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Sample records for giant cell lesion

  1. Giant-cell lesions of the facial bones

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.M.; Lawson, W.; Cohen, B.A.

    1983-04-01

    Giant-cell lesions of the paranasal sinuses, including the giant-cell reparative granuloma, the brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, the true giant-cell tumor, cherubism, and the aneurysmal bone cyst, are uncommon entities. Plain radiographic and computed-tomographic studies of these lesions are described and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  2. Treatment of central giant cell lesions using bisphosphonates with intralesional corticosteroid injections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Central giant cell lesions are benign intraosseous proliferative lesions that have considerable local aggressiveness. Nonsurgical treatment methods, such as intralesional corticosteroid injections, systemic calcitonin and interferon have been reported. Recently, bisphosphonates have been used to treat central giant cell lesions. A case of a 36-year-old male with a central giant cell lesion crossing the mandibular midline was treated with intralesional corticosteroids combined with alendronate sodium for the control of systemic bone resorption. The steroid injections and the use of bisphosphonates were stopped after seven months when further needle penetration into the lesion was not possible due to new bone formation. After two years, the bony architecture was near normal, and only minimal radiolucency was present around the root apices of the involved teeth. The patient was followed up for four years, and panoramic radiography showed areas of new bone formation. Thus far, neither recurrence nor side effects of the medication have been detected. PMID:22913518

  3. Multinucleate Giant Cells in FNAC of Benign Breast Lesions: Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    R, Kalyani; Murthy V, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleate giant cells are described in breast aspirates. However, due to its rarity very few cases have been described cytologically. Hence recognition and correct interpretation of their presence is difficult, yet crucial for accurate diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The prospective study of FNAC (fine needle aspirate cytology) of breast lumps was conducted for a period of six months. Direct smears were prepared from the material aspirated. In case of fluid aspirates, centrifuge done and cell sediment was used for making smears. Smears were alcohol fixed and stained with PAP/H&E or air dried smears were stained with Leishman stain. Further smears were subjected to immunocytochemistry using vimentin and CD34 markers to know the origin of multinucleate giant cells. Results: We have reported 11 cases of breast lesions, which showed multinucleate giant cells on FNAC. Out of the 11 cases, Cytologically six cases showed granuloma debris with relative proportion of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells. Two cases were diagnosed as acute suppurative granulomatous mastitis. Two cases of fibroadenoma and one case of fat necrosis showed multinucleate giant cells. Immunocytochemistry showed vimentin positivity in both stromal and histiocytic type of multinucleate giant cells and in isolated histiocytes. CD34 was focally positive in histiocytic type of giant cells. Conclusion: An effort is made to distinguish between the stromal and histiocytic type giant cells in non-neoplastic breast lesions. Further molecular studies have to be done to know the exact histogenesis and role of these multinucleate giant cells in benign lesions. PMID:25653953

  4. Giant Cell Lesions in Noonan Syndrome: Case Report and Review of The Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bufalino, Andreia; Carrera, Manoela; Carlos, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Noonan-like/multiple giant cell lesion syndrome (NS/MGCLS) is a rare condition with phenotypic overlap with Noonan syndrome (NS). Once thought to be a specific and separate entity, it is now suggested to be a variant of the NS spectrum. We report a patient with classical cardinal features of NS, including short stature, mild ptosis, hypertelorism, down-slating palpebral fissures, low-set and posteriorly angulated ears, short neck, pectus excavatum, widely spaced nipples and cryptochidism, which were associated with bilateral central giant cell lesions in the mandible and germ-line mutation (C218T, Thr73Ile) in the exon 3 of the PTPN11 gene. The similar clinical and genetic aspects support the observation that NS/MGCLS is a variant of NS and giant cell lesions are an integrant part of this disorder. PMID:20383758

  5. IL-4 induces the formation of multinucleated giant cells and expression of β5 integrin in central giant cell lesion

    PubMed Central

    Aghbali, Amirala; Rafieyan, Sona; Mohamed-Khosroshahi, Leila; Baradaran, Behzad; Shanehbandi, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Background It is now well established that IL-4 has a central role in the development of monocytes to multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) by inducing the expression of integrins on the surface of monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of IL-4 in induction of β5 integrin expression in the peripheral blood samples of patients with giant cell granuloma. Material and Methods Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood samples of patients with central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and healthy controls using human Monocyte Isolation Kit II. Isolated monocytes were then cultured in the absence or presence of IL-4 (10 and 20 ng/mL), and following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, Real-time PCR was performed to determine the level of β5 integrin expression. The formation of CGCGs and morphological analyses were done under light microscopy. For confirmation of CGCGs, immunocytochemistry technique was also carried out by anti-RANK (receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand) antibody. Results In both patient and control groups, β5 levels were significantly enhanced by increasing the IL-4 dose from 10 to 20 ng/mL. In addition, these differences were significant between patient and control groups without IL-4 treatment. On the other hand, the number of cells which expressed RANK and therefore the number of giant cells were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison to controls, as assessed by immunohistochemistry evaluations. Conclusions In this study, we showed an elevation in the expression levels of β5 integrin when stimulated by IL-4. It is strongly indicated that this integrin acts as an important mediator during macrophage to macrophage fusion and development of giant cells. Key words:β5 integrin, giant cell, Il-4, monocyte, rank. PMID:27918730

  6. Identification of candidate microbial sequences from inflammatory lesion of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K; Goldman, Melissa; Sandusky, Hallie; Ziv, Nurit; Hoffman, Gary S; Goodglick, Todd; Goodglick, Lee

    2004-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a granulomatous inflammatory disease of medium and large arteries which is prevalent in the elderly population. The etiology of GCA is unknown, although the immunologic features suggest the possible presence of a microorganism. Our group has examined whether microbial DNA fragments were present at GCA lesions and whether such microbial fragments could be associated with disease pathogenesis. Initial identification of microbial sequences was performed using genomic representational difference analysis (RDA). Laser dissecting microscopy was used to isolate cells from GCA lesions and adjacent uninvolved temporal artery. Using genomic RDA, we isolated 10 gene fragments; three of these sequences had high homology with prokaryotic genes and were considered high-priority candidates for further study. An examination of serum from GCA(+) individuals (in contrast to healthy age-matched controls) showed the presence of IgG which recognized in vitro translated proteins from these clones.

  7. Giant Cell Lesions of Lungs: A Histopathological and Morphometric Study of Seven Autopsy Cases

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, M.; Biligi, Dayananda S; Raghupathi, A.R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in several pathologic conditions. The exact mechanism of their generation is still unclear. MGC are a common feature of granulomas that develop during various inflammatory reactions. Aim To study the histopathological features of giant cell lesions in lungs and correlate the characteristics of giant cells with other histopathological findings. Also, to determine the utility of morphometry to differentiate foreign body and Langhans MGC. Materials and Methods Seven cases were analysed. Specimen of lungs was grossed, sectioned and processed. Routinely, tissue sections were stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Polarizing microscopy and special stains were employed in selected cases. Granulomas and MGC were counted and measured. Several other parameters like location, distribution, type and number of MGC, associated predominant inflammatory component and nature of granulomas were analysed. Results Five patterns of lesions were observed in seven cases. Aspiration pneumonia was seen in three cases (42.85%) and constituted the most common pattern. However, aspiration pneumonia as the only cause of MGC was seen in only one case (14.28%). Pulmonary tuberculosis and asteroid bodies constituted two cases (28.57%) each. Cryptococcal pneumonia and cholesterol clefts constituted one case (14.28%) each. Crypococci were demonstrated to be positively birefringent by polarized microscopy on Ziehl-Neelsen stained sections. Based on statistical analysis of morphometric data, a new index (NP index) was proposed to statistically categorize MGC into foreign body type and Langhans type. NP index value of ≤0.016 was found to be statistically significant (p<0.005) in foreign body MGC. It had high sensitivity and efficacy. Conclusion MGC may not be always associated with granulomas. The mechanisms that lead to the occurrence of MGC, independent of granuloma needs to be elucidated. Morphometry may

  8. Aggressive giant cell lesion of the jaws: a review of management options and report of a mandibular lesion treated with denosumab.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, John Edward; Bowe, Conor; Murphy, Colm; Toner, Mary; Kearns, Gerard J

    2015-11-01

    Giant cell lesions (GCLs), previously referred to as giant cell granulomas, are benign tumors of the jaws of unknown etiology. Surgical management of aggressive GCLs is challenging, as these lesions demonstrate a tendency to recur following surgical removal. In addition, surgical treatment can be associated with significant morbidity. In an attempt to reduce both the extent of morbidity and the recurrence rate following surgery, a number of pharmacologic therapies have been advocated on the basis of assumptions about the predominant cell types and receptors, for the management of these lesions. This report describes the use of denosumab, an agent originally used for its anti-resorptive effects, in the management of an aggressive GCL of the mandible in an older patient, who was unsuitable for extensive surgery and in whom treatment with intralesional triamcinolone had proved unsuccessful. Denosumab may be a viable alternative or adjunct to surgery in the management of GCLs of the jaws.

  9. A Giant-Cell Lesion with Cellular Cannibalism in the Mandible: Case Report and Review of Brown Tumors in Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Cimetti, Laura; Annoni, Matteo; Anselmi, Diego; Tettamanti, Lucia; Tagliabue, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    A small radiolucent area in the mandible was discovered in a 58-year-old woman with no oral complaints. The patient's history included only hypertension. The lesion was considered as an inflammatory cyst and was enucleated. Three months later, a CT revealed the presence of a cyst-like lesion in the mandible with thin expanded buccal cortical plate, localized erosion, and a polylobate appearance on the lingual aspect of the cortical plate. The histological diagnosis of the lesion was central giant-cell granuloma (CGCG). The lesion was thoroughly enucleated. Nevertheless, another X-ray carried out six months later revealed multiple bilateral osteolytic areas throughout the jaw. In addition, widespread cortical plate erosion was observed, as well as signs of root resorption and periodontal enlargement. There was no sign of neurological involvement, although the nerves appeared to be dislocated. After full blood chemistry analysis and detailed collection of radiographs, the final diagnosis was brown tumors in primary hyperparathyroidism. This case report demonstrates how dental clinicians may be the first-line specialists who identify a complex systemic disease before other clinicians. Finally, it highlights the role of cellular cannibalism in predicting the clinical aggressiveness of brown tumors as well as in other giant-cell lesions. PMID:28280638

  10. A Giant-Cell Lesion with Cellular Cannibalism in the Mandible: Case Report and Review of Brown Tumors in Hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Lorenzo; Cimetti, Laura; Annoni, Matteo; Anselmi, Diego; Tettamanti, Lucia; Tagliabue, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    A small radiolucent area in the mandible was discovered in a 58-year-old woman with no oral complaints. The patient's history included only hypertension. The lesion was considered as an inflammatory cyst and was enucleated. Three months later, a CT revealed the presence of a cyst-like lesion in the mandible with thin expanded buccal cortical plate, localized erosion, and a polylobate appearance on the lingual aspect of the cortical plate. The histological diagnosis of the lesion was central giant-cell granuloma (CGCG). The lesion was thoroughly enucleated. Nevertheless, another X-ray carried out six months later revealed multiple bilateral osteolytic areas throughout the jaw. In addition, widespread cortical plate erosion was observed, as well as signs of root resorption and periodontal enlargement. There was no sign of neurological involvement, although the nerves appeared to be dislocated. After full blood chemistry analysis and detailed collection of radiographs, the final diagnosis was brown tumors in primary hyperparathyroidism. This case report demonstrates how dental clinicians may be the first-line specialists who identify a complex systemic disease before other clinicians. Finally, it highlights the role of cellular cannibalism in predicting the clinical aggressiveness of brown tumors as well as in other giant-cell lesions.

  11. Detection of the Epstein-Barr virus and DNA-topoisomerase II- α in recurrent and nonrecurrent giant cell lesion of the jawbones.

    PubMed

    Zyada, Manal M; Salama, Nagla M

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II-α correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs) as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II-α using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II-α in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs) and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs). Student t-test showed that mean Topo II-α labelling index (LI) in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (P = 0.0001). Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II-α LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II-α LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II-α LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  12. Giant-cell granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Emilio; Santamarta, David; Lomas-García, Jesús; Ibáñez-Plágaro, F Javier; Fernández-Fernández, J Javier; Ariño, Teresa Ribas; García-Cosamalón, José

    2012-02-01

    Giant-cell granuloma is a benign and nonneoplastic lesion with an expansive and locally destructive behavior. It typically involves the mandible and the maxilla. Only 1 case arising from the odontoid process of the axis has been reported previously. The authors report on a 64-year-old man with a giant-cell granuloma of the axis. They review this uncommon entity, emphasizing the complexity of differentiating between this lesion and other giant-cell tumors.

  13. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  14. An eggshell-like mineralized recurrent lesion in the popliteal region after treatment of giant cell tumor of the bone with denosumab.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Keisuke; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Takagi, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Kazuo; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of recurrent giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) in which treatment with denosumab gradually enhanced the eggshell-like mineralization at the periphery of the tumor. A 28-year-old male presented with a mass on his left distal femur that had enlarged within the past few months. Before curettage, GCTB of the distal femur was diagnosed based on histological analysis of a biopsy specimen; the tumor consisted of a proliferation of ovoid mononuclear stromal cells with evenly scattered multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. The tumor recurred three times after the initial diagnosis; at the time of the third relapse, the patient underwent en bloc resection and reconstruction with a knee joint prosthesis. He was also treated with denosumab postoperatively because some studies have recently shown the benefits of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor denosumab as adjuvant therapy in patients with GCTB. Six months after starting adjuvant treatment with denosumab, radiography revealed a mineralized nodule >2 cm in diameter at the popliteal region; this lesion was considered a soft tissue recurrence of GCTB. Treatment with denosumab was continued for another 1.5 years, and the lesion was resected. Histological examination showed residual mononuclear stromal cells expressing RANKL without multinucleated giant cells surrounded by the peripheral mineralization. The patient was successfully treated by complete resection with the support of adjuvant treatment with denosumab.

  15. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  16. Giant-cell granuloma of the sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, J.T.; Weber, A.L.

    1983-04-01

    Three cases are presented which illustrate giant-cell granulomas in the maxillary, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses. The radiographic features are nonspecific, and the lesion can mimic carcinoma. Ossification can be demonstrated, especially with computed tomography, and may indicate a benign lesion.

  17. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  18. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  19. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: This enormity is a rarity.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Silvia Victor; Mitra, Dipika Kalyan; Pawar, Sudarshana Devendrasing; Vijayakar, Harshad Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant cell epulis, osteoclastoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, or giant cell hyperplasia. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen. The lesions are painless, vary in size, and may cover several teeth. It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient.

  20. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  2. Immunocytochemical study of giant cell fibroma.

    PubMed

    Campos, E; Gomez, R S

    1999-01-01

    Giant cell fibroma (GCF) is a non-neoplastic lesion of the oral mucosa. The origin of stellate and multinucleate cells of GCF is not well known. The purpose of the present article was to investigate the immunoreactivity of these cells for leukocyte common antigen, vimentin, tryptase, HLA-DR, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD68, and S-100. The results showed positive staining only for vimentin. This suggests that the stellate and multinucleate cells of GCF have a fibroblast phenotype.

  3. Imaging of giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Shaligram; Pardiwala, Dinshaw N

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive lesion generally occurring in skeletally mature individuals. Typically involving the epiphysiometaphyseal region of long bones, the most common sites include the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. On radiographs, GCT demonstrates a lytic lesion centered in the epiphysis but involving the metaphysis and extending at least in part to the adjacent articular cortex. Most are eccentric, but become symmetric and centrally located with growth. Most cases show circumscribed borders or so-called geographical destruction with no periosteal reaction unless a pathological fracture is present. There is no mineralized tumor matrix. Giant cell tumor can produce wide-ranging appearances depending on site, complications such as hemorrhage or pathological fracture and after surgical intervention. This review demonstrates a spectrum of these features and describes the imaging characteristics of GCT in conventional radiographs, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, positron emission tomography scans and angiography. PMID:21139758

  4. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion.

  5. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  6. A composite neoplastic lesion of the vulva with mixed features of fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum combined with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia containing multinucleated giant cells.

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2014-10-01

    Anogenital mammary-like glands (AGMLG) are nowadays considered a normal component of the anogenital area. Lesions affecting AGMLG are similar to those seen in breast. We present a case of a complex neoplastic lesion of the AGMLG with mixed features of fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum combined with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. Multinucleated cells were detected in the pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia areas as seen in some patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. The neoplasm is similar to rare mammary composite neoplasms that feature simultaneously patterns of a fibroepithelial neoplasms and intraductal papilloma.

  7. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Erdem, Yavuz; Gokcek, Cevdet; Koktekir, Ender; Kilic, Celal; Yasitli, Ugur; Tekiner, Ayhan

    2009-10-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign fibroosseous lesion. It typically arises in the mandible and maxilla, and less frequently in the skull bones. We report a case of GCRG of the axis, which is the first to be reported in the literature. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of pain at his neck. There was no neurological deficit. CT and MRI showed a lesion destructing the body of the axis. Biopsy specimens were taken through the transoral-transpharyngeal route. Histopathological diagnosis was GCRG. The lesion was removed subtotally by the same route. We filled the tumor cavity with a bone graft and the patient was discharged with a halo brace without any neurological deficits. The follow-up CT revealed one year after the surgery showed sclerosis at the tumor site. The etiopathogenesis of GCRG is still controversial and the differential diagnosis, especially from giant cell tumor of bone is quite difficult. The treatment of choice for these lesions is complete surgical removal. Some authors recommend radiotherapy if total removal fails.

  8. [Trochanteric bursitis, pelvic enthesopathy and giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Lorléac'h, A; Duffau, P; Michaux, C; Greib, C; Caubet, O; Viallard, J-F; Pellegrin, J-L

    2008-12-01

    Giant cell arteritis, a large-sized vessel vasculitis, may be associated with musculoskeletal proximal (polymyalgia rheumatica) or distal manifestations. A 68-year-old woman, who had inflammatory pelvic girdle pain, was diagnosed with giant cell arteritis and was successfully treated with corticosteroids. The magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed a bilateral bursitis and pelvic girdle enthesopathy. Bursitis is the main anatomic lesion occurring in polymyalgia rheumatica and can be underlined by ultrasonography.

  9. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Journal Articles Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis May 2016 Questions and Answers about Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis This publication contains general information about polymyalgia ...

  10. Giant Cell Fibroma in Children: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nikitakis, Nikolaos G.; Emmanouil, Dimitris; Maroulakos, Michail P.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Giant cell fibroma is a type of fibrous tumour of the oral mucosa which rarely affects children under the age of 10. The purpose of this paper was to contribute two clinically and histologically documented cases of giant cell fibroma in the free gingiva of a 7 and 6 year old boys. Methods Both nodules were presented in the mandibular anterior region. In the differential diagnosis several fibrous hyperplastic lesions were considered such as traumatic fibroma, papilloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, giant cell fibroma and odontogenic hamartoma. Results The lesions were removed and the histological examination revealed fibrocollagenous connective tissue with the presence of stellate giant cells which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. Conclusions Dentists should be aware of the existence of giant cell fibroma in children, which must be included in the differential diagnosis of nodular lesions of the gingiva and adequately diagnosed and treated by removal and histopathological examination. PMID:24422028

  11. Giant Cell Tumor within the Proximal Tibia after ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takashi; MacCormick, Lauren; Ellermann, Jutta; Clohisy, Denis; Marette, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    26-year-old female with prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction developed an enlarging lytic bone lesion around the tibial screw with sequential imaging over the course of one year demonstrating progression of this finding, which was confirmed histologically to be a giant cell tumor of bone. The lesion originated around the postoperative bed, making the diagnosis challenging during the early course of the presentation. The case demonstrates giant cell tumor which originated in the metaphysis and subsequently grew to involve the epiphysis; therefore, early course of the disease not involving the epiphysis should not exclude this diagnosis.

  12. Giant Cell Tumor within the Proximal Tibia after ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takashi; MacCormick, Lauren; Ellermann, Jutta; Clohisy, Denis; Marette, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    26-year-old female with prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction developed an enlarging lytic bone lesion around the tibial screw with sequential imaging over the course of one year demonstrating progression of this finding, which was confirmed histologically to be a giant cell tumor of bone. The lesion originated around the postoperative bed, making the diagnosis challenging during the early course of the presentation. The case demonstrates giant cell tumor which originated in the metaphysis and subsequently grew to involve the epiphysis; therefore, early course of the disease not involving the epiphysis should not exclude this diagnosis. PMID:26981302

  13. Reparative giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Duarte Ruiz, Blanca; Riba García, Francisco de Asís; Navarro Cuéllar, Carlos; Bucci, Tommaso; Cuesta Gil, Matías; Navarro Vila, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Reparative giant cell granulomas are benign, infrequent tumors, of non-odontogenic origin, that develop at central or peripheral level. Peripherally located lesions are frequently denominated "giant cell epulis", and never correspond to true neoplasia, but rather to inflammatory reactions secondary to another lesion (hemorrhage, etc.). It should be taken into account, that in general, head and neck tumors of infancy usually demonstrate an atypical biological behaviour. Furthermore, the anatomicopathologic diagnosis is often compromised in this type of lesion. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy, who, three weeks after suffering a slight facial trauma, developed a painless, exophytic swelling of approximately 4 cm, with bleeding on palpation, in the ipsilateral hemimaxilla. The lesion demonstrated rapid, progressive and continuous growth. The facial CT and incisional biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of reparative giant cell granuloma. The patient was surgically treated, carrying out a left marginal maxillectomy associated with the extirpation of the soft-tissue lesion. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a Bichat fat-pad providing the patient with optimal esthetic and functional results. The definitive anatomicopathologic report of the surgical piece is compatible with reparative giant cell granuloma.

  14. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  15. Central Giant Cell Granuloma: A potential endodontic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Safoura; Fouroghi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Central Giant Cell Granulomas (CGCGs) may manifest as radiolucencies anywhere in the mandible or maxilla. In rare cases, it can appear as a localized periradicular area and mimic an endodontic lesion. This case report presents an uncommon location of CGCG which was not accurately diagnosed nor timely treated. Periodic follow ups of periapical radiolucencies after RCT are necessary. Dentists should include CGCG in differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):158-60].

  16. Pediatric Upper Cervical Spine Giant Cell Tumor: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alfawareh, Mohammad D.; Shah, Irfanullah D.; Orief, Tamer I.; Halawani, Mohammad M.; Attia, Walid I.; Almusrea, Khaled N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this work is to report the case of a giant cell tumor involving the second cervical vertebra in a pediatric patient. Surgical management included a combined posterior and anterior cervical approach. There has been no recurrence in 2 years of follow-up. Case Report A 13-year-old girl presented with scoliosis with incidentally lytic lesion involving the second cervical vertebra. The radiologic investigations and biopsy result indicated a giant cell tumor of the bone. A combined posterior and anterior cervical approach was performed to resect the lesion, reconstruct the spine, and restore stability. Two years of follow-up revealed no recurrence of the lesion with stable reconstruction of the spine. Results The lesion was surgically managed for excision and spinal fusion by combining a posterior occipitocervical arthrodesis with an anterior retropharyngeal cervical approach. The final histopathology result confirmed a giant cell tumor of the bone. Conclusions Giant cell tumor involving the second cervical vertebra is uncommon; this tumor can be managed surgically by using a combined posterior and anterior cervical retropharyngeal approach. The presented case was unique in terms of the tumor location, patient age, and surgical management. PMID:26225290

  17. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma: A Review of 123 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Jafari, Shahin; Eslami, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background: Peripheral giant cell granuloma is one of the reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity, which originates from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical characteristics of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population. Methods: A series of 123 consecutive confirmed cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma after biopsy were evaluated. Age, sex, anatomic location, consistency, etiologic factor, pain and bleeding history, color, surface texture, and pedicle situation were recorded and were analyzed by chi-square test and values were considered to be significant if P < 0.05. Results: Age ranged from 6 to 75 years (mean 33 years). Women affected more than men (M/F 1:1.1). Peripheral giant cell granuloma was seen in the mandible more than in the maxilla and in the anterior region more than in the posterior region. In most cases, lesions were pink, pedunculated and had non-ulcerated surface. In less than half of the cases, there was no history of bleeding and also pain was rarely reported. Calculus was the most common etiologic factor. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the clinical features of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population are almost similar to those reported by other investigators. PMID:21528029

  18. Case report 207: Giant cell reparative granuloma of left femur arising in polyostatic fibrous dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Travers, H.; Neff, J.R.

    1982-08-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of lytic lesions in the femur are discussed. Roentgenograms, a tomogram and pathological studies of a giant cell reparative granuloma of left femur arising in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia are presented.

  19. Management of Giant cell tumor occupying the 5th metacarpal bone in 6 years old child.

    PubMed

    Al Lahham, Salim; Al Hetmi, Talal; Sharkawy, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTOB) is a relatively uncommon tumor of the bone. It is characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells. Giant-cell tumor of the bone accounts for 4-5% of primary bone tumors and ∼20% of benign bone tumors. Giant cell tumors of the hand are rare, accounting for only 2-4% of all giant cell tumors. Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bones of the hand has some special features as compared to GCT at other sites. Because of the aggressive nature of this lesion, adequate assessment of the treatment method is required. The aim is to eradicate the disease but preserve as much hand function as possible. Methods of treatment include curettage with or without bone grafts, local resection possibly combined with reconstruction using homologous or autologous bone, amputation, and resection of one or more rays.

  20. Painful scoliosis due to superposed giant cell bone tumor and aneurysmal bone cyst in a child.

    PubMed

    Togral, Guray; Arikan, Murat; Hasturk, Askin E; Gungor, Safak

    2014-07-01

    Giant cell bone tumors are the most common precursor lesions of aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) developing secondarily. In giant cell bone tumors containing an explicit ABC component, the observation of the solid component of the giant cell bone tumor plays a critical role in the separation of the primary ABC. In general, ABC cases together with giant cell tumors in the bone are diagnosed histopathologically. The combination of giant cell bone tumor with superposed ABC and that of painful scoliosis with backache is rarely seen in children. In this case study, we discussed the diagnosis and the treatment of a giant cell tumor and superposed an ABC present in the fifth lumbar spine in a pediatric patient admitted to our clinic with a complaint of acute scoliotic back pain.

  1. Multifocal Central Giant Cell Granuloma - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Tamgadge; Avinash, Tamgadge; Snehal, Dhauskar; Neha, Tiwari; Uma, Mudaliar

    2016-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a benign, aggressive neoplasm composed of multinucleated giant cells that almost exclusively occurs in the jaws though extra- gnathic incidence is rare. Multifocal CGCGs of the jaws are very rare and suggestive of systemic diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, an inherited syndrome such as Noonan- like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome or other disorders.Very few cases of multifocal CGCGs in the jaws without any concomitant systemic disease have been reported. This paper describes an unusual case reported to the Oral Surgery Department of Dr. D.Y.Patil Dental College & Hospital, Nerul, Navi-Mumbai in 2014 in a 45-year-old male with multifocal central giant cell granuloma involving maxilla and mandible. The serum alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphorus levels were within the normal limits. After complete clinical examination hyperparathyroidism and clinical characteristic of any syndromes such as Noonan-like syndrome and neurofibromatosis were ruled out. Thus this paper reports a non-syndromic multifocal central giant cell granuloma. PMID:27799978

  2. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis in childhood: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Sultan; Akçan, Ramazan; Heybet, Eyup Ruşen; Cavlak, Mehmet; Pehlivan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is a rare entity of unknown origin, which causes sudden death in more than half of the affected patients. It is rarely seen in childhood, and might result in death due to heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is mostly diagnosed at autopsy incidentally. Here we present a rare case of childhood idiopathic giant cell myocarditis. A 10-year old boy found dead in his bed in the morning. Interview with family members revealed death the boy was in good health conditions apart from being overweight. At autopsy, external examination was completely normal. Internal examination revealed normal findings; the heart was 297g and macroscopically normal. No traces of any toxic agents detected in complete toxicological analyses. Areas characterized with granulomatous lesions, lymphocytes, histiocytes, and multinucleated giant cells were observed in myocardium at histopathological examination. No necrosis was observed in granulomatous areas. Tuberculosis was negative in the PCR assays. There were no signs indicative of fungal infection, and clinical status of the case was not compatible with the sarcoidosis. In this respect death was attributed to idiopathic giant cell myocarditis.

  3. Immunohistochemical characterization of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M B; Altermatt, H J; Scheithauer, B W; Shepherd, C W; VandenBerg, S R

    1996-01-01

    cell types and to varying degrees within their processes. Neurofilament protein and calbindin staining was present in 8 tumors, with reactivity for the former being distributed in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. MAP2 was detected in a few cells of two tumors. Immunoreactivity for neuropeptides was observed in 17 lesions. Somatostatin and metenkephalin staining was noted in 10 tumors (50%) being present particularly within polygonal cells. Neuropeptide Y, serotonin and Beta-endorphin reactivity was found in 6 (30%), 5 (25%), and 4 tumors (20%), respectively; Beta-endorphin was lacking in giant cells, whereas neuropeptide Y and serotonin were seen within their cell bodies. Substance P and VIP were evident in only occasional polygonal cells of 2 (10%) and 1 tumor (5%), respectively. Stains for cholecystokinin were negative. The observation of immunoreactivity for both glial- and neuron-associated epitopes within tumor cells of the same morphology suggests that SEGAs represent proliferations of cell lineages with the capacity to undergo divergent glioneuronal as well as neuroendocrine differentiation to a greater extent than do other mixed glial-neuronal neoplasms.

  4. Virus-associated papillomatous skin lesions in a giant guitarfish Rhynchobatus djiddensis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camus, Alvin; Dill, Jennifer; McDermott, Alexa; Camus, Melinda; Fan Ng, Terry Fei

    2016-01-13

    Although elasmobranch species are increasingly displayed in public aquaria, knowledge of disease in wild and captive elasmobranchs, as well as the agents involved, remains limited, and descriptions are often incomplete. This report describes papillomatous skin lesions in a juvenile giant guitarfish Rhynchobatus djiddensis associated with intranuclear viral particles. Skin biopsies were collected from multiple, friable, raised, villonodular skin lesions affecting pigmented and non-pigmented skin of the caudal fin and ventrum, respectively. Microscopic examination revealed papillary proliferation of the epidermis, with widespread marked karyomegaly of squamous epithelial cells. In approximately 75% of nuclei, chromatin was marginated by one to multiple, large, amphophilic inclusions. Large numbers of unencapsulated, 75 nm, icosahedral viral particles were observed to form large arrays in affected nuclei using transmission electron microscopy. Based on intranuclear location, particle size and morphology, a consensus nested-PCR for adenovirus polymerase was attempted. However, no adenoviral gene sequence was amplified. The nature of the involved virus remains unknown and an ongoing area of investigation. Lesions regressed completely over a 6 mo period, during which time the animal showed no signs of systemic illness, and there has been no recrudescence for 6 mo following resolution. Two cohorts of similar age and in close contact with the case animal were unaffected.

  5. Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; S., Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults. The patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless a cardiac transplantation is performed. We are reporting here an autopsy case of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis with no symptoms in a 27-year old -worker who died suddenly. The purpose of this report was to emphasize that idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was a rare disease and that it could exist in the absence of any symptomatic heart disease. PMID:23205365

  6. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, AK; Nath, R; Mishra, MP

    2007-01-01

    Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31), followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21), distal end of radius(n=14), upper end of fibula (n=9), proximal end of femur(n=5), upper end of the humerus(n=3), iliac bone(n=2), phalanx (n=2) and spine(n=1). The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4) and metatarsal(n=1). Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases. Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice. The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction. PMID:21139762

  7. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-07-07

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness.

  8. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Aralasmak, A; Aygun, N; Westra, W H; Yousem, D M

    2006-09-01

    We present 2 patients with giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the sphenoid bone. The first patient is an 8-year-old boy with involvement of the greater wing, and the second is a 53- year-old man with a lateral pterygoid plate mass. Both patients presented with rapid expansion of lytic bone lesions, which had solid and cystic components and lacked matrix calcification. Biopsies were indeterminate for definitive diagnoses. The radiologic appearance, location, and incidence of the lesions, and the patient's age and medical history are helpful aids in narrowing the differential diagnosis of sphenoid bone lesions. However, the imaging and, occasionally, even the histologic findings may not suggest the specific diagnosis of GCRG, which must be added into the differential diagnosis of rapidly enlarging cystic bone lesions of the sphenoid bone.

