Our study extends comparative knowledge of birth patterns in Alouatta to a poorly known species, and provides insights into the different ways in which diet and life history may affect the timing of births in large-bodied platyrrhines under the same seasonal ecological conditions.

  20. Patterns of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis following Myodil myelography: the significance of spinal canal stenosis and previous surgery.

    PubMed

    Laitt, R; Jackson, A; Isherwood, I

    1996-08-01

    109 patients who had undergone Myodil myelography on at least one occasion were identified. The patterns of lumbar nerve root distribution in this group were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship between these patterns and the presence of spinal stenosis or previous surgery was investigated. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditic nerve root patterns were seen in 68 patients and were classified into three groups according to Delemarter et al. Central clumping of nerve roots (type 1) and complete opacification of the thecal sac (type 3), extending over at least one vertebral level, were significantly related to spinal stenosis at an adjacent level (p < 0.0001). Peripheral adhesion of nerve roots to the theca (type 2) was significantly related to previous surgery at the level of abnormality (p < 0.00005). Only a single case of arachnoiditic nerve root patterns was seen in the absence of stenosis or previous surgery. We conclude that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis is significantly related to previous Myodil myelography in the presence of spinal stenosis or previous surgery but that Myodil alone rarely produces these changes.

  1. Subarachnoid pressure-dependent change in syrinx size in a patient with syringomyelia associated with adhesive arachnoiditis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han Soo; Joko, Masahiro; Matsuo, Naoki; Kim, Sang Don; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    The pathophysiology of syringomyelia is still not well understood. Current prevailing theories involve the assumption that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flows into the syrinx from the subarachnoid space through the perivascular space of Virchow-Robin. Reported here is the case of a patient with syringomyelia in which this course is clearly contradicted. This patient with a holocord syrinx associated with adhesive arachnoiditis was treated 3 years previously with insertion of a subarachnoid-peritoneal shunt and had recently experienced worsening myelopathy. On surgical exploration, the shunt system was functioning normally. The medium-pressure shunt valve was replaced with an adjustable valve with a higher closing pressure setting, thus increasing the CSF pressure in the subarachnoid space. Contrary to prevailing theories, this procedure markedly reduced the size of the syrinx. This case provides direct evidence that the syrinx size is inversely related to subarachnoid CSF pressure and supports the hypothesis that the pressure gradient across the spinal cord parenchyma is the force that generates syringes in syringomyelia.

  2. Giant magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenas, Terrisa Ann

    The limitation of magnetostrictive composites has been in their low magnetostrictive response when compared to their monolithic counterparts. In this dissertation research is presented describing the methods and analysis used to create a giant magnetostrictive composite (GMC) producing giant strains at low fields, exhibiting magnetization ``jumping'' and the ΔE effect. This composite combines the giant magnetostrictive material, Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2) in particle form, with a nonmetallic binder and is capable of producing strains (at room temperature) exceeding 1000 ppm at a nominal field of 1.5 kOe mechanically unloaded and 1200 ppm at 8 MPa preload (2.5 kOe). Several studies leading to the high response of this composite are presented. A connectivity study shows that a [1-3] connected composite produces 50% more strain than a [0-3] composite. A resin study indicates that the lower the viscosity of the resin, the greater the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the removal of voids during degassing. A void study correlates the increase in voids to the decrease in strain response. A model is used to correlate analysis with experimental results within 10% accuracy and shows that an optimal volume fraction exists based on the properties of the binder. Using a Polyscience Spurr low- viscosity (60 cps) binder this volume fraction is nominally 20%; this optimum is attributed to the balance of epoxy contracting on the particle (built-in preload) and the actuation delivered by the magnetostrictive material. In addition to the connectivity, resin, void, and volume-fraction study, particle size and gradation studies are presented. Widely dispersed (<106, <212, <300 μm), narrowly dispersed (<45, (90-106), (275-300) μm), and an optimized bimodal (18.7% of (45-90) μm with 81.3% of (250-300) μm) particle distributions are studied. Results show that the larger the particle size, the higher the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the reduction of

  3. On to the Ice Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reh, Kim; Hofstdater, Mark; Simon, Amy; Elliott, John

    2017-04-01

    Voyager 2 mission flew by Uranus in 1986 and Neptune in 1989 resulting in stunning remote observations not previously accessible from the ground. There have been no follow-up space flight missions to examine ice giants and, as a result there are significant gaps in our understanding of planetary formation and evolution. This gap not only affects our understanding of our own solar system but also our understanding of exoplanets; the majority of planets discovered around other stars are thought to be ice giants. Ice Giants are likely to be far more abundant in our galaxy than previously thought. The U.S. 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey committee recognized the importance of Uranus and Neptune, and prioritized the exploration of the Ice Giants. Following from this, NASA and ESA have recently completed a study of candidate missions to Uranus and Neptune, the so-called ice giant planets. The intent was to examine what could be accomplished within the budget realities of the predictable future. This "Pre-Decadal Study," focused on opportunities for missions launching in the 2020's and early 2030's. This paper presents results from the Ice Giants study (science, architectures and technologies) and concludes that compelling and affordable missions to the Ice Giants are within our reach.

  4. Formation of artificial granules for proving gelation as the main mechanism of aerobic granulation in biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Yang, Shu-Fang; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, gelation-facilitated biofilm formation as a new mechanism is proposed for the phenomenon of aerobic granulation in biological wastewater treatment. To obtain an experimental proof for the gelation-based theory, the granulation process was simulated in a chemical system using latex particles for bacterial cells and organic polymers (alginate and peptone) for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in a solution with the addition of cations (Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺ and Fe³⁺). The results showed that at a low alginate content (70 mg g⁻¹ mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS)) flocculation was observed in the suspension with loose flocs. At a higher alginate content (180 mg g⁻¹ MLSS), together with discharge of small flocs, formation of artificial gel granules was successfully achieved leading to granulation. The artificial granules show a morphological property similar to that of actual microbial granules. However, if the protein content increased, granulation became difficult with little gel formation. The experimental work demonstrates the importance of the bonding interactions between EPS functional groups and cations in gel formation and granulation. The laboratory results on the formation of artificial granules provide a sound proof for the theory of gelation-facilitated biofilm formation as the main mechanism for aerobic granulation in sludge suspensions.

  5. Evolution of structure and properties of granules containing microcrystalline cellulose and polyvinylpyrrolidone during high-shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Granulation behavior of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) in the presence of 2.5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was systematically studied. Complex changes in flowability and tabletability of lubricated MCC granules are correlated to changes in intragranular porosity, morphology, surface smoothness, size distribution, and specific surface area (SSA). With 2.5% PVP, the use of 45% granulation water leads to 84% reduction in tablet tensile strength and 76% improvement in powder flow factor. The changes in powder performance are explained by granule densification and surface smoothing. The granulating water level corresponding to the onset of overgranulation, 45%, is significantly lower than the 70% water required for unlubricated MCC granules without PVP. At more than 45% water levels, MCC-PVP granules flow well but cannot be compressed into intact tablets. Such changes in powder performance correspond to the rapid growth into large and dense spheres with smooth surface. Compared with MCC alone, the onset of the phase of fast granule size enlargement occurs at a lower water level when 2.5% PVP is used. Although the use of 2.5% PVP hastens granule nucleation and growth rate, the mechanisms of overgranulation are the same, that is, size enlargement, granule densification, surface smoothing, and particle rounding in both systems.