  9. CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF THE JAWS AND GIANT CELL TUMOR OF LONG BONES - AN IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL COMPARATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Maria do Socorro; Piva, Marta Rabello; Nonaka, Cassiano Francisco Weege; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lélia Batista; Pinto, Leão Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated whether some components of the extracellular matrix and CD68 expression may drive the differences between the central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the jaws and giant cell tumor (GCT) of long bones, which present distinct evolution and clinical behavior. Material and Methods: Eight cases of CGCG and 7 cases of GCT were selected and immunohistochemically analyzed to verify the pattern of expression of CD68, tenascin (Tn) and fibronectin (Fn). Results: A large number of the mononuclear cells and multinucleated giant cells CD68+ was observed in both of the studied lesions, indicating histiocyte/macrophage origin. Seven cases of CGCG of the jaws showed intense staining of Fn, with uniform distribution predominantly. In all 7 cases of GCT of long bones the Fn displayed intense expression, with distribution pattern varying from uniform to reticulate/fibrillar. Six cases of CGCG were intensively stained by Tn, presenting focal expression in half of specimens, and reticulate/fibrillar pattern of expression in 4 cases. All cases of GCT of the long bones presented intense expression of Tn, uniform distribution, and reticulate/fibrillar pattern of expression in four cases. Conclusions: The immunoexpression of CD68 in mononuclear cells and multinucleated giant cells and staining patterns of Fn and Tn were similar in both entities. These findings indicate that these proteins could not be used to explain the differences between the CGCG of the jaws and GCT of the long bones. PMID:19089150

  10. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  11. Rare Giant Cell Tumor of Olecranon Bone!!!!

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Pawan; Gautam, Vishal; Saini, Narender; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a bone tumor involving epiphyseal area of bone abutting the subchondral bone. Commonly found in long bones such as proximal tibia and distal femur. We report a case of GCT of olecranon bone in a 23-year-old male. Case Report: A 23-year-old patient presented to our outpatient department with pain and mild swelling at the elbow from last 2 to 3 months. On examination, it was seen that there was a moderate swelling at the tip of the olecranon. The magnetic resonance imaging reported a lytic lesion in the olecranon but sparing the coronoid process of the ulna, the biopsy report confirmed that histologically it was a GCT of the bone. Total excision of the tumor was done after lifting the aponeurosis of the triceps muscle. The area remaining after excision of the tumor was phenol cauterized and cleaned with hydrogen peroxide solution. Triceps was reinserted on the remaining ulna. At follow-up the radiographs showed adequate excision of the tumor. The patient gained a full range of movement at the elbow and was functionally restored. There were no signs of any systemic spread of the tumor. Conclusion: GCT though a very common bone tumor could be missed if present in atypical locations. Radiographically soap bubble appearance might not be present in every case, and there could be multiple diagnoses for lytic lesion in bone. Proper investigations and histopathological examination are necessary for accurate diagnosis and further treatment planning. Early treatment helps in complete excision of tumor along with return of adequate function of the patient. PMID:28164048

  12. Giant Cell Fibroma in a Two-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Bonini, Gabriela Azevedo Vasconcelos Cunha; Del Conte Zardetto, Cristina Giovannetti; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2016-01-01

    The giant cell fibroma is a benign nonneoplastic fibrous tumor of the oral mucosa. It occurs in the first three decades of life in the mandibular gingiva, predominantly, showing predilection for females. This article reports a case of giant cell fibroma in a 2-year-old girl, which is an uncommon age for this lesion. The patient was brought for treatment at the Research and Clinical Center of Dental Trauma in Primary Teeth, where practice for the Discipline of Pediatric Dentistry (Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil) takes place. During clinical examination, a tissue growth was detected on the lingual gingival mucosa of the lower right primary incisors teeth. The lesion was excised under local anesthesia and submitted to histological examination at the Oral Pathology Department of the Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. There was no recurrence after 20 months of monitoring. This instance reinforces the importance of oral care from the very first months of life in order to enable doctors to make precocious diagnosis and offer more appropriate treatments for oral diseases, as well as to promote more efficient oral health in the community. PMID:27822394

  13. Sunspots and Giant-Cell Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Ed J.

    2000-01-01

    From analysis of Doppler velocity images from SOHO/MDI, Hathaway et al (2000, Solar Phys., in press) have found clear evidence for giant convection cells that fill the solar surface, have diameters 3 - 10 times that typical of supergranules, and have lifetimes approx. greater than 10 days. Analogous to the superposition of the granular convection on the supergranular convection, the approx. 30,000 km diameter supergranules are superposed on these still larger giant cells. Because the giant cells make up the large-scale end of a continuous power spectrum that peaks at the size scale of supergranules, it appears that the giant cells are made by the same mode of convection as the supergranules. This suggests that the giant cells are similar to supergranules, just longer-lived, larger in diameter, and deeper. Here we point out that the range of lengths of large bipolar sunspot groups is similar to the size range of giant cells. This, along with the long lives (weeks) of large sunspots, suggests that large sunspots sit in long-lived, deep downflows at the corners of giant cells, and that the distance from leader to follower sunspots in large bipolar groups is the distance from one giant-cell corner to the next. By this line of reasoning, an unusually large and strong downdraft might pull in both legs of a rising spot-group magnetic flux loop, resulting in the formation of a delta sunspot. This leads us to suggest that a large, strong giant-cell corner downdraft should be present at the birthplaces of large delta sunspots for some time (days to weeks) before the birth. Thus, early detection of such downdrafts by local helioscismology might provide an early warning for the formation of those active regions (large delta sunspot groups) that produce the Sun's most violent flares and coronal mass ejections. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Solar Physics Branch of its Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  14. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  15. Correlation of Histopathologic Features with Demographic, Gross and Radiographic Findings in Giant Cell Granulomas of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Aghbali, Amirala; Sina, Mahmood; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi; Emamverdizadeh, Parya; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Mahmoudi, Seyyed Mostafa; Janani, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. The correlation between morphology of giant cells in peripheral granulomas of the jaws and the aggressive behavior of the lesion is unknown. This study investigated the correlation between the histopathologic features with demographic, gross and radiographic findings in giant cell granulomas. Materials and methods. In this analytical study, data from 23 cases of central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and 42 cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) were analyzed, focusing on age, gender, location, and gross and radiographic features. For each patient, microscopic slides were assessed in terms of histologic features of giant cells and stroma. Results. No significant differences were found in the mean number of nuclei or the size of nuclei and giant cell distribution patterns between the jaws and genders in both lesions (P >0.05). Correlation between the mean number of nuclei and age was positively significant and correlation between the size of nuclei and age was negatively significant (P < 0.05). In addition, correlation between the mean number and size of nuclei and the size of the lesion was significant (P < 0.05). Correlation between stroma and aggressiveness of CGCGs was not statistically significant. Correlation between histopathologic features and radiographic findings was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There were correlations between the mean number of nuclei per giant cell and the size of the lesion and age, and between the size of nuclei and size of the lesion. No relation was observed between histopathologic and radiographic features. PMID:24578821

  16. Giant cell granuloma of the maxilla. Global management, review of literature and case report

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Solo de Zaldívar, Damián; González-García, Raúl; Ruíz-Laza, Luís; Villanueva-Alcojol, Laura; González-Ballester, David; Hernández Vila, Cristina; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell granuloma is a relatively rare benign entity but can be locally aggressive. Histologically characterized by intense proliferation of multinucleated giant cells and fibroblasts. Affects bone supported tissues. Definitive diagnosis is given by biopsy. Clinically manifest as a mass or nodule of reddish color and fleshy, occasionally ulcerated surface. They can range from asymptomatic to destructive lesions that grow quickly. It is a lesion to be considered in the differential diagnosis of osteolytic lesions affecting the maxilla or jaw. Its management passed from conservative treatment with intralesional infiltration of corticosteroids, calcitonin or interferon, to the surgical resection and reconstruction, for example with microvascular free flaps. Key words:Giant cell granuloma, intralesional injection, microvascular free flap, fibula. PMID:24558538

  17. [Giant cell arteritis--case report].

    PubMed

    Napora, Katarzyna J; Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2008-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic disease of unknown origin. Vasculitis involves large and medium-sized vessels. Frequent clinical manifestations include characteristic headache in the temporal area, jaw or tongue claudication, apathy, fatigue, weight loss. The incidence of ocular involvement is reported in up to 70% patients. The most common and serious ophthalmic presentation is arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, which can lead to irreversible visual loss. Only early and aggressive steroid therapy may prevent this dangerous complication. The authors presented a case of a 68-years-old woman with giant cell arteritis. The main visual manifestation of this disease was anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

  18. What Are Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... permanently damaged. There is also a risk of blindness or stroke. Early symptoms of giant cell arteritis ... giant cell arteritis are more likely to develop blindness. The likelihood of getting these conditions peaks between ...

  19. Giant cell angiofibroma of the oral cavity: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Cleverton Roberto; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; León, Jorge Esquiche; Mistro, Florence; Kignel, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Giant cell angiofibroma is a well-circumscribed, normally encapsulated, distinctive orbital soft tissue tumor. However, it is now recognized that this lesion can also present in other locations, including the oral cavity. The morphological hallmark is a richly vascularized, patternless spindle cell proliferation containing pseudovascular spaces and floret-type multinucleate giant cells. CD34 immunoreactivity, although not specific, represents the only immunohistochemical finding of potential diagnostic value. We present a case of a 44-year-old male Caucasian patient complaining of painless solitary nodule arising on the right buccal mucosa, which was diagnosed as giant cell angiofibroma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case of oral giant cell angiofibroma reported in the English-language literature.

  20. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  1. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  2. Radiological and Histopathological Outcome of Giant Cell Tumor of Femur with Denosumab Treatment: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R.; Jojo, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumour of Bone (GCTB) is a benign but locally aggressive osteolytic skeletal neoplasm of young adults consisting of giant cells expressing RANK (Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB) and mesenchymal spindle-like stromal cells expressing RANKL (RANK ligand). The interaction of these cells leads to bone resorption. Recently, the RANKL inhibitor, denosumab, has demonstrated activity against giant-cell tumours. The current article reports a case of a Giant cell tumour of left distal femur with pathological fracture. A 34-year-old male patient presented with history of on and off dull aching pain in the left knee for 4 months followed by a history of trivial fall. He sustained a closed injury in the left knee, following which he was unable to bear weight and developed pain and swelling in left knee. Conventional radiographs and Computerized tomography (CT) was done which showed the presence of a left distal femoral osteolytic lesion and a histological analysis of a biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of GCTB. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant denosumab therapy which resulted in successful downstaging of the tumour followed by extended curettage of the lesion with high speed burr and argon laser cautery. The post-curettage microscopic examination revealed the absence of osteoclast-type giant cells. PMID:28208958

  3. [Giant cell tumours in a pyramidal bone: a clinical case and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Santiago, M M; González-Arteaga, J; Hidalgo-Ovejero, A M

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) of the bone are benign, but locally invasive tumours. We present a new case of carpus GCT, involving the triquetrum. The diagnosis required a prior biopsy before doing the block resection. This treatment is the best option to avoid recurrences. We review the literature on this particular lesion in the carpus bone.

  4. Giant metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bognet, Rachel; Thompson, Christina; Campanelli, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with a rapidly growing, asymptomatic mass on his left mid-back for the past 3 months. The patient's medical history revealed an intentional 60-pound weight loss over the previous 2 years along with smoking approximately 1 pack of cigarettes per day. On physical examination, a fungating, 11-cm red tumor with palpable broader underlying extension (23 cm total) was present on the left mid-back with distinct red dermal nodules in a dermatomal distribution. In close proximity were two ulcerated nodules, proven histologically to be basal cell carcinomas. In the left groin was massive, fixed lymphadenopathy. A punch biopsy of the tumor was performed, which showed a dense infiltrate of small, round hyperchromatic blue cells that stained positive for CD 56 and pancytokeratin in a perinuclear dot pattern. Tumor cells were negative for CK20, TTF, CK7, and LCA.

  5. Denosumab-treated Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Exhibits Morphologic Overlap With Malignant Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, John; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Bredella, Miriam A; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Nielsen, G Petur; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a locally aggressive benign neoplasm characterized by an abundance of osteoclastic giant cells that are induced by the neoplastic mononuclear cells; the latter express high levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor, which is clinically used to treat GCT, leads to a marked alteration in the histologic appearance of the tumor with giant cell depletion and new bone deposition, leading to substantial histologic overlap with other primary tumors of bone. Most significantly, denosumab-treated GCT (tGCT) with abundant bone deposition may mimic de novo osteosarcoma, or GCT that has undergone malignant transformation. To histologically characterize tGCT, we identified 9 cases of GCT biopsied or resected after denosumab treatment. tGCT cases included 16 specimens from 9 patients including 6 female and 3 male individuals aged 16 to 47 (median 32) years. Duration of treatment varied from 2 to 55 months. We compared these tumors with malignant neoplasms arising in GCTs (n=9). The histology of tGCT was variable but appeared to relate to the length of therapy. All tGCTs showed marked giant cell depletion. Early lesions were highly cellular, and the combination of cellularity, atypia, and haphazard bone deposition caused the lesion to resemble high-grade osteosarcoma. Unlike de novo high-grade osteosarcoma or malignancies arising in GCT, however, tGCT showed less severe atypia, reduced mitotic activity, and lack of infiltrative growth pattern. Tumor in patients on prolonged therapy showed decreased cellularity and abundant new bone, deposited as broad, rounded cords or long, curvilinear arrays. The latter morphology was reminiscent of low-grade central osteosarcoma, but, unlike low-grade central osteosarcoma, tGCT was negative for MDM2 and again lacked an infiltrative growth pattern. Overall, tGCT may have a wide range of morphologic appearances. Because the treated tumors bear little

  6. Recurrent multilocular mandibular giant cell granuloma in neurofibromatosis type 1: Evidence for second hit mutation of NF1 gene in the jaw lesion and treatment with curettage and bone substitute materials.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Grob, Tobias J; Hollants, Silke; Zustin, Jozef; Spaepen, Marijke; Mautner, Victor F; Luebke, Andreas M; Hagel, Christian; Legius, Eric; Brems, Hilde

    2016-08-01

    Giant cell granuloma (GCG) of the jaw is a rare, well-known feature of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), an inborn multisystem disorder. Recently, the development of GCG in NF1 was attributed to second hit mutations in the NF1 gene. The treatment of GCG is pragmatic with a preference for local curettage of lytic osseous areas. This report describes the surgical therapy of an NF1-affected female with multilocular mandibular GCG and hypodontia who additionally suffered from a brain tumour and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Although local recurrence of GCG was noted, augmentation of the curetted cavities with a bone substitute in successive interventions successfully restored the extensive periradicular local defects and stabilised the teeth. A meticulous in vitro study of the GCG specimen revealed a second hit mutation in the NF1 gene in the GCG spindle-cells. This study contributes to the increasing knowledge of the molecular basis for GCG in the jaw of NF1 patients, indicating that it is a neoplasm.

  7. Giant kidney worms in a patient with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Jemima; Lombardo, Lindsay; Janda, William M; Hollowell, Courtney M P

    2016-03-07

    Dioctophyma renale (D. renale), or giant kidney worms, are the largest nematodes that infect mammals. Approximately 20 cases of human infection have been reported. We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a recent history of unintentional weight loss and painless haematuria, passing elongated erythematous tissue via his urethra. CT revealed a left renal mass with pulmonary nodules and hepatic lesions. On microscopy, the erythematous tissue passed was identified as D. renale. On subsequent renal biopsy, pathology was consistent with renal cell carcinoma. This is the first reported case of concomitant D. renale infection and renal cell carcinoma, and the second reported case of D. renale infection of the left kidney alone.

  8. The clinical approach toward giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Dijkstra, P D Sander; van de Sande, Michiel A J; Kroep, Judith R; Nout, Remi A; van Rijswijk, Carla S P; Bovée, Judith V M G; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Gelderblom, Hans

    2014-05-01

    We provide an overview of imaging, histopathology, genetics, and multidisciplinary treatment of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), an intermediate, locally aggressive but rarely metastasizing tumor. Overexpression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) by mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells promotes recruitment of numerous reactive multinucleated giant cells. Conventional radiographs show a typical eccentric lytic lesion, mostly located in the meta-epiphyseal area of long bones. GCTB may also arise in the axial skeleton and very occasionally in the small bones of hands and feet. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to evaluate the extent of GCTB within bone and surrounding soft tissues to plan a surgical approach. Curettage with local adjuvants is the preferred treatment. Recurrence rates after curettage with phenol and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA; 8%-27%) or cryosurgery and PMMA (0%-20%) are comparable. Resection is indicated when joint salvage is not feasible (e.g., intra-articular fracture with soft tissue component). Denosumab (RANKL inhibitor) blocks and bisphosphonates inhibit GCTB-derived osteoclast resorption. With bisphosphonates, stabilization of local and metastatic disease has been reported, although level of evidence was low. Denosumab has been studied to a larger extent and seems to be effective in facilitating intralesional surgery after therapy. Denosumab was recently registered for unresectable disease. Moderate-dose radiotherapy (40-55 Gy) is restricted to rare cases in which surgery would lead to unacceptable morbidity and RANKL inhibitors are contraindicated or unavailable.

  9. Pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis: new insight into the implication of CD161+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Samson, M; Audia, S; Martin, L; Janikashvili, N; Bonnotte, B

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a granulomatous large-vessel vasculitis that usually affects the aorta and/or its major branches, especially the branches of the carotid arteries. Histo-pathological lesions are observed in all layers of the artery leading to segmental and focal panarteritis with a polymorphic cell infiltrate that includes T cells, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells, a fragmented internal elastic lamina and intimal hyperplasia. The pathophysiology of GCA is complex and not fully understood. In this review, we discuss the immunological aspects of GCA pathogenesis with a particular emphasis on T cell responses. Upon dendritic cell activation in the adventitia, CD4 T cells co-expressing CD161 are recruited in the arterial wall and polarised into Th1 and Th17 cells that produce IFN-γ and IL-17, respectively. These cytokines activate macrophages, giant cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, thus inducing vascular remodelling which leads to the ischaemic manifestations of GCA. Macrophages infiltrating the adventitia produce IL-1β and IL-6, which are responsible for the general symptoms encountered in GCA.

  10. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy. PMID:27795755

  11. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  13. Usefulness of immunosuppression for giant cell myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie T; Hare, Joshua M; Tazelaar, Henry D; Edwards, William D; Starling, Randall C; Deng, Mario C; Menon, Santosh; Mullen, G Martin; Jaski, Brian; Bailey, Kent R; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Dec, G William

    2008-12-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a rare and highly lethal disorder. The only multicenter case series with treatment data lacked cardiac function assessments and had a retrospective design. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study of immunosuppression including cyclosporine and steroids for acute, microscopically-confirmed GCM. From June 1999 to June 2005 in a standard protocol, 11 subjects received high dose steroids and cyclosporine, and 9 subjects received muromonab-CD3. In these, 7 of 11 were women, the mean age was 60 +/- 15 years, and the mean time from symptom onset to presentation was 27 +/- 33 days. During 1 year of treatment, 1 subject died of respiratory complications on day 178, and 2 subjects received heart transplantations on days 2 and 27, respectively. Serial endomyocardial biopsies revealed that after 4 weeks of treatment the degree of necrosis, cellular inflammation, and giant cells decreased (p = 0.001). One patient who completed the trial subsequently died of a fatal GCM recurrence after withdrawal of immunosuppression. Her case demonstrates for the first time that there is a risk of recurrent, sometimes fatal, GCM after cessation of immunosuppression. In conclusion, this prospective study of immunosuppression for GCM confirms retrospective case reports that such therapy improves long-term survival. Additionally, withdrawal of immunosuppression can be associated with fatal GCM recurrence.

  14. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high).

  15. The central giant cell granuloma in childhood: clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Adriano Mota; Fernandes, Alexandre Vieira; Magalhaes, Aparecido Onorio; Moreira, Marilia Rodrigues

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews the literature involving the central giant cell granuloma. Diagnosis and treatment are presented. The article reports the case of central giant cell granuloma, affecting the anterior region maxillary of a child, whom a conservative treatment, with cryotherapy, helped the preservation of anterior permanent teeth germs.

  16. Giant cell tumor of the greater wing of the sphenoid: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Andrés Coca; Llorente Pendás, José L; Rodrigo Tapia, Juan P; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    We report a very unusual presentation of giant cell tumor probably originated on the greater wing of the sphenoid and show a review about the knowledge and the treatment of the lesion in this rare localization. We treated a 48-year-old man with a giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa. He presented with a right-side hearing loss and facial pain. The tumor was resected by means of a subtemporal-preauricular approach, and after 12 months of follow-up, the patient is free of recurrence. Giant cell tumors of the skull base are an extremely rare neoplasm, and there is not much information on the literature about the treatment and the prognostic. Wide resection ought to be made, and at the follow-up, the clinician must try to diagnose not only local recurrence but also the possibility of distant metastases to the lung.

  17. Disappearance of giant cells and presence of newly formed bone in the pulmonary metastasis of a sacral giant-cell tumor following denosumab treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Tetsuro; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Ogose, Akira; Sasaki, Taro; Hotta, Tetsuo; Inagawa, Shoichi; Umezu, Hajime; Endo, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    A giant-cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a benign but locally aggressive bone tumor. Recently, the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) ligand inhibitor, denosumab, has demonstrated activity against giant-cell tumors. The current study reports a case of a sacral GCTB with lung metastasis. A 19-year-old male patient presented with right buttock pain and right lower leg pain, and a sacral GCTB was diagnosed based on the histological analysis of a biopsy specimen. The patient was successfully treated with neoadjuvant denosumab therapy, which allowed curettage. In addition, the pulmonary nodule reduced in size following denosumab administration, and surgical resection was performed. Since the operation, the patient has been managed with the continued use of denosumab with no sign of recurrence. Microscopic findings from the surgical specimen following denosumab treatment revealed that the giant cells had disappeared and woven bone had formed. The specimen from the pulmonary nodule exhibited similar findings to the surgical specimen. It was reported that denosumab treatment was able to reduce the number of giant cells and RANK-positive stromal cells, and cause the formation of new bone in the primary lesion. The present study reports the first case to demonstrate the efficiency of denosumab in treating pulmonary metastasis of GCTB.

  18. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour (GCT)-A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Anshu; Murgod, Gururaj; Korlhalli, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    Giant Cell Tumours (GCT) of bone account for 5% of all primary bone tumours. Multicentric variety is a rare variant of this condition, accounting for less than 1% of all cases and can occur as synchronous or metachronous lesions. We report a 22-year-old male patient with 18 months history of painful progressive swellings around the right knee. Radiographs revealed expansile lytic lesions in the distal femur, proximal tibia and fibula and core needle biopsy was typical of GCT. Biochemical parameters were normal and radiological investigations did not reveal any metastasis. The patient was treated by above knee amputation due to the extensive nature of the tumours. The excised tissue from all sites had features of giant cell tumor with no atypia or malignant cells seen. The patient is free from recurrence or metastasis at three years follow up.

  19. [Giant cell tumor of the C2 colonized by an aneurismal bone cyst. Report of case].

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Boujan, F; Beaujeux, R; Boyer, P; Froelich, S

    2012-12-01

    Giant cell tumor is colonized by aneurismal bone cyst in only 15% of cases and cervical localisation accounts for less than 1% of giant cell tumors. We are reporting a rare case of a C2 hypervascularized giant cell tumor colonized by an aneurismal bone cyst treated with an effective preoperative Onyx embolization followed by a full tumor resection. The patient experienced a moderate cervical spine injury 2 months prior admission followed by a progressive stiff neck and cervicalgia. CT and MRI identified a lytic lesion of the body and lateral masses of the C2 with encasement of both vertebral arteries. The angiography showed a hypervascularization of the lesion from the vertebral and external carotid arteries as well as a thrombosis of the V3 segment of the right vertebral artery at the C1 level. A posterior occipito-C3/C4 fixation and a tumor biopsy were performed. Histopathological examination concluded to a giant cell tumor colonized by an aneurismal bone cyst. Three weeks later, the patient developed a right upper extremity deficit. The MRI showed an increased C1-C2 stenosis and an increase of the hypervascularization. Three sessions of embolization by the onyx were performed. During surgery a near total tumor devascularisation was observed and a complete resection of the tumor was achieved through an anterolateral approach. Reconstruction consisted of a cementoplasty of the C2 body and odontoïd process with an anterior C3-prosthesis plate. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  20. The Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in Edentulous Patients: Report of Three Unique Cases

    PubMed Central

    Etoz, Osman A.; Demirbas, Ahmet Emin; Bulbul, Mehmet; Akay, Ebru

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a rare reactive exophytic lesion taking place on the gingiva and alveolar ridge usually as a result of local irritating factors such as trauma, tooth extraction, badly finished fillings, unstable dental prosthesis, plaque, calculus, chronic infections, and impacted food. This article presents 3 cases of PGCG that presented at the same location of the edentulous mandible of patients that using complete denture for over ten years. PMID:20613923

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated with a giant cell tumor: One case in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ouzaa, M R; Bennis, A; Iken, M; Abouzzahir, A; Boussouga, M; Jaafar, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism can present itself as brown tumors (or osteolytic expansive lesions) that usually disappear after normalization of calcium and phosphate levels. It rarely occurs simultaneously with a giant cell tumor. The authors report one case of a localized form at the distal radius in a patient being followed for primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnostic challenges related to the clinical and radiological similarities of these two pathological entities are discussed, as they can lead to delays in therapeutic management.

  2. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  3. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Rishi; Arunprasath, P.; Padmavathy, L.; Srivenkateswaran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma (AEGCG) is a rare granulomatous skin disease characterized clinically by annular plaques with elevated borders and atrophic centers found mainly on sun-exposed skin and histologically by diffuse granulomatous infiltrates composed of multinucleated giant cells, histiocytes and lymphocytes in the dermis along with phagocytosis of elastic fibers by multinucleated giant cells. We report a case of AEGCG in a 50-year-old woman and is highlighted for the classical clinical and histological findings of the disease and its rare co-existence with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. PMID:27057492

  4. Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a patient with baboon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khelifa-Hamdani, Elhem; Touati-Serraj, Monia; Perriard, Jacqueline; Chavaz, Pierre; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Kaya, Gürkan

    2008-10-01

    Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis is a recently described pathological entity, which can be seen as an unusual lichenoid drug eruption, a manifestation of sarcoidosis or within herpes zoster scars. Histopathological findings include focal vacuolar alteration of the basal layer with cytoid bodies, dermal and intraepidermal multinucleated giant cells and a mixed chronic inflammatory infiltrate with a lichenoid pattern consisting of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and plasma cells. Here, we report a giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a 41-year-old male patient who developed, 3 days after intravenous treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for erysipelas of the left leg, a clinical picture suggesting a baboon syndrome characterized by an erythematous and pruritic eruption on the axillary, inguinal and popliteal areas and the anterior side of elbows. This is the first reported case of giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a patient with baboon syndrome.

  5. Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates in Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Astrid; Younge, Brian R.; Szweda, Luke; Mock, Bettina; Björnsson, Johannes; Moeller, Kerstin; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2002-01-01

    Arterial wall damage in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is mediated by several different macrophage effector functions, including the production of metalloproteinases and lipid peroxidation. Tissue-invading macrophages also express nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-2, but it is not known whether nitric oxide-related mechanisms contribute to the disease process. Nitric oxide can form nitrating agents, including peroxynitrite, a nitric oxide congener formed in the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates. Protein nitration selectively targets tyrosine residues and can result in a gain, as well as a loss, of protein function. Nitrated tyrosine residues in GCA arteries were detected almost exclusively on endothelial cells of newly formed microcapillaries in the media, whereas microvessels in the adventitia and the intima were spared. Nitration correlated with endothelial NOS-3 expression and not with NOS-2-producing macrophages, which preferentially homed to the hyperplastic intima. The restriction of nitration to the media coincided with the production of reactive oxygen intermediates as demonstrated by the presence of the toxic aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal. Depletion of tissue-infiltrating macrophages in human temporal artery-SCID mouse chimeras disrupted nitrotyrosine generation, demonstrating a critical role of macrophages in the nitration process that targeted medial microvessels. Thus, protein nitration in GCA is highly compartmentalized, reflecting the production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen intermediates in the inflamed arterial wall. Heterogeneity of microvessels in NOS-3 regulation may be an additional determinant contributing to this compartmentalization and could explain the preferential targeting of newly generated capillary beds. PMID:12107096

  6. Evaluation of mast cell counts and microvessel density in reactive lesions of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Tahamtan, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable immunohistochemical assays to assess the definitive role of mast cells (MCs) and angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of oral reactive lesions are generally not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mast cell counts (MCC) and microvessel density (MVD) in oral reactive lesions and determine the correlation between MCC and MVD. Methods. Seventy-five cases of reactive lesions of the oral cavity, including pyogenic granuloma, fibroma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, peripheral ossifying fibroma (15 for each category) were immunohisto-chemically stained with MC tryptase and CD31. Fifteen cases of normal gingival tissue were considered as the control group. The mean MCC and MVD in superficial and deep connective tissues were assessed and total MCC and MVD was computed for each lesion. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in MCC and MVD between the study groups (P < 0.001). MC tryptase and CD31 expression increased in the superficial connective tissue of each lesion in comparison to the deep con-nective tissue. A significant negative correlation was not found between MCC and MVD in oral reactive lesions (P < 0.001, r = -0.458). Conclusion. Although MCs were present in the reactive lesions of the oral cavity, a direct correlation between MCC and MVD was not found in these lesions. Therefore, a significant interaction between MCs and endothelial cells and an active role for MCs in the growth of oral reactive lesions was not found in this study. PMID:28096950

  7. Paroxysmal hemicrania as the clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Beams, Jennifer L; Rozen, Todd D

    2011-09-28

    Head pain is the most common complaint in patients with giant cell arteritis but the headache has no distinct diagnostic features. There have been no published reports of giant cell arteritis presenting as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. We describe a patient who developed a new onset headache in her fifties, which fit the diagnostic criteria for paroxysmal hemicrania and was completely responsive to corticosteroids. Removal of the steroid therapy brought a reemergence of her headaches. Giant cell arteritis should be considered in the evaluation of secondary causes of paroxysmal hemicrania; in addition giant cell arteritis needs to be ruled out in patients who are over the age of 50 years with a new onset trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

  8. Paroxysmal hemicrania as the clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Beams, Jennifer L.; Rozen, Todd D.

    2011-01-01

    Head pain is the most common complaint in patients with giant cell arteritis but the headache has no distinct diagnostic features. There have been no published reports of giant cell arteritis presenting as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. We describe a patient who developed a new onset headache in her fifties, which fit the diagnostic criteria for paroxysmal hemicrania and was completely responsive to corticosteroids. Removal of the steroid therapy brought a reemergence of her headaches. Giant cell arteritis should be considered in the evaluation of secondary causes of paroxysmal hemicrania; in addition giant cell arteritis needs to be ruled out in patients who are over the age of 50 years with a new onset trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. PMID:24765352

  9. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue arising in breast.

    PubMed

    May, Steve A; Deavers, Michael T; Resetkova, Erika; Johnson, Deborah; Albarracin, Constance T

    2007-10-01

    Primary giant cell tumor of soft tissue (GCT-ST) arising in breast is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman with a primary breast giant cell tumor that appeared histologically identical to giant cell tumor of bone and had a clinically malignant course. The patient presented with a cystic mass of the breast, suspected on imaging to be an organizing hematoma, possibly related to previous injury. Histopathological evaluation revealed a neoplasm composed of mononuclear cells admixed with osteoclast-like giant cells resembling giant cell tumor of bone. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68, smooth muscle actin, and vimentin, but was negative for a panel of epithelial and additional muscle markers. These features were most consistent with GCT-ST, an uncommon neoplasm of low malignant potential. Despite aggressive surgical treatment achieving clear surgical margins, the patient expired with pulmonary metastases within a year of her initial presentation. This case demonstrates the difficulty of predicting clinical behavior of GCT-ST of breast on the basis of histological features and depth of tumor alone. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a GCT-ST arising in the breast associated with a fatal outcome. The distinction of this entity from other more common primary breast tumors with giant cell morphology is also emphasized.

  10. Giant cell reparative granuloma presenting as a midline nasal mass.

    PubMed

    Govett, G S; Amedee, R G

    1991-03-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an uncommon entity that has been reported in all areas of the head and neck. It must be distinguished from true giant cell tumors, brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism, aneurysmal bone cysts, and fibrous dysplasia. It responds well to surgical debulking and curettage and has a benign clinical course. We describe a case report of a GCRG presenting as a midline nasal mass and review the pertinent English language literature.