  6. Rab3A, a possible marker of cortical granules, participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Bello, Oscar Daniel; Cappa, Andrea Isabel; de Paola, Matilde; Zanetti, María Natalia; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Fissore, Rafael A; Mayorga, Luis S; Michaut, Marcela A

    2016-09-10

    Fusion of cortical granules with the oocyte plasma membrane is the most significant event to prevent polyspermy. This particular exocytosis, also known as cortical reaction, is regulated by calcium and its molecular mechanism is still not known. Rab3A, a member of the small GTP-binding protein superfamily, has been implicated in calcium-dependent exocytosis and is not yet clear whether Rab3A participates in cortical granules exocytosis. Here, we examine the involvement of Rab3A in the physiology of cortical granules, particularly, in their distribution during oocyte maturation and activation, and their participation in membrane fusion during cortical granule exocytosis. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis showed that Rab3A and cortical granules have a similar migration pattern during oocyte maturation, and that Rab3A is no longer detected after cortical granule exocytosis. These results suggested that Rab3A might be a marker of cortical granules. Overexpression of EGFP-Rab3A colocalized with cortical granules with a Pearson correlation coefficient of +0.967, indicating that Rab3A and cortical granules have almost a perfect colocalization in the egg cortical region. Using a functional assay, we demonstrated that microinjection of recombinant, prenylated and active GST-Rab3A triggered cortical granule exocytosis, indicating that Rab3A has an active role in this secretory pathway. To confirm this active role, we inhibited the function of endogenous Rab3A by microinjecting a polyclonal antibody raised against Rab3A prior to parthenogenetic activation. Our results showed that Rab3A antibody microinjection abolished cortical granule exocytosis in parthenogenetically activated oocytes. Altogether, our findings confirm that Rab3A might function as a marker of cortical granules and participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs.

  7. Visualization and understanding of the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Fonteyne, Margot; Helkimo, Niko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Juuti, Mikko; Delaet, Urbain; Van Assche, Ivo; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in the application of twin screw granulation as a continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical drug formulations. However, the mixing of granulation liquid and powder material during the short residence time inside the screw chamber and the atypical particle size distribution (PSD) of granules produced by twin screw granulation is not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study aims at visualizing the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging. In first instance, the residence time of material inside the barrel was investigated as function of screw speed and moisture content followed by the visualization of the granulation liquid distribution as function of different formulation and process parameters (liquid feed rate, liquid addition method, screw configuration, moisture content and barrel filling degree). The link between moisture uniformity and granule size distributions was also studied. For residence time analysis, increased screw speed and lower moisture content resulted to a shorter mean residence time and narrower residence time distribution. Besides, the distribution of granulation liquid was more homogenous at higher moisture content and with more kneading zones on the granulator screws. After optimization of the screw configuration, a two-level full factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the influence of moisture content, screw speed and powder feed rate on the mixing efficiency of the powder and liquid phase. From these results, it was concluded that only increasing the moisture content significantly improved the granulation liquid distribution. This study demonstrates that NIR chemical imaging is a fast and adequate measurement tool for allowing process visualization and hence for providing better process understanding of a continuous twin screw granulation system.

  8. The Kepler Cepheid V1154 Cyg revisited: light curve modulation and detection of granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derekas, A.; Plachy, E.; Molnár, L.; Sódor, Á.; Benkő, J. M.; Szabados, L.; Bognár, Zs.; Csák, B.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Szabó, R.; Pál, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the bright Cepheid-type variable star V1154 Cygni using 4 yr of continuous observations by the Kepler space telescope. We detected 28 frequencies using the standard Fourier transform method. We identified modulation of the main pulsation frequency and its harmonics with a period of ˜159 d. This modulation is also present in the Fourier parameters of the light curve and the O - C diagram. We detected another modulation with a period of about 1160 d. The star also shows significant power in the low-frequency region that we identified as granulation noise. The effective time-scale of the granulation agrees with the extrapolated scalings of red giant stars. Non-detection of solar-like oscillations indicates that the pulsation inhibits other oscillations. We obtained new radial velocity observations that are in a perfect agreement with previous years data, suggesting that there is no high-mass star companion of V1154 Cygni. Finally, we discuss the possible origin of the detected frequency modulations.

  9. Giant magnetofossils and hyperthermal events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liao; Roberts, Andrew P.; Williams, Wyn; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Jovane, Luigi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize magnetic minerals with precisely controlled size, morphology, and stoichiometry. These cosmopolitan bacteria are widely observed in aquatic environments. If preserved after burial, the inorganic remains of magnetotactic bacteria act as magnetofossils that record ancient geomagnetic field variations. They also have potential to provide paleoenvironmental information. In contrast to conventional magnetofossils, giant magnetofossils (most likely produced by eukaryotic organisms) have only been reported once before from Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 55.8 Ma) sediments on the New Jersey coastal plain. Here, using transmission electron microscopic observations, we present evidence for abundant giant magnetofossils, including previously reported elongated prisms and spindles, and new giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, not only during the PETM, but also shortly before and after the PETM. Moreover, we have discovered giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals from the equatorial Indian Ocean during the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum (˜40 Ma). Our results indicate a more widespread geographic, environmental, and temporal distribution of giant magnetofossils in the geological record with a link to "hyperthermal" events. Enhanced global weathering during hyperthermals, and expanded suboxic diagenetic environments, probably provided more bioavailable iron that enabled biomineralization of giant magnetofossils. Our micromagnetic modelling indicates the presence of magnetic multi-domain (i.e., not ideal for navigation) and single domain (i.e., ideal for navigation) structures in the giant magnetite particles depending on their size, morphology and spatial arrangement. Different giant magnetite crystal morphologies appear to have had different biological functions, including magnetotaxis and other non-navigational purposes. Our observations suggest that hyperthermals provided ideal conditions for

  10. Adsorption mechanism for xanthene dyes to cellulose granules.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Aya; Yamane, Chihiro; Seguchi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    The xanthene dyes, erythrosine, phloxine, and rose bengal, were adsorbed to charred cellulose granules. The charred cellulose granules were preliminarily steeped in ionic (NaOH, NaCl, KOH, KCl, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)), nonionic (glucose, sucrose, and ethanol), and amphipathic sucrose fatty acid ester (SFAE) solutions, and adsorption tests on the dye to the steeped and charred cellulose granules were conducted. Almost none of the dye was adsorbed when the solutions of ionic and amphipathic molecules were used, but were adsorbed in the case of steeping in the nonionic molecule solutions. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and the Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) profiles of SFAE which was adsorbed to the charred cellulose granules and extracted by ethyl ether suggested the presence of hydrophobic sites on the surface of the charred cellulose granules. We confirmed that the xanthene dyes could bind to the charred cellulose granules by ionic and hydrophobic bonds.

  11. Specific lignin accumulation in granulated juice sacs of Citrus maxima.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ling; Pan, Teng-Fei; Guo, Zhi-Xiong; Pan, Dong-Ming

    2014-12-17

    Juice sac granulation occurring in pummelo fruits [Citrus maxima (Burm.) Merr.] is an undesirable trait, and the underlying mechanism remains unresolved. Previous studies have shown that lignin metabolism is closely associated with the process of juice sac granulation. Here, a method suitable for lignin isolation from pummelo tissues is established. Acetylated lignins from different pummelo tissues and cultivars were analyzed by HSQC NMR. The results showed that lignins in granulated juice sacs were characterized by an extremely high abundance of guaiacyl units (91.13-96.82%), in contrast to lignins from other tissues, including leaves, stems, and segment membranes. The abnormally accumulated lignins in granulated juice sacs were specific and mainly polymerized from coniferyl alcohol. No significant difference was found in lignin types among various cultivars. These findings indicated that the mechanism of juice sac granulation might be similar among various cultivars, although very different degrees of juice sac granulation can be observed.