  11. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma: A report of 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Patil, Chetan; Balki, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma initially described by O’Brien in 1975 is a disorder of uncertain etiopathogenesis presenting with annular erythematous plaques predominantly on the sun-exposed areas. Hisptopathologically, it is characterized by elastin degenration, multinucleate giant cells, and elastophagocytosis. The authors came across 10 such cases, which were managed with hydroxychloroquine resulting in complete resolution in 4–6 months. PMID:26904442

  12. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  13. Doublecortin immunoreactivity in giant cells of tuberous sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Masashi; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Becker, Laurence E; Itoh, Masayuki; Takashima, Sachio

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral cortical lesions of tuberous sclerosis (TSC) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) show disturbances in laminar architecture and cellular differentiation. We immunohistochemically studied the expression of doublecortin, a fetal neuronal protein that regulates neuronal migration, in the surgical specimens of five TSC and eight FCD patients. In both TSC and FCD, bizarre giant cells showed a variable degree of doublecortin immunoreactivity. Both cytomegalic neurons and balloon cells were positive. The staining tended to be more intense in TSC than in FCD, although there were exceptional cases in both groups. Doublecortin immunoreactivity of normal-sized neural cells was restricted to a small number of astrocytes, and comparable to that in control patients. The persistent expression of doublecortin by giant cells in the postnatal cerebrum is additional evidence of abnormal differentiation, which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of cortical disarray in TSC and FCD.

  14. HHV-6A in syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Leonardo; Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Rossi, Giulio; Cocchi, Stefania; Codeluppi, Mauro; Pecorari, Monica; Masetti, Michele; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Gennari, William; Portolani, Marinella; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Landini, Maria Paola; Schulz, Thomas F; Torelli, Giuseppe; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2008-08-07

    Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis is a rare but severe form of hepatitis that is associated with autoimmune diseases, drug reactions, and viral infections. We used serologic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods to search for an infectious cause in a case of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis that developed in a liver-transplant recipient who had latent infection with variant B of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6B) and who had received the organ from a donor with variant A latent infection (HHV-6A). At the onset of the disease, the detection of HHV-6A (but not HHV-6B) DNA in plasma, in affected liver tissue, and in single micromanipulated syncytial giant cells with the use of two different polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assays indicated the presence of active HHV-6A infection in the patient. Expression of the HHV-6A-specific early protein, p41/38, but not of the HHV-6B-specific late protein, p101, was demonstrated only in liver syncytial giant cells in the absence of other infectious pathogens. The same markers of HHV-6A active infection were documented in serial follow-up samples from the patient and disappeared only at the resolution of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis. Neither HHV-6B DNA nor late protein was identified in the same follow-up samples from the patient. Thus, HHV-6A may be a cause of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

  15. New developments in giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Frohman, Larry; Wong, Aaron B C; Matheos, Kaliopy; Leon-Alvarado, Luis G; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a medium-to-large vessel vasculitis with potentially sight- and life- threatening complications. Our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of GCA has advanced rapidly in recent times. The validity of using the American College of Rheumatology guidelines for diagnosis of GCA in a clinical setting has been robustly challenged. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, an important marker of inflammation, is lowered by the use of statins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conversely, it may be falsely elevated with a low hematocrit. Despite the emergence of new diagnostic modalities, temporal artery biopsy remains the gold standard. Evidence suggests that shorter biopsy lengths and biopsies done weeks to months after initiation of steroid therapy are still useful. New imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography have shown that vascular inflammation in GCA is more widespread than originally thought. GCA, Takayasu arteritis, and polymyalgia rheumatica are no longer thought to exist as distinct entities and are more likely parts of a spectrum of disease. A range of immunosuppressive drugs have been used in conjunction with corticosteroids to treat GCA. In particular, interleukin-6 inhibitors are showing promise as a therapy.

  16. Giant cell tumors of the axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors.

  17. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  18. Giant cell arteritis: Current treatment and management

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana Filipa; O’Neill, Lorraine; Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of medical therapy in giant cell arteritis (GCA) and should be started immediately to prevent severe consequences of the disease, such as blindness. However, glucocorticoid therapy leads to significant toxicity in over 80% of the patients. Various steroid-sparing agents have been tried, but robust scientific evidence of their efficacy and safety is still lacking. Tocilizumab, a monoclonal IL-6 receptor blocker, has shown promising results in a number of case series and is now being tested in a multi-centre randomized controlled trial. Other targeted treatments, such as the use of abatacept, are also now under investigation in GCA. The need for surgical treatment is rare and should ideally be performed in a quiescent phase of the disease. Not all patients follow the same course, but there are no valid biomarkers to assess therapy response. Monitoring of disease progress still relies on assessing clinical features and measuring inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound) are clearly important screening tools for aortic aneurysms and assessing patients with large-vessel involvement, but may also have an important role as biomarkers of disease activity over time or in response to therapy. Although GCA is the most common form of primary vasculitis, the optimal strategies for treatment and monitoring remain uncertain. PMID:26090367

  19. Arthroplasty for tenosynovial giant cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Verspoor, Floortje G M; Hannink, Gerjon; Scholte, Anouk; Van Der Geest, Ingrid C M; Schreuder, H W Bart

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (t-GCTs) can behave aggressively locally and affect joint function and quality of life. The role of arthroplasty in the treatment of t-GCT is uncertain. We report the results of arthroplasty in t-GCT patients. Patients and methods t-GCT patients (12 knee, 5 hip) received an arthroplasty between 1985 and 2015. Indication for arthroplasty, recurrences, complications, quality of life, and functional scores were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 5.5 (0.2–15) years. Results 2 patients had recurrent disease. 2 other patients had implant loosening. Functional scores showed poor results in almost half of the knee patients. 4 of the hip patients scored excellent and 1 scored fair. Quality of life was reduced in 1 or more subscales for 2 hip patients and for 5 knee patients. Interpretation In t-GCT patients with extensive disease or osteoarthritis, joint arthroplasty is an additional treatment option. However, recurrences, implant loosening, and other complications do occur, even after several years. PMID:27357329

  20. Clinical characteristics and prognoses of six patients with multicentric giant cell tumor of the bone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenglei; Tang, Yawen; Li, Mei; Jiao, Qiong; Zhang, Huizhen; Yang, Qingcheng; Yao, Weiwu

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric giant cell tumor of the bone (MGCT) is a rare entity whose radiographic, pathological and biological features remain confusing. We retrospectively reviewed six patients (1 male, 5 female; average age, 22.33 years) treated for confirmed MGCT between 2001 and 2015. The patients' clinical information, images from radiographs (n = 14), CT (n = 13), MRI (n = 8), bone scintigraphy (n = 1) and PET-CT (n = 2), as well as histologic features, treatment and prognosis were analyzed. A total of 17 lesions were detected: 4 around the knee joint, 3 in the greater trochanter and head of the femur, 5 in the small bones of the feet, and 2 in flat bones. All these lesions occurred in an ipsilateral extremity. One patient had Paget's disease. On radiographs and CT, 12 lesions exhibited sclerotic margins or patchy sclerosis, 8 showed cortical discontinuity, and 5 showed soft tissue masses. On histopathology, 8 lesions showed signs of sarcomatous transformation and one had transformed into osteosarcoma. Ten lesions in 4 patients were initially treated with surgery, and 3 showed local recurrence. Seven lesions in 3 patients were treated with denosumab. All the patients are currently stable without metastasis. These results suggest MGCT tends to occur in uncommon sites with sclerosis. Because these lesions can be aggressive, patients should be carefully monitored for the recurrence or formation of other lesions, especially in an ipsilateral extremity. PMID:27823978

  1. Spondylectomy for Giant Cell Tumor After Denosumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Cavalcante, Rodrigo Alves; Silva Marques, Rômulo Alberto; dos Santos, Vinicius Gonçalves; Sabino, Eduardo; Fraga, Ailton Cabral; Zaccariotti, Vladimir Arruda; Arruda, Joao Batista; Fernandes, Yvens Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. A case report. Objective. To report a case of the lumbar giant cell tumor (GCT) utilizing a new clinical treatment modality (denosumab therapy), which showed a massive tumor reduction combined with the L4 spondylectomy. Summary of Background Data. There are some controversies about spinal GCT treatments. Denosumab has provided good clinical results in terms of tumor shrinkage, and local control in a short-time follow-up clinical study phase 2, although for spinal lesions, it has not been described. Nonetheless, “en bloc” spondylectomy has been accepted as being the best treatments modalities in terms of oncological control. Methods. A case study with follow-up examination and series radiological assessments 6 months after therapy started, followed by a complex spine surgery. Results. The denosumab therapy showed on the lumbar computed tomography scans follow-up 6 months later, a marked tumor regression around 90% associated to vertebral body calcification, facilitating a successful L4 spondylectomy with an anterior and posterior reconstruction. The patient recovered without neurological deficits. Conclusion. A new therapeutic modality for spinal GCT is available and showing striking clinical results; however, it is necessary for well-designed studies to answer the real role of denosumab therapy avoiding or facilitating complex spine surgeries as spondylectomies for spinal GCT. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:26579960

  2. Delayed reaction after an octopus bite showing a giant cell-rich granulomatous dermatitis/panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Misago, Noriyuki; Inoue, Takuya; Narisawa, Yutaka

    2008-11-01

    Adequate clinical data and a sufficient workup, in addition to the histopathological findings, are frequently required to make a correct diagnosis of granulomatous dermatitis/panniculitis. These lesions with an unexpected etiology may include delayed hypersensitivity granulomatous reactions to various factors, such as metals or marine animal injuries. A 50-year-old male presented with multiple subcutaneous nodules on his right forearm 1 month following an octopus bite at his right wrist. After the disappearance of these lesions, which responded well to low-dose oral prednisone, another type of skin lesion characterized by small, numerous papules reappeared on his right forearm. Histopathologically, a specimen from a subcutaneous nodule showed mostly lobular granulomatous panniculitis, which showed an extensive diffuse infiltrate composed of numerous multinucleated giant cells and epithelioid cells intermingling with lymphocytes and eosinophils. A specimen from a papule that subsequently developed disclosed a diffuse granulomatous dermatitis composed of similar cells and also showed granuloma annulare-like features. This case is considered to be a delayed reaction after an octopus bite showing an unusual giant cell-rich granulomatous dermatitis/panniculitis. Octopus bites should therefore be included among the marine animal injuries, which cause a delayed-type reaction with granulomatous dermatitis/panniculitis.

  3. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Link, Thomas; Cho, Soo-Jin; Motamedi, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate. PMID:27630783

  4. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Dadey, David Y A; Kamath, Ashwin A; Leuthardt, Eric C; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although open resection remains the standard therapy, complication rates remain high. To minimize morbidity, less invasive approaches, such as endoscope-assisted resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy with mTOR pathway inhibitors, are also used to treat these lesions. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a relatively new modality that is increasingly used to treat a variety of intracranial lesions. In this report, the authors describe two pediatric cases of SEGA that were treated with LITT. In both patients the lesion responded well to this treatment modality, with tumor shrinkage observed on follow-up MRI. These cases highlight the potential of LITT to serve as a viable minimally invasive therapeutic approach to the management of SEGAs in the pediatric population.

  5. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  6. Denosumab-Treated Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Its Histologic Spectrum and Potential Diagnostic Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Roitman, Pablo Daniel; Jauk, Federico; Farfalli, Germán Luis; Albergo, José Ignacio; Aponte-Tinao, Luis Alberto

    2017-02-21

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a locally aggressive, rarely metastasizing primary bone neoplasm that occurs most frequently in the epiphysis of long bones of young adults. It is composed of round, oval or elongated mononuclear cells admixed with osteoclast-like giant cells that express receptor activator of nuclear factor- қB (RANK). The mononuclear stromal cells express RANK ligand (RANKL), a mediator of osteoclast activation. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits RANKL reducing tumor-associated bone lysis, has been used to treat selected cases of GCT. We reviewed the clinical records and histologic slides of 9 patients with GCT that had received denosumab therapy and were subsequently surgically treated. There were 5 males and 4 females, aged 20 to 66 (mean 36). Duration of treatment varied from 2,5 to 13months (mean 5,9). In all cases, different degrees of ossification, fibrosis, depletion of giant cells and proliferation of mononuclear cells were seen. With this combination of changes, denosumab-treated GCT may mimick other lesions such as fibrous dysplasia, juvenile ossifying fibroma, nonossifying fibroma and osteoblastoma. Less frequent but more relevant is the presence of cellular atypia or patterns of ossification that resemble an undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, a conventional osteosarcoma or a low-grade central osteosarcoma. The presence of clinical and radiological response to denosumab along with the lack of high mitotic activity, atypical mitotic figures, extensive necrosis or a permeative pattern of growth, represent clues to achieve a correct diagnosis.

  7. Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Lambert, Marc; Liozon, Eric; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigné, Gwénola; Ollivier, Yann; Ly, Kim; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9–250] mg/L vs 120 [3–120] mg/L; P < 0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also

  8. Relapses in Patients With Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Marco A.; García-Martínez, Ana; Prieto-González, Sergio; Tavera-Bahillo, Itziar; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; Planas-Rigol, Ester; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Butjosa, Montserrat; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a relapsing disease. However, the nature, chronology, therapeutic impact, and clinical consequences of relapses have been scarcely addressed. We conducted the present study to investigate the prevalence, timing, and characteristics of relapses in patients with GCA and to analyze whether a relapsing course is associated with disease-related complications, increased glucocorticoid (GC) doses, and GC-related adverse effects. The study cohort included 106 patients, longitudinally followed by the authors for 7.8 ± 3.3 years. Relapses were defined as reappearance of disease-related symptoms requiring treatment adjustment. Relapses were classified into 4 categories: polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), cranial symptoms (including ischemic complications), systemic disease, or symptomatic large vessel involvement. Cumulated GC dose during the first year of treatment, time required to achieve a maintenance prednisone dose <10 mg/d (T10), <5 mg/d (T5), or complete prednisone discontinuation (T0), and GC-related side effects were recorded. Sixty-eight patients (64%) experienced at least 1 relapse, and 38 (36%) experienced 2 or more. First relapse consisted of PMR in 51%, cranial symptoms in 31%, and systemic complaints in 18%. Relapses appeared predominantly, but not exclusively, within the first 2 years of treatment, and only 1 patient developed visual loss. T10, T5, and T0 were significantly longer in patients with relapses than in patients without relapse (median, 40 vs 27 wk, p  < 0.0001; 163 vs 89.5 wk, p = 0.004; and 340 vs 190 wk, p = 0.001, respectively). Cumulated prednisone dose during the first year was significantly higher in relapsing patients (6.2 ± 1.7 g vs 5.4 ± 0.78 g, p = 0.015). Osteoporosis was more common in patients with relapses compared to those without (65% vs 32%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study provide evidence that a relapsing course is associated

  9. Strain difference in rats with experimental giant cell myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shioji, K; Kishimoto, C; Nakayama, Y; Sasayama, S

    2000-04-01

    Immunogenetic mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The present study investigated the incidence, histopathology and histocompatibility characteristics of experimental giant cell myocarditis in various strains of rats. Experimental giant cell myocarditis was induced by immunization with porcine cardiac myosin in Lewis (RT-1(l)), Dahl (DIR/Eis) (RT-1(l)), Fisher (RT-1(lv 1)) rats, but not in Dahl (DIS/Eis) (RT-1(l)) or Brown Norway (RT-1(n)). Myocarditis was most severe in the Lewis rats and their heart weight/body weight ratio was significantly higher than that of control rats immunized with Freund's complete adjuvant alone. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the expression and severity of experimental giant cell myocarditis may be determined mainly by genetic factors, including both major histocompatibility complex genes as well as other genes, which may be controlled by an immune mechanism.

  10. [Atypical presentation of a clinical case of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Rosselló Aubach, L L; Torres Cortada, G; Cabau Rúbies, J; Aragón Sanz, M A; Oncins Torres, R

    2006-06-01

    We present a very unusual clinical case of giant cell arteritis with uterus involvement, in a women of 66 years old, that began clinical features of pain and functional limitation of shoulders and hip 3 mouth before been operated of uterus prolapse with hysterectomy. Biopsy of uterus found affected arterial vesels with wall sclerosis and granulomatous inflamation with giant cells, without necrosis, involving media and perivascular portions suggesting giant cell arteritis. In a previous reports review, we only found ten similar clinical cases. In that cases, clinical features were no suggestif of the disease. Although the well known tendency of arteritis to involve some specific vascular areas, the case we present is an example of the systemic course of the disease and his difficulty to diagnose.

  11. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma associated with choroidal infiltration and syncytial giant cell hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Amer, Radgonde; Pe'er, Jacob; Pappo, Orit; Dotan, Shlomo

    2005-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman developed necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG), a thickened choroid, and syncytial giant cell hepatitis, a previously unreported association. NXG and syncytial giant cell hepatitis may have a common autoimmune pathogenesis.

  12. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  13. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  14. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy.

  15. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  16. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Christina; Leis, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC) is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect. PMID:28083152

  17. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Giardina, A; Rizzo, A; Ferrante, A; Capra, G; Triolo, G; Ciccia, F

    2013-03-28

    Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  18. Liver transplant for giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, H. V.; Rela, M.; Baker, A.; Ball, C.; Portmann, B.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Heaton, N.

    1997-01-01

    

 Giant cell hepatitis (CGH) with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AHA) is a distinct entity with an aggressive course. Immunosuppression may help early disease. A case is reported of a child with GCH and AHA with early disease recurrence after liver transplantation for end stage liver disease. 

 PMID:9370907

  19. Giant cell myocarditis mimicking idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Weidenbach, Michael; Springer, Tina; Daehnert, Ingo; Klingel, Karin; Doll, Susanne; Janousek, Jan

    2008-02-01

    We report an adolescent with giant cell myocarditis (GCM) mimicking tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. His electrocardiogram (ECG) was typical for an incessant form of fascicular ventricular tachycardia. The patient rapidly deteriorated and required support using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Biopsy revealed GCM with massive myocyte necrosis. He was successfully heart transplanted 6 days after admission.

  20. The diagnosis and classification of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) involves the major branches of the aorta with predilection for the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. It occurs in individuals older than 50 years and the incidence increases with age. The signs and symptoms of giant cell arteritis can be classified into four subsets: cranial arteritis, extracranial arteritis, systemic symptoms and polymyalgia rheumatica. Patients may develop any combination of these manifestations, associated with laboratory evidence of an acute-phase reaction. The only test that confirms GCA diagnosis is a temporal artery biopsy, showing vasculitis with mononuclear cell inflammatory infiltrates, often with giant cells. Due to the focal and segmental nature of the infiltrates, areas of inflammation may be missed by the biopsy and the histological examination is normal in about 15% of the cases. Some imaging modalities may aid in the diagnosis of GCA. Among those, color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries is more commonly used. There are no independent validating criteria to determine whether giant cell arteritis is present when a temporal artery biopsy is negative. The American College of Rheumatology criteria for the classification of giant cell arteritis may assist in the diagnosis. However, meeting classification criteria is not equivalent to making the diagnosis in individual patients, and the final diagnosis should be based on all clinical, laboratory, imaging and histological findings. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for GCA. The initial dose is 40-60 mg/day for most uncomplicated cases. Addition of low-dose aspirin (100 mg/d) has been shown to significantly decrease the rate of vision loss and stroke during the course of the disease.

  1. Soft Tissue Giant Cell Tumour of Low Malignant Potential: A Rare Tumour at a Rare Site

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; V., Geethamani; C., Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    “Soft tissue giant cell tumour of low malignant potential” is considered as the soft tissue counterpart of osteoclastoma of the bone. It is a primary soft tissue tumour which is classified under the category of fibrohistiocytic tumours of intermediate malignancy.Seventy percent of the tumours involve the extremities and only about seven percent of them arise in head and neck region. They are composed of nodules of histiocytes in a vascular stroma, with multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), CD68 and Tarterate Resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). We are presenting a case of a 75-year-old man who had a nodule on the ala of the nose. Histopathology showed a histiocytic lesion. Benign fibrous histiocytoma, plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumour, solitary reticulohistiocytoma and histioid leprosy were ruled out by using special stains and immunostains. Expression of smooth muscle actin and CD68 confirmed the diagnosis of a soft tissue giant cell tumour with a low malignant potential. PMID:24551690

  2. Garcin syndrome resulting from a giant cell tumor of the skull base in a child.

    PubMed

    Bibas-Bonet, Hilda; Fauze, Ricardo A; Lavado, María Graciela; Páez, Rafael O; Nieman, Judith

    2003-05-01

    Garcin syndrome is characterized by a progressive ipsilateral involvement of cranial nerves, culminating in paralysis of all or at least seven of them, without sensory or motor long-tract disturbance, with no intracranial hypertension, and with osteoclastic involvement in the skull base on radiographic computed tomography. Giant cell tumor is a primary bone tumor rarely affecting the skull base. An 8-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of increasingly worsening right otalgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, right facial numbness, and diplopia. She was admitted with a 2-week history of swallowing difficulties, voice change, and right shoulder pain. Neurologic examination disclosed unilateral paralysis of the right fifth through twelfth cranial nerves, with no other abnormal neurologic findings. Skull radiographic computed tomography revealed lytic lesions in the right temporal petrous portion. Computed tomographic scan indicated a destructive mass involving the right greater wing of the sphenoid bone and temporal petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a tumor arising from the temporosphenoidal region, infiltrating neither the brain nor the brainstem. No hydrocephalus was observed. Biopsy revealed giant cell tumor. Posterior treatment consisted of radiotherapy. At an 8-year follow-up, the patient was well but with functional sequelae. There is no magnetic resonance imaging evidence of tumor growth. No other giant cell tumor presenting as Garcin syndrome is known to have been reported.

  3. Giant cell tumor: rapid recurrence after cessation of long-term denosumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Matcuk, George R; Patel, Dakshesh B; Schein, Aaron J; White, Eric A; Menendez, Lawrence R

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of rapid recurrence of a giant cell tumor (GCT) of the distal radius in a 24-year-old woman following the cessation of long-term denosumab therapy. GCT of bone is a histologically benign tumor with multinucleated giant cells on a background of mononuclear giant cells usually presenting as a well-defined epi-metaphyseal lytic lesion without sclerotic margins. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), has proven to be an effective neoadjuvant treatment for GCT. The tumor in this case had demonstrated a good response with sustained control for over 2 years while on denosumab therapy. However, within 2 months of cessation of therapy, the tumor demonstrated rapid recurrence and progression with growth, osteolysis, and increased soft tissue component. Despite reinitiating denosumab therapy, there was progressive tumor growth and destruction, ultimately necessitating below-the-elbow amputation. This case illustrates the need for maintenance of denosumab therapy for GCT of bone or definitive surgical treatment prior to its cessation.

  4. A Rare Giant Cell Tumor of the Distal Fibula and its Management.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Kapoor, Chirag; Golwala, Paresh; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-07-01

    Giant Cell Tumour (GCT) of the distal fibula is extremely rare and poses challenges in the surgical management. Wide excision or intralesional curettage, along with adjuvant chemical cauterisation can prevent the recurrence of GCT. The excised bone gap needs reconstruction using tricortical iliac autograft and supportive plate fixation. In addition to wide excision, preservation of ankle mortise is advisable in locally aggressive and large lesions of the distal fibula. We report a GCT of the distal fibula in a young female patient. As part of the treatment, en bloc resection, chemical cauterisation with phenol, and distal fibula reconstruction with a tricortical iliac crest bone graft was done. Eighteen months after the treatment, the patient has no recurrence and her ankle is stable with full range of movement. We suggest this method to be worthwhile for the treatment of this uncommon lesion in quantifying recurrence and functional outcome.

  5. High-pressure paint-gun injury of the finger simulating giant cell tumor of tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Stefanato, Catherine M; Turner, Matthew S; Bhawan, Jag

    2005-02-01

    High-pressure paint guns deliver paint at approximately 3000 pounds per square inch. At this pressure, paint will penetrate the skin and spread quickly through fascial planes and tendon sheaths. The present case is that of a lesion from the finger of a 35-year-old white male in whom a history was initially unavailable. Histologic examination revealed diffuse fibrohistiocytic proliferation and giant cells, with numerous darkly pigmented, uniformly small-sized particles throughout the lesion. The initial impression was that of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. However, the pigment particles were negative for Perls stain, and polariscopic examination revealed clear refractile fragments. These findings raised the possibility that the lesion was the result of a traumatic event. On further inquiry, it was revealed that the patient had sustained a high-pressure paint-gun injury 1 year earlier. The simulation, histopathologically, of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath by a high-pressure paint-gun injury has not, to our knowledge, been reported previously, nor has the histologic finding of small, uniformly sized pigment particles and polarizable refractile fragments in this particular type of injury.

  6. Giant cell tumor of the femoral neck: case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; Amaral, Rogério Andrade do; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Moraes, Frederico Barra de; Chaibe, Eduardo Damasceno

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with a giant cell tumor of the left femoral neck, with adjacent progressive invasion of bone tissue. Initial treatment was done with local curettage and autologous bone graft from fibula, electrocauterization and filling with methyl methacrylate. A local tumoral relapse was present after one year; therefore a new surgical procedure was necessary, with proximal femoral wide resection and unconventional endoprosthesis fixation. The article discusses the clinical aspects and surgical treatment. This report aimed to demonstrate the necessity to perform wide resection for giant cell tumor of the femoral neck, prioritizing total resection of the tumor and its local extension, preserving limb integrity and demonstrating the complete failure of preserving surgery in cases of femoral neck involvement.

  7. Denosumab for the treatment of giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Brodowicz, Thomas; Hemetsberger, Margit; Windhager, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is typically composed of neoplastic stromal cells and non-neoplastic osteoclastic giant cells. RANK-expressing osteoclastic giant cells are recruited by RANK ligand excreted by the stromal cells, and used by these neoplastic cells to create expansion space. Denosumab specifically binds to and inhibits RANK ligand, thereby eradicating osteoclastic giant cells from the tumor and thus reducing osteolytic activity. Clinical studies reported disease stabilization and clinical benefit in terms of reduced pain and analgesics use, avoided surgeries or surgeries with less morbid procedures. Adverse events observed in patients with giant cell tumor of bone were consistent with the known safety profile of denosumab with a very low incidence of hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis. Overall, denosumab was shown to suppress osteolytic activity and slow disease progression and is thus a treatment option for patients with giant cell tumor of bone.

  8. Giant cell arteritis: a systemic disease with rare cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Baum, E W; Sams, W M; Payne, R R

    1982-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic disease usually occurring in patients in the fifth decade or older, more often in women. Dermatologic manifestations are rare but, when found, are usually expressed as scalp ulcerations or blanching associated with gangrene of the tongue. The dermatologist should be familiar with the entity because it is often more severe when associated with scalp necrosis, and prompt intervention with corticosteroids can prevent catastrophic sequelae.

  9. CTCFL (BORIS) mRNA Expression in a Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano-Galván, Graciela; Reyes-Romero, Miguel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Almeda-Ojeda, Oscar Eduardo; Lemus-Rojero, Obed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a relatively common benign reactive lesion of the oral cavity which can occur at any age. CTCFL/BORIS (CTCF like/Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites) and CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) are paralogous genes with an important role in the regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and nuclear chromatin insulators regulation. BORIS expression promotes cell immortalization and growth while CTCF has tumor suppressor activity; the expression pattern may reflect the reverse transcription silencing of BORIS. The aim of this work was to describe a histopathological and molecular approach of an 8-year-old pediatric male patient with PGCG diagnosis. It was observed that the PGCG under study expressed CTCF as well as BORIS mRNAs alongside with the housekeeping gene GAPDH, which may be related to possible genetic and epigenetic changes in normal cells of oral cavity. PMID:25114808

  10. Everolimus: in patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Curran, Monique P

    2012-02-01

    Everolimus is an orally administered inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Everolimus (starting dosage 3.0 mg/m(2)) was associated with a significant reduction in the volume of the largest subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) in 28 patients aged ≥3 years with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in a phase II trial (C2485). At 6 months, 32% of patients treated with everolimus had a ≥50% reduction in the volume of their largest SEGA lesion (assessed via an independent central radiology review); 75% had a ≥30% reduction. No patients developed new lesions. During the extension phase of this trial (median duration 34 months), the reduction in SEGA volume was maintained, with no everolimus recipient requiring surgery or other therapy for SEGA or hydrocephalus. In a phase III trial (EXIST-1) in 117 patients with SEGA associated with TSC, 35% of everolimus recipients (starting dosage 4.5 mg/m(2)) versus none of the placebo recipients (p < 0.0001) had an overall response (a reduction in the sum of all target SEGA volumes of ≥50% relative to baseline, nonworsening of non-target SEGA lesions, no new SEGA lesions, and no new/worsening hydrocephalus). Everolimus was generally well tolerated in patients with SEGA associated with TSC; most drug-related adverse reactions were mild to moderate in severity.

  11. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery.

    PubMed

    von Borstel, Donald; A Taguibao, Roberto; A Strle, Nicholas; E Burns, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis.

  12. Asymmetric cell division in polyploid giant cancer cells and low eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Yijia; Zhang, Shiwu

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is critical for generating cell diversity in low eukaryotic organisms. We previously have reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) induced by cobalt chloride demonstrate the ability to use an evolutionarily conserved process for renewal and fast reproduction, which is normally confined to simpler organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which reproduces by asymmetric cell division, has long been a model for asymmetric cell division studies. PGCCs produce daughter cells asymmetrically in a manner similar to yeast, in that both use budding for cell polarization and cytokinesis. Here, we review the results of recent studies and discuss the similarities in the budding process between yeast and PGCCs.

  13. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G

    2017-03-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the "storage lesion(s)". Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients.

  14. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Gideon; Breuer, Gabriel S

    2016-10-31

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2-3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be "isolated" or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of "isolated" PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, "hidden" GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2-3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied.

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Gideon; Breuer, Gabriel S.

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2–3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be “isolated” or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of “isolated” PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, “hidden” GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2–3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied. PMID:27824543

  16. [Giant cell arteritis: guidelines of the University Hospital of Lausanne].

    PubMed

    Tsetsou, S; Michel, P; Ribi, C; Hirt, L; Kawasaki, A; Hugli, O; De Leval, L; Bart, P-A; Waeber, G; Meuli, R; Raffoul, W; So, A; Du Pasquier, R

    2015-02-11

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a subacute/chronic vasculitis and represents the most common form of systemic vasculitis in people over the age of 50 years. The absence of clear and specific diagnostic criteria with the highly variable clinical presentation is a diagnostic challenge requesting a multidisciplinary approach. Yet, GCA is an emergency and the treatment must be initiated very rapidly due to the risk of blindness. This article presents a review of GCA as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic institutional guidelines of the University Hospital of Lausanne.

  17. Alternative pharmacologic therapy for aggressive central giant cell granuloma: denosumab.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Willem H; Coumou, Annet W; Kessler, Peter A H W; de Lange, Jan

    2014-07-01

    In the search for new pharmacologic therapies for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), proteins that are essential to osteoclastogenesis are intriguing potential targets. In the present case report, we describe a 25-year-old patient with an aggressive CGCG of the maxilla, who was successfully treated with the antiresorptive agent denosumab, after other pharmacologic treatment had failed to achieve regression or stabilization of the tumor. Denosumab could be a promising alternative to potentially mutilating surgery for CGCG. However, more research is needed before definite conclusions can be drawn about the potential role of this agent in the treatment of CGCG.