  12. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  13. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  14. Giant Hedge-Hogs: Spikes on Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2004-01-28

    We consider giant gravitons on the maximally supersymmetric plane-wave background of type IIB string theory. Fixing the light-cone gauge, we work out the low energy effective light-cone Hamiltonian of the three-sphere giant graviton. At first order, this is a U(1) gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}. We place sources in this effective gauge theory. Although non-vanishing net electric charge configurations are disallowed by Gauss' law, electric dipoles can be formed. From the string theory point of view these dipoles can be understood as open strings piercing the three-sphere, generalizing the usual BIons to the giant gravitons, BIGGons. Our results can be used to give a two dimensional (worldsheet) description of giant gravitons, similar to Polchinski's description for the usual D-branes, in agreement with the discussions of hep-th/0204196.

  15. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Aerobic Granules: Microbial Landscape and Architecture, Stages, and Practical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    For the successful application of aerobic granules in wastewater treatment, granules containing an appropriate microbial assembly able to remove contaminants should be retained and propagated within the reactor. To manipulate and/or optimize this process, a good understanding of the formation and dynamic architecture of the granules is desirable. Models of granules often assume a spherical shape with an outer layer and an inner core, but limited information is available regarding the extent of deviations from such assumptions. We report on new imaging approaches to gain detailed insights into the structural characteristics of aerobic granules. Our approach stained all components of the granule to obtain a high quality contrast in the images; hence limitations due to thresholding in the image analysis were overcome. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the granular structure was obtained that revealed the mesoscopic impression of the cavernlike interior of the structure, showing channels and dead-end paths in detail. In “old” granules, large cavities allowed for the irrigation and growth of dense microbial colonies along the path of the channels. Hence, in some areas, paradoxically higher biomass content was observed in the inner part of the granule compared to the outer part. Microbial clusters “rooting” from the interior of the mature granule structure indicate that granules mainly grow via biomass outgrowth and not by aggregation of small particles. We identify and discuss phenomena contributing to the life cycle of aerobic granules. With our approach, volumetric tetrahedral grids are generated that may be used to validate complex models of granule formation. PMID:24657859

  17. Control of starch granule numbers in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Crumpton-Taylor, Matilda; Grandison, Scott; Png, Kenneth M Y; Bushby, Andrew J; Smith, Alison M

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate starch granule numbers in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Lack of quantitative information on the extent of genetic, temporal, developmental, and environmental variation in granule numbers is an important limitation in understanding control of starch degradation and the mechanism of granule initiation. Two methods were developed for reliable estimation of numbers of granules per chloroplast. First, direct measurements were made on large series of consecutive sections of mesophyll tissue obtained by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. Second, average numbers were calculated from the starch contents of leaves and chloroplasts and estimates of granule mass based on granule dimensions. Examination of wild-type plants and accumulation and regulation of chloroplast (arc) mutants with few, large chloroplasts provided the following new insights. There is wide variation in chloroplast volumes in cells of wild-type leaves. Granule numbers per chloroplast are correlated with chloroplast volume, i.e. large chloroplasts have more granules than small chloroplasts. Mature leaves of wild-type plants and arc mutants have approximately the same number of granules per unit volume of stroma, regardless of the size and number of chloroplasts per cell. Granule numbers per unit volume of stroma are also relatively constant in immature leaves but are greater than in mature leaves. Granule initiation occurs as chloroplasts divide in immature leaves, but relatively little initiation occurs in mature leaves. Changes in leaf starch content over the diurnal cycle are largely brought about by changes in the volume of a fixed number of granules.

  18. Precise Proper-Motion Measurement of Solar Granulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    representation of the numerical method for the spatially localized cross correlation and displacement map. Two original granulation J(x) images obtained at times t...quadratic methods give displacements correct to a precision of - 10%. V. NOISE ANALYSIS We now dis,;uss a time series of solar granulation images taken with...estimate the extreme position of a function. To analyze these methods further, we digitized along the 45 diagonal the sample granulation photograph at 12

  19. Enhancing screw stability in osteosynthesis with hydroxyapatite granules.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Yamamura, S; Dohmae, Y

    1998-01-01

    We employed hydroxyapatite (HA) granules to enhance screw fixation in revision surgery of failed osteosynthesis with a compression hip screw system in an 83-year-old woman. After reduction of the fracture, the fracture site with a large bone defect was filled with HA granules, and osteosynthesis was accomplished with a double cannulated lag screw and plate system. We feel that this HA granule augmentation method may also be suitable for osteosynthesis in other osteoporotic fractures.

  20. Comparison of low shear, high shear, and fluid bed granulation during low dose tablet process development.

    PubMed

    Hausman, Debra S

    2004-03-01

    Three processing methods were compared to develop a low dose (0.1%) immediate release tablet. Similar formulations were used to evaluate low shear, high shear, and fluid bed granulation methods. For each granulation process, the drug was dissolved or suspended in the granulating fluid and sprayed into the granulator. Both water and methanol were evaluated as granulating fluids. The low shear granulation was performed in a Patterson-Kelley V-Blender with I-bar. The high shear granulation was performed in a GRAL (top entry impeller) and a Diosna (bottom mounted impeller). Fluid bed granulation was also performed using top-spray. Acceptable content uniformity was obtained using each technology. The type of granulator and granulating solvent affected the granulation particle size distributions and bulk/tap densities. However, the addition of extragranular microcrystalline cellulose minimized the effect of variable granulation properties and allowed similar tablets to be produced from each granulation process.

  1. Preparation of Spherical Granules of Octacalcium Phosphate for Medical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Natsuko; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ioku, Koji

    2012-06-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is regarded as a precursor of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is an inorganic constituent of human bones and teeth. OCP is also becoming regarded as one of the important biomaterials. Despite some studies on OCP as biomedical materials, there are few methods for shape forming of OCP. The objective of this study is preparing spherical granules of OCP. The spherical granular shape has an advantage for handling. The spherical granules can achieve easy injection into the defect site by a catheter. In the present study, preparation of spherical granules of OCP from α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) was attempted. The starting material of α-TCP powder was dispersed in the gelatin solution. The resultant slurry was added into vegetable oil, and then the spherical granules of α-TCP/gelatin were formed by the surface tension of the slurry and the shearing force of stirring. By calcining the obtained α-TCP/gelatin granules, the spherical granules with α-TCP single phase were obtained. These spherical granules of α-TCP were immersed in the acetic acid buffer solution whose temperature and pH were controlled. The calcium phosphate spherical granules containing OCP were obtained. The shorter treatment time was favorable for preparing spherical granules containing more OCP.

  2. GRANULES ASSOCIATED WITH THE CHLOROPLAST LAMELLAE OF PORPHYRIDIUM CRUENTUM

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, E.; Conti, S. F.

    1966-01-01

    Small granules with a diameter of approximately 350 A are attached to the chloroplast lamellae of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum. To some extent, their size depends on the culture conditions and the age of the cell. It was possible to preserve the granules only with aldehyde prefixation. It can be seen that fixed or negatively stained granules are comprised of smaller subunits. The granules are arranged regularly on the lamellae in repeating rows with a center-to-center granule distance of 400 to 500 A. Attempts at characterization of these chloroplast granules revealed that they are resistant to hydrolysis by ribonuclease and appear to be structurally unaffected by methanol-acetone extraction. Because of their close association with the chloroplast lamellae, they are considered as possible sites of phycobilin concentration. This possibility is supported by two observations: when the phycobilins are removed, the granules disappear; and, when the chlorophyll and stainable membrane portions are selectively removed, the phycobilins and granules are still present. It was found that all other marine red algae examined had granules which were associated with the chloroplast lamellae. PMID:5962937

  3. Mucous granule exocytosis and CFTR expression in gallbladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kuver, R; Klinkspoor, J H; Osborne, W R; Lee, S P

    2000-02-01

    A mechanistic model of mucous granule exocytosis by columnar epithelial cells must take into account the unique physical-chemical properties of mucin glycoproteins and the resultant mucus gel. In particular, any model must explain the intracellular packaging and the kinetics of release of these large, heavily charged species. We studied mucous granule exocytosis in gallbladder epithelium, a model system for mucus secretion by columnar epithelial cells. Mucous granules released mucus by merocrine exocytosis in mouse gallbladder epithelium when examined by transmission electron microscopy. Spherules of secreted mucus larger than intracellular granules were noted on scanning electron microscopy. Electron probe microanalysis demonstrated increased calcium concentrations within mucous granules. Immunofluorescence microscopic studies revealed intracellular colocalization of mucins and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Confocal laser immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed colocalization. These observations suggest that calcium in mucous secretory granules provides cationic shielding to keep mucus tightly packed. The data also suggests CFTR chloride channels are present in granule membranes. These observations support a model in which influx of chloride ions into the granule disrupts cationic shielding, leading to rapid swelling, exocytosis and hydration of mucus. Such a model explains the physical-chemical mechanisms involved in mucous granule exocytosis.

  4. Osseointegration of alumina bioceramic granules: A comparative experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerikh, V. V.; Avetisyan, A. R.; Zaydman, A. M.; Anikin, K. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Aronov, A. M.; Semantsova, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    To perform a comparative analysis of osseointegration of bioceramic alumina-based granules, hydroxyapatite-based granules, and deproteinized bone granules. The experiment was conducted on 52 adult male Kyoto-Wistar rats weighing 350 to 520 g. The animals were divided into five matched groups that differed only in the type of an implanted material. The granules were implanted in the lumbar vertebral bodies and in the distal right femur of each laboratory animal. Two months after surgery, the animals were euthanized, followed by tissue sampling for morphological studies. An examination of specimens from the groups with implanted alumina granules revealed the newly formed trabecular bone with remodeling signs. The bone tissue filled the intragranular space, tightly adhering to the granule surface. There was no connective tissue capsule on the border between bone tissue and alumina granules. Cylindrical bioceramic alumina-based granules with an open internal channel have a higher strength surpassing than that of analogs and the osseointegration ability close to that of hydroxyapatite and deproteinized bone granules.

  5. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection. [recovery boilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  6. Studies of alpha-granule proteins in cultured human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Dragoslava Kika; Cramer, Elisabeth M; Alimardani, Gulie; Fichelson, Serge; Massé, Jean-Marc; Hayward, Catherine P M

    2003-11-01

    alpha-Granule protein storage is important for producing platelets with normal haemostatic function. The low to undetectable levels of several megakaryocyte-synthesized alpha-granule proteins in normal plasma suggest megakaryocytes are important to sequester these proteins in vivo. alpha-Granule protein storage in vitro has been studied using other cell types, with differences observed in how some proteins are processed compared to platelets. Human megakaryocytes, cultured from cord blood CD34(+) cells and grown in serum-free media containing thrombopoietin, were investigated to determine if they could be used as a model for studying normal alpha-granule protein processing and storage. ELISA indicated that cultured megakaryocytes contained the alpha-granule proteins multimerin, von Willebrand factor, thrombospondin-1, beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4, but no detectable fibrinogen and factor V. A significant proportion of the alpha-granule protein in megakaryocyte cultures was contained within the cells (averages: 41-71 %), consistent with storage. Detailed analyses of multimerin and von Willebrand factor confirmed that alpha-granule proteins were processed to mature forms and were predominantly located in the alpha-granules of cultured megakaryocytes.Thrombopoietin-stimulated cultured megakaryocytes provide a useful model for studying alpha-granule protein processing and storage.

  7. Identification of SNAREs that mediate zymogen granule exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, James A.; Campos-Toimil, Manuel; Thomas, Paul; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-08-03

    A secretagogue-stimulated pancreatic acinar cell releases digestive enzymes from its apical pole. We attempted to identify the SNAREs involved in zymogen granule exocytosis. Antibodies against syntaxins 2 and 3, SNAP-23 and VAMP 8, and the corresponding recombinant SNAREs, inhibited amylase secretion from streptolysin O-permeabilised acini; other anti-SNARE antibodies and SNAREs had no effect. Botulinum neurotoxin C, which cleaved syntaxin 2 and (to a lesser extent) syntaxin 3, but not syntaxins 4, 7 or 8, also inhibited exocytosis. We propose that syntaxin 2, SNAP-23 and VAMP 8 mediate primary granule-plasma membrane fusion. Syntaxin 3 may be involved in secondary granule-granule fusion.

  8. Release of carbon granules from cigarettes with charcoal filters

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, J. L.; Stegmeier, S. J.; Mayer, A. G.; Lesses, J. D.; Streck, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inspect cigarettes with a triple granular filter for charcoal granules on the cut filter surface and, if present, to determine whether the charcoal granules on the filter are released during smoking. DESIGN: 400 Lark cigarettes in 20 packs were examined individually by each of three investigators for the presence of charcoal granules on the cut surface of the cellulose acetate filter. Without removing the cigarettes from the pack, the filters were examined with a stereo zoom microscope for charcoal granules. The percentage of cigarettes that had charcoal granules was defined, and charcoal granules on each filter were counted. Randomly selected cigarettes were then smoked by consenting adult smokers to assess whether the charcoal granules were released during smoking. Lark cigarettes were smoked with a conventional cigarette holder that had been configured to contain an in-line membrane. After smoking, the membrane was analysed microscopically for charcoal granules and other components of the filter that had been released during smoking. RESULTS: Charcoal granules were observed in 79.8% (319/400) of the cigarettes examined. The number of granules per cigarette was 3.3 (SD 3.7). Gaps between the tipping papers--the wrapping papers that surround the filter--were often seen (70%; 242 (71); n = 400 cigarettes). Further, the charcoal cavity was about 60% empty. For all smokers (n = 8/8), charcoal granules were released during smoking. The number of charcoal granules captured on the membranes was 22.5 (16.2) per cigarette. CONCLUSIONS: Charcoal granules are incorporated into cigarette filters to aid in removing toxins in cigarette smoke. In studies of Lark, a popular American cigarette with a charcoal filter, charcoal granules were observed on the filter surface, and were released from the filter when the cigarettes were smoked. During smoking, the toxin-containing charcoal granules are inhaled or ingested. The specific adverse health effects of inhaling or

  9. Effect of Primary Particle Size on the Granule Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, Nejat; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Ding, Yulong; Jia, Xiaodong

    2009-06-01

    Results of a study of the influence of primary particle size on the strength, density and internal structure of granules produced in a high shear mixer granulator, Cyclomix (manufactured by Hosokawa Micron B.V., The Netherlands) are reported. Different grades of calcium carbonate powder (available commercially as Durcal 15, 40 and 65) were granulated in a 50 L granulator. Durcal 15 is the finest powder, d50 = 23 μm, and Durcal 65 is the coarsest one, d50 = 60 μm. An aqueous solution of polyethylene glycol was used as the binder. Granules produced from the three powder grades were dried and tested to ascertain their internal structure using X-ray Micro Tomography (XMT). The granules were also individually subjected to quasi-static compression to characterise their crushing strength. The envelop density of granules for each powder grade was also measured. The results show that the envelope density increases with the mean size of primary particles. It is found that a more uniform strength and density distributions are obtained for the coarsest powder grade and the granulation operating conditions for the finest grade, Durcal 15, produced the weakest granules. This is attributed to the presence of large pores and cavities in their cores, as observed by XMT.