  18. Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor Arising on the Scapular Region

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Asako; Ueno, Takashi; Takayama, Ryoko; Ansai, Shin-ichi; Futagami, Ayako; Kawana, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TSGCT) is a benign soft tissue tumor arising from the synovial membrane that composes the lining of joints, tendons and bursae. TSGCT is a common tumor occurring in the hands and fingers, and also consecutively in the knees, ankles, feet and hips. It is rarely found in the scapular region. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases arising on the upper back have been reported. This report presents the case of a 44-year-old Japanese female with a TSGCT arising on her right scapular region. PMID:24403889

  19. The cytotoxic T cells may contribute to the in situ immune response in Jorge Lobo's Disease human lesions.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Ariane Fernandes; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões; Barboza, Tânia Cristina; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Xavier, Marília Brasil; de Oliveira, Clivia Maria Moraes; Unger, Deborah Aben Athar; Kanashiro-Galo, Luciane; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Pagliari, Carla

    2017-02-01

    Jorge Lobo's Disease (JLD) is a cutaneous chronic granulomatous disease caused by the pathogenic fungus Lacazia loboi. It is characterized by a granulomatous reaction with multinucleated giant cells and high number of fungal cells. In order to contribute to the comprehension of immune mechanisms in JLD human lesions, we studied the cytotoxic immune response, focusing on TCD8+ and NK cells, and granzyme B. Forty skin biopsies of lower limbs were selected and an immunohistochemistry protocol was developed to detect CD8+ T cells, NK cells and Granzyme B. In order to compare the cellular populations, we also performed a protocol to visualize TCD4+ cells. Immunolabeled cells were quantified in nine randomized fields in the dermis. Lesions were characterized by inflammatory infiltrate of macrophages, lymphocytes, epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells with intense number of fungal forms. There was a prevalence of CD8 over CD4 cells, followed by NK cells. Our results suggest that in JLD the cytotoxic immune response could represent another important mechanism to control Lacazia loboi infection. We may suggest that, although CD4+ T cells are essential for host defense in JLD, CD8+ T cells could play a role in the elimination of the fungus.

  20. Symplastic/pseudoanaplastic giant cell tumor of the bone

    PubMed Central

    Agaram, Narasimhan; Hwang, Sinchun; Lu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Healey, John; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Objective Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive primary bone tumor. Its malignant counterpart is quite rare. Rarely, a conventional GCTB shows marked nuclear atypia, referred to as symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, which can mimic sarcomatous transformation. Recently, somatic driver mutations of histone H3.3 exclusively in H3F3A have been described in GCTB. We report a series of 9 cases of GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, along with analysis of H3F3A variants. Materials and methods Nine cases of GCTB with symplastic change were identified. Clinico-radiological features, morphological features, and immunohistochemical stain for Ki-67 stain were reviewed. H3F3A variants were also analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Results Histologically, conventional giant cell tumor areas with scattered foci of markedly atypical cells were seen in all of the cases and all showed rare if any Ki-67 labeling. One patient had received denosumab treatment and another radiation therapy. Radiological features were characteristic of conventional GCTB. Mutation in H3F3A (p.Gly34Trp [G34W]) was found in 6 of the 7 cases. Clinical follow-up ranged from 6 to 208 months. Local recurrences were seen in 4 cases (44 %). Conclusions GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change is an uncommon variant of conventional GCTB, which can mimic primary sarcoma or sarcomatous transformation. These tumors possess the same missense mutation in histone H3.3 as conventional GCTB. PMID:27020452

  1. Dedifferentiated Giant-Cell Tumor of Bone with an Undifferentiated Round Cell Mesenchymal Component

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Villaseñor, Eréndira G.; Cortés-González, Socorro; Linares-González, Luis Miguel; González-Guzmán, Roberto; Rico-Martínez, Genaro

    2014-01-01

    The dedifferentiated giant-cell tumor of the bone is a very rare variant of the giant-cell tumor (GCT). We report the clinical, radiographic and histological findings of a dedifferentiated GCT in which the dedifferentiated component consisted of small round cells. We also comment on previously reported cases of dedifferentiated GCT, discuss the clinical implications of this dual histology, and analyze the information published about the coexistence of similar genetic abnormalities in GCT and small round cell tumors of the bone. PMID:25276319

  2. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  3. Management of Giant Cell Tumour Radius in a Three Year old Child with an Improvised Technique

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumours of immature skeleton have a very low incidence and epi-metaphyseal location. We are presenting giant cell tumour distal radius in a skeletally immature patient; an uncontained defect with a large soft tissue component which was managed by wide excision and reconstruction with an improvised technique. PMID:25654002

  4. Dermatopathology in historical perspective: the Montgomery giant cell of lichen simplex chronicus.

    PubMed

    Rubakovic, Svetlana; Steffen, Charles

    2010-01-01

    In this short historical review, we will discuss the origin and references to the giant cell that is sometimes histopathologically present in the dermis of lichen simplex chronicus that was first described by Hamilton Montgomery, MD. A photomicrograph of the giant cell was included by Montgomery in his text Dermatopathology published in 1967. We will then provide a short biography of Montgomery.

  5. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  6. Giant cell tumour of bone in the denosumab era.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Dijkstra, P D Sander; Blay, Jean-Yves; Gelderblom, Hans

    2017-03-30

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an intermediate locally aggressive primary bone tumour, occurring mostly at the meta-epiphysis of long bones. Overexpression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells promotes recruitment of numerous reactive multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells, causing lacunar bone resorption. Preferential treatment is curettage with local adjuvants such as phenol, alcohol or liquid nitrogen. The remaining cavity may be filled with bone graft or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement; benefits of the latter are a lower risk of recurrence, possibility of direct weight bearing and early radiographic detection of recurrences. Reported recurrence rates are comparable for the different local adjuvants (27-31%). Factors increasing the local recurrence risk include soft tissue extension and anatomically difficult localisations such as the sacrum. When joint salvage is impossible, en-bloc resection and endoprosthetic joint replacement may be performed. Local tumour control on the one hand and maintenance of a functional native joint and quality of life on the other hand are the main pillars of surgical treatment for this disease. Current knowledge and development in the fields of imaging, functional biology and systemic therapy are forcing us into a paradigm shift from a purely surgical approach towards a multidisciplinary approach. Systemic therapy with denosumab (RANKL inhibitor) or zoledronic acid (bisphosphonates) blocks, respectively inhibits, bone resorption by osteoclast-like giant cells. After use of zoledronic acid, stabilisation of local and metastatic disease has been reported, although the level of evidence is low. Denosumab is more extensively studied in two prospective trials, and appears effective for the optimisation of surgical treatment. Denosumab should be considered in the standard multidisciplinary treatment of advanced GCTB (e.g. cortical destruction, soft

  7. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the “storage lesion(s)”. Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients. PMID:28263166

  8. Protein Expression Profiling of Giant Cell Tumors of Bone Treated with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kenta; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Kohsaka, Shinji; Akaike, Keisuke; Tanabe, Yu; Kubota, Daisuke; Ishii, Midori; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Okubo, Taketo; Takagi, Tatsuya; Yao, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are locally aggressive osteolytic bone tumors. Recently, some clinical trials have shown that denosumab is a novel and effective therapeutic option for aggressive and recurrent GCTB. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of denosumab. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed using GCTB samples which were taken before and after denosumab treatment. Each expression profile was analyzed using the software program to further understand the affected biological network. One of identified proteins was further evaluated by gelatin zymography and an immunohistochemical analysis. We identified 13 consistently upregulated proteins and 19 consistently downregulated proteins in the pre- and post-denosumab samples. Using these profiles, the software program identified molecular interactions between the differentially expressed proteins that were indirectly involved in the RANK/RANKL pathway and in several non-canonical subpathways including the Matrix metalloproteinase pathway. The data analysis also suggested that the identified proteins play a critical functional role in the osteolytic process of GCTB. Among the most downregulated proteins, the activity of MMP-9 was significantly decreased in the denosumab-treated samples, although the residual stromal cells were found to express MMP-9 by an immunohistochemical analysis. The expression level of MMP-9 in the primary GCTB samples was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors, including patient outcomes. Although the replacement of tumors by fibro-osseous tissue or the diminishment of osteoclast-like giant cells have been shown as therapeutic effects of denosumab, the residual tumor after denosumab treatment, which is composed of only stromal cells, might be capable of causing bone destruction; thus the therapeutic application of denosumab would be still necessary for these lesions. We believe that the protein expression

  9. Increased TNF-α, IL-6 and decreased IL-1β immunohistochemical expression by the stromal spindle-shaped cells in the central giant cell granuloma of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Chrysomali, Evanthia; Stylogianni, Evangelia; Donta, Catherine; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: the exp ress ion of the osteoclastogenic cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were immunohistochemically evaluated in periph eral (PGCG) and central (CGCG) giant cell granulomas of the jaws in order to determine diff erences between these two lesions and between the two distinct tumor cell populations (multinucleated giant cells, MGCs and stromal sp indle-sh aped cells). Study Design: Paraffin-embedd ed tiss ue sections from 40 PGCG and 40 CGCG were immunohistochemically stained using antibodies against TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. The percentage of positively stained cells and the staining intensity were ass ess ed to provide a combined immunoreactivity score value. Results: TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were exp ress ed in all lesions. The CGCG compared to the PGCG sh owed significantly increased exp ress ion of TNF-α and IL-6 and decreased exp ress ion of IL-1β by the sp indle-sh aped cells and increased exp ress ion of IL-1β by the MGCs. The MGCs demonstrated in comparison to the stromal sp indlesh aped cells significantly increased exp ress ion of all three cytokines in both PGCG and CGCG. Conclusions: The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β seem to be involved in the growth process of PGCG and CGCG of the jaws. A poss ible alteration in the sy nthesis or/and activity of these cytokines by the stromal sp indle cells in the CGCGs may enhance osteolys is through the stimulation of osteoclast progenitor cells, given the fact that the intraoss eous lesions cause bone resorption. Key words: Giant cell granuloma, giant cell tumor, multinucleated giant cells, jaw, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1beta, immunohistochemistry. PMID:22157665

  10. Tongue necrosis as first symptom of giant cell arteritis (GCA).

    PubMed

    Brodmann, M; Dorr, A; Hafner, F; Gary, T; Pilger, E

    2009-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common systemic vasculitis affecting people over the age of 50 years, especially in the western world. Nevertheless, the initial diagnosis can be tricky, as some of the patients present at first time with a real unusual initial manifestation. One of these can be tongue necrosis, which is according to the literature in accordance with scalp necrosis, the rarest initial manifestation form of GCA. We describe two patients who presented with tongue necrosis as initial symptom of GCA. The diagnosis was made by the American College of Rheumatology criteria, biopsy and duplex sonography of their temporal arteries. A typical halo was seen as a sign of intimal edema. The patients were put on corticosteroids immediately after diagnosis was proven and their symptoms improved quickly.

  11. Giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica: an update.

    PubMed

    González-Gay, Miguel A; Pina, Trinitario

    2015-02-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are two closely related diseases in people aged 50 years and older, which are more frequently observed in Western countries. Despite being common entities, concern still exists about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of both entities. New imaging techniques, such as 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, have proved to be useful in detecting large-vessel involvement in GCA. Corticosteroids are the cornerstone of the therapy in GCA and PMR. Relapses are frequent in these conditions. Unlike methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists, anti-interleukin-6 receptor therapy appears to be useful in patients with GCA and PMR who are refractory to corticosteroids. This review summarizes recent studies on GCA and PMR.

  12. Case Study: Giant Cell Arteritis with Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Daniel Chomlak, R.; Ghazanfari, Farshad; Datta, Mineesh

    2016-01-01

    In giant cell arteritis (GCA), involvement of the vertebral arteries is rare with reported rates of 3%–4% for ischemic events secondary to vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion for those patients with GCA. This case study describes a patient who initially presented with acute onset of vertigo but was also found to have transient, side-alternating upper limb neurological findings. While initial imaging showed no vascular abnormalities, it was not until GCA was eventually confirmed with a temporal artery biopsy that the initial scans were shown to have bilateral narrowing of the vertebral arteries. While rare, vertebral artery involvement is an important complication to consider in the setting of GCA due to the high rate of associated mortality, despite immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27279753

  13. Giant cell tumor of the patella with a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SONG, MINGZHI; DAI, WEI; SUN, RAN; LIANG, HONGFENG; LIU, BINGWU; WU, YUXUAN; MA, KAI; LU, MING

    2016-01-01

    The substance of the patella is an uncommon location for tumor occurrence and development. The present study reports a case of giant cell tumor (GCT) of the patella, combined with an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of GCT with ABC published in English. GCT is the most common type of benign tumor. Secondary ABC is frequently associated with GCT, but this symbiotic tumor rarely occurs in the patella. A 27-year-old male patient was examined at the outpatient clinic, and clinicopathological characteristics of the tumor were observed. X-ray and computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a lytic lesion located in the center of the right patella. Curettage, followed by autogenic and allograft bone grafting, was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as a GCT with secondary ABC. No recurrence or metastasis was identified during the 1-year follow-up period. The present study reports a case of GCT with secondary ABC, and discusses the rare location and histopathological type of this tumor, in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of patellar tumors in general. PMID:27313738

  14. Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (pigmented villonodular synovitis-)-like changes in periprosthetic interface membranes.

    PubMed

    Söder, Stephan; Sesselmann, Stefan; Aigner, Thomas; Oehler, Stephan; Agaimy, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TSGCT; synonym, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)) is a rare low-grade mesenchymal neoplasm of either intra-articular or extra-articular origin. The etiopathogenesis of TSGCT is still uncertain, but recent studies showed a translocation involving colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) gene in a subset of cases. Histological features mimicking TSGCT can sometimes be encountered in periprosthetic interface membranes. To investigate the frequency and morphologic spectrum of this phenomenon, we conducted a systematic analysis of 477 periprosthetic interface membranes and performed immunohistochemical analysis on a subset of lesions compared to genuine TSGCT. In 26 of 477 periprosthetic membrane samples (5 %), at least some TSGCT-like features were found and 18 cases (4 %) strongly resembled it. Wear particles were detected in 100 % of the TSGCT-like lesions but only in 63.3 % of the whole cohort of periprosthetic membranes (p value <0.001). Immunohistochemistry comparing true TSGCT and TSGCT-like membranes showed similar inflammatory infiltrates with slightly elevated CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and a slightly higher proliferation index in TSGCT samples. In conclusion, TSGCT-like changes in periprosthetic membranes likely represent exuberant fibrohistiocytic inflammatory response induced by wear particles and should be distinguished from genuine (neoplastic) TSGCT. Although TSGCT and TSGCT-like periprosthetic membranes represent different entities, their comparable morphology might reflect analogous morphogenesis.

  15. Single step modified ink staining for Tzanck test: quick detection of herpetic giant cells in Tzanck smear.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Hitoshi; Akeda, Tomoko; Yamanaka, Kei-Ichi; Isoda, Kenichi; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2012-02-01

    Tzanck test has been recently re-evaluated as a method for the diagnosis of herpes virus infection. Giemsa staining for the Tzanck test is time-consuming and laborious. There is a need to develop simple and quick staining methods for bedside diagnosis of this disease. We report a single step and quick method for staining herpes giant cells in Tzanck smears using routinely available inks and physiological saline. A keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) was cultured on a slide glass and stained with various commercially available blue, blue-black and black inks serially diluted with physiological saline. Clinical smear samples from herpes lesions were also stained with these solutions without specific pretreatment. The nuclei of HaCaT were clearly stained showing high contrast with the cytoplasm using 5% Parker-Quink blue-black ink saline solution. Concentration of ink solution higher or lower than 5% resulted in less contrast. Blue or black inks or other manufacturers' inks can also be used, but staining of the cultured keratinocytes was less clear. Smear of clinical samples from herpes lesions were also stained with 5% ink solution. The nuclei of the multinucleated giant cells were clearly stained, and the sample could be immediately used for microscopic examination. One step staining of Tzanck smear using this diluted ink solution is an inexpensive and a convenient bedside diagnostic tool for the dermatologist.

  16. Advantages of Pressurized-Spray Cryosurgery in Giant Cell Tumors of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Dabak, Nevzat; Göçer, Hasan; Çıraklı, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Background: Giant Cell Tumor is considered a benign, local and aggressive tumor. Although considered a benign bone tumor, it is still the subject of discussion and research because of the associated local bone destruction, as well as high rates of recurrence and distant metastases. Options are being developed for both surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies. Aims: The present study evaluated the administration of cryotherapy via a pressurized-spray technique in giant cell tumors of the bone. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study included 40 patients who were treated with extensive curettage and cryotherapy at various locations during the period from February 2006 to December 2013. Informed consent forms were obtained from the participants and ethics committee approval was taken from the local ethics committee of Ondokuz Mayıs University. The pressurized-spray technique was performed using liquid nitrogen. The patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, radiological appearance, treatment modality, duration of follow-up, skin problems and recurrence. Results: Twenty-one patients were female; 19 were male. The average age of the patients was 33 years (range: 16–72 years), and the average duration of follow-up was 43 months (range: 12–80 months). The average time from the onset of the complaints to the diagnosis was 6 months (range: 2–12 months). Based on the Campanacci classification: 9 patients were Grade I; 25 patients were Grade II; six patients were Grade III. The lesion was located in the femur in 14 patients, in the tibia in 11 patients, in the radius in 5 patients, in the pelvis in 4 patients, in the fibula in 3 patients, in the metatarsal in 2 patients and in the phalanges of the hand in one patient. One patient had postoperative early fracture. None of the patients had skin problems and infection. Three (7.5%) of the patients had recurrence. Conclusion: It was found that cryotherapy was highly effective in the lesions

  17. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals.

  18. Therapy-resistant foreign body giant cell granuloma at the periapex of a root-filled human tooth

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, P.N.; Sjoegren, U.K.; Krey, G.; Sundqvist, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Although the primary etiological factor of periapical lesions is microbial, there are other independent factors that can adversely affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. In this communication, we present morphological evidence in support of the role of a foreign body reaction of periapical tissue to root-filling materials. The specimen consisted of a surgical biopsy of an asymptomatic periapical lesion which persisted after a decade of postendodontic follow-up. The biopsy was processed for correlated light and electron microscopy and was analyzed by various microtechniques. The unique feature of the lesion was the presence of vast numbers of large multinucleated cells and their cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Morphologically, these multinucleated cells resembled foreign body giant cells. They contained characteristic birefringent cytoplasmic inclusions which on electron-probe x-ray microanalysis consistently revealed the presence of magnesium and silicon. The magnesium and silicon are presumably the remnants of a root-filling excess which protruded into the periapex and had been resorbed during the follow-up period. These observations strongly suggest that in the absence of microbial factors, root-filling materials which contain irritating substances can evoke a foreign body reaction at the periapex, leading to the development of asymptomatic periapical lesions that may remain refractory to endodontic therapy for long periods of time.

  19. Therapy-resistant foreign body giant cell granuloma at the periapex of a root-filled human tooth.

    PubMed

    Nair, P N; Sjögren, U; Krey, G; Sundqvist, G

    1990-12-01

    Although the primary etiological factor of periapical lesions is microbial, there are other independent factors that can adversely affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. In this communication, we present morphological evidence in support of the role of a foreign body reaction of periapical tissue to root-filling materials. The specimen consisted of a surgical biopsy of an asymptomatic periapical lesion which persisted after a decade of postendodontic follow-up. The biopsy was processed for correlated light and electron microscopy and was analyzed by various microtechniques. The unique feature of the lesion was the presence of vast numbers of large multinucleated cells and their cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Morphologically, these multinucleated cells resembled foreign body giant cells. They contained characteristic birefringent cytoplasmic inclusions which on electron-probe X-ray microanalysis consistently revealed the presence of magnesium and silicon. The magnesium and silicon are presumably the remnants of a root-filling excess which protruded into the periapex and had been resorbed during the follow-up period. These observations strongly suggest that in the absence of microbial factors, root-filling materials which contain irritating substances can evoke a foreign body reaction at the periapex, leading to the development of asymptomatic periapical lesions that may remain refractory to endodontic therapy for long periods of time.

  20. Cellular localization of metabotropic glutamate receptors in cortical tubers and subependymal giant cell tumors of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Boer, K; Troost, D; Timmermans, W; Gorter, J A; Spliet, W G M; Nellist, M; Jansen, F; Aronica, E

    2008-09-22

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with cortical malformations (cortical tubers) and the development of glial tumors (subependymal giant-cell tumors, SGCTs). Expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtypes is developmentally regulated and several studies suggest an involvement of mGluR-mediated glutamate signaling in the regulation of proliferation and survival of neural stem-progenitor cells, as well as in the control of tumor growth. In the present study, we have investigated the expression and cell-specific distribution of group I (mGluR1, mGluR5), group II (mGluR2/3) and group III (mGluR4 and mGluR8) mGluR subtypes in human TSC specimens of both cortical tubers and SGCTs, using immunocytochemistry. Strong group I mGluR immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the large majority of TSC specimens in dysplastic neurons and in giant cells within cortical tubers, as well as in tumor cells within SGCTs. In particular mGluR5 appeared to be most frequently expressed, whereas mGluR1alpha was detected in a subpopulation of neurons and giant cells. Cells expressing mGluR1alpha and mGluR5, demonstrate IR for phospho-S6 ribosomal protein (PS6), which is a marker of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation. Group II and particularly group III mGluR IR was less frequently observed than group I mGluRs in dysplastic neurons and giant cells of tubers and tumor cells of SGCTs. Reactive astrocytes were mainly stained with mGluR5 and mGluR2/3. These findings expand our knowledge concerning the cellular phenotype in cortical tubers and in SGCTs and highlight the role of group I mGluRs as important mediators of glutamate signaling in TSC brain lesions. Individual mGluR subtypes may represent potential pharmacological targets for the treatment of the neurological manifestations associated with TSC brain lesions.

  1. A giant benign clear cell hidradenoma on the anterior trunk.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Atis, Guldehan; Altunay, Ilknur Kivanç; Sakiz, Damlanur

    2011-10-05

    Clear cell hidradenoma (CCH) is an uncommon variant of benign cutaneous adnexal tumors. These tumors are clinically asymptomatic, solitary dermal nodules. They occur most frequently on the scalp, face abdomen and extremities. Growth is slow and malignant change is rare. 45-year-old woman presented with a nodule which had begun 4 years ago as a small nodular asymptomatic lesion and had a central ulceration and a minimal hemorrhagic discharge on her anterior abdomen wall. On dermatologic examination there was a 6.5×5×4 cm non-tender, soft reddish purple nodule, with lobular appearance and ulceration. In the laboratory investigations, all hematologic and biochemical tests were normal. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a cystic tumor with lobulated contour with contrast enhancement. The lesion was excised totally. In histopathological examination, the tumor was composed of biphasic smaller dark polygonal cells and larger clear cells and coarse nuclear chromatine. There were duct like structures. Immunohistochemical investigation was done for the suspicion of malignancy. Cytoplasm of clear cells and of duct like structures showed PAS-positive and d-PAS resistant staining. There was a positive reaction to epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen. The mitotic index in Ki 67 examination was low. All these findings confirmed the diagnosis of benign CCH.

  2. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  4. The tumoricidal properties of inflammatory tissue macrophages and multinucleate giant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Poste, G.

    1979-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells from C3H/HeN mice infected with bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) and subcutaneous inflammatory macrophages from uninfected mice exhibit spontaneous cytotoxicity for tumor cells in vitro, but their tumoricidal activity can be increased by incubation in vitro with lymphokines released by mitogen- or antigen-stimulated lymphocytes. Inflammatory macrophages from these sites are only susceptible to activation in vitro by lymphokines for a short period (less than 4 days) following their initial emigration from the circulation to the site of inflammation. The expression of tumoricidal activity by activated macrophages is similarly short-lived (less than 4 days). Once the tumoricidal state is lost it cannot be restored by further incubation with lymphokines in vitro. Fusion of macrophages to form multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) accompanies the loss of tumoricidal activity and the onset of resistance to activation by lymphokines, but the fusion process is not responsible for these changes, since unfused macrophages are similarly affected. Activation and acquisition of tumoricidal properties is confined to young macrophages recruited from the circulation during acute inflammation. Older macrophages and MGCs in chronic inflammatory lesions in which recruitment of new macrophages has ceased are nontumoricidal and are refractory to activation by lymphokines in vitro. These findings are discussed in relation to the efficiency of macrophage-mediated destruction of tumors in vivo and the amplification of macrophage antitumor activity by immunotherapeutic agents. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:382866

  5. Polyomavirus (BK)-associated pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Borislav A; Papadimitriou, John C; Chai, Toby C; Ramos, Emilio; Staats, Paul N; Drachenberg, Cinthia B

    2013-04-01

    This report describes the morphological features of a pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with focal trophoblastic differentiation of the urinary bladder in a male, 12 years post living related donor renal transplant. The voided urine cytology demonstrated rare decoy cells admixed with markedly atypical urothelial cell clusters, papillae and giant cells. Cystoprostatectomy demonstrated a nodular mass involving the trigone and right lateral-posterior wall, adjacent to the ureteral orifice. Hematoxylin-eosin stained sections showed two synchronous malignancies: (a) pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with focal trophoblastic differentiation of the urinary bladder, metastatic to the omentum and (b) prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 3+4=7, involving the right prostate lobe. Strong diffuse expression of polyomavirus large T antigen was demonstrated in the primary and metastatic pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma, supporting a possible role for polyomavirus (BK) in the oncogenetic pathway. The prostatic adenocarcinoma was negative for polyomavirus large T antigen. Our findings of p63, CK7 and CK903 expression in pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma suggest that the tumor is of urothelial derivation. This is the first report describing the morphological features of urinary bladder pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with trophoblastic differentiation, positive for polyomavirus large T antigen, arising in the background of BKV reactivation.

  6. Photoinduced Giant Dielectric Constant in Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Perez, Emilio J; Sanchez, Rafael S; Badia, Laura; Garcia-Belmonte, Germá; Kang, Yong Soo; Mora-Sero, Ivan; Bisquert, Juan

    2014-07-03

    Organic-inorganic lead trihalide perovskites have emerged as an outstanding photovoltaic material that demonstrated a high 17.9% conversion efficiency of sunlight to electricity in a short time. We have found a giant dielectric constant (GDC) phenomenon in these materials consisting on a low frequency dielectric constant in the dark of the order of ε0 = 1000. We also found an unprecedented behavior in which ε0 further increases under illumination or by charge injection at applied bias. We observe that ε0 increases nearly linearly with the illumination intensity up to an additional factor 1000 under 1 sun. Measurement of a variety of samples of different morphologies, compositions, and different types of contacts shows that the GDC is an intrinsic property of MAPbX3 (MA = CH3NH3(+)). We hypothesize that the large dielectric response is induced by structural fluctuations. Photoinduced carriers modify the local unit cell equilibrium and change the polarizability, assisted by the freedom of rotation of MA. The study opens a way for the understanding of a key aspect of the photovoltaic operation of high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  7. Hippocampal place cell instability after lesions of the head direction cell network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calton, Jeffrey L.; Stackman, Robert W.; Goodridge, Jeremy P.; Archey, William B.; Dudchenko, Paul A.; Taube, Jeffrey S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of cells that encode spatial location (place cells) or head direction (HD cells) in the rat limbic system suggests that these cell types are important for spatial navigation. We sought to determine whether place fields of hippocampal CA1 place cells would be altered in animals receiving lesions of brain areas containing HD cells. Rats received bilateral lesions of anterodorsal thalamic nuclei (ADN), postsubiculum (PoS), or sham lesions, before place cell recording. Although place cells from lesioned animals did not differ from controls on many place-field characteristics, such as place-field size and infield firing rate, the signal was significantly degraded with respect to measures of outfield firing rate, spatial coherence, and information content. Surprisingly, place cells from lesioned animals were more likely modulated by the directional heading of the animal. Rotation of the landmark cue showed that place fields from PoS-lesioned animals were not controlled by the cue and shifted unpredictably between sessions. Although fields from ADN-lesioned animals tended to have less landmark control than fields from control animals, this impairment was mild compared with cells recorded from PoS-lesioned animals. Removal of the prominent visual cue also led to instability of place-field representations in PoS-lesioned, but not ADN-lesioned, animals. Together, these findings suggest that an intact HD system is not necessary for the maintenance of place fields, but lesions of brain areas that convey the HD signal can degrade this signal, and lesions of the PoS might lead to perceptual or mnemonic deficits, leading to place-field instability between sessions.

  8. Importance of mast cells in human periapical inflammatory lesions.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Montes, Constantino; Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Rosales-García, Gilberto; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2004-12-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in periapical inflammatory lesions is not well understood. The objective of this work was to quantify MC numbers in human periapical lesions with the aim to clarify their role in the pathogenesis of these lesions. We analyzed the slides of 64 human periapical inflammatory lesions stained with pH 8.0 toluidine blue technique, quantified the number of MCs, and evaluated any correlation with age, gender, size, and location. The results of this study suggest that MCs were more numerous in females (p < 0.01); MC numbers were higher in biopsies from granulomas with proliferating epithelium and lower in biopsies from chronic apical abscesses; MC counts did not correlate with patients' age or size. MCs were observed more commonly in areas containing inflammatory infiltrate and degranulation was a frequent finding in these zones. Our results suggest that MCs play an active role in the pathogenesis of the periapical inflammatory lesions. The potential role of MCs related with the initiation, development, and persistence of the periapical inflammatory process are discussed.

  9. Differentially expressed genes in giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Babeto, Erica; Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Peitl Junior, Paulo; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; de Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; de Freitas Calmon, Marília; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Rahal, Paula

    2011-04-01

    Giant cells tumors of bone (GCTB) are benign in nature but cause osteolytic destruction with a number of particular characteristics. These tumors can have uncertain biological behavior often contain a significant proportion of highly multinucleated cells, and may show aggressive behavior. We have studied differential gene expression in GCTB that may give a better understanding of their physiopathology, and might be helpful in prognosis and treatment. Rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) was used to identify and measure novel genes that appear to be differentially expressed, including KTN1, NEB, ROCK1, and ZAK using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry in the samples of GCTBs compared to normal bone tissue. Normal bone was used in the methodology RaSH for comparison with the GCTB in identification of differentially expressed genes. Functional annotation indicated that these genes are involved in cellular processes related to their tumor phenotype. The differential expression of KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK was independently confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expression of the KTN1 and ROCK1 genes were increased in samples by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and ZAK had reduced expression. Since ZAK have CpG islands in their promoter region and low expression in tumor tissue, their methylation pattern was analyzed by MSP-PCR. The genes identified KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK may be responsible for loss of cellular homeostasis in GCTB since they are responsible for various functions related to tumorigenesis such as cell migration, cytoskeletal organization, apoptosis, and cell cycle control and thus may contribute at some stage in the process of formation and development of GCTB.

  10. Giant cell rich osteosarcoma revisited-diagnostic criteria and histopathologic patterns, Ki67, CDK4, and MDM2 expression, changes in response to bisphosphonate and denosumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2016-06-01

    Defining giant cell-rich osteosarcoma (GCRO) as "an osteosarcoma in which more than 50% of the tumor consists of numerous uniformly distributed osteoclastic giant cells amidst oval or spindle mononuclear cells embedded in a fibrovascular stroma," eight such cases identified among 265 cases of osteosarcoma were analysed. Their age ranges from 11 to 33 years, with peak incidence in the second decade and equal sex distribution. Seventy-five percent presented with pain, commonest in the knee, affecting the metaphysis. Most appeared radiologically as well-circumscribed expansile multiloculated osteolytic lesions, and many are displayed periosteal reaction. They showed several distinct histologic patterns: the stromal and giant cell, fibrohistiocytic, aneurysmal-cystic, osteoblastoma-like, and parosteal and fibrous dysplasia-like patterns. Focal subtle lacelike osteoid deposition, permeative infiltration into adjacent native bony trabeculae and over 30 % Ki67 proliferative index were characteristic. There was no CDK4 and MDM2 amplification. In those having bisphosphonate and denosumab treatment, there was limited focal necrosis with reduction in the number of giant cells and broad trabecular woven bone formation but no giant osteoclast was seen. Two patients with initial diagnosis of giant cell tumor treated by curettage and local resection pursued aggressive clinical courses, died after 14 and 21 months. The others survived 12 to 110 months. GCRO accounts for about 3 % of all osteosarcomas and apart from its more frequent diaphyseal location and associated normal bone-specific alkaline phosphate levels; it shares with conventional high-grade osteosarcoma the same patient demographics, sites of occurrence, absence of CDK4 and MDM2 amplification, and probably clinical course.

  11. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis--a distinctive clinico-pathological entity.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M J; Pomerance, A; Teare, R D

    1975-01-01

    Eleven cases of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis are described, The pathological features are unmistakable with serpiginous areas of myocardial necrosis, at the margins of which giant cells can be seen on histological examination. The aetiology of the condition remains obscure but associated pathology suggests that altered immunity may be a factor. The rapid clinical course is, however, highly suggestive of an infective cause though none has been found. Images PMID:1122272

  12. Titan cells in Cryptococcus neoformans: cells with a giant impact.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2013-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that commonly infects immunocompromised individuals, yet has developed multiple adaptation mechanisms to the host. Several virulence factors (capsule and melanin) have been known for many years. However, this yeast also possesses a morphogenetic program that is still not well characterized. C. neoformans has the ability to dramatically enlarge its size during infection to form 'titan cells' that can reach up to 100μm in cell body diameter, in contrast to typical size cells of 5-7μm. These titan cells pose a problem for the host because they contribute to fungal survival, dissemination to the central nervous system, and possibly even latency. In this review, we will provide an overview of these cells, covering current knowledge about their phenotypic features, mechanism of formation, and their significance during infection.