  10. Microbial granulation for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Mo-Kwon; Hwang, Yuhoon; Im, Wan-Taek; Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Park, Chul; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the formation of microbial granules to boost the productivity of lactic acid (LA). The flocculated form of LA-producing microbial consortium, dominated by Lactobacillus sp. (91.5% of total sequence), was initially obtained in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), which was fed with 2% glucose and operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12 h and pH 5.0 ± 0.1 under a thermophilic condition (50°C). The mixed liquor in the CSTR was then transferred to an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB). The fermentation performance and granulation process were monitored with a gradual decrease of HRT from 8.0 to 0.17 h, corresponding to an increase in the substrate loading from 60 to 2,880 g glucose L(-1) d(-1) . As the operation continued, the accumulation of biomass in the UASB was clearly observed, which changed from flocculent to granular form with decrease in HRT. Up to the HRT decrease to 0.5 h, the LA concentration was maintained at 19-20 g L(-1) with over 90% of substrate removal efficiency. However, further decrease of HRT resulted in a decrease of LA concentration with increase in residual glucose. Nevertheless, the volumetric LA productivity continuously increased, reaching 67 g L-fermenter (-1) h(-1) at HRT 0.17 h. The size of LA-producing granules and hydrophobicity gradually increased with decrease in HRT, reaching 6.0 mm and 60%, respectively. These biogranules were also found to have high settling velocities and low porosities, ranging 2.69-4.73 cm s(-1) and 0.39-0.92, respectively. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Observation of polyphosphate granules in cable bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Nielsen, L. P.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Cable bacteria are long filamentous bacteria that capable for long distance electron transport: transporting electrons derived from oxidizing sulfide in anoxic layers, to oxygen at the sediment surface, over a distance of centimeters. Cable bacteria are found in many types of freshwater and marine sediment all over the world, with density of approximately thousands of kilometers per square meter. These long filaments are composed by individual cells closely related to Desulfobulbaceae, connected with a shared outer membrane inside which the strings structure are presumed to be highly conductive. The observed doubling time of cells within the filament is about 20 min, which is among the shortest compare to other bacteria. In these cable cells, we constantly observed polyphosphate granules (poly-P), regardless of cell dimension and shape. This is very interesting since it has long been recognized that the microbial polyP content is low during rapid growth and increases under unfavorable conditions, for example, increasing sulfide concentration and anoxia resulted in a decomposition of poly-P in Beggiatoa. Here, we investigated marine cable bacteria from Netherland and Aarhus Bay, focusing on the poly-P dynamics under various redox conditions. In poly-P stained cells, typically there are two big poly-P granules locate at each polar. In dividing cells, however, the morphology of poly-P changed to six small granules precisely arranged to two row. Moreover, the cells seem be able to continuously divide more than one time without elongation step. These varied poly-P morphologies demonstrate that poly-P is closely related to the cell growth and cell division, by an unknown mechanism. Individual cable filaments were picked up and were exposed to different redox conditions; our primary data indicated the cable cells could suffer anoxic condition better than oxic condition. We also detected decomposition of poly-P under anoxia. These results call for an in-depth examination

  12. The presence of lysophosphatidylcholine in chromaffin granules

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Gilbert; Sheltawy, Ayman

    1980-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine is thought to be a characteristic component of the chromaffin granules in adrenal glands. By the use of a t.l.c. system that resolves minor phospholipids satisfactorily, this subcellular location was confirmed in the present study in bovine glands. However, phospholipid degradation was demonstrated in homogenates of the adrenal medulla and cortex under conditions similar to those of subcellular fractionation (incubation at 4°C for 90min). Phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin were hydrolysed, but the concentration of lysophosphatidylcholine did not change, indicating that the latter was present in the medulla before this treatment. Attempts were made to decrease the time between death of the animal and the extraction of lipids. Lysophosphatidylcholine was easily demonstrable in lipid extracts of the dissected medulla and even in those of the whole bovine gland. For practical reasons it is not possible to decrease further the time lapse before extraction in the case of this animal. Adrenal glands were obtained from anaesthetized and untreated rabbits. These were frozen immediately in liquid N2 and the lipids were extracted. In a control experiment, the glands from rabbit were dissected and treated in the same manner as with those of ox, and then the lipids were extracted. No lysophosphatidylcholine was detected in the extracts from glands frozen in liquid N2 but lysophosphatidylcholine was observed in the controls. These results suggest that lysophosphatidylcholine is not a component of chromaffin granules, but is produced if the period between death of the animal and lipid extraction is unduly prolonged. To discover whether lysophosphatidylcholine affected the permeability barrier properties of chromaffin granules, sonicated liposomes of egg phosphatidylcholine alone or with lysophosphatidylcholine (15mol/100mol) were prepared. Both types were shown by electron microscopy to be largely made up of single bilayer vesicles. The exchange

  13. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  14. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  15. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  16. What Is Giant Cell Arteritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 01, 2017 Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an inflammation (swelling) of the arteries, which are the blood ... help nourish your eyes, reduced blood flow can cause sudden, painless vision loss. This condition is called ...

  17. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  18. Giant sacrolumbar meningioma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McGillicuddy, J E; Hopkins, J W

    1990-06-01

    A case of giant sacral meningioma with presacral and lumbar extension is presented. The difficulties in diagnosis and management are emphasized including the staged multidisciplinary surgical approaches and preoperative tumor embolization.

  19. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  20. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  1. Giant cell arteritis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravin; Karia, Niral; Jain, Shaifali; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is the most common vasculitis in Caucasians. Acute visual loss in one or both eyes is by far the most feared and irreversible complication of giant cell arteritis. This article reviews recent guidelines on early recognition of systemic, cranial, and ophthalmic manifestations, and current management and diagnostic strategies and advances in imaging. We share our experience of the fast track pathway and imaging in associated disorders, such as large-vessel vasculitis. PMID:28539785

  2. Evaluation of granulated lactose as a carrier for DPI formulations 1: effect of granule size.

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Du, Ju; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of large granulated lactose carrier particle systems on aerosol performance of dry powder inhaler formulations. Granulated lactose carriers with average sizes ranging from 200 to 1,000 μm were prepared and subsequently fractionated into separate narrow size powders. The fractionated granulated lactose (GL) samples were characterized in terms of size, specific surface area, surface roughness, morphology, density, flowability, and solid-state. The in vitro aerosolization performance was performed on the different size fractions of GL samples from a commercial inhaler device (Aerolizer®) with a model formulation (2% w/w salbutamol sulfate). The cascade impaction parameters employed were 60 or 90 L/min with standard (aperture size, 0.6 mm) or modified piercing holes (aperture size, 1.2 mm) of the inhaler loaded capsules. It was shown that the largest size fraction formulation (850-1000 μm) had a slight improvement in the fine particle fraction (FPF) compared to immediately preceding size fractions, explained by a smaller adhesive force between drug and carrier. Compared to commercial piercing holes, enlarged piercing holes generated a slight decreasing trend of FPF as the lactose powder sizes increased from 200-250 μm to 600-850 μm, perhaps due to the reduced detachment force by flow forces. The size, surface roughness, density, and flowability of lactose carrier as well as device design all contributed to the aerosol dispersion performance of granulated lactose-based adhesive mixtures. It was concluded that poorer or enhanced redispersion performance is not an inherent property to the significantly large size of granulated lactose carriers as previously contended.