  13. The prognostic significance of histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry in giant cell tumors of bone.

    PubMed

    Fornasier, V L; Protzner, K; Zhang, I; Mason, L

    1996-08-01

    Eighty-two cases of giant cell tumor (GCT) were reviewed. Hematoxylin-eosin-and hematoxylin, phloxine, saffron, and alcian green-stained sections (82 cases) were examined for mitotic rate, the number of giant cells, and the pleomorphism of the stromal cells. In 29 cases, the tumor was stained for CD68, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (AIACT), S100 protein, Muramidase, and von Willebrand factor (factor VIII). The staining properties of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells were compared. Morphometric analysis was performed on 14 cases with a LECO 2001 computer-assisted image analyzer (LECO Instruments Ltd, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) and included absolute cell count, nuclear area, perimeter, roughness, roundness, and aspect and nuclear versus cytoplasmic ratios, measured both in the stromal cells and giant cells. The cases were divided into four groups: (1) cases with metastasis, (2) cases with recurrence, (3) cases with both metastasis and recurrence, and (4) cases with neither metastasis nor recurrence. Immunohistochemistry revealed a stronger AIACT than muramidase positivity in general. The staining was stronger in stromal cells than in giant cells. Giant cells in all tumors were positive for CD68. Stromal cells showed weaker positivity for the same stain. The number of asymmetrical mitotic figures was significantly greater in group 3 than in group 4 (P < .05). Morphometric assessment has identified a statistically significant difference in the aspect ratio and the roundness of the nuclei between these two groups. The other parameters did not differ significantly. In this article, the significance of these findings in prognostication and the histogenesis of the giant cell tumor are discussed. Their clinical applicability is yet to be determined.

  14. Multinucleated Giant Cancer Cells Produced in Response to Ionizing Radiation Retain Viability and Replicate Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Scott, April; Wang, Ying W.; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2017-01-01

    Loss of wild-type p53 function is widely accepted to be permissive for the development of multinucleated giant cells. However, whether therapy-induced multinucleation is associated with cancer cell death or survival remains controversial. Herein, we demonstrate that exposure of p53-deficient or p21WAF1 (p21)-deficient solid tumor-derived cell lines to ionizing radiation (between 2 and 8 Gy) results in the development of multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent to the culture dish for long times post-irradiation. Somewhat surprisingly, single-cell observations revealed that virtually all multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent for the duration of the experiments (up to three weeks post-irradiation) retain viability and metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and the majority (>60%) exhibit DNA synthesis. We further report that treatment of multinucleated giant cells with pharmacological activators of apoptosis (e.g., sodium salicylate) triggers their demise. Our observations reinforce the notion that radiation-induced multinucleation may reflect a survival mechanism for p53/p21-deficient cancer cells. With respect to evaluating radiosensitivity, our observations underscore the importance of single-cell experimental approaches (e.g., single-cell MTT) as the creation of viable multinucleated giant cells complicates the interpretation of the experimental data obtained by commonly-used multi-well plate colorimetric assays. PMID:28208747

  15. Cryosurgery as Additional Treatment in Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Scholte, A.; van der Geest, I. C. M.; Hannink, G.; Schreuder, H. W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) emerge from the synovium and can behave aggressively. Surgical resection is the standard treatment. However, up to half of the patients with diffuse type show recurrences. Several additional treatments have been applied to reduce recurrences; none of these treatments was proven to be superior to surgical resection solely. This article describes the results of additional cryosurgery to surgical resection. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 141 TGCT patients, between 1999 and 2007. Twelve patients had additional cryosurgery. The knee (n = 8), hip (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1) were affected. Primary outcome variables were treatment indications, recurrences, and complications. Results. Indications for additional cryosurgery were extended disease, bone involvement, and locations that are difficult to surgically get disease-free such as cruciate ligaments. Five patients had recurrent disease, all of which had prior treatments. None of the primary treated patients had recurrent disease. One patient had a deep infection. Discussion. Cryosurgery may serve as an additional treatment for diffuse TCGT in selected cases. However, because of the small number of patients and the heterogeneous group we could not prove an advantage of additional cryosurgery over surgical resection only. Cryosurgery should be considered for further evaluation in a prospective study. If there is any effect it would be helpful, especially in patients with multiple TGCT recurrences. PMID:28115910

  16. Multidisciplinary Approach to Management of Temporal Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Taija K.; Saat, Riste; Kontio, Risto; Piippo, Anna; Tarkkanen, Maija; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Jero, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are rare osseous tumors that rarely appear in the skull. Methods We review the clinical course of a 28-year-old previously healthy woman with a complicated GCT. Results The reviewed patient presented with a middle cranial fossa tumor acutely complicated by reactive mastoiditis. Left tympanomastoidectomy was performed for drainage of the mastoiditis and for biopsies of the tumor. Due to the challenging tumor location, the patient was treated with denosumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody against receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, for 7 months, which resulted in significant preoperative tumor shrinkage. Extensive temporal craniotomy and resection of the tumor followed utilizing a temporomandibular joint total endoprosthesis for reconstruction. A recurrence of the tumor was detected on computed tomography at 19 months after surgery and treated with transtemporal tumor resection, parotidectomy, and mandible re-reconstruction. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach resulted in a good functional result and, finally, an eradication of the challengingly located middle cranial fossa tumor. PMID:28078198

  17. The Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Anne S; Yashkin, Arseniy P; Sloan, Frank A; Lee, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is protective against giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to estimate the incidence of GCA diagnosis in the Medicare population. Methods Medicare 5% claims files from 1991-2011 were used to identify beneficiaries diagnosed with DM, but not GCA, within a three-year ascertainment period. Propensity score matching was used to define a control group of non-diabetics with comparable demographic covariates. Competing-risk regression was then used to assess the impact of DM diagnosis on GCA diagnosis. To allow for a three-year ascertainment period, the analysis sample was limited to beneficiaries over 68 years old at baseline. Results A total of 151,041 beneficiaries diagnosed with DM were matched to an equal number of controls. Mean study follow-up was 67.75 months. GCA was diagnosed among 1,116 beneficiaries with DM (0.73%) versus 465 (0.30%) controls. The risk of receiving a GCA diagnosis among patients with DM was increased by 100% (sub hazard ratio (SHR): 2.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.78 2.25). The annual incidence of GCA diagnosis among U.S. Medicare beneficiaries over 68 was 93 in 100,000. Conclusion A DM diagnosis is not protective against a GCA diagnosis in the Medicare population. Our data suggests that a DM diagnosis increases the risk of GCA diagnosis within 5.7 years for Medicare beneficiaries over 68. PMID:25602744

  18. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Cristhiane Almeida; Anhesini, Brunna Haddad; Aguilera, Jéssica Marques Gomes da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or medical history, but the habit of picking his teeth and “poking” the gingiva. The oral lesion consisted of an asymptomatic, rounded, pink colored, smooth surface, soft tissue injury with fibrous consistency and approximated size of 1.5 cm located in the attached gingiva between the upper left permanent lateral incisor and the primary canine of the same side. Excisional biopsy was performed through curettage and removal of the periosteum, periodontal ligament, and curettage of the involved teeth with vestibular access. The histopathological analysis led to the diagnosis of PGCG. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the PGCG resulted in a more conservative surgery and a reduced risk for tooth and bone loss and recurrence of the lesion. After four years of control, patient had no relapse of the lesion and good gingival and osseous health. PMID:27999690

  19. Treatment of a skull-base giant cell tumor with endoscopic endonasal resection and denosumab: case report.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yukihiro; Furuno, Yuichi; Kawabe, Takuya; Ohwada, Kei; Tatsuzawa, Kazunori; Sasajima, Hiroyasu; Hashimoto, Naoya

    2017-02-01

    A 34-year-old man with a 1-week history of diplopia was referred to the authors' hospital. Neurological examination revealed left abducens nerve palsy. Computed tomography showed a lesion in the left sphenoid sinus involving the medial wall of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) and osteolytic change at the clivus bordering the lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an extensive soft-tissue mass occupying the left sphenoid sinus. Surgical intervention by the endoscopic transnasal method allowed most of the lesion to be removed. Only the portion attached to the medial wall of the ICA was not removed. Postoperatively, the lesion was diagnosed as a giant cell tumor (GCT) and the patient received 120 mg of subcutaneous denosumab every 4 weeks, with additional doses on Days 8 and 15 during the first month of therapy. MRI a week after starting denosumab revealed shrinkage of the initially fast-growing residual tumor. The patient was discharged upon completion of the third denosumab administration. GCT is an aggressive stromal tumor developing mainly in young adults. Complete resection is recommended for GCT in the literature. However, size and location of the CGT often limit this approach. Various adjuvant treatments for skull base GCTs have been reported, including radiation and chemotherapy. However, the roles of adjuvant therapies have yet to be clearly defined. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody, was recently approved for GCT in several countries. Denosumab may permit less invasive treatments for patients with GCTs while avoiding deleterious outcomes, and may also limit disease progression and recurrence.

  20. Giant cell glioblastoma in the cerebrum of a Pembroke Welsh corgi.

    PubMed

    Giri, D K; Aloisio, F; Alosio, F; Ajithdoss, D K; Ambrus, A; Lidbury, J A; Hein, H E; Porter, B F

    2011-05-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered female Pembroke Welsh corgi was presented with a 1-month history of ataxia and panting. The clinical signs progressed until the dog became anorexic, obtunded and exhibited circling to the left. At necropsy examination, a mass was detected in the left forebrain, impinging on the cribriform plate. Microscopically, the mass was composed of sheets of round to pleomorphic neoplastic cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. Nuclear atypia, anisocytosis and anisokaryosis were common. Numerous bizarre, multinucleated giant cells containing 60 or more nuclei and giant mononuclear cells were present. The matrix contained abundant reticulin. Immunohistochemistry revealed the neoplastic cells uniformly to express vimentin, and a small number of neoplastic cells expressed glial fibrillary acid protein. A diagnosis of giant cell glioblastoma was made. Although well recognized in man, this tumour has been documented rarely in the veterinary literature.

  1. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor.

  2. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high.

  3. Treatment and outcome of giant cell tumors of the pelvis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of bone rarely affect the pelvis. We report on 20 cases that have been treated at our institution during the last 20 years. Methods 20 patients with histologically benign GCT of the pelvis were included in this study. 9 tumors were primarily located in the iliosacral area, 6 in the acetabular area, and 5 in the ischiopubic area. 8 patients were treated by intralesional curettage and 6 by intralesional resection with additional curettage of the margins. 3 patients with iliacal tumors were treated by wide resection. 2 patients were treated by a combination of external beam irradiation and surgery, and 1 patient solely by irradiation. In addition, 9 patients received selective arterial embolization one day before surgery. Of the 6 patients with acetabular tumors, 1 secondarily received an endoprosthesis and 1 was primarily treated by hip transposition. The patients were followed for a median time of 3 (1–11) years. Results 1 patient with a pubic tumor developed a local recurrence 1 year after intralesional resection and additional curettage of the margins. The recurrence presented as a small soft tissue mass within the scar tissue of the gluteal muscles and was treated by resection. No secondary sarcoma was detected and none of the patients developed pulmonary metastases or multicentricity. No major complication occurred during surgery. Interpretation We conclude that most GCTs of the pelvis can be treated by intralesional procedures. For tumors of the iliac wing, wide resection can be an alternative. Surgical treatment of tumors affecting the acetabular region often results in functional impairment. Pre-surgical selective arterial embolization appears to be a safe procedure that may reduce the risk of local recurrence. PMID:19916695

  4. Giant-cell tumor: analysis on the importance of early diagnosis and the epidemiological profile☆

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Diniz Ferraz, Diego Firmino; Torres dos Santos, César Augusto; Farias Costa, Victor Hugo; Gonçalves Souza, Antônio Marcelo; Gomes Lima, Paulo Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to ascertain the relationship between early diagnosis of giant-cell tumors (GCT) and their prognosis, by correlating the time of symptom onset with the staging of the injury (through the Campanacci classification at the time of diagnosis), and with the type of treatment. The secondary objective of the study was to outline the epidemiological profile of patients with GCT in the region where the data were gathered, and to compare them with data in the literature. Methods The authors present an evaluation on 61 patients diagnosed with bone GCT, with regard to the site of involvement, age, initial symptoms, time of symptom onset, classification and type of treatment, among patients attended between May 1994 and August 2009. Results The threshold indicated as the limit for Campanacci stage I tumors to be the commonest diagnosis, with a 98.2% chance that the treatment would be non-aggressive, was 2 months after symptom onset. This finding was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Every additional month increased the chance that a patient would be diagnosed with an advanced-stage tumor by 10.94%, in relation to the chances of having the other two stages of the tumor. Conclusion The study result not only suggests that the alternative hypothesis that the earlier the diagnosis of GCT is, the less severe the lesion will be, has been confirmed; but also especially predicts the relationship between the time of symptom appearance and the severity of the tumor. PMID:26962501

  5. Primary Hyperparathyroidism Misdiagnosed as Giant Cell Bone Tumor of Maxillary Sinus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aghaghazvini, Leila; Sharifian, Hashem; Rasuli, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is an endocrine disorder recognized by hyperfunction of parathyroid gland, which can result in persistent bone absorption and brown tumor. Facial involvement of brown tumor is rare and usually involves the mandible. Giant cell tumor ( GCT) is an expansile osteolytic bone tumor which is very similar in clinical, radiological and histological features to brown tumor. Herein, we present a 35-year-old woman with an 11-month history of gradually swelling of the right maxilla and buccal spaces began during pregnancy two years ago. No other clinical or laboratory problems were detected. Postpartum CT scan demonstrated a lytic expansile multi-septated mass lesion containing enhancing areas, which initially described as GCT of the right maxillary sinus following surgery. Four months later, gradual progressive swelling of the bed of tumor was recurred and revised pathological slices were compatible with GCT. Regarding patient recent paresthesia, repeated laboratory tests were performed. Finally, according to laboratory results (elevation of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone), ultrasonographic findings and radioisotope scan (Sestamibi), probable parathyroid mass and brown tumor of maxilla was diagnosed. Pathology confirmed hyperplasia of right inferior parathyroid gland. Our case was thought-provoking due to its interesting clinical presentation and unusual presentation of brown tumor in parathyroid hyperplasia. PMID:27127572

  6. An Unusual and Complicated Course of a Giant Cell Tumor of the Capitate Bone

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old female patient presented with a carpal giant cell tumor (GCT) of the right capitate bone. The lesion was initially misdiagnosed as having an osteomyelitis. First, the diagnosis of a benign GCT was confirmed by histological examination. Second, an intralesional curettage and packing of the cavity with cancellous iliac crest bone grafts combined with a fusion of the third carpometacarpal (CMC III) joint were carried out. Third, due to a secondary midcarpal osteoarthritis and a secondary scaphoid nonunion, the CMC III joint fusion plate was removed and the midcarpal joint completely excised. Fourth, in the absence of recurrence of GCT, a four-corner fusion (4CF) with a corticocancellous iliac crest bone graft and complete excision of the scaphoid bone had to be performed. Fifth, a total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) was performed due to hardware failure of 4CF with migration of a headless compression screw into radiocarpal joint which led to erosion of articular surface of the distal radius. At the 3-year follow-up that includes a 1-year follow-up after TWA, there was no recurrence of GCT, and the TWA was not failed. The patient reported that she would have the motion-preserving TWA again. PMID:27847665

  7. Treating giant cell tumours with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-SooS S; Moon, Jeong-Lim; Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Hanlim

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To report on 23 patients with giant cell tumour (GCT) of the femur or tibia treated with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation. METHODS. Records of these 14 men and 9 women aged 22 to 38 (mean, 31) years were reviewed. The most common site involved was the distal femur (n=13), followed by proximal tibia (n=8), proximal femur (n=1), and distal tibia (n=1). The lesions were classified as grade I (n=3), grade II (n=18), and grade III (n=2). Based on histology, the tumour stage was classified as grade I (n=5) and grade II (n=18). Two of these patients had recurrences, which were initially treated with simple curettage and bone grafting of the distal femur and distal tibia. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 5.7 (range, 2.5-10.1) years. 14 of the 23 patients were followed up for over 10 years. No patient developed any local recurrence, remote metastasis, or complication related to surgery or adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSION. Combined treatment entailing curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation was effective in treating GCT of bone.

  8. Pyogenic Granuloma/Peripheral Giant-Cell Granuloma Associated with Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jané-Salas, Enric; Albuquerque, Rui; Font-Muñoz, Aura; González-Navarro, Beatríz; Estrugo Devesa, Albert; López-López, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pyogenic granuloma (PG) and peripheral giant-cell granuloma (PGCG) are two of the most common inflammatory lesions associated with implants; however, there is no established pathway for treatment of these conditions. This paper aims to illustrate the successful treatment of PG and PGCG and also report a systematic review of the literature regarding the various treatments proposed. Methods. To collect relevant information about previous treatments for PG and PGCG involving implants we carried out electronic searches of publications with the key words “granuloma”, “oral”, and “implants” from the last 15 years on the databases Pubmed, National Library of Medicine's Medline, Scielo, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Results. From the electronic search 16 case reports were found showing excision and curettage as the main successful treatment. As no clinical trials or observational studies were identified the authors agreed to present results from a review perspective. Conclusion. This is the largest analysis of PG and PGCG associated with implants published to date. Our review would suggest that PGCG associated with implants appears to have a more aggressive nature; however the level of evidence is very limited. Further cohort studies with representative sample sizes and standard outcome measures are necessary for better understanding of these conditions. PMID:26697068

  9. Giant cells in anaplastic mammary carcinoma of the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Della Salda, L; Sarli, G; Benazzi, C; Marcato, P S

    1993-11-01

    Four uncommon anaplastic mammary carcinomas containing numerous giant cells are described in three dogs and one cat. The giant cells of all cases were studied by means of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to detect epithelial (carcinoembryonic antigen and keratin) and mesenchymal (vimentin, lysozyme and S-100 protein) differentiation. Most of them proved to have an epithelial immunophenotype. Ultrastructurally, scattered bundles of tonofilaments but no lysosome-like bodies could be detected. One tumour had an additional, different type of giant cell, which had a benign multinucleated osteoclast-like appearance, gave positive staining for acid phosphatase, had a histiocytic-stromal immunohistochemical pattern, and was, ultrastructurally, multinucleate with irregular folds and no evidence of tonofilaments. In one case some giant cells had an epithelial immunophenotype and others a stromal immunophenotype, even though their histological and ultrastructural features were the same. In the least histologically differentiated tumour the giant cells presented a coexpression of intermediate filaments. This supported the theory that there might be a stem cell origin for most canine mammary tumours.

  10. Linking genomic reorganization to tumor initiation via the giant cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Niu, N; Zhang, J; Zhang, N; Mercado-Uribe, I; Tao, F; Han, Z; Pathak, S; Multani, A S; Kuang, J; Yao, J; Bast, R C; Sood, A K; Hung, M-C; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying our recent paradoxical finding that mitotically incapacitated and genomically unstable polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are capable of tumor initiation, we labeled ovarian cancer cells with α-tubulin fused to green fluorescent protein, histone-2B fused to red fluorescent protein and FUCCI (fluorescent ubiquitination cell cycle indicator), and tracked the spatial and time-dependent change in spindle and chromosomal dynamics of PGCCs using live-cell fluorescence time-lapse recording. We found that single-dose (500 nm) treatment with paclitaxel paradoxically initiated endoreplication to form PGCCs after massive cell death. The resulting PGCCs continued self-renewal via endoreplication and further divided by nuclear budding or fragmentation; the small daughter nuclei then acquired cytoplasm, split off from the giant mother cells and acquired competency in mitosis. FUCCI showed that PGCCs divided via truncated endoreplication cell cycle (endocycle or endomitosis). Confocal microscopy showed that PGCCs had pronounced nuclear fragmentation and lacked expression of key mitotic proteins. PGCC-derived daughter cells were capable of long-term proliferation and acquired numerous new genome/chromosome alterations demonstrated by spectral karyotyping. These data prompt us to conceptualize a giant cell cycle composed of four distinct but overlapping phases, initiation, self-renewal, termination and stability. The giant cell cycle may represent a fundamental cellular mechanism to initiate genomic reorganization to generate new tumor-initiating cells in response to chemotherapy-induced stress and contributes to disease relapse. PMID:27991913

  11. Biophysical characterisation of electrofused giant HEK293-cells as a novel electrophysiological expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, D.; Terpitz, U.; Zhou, A.; Reuss, R.; Mueller, K.; Sukhorukov, V.L.; Gessner, P.; Nagel, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Bamberg, E. . E-mail: ernst.bamberg@mpibp-frankfurt.mpg.de

    2006-09-22

    Giant HEK293 cells of 30-65 {mu}m in diameter were produced by three-dimensional multi-cell electrofusion in 75 mOsm sorbitol media. These strong hypotonic conditions facilitated fusion because of the spherical shape and smooth membrane surface of the swollen cells. A regulatory volume decrease (RVD), as observed at higher osmolalities, did not occur at 75 mOsm. In contrast to field-treated, but unfused cells, the increase in volume induced by hypotonic shock was only partly reversible in the case of fused giant cells after their transfer into isotonic medium. The large size of the electrofused cells allowed the study of their electrophysiological properties by application of both whole-cell and giant excised patch-clamp techniques. Recordings on giant cells yielded a value of 1.1 {+-} 0.1 {mu}F/cm{sup 2} for the area-specific membrane capacitance. This value was consistent with that of the parental cells. The area-specific conductivity of giant cells (diameter > 50 {mu}m) was found to be between 12.8 and 16.1 {mu}S/cm{sup 2}, which is in the range of that of the parental cells. Measurements with patch-pipettes containing fluorescein showed uniform dye uptake in the whole-cell configuration, but not in the cell-attached configuration. The diffusion-controlled uniform uptake of the dye into the cell interior excludes internal compartmentalisation. The finding of a homogeneous fusion was also supported by expression of the yellow fluorescent protein YFP (as part of the fusion-protein ChR2-YFP) in giant cells since no plasma-membrane bound YFP-mediated fluorescence was detected in the interior of the electrofused cells. Functional expression and the electrophysiological characterisation of the light-activated cation channel Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) yielded similar results as for parental cells. Most importantly, the giant cells exhibited a comparable expression density of the channel protein in the plasma membrane as observed in parental cells. This demonstrates that

  12. Differential gene expression in stromal cells of human giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Wuelling, M; Delling, G; Kaiser, E

    2004-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) offers a unique model for the hematopoietic-stromal cell interaction in human bone marrow. Evidence has been presented that GCT stromal cells (GCTSCs) promote accumulation, size and activity of the giant cells. Although GCTSCs are considered the neoplastic component of GCT, little is known about their genetic basis and, to date, a tumor-specific gene expression pattern has not been characterized. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as the origin of the GCT neoplastic stromal cell. Using state of the art array technology, expression profiling was applied to enriched stromal cell populations from five different GCTs and two primary MSCs as controls. Of the 29 differentially expressed genes found, 25 showed an increased expression. Differential mRNA expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 10 selected genes, supporting the validity of cDNA arrays as a tool to identify tumor-related genes in GCTSCs. Increased expression of two oncogenes, JUN and NME2, was substantiated at the protein level, utilizing immunohistochemical evaluation of GCT sections and Western-blot analysis. Increased phosphorylation of JUN Ser-63 was also found.

  13. Respiration characteristics of mitochondria in parental and giant transformed cells of the murine Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Horbay, Rostyslav O; Manko, Bohdan O; Manko, Volodymyr V; Lootsik, Maxim D; Stoika, Rostyslav S

    2012-01-01

    Respiration characteristics of mitochondria of the parental and giant cells of murine NK/Ly (Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma) were studied. The giant cell-enriched ascites were obtained by serial intraperitoneal injections of vinblastine in tumour-bearing mice. Ascites containing >70% giant cells were used. Their diameter of was over 17 μm (~2800 μm(3)), while the diameter of the parental cells was 12.7 μm (1100 μm(3)). The respiration rate of mitochondria in situ was measured by oxygen consumption in intact and digitonin-permeabilized NK/Ly cells. Endogenous respiration of intact giant NK/Ly cells was three times higher compared to the parental ones, roughly in agreement with the volume change. The giant NK/Ly cells were far more resistant to permeabilization with digitonin than the parental cells, as shown by Trypan Blue and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release tests. After digitonin permeabilization, oxygen consumption was reduced to a minimal level (0.06 ng atom O/(s × 106 cells) in both types of cells. Addition of α-ketoglutarate or succinate to the incubation medium increased oxygen consumption in the parental cells by 46 and 164% respectively. In the giant NK/Ly cells, the corresponding increases were 164 and 276%. Addition of ADP to α-ketoglutarate- or succinate-supplemented medium further stimulated oxygen consumption of the permeabilized NK/Ly cells; however, the effect of ADP was more pronounced in the giant cells. In addition, indices of respiratory control were significantly higher in the giant cells. Oligomycin suppressed considerably the respiration of the intact giant cells but had a much weaker effect on parental cells. Thus, giant NK/Ly cells possess much higher respiration rates and show tighter coupling between the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation compared with parental cells.

  14. Structure and Evolution of Giant Cells in Global Models of Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Brun, Allan Sacha; DeRosa, Marc L.; Toomre, Juri

    2008-01-01

    The global scales of solar convection are studied through three-dimensional simulations of compressible convection carried out in spherical shells of rotating fluid that extend from the base of the convection zone to within 15 Mm of the photosphere. Such modeling at the highest spatial resolution to date allows study of distinctly turbulent convection, revealing that coherent downflow structures associated with giant cells continue to play a significant role in maintaining the differential rotation that is achieved. These giant cells at lower latitudes exhibit prograde propagation relative to the mean zonal flow, or differential rotation, that they establish, and retrograde propagation of more isotropic structures with vortical character at mid and high latitudes. The interstices of the downflow networks often possess strong and compact cyclonic flows. The evolving giant-cell downflow systems can be partly masked by the intense smaller scales of convection driven closer to the surface, yet they are likely to be detectable with the helioseismic probing that is now becoming available. Indeed, the meandering streams and varying cellular subsurface flows revealed by helioseismology must be sampling contributions from the giant cells, yet it is difficult to separate out these signals from those attributed to the faster horizontal flows of supergranulation. To aid in such detection, we use our simulations to describe how the properties of giant cells may be expected to vary with depth and how their patterns evolve in time.

  15. Giant cytoplasmic granules in Langerhans cells of Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Gutiérrez-Palomera, G; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Rondán, A; Antuna, S

    1990-02-01

    Giant membrane-bound cytoplasmic granules were found in the epidermal Langerhans cells of a patient with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome. These cells also contained normal-appearing Birbeck granules. The giant granules had a granular or sometimes globular internal structure; they are believed to derive from fusion of lysosomes or some portion of Birbeck granules. It is unclear whether this morphologic change in Langerhans cell interferes with their antigen-presenting function; it may be, in part, responsible for the frequent infections seen in patients with Chediak-Higashi syndrome that are otherwise more clearly related to the abnormalities in neutrophils and lymphocytes. The Langerhans cell is another cellular type in Chediak-Higashi syndrome in which giant cytoplasmic granules are found.

  16. Premalignant Oral Lesion Cells Elicit Increased Cytokine Production and Activation of T-cells

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, SARA D.; LEVINGSTON, CORINNE; YOUNG, M. RITA I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are known to evade the host immune response. How premalignant oral lesions modulate the immune response, however, has yet to be elucidated. Materials and Methods A mouse model of oral carcinogenesis was used to determine how mediators from premalignant oral lesion cells vs. HNSCC cells impact on immune cytokine production and activation. Results Media conditioned by premalignant lesion cells elicited an increased production of T cell-associated cytokines and proinflammatory mediators from cervical lymph node cells compared to media conditioned by HNSCC cells or media alone. In the presence of premalignant lesion cell-conditioned media, CD4+ T cell expression of the IL-2 receptor CD25 and CD8+ T cell expression of the activation marker CD69 was greater, compared to what was induced in HNSCC cell-conditioned media or media alone. Conclusion Premalignant lesion cells promote a proinflammatory environment and induce immune changes before HNSCC tumors are established. PMID:27354582

  17. Inactivated autograft–prosthesis composite have a role for grade III giant cell tumor of bone around the knee

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumors (GCT) around the knee are common and pose a special problem of reconstruction after tumor excision, especially for grade III GCT. We questioned whether en bloc resection and reconstruction with alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite would provide (1) local control and long-term survival and (2) useful limb function in patients who had grade III GCT around the knee. Methods We retrospectively reviewed eight patients (5 males and 3 females) treated with this procedure with mean age of 31 years (range 20 to 43 years) from Jan 2007 to Oct 2008. 5 lesions were located in distal femur and 3 in proximal tibia. 4 patients were with primary tumor and the other 4 with recurrence. 2 patients showed pathological fracture. Results Mean Follow-up is 54 months ranging from 38 to 47 months. No recurrence, metastasis, prosthesis loosening were found. The mean healing time between autograft and host bone was 5.5 months. The mean MSTS score was 26.3 (88%) ranging from 25 to 29. The mean ISOLS composite graft score was 32.8 (88.5%) ranging from 28 to 35. Creeping substitution is possibly the main way in bony junction. The healing time in femoral lesion is faster than that in tibial lesion. Conclusions The technique of alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite could be able to achieve satisfactory oncological and functional outcomes in Grade III GCT. PMID:24209887

  18. Limb Preservation in Recurrent Giant Cell Tumour of Distal End of Radius with Fibular Graft Fracture: Role of Ulnocarpal Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narinder

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of distal radius are locally aggressive tumors with a high rate of recurrence. Though surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, reconstruction remains a challenge in cases of recurrence. Recurrences of GCT in autogenous fibular grafts have been rarely reported and pathological fractures through such grafts are even rarer. Ulnocarpal arthrodesis has never been described as a limb preservation procedure in such a recurrent lesion in distal radius with pathological fracture through a well incorporated fibular graft. A case of pathological fracture in a well incorporated autogenous non-vascularized fibular bone graft in recurrent GCT of distal radius and its successful management with ulnocarpal arthrodesis is reported. In such a scenario where other reconstructive options like allograft or prosthetic reconstructions are not likely to succeed, ulnocarpal arthrodesis may be considered as a salvage procedure.

  19. Treatment with Doxycycline of Generalized Annular Elastolytic Giant Cell Granuloma Associated with Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tas, B; Caglar, A; Ozdemir, B

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is a case of generalized annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma (AEGCG) associated with borrelia infection and genes of p-30, p-31, p-39. A possible cross-mediated reaction from the T-cell type which might have induced the AEGCG is discussed from the concept of “heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and molecular mimicry”. PMID:26624605

  20. The suitability of the ultrasound biomicroscope for establishing texture in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Roters, S.; Szurman, P.; Engels, B.; Brunner, R.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To establish whether ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) is a helpful tool in locating the arterial segment responsible in patients with segmental attacks in giant cell arteritis
METHODS—The superficial temporal arteries of 19 patients with suspected giant cell arteritis were examined with the UBM before biopsy.
RESULTS—20 specimens provided the histological proof of giant cell arteritis in five patients. Side differences, a dark perivascular halo, and high reflexivity of the intra-arterial space were found.
CONCLUSION—it is assumed that there are two types of arteritic inflammation: (1) the occlusion of intra-arterial space due to intimal fibrosis (UBM: high reflexive "filling"), and (2) inflammation of the perivascular zone with oedematous thickening and infiltration of the media (UBM: dark halo) and its combination. UBM is helpful in obtaining an indication of the side and segment for biopsy.

 PMID:11466252

  1. Everolimus Treatment for an Early Infantile Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Minagawa, Kimio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are benign tumors often observed with tuberous sclerosis complex. These tumors are rarely diagnosed during fetal life or early infancy. Until recently, the only available treatment has been surgical resection. Current clinical research has demonstrated that everolimus can induce these tumors' regression. We report a 19-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis complex. At 2 months of age, he presented with congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that was complicated by refractory epilepsy and severe mental retardation. Treatment with everolimus was started when he was 10 months old. Three months after initiating everolimus, the tumor was significantly reduced in size, and the reduction was subsequently maintained. His seizures decreased and he showed cognitive and developmental improvement. No severe adverse events have been observed to date. Everolimus has promise as an effective alternative to surgery for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas during early infancy.

  2. Giant Cell Tumour of Proximal Phalanx of Ring Finger: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rishit; Shah, Malkesh; Patel, Amit; Golwala, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone arising from a phalanx of a finger is extremely rare. Only two percent of all reported GCTs are found in the hand, which show a higher rate of recurrence as compared to those occurring at a more proximal location. Here we report a rare case of giant cell tumour of proximal phalanx of the ring finger in a 20-year-old male, which was treated with extended curettage and bone grafting. After two years of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with complete functional recovery and no signs of recurrence. PMID:27900230

  3. Gene mutations and actionable genetic lesions in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Makhdum; Zhang, Leo; Nomie, Krystle; Lam, Laura; Wang, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mutations and epigenetic alterations are key events in transforming normal cells to cancer cells. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the B-cell, is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis especially for those patients who are resistant to the frontline drugs. There is a great need to describe the molecular basis and mechanism of drug resistance in MCL to develop new strategies for treatment. We reviewed frequent somatic mutations and mutations involving the B-cell pathways in MCL and discussed clinical trials that attempted to disrupt these gene pathways and/or epigenetic events. Recurrent gene mutations were discussed in the light of prognostic and therapeutic opportunity and also the challenges of targeting these lesions. Mutations in the ATM, CCND1, TP53, MLL2, TRAF2 and NOTCH1 were most frequently encountered in mantle cell lymphoma. Translational models should be built that would assess mutations longitudinally to identify important compensatory, pro-survival and anti-apoptic pathways and actionable genetic targets. PMID:27449094

  4. Mast cell tumour in a giant Galapagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra vicina).

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Stacy, B A; Morales, J A; Gastezzi-Arias, P; Landazuli, S; Jacobson, E R

    2008-01-01

    A well-differentiated cutaneous mast cell tumour was diagnosed in a subadult female giant Galapagos tortoise. The tumour was a pedunculated, verrucose mass located near the base of the neck. The histological features, which were diagnostic for a mast cell tumour, included abundant intracytoplasmic granules that were stained metachromatically with Giemsa and toluidine blue stains. Mast cell tumours are rare in reptiles, and this is the first description of a mast cell tumour in a chelonian.

  5. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces Th17 cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. We previously reported that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteremia accelerated atherosclerosis accompanied by inflammation in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. In this study, we investigated whether Aa promotes the Th17 inducing pathway in Aa-challenged Apoe(shl) mice. Mice were intravenously injected with live Aa HK1651 or vehicles. Time-course analysis of splenic IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell frequencies, the proximal aorta lesion area, serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels, the mRNA expression of Th17-related molecules such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL17RA, STAT3, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β and RORγt, Th17-related microRNA levels and the levels of AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 were examined. Challenge with Aa time dependently induced tropism of Th17 cells in the spleen and increase in atheromatous lesions in the aortic sinus of Apoe(shl) mice. Serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels were significantly enhanced by Aa. The gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17RA, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β, STAT3, RORγt, AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 was also time dependently stimulated in the aorta of Aa-challenged mice. Furthermore, Aa challenge significantly increased the expression of miR-146b and miR-155 in the aorta. Based on the results, it seems that Aa stimulates Th17 induction that affects the progression of Aa-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  6. Incomplete cytokinesis and re-fusion of small mononucleated Hodgkin cells lead to giant multinucleated Reed–Sternberg cells

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Newrzela, Sebastian; Heinrich, Tim; Weiser, Christian; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Schmid, Frederike; Warner, Kathrin; Hartmann, Sylvia; Schroeder, Timm; Küppers, Ralf; Rieger, Michael A.; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleated Reed–Sternberg (RS) cells are pathognomonic for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and their presence is essential for diagnosis. How these giant tumor cells develop is controversial, however. It has been postulated that RS cells arise from mononucleated Hodgkin cells via endomitosis. Conversely, continuous single-cell tracking of HL cell lines by long-term time-lapse microscopy has identified cell fusion as the main route of RS cell formation. In contrast to growth-induced formation of giant Hodgkin cells, fusion of small mononuclear cells followed by a size increase gives rise to giant RS cells. Of note, fusion of cells originating from the same ancestor, termed re-fusion, is seen nearly exclusively. In the majority of cases, re-fusion of daughter cells is preceded by incomplete cytokinesis, as demonstrated by microtubule bonds among the cells. We confirm at the level of individual tracked cells that giant Hodgkin and RS cells have little proliferative capacity, further supporting small mononuclear Hodgkin cells as the proliferative compartment of the HL tumor clone. In addition, sister cells show a shared propensity for re-fusion, providing evidence of early RS cell fate commitment. Thus, RS cell generation is related neither to cell fusion of unrelated Hodgkin cells nor to endomitosis, but rather is mediated by re-fusion of daughter cells that underwent mitosis. This surprising finding supports the existence of a unique mechanism for the generation of multinuclear RS cells that may have implications beyond HL, given that RS-like cells are frequently observed in several other lymphoproliferative diseases as well. PMID:24302766

  7. Characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow of giant panda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Yang; Yie, Shangmian; Lan, Jingchao; Pi, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhihe; Huang, He; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Ming; Cai, Kailai; Wang, Hairui; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    In present study, we report on bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are isolated from giant pandas. Cells were collected from the BM of two stillborn giant pandas. The cells were cultured and expanded in 10% fetal bovine serum medium. Cell morphology was observed under an inverted microscopy, and the proliferation potential of the cells was evaluated by counting cell numbers for eight consecutive days. Differentiation potentials of the cells were determined by using a variety of differentiation protocols for osteocytes, adipocytes, neuron cells, and cardiomyocytes. Meanwhile, the specific gene expressions for MSCs or differentiated cells were analyzed by RT-PCR. The isolated cells exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology; expressed mesenchymal specific markers such as cluster of differentiation 73 (CD73), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX-2), guanine nucleotide-binding protein-like 3 (GNL3), and stem cell factor receptor (SCFR); and could be differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes that were characterized by Alizarin Red and Oil Red O staining. Under appropriate induction conditions, these cells were also able to differentiate into neuroglial-like or myocardial-like cells that expressed specific myocardial markers such as GATA transcription factors 4 (GATA-4), cardiac troponin T (cTnT), and myosin heavy chain 7B (MYH7B), or neural specific markers such as Nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). This study demonstrated stem cells recovery and growth from giant pandas. The findings suggest that cells isolated from the BM of giant pandas have a high proliferative capacity and multiple differentiation potential in vitro which might aid conservation efforts.

  8. Heterogeneous vesicles in mucous epithelial cells of posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Guo, X; Zhong, S; Ge, T; Peng, S; Yu, P; Zhou, Z

    2015-08-25

    The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultrastructural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E). Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i) electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC); ii) electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC); and iii) mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC).

  9. A Model of Giant Vacuole Dynamics in Human Schlemm’s Canal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Simon, David; Reed, Ashley; Stamer, W. Daniel; Overby, Darryl R.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous humour transport across the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm’s canal likely involves flow through giant vacuoles and pores, but the mechanics of how these structures form and how they influence the regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) are not well understood. In this study, we developed an in vitro model of giant vacuole formation in human Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells (HSCECs) perfused in the basal-to-apical direction (i.e., the direction that flow crosses the inner wall in vivo) under controlled pressure drops (2 or 6 mmHg). The system was mounted on a confocal microscope for time-lapse en face imaging, and cells were stained with calcein, a fluorescent vital dye. At the onset of perfusion, elliptical void regions appeared within an otherwise uniformly stained cytoplasm, and 3-dimensional reconstructions revealed that these voids were dome-like outpouchings of the cell to form giant vacuole-like structures or GVLs that reproduced the classic “signet ring” appearance of true giant vacuoles. Increasing pressure drop from 2 to 6 mmHg increased GVL height (14 ± 4 vs. 21 ± 7 µm, p < 0.0001) and endothelial hydraulic conductivity (1.15 ± 0.04 vs. 2.11 ± 0.49 µL min−1 mmHg−1 cm−2; p < 0.001), but there was significant variability in the GVL response to pressure between cell lines isolated from different donors. During perfusion, GVLs were observed “migrating” and agglomerating about the cell layer and often collapsed despite maintaining the same pressure drop. GVL formation was also observed in human umbilical vein and porcine aortic endothelial cells, suggesting that giant vacuole formation is not a unique property of Schlemm’s canal cells. However, in these other cell types, GVLs were rarely observed “migrating” or contracting during perfusion, suggesting that Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells may be better adapted to withstand basal-to-apical directed pressure gradients. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro

  10. Differential expression of filamin B splice variants in giant cell tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Joseph Chi-Ching; Lau, Carol Po-Ying; Cheung, Alex Chun; Wong, Kwok-Chuen; Huang, Lin; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is the most commonly reported non-malignant bone tumor in Hong Kong. This kind of tumor usually affects people aged 20–40 years. Also, it is well known for recurrence locally, especially when the tumor cannot be removed completely. Filamins are actin-binding proteins which contain three family members, filamin A, B and C. They are the products of three different genes, FLNA, FLNB and FLNC, which can generate various transcript variants in different cell types. In this study, we focused on the effects of FLNBv2 and FLNBv4 toward GCT cells. The only difference between FLNBv2 and FLNBv4 is that FLNBv4 does not contain hinge 1 region. We found that the relative abundance of FLNBv4 varies among different GCT cell lines while the expression level of FLNBv4 in normal osteoblasts was only marginally detectable. In the functional aspect, overexpression of FLNBv4 led to upregulation of RANKL, OCN, OPG and RUNX2, which are closely related to GCT cell survival and differentiation. Moreover, FLNBv4 can have a negative effect on cell viability of GCT cells when compare with FLNBv2. In conclusion, splicing variants of FLNB are differentially expressed in GCT cells and may play a role in the proliferation and differentiation of tumor cells. PMID:27779699

  11. Generation of cancer stem-like cells through the formation of polyploid giant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Mercado-Uribe, I; Xing, Z; Sun, B; Kuang, J; Liu, J

    2014-01-02

    Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) have been observed by pathologists for over a century. PGCCs contribute to solid tumor heterogeneity, but their functions are largely undefined. Little attention has been given to these cells, largely because PGCCs have been generally thought to originate from repeated failure of mitosis/cytokinesis and have no capacity for long-term survival or proliferation. Here we report our successful purification and culture of PGCCs from human ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian cancer. These cells are highly resistant to oxygen deprivation and could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion, generating regular-sized cancer cells quickly through budding or bursting similar to simple organisms like fungi. They express normal and cancer stem cell markers, they divide asymmetrically and they cycle slowly. They can differentiate into adipose, cartilage and bone. A single PGCC formed cancer spheroids in vitro and generated tumors in immunodeficient mice. These PGCC-derived tumors gained a mesenchymal phenotype with increased expression of cancer stem cell markers CD44 and CD133 and become more resistant to treatment with cisplatin. Taken together, our results reveal that PGCCs represent a resistant form of human cancer using an ancient, evolutionarily conserved mechanism in response to hypoxia stress; they can contribute to the generation of cancer stem-like cells, and also play a fundamental role in regulating tumor heterogeneity, tumor growth and chemoresistance in human cancer.

  12. Differential expression of filamin B splice variants in giant cell tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Joseph Chi-Ching; Lau, Carol Po-Ying; Cheung, Alex Chun; Wong, Kwok-Chuen; Huang, Lin; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is the most commonly reported non-malignant bone tumor in Hong Kong. This kind of tumor usually affects people aged 20-40 years. Also, it is well known for recurrence locally, especially when the tumor cannot be removed completely. Filamins are actin-binding proteins which contain three family members, filamin A, B and C. They are the products of three different genes, FLNA, FLNB and FLNC, which can generate various transcript variants in different cell types. In this study, we focused on the effects of FLNBv2 and FLNBv4 toward GCT cells. The only difference between FLNBv2 and FLNBv4 is that FLNBv4 does not contain hinge 1 region. We found that the relative abundance of FLNBv4 varies among different GCT cell lines while the expression level of FLNBv4 in normal osteoblasts was only marginally detectable. In the functional aspect, overexpression of FLNBv4 led to upregulation of RANKL, OCN, OPG and RUNX2, which are closely related to GCT cell survival and differentiation. Moreover, FLNBv4 can have a negative effect on cell viability of GCT cells when compare with FLNBv2. In conclusion, splicing variants of FLNB are differentially expressed in GCT cells and may play a role in the proliferation and differentiation of tumor cells.

  13. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome with central giant cell granuloma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Türkoğlu, Kivanç; Orhan, Kaan; Demir, Pinar; Karabulut, Bariş; Can-Karabulut, Deniz C

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes a clinical case of both giant cell granuloma and Kartagener syndrome in a 15-year-old male patient, with emphasis on the radiographic aspects of this extremely unusual pathology. To our knowledge, the presence of these 2 rare clinical conditions in the same patient has not been previously reported.

  14. Suspected Giant cell aortitis : from multiple aortic structural damage to fatal listeria sepsi. A case report.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Valeria; Isernia, Giacomo

    2017-03-16

    Giant cell arteritis ( GCA) is an inflammatory vasculopathy affecting large and middle-sized vessels , specifically cranial arteries derived from carotid artery. Isolated extracranial vessel involvement can occur. Interest in extravascular manifestations is recently increasing because of diffusion of sensitive and specific imaging tools such as 18FDG PET TC . Patients have an increased relative risk of severe infection. Listeria monocytogenes infection risk is increased, and vascular system involvement and graft infection have been, even though rarely, reported. We report the case of a 72 year old woman with a history of suspected giant cell aortitis , previous surgical treatment of ascendant and descendant thoracic aortic aneurysm, presenting 7 year after TEVAR with thoracic pain , fever, inflammatory indexes increase, leukocytosis, listeria sepsis and rapidly increasing type I proximal endoleak on CT. 18 FDG PET positivity was associated. Endograft listeria infection on aortitis reactivation was suspected but death for multi-organ failure and absence of autopsy data couldn't confirm diagnosis . Listeria vascular graft infection has been reported previously. Giant cell arteritis is a predisposing condition. We report the first case of endograft infection by listeria monocytogenes in a patient with positive history of suspected giant cell aortic aneurysm.

  15. A mouse model of luciferase-transfected stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Huang, Lin; Li, Gang; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    A major barrier towards the study of the effects of drugs on Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCT) has been the lack of an animal model. In this study, we created an animal model in which GCT stromal cells survived and functioned as proliferating neoplastic cells. A proliferative cell line of GCT stromal cells was used to create a stable and luciferase-transduced cell line, Luc-G33. The cell line was characterized and was found that there were no significant differences on cell proliferation rate and recruitment of monocytes when compared with the wild type GCT stromal cells. We delivered the Luc-G33 cells either subcutaneously on the back or to the tibiae of the nude mice. The presence of viable Luc-G33 cells was assessed using real-time live imaging by the IVIS 200 bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system. The tumor cells initially propagated and remained viable on site for 7 weeks in the subcutaneous tumor model. We also tested in vivo antitumor effects of Zoledronate (ZOL) and Geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) alone or their combinations in Luc-G33-transplanted nude mice. ZOL alone at 400 µg/kg and the co-treatment of ZOL at 400 µg/kg and GGTI-298 at 1.16 mg/kg reduced tumor cell viability in the model. Furthermore, the anti-tumor effects by ZOL, GGTI-298 and the co-treatment in subcutaneous tumor model were also confirmed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In conclusion, we established a nude mice model of GCT stromal cells which allows non-invasive, real-time assessments of tumor development and testing the in vivo effects of different adjuvants for treating GCT.

  16. Multinucleated giant cells in the implant bed of bone substitutes are foreign body giant cells-New insights into the material-mediated healing process.

    PubMed

    Barbeck, Mike; Booms, Patrick; Unger, Ronald; Hoffmann, Verena; Sader, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2017-04-01

    In addition to macrophages, multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are involved in the tissue reaction to a variety of biomaterials. Especially in the case of bone substitute materials it has been assumed that the MNGCs are osteoclasts, based on the chemical and physical similarity of many materials to the calcified matrix and the bony environment in which they are used. However, many studies indicate that these cells belong to the cell line of the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs), which are of "inflammatory origin", although they have been shown to possess both a pro- and also anti-inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, no information is available about their role in the tissue reaction to bone substitute materials. The present study was conducted to analyze the origin of MNGCs in the implant beds of a synthetic and a xenogeneic bone substitute and focused on the application of immunohistochemical methods. Two antibodies against integrin molecules specific for osteoclasts (β-3 integrin) or FBGCs (β-2 integrin) were used to distinguish both giant cell types. The results of the present study indicate that the MNGCs induced by both kinds of bone substitutes are FBGCs, as they express only β-2 integrin in contrast to the osteoclasts outside of the immediate implantation areas, which only demonstrate β-3 integrin expression. These data give new insight into the tissue reaction to both xenogeneic and synthetic bone substitutes. Based on this new knowledge further research concerning the proteomic profile of the FBGCs especially based on the different physicochemical properties of bone substitutes is necessary. This may show that specific characteristics of bone substitutes may exhibit a substantial influence on the regeneration process via the expression of anti-inflammatory molecules by FBGCs. Based on this information it may be possible to formulate and choose bone substitutes that can guide the process of bone tissue regeneration on the molecular level. © 2017 Wiley

  17. Cell-to-cell transfer of glial proteins to the squid giant axon: The glia- neuron protein transfer hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, RJ; Gainer, H; Barker, JL

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that glial cells synthesize proteins which are transferred to adjacent neurons was evaluated in the giant fiber of the squid (Loligo pealei). When giant fibers are separated from their neuron cell bodies and incubated in the presence of radioactive amino acids, labeled proteins appear in the glial cells and axoplasm. Labeled axonal proteins were detected by three methods: extrusion of the axoplasm from the giant fiber, autoradiography, and perfusion of the giant fiber. This protein synthesis is completely inhibited by puromycin but is not affected by chloramphenicol. The following evidence indicates that the labeled axonal proteins are not synthesized within the axon itself. (a) The axon does not contain a significant amount of ribosomes or ribosomal RNA. (b) Isolated axoplasm did not incorporate [(3)H]leucine into proteins. (c) Injection of Rnase into the giant axon did not reduce the appearance of newly synthesized proteins in the axoplasm of the giant fiber. These findings, coupled with other evidence, have led us to conclude that the adaxonal glial cells synthesize a class of proteins which are transferred to the giant axon. Analysis of the kinetics of this phenomenon indicates that some proteins are transferred to the axon within minutes of their synthesis in the glial cells. One or more of the steps in the transfer process appear to involve Ca++, since replacement of extracellular Ca++ by either Mg++ or Co++ significantly reduces the appearance of labeled proteins in the axon. A substantial fraction of newly synthesized glial proteins, possibly as much as 40 percent, are transferred to the giant axon. These proteins are heterogeneous and range in size from 12,000 to greater than 200,000 daltons. Comparisons of the amount of amino acid incorporation in glia cells and neuron cell bodies raise the possibility that the adaxonal glial cells may provide an important source of axonal proteins which is supplemental to that provided by axonal transport

  18. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  19. Intraoperative squash cytology and histology of giant cell ependymoma: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Ebru; Kucuk, Ulku; Ersen, Ayca; Pala, Emel E; Senoglu, Mehmet; Binatli, Ali O; Yildirim, Zubeyde

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell ependymomas (GCE) are extremely rare tumors, with 24 cases described in the literature. Squash cytology is a rapid, reliable, simple technique for intraoperative consultation in neurosurgical practice. We describe a rare case of GCE arising at level of L4-L5 in a 66-year-old woman and discuss the cytologic/histologic features. Intraoperative smears were highly cellular with a prominent fibrillary background and exhibited papillary structures and sheets composed of highly atypical and bizarre cells. Some of the cells showed nuclear pseudoinclusions and rarely formed pseudorosette-like arrays. Intraoperative diagnosis was high grade glial tumor. On paraffin sections, besides extensive polymorphism, there were no microvascular proliferation, necrosis, and mitosis and the final diagnosis was WHO grade II GCE. GCE may be a diagnostic challenge on intraoperative smears, frozen, and paraffin sections. It must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of giant cell exhibiting benign and malignant tumors of brain. PMID:28182061

  20. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Hilary M. A.; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A.; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  1. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  2. Denosumab, a Potential Alternative to the Surgical Treatment of Distal Radius Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Ganjoo, Kristen N; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-08-01

    Juxta-articular giant cell tumors can pose major surgical challenges. Aggressive distal radius giant cell tumors often require complex reconstructive procedures that are associated with numerous complications. We present a case of a 25-year old man with a Campanacci grade 3 giant cell tumor of the distal radius that was successfully treated with denosumab without complex reconstructive procedures. At 3.5-year follow-up and 1-year drug free period, the patient remained asymptomatic without histologic evidence of recurrent tumor. With denosumab therapy, patients can potentially avoid surgery and achieve a successful outcome.

  3. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in skin lesions of classic Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mirna; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent producers of type I interferons (IFNs), which allows them to provide anti-viral resistance and to link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. pDCs are involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious [especially viral, such as Molluscum contagiosum (MC)], inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal, systemic lympho-angioproliferative tumor associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Microscopy typically exhibits a chronic inflammatory lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in addition to the vascular changes and spindle cell proliferation. Despite the extensive research done on the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV, pDCs role in relation to KS has only rarely been investigated. Given this, we intend to investigate pDC occurrence and activity in the skin lesions of KS. Immunohistochemical staining for BDCA-2 (specific pDC marker) and MxA (surrogate marker for local type I IFN production) was performed on classic KS (n = 20) with the control group comprising inflamed MC (n = 20). As expected, BDCA-2+ pDCs were present in abundance with diffuse and intense MxA expression (indicative of local type I IFN production) in all inflamed MC cases (20 of 20, 100 %). Though present in all the KS cases, pDCs were significantly less abundant in KS than in inflamed MC cases, and MxA expression was patchy/weak in most KS cases. In summary, pDCs are part of the inflammatory host response in KS; however, they were generally low in number with decreased type I IFN production which is probably related to KSHV's ability to evade the immune system through the production of different viral proteins capable of suppressing IFN production as well as pDC function.

  4. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  5. Microglial cell activation in demyelinating canine distemper lesions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Veronika M; Czub, Markus; Schreiner, Nicole; Moore, Peter F; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Tipold, Andrea

    2004-08-01

    Microglia cells are the principal immune effector elements of the brain responding to any pathological event. To elucidate the possible role of microglia in initial non-inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, microglia from experimentally CDV infected dogs were isolated ex vivo by density gradient centrifugation and characterized immunophenotypically and functionally using flow cytometry. Results from dogs with demyelinating lesions were compared to results from recovered dogs and two healthy controls. CDV antigen could be detected in microglia of dogs with histopathologically confirmed demyelination. Microglia of these dogs showed marked upregulation of the surface molecules CD18, CD11b, CD11c, CD1c, MHC class I and MHC class II and a tendency for increased expression intensity of ICAM-1 (CD54), B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), whereas no increased expression was found for CD44 and CD45. Functionally, microglia exhibited distinctly enhanced phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was concluded that in CDV infection, there is a clear association between microglial activation and demyelination. This strongly suggests that microglia contribute to acute myelin destruction in distemper.

  6. Human atherosclerosis. III. Immunocytochemical analysis of the cell composition of lesions of young adults.

    PubMed Central

    Katsuda, S.; Boyd, H. C.; Fligner, C.; Ross, R.; Gown, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    There have been only limited immunocytochemical studies of the cell composition of the early lesions of human atherosclerosis, and none that incorporate a comprehensive panel of antibodies to various cell types and subsets. The authors thus performed a prospective study of 27 lesions from 16 different individuals ranging in age from 15 to 34 years. These were all lesions that appeared grossly as slightly raised, yellow fatty streaks in the posterior ascending aorta, but on histologic examination had varying degrees of round-cell, spindle-cell, and foam-cell accumulation. Using a panel of antibodies, including monoclonal antibodies specific for smooth muscle cells [HHF35], human macrophages [HAM56], endothelial cells [monoclonal antibodies to F. VIII related antigen], lymphocytes [anti-CD45, anti-CD20, anti-CD45RO, anti-T-cell receptor], it was revealed that the predominant cell type in these early lesions was the smooth muscle cell, including the vast majority of the foam cells, which tended to appear in the deeper regions of the lesions. There were variable numbers of smooth muscle cells and lymphocytes; the latter were exclusively T cells. It is concluded that in atherosclerotic lesions of young adults, which may represent various stages of fatty streak formation and advanced fatty streaks, smooth muscle cell accumulation may be an early event. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1562051

  7. Papanicolaou staining of exfoliated vaginal epithelial cells facilitates the prediction of ovulation in the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Durrant, B; Czekala, N; Olson, M; Anderson, A; Amodeo, D; Campos-Morales, R; Gual-Sill, F; Ramos-Garza, J

    2002-04-15

    The giant panda is seasonally monoestrus, experiencing a single estrous with spontaneous ovulation in the spring. Therefore, accurate monitoring of the estrous cycle to pinpoint the time of ovulation is critical for the success of timed mating or artificial insemination. Analysis of exfoliated vaginal epithelial cells is a simple technique that rapidly yields information about the estrous status of a panda. Vaginal swabs were obtained during five estrous cycles of two nulliparous females. Cells were stained with the trichrome Papanicolaou and classified as basophils, intermediates or superficials. The color of stained cells, basophilic, acidophilic or keratinized, was recorded as a characteristic independent of the three standard cell types. The day urinary conjugates of estrogen fell from peak levels was considered the day of ovulation. A chromic shift occurred 8-9 days before ovulation when the majority of exfoliated vaginal cells changed from basophilic (blue) to acidophilic (pink) without accompanying nuclear or cytoplasmic changes. A second chromic shift was consistently observed 2 days prior to ovulation when keratinized (orange) cells replaced acidophils as the majority of vaginal cells. Monochrome staining of vaginal cells is sufficient to quantify superficial cells, which is a useful adjunct to behavioral and endocrinological data in determining estrous in the giant panda. However, the timing and duration of superficial cell elevations are substantially different between and within individual females, which limits the accuracy of timing ovulation for artificial insemination. The predictive value of vaginal cytology was greatly enhanced with the trichrome stain and evaluation of cell color.

  8. Silencing of the UCHL1 gene in giant cell tumors of bone.

    PubMed

    Fellenberg, Jörg; Lehner, Burkhard; Witte, Daniela

    2010-10-15

    Giant cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors consisting of multinucleated giant cells, fibroblast-like stromal cells and mononuclear histiocytes. The stromal cells have been identified as the neoplastic cell population, which promotes the recruitment of histiocytes and the formation of giant cells. Strong evidence exists that these cells develop from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in GCT tumorigenesis. The aim of our study was the identification of cancer-related genes differentially expressed in GCTs compared to MSCs in order to identify possible targets for aberrant promoter methylation, which may contribute to MSC transformation and GCT development. Gene expression of 440 cancer-related genes was analyzed by DNA microarrays in GCT stromal cells and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) isolated from the same patient (n = 3) to avoid interindividual variations. Differential expression was identified for 14 genes, which could be confirmed by quantitative PCR in further 21 GCT and 10 BMSC samples. The most pronounced difference in gene expression was detected for UCHL1, an important regulator of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed a strong methylation of the CpG island covering the UCHL1 promoter in GCT stromal cells, whereas methylation was completely absent in BMSCs. UCHL1 expression in stromal cells could be restored by the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-dC. These data demonstrate that the UCHL1 gene is inactivated in GCTs but not in MSCs, suggesting a possible role of UCHL1 in MSC transformation and GCT development.

  9. CEMENTLESS ENDOPROSTHESIS IN THE TREATMENT OF GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE TIBIA: EIGHTEEN YEARS OF EVOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Glauco Pauka; Sonehara, Helio Ayabe; Neto, Mario Armani

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report on a giant cell tumor of the juxta-articular proximal tibia with a pathological fracture. A female patient presented pain and increased local volume after falling from her own height. She underwent clinical examination, radiographic examination and puncture biopsy. A diagnosis of giant cell tumor was made. The patient was then treated with tumor resection and use of an unconventional partial endoprosthesis of the tibia with preservation of the joint surface of the tibial plateau. The patient evolved with improvement of symptoms and maintenance of joint function of the operated limb, absence of recurrence and complications, without any need for reoperation over 18 years of follow-up. PMID:27026973

  10. [Giant cell tumor of the lumbar spine. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Zabalo, Gorka; Ortega, Rodrigo; Vázquez, Alfonso; Carballares, Ianire; Díaz, Jorge; Portillo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old patient complaining of chronic low back pain radiating to his left thigh. His MRI showed a lytic L1 vertebral body injury. A transpedicular biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor. He underwent a L1 vertebrectomy and vertebral body replacement with a titanium cylinder using anterior approach, followed by the removal of the L1 posterior arch and the placement of pedicle screws through a posterior approach. The giant cell tumor is a rare benign primary bone tumor that can be locally aggressive and can potentially spread to other areas, usually to the lungs. Although it most frequently affects long bones, approximately 10% of tumors are located in the spine. To minimise the risk of recurrence, the elective management option is surgery.

  11. Denosumab: a new treatment option for giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lewin, J; Thomas, D

    2013-11-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, usually benign neoplasm characterized by infiltration with osteoclast-like giant cells, and the osteoclast differentiation factor receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is heavily involved in its pathogenesis. Denosumab belongs to a new class of drugs that inhibit RANKL. Prior to denosumab, multimodality treatment in refractory, recurrent and metastatic GCTB has shown variable results. Recent phase II data have demonstrated denosumab's activity with regard to disease and symptom control, without significant adverse effects. On the basis of this data, the FDA approved denosumab for the treatment of patients whose GCTB is unresectable, or when surgery is likely to result in severe morbidity. Ongoing questions remain, including the optimal scheduling, patient selection, use in the adjuvant setting and long-term toxicity concerns.

  12. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  13. DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: Three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.N.; Shigenaga, M.K.; Gold, L.S.

    1993-12-01

    DNA lesions that escape repair have a certain probability of giving rise to mutations when the cell divides. Endogenous DNA damage is high: 10{sup 6} oxidative lesions are present per rat cell. An exogenous mutagen produces an increment in lesions over the background rate of endogenous lesions. The effectiveness of a particular lesion depends on whether it is excised by a DNA repair system and the probability that it gives rise to a mutation when the cell divides. When the cell divides, an unrepaired DNA lesion has a certain probability of giving rise to a mutation. Thus, an important factor in the mutagenic effect of an exogenous agent whether it is genotoxic or non-genotoxic, is the increment it causes over the background cell division rate (mitogenesis) in cells that appear to matter most in cancer, the stem cells, which are not on their way to being discarded. Increasing their cell division rate increases by high doses of chemicals. If both the rate of DNA lesions and cell division are increased, then there will be a multiplicative effect on mutagenesis (and carcinogenesis), for example, by high doses of a mutagen that also increases mitogenesis through cell killing. The defense system against reactive electrophilic mutagens, such as the glutathione transferases, are also almost all inducible and buffer cells against increments in active forms of chemicals that can cause DNA lesions. A variety of DNA repair defense systems, almost all inducible, buffer the cell against any increment in DNA lesions. Therefore, the effect of a particular chemical insult depends on the level of each defense, which in turn depends on the past history of exposure. Exogenous agents can influence the induction and effectiveness of these defenses. Defenses can be partially disabled by lack of particular micronutrients in the diet (e.g., antioxidants).

  14. Giant vesicles "colonies": a model for primitive cell communities.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Paolo; Stano, Pasquale; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2012-07-09

    Current research on the origin of life typically focuses on the self-organisation of molecular components in individual cell-like compartments, thereby bringing about the emergence of self-sustaining minimal cells. This is justified by the fact that single cells are the minimal forms of life. No attempts have been made to investigate the cooperative mechanisms that could derive from the assembly of individual compartments. Here we present a novel experimental approach based on vesicles "colonies" as a model of primitive cell communities. Experiments show that several advantages could have favoured primitive cell colonies when compared with isolated primitive cells. In fact there are two novel unexpected features typical of vesicle colonies, namely solute capture and vesicle fusion, which can be seen as the basic physicochemical mechanisms at the origin of life.

  15. Aortitis due to giant cell arteritis and psoriatic arthritis: An uncommon association.

    PubMed

    García-Cezón de la Cruz, M Del Pilar; Almodóvar, Raquel; García Pérez, Javier; Dhimes, Patricia Fanny; Zarco, Pedro

    2016-04-27

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with psoriatic arthritis who developed aortitis secondary to giant cell arteritis. She presented with a 2-mounth history of dry cough, fever and fatigue. There was no evidence of tumor or infectious processes. Abdominal computed tomographic and computed tomography coronary angiographic findings were suggestive of aortitis. Histological study of a temporal artery biopsy confirmed temporal arteritis. We also review the available literature on this uncommon condition.