  3. Involvement of the cytoskeleton in the movement of cortical granules during oocyte maturation, and cortical granule anchoring in mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Connors, S A; Kanatsu-Shinohara, M; Schultz, R M; Kopf, G S

    1998-08-01

    Exocytosis of cortical granules in mouse eggs is required to produce the zona pellucida block to polyspermy. In this study, we examined the role of microfilaments and microtubules in the regulation of cortical granule movement toward the cortex during oocyte maturation and anchoring of cortical granules in the cortex. Fluorescently labeled cortical granules, microfilaments, and microtubules were visualized using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. It was observed that cortical granules migrate to the periphery of the oocyte during oocyte maturation. This movement is blocked by the treatment of oocytes with cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of microfilament polymerization, but not with nocodazole or colchicine, inhibitors of microtubule polymerization. Cortical granules, once anchored at the cortex, remained in the cortex following treatment of metaphase II-arrested eggs with each of these inhibitors; i.e., there was neither inward movement nor precocious exocytosis. Finally, the single cortical granule-free domain that normally becomes localized over the metaphase II spindle was not observed when the chromosomes become scattered following microtubule disruption with nocodazole or colchicine. In these instances a cortical granule-free domain was observed over each individual chromosome, suggesting that the chromosome or chromosome-associated material, and not the spindle, dictates the localization of the cortical granule-free domain.

  4. Influence of process variable and physicochemical properties on the granulation mechanism of mannitol in a fluid bed top spray granulator.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Jonathan; Kaster, Meagan; Dumont, Hubert

    2005-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of specific process variables, including the hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) binder solution atomization, on the fluidized bed top spray granulation of mannitol. Special attention was given to the relationship between wetting and the granule growth profile. The atomization of the HPC binder solution using a binary nozzle arrangement produced droplets of decreasing size as the atomization pressure was increased, while changes in the spray rate had little effect on the mean droplet size. Increasing the HPC binder concentration from 2 to 8% w/w increased the binder droplet size and was most likely attributed to higher solution viscosity. The top spray granulation of mannitol showed induction type growth behavior. Process conditions like high spray rate, low fluidizing air velocity and binder solution concentration that promote the availability of HPC binder solution at the surface of the particles appeared to be key in enhancing nucleation and growth of the granules. Increasing the bed moisture level, up to a certain value, reduced the contribution of attrition to the overall growth profile of the granule and, more significantly, produced less granule breakage on drying. It was observed that the mean granule size could be reduced as much as 40% between the end of granulation and the end of drying for lower initial bed moisture level despite a shorter drying phase. High atomization pressure, especially when maintained during the drying phase, contributed substantially to granule breakage.

  5. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  6. Kuiper Prize: Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-10-01

    The study of giant planet atmospheres is near and dear to me, for several reasons. First, the giant planets are photogenic; the colored clouds are great tracers, and one can make fantastic movies of the atmosphere in motion. Second, the giant planets challenge us with storms that last for hundreds of years and winds that blow faster the farther you go from the sun. Third, they remind us of Earth with their hurricanes, auroras, and lightning, but they also are the link to the 200 giant planets that have been discovered around other stars. This talk will cover the past, present, and future (one hopes) of giant planet research. I will review the surprises of the Voyager and Galileo eras, and will discuss what we are learning now from the Cassini orbiter. I will review the prospects for answering the outstanding questions like: Where's the water? What is providing the colors of the clouds? How deep do the features extend? Where do the winds get their energy? What is the role of the magnetic field? Finally, I will briefly discuss how extrasolar giant planets compare with objects in our own solar system.

  7. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min

    2011-11-17

    Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals.

  8. Regulated proteolysis by cortical granule serine protease 1 at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Haley, Sheila A; Wessel, Gary M

    2004-05-01

    Cortical granules are specialized organelles whose contents interact with the extracellular matrix of the fertilized egg to form the block to polyspermy. In sea urchins, the granule contents form a fertilization envelope (FE), and this construction is critically dependent upon protease activity. An autocatalytic serine protease, cortical granule serine protease 1 (CGSP1), has been identified in the cortical granules of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs, and here we examined the regulation of the protease activity and tested potential target substrates of CGSP1. We found that CGSP1 is stored in its full-length, enzymatically quiescent form in the granule, and is inactive at pH 6.5 or below. We determined the pH of the cortical granule by fluorescent indicators and micro-pH probe measurements and found the granules to be pH 5.5, a condition inhibitory to CGSP1 activity. Exposure of the protease to the pH of seawater (pH 8.0) at exocytosis immediately activates the protease. Activation of eggs at pH 6.5 or lower blocks activation of the protease and the resultant FE phenotypes are indistinguishable from a protease-null phenotype. We find that native cortical granule targets of the protease are beta-1,3 glucanase, ovoperoxidase, and the protease itself, but the structural proteins of the granule are not proteolyzed by CGSP1. Whole mount immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that inhibition of CGSP1 activity affects the localization of ovoperoxidase but does not alter targeting of structural proteins to the FE. The mistargeting of ovoperoxidase may lead to spurious peroxidative cross-linking activity and contribute to the lethality observed in protease-null cells. Thus, CGSP1 is proteolytically active only when secreted, due to the low pH of the cortical granules, and it has a small population of targets for cleavage within the cortical granules.

  9. Drug distribution in wet granulation: foam versus spray.

    PubMed

    Tan, Melvin X L; Nguyen, Thanh H; Hapgood, Karen P

    2013-09-01

    Foam granulation technology is a new wet granulation approach for pharmaceutical formulations. This study evaluates the performance of foam and spray granulation in achieving uniform drug distribution using a model formulation. To observe wetting and nuclei formation, single drop/foam penetration experiments were performed on a static powder bed comprised of varying compositions of hydrophilic/hydrophobic glass ballotini, and hydrophilic lactose/hydrophobic salicylic acid respectively. High shear granulation experiments were performed in a 5L mixer using varying compositions of hydrophilic lactose and hydrophobic salicylic acid. Four percent hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) solution was delivered at 90 g/min as either a foam (92% FQ) or an atomized spray whilst recording impeller power consumption. After drying, the granule size distribution was measured and the granule composition was estimated using gravimetric filtration in methanol. Foam penetration was less dependent on the powder hydrophobicity compared to drop penetration. For glass ballotini powder mixtures, foam induced nucleation created nuclei with relatively uniform structure and size regardless of the powder hydrophobicity. For salicylic acid and lactose mixtures, increasing the proportion of salicylic acid reduced the nuclei granule size for both foam and drop binder addition. The granule drug distribution was not significantly affected by the binder addition method. Processing conditions, including liquid binder amount, impeller speed, wet massing, and the wettability properties of the formulation were the dominant factors for delivering homogeneous granules. The study reveals that foam and spray granulation involve different nucleation mechanisms - spray tends to incur early liquid penetration whereas foam granulation operates well in mechanical dispersion.

  10. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals. PMID:22088197

  11. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x <= 0.5, is associated with a first order magnetic phase transition and it reaches values of 3 to 4 K and 6 to 10 J/kg K per 1 T field change, respectively. The refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 <= x <= 1 allowed us to obtain a qualitative understanding of the basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  12. Control of bisphosphonate release using hydroxyapatite granules.

    PubMed

    Seshima, Hisashi; Yoshinari, Masao; Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Kawada, Eiji; Inoue, Takashi; Oda, Yutaka

    2006-08-01

    The efficacy of hydroxyapatite (HAp) as a carrier was investigated to establish a method of local administration of bisphosphonates (Bps), which has currently been administered systemically. HAp granules (300-500 microm in size) with different physicochemical features were prepared by altering the sintering temperature. To ascertain the physicochemical properties of the HAp granules, their crystallinity was assessed using X-ray diffraction, the surface morphology was examined under scanning electron microscopy, and the specific surface area and calcium dissolution were evaluated. Different Bps-HAp composites were subsequently prepared and the concentration of Bps released from these composites was measured. The influence of Bps-HAp composites on the rate of osteoclast survival was also evaluated. The results revealed that (1) HAp solubility depends on the sintering temperature; (2) The concentration of released Bps could be controlled by regulating the sintering temperature of HAp as a carrier; and (3) Bps released from Bps-HAp composites reduced the number of osteoclasts. These findings indicated that Bps-HAp composites could be locally administered as a drug delivery system to areas with bone resorption.