  16. Primary giant cell malignant fibrous histiocytoma-associated with renal calculus

    PubMed Central

    Altunkol, Adem; Savas, Murat; Ciftci, Halil; Gulum, Mehmet; Yagmur, Ismail; Bitiren, Muharrem

    2014-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFH) are the most commonly seen soft tissue sarcomas in adults. It is rarely seen in some visceral organs. Kidneys are the parenchymal organs in which MFHs are most frequently seen. More than 50 cases of primary renal MFH have been reported. Among these cases, only 1 was reported as primary giant cell subtype in association with urolithiasis. This case report is the second such case with the these characteristics. PMID:24678364

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and giant cell hepatitis: Report of three infants.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Şule; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Balamtekin, Necati; Baysoy, Gökhan; Aytaç Elmas, Selin; Orhan, Diclehan; Kale, Gülsev; Yüce, Aysel; Gürakan, Figen; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla

    2010-12-05

    Giant cell hepatitis associated with direct Coombs' test-positive hemolytic anemia is a rare condition of childhood and the pathogenesis remains unclear. An autoimmune activation and loss of self-tolerance in these patients may be the underlying pathology related to the response of some of the patients to immunosuppressive treatment. Herein, we report the clinical presentation and course of three consecutive patients with this rare condition. We conclude that serum ferritin at diagnosis may be used for prediction of the outcome.

  18. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath: a rare periungual location simulating myxoid cyst*

    PubMed Central

    Minotto, Renan; Rodrigues, Camila Britto; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Furian, Roque

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumor most frequent between the third and fifth decades of life. It can mimic and make differential diagnoses with several hand tumors. Definitive diagnosis and the treatment of choice are reached with complete resection and histopathological examination. Here we describe a case with clinical presentation similar to that of a myxoid cyst. PMID:28225971

  19. Bone injury and late giant-cell tumor occurrence: a possible relation. A case report.

    PubMed

    De Nayer, P P; Delloye, C; Malghem, J

    1987-09-01

    A giant-cell tumor of the upper end of the fibula, five years after a documented bone injury at the same site is reported. The histologic diagnosis was corroborated by the patient's age, tumor localization, radiologic and pathologic aspects. The role of a bone injury as a promoting factor in the development of this tumor is discussed. The tumoral occurrence as a reactive process to trauma in this case may not be ruled out.

  20. Two Cases of Sarcoma Arising in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Treated with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Broehm, Cory Julian; Garbrecht, Erika L.; Wood, Jeff; Bocklage, Therese

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a generally benign, but often locally aggressive, neoplasm of bone, with a propensity for recurrence. Sarcomatous transformation is rare and typically occurs with a history of recurrences and radiation treatment. Denosumab, an inhibitor of the RANK ligand involved in bone resorption in GCT, is increasingly used in treatment of recurrent or unresectable giant cell tumor of bone. We report two cases of sarcomatous transformation of GCT to osteosarcoma in patients receiving denosumab. One was a 59-year-old male with a 12-year history of GCT and multiple recurrences taking denosumab for 2.5 years. The second case was in a 56-year-old male with a seven-year history of GCT taking denosumab for six months. Review of the literature shows one case report of malignant transformation of GCT in a patient being treated with denosumab. As the use of denosumab for treatment of GCT will likely increase, larger, controlled studies are needed to ascertain whether denosumab may play a role in malignant transformation of giant cell tumor of bone. PMID:26798348

  1. Chromaffin cell grafts to rat cerebral cortex reverse lesion-induced memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Welner, S A; Koty, Z C; Boksa, P

    1990-09-10

    Adrenal chromaffin cells were isolated from donor adult rats and transplanted to the cerebral cortex of bilaterally nucleus basalis magnocellularis-lesioned rats. Chromaffin cell grafts to lesioned animals completely reversed the spatial memory deficit seen in lesioned alone animals on a T-maze alternation task. Although chromaffin cell grafts have been used previously to reverse motor abnormalities arising from defective nigro-striatal aminergic transmission, the present report is the first evidence that chromaffin cell transplants can reverse deficits in memory function. Grafts also enhanced cortical acetylcholinesterase staining.

  2. MAP65-3 Microtubule-Associated Protein Is Essential for Nematode-Induced Giant Cell Ontogenesis in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Lecomte, Philippe; Jammes, Fabien; Quentin, Michaël; Pagnotta, Sophie; Andrio, Emilie; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Marfaing, Nicolas; Gounon, Pierre; Abad, Pierre; Favery, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The infection of plants by obligate parasitic nematodes constitutes an interesting model for investigating plant cytoskeleton functions. Root knot nematodes have evolved the ability to manipulate host functions to their own advantage by redifferentiating root cells into multinucleate and hypertrophied feeding cells. These giant cells result from repeated rounds of karyokinesis without cell division. Detailed functional analyses demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana Microtubule-Associated Protein65-3 (MAP65-3) was essential for giant cell ontogenesis and that cytokinesis was initiated but not completed in giant cells. In developing giant cells, MAP65-3 was associated with a novel kind of cell plate—the giant cell mini cell plate—that separates daughter nuclei. In the absence of functional MAP65-3, giant cells developed but failed to fully differentiate and were eventually destroyed. These defects in giant cells impaired the maturation of nematode larvae. Thus, MAP65-3 is essential for giant cell development during root knot nematode infection. Subcellular localization of MAP65-3 and analysis of microtubule organization in the dyc283 T-DNA map65-3 mutant demonstrated that MAP65-3 played a critical role in organizing the mitotic microtubule array during both early and late mitosis in all plant organs. Here, we propose a model for the role of MAP65-3 in giant cell ontogenesis. PMID:18263774

  3. Rhesus monkey neural stem cell transplantation promotes neural regeneration in rats with hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Li-Juan; Bian, Hui; Fan, Yao-Dong; Wang, Zheng-Bo; Yu, Hua-Lin; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Rhesus monkey neural stem cells are capable of differentiating into neurons and glial cells. Therefore, neural stem cell transplantation can be used to promote functional recovery of the nervous system. Rhesus monkey neural stem cells (1 × 10(5) cells/μL) were injected into bilateral hippocampi of rats with hippocampal lesions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that green fluorescent protein-labeled transplanted cells survived and grew well. Transplanted cells were detected at the lesion site, but also in the nerve fiber-rich region of the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum. Some transplanted cells differentiated into neurons and glial cells clustering along the ventricular wall, and integrated into the recipient brain. Behavioral tests revealed that spatial learning and memory ability improved, indicating that rhesus monkey neural stem cells noticeably improve spatial learning and memory abilities in rats with hippocampal lesions.

  4. Clustered DNA lesion repair in eukaryotes: relevance to mutagenesis and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Evelyne; Harrison, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    A clustered DNA lesion, also known as a multiply damaged site, is defined as ≥ 2 damages in the DNA within 1–2 helical turns. Only ionizing radiation and certain chemicals introduce DNA damage in the genome in this non-random way. What is now clear is that the lethality of a damaging agent is not just related to the types of DNA lesions introduced, but also to how the damage is distributed in the DNA. Clustered DNA lesions were first hypothesized to exist in the 1990’s, and work has progressed where these complex lesions have been characterized and measured in irradiated as well as in non-irradiated cells. A clustered lesion can consist of single as well as double strand breaks, base damage and abasic sites, and the damages can be situated on the same strand or opposing strands. They include tandem lesions, double strand break (DSB) clusters and non-DSB clusters, and base excision repair as well as the DSB repair pathways can be required to remove these complex lesions. Due to the plethora of oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the repair proteins involved in their removal from the DNA, it has been necessary to study how repair systems handle these lesions using synthetic DNA damage. This review focuses on the repair process and mutagenic consequences of clustered lesions in yeast and mammalian cells. By examining the studies on synthetic clustered lesions, and the effects of low vs high LET radiation on mammalian cells or tissues, it is possible to extrapolate the potential biological relevance of these clustered lesions to the killing of tumor cells by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and to the risk of cancer in non-tumor cells, and this will be discussed. PMID:21185841

  5. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone With Pseudosarcomatous Changes Leading to Premature Denosumab Therapy Interruption: A Case Report With Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Pareja, Andrea; Larousserie, Frédérique; Boudabbous, Sana; Beaulieu, Jean-Yves; Mach, Nicolas; Saiji, Essia; Rougemont, Anne-Laure

    2016-06-01

    Denosumab has shown promising results in the management of giant cell tumor of bone, a primary bone tumor with locally aggressive behaviour. We report a case of premature denosumab interruption due to radiological and clinical tumor expansion of a giant cell tumor of the distal ulna. Although denosumab is known to induce tumor regression, with progressive ossification and loss of the characteristic morphology of giant cell tumor of bone, the ulnar tumor specimen showed a moderately to highly cellular proliferation of short spindle-shaped cells, and no osteoclast-like giant cells. There were no abnormal mitotic figures. We considered the surgical specimen as a giant cell tumor of bone with partial regression after prematurely interrupted denosumab treatment. This case illustrates the diagnostic issues of an initially unfavourable evolution raising concern for malignancy, and the difficulties in histological assessment of a partially treated giant cell tumor of bone, that may mimic osteosarcoma.

  6. A Fraction of CD133+ CNE2 Cells Is Made of Giant Cancer Cells with Morphological Evidence of Asymmetric Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingping; Zhang, Qianbing; Wang, Shuang; Xie, Siming; Fang, Weiyi; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jinsong; Yao, Kaitai

    2015-01-01

    CD133 has been suggested as a broad-spectrum marker for cancer stem cells(CSCs). The present study investigated the expression of CD133 in biopsy tissues of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), NPC cell lines and the immortalized cell line NP69 by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and qRT-PCR. CD133+ cancer cells were isolated using magnetic-activated cell sorting technology. The study demonstrated that CD133+ cells are rare in NPC tissues and cell lines and that their self-renewal and proliferation abilities are stronger than those of CD133- cells and suggested that CD133+ NPC cells have characteristics of cancer stem cells. We further observed CD133+ cancer cells using a light microscope and scanning electron microscope. Generally, CD133+ cells are small, regular and round with small microvilli. On the other hand, CD133- cells are more polymorphic and larger with long micromicrovilli. Additionally, in some fields, several giant cancer cells (GCCs) in the CD133+ cell group were identified under the light microscope. Most of them were polynuclear cells. Under the scanning electron microscope, we found indefinite regular small bodies on the surface of or surrounding the giant cancer cells, some of which appeared to be creeping out the parental cells. This phenomenon was not observed in the CD133- cell groups. Through comparison with descriptions of apoptotic bodies in the literature and from the results of the acridine orange test, we propose that some of the small bodies are daughter cells of the GCCs. This phenomenon is a mode of division of cancer cells called neosis, or budding, which is a form of reproduction for simple organisms. Budding is satisfied with the rapid speed of tumor development. GCCs could be isolated by CD133 beads because the daughter cells have stem-cell characteristics and express stem-cell markers. PMID:26535065

  7. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  8. Differentiation of trophoblast giant cells and their metabolic functions are dependent on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Karim; Anghel, Silvia I; Joye, Elisabeth; Tan, Nguan Soon; Basu-Modak, Sharmila; Trono, Didier; Wahli, Walter; Desvergne, Béatrice

    2006-04-01

    Mutation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARbeta/delta) severely affects placenta development, leading to embryonic death at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) to E10.5 of most, but not all, PPARbeta/delta-null mutant embryos. While very little is known at present about the pathway governed by PPARbeta/delta in the developing placenta, this paper demonstrates that the main alteration of the placenta of PPARbeta/delta-null embryos is found in the giant cell layer. PPARbeta/delta activity is in fact essential for the differentiation of the Rcho-1 cells in giant cells, as shown by the severe inhibition of differentiation once PPARbeta/delta is silenced. Conversely, exposure of Rcho-1 cells to a PPARbeta/delta agonist triggers a massive differentiation via increased expression of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 and integrin-linked kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of Akt. The links between PPARbeta/delta activity in giant cells and its role on Akt activity are further strengthened by the remarkable pattern of phospho-Akt expression in vivo at E9.5, specifically in the nucleus of the giant cells. In addition to this phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt main pathway, PPARbeta/delta also induced giant cell differentiation via increased expression of I-mfa, an inhibitor of Mash-2 activity. Finally, giant cell differentiation at E9.5 is accompanied by a PPARbeta/delta-dependent accumulation of lipid droplets and an increased expression of the adipose differentiation-related protein (also called adipophilin), which may participate to lipid metabolism and/or steroidogenesis. Altogether, this important role of PPARbeta/delta in placenta development and giant cell differentiation should be considered when contemplating the potency of PPARbeta/delta agonist as therapeutic agents of broad application.

  9. Establishment of three cell lines from Chinese giant salamander and their sensitivities to the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiang-Di; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Huang, Xing; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-06-12

    Known as lethal pathogens, Ranaviruses have been identified in diseased fish, amphibians (including Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus, the world's largest amphibian) and reptiles, causing organ necrosis and systemic hemorrhage. Here, three Chinese giant salamander cell lines, thymus cell line (GSTC), spleen cell line (GSSC) and kidney cell line (GSKC) were initially established. Their sensitivities to ranaviruses, wild-type Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) and recombinant Rana grylio virus carrying EGFP gene (rRGV-EGFP) were tested. Temporal transcription pattern of ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP), fluorescence and electron microscopy observations showed that both the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus could replicate in the cell lines.

  10. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: recurrent lesions affecting mandible in a 10-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Loducca, S V; Mantesso, A; Araújo, N S; Magalhães, M H

    2001-01-01

    Hand-Schuller-Christian disease is a multifocal variant of eosinophilic granuloma, characterised by the classical triad of bony lesions, exophthalmos and diabetes insipidus. This case relates recurrent Langerhans' cell histiocytosis lesions presented as destruction of periodontal support associated with diabetes in a 10-year-old patient. Medical history suggests that the case represents a case of Hand-Schuller Christian disease.

  11. Activated myeloid dendritic cells accumulate and co-localize with CD3+ T cells in coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Atilla; Rowley, Anne; Schulte, Danica J; Doherty, Terence M; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Fishbein, Michael C; Kalelkar, Mitra; Cicha, Iwona; Schubert, Katja; Daniel, Werner G; Garlichs, Christoph D; Arditi, Moshe

    2007-08-01

    Emerging evidence implicating the participation of dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells in various vascular inflammatory diseases such as giant cell arteritis, Takayasu's arteritis, and atherosclerosis led us to hypothesize that they might also participate in the pathogenesis of coronary arteritis in Kawasaki disease (KD). Coronary artery specimens from 4 patients with KD and 6 control patients were obtained. Immunohistochemical and computer-assisted histomorphometric analyses were performed to detect all myeloid DCs (S-100(+), fascin(+)), all plasmacytoid DCs (CD123(+)) as well as specific DC subsets (mature myeloid DCs [CD83(+)], myeloid [BDCA-1(+)] and plasmacytoid DC precursors [BDCA-2(+)]), T cells (CD3(+)), and all antigen-presenting cells (HLA-DR(+)). Co-localization of DCs with T cells was assessed using double immunostaining. Significantly more myeloid DCs at a precursor, immature or mature stage were found in coronary lesions of KD patients than in controls. Myeloid DC precursors were distributed equally in the intima and adventitia. Mature myeloid DCs were particularly abundant in the adventitia. There was a significant correlation between mature DCs and HLA-DR expression. Double immunostaining demonstrated frequent contacts between myeloid DCs and T cells in the outer media and adventitia. Plasmacytoid DC precursors were rarely found in the adventitia. In conclusion, coronary artery lesions of KD patients contain increased numbers of mature myeloid DCs with high HLA-DR expression and frequent T cell contacts detected immunohistochemically. This suggests that mature arterial myeloid DCs might be activating T cells in situ and may be a significant factor in the pathogenesis of coronary arteritis in KD.

  12. A short-term in vivo model for giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Because of the lack of suitable in vivo models of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), little is known about its underlying fundamental pro-tumoral events, such as tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. There is no existing cell line that contains all the cell and tissue tumor components of GCT and thus in vitro testing of anti-tumor agents on GCT is not possible. In this study we have characterized a new method of growing a GCT tumor on a chick chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM) for this purpose. Methods Fresh tumor tissue was obtained from 10 patients and homogenized. The suspension was grafted onto the CAM at day 10 of development. The growth process was monitored by daily observation and photo documentation using in vivo biomicroscopy. After 6 days, samples were fixed and further analyzed using standard histology (hematoxylin and eosin stains), Ki67 staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results The suspension of all 10 patients formed solid tumors when grafted on the CAM. In vivo microscopy and standard histology revealed a rich vascularization of the tumors. The tumors were composed of the typical components of GCT, including (CD51+/CD68+) multinucleated giant cells whichwere generally less numerous and contained fewer nuclei than in the original tumors. Ki67 staining revealed a very low proliferation rate. The FISH demonstrated that the tumors were composed of human cells interspersed with chick-derived capillaries. Conclusions A reliable protocol for grafting of human GCT onto the chick chorio-allantoic membrane is established. This is the first in vivo model for giant cell tumors of bone which opens new perspectives to study this disease and to test new therapeutical agents. PMID:21668953

  13. Apoptosis triggered by pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester-mediated photodynamic therapy in a giant cell tumor in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.-T.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Q.-Q.; Bi, Y.; Bai, D.-Q.; Ou, Y.-S.

    2014-06-01

    A giant cell tumor in bone is the common primary bone tumor with aggressive features, occurring mainly in young adults. Photodynamic therapy is a new therapeutic technique for tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of Pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester (MPPa)-mediated photodynamic therapy on the proliferation of giant cell tumor cells and its mechanism of action. Cell proliferation was evaluated using an MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was detected by Hoechst nuclear staining, and flow cytometric assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes and cytochrome c, caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression was assessed. Finally, we found that MPPa-mediated photodynamic therapy could effectively suppress the proliferation of human giant cell tumor cells and induce apoptosis. The mitochondrial pathway was involved in the MPPa-photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis.

  14. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in patients without hard metal exposure: analysis of 3 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khoor, Andras; Roden, Anja C; Colby, Thomas V; Roggli, Victor L; Elrefaei, Mohamed; Alvarez, Francisco; Erasmus, David B; Mallea, Jorge M; Murray, David L; Keller, Cesar A

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell interstitial pneumonia is a rare lung disease and is considered pathognomonic for hard metal lung disease, although some cases with no apparent hard metal (tungsten carbide cobalt) exposure have been reported. We aimed to explore the association between giant cell interstitial pneumonia and hard metal exposure. Surgical pathology files from 2001 to 2004 were searched for explanted lungs with the histopathologic diagnosis of giant cell interstitial pneumonia, and we reviewed the associated clinical histories. Mass spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and human leukocyte antigen typing data were evaluated. Of the 455 lung transplants, 3 met the histologic criteria for giant cell interstitial pneumonia. Patient 1 was a 36-year-old firefighter, patient 2 was a 58-year-old welder, and patient 3 was a 45-year-old environmental inspector. None reported exposure to hard metal or cobalt dust. Patients 1 and 2 received double lung transplants; patient 3 received a left single-lung transplant. Histologically, giant cell interstitial pneumonia presented as chronic interstitial pneumonia with fibrosis, alveolar macrophage accumulation, and multinucleated giant cells of both alveolar macrophage and type 2 cell origin. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis revealed no cobalt or tungsten particles in samples from the explanted lungs. None of the samples had detectable tungsten levels, and only patient 2 had elevated cobalt levels. The lack of appropriate inhalation history and negative analytical findings in the tissue from 2 of the 3 patients suggests that giant cell interstitial pneumonia is not limited to individuals with hard metal exposure, and other environmental factors may elicit the same histologic reaction.

  15. Foreign body giant cells selectively covering haptics of intraocular lens implants: indicators of poor toleration?

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R

    1983-10-01

    A Sputnik lens implant removed after five years because of bullous keratopathy exhibits a dense covering of its Supramid anterior staves with large foreign body giant cells, while its Prolene loops and Polymethylmethacrylate optics have attracted only few of these cell units. The glass-membrane-like component of the reactive membrane also shows significant differences on the different parts of this implant. The use of observation of the components of reactive membranes on lens implants as indicators of toleration in the eye is suggested.

  16. Giant Lysosomes as a Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanism in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Federico; Trombetta, Elena; Cetrangolo, Paola; Maggioni, Marco; Razini, Paola; De Santis, Francesca; Torrente, Yvan; Prati, Daniele; Torresani, Erminio; Porretti, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous improvements in therapeutic protocols, cancer-related mortality is still one of the main problems facing public health. The main cause of treatment failure is multi-drug resistance (MDR: simultaneous insensitivity to different anti-cancer agents), the underlying molecular and biological mechanisms of which include the activity of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins and drug compartmentalisation in cell organelles. We investigated the expression of the main ABC proteins and the role of cytoplasmic vacuoles in the MDR of six hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, and confirmed the accumulation of the yellow anti-cancer drug sunitinib in giant (four lines) and small cytoplasmic vacuoles of lysosomal origin (two lines). ABC expression analyses showed that the main ABC protein harboured by all of the cell lines was PGP, whose expression was not limited to the cell membrane but was also found on lysosomes. MTT assays showed that the cell lines with giant lysosomes were more resistant to sorafenib treatment than those with small lysosomes (p<0.01), and that verapamil incubation can revert this resistance, especially if it is administered after drug pre-incubation. The findings of this study demonstrate the involvement of PGP-positive lysosomes in drug sequestration and MDR in HCC cell lines. The possibility of modulating this mechanism using PGP inhibitors could lead to the development of new targeted strategies to enhance HCC treatment. PMID:25493932

  17. Tiny solar cells may sprout a giant for Texas Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.

    1982-07-01

    The Texas Instruments solar energy system is described. The closed-loop system consists of 4 main components: (1) the solar chemical converter; (2) hydrogen storage; (3) fuel cell; and (4) heat exchanger. The solar chemical converter contains thousands of tiny, spherical, single-crystal photovoltaic (PV) cells embedded in a glass matrix with a conductive backing. Sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiency is 13%. Operation of the system is described as follows: when sunlight is available, the electricity generated by the PV sheet in the solar chemical converter is used to electrolyze HBr into H/sub 2/ and Br/sub 2/. The hydrogen is stored in one part of the system while the hot Br/sub 2/ is cycled to the heat storage and heat exchanger unit. Electricity is produced by combining the H/sub 2/ and Br/sub 2/ in the fuel cell; thermal energy is obtained from the heat storage and heat exchanger unit. Advantages of this system (expected to provide 90% of a home's power) are discussed and current status of the project is reviewed. (MJJ)

  18. Phosphoinositides: Tiny Lipids With Giant Impact on Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) make up only a small fraction of cellular phospholipids, yet they control almost all aspects of a cell's life and death. These lipids gained tremendous research interest as plasma membrane signaling molecules when discovered in the 1970s and 1980s. Research in the last 15 years has added a wide range of biological processes regulated by PIs, turning these lipids into one of the most universal signaling entities in eukaryotic cells. PIs control organelle biology by regulating vesicular trafficking, but they also modulate lipid distribution and metabolism via their close relationship with lipid transfer proteins. PIs regulate ion channels, pumps, and transporters and control both endocytic and exocytic processes. The nuclear phosphoinositides have grown from being an epiphenomenon to a research area of its own. As expected from such pleiotropic regulators, derangements of phosphoinositide metabolism are responsible for a number of human diseases ranging from rare genetic disorders to the most common ones such as cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that a number of infectious agents hijack the PI regulatory systems of host cells for their intracellular movements, replication, and assembly. As a result, PI converting enzymes began to be noticed by pharmaceutical companies as potential therapeutic targets. This review is an attempt to give an overview of this enormous research field focusing on major developments in diverse areas of basic science linked to cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23899561

  19. Giant Basal Cell Carcinomas Arising on the Bilateral Forearms of a Patient: A Case Report and Review of Nonsurgical Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Shangraw, Sarah; Stone, Rivka C.; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Kirsner, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Giant basal cell carcinomas (GBCCs) are large basal cell carcinomas (BCCs; <5 cm) with a greater propensity to invade and metastasize than standard BCCs. The presence of 2 GBCCs in a single individual is rare. We present the case of a 71-year-old Caucasian male with bilateral GBCCs on the dorsal forearms, measuring 130 cm2 and 24 cm2, respectively, that developed over a 21-year period. Over this period, the patient treated the tumors with herbal remedies. Histologic evaluation showed a conventional nodular BCC for both tumors. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a T4N0M0 stage for the larger lesion. Surgical excision and grafting and reconstruction were offered, but he declined. This case highlights a shared belief in holistic treatments and rejection of Western medical interventions that are common among many patients with GBCC. Studies reporting nonsurgical treatments for GBCCs, including radiotherapy, vismodegib, topical imiquimod, and acitretin are reviewed. PMID:28101025

  20. Giant Cell Tumor Developing in Paget’s Disease of Bone: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Puri, Ajay; Shah, Sanket; Rekhi, Bharat; Gulia, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a disease of elderly characterized by disorganized bone remodeling. Development of secondary neoplasm in PDB is a known but rare phenomenon. Development of giant cell tumor in PDB (GCT-PDB) is extremely rare, and little is known about its etiopathogenesis and management. We present a case report of such a development with a review of the literature and the role of various new modalities of treatment available in the management of this rare condition. Case Report: A 40-year-old gentleman presented with back pain and on evaluation was diagnosed as a case of polyostotic PDB. He was treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D supplements. After an asymptomatic period of 3-year, he presented with a gluteal mass involving ilium and sacrum which was confirmed as GCT on biopsy. Serial angioembolization was attempted but mass progressed, so surgery performed with excision and curettage of the lesion. He presented with a local recurrence 2 years later with a large soft tissue component. He was started on denosumab, RANKL inhibitor, with the aim to downstage the lesion. The patient showed a good response after 6 doses with reduction in soft tissue mass followed by which he underwent surgery with partial T-1 internal hemipelvectomy and curettage of sacrum. Currently, the patient is asymptomatic at a follow-up of 15 months. Conclusion: GCT-PDB is a rare phenomenon occurring mainly in polyostotic PDB and is associated with more severe manifestations of the disease. The management is challenging and requires multimodality management. Pharmacological agents include use of bisphosphonates and RANK ligand inhibitor - denosumab. Although surgery is the mainstay of treatment for GCT, other modalities of treatment such as RANK ligand inhibitors (denosumab), selective arterial embolization, or radiation therapy has to be used for inoperable cases or where surgery would be functionally too morbid, especially in cases

  1. Giant cell tumor of bone with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst-like change producing β-human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Fitzhugh, Valerie A; Katava, Gordana; Wenokor, Cornelia; Roche, Natalie; Beebe, Kathleen S

    2014-06-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a benign, locally aggressive neoplasm that is composed of sheets of neoplastic mononuclear cells interspersed amongst non-neoplastic, uniformly distributed, osteoclast-like giant cells. They represent approximately 4-5% of primary bone tumors. Rarely, bone tumors have been noted to produce human chorionic gonadotropin, a finding most often reported in osteosarcoma. We present the case of a young woman who presented with a low-level human chorionic gonadotropin level which, after resection of her recurrent giant cell tumor of bone with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst-like change, became undetectable in her blood. Furthermore, cells within the aneurysmal bone cyst component were immunohistochemically positive for β-human chorionic gonadotropin. This is the first report of such a finding in the literature.

  2. Fluctuations of the transcription factor ATML1 generate the pattern of giant cells in the Arabidopsis sepal

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Heather M; Teles, José; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Refahi, Yassin; San-Bento, Rita; Ingram, Gwyneth; Jönsson, Henrik; Locke, James C W; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular development produces patterns of specialized cell types. Yet, it is often unclear how individual cells within a field of identical cells initiate the patterning process. Using live imaging, quantitative image analyses and modeling, we show that during Arabidopsis thaliana sepal development, fluctuations in the concentration of the transcription factor ATML1 pattern a field of identical epidermal cells to differentiate into giant cells interspersed between smaller cells. We find that ATML1 is expressed in all epidermal cells. However, its level fluctuates in each of these cells. If ATML1 levels surpass a threshold during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, the cell will likely enter a state of endoreduplication and become giant. Otherwise, the cell divides. Our results demonstrate a fluctuation-driven patterning mechanism for how cell fate decisions can be initiated through a random yet tightly regulated process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19131.001 PMID:28145865

  3. Functional outcome of en bloc resection of a giant cell tumour of the distal radius and arthrodesis of the wrist and distal ulna using an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulna bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zhong, J; Li, D; Sun, C; Zhao, H; Gao, Y

    2016-08-25

    Giant cell tumour of the distal radius is a locally aggressive lesion. In this study, we performed a wrist arthrodesis reconstruction with an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulnar bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure for a giant cell tumour of the distal radius. From January 2007 to September 2013, we followed eight patients for a mean duration of 36 months. One patient developed a recurrence and was treated by amputation; the other seven patients achieved radiological union in about 8 months. There was no wrist instability, deformation or dislocation; the mean range of motion of the forearm achieved 75° of supination and 70° of pronation. The patients could recover reasonable grip strength. This new operative procedure can excise the tumour with a low rate of recurrence, fewer functional deficits and fewer complications than reported for other procedures.

  4. Depletion of Epidermal Langerhans Cells in the Skin Lesions of Pellagra Patients.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sayaka; Miyagi, Takuya; Sogabe, Yoko; Yasuda, Masahito; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Utani, Atsushi; Izaki, Seiichi; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2017-02-28

    Pellagra is a nutrient deficiency disease caused by insufficient niacin levels. Recent studies have shown that numbers of epidermal Langerhans cells decreased in other diseases caused by nutritional deficiencies, including necrolytic migratory erythema and acrodermatitis enteropathica. Epidermal Langerhans cells are capable of modulating or even halting the inflammatory reaction. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the number of Langerhans cells and other dendritic cells, and maturation of epidermal Langerhans cells in the lesional and adjacent non-lesional skin in pellagra patients. Seven pellagra patients and 10 healthy individuals who served as controls were included. The number and distribution of dendritic cells and other cutaneous cells were examined by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal Langerhans cells decreased considerably in the skin lesions of pellagra patients, whereas other dendritic cells did not change. The decrease in the number of Langerhans cells was positively correlated with the histological severity of skin lesions. As the number of Langerhans cells was not reduced in the undisturbed neighboring skin, the depletion of epidermal Langerhans cells did not precede skin damage but was a cause of prolonged severe inflammation.

  5. Radiology of giant cell tumors of bone: computed tomography, arthro-tomography, and scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T M; Schiebler, M; Springfield, D S; Enneking, W F; Hawkins, I F; Spanier, S S

    1984-01-01

    Radiologic studies of 50 giant cell tumors of bone in 48 patients were useful in assessing the anatomic extent for planning surgical treatment. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) provided the most useful and complete evaluation, including soft tissue extent and relationship to major vessels. Angiography was useful when the extraosseous extent and vascular relationships were not entirely clear on CT. Arthro-tomography was the best way to evaluate tumor invasion through subchondral cortex and articular cartilage. Reactive soft tissues, with edema and hyperemia, were difficult to distinguish from tumor tissue on CT and angiograms. Bone scintigrams often showed intense uptake beyond the true tumor limits.

  6. Varicella Zoster Virus in Temporal Arteries of Patients With Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria

    2015-07-15

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an immune-mediated disease of unknown etiology. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) antigen was found in all of 4 GCA-positive temporal arteries (TAs) but was not present in any of 13 normal TAs. All 4 GCA-positive TAs contained viral antigen in skip areas, mostly in the adventitia and media and least in the intima. Despite formalin fixation, VZV DNA was detected in 2 of 4 GCA-positive, VZV antigen-positive TAs. Skeletal muscle was attached to 3 of 4 TAs, and VZV antigen was found in 2 and VZV DNA in 1. VZV may cause GCA.

  7. Golden bullet-denosumab: early rapid response of metastatic giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Demirsoy, Ugur; Karadogan, Meriban; Selek, Özgür; Anik, Yonca; Aksu, Görkem; Müezzinoglu, Bahar; Corapcioglu, Funda

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is usually a benign, locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. Histogenesis of GCTB is unknown and a correlation has not been found between histologic and clinical course. For this reason, many authors consider its prognosis unpredictable. Lung metastasis after GCTB treatment is well known and generally has unfavorable outcome, despite varied chemotherapy regimens. Denosumab, which inhibits RANK-RANKL interaction, is a new, promising actor among targeted therapeutic agents for GCTB. In this report, we emphasize on early rapid response to denosumab in metastatic GCTB.