  13. Monitoring fluidized bed drying of pharmaceutical granules.

    PubMed

    Briens, Lauren; Bojarra, Megan

    2010-12-01

    Placebo granules consisting of lactose monohydrate, corn starch, and polyvinylpyrrolidone were prepared using de-ionized water in a high-shear mixer and dried in a conical fluidized bed dryer at various superficial gas velocities. Acoustic, vibration, and pressure data obtained over the course of drying was analyzed using various statistical, frequency, fractal, and chaos techniques. Traditional monitoring methods were also used for reference. Analysis of the vibration data showed that the acceleration levels decreased during drying and reached a plateau once the granules had reached a final moisture content of 1–2 wt.%; this plateau did not differ significantly between superficial gas velocities, indicating a potential criterion to support drying endpoint identification. Acoustic emissions could not reliably identify the drying endpoint. However, high kurtosis values of acoustic emissions measured in the filtered air exhaust corresponded to high entrainment rates. This could be used for process control to adjust the fluidization gas velocity to allow drying to continue rapidly while minimizing entrainment and possible product losses.

  14. Rheological and fractal hydrodynamics of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Tijani, H I; Abdullah, N; Yuzir, A; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-06-01

    The structural and hydrodynamic features for granules were characterized using settling experiments, predefined mathematical simulations and ImageJ-particle analyses. This study describes the rheological characterization of these biologically immobilized aggregates under non-Newtonian flows. The second order dimensional analysis defined as D2=1.795 for native clusters and D2=1.099 for dewatered clusters and a characteristic three-dimensional fractal dimension of 2.46 depicts that these relatively porous and differentially permeable fractals had a structural configuration in close proximity with that described for a compact sphere formed via cluster-cluster aggregation. The three-dimensional fractal dimension calculated via settling-fractal correlation, U∝l(D) to characterize immobilized granules validates the quantitative measurements used for describing its structural integrity and aggregate complexity. These results suggest that scaling relationships based on fractal geometry are vital for quantifying the effects of different laminar conditions on the aggregates' morphology and characteristics such as density, porosity, and projected surface area.

  15. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes After Fenestration and Partial Wall Excision of Idiopathic Intradural Spinal Arachnoid Cysts Presenting with Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vibhu K; Manoharan, Sakthivel R; Do, Hyunwoo; Minnema, Amy; Shaddy, Sophia M; Elder, J Brad; Farhadi, H Francis

    2017-09-01

    Intradural spinal arachnoid cysts (ISACs) with associated neurologic deficits are encountered infrequently. Various management strategies have been proposed with minimal data on comparative outcomes. We describe the clinical and radiologic presentation as well as the outcomes of 14 surgically managed patients who presented with an ISAC and associated myelopathy. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical course of consecutive patients presenting with neurologic deficits associated with idiopathic ISACs at our institution. The diagnoses were based on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies followed by intraoperative and histopathological confirmation. A total of 14 consecutive patients with ISACs (1 cervicothoracic, 12 thoracic, and 1 thoracolumbar) and associated myelopathy were identified. Syringomyelia was noted in 8 patients. All ISACs were treated with cyst fenestration and partial wall resection through a posterior approach. Preoperative neurologic symptoms were noted to be stable or improved in all patients starting at 6-week postoperative follow-up. The median (interquartile range) preoperative mJOA score was 13 (12.0-14.8), whereas the postoperative median score at a mean follow-up of 22 months (range 6-50 months) was 16 (14.0-17.0), which represents a median improvement (ΔmJOA) of 2.0 (1.3-3.0) (P < 0.001). Comparison of ΔmJOA scores between cases without and with associated syrinxes did not reveal a significant difference (P = 0.23). Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed spinal cord re-expansion at the level of the ISAC in all cases and either complete or partial syrinx resolution in 7 of 8 cases. Early treatment with fenestration and partial wall resection allows for cord decompression, syrinx resolution, and gradual resolution of myelopathic symptoms in most cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ATPase-Modulated Stress Granules Contain a Diverse Proteome and Substructure.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saumya; Wheeler, Joshua R; Walters, Robert W; Agrawal, Anurag; Barsic, Anthony; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-28

    Stress granules are mRNA-protein granules that form when translation initiation is limited, and they are related to pathological granules in various neurodegenerative diseases. Super-resolution microscopy reveals stable substructures, referred to as cores, within stress granules that can be purified. Proteomic analysis of stress granule cores reveals a dense network of protein-protein interactions and links between stress granules and human diseases and identifies ATP-dependent helicases and protein remodelers as conserved stress granule components. ATP is required for stress granule assembly and dynamics. Moreover, multiple ATP-driven machines affect stress granules differently, with the CCT complex inhibiting stress granule assembly, while the MCM and RVB complexes promote stress granule persistence. Our observations suggest that stress granules contain a stable core structure surrounded by a dynamic shell with assembly, disassembly, and transitions between the core and shell modulated by numerous protein and RNA remodeling complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Giant necrotic pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Quigley, Edward P; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2013-10-01

    Apoplexy of the pituitary gland is a rare complication of pituitary adenomas, involving hemorrhage with or without necrosis within the tumor. This condition may be either asymptomatic or may present with severe headache, visual impairment, ophthalmoplegia, and pituitary failure. Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is usually required to ensure reversal of visual impairment. Reports of pituitary apoplectic lesions exceeding 60.0mm in diameter are very rare. A 39-year-old man with long-standing history of nasal congestion, decreased libido and infertility presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and diplopia. MRI of the head demonstrated a massive skull base lesion of 70.0 × 60.0 × 25.0mm, compatible with a giant pituitary macroadenoma. The lesion failed to enhance after administration of a contrast agent, suggesting complete necrotic apoplexy. Urgent surgical decompression was performed, and the lesion was resected via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathological analysis revealed evidence of necrotic pituitary apoplexy. At the 2 month follow-up, the patient had near-complete to complete resolution of his visual impairment. To the authors' knowledge, this report is unique as the patient demonstrated complete necrotic apoplexy and it underlines the diagnostic dilemma in such a case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  19. Giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Jem; Lester, Susan; Hill, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common vasculitis of the elderly. The diagnosis can be challenging at times because of the limitation of the American Rheumatology Association (ARA) classification criteria and the significant proportion of biopsy-negative patients with GCA. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in establishing diagnosis and improved histopathology techniques to improve the sensitivity of temporal artery biopsy. There have been significant advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of GCA, particularly the role of cytokine pathways such as the interleukins, IL-6-IL-17 axis, and the IL-12-interferon-γ axis and their implication for new therapies. We highlight that glucocorticoids remain the primary treatment for GCA, but recognize the risk of steroid-induced side effects. A number of pharmacotherapies to enable glucocorticoid dose reduction and prevent relapse have been studied. Early diagnosis and fast-track pathways have improved outcomes by encouraging adherence to evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebellar granule cells encode the expectation of reward

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Mark J; Kim, Tony Hyun; Savall, Joan; Schnitzer, Mark J; Luo, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    The human brain contains ~60 billion cerebellar granule cells1, which outnumber all other neurons combined. Classical theories posit that a large, diverse population of granule cells allows for highly detailed representations of sensorimotor context, enabling downstream Purkinje cells to sense fine contextual changes2–6. Although evidence suggests a role for cerebellum in cognition7–10, granule cells are known to encode only sensory11–13 and motor14 context. Using two-photon calcium imaging in behaving mice, here we show that granule cells convey information about the expectation of reward. Mice initiated voluntary forelimb movements for delayed water reward. Some granule cells responded preferentially to reward or reward omission, whereas others selectively encoded reward anticipation. Reward responses were not restricted to forelimb movement, as a Pavlovian task evoked similar responses. Compared to predictable rewards, unexpected rewards elicited markedly different granule cell activity despite identical stimuli and licking responses. In both tasks, reward signals were widespread throughout multiple cerebellar lobules. Tracking the same granule cells over several days of learning revealed that cells with reward-anticipating responses emerged from those that responded at the start of learning to reward delivery, whereas reward omission responses grew stronger as learning progressed. The discovery of predictive, non-sensorimotor encoding in granule cells is a major departure from current understanding of these neurons and dramatically enriches contextual information available to postsynaptic Purkinje cells, with important implications for cognitive processing in the cerebellum. PMID:28321129

  1. [Working out of technology and rationing quality of "Glysocal" granules].

    PubMed

    Mekhralieva, S D

    2011-02-01

    The technology of "Glysocal" granules on the basis of biologically active substances extracted from plants having wound healing, regenerative and antioxidant properties has been developed for treatment of gastroenteric diseases. Quality rationing of Glycyrrhiza, Sophora, and Calendula granules (condition and period of storage, pharmacological activity and microbiological cleanliness) has been defined.

  2. Autophagy meets fused in sarcoma-positive stress granules.

    PubMed

    Matus, Soledad; Bosco, Daryl A; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in fused in sarcoma and/or translocated in liposarcoma (FUS, TLS or FUS) are linked to familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant FUS selectively accumulates into discrete cytosolic structures known as stress granules under various stress conditions. In addition, mutant FUS expression can alter the dynamics and morphology of stress granules. Although the link between mutant FUS and stress granules is well established, the mechanisms modulating stress granule formation and disassembly in the context of ALS are poorly understood. In this issue of Neurobiology of Aging, Ryu et al. uncover the impact of autophagy on the potential toxicity of mutant FUS-positive stress granules. The authors provide evidence indicating that enhanced autophagy activity reduces the number of stress granules, which in the case of cells containing mutant FUS-positive stress granules, is neuroprotective. Overall, this study identifies an intersection between the proteostasis network and alterations in RNA metabolism in ALS through the dynamic assembly and disassembly of stress granules.

  3. Separation of rat pituitary secretory granules by continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel; Exton, Carrie; Salada, Thomas; Shellenberger, Kathy; Waddle, Jenny; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The separation of growth hormone-containing cytoplasmic secretory granules from the rat pituitary gland by continuous flow electrophoresis is described. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that granule subpopulations can be separated due to differences in surface charge; these, in turn, may be related to the oligomeric state of the hormone.

  4. Internal structure and fragmentation kinetics of silica granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosseau, P.; Dumas, T.; Bonnefoy, O.; Barriquand, L.; Guy, L.; Thomas, G.

    2013-06-01

    To improve the mechanical properties of tires, silica granules can be incorporated into the elastomer as well as carbon black. Ideally, the fragmentation of the granules in the elastomer must be obtained with low mechanical stresses and lead to very small fragments distributed homogeneously in the material. On the other hand, granules must present a sufficient cohesion, in order to avoid the generation of fine particles during handling operations. Thus it appears necessary to control the mechanical strength of granules and the mechanism of their fragmentation. In this experimental study, we investigated the fragmentation of silica granules of 250 microns produced by spray drying. For this, we characterized by granulometry the evolution of the Particle Size Distribution of silica powder in water. The granules were suspended in water and submitted to ultrasounds. This treatment is used to create the fragmentation that occurs by viscous shearing in industrial rubber processing. A core-shell structure, characteristic of granules obtained by atomization process, was observed by SEM. Furthermore, by varying the intensity of mechanical stress, the multi-scale structure of granules was evidenced as well as the existence of different regimes of fragmentation. The kinetics of fragmentation was experimentally followed on two grades of silica that showed significant differences in their behavior during the fragmentation process.

  5. Nonreutilizaton of adrenal chromaffin granule membranes following secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nobiletti, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular postexocytotic fate of the adrenal chromaffin granule membrane (reutilization vs. nonreutilization) was addressed through two experimental approaches. First, (/sup 3/H) leucine pulse-chase labeling experiments were conducted in two systems - the isolated retrograde perfused cat adrenal gland and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to compare chromaffin granule soluble dopamine-B-hydroxylase (DBH) turnover (marker for granule soluble content turnover) to that of membrane-bound DBH (marker for granule membrane turnover). Experiments in cat adrenal glands showed that at all chase periods the granule distribution of radiolabeled DBH was in agreement with the DBH activity distribution (73% membrane-bound/27% soluble) - a result consistent with parallel turnover of soluble and membrane-bound DBH. Experiments in cultured bovine cells showed that labeled soluble and membrane-bound DBH had parallel turnover patterns and at all chase period, the distribution of radiolabeled DBH between the soluble contents and membranes was similar to the DBH activity distribution (50% soluble/50% membrane-bound). The above experiments showed that the soluble contents and membranes turnover in parallel and are consistent with nonreutilization of chromaffin granule membranes following exocytosis. Isolated retrograde perfused bovine adrenal glands were subjected to repetitive acetylcholine stimulation to induce exocytosis and then the dense and less-dense chromaffin granule fractions were isolated. Since both approaches gave results consistent with membrane nonreutilization, the authors conclude that once a chromaffin granule is involved in exocytosis, its membrane is not reutilized for the further synthesis, storage, and secretion of catecholamines.

  6. 21 CFR 520.970a - Flunixin meglumine granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flunixin meglumine granules. 520.970a Section 520.970a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Specifications. Each 10-gram packet contains flunixin meglumine equivalent to 250 milligrams...

  7. Formation of Elongated Starch Granules in High-amylose Maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GEMS-0067 maize starch contains up to 32% elongated starch granules much higher than amylose-extender (ae) single-mutant maize starch (~7%) and normal (non-mutant) maize starch (0%). These elongated granules are highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis at 95-100 C, which function as resistant starc...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1330 - Meclofenamic acid granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Meclofenamic acid granules. 520.1330 Section 520.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Chemical name. N-(2,6-Dichlorom-tolyl) anthranilic acid. (b) Specifications. The drug is in...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1330 - Meclofenamic acid granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Meclofenamic acid granules. 520.1330 Section 520.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Chemical name. N-(2,6-Dichlorom-tolyl) anthranilic acid. (b) Specifications. The drug is in...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1720b - Phenylbutazone granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phenylbutazone granules. 520.1720b Section 520.1720b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Specifications. The drug is in granular form. It is packaged to contain either 8 grams of...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1720b - Phenylbutazone granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phenylbutazone granules. 520.1720b Section 520.1720b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Specifications. The drug is in granular form. It is packaged to contain either 8 grams of...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1720b - Phenylbutazone granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phenylbutazone granules. 520.1720b Section 520.1720b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Specifications. The drug is in granular form. It is packaged to contain either 8 grams of...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  16. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  17. 21 CFR 520.970a - Flunixin meglumine granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flunixin meglumine granules. 520.970a Section 520.970a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Specifications. Each 10-gram packet contains flunixin meglumine equivalent to 250 milligrams...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1720b - Phenylbutazone granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phenylbutazone granules. 520.1720b Section 520.1720b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Specifications. The drug is in granular form. It is packaged to contain either 8 grams of...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1330 - Meclofenamic acid granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Meclofenamic acid granules. 520.1330 Section 520.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... granules. (a) Chemical name. N-(2,6-Dichlorom-tolyl) anthranilic acid. (b) Specifications. The drug is in...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...