  8. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment.

  9. Giant Cell Tumor: A Rare Condition in the Immature Skeleton—A Retrospective Study of Symptoms, Treatment, and Outcome in 16 Children

    PubMed Central

    Skeie, Anette Torød; Lobmaier, Ingvild Koren; Zaikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pediatric giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is rare and the course of the disease in the immature skeleton is sparsely described. We performed a retrospective study addressing symptoms, treatment, and outcome in children with GCT. Methods. Review of medical records and images of patients with GCT. Patients were detected from our hospital prospective database and those with open epiphyseal cartilages were included. Results. 16 children (75% girls) from 6 to 15 years old were identified. Eight lesions (50%) were in long bones and 4 (25%) in flat bones. One lesion appeared to be purely epiphyseal. All patients had pain as the initial symptom. Local recurrence developed in 2 patients. 14 of 16 patients returned to normal activity with no sequelae. One patient developed anisomelia after surgery. Conclusions. The biological tumor behavior in children does not seem to differ from what is reported in adults. Lesions in flat bones are very unusual, but our data alone do not provide enough evidence to conclude that this is more common in the immature skeleton. Literature review showed only one previous case report describing a purely epiphyseal GCT. Intralesional curettage is appropriate treatment and gives good functional results with acceptable recurrence rates. PMID:27999474

  10. Peptidergic modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of the squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of a range of neuropeptides were investigated on the membrane potential of the Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the tropical squid. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produced a dose-dependent, long-lasting hyperpolarization of the Schwann-cell membrane potential. Among peptides structurally related to VIP, similar effects were produced by peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) but not by secretin and glucagon. Substance P and somatostatin also hyperpolarized the Schwann-cell membrane potential but via receptor systems distinct from those activated by VIP. Methionine enkephalin ([Met]-enkephalin) blocked the actions of all the above peptides as well as the effects of DL-octopamine and carbachol. The actions of [Met]-enkephalin upon the VIP responses were antagonized by naloxone. VIP produces its effects on the Schwann-cell membrane potential via a receptor system that is independent from those described previously which mediate the effects of carbachol and DL-octopamine. However, VIP can potentiate the effects of the latter systems. The actions of VIP on the Schwann cell are unlikely to be mediated via changes in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels and are insensitive to changes in the level of extracellular calcium in the superfusate. The actions of VIP are, however, potentiated in the presence of low concentrations of lithium ions suggesting that the VIP receptor may mediate its effects by inducing the hydrolysis of polyphosphatidylinositols in the Schwann-cell membrane. Evidence is presented for the existence of an endogenous VIP-like component in the normal hyperpolarizing action of giant-axon activity on the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. PMID:2435897

  11. Intranodal leiomyoma in a young child: report of a rare spindle cell lesion.

    PubMed

    Girhotra, Manish; Virk, Shehbaaz Singh; Verma, Sarika; Bansal, Kalpana; Gupta, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary spindle cell lesions of lymph nodes, with the exception of Kaposi's sarcoma, are rare. Intranodal palisaded myofibroblastoma has been described as a spindle cell tumor with prominent amianthoid fibers, intralesional hemorrhage, and intracellular or extracellular inclusions. Another spindle cell lesion, intranodal leiomyoma, has been reported only occasionally. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with a mass in the neck without other systemic complaints. Excision biopsy of the lymph node revealed a spindle cell tumor with lymph nodal tissue at the periphery. The tumor showed features of smooth muscle differentiation with focally high mitotic index. The classical features of myofibroblastoma were not present. A final pathologic diagnosis of intranodal leiomyoma was rendered. The child has been free of recurrence in the follow-up period. Intranodal leiomyoma is a rare primary spindle cell lesion of the lymph nodes and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the same.

  12. Apoptotic Index and Proliferative Index in Premalignant and Malignant Squamous Cell Lesions of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vidya; Juluri, Ravichandra; Goel, Seema; Madan, Jyotsna; Mitra, Subir K; Gopalakrishnan, Dharmarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell lesions are most commonly diagnosed lesions in India. Both premalignant and malignant lesions are frequently encountered. In this study, we evaluated the role and significance of apoptotic indices (AI) and proliferative indices (PI) in premalignant and malignant squamous cell lesions of the oral cavity. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 histologically proven cases of premalignant and malignant oral squamous cell lesions were analyzed. The biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and also with monoclonal antibody Ki-67. AI and PI were assessed using a light microscope. Results: AI was found to increase gradually from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest AI was seen in well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). PI also was found to increase significantly from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest PI was seen in poorly differentiated SCC. Conclusion: AI in conjunction with the PI offers an accurate idea as to the nature and course of the lesion and may help to plan timely surgical intervention that results in better clinical prognosis and outcome. PMID:25709366

  13. DNA lesions in hyperthermic cell killing: effects of thermotolerance, procaine, and erythritol.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, J B; Konings, A W

    1986-04-01

    When HeLa S3 cells were subjected to 45 degrees C hyperthermia, DNA lesions were detected by the use of the alkaline unwinding/hydroxylapatite method. The number of lesions formed was not affected when the cells were made thermotolerant by either an acute (15 min 44 degrees C + 5 h 37 degrees C) or a chronic (5 h 42 degrees C) pretreatment before 45 degrees C hyperthermia. The presence of 10 mM procaine (heat sensitizer) or 0.5 M erythritol (heat protector) during hyperthermia also had no effect on the rate of formation of heat-induced alkali labile DNA lesions. These observations do not support a concept where DNA lesions are considered to be the ultimate cause of hyperthermic cell killing. Both drugs, however, influenced the rate of repair of radiation-induced strand breaks when present during preirradiation heat treatment. We conclude that the initial number of heat-induced alkali labile DNA lesions is not directly related to cell survival. It cannot be excluded, however, that differences in posthyperthermic repair of these lesions may lead to a positive correlation between residual DNA damage and survival after the different experimental conditions.

  14. Therapeutic Antibodies Targeting CSF1 Impede Macrophage Recruitment in a Xenograft Model of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongwei; Clarkson, Paul W.; Gao, Dongxia; Pacheco, Marina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2010-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor is a neoplastic disease of joints that can cause severe morbidity. Recurrences are common following local therapy, and no effective medical therapy currently exists. Recent work has demonstrated that all cases overexpress macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1), usually as a consequence of an activating gene translocation, resulting in an influx of macrophages that form the bulk of the tumor. New anti-CSF1 drugs have been developed; however there are no preclinical models suitable for evaluation of drug benefits in this disease. In this paper, we describe a novel renal subcapsular xenograft model of tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Using this model, we demonstrate that an anti-CSF1 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibits host macrophage infiltration into this tumor. The results from this model support clinical trials of equivalent humanized agents and anti-CSF1R small molecule drugs in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor refractory to conventional local therapy. PMID:20981142

  15. Binucleate trophoblast giant cells in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) placenta.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A F; Klisch, K; Miglino, M A; Pereira, F T V; Bevilacqua, E

    2006-01-01

    The binucleate trophoblast giant cells (BNC) of the water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, placenta were studied, with emphasis on the synthesis of BNC-specific proteins. Placentomal tissues of 27 water buffalos (2-10 months of pregnancy) were processed for light and electron microscopy. The frequency of BNCs was 20% of the trophoblastic cells in 2-3-month placentas and increased to 27% in the later stages. Ultrastructurally, binucleate cells displayed a prominent granular endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, typical of cells involved with protein synthesis and exportation. The buffalo BNCs contained periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive granules and reacted with antisera against bovine placental lactogen, prolactin-related protein-I, and pregnancy-associated glycoproteins. Lectin histochemistry with Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, Vicia villosa agglutinin, and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin showed specific staining of BNCs. Different stages of BNC migration and fusion with uterine epithelial cells were observed. Trinucleate feto-maternal hybrid cells were the typical outcome of cell fusions. These cells underwent degeneration, with typical morphological features of apoptosis. The results revealed a strong homology between water buffalo and cattle BNCs concerning cell morphology, protein expression, glycosylation pattern, and characteristics of cell migration and fusion.

  16. Oncocytic Pleomorphic Adenoma of Palatal Salivary Gland with Macrophages and Giant Cells Associated with Cholesterol Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sarode, Gargi S.; Sarode, Sachin C.; Patil, Shankargouda; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common salivary gland tumor characterized by histo-morphological diversity in the form of myxoid, hyalinized, chondroid, osseous, and squamous areas. In this paper, we report a rare case of predominantly oncocytic variant of PA in a 45-year-old male patient on the posterior palatal region. Microscopic examination showed homogenous eosinophilic cellular mass composed of epithelial components arranged in the form of tubular and solid patterns. The polygonal and oval cells showed abundant dark eosinophilic granular cytoplasm. The cell borders were distinct with a central nucleus showing prominent nucleoli. Interestingly at few places, cholesterol clefts were seen surrounded by macrophages and giant cells. The tumor was surgically excised with no evidence of recurrence after 2 years. PMID:28028431

  17. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W.; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro. PMID:26375397

  18. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  19. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D; Matsushima, Glenn K; Tabas, Ira

    2016-12-13

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl(-/-) or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis.

  20. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl−/− or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr−/− mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr−/− mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27958361

  1. Effects of gastric vagotomy on visceral cell proliferation induced by ventromedial hypothalamic lesions: role of vagal hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Yuri; Osaka, Toshimasa; Suzuki, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Takeo; Niijima, Akira; Kageyama, Haruaki; Fumiko, Takenoya; Shioda, Seiji; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-07-01

    In rats, ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions induce cell proliferation in the visceral organs (stomach, small intestine, liver, and pancreas) due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve. To investigate the effects of selective gastric vagotomy on VMH lesion-induced cell proliferation and secretion of gastric acid, we assessed the mitotic index (the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive cells per 1,000 cells in the gastric mucosal cell layer) and measured the volume of secreted basal gastric acid. Furthermore, to explore whether or not ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) lead to ulcer formation in VMH-lesioned rats, we assessed the ulcer index of both sham-operated and VMH-lesioned rats after administration of ethanol. VMH lesions resulted in an increased mitotic index and thickness of the gastric mucosal cell layer and gave rise to the hypersecretion of gastric acid. Selective gastric vagotomy restored these parameters to normal without affecting cell proliferation in other visceral organs. Ethanol-induced AGML caused ulcers in sham VMH-lesioned rats, whereas VMH-lesioned rats were less likely to exhibit such ulcers. These results suggest that VMH lesion-induced vagally mediated cell proliferation in the visceral organs is associated with hyperfunction in these organs, and VMH lesion-induced resistance to ethanol may be due to thickening of the gastric mucosal cell layer resulting from cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa-this in turn is due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve.

  2. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  3. Denosumab treatment of inoperable or locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Borkowska, Aneta; Goryń, Tomasz; Pieńkowski, Andrzej; Wągrodzki, Michał; Jagiełło-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Rogala, Paweł; Szacht, Milena; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, locally aggressive tumor that rarely metastasizes and typically occurs in the bones. At present, the primary treatment for GCTB is curettage with local adjuvants. Giant cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor appears to present an effective therapeutic option in advanced cases of GCTB. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of denosumab in large group of patients with locally advanced GCTB. A total of 35 patients with histologically confirmed GCTB that were treated with denosumab with no participation in clinical trials between May 2013 and September 2015 were included in the present study. Denosumab treatment was administered until complete tumor resection was feasible or tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity had occurred. The mean denosumab treatment duration was 7.4 months. A total of 17 patients received surgery following denosumab treatment: 11 patients underwent wide en bloc resection with prosthesis implantation in 10 cases and 6 patients were treated with intralesional curettage. Tumor progression was observed in 2 patients that underwent intralesional curettage without prosthesis implantation. In addition, tumor progression was observed during denosumab treatment in 2 patients that had previously undergone radiotherapy. The overall 1-year progression-free survival rate was 92.8%. Thus, for patients with advanced, unresectable, progressive or symptomatic pretreated GCTB, denosumab provides a therapeutic option not previously available, which has become the standard therapy in multidisciplinary management of GCTB. PMID:28101196

  4. Denosumab treatment of inoperable or locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Borkowska, Aneta; Goryń, Tomasz; Pieńkowski, Andrzej; Wągrodzki, Michał; Jagiełło-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Rogala, Paweł; Szacht, Milena; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, locally aggressive tumor that rarely metastasizes and typically occurs in the bones. At present, the primary treatment for GCTB is curettage with local adjuvants. Giant cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor appears to present an effective therapeutic option in advanced cases of GCTB. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of denosumab in large group of patients with locally advanced GCTB. A total of 35 patients with histologically confirmed GCTB that were treated with denosumab with no participation in clinical trials between May 2013 and September 2015 were included in the present study. Denosumab treatment was administered until complete tumor resection was feasible or tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity had occurred. The mean denosumab treatment duration was 7.4 months. A total of 17 patients received surgery following denosumab treatment: 11 patients underwent wide en bloc resection with prosthesis implantation in 10 cases and 6 patients were treated with intralesional curettage. Tumor progression was observed in 2 patients that underwent intralesional curettage without prosthesis implantation. In addition, tumor progression was observed during denosumab treatment in 2 patients that had previously undergone radiotherapy. The overall 1-year progression-free survival rate was 92.8%. Thus, for patients with advanced, unresectable, progressive or symptomatic pretreated GCTB, denosumab provides a therapeutic option not previously available, which has become the standard therapy in multidisciplinary management of GCTB.

  5. An Endocrine Jaw Lesion: Dentist Perspective in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalapala, Lavanya; Babburi, Suresh; Venigalla, Aparna; Pinisetti, Soujanya; Ganipineni, Kiranmai

    2016-01-01

    Brown tumor is a rare nonneoplastic focal giant cell lesion that occurs in hyperparathyroidism patients with a prevalence rate of 0.1% in jaws. We report an extremely rare case of brown tumor in mandible of a 40-year-old female patient that presented as the first clinical manifestation of hyperparathyroidism. Dentist played a pivotal role in the present case by the early diagnosis of lesion and its intervention. PMID:27974979

  6. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  7. Aneurysmal Lesions of Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Contain Clonally Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Song; White, John V.; Lin, Wan Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Solomides, Charalambos; Evans, Kyle; Ntaoula, Nectaria; Nwaneshiudu, Ifeyinwa; Gaughan, John; Monos, Dimitri S.; Oleszak, Emilia L.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with often life-threatening consequences. This vascular disorder is responsible for 1–2% of all deaths in men aged 65 years or older. Autoimmunity may be responsible for the pathogenesis of AAA. Although it is well documented that infiltrating T cells are essentially always present in AAA lesions, little is known about their role in the initiation and/or progression of the disease. To determine whether T cells infiltrating AAA lesions contain clonally expanded populations of T cells, we amplified β-chain TCR transcripts by the nonpalindromic adaptor–PCR/Vβ-specific PCR and/or Vβ-specific PCR, followed by cloning and sequencing. We report in this article that aortic abdominal aneurysmal lesions from 8 of 10 patients with AAA contained oligoclonal populations of T cells. Multiple identical copies of β-chain TCR transcripts were identified in these patients. These clonal expansions are statistically significant. These results demonstrate that αβ TCR+ T lymphocytes infiltrating aneurysmal lesions of patients with AAA have undergone proliferation and clonal expansion in vivo at the site of the aneurysmal lesion, in response to unidentified self- or nonself Ags. This evidence supports the hypothesis that AAA is a specific Ag–driven T cell disease. PMID:24752442

  8. Cat retinal ganglion cell receptive-field alterations after 6-hydroxydopamine induced dopaminergic amacrine cell lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, G.W.; Smith, E.L. III

    1985-06-01

    Optic tract single-unit recordings were used to study ganglion cell response functions of the intact cat eye after 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioning of the dopaminergic amacrine cell (AC) population of the inner retina. The impairment of the dopaminergic AC was verified by high pressure-liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection of endogenous dopamine content and by (/sup 3/H)dopamine high-affinity uptake; the dopaminergic ACs of the treated eyes demonstrated reduced endogenous dopamine content and reduced (/sup 3/H)dopamine uptake compared with that of their matched controls. Normal appearing (/sup 3/H)GABA and (/sup 3/H)-glycine uptake in the treated retinas suggests the absence of any nonspecific action of the 6-OHDA on the neural retina. The impairment of the dopaminergic AC population was found to alter a number of response properties in off-center ganglion cells, but this impairment had only a modest effect on the on-center cells. An abnormally high proportion of the off-center ganglion cells in the 6-OHDA treated eyes possessed nonlinear, Y-type receptive fields. These cells also possessed shift-responses of greater than normal amplitude, altered intensity-response functions, reduced maintained activities, and more transient center responses. Of the on-center type cells, only the Y-type on-center cells were affected by 6-OHDA, possessing higher than normal maintained activities and altered intensity-response functions. The on-center X-cells were unaffected by 6-OHDA treatment. The dopaminergic AC of the photopically adapted cat retina therefore modulates a number of ganglion cell response properties and within the limits of this study is most prominent in off-center ganglion cell circuitry.

  9. Stem cell therapy: A novel treatment approach for oral mucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Suma, G. N.; Arora, Madhu Pruthi; Lakhanpal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential to alleviate sufferings of many diseases that currently have no effective therapy. The research in this field is growing at an exponential rate. Stem cells are master cells that have specialized capability for self-renewal, potency and capability to differentiate to many cell types. At present, the adult mesenchymal stem cells are being used in the head and neck region for orofacial regeneration (including enamel, dentin, pulp and alveolar bone) in lieu of their proliferative and regenerative properties, their use in the treatment of oral mucosal lesions is still in budding stages. Moreover, there is scanty literature available regarding role of stem cell therapy in the treatment of commonly seen oral mucosal lesions like oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, oral ulcers and oral mucositis. The present review will focus on the current knowledge about the role of stem cell therapies in oral mucosal lesions and could facilitate new advancements in this area (articles were obtained from electronic media like PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane and Medline etc., from year 2000 to 2014 to review the role of stem cell therapy in oral mucosal lesions). PMID:25709329

  10. Clear-cell melanocytic lesions with balloon-cell and sebocyte-like melanocytes: a unifying concept.

    PubMed

    Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Guo, Ying; Maia-Cohen, Sandra; Mones, Joan

    2014-05-01

    Melanocytes may assume unique shapes and sizes but rarely have clear cytoplasm. We studied 28 melanocytic lesions that contained clear-cell melanocytes of the balloon-cell and sebocyte-like types. Clear-cell melanocytes were found more commonly in females (64%) than in males (36%), with predominance in females younger than 50 years (79%) and predominance in males older than 50 years (67%). They were distributed evenly throughout the body but were not found on acral sites. Clear-cell melanocytes were most prevalent in congenital nevi (18 or 72%) but were also found in 5 Clark nevi, 2 Meischer nevi, 1 Unna nevus, 1 atypical intra-epidermal proliferation, and 1 melanoma. The clear cells were distributed diffusely in 86% of the lesions and focally in 14%. The overall percentage of clear-cell melanocytes was 56%. The percentage of balloon cells was 57% and sebocyte-like melanocytes 32%. Clear cells with morphologic features of both balloon cells and sebocyte-like melanocytes, that is, intermediate cells, were present in all lesions with an overall percentage of 12%. The presence of melanocytes of both the balloon-cell and sebocyte-like types and the finding of clear-cell melanocytes with intermediate features in all lesions lends support to the theory that balloon-cell and sebocyte-like melanocytes may represent morphologic expressions of the same alteration in melanogenesis.

  11. Roe Protein Hydrolysates of Giant Grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) Inhibit Cell Proliferation of Oral Cancer Cells Involving Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Tang, Jen-Yang; Liu, Ya-Sin; Wang, Hui-Ru; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Yen, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Roe protein hydrolysates were reported to have antioxidant property but the anticancer effects were less addressed, especially for oral cancer. In this study, we firstly used the ultrafiltrated roe hydrolysates (URH) derived from giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) to evaluate the impact of URH on proliferation against oral cancer cells. We found that URH dose-responsively reduced cell viability of two oral cancer cells (Ca9-22 and CAL 27) in terms of ATP assay. Using flow cytometry, URH-induced apoptosis of Ca9-22 cells was validated by morphological features of apoptosis, sub-G1 accumulation, and annexin V staining in dose-responsive manners. URH also induced oxidative stress in Ca9-22 cells in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/superoxide generations and mitochondrial depolarization. Taken together, these data suggest that URH is a potential natural product for antioral cancer therapy. PMID:27195297

  12. Tsc2 null murine neuroepithelial cells are a model for human tuber giant cells, and show activation of an mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Onda, Hiroaki; Crino, Peter B; Zhang, Hongbing; Murphey, Ryan D; Rastelli, Luca; Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-12-01

    Cortical tubers are developmental brain malformations in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) that cause epilepsy and autism in TSC patients whose pathogenesis is uncertain. Tsc2 null murine neuroepithelial progenitor (NEP) cells display persistent growth when growth factors are withdrawn, express GFAP at high levels, and have reduced expression of a set of early neuronal lineage markers. Tsc2 null NEP cells exhibit aberrant differentiation into giant cells that express both beta III-tubulin and GFAP and that are morphologically similar to giant cells in human tubers. Tsc2 null giant cells and tuber giant cells have similar transcriptional profiles. Tsc2 null NEP cells express high levels of phosphorylated S6kinase, S6, Stat3, and 4E-BP-1, which is reversed by treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR. We conclude that giant cells in human tubers likely result from a complete loss of TSC2 expression and activation of an mTOR pathway during cortical development.

  13. Giant-cell interstitial pneumonia and hard-metal pneumoconiosis. A clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, N.P.; Sciurba, F.C.; Owens, G.R.; Hodgson, M.J.; Yousem, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    We report four cases of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia that occurred in association with exposure to hard metals. All patients presented with chronic interstitial lung disease and had open-lung biopsies that revealed marked interstitial fibrosis, cellular interstitial infiltrates, and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells displaying cellular cannibalism. We also review the literature to determine the sensitivity and specificity of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia for hard-metal pneumoconiosis. Although hard-metal pneumoconiosis may take the form of usual interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and giant-cell interstitial pneumonia, the finding of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia is almost pathognomonic of hard-metal disease and should provoke an investigation of occupational exposure. 25 references.

  14. The giant protein Ebh is a determinant of Staphylococcus aureus cell size and complement resistance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice G; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus USA300, the clonal type associated with epidemic community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, displays the giant protein Ebh on its surface. Mutations that disrupt the ebh reading frame increase the volume of staphylococcal cells and alter the cross wall, a membrane-enclosed peptidoglycan synthesis and assembly compartment. S. aureus ebh variants display increased sensitivity to oxacillin (methicillin) as well as susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Mutations in ebh are associated with reduced survival of mutant staphylococci in blood and diminished virulence in mice. We propose that Ebh, following its secretion into the cross wall, contributes to the characteristic cell growth and envelope assembly pathways of S. aureus, thereby enabling complement resistance and the pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections.

  15. An Explanation of the Photoinduced Giant Dielectric Constant of Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Almond, Darryl P; Bowen, Chris R

    2015-05-07

    A photoinduced giant dielectric constant of ~10(6) has been found in impedance spectroscopy measurements of lead halide perovskite solar cells. We report similar effects in measurements of a porous lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sample saturated with water. The principal effect of the illumination of the solar cell and of the introduction of water into the pore volume of the PZT sample is a significant increase in conductivity and dielectric loss. This is shown to exhibit low frequency power law dispersion. Application of the Kramers-Kronig relationships show the large measured values of permittivity to be related to the power law changes in conductivity and dielectric loss. The power law dispersions in the electrical responses are consistent with an electrical network model of microstructure. It is concluded that the high apparent values of permittivity are features of the microstructural networks and not fundamental effects in the two perovskite materials.

  16. Lethal (2) giant larvae: an indispensable regulator of cell polarity and cancer development.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Miao, Yi; Xu, Kedong; Liu, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Cell polarity is one of the most basic properties of all normal cells and is essential for regulating numerous biological processes. Loss of polarity is considered a hallmark for cancer. Multiple polarity proteins are implicated in maintenance of cell polarity. Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl) is one of polarity proteins that plays an important role in regulating cell polarity, asymmetric division as well as tumorigenesis. Lgl proteins in different species have similar structures and conserved functions. Lgl acts as an indispensable regulator of cell biological function, including cell polarity and asymmetric division, through interplaying with other polarity proteins, regulating exocytosis, mediating cytoskeleton and being involved in signaling pathways. Furthermore, Lgl plays a role of a tumor suppressor, and the aberrant expression of Hugl, a human homologue of Lgl, contributes to multiple cancers. However, the exact functions of Lgl and the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. In this review, we will give an overview of the Lgl functions in cell polarity and cancer development, discuss the potential mechanisms underlying these functions, and raise our conclusion of previous studies and points of view about the future studies.

  17. A male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyuki; Itano, Osamu; Oshima, Go; Chiba, Naokazu; Ishikawa, Hideki; Koyama, Yasumasa; Du, Wenlin; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2011-09-08

    We report a rare male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A 59-year-old Japanese man with diabetes visited our hospital, complaining of fullness in the upper abdomen. A laboratory analysis revealed anemia (Hemoglobin; 9.7 g/dl) and elevated C-reactive protein (3.01 mg/dl). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 274 U/ml and Carcinoembryonic antigen was 29.6 ng/ml. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a 14-cm cystic mass in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen that appeared to originate from the pancreatic tail. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy/total gastrectomy/cholecystectomy. The mass consisted of a multilocular cystic lesion. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by cuboidal or columnar epithelium, including mucinous epithelium. Sarcomatous mononuclear cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells were found in the stroma. Ovarian-type stroma was not seen. We made a diagnosis of osteoclast-like giant cell tumor originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. All surgical margins were negative, however, two peripancreatic lymph nodes were positive. The patient recovered uneventfully. Two months after the operation, multiple metastases occurred in the liver. He died 4 months after the operation.

  18. One-step bone marrow-derived cell transplantation in talarosteochondral lesions: mid-term results

    PubMed Central

    BUDA, ROBERTO; VANNINI, FRANCESCA; CAVALLO, MARCO; BALDASSARRI, MATTEO; NATALI, SIMONE; CASTAGNINI, FRANCESCO; GIANNINI, SANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Purpose to verify the capability of scaffold-supported bone marrow-derived cells to be used in the repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Methods using a device to concentrate bone marrow-derived cells, a scaffold (collagen powder or hyaluronic acid membrane) for cell support and platelet gel, a one-step arthroscopic technique was developed for cartilage repair. In a prospective clinical study, we investigated the ability of this technique to repair talar osteochondral lesions in 64 patients. The mean follow-up was 53 months. Clinical results were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale score. We also considered the influence of scaffold type, lesion area, previous surgery, and lesion depth. Results the mean preoperative AOFAS scale score was 65.2 ± 13.9. The clinical results peaked at 24 months, before declining gradually to settle at a score of around 80 at the maximum follow-up of 72 months. Conclusions the use of bone marrow-derived cells supported by scaffolds to repair osteochondral lesions of the talus resulted in significant clinical improvement, which was maintained over time. Level of Evidence level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:25606518

  19. DNA lesion identity drives choice of damage tolerance pathway in murine cell chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Isadora S.; Bar, Carmit; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Ainbinder, Elena; Leopold, Karoline; de Wind, Niels; Geacintov, Nicholas; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    DNA-damage tolerance (DDT) via translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) or homology-dependent repair (HDR) functions to bypass DNA lesions encountered during replication, and is critical for maintaining genome stability. Here, we present piggyBlock, a new chromosomal assay that, using piggyBac transposition of DNA containing a known lesion, measures the division of labor between the two DDT pathways. We show that in the absence of DNA damage response, tolerance of the most common sunlight-induced DNA lesion, TT-CPD, is achieved by TLS in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Meanwhile, BP-G, a major smoke-induced DNA lesion, is bypassed primarily by HDR, providing the first evidence for this mechanism being the main tolerance pathway for a biologically important lesion in a mammalian genome. We also show that, far from being a last-resort strategy as it is sometimes portrayed, TLS operates alongside nucleotide excision repair, handling 40% of TT-CPDs in repair-proficient cells. Finally, DDT acts in mouse embryonic stem cells, exhibiting the same pattern—mutagenic TLS included—despite the risk of propagating mutations along all cell lineages. The new method highlights the importance of HDR, and provides an effective tool for studying DDT in mammalian cells. PMID:25589543

  20. Pre-existing smooth muscle cells contribute to neointimal cell repopulation at an incidence varying widely among individual lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pu; Hong, Michael S.; Fu, Chunhua; Schmit, Bradley M.; Su, Yunchao; Berceli, Scott A.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    Background With the diverse origin of neointimal cells, previous studies have documented differences of neointimal cell-lineage composition across models, but the animal-to-animal difference has not attracted much attention though the cellular heterogeneity may impact neointimal growth and its response to therapeutic interventions. Methods The R26R+;Myh11-CreER+ and R26R+;Scl-CreER+ mice were utilized to attach LacZ tags to the pre-existing smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs), respectively. Neointimal lesions were created via complete ligation of the common carotid artery (CCA) and transluminal injury to the femoral artery (FA). Results LacZ-tagged SMCs were physically relocated from media to neointima and changed to a de-differentiated phenotype in both CCA and FA lesions. The content of SMCs in the neointimal tissue, however, varied widely among specimens, ranging from 5–70% and 0–85%, with an average at low levels of 27% and 29% in CCA (n=15) and FA (n=15) lesions, respectively. Bone marrow cells, while able to home to the injured arteries, did not differentiate fully into SMCs after either type of injury. Pre-existing ECs were located in the sub-endothelial region and produced mesenchymal marker α-actin, indicating endothelial-mesenchymal-transition (EndoMT), however, EC-derived cells represented only 7% and 3% of the total neointimal cell pool of CCA (n=7) and FA (n=7) lesions, respectively. ECs located on the luminal surface exhibited little evidence for EndoMT. Conclusion Neointimal hyperplasia proceeds with a wide range of variation in its cellular composition between individual lesions. Relative to ECs, SMCs are major contributors to the lesion-to-lesion heterogeneity in neointimal cell-lineage composition. PMID:26387788

  1. Gentiana asclepiadea protects human cells against oxidation DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Hudecová, Alexandra; Hašplová, Katarína; Miadoková, Eva; Magdolenová, Zuzana; Rinna, Alessandra; Collins, Andrew R; Gálová, Eliška; Vaculčíková, Dagmar; Gregáň, Fridrich; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine whether the methanolic and aqueous extracts from the haulm and flower of Gentiana asclepiadea exhibited free radical scavenging and protective (antigenotoxic) effect against DNA oxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in human lymphocytes and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). All four extracts exhibited high scavenging effect on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals at concentrations 2.5 and 25 mg ml(-1). The level of DNA damage was measured using the alkaline version of single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Challenge with H(2)O(2) shows that the pre-treatment of the cells with non-genotoxic doses of Gentiana extracts protected human DNA-either eliminated or significantly reduced H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage. The genotoxic activity of H(2)O(2) was most effectively decreased after 30 min of pre-incubation with 0.05 mg ml(-1) (range, 93.5%-96.3% of reduction in lymphocytes) and 0.25 mg ml(-1) (range, 59.5%-71.4% and 52.7%-66.4% of reduction in lymphocytes and HEK 293 cells, respectively) of G. asclepiadea extracts. These results suggest that the tested G. asclepiadea extracts could be considered as an effective natural antioxidant source.

  2. T cells in ANCA-associated vasculitis: what can we learn from lesional versus circulating T cells?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) - associated vasculitis (AAV) is a life-threatening autoimmune disease characterized by an antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis and necrotizing vasculitis. Apart from antibodies, T cells are also involved in disease pathogenesis. This review stresses the hallmarks of T cell-mediated pathology in AAV and highlights the characteristics of lesional and circulating T cells in the immune response in AAV. Circulating effector T-cell populations are expanded and are in a persistent state of activation. Circulating regulatory T-cell subsets are less well characterized but seem to be impaired in function. Lesional effector T cells are present in granulomas, vasculitic lesions, and nephritis. Lesional T cells usually show pro-inflammatory properties and promote granuloma formation. Apart from T cells, dendritic cells are abundantly present at the sites of inflammation and locally orchestrate the immune response. Targeting the above-mentioned T cell-mediated disease mechanisms will potentially provide powerful therapeutic tools for AAV. PMID:20236453

  3. Acute seronegative hepatitis C manifesting itself as adult giant cell hepatitis--a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kryczka, Wiesław; Walewska-Zielecka, Bozena; Dutkiewicz, Ewa

    2003-08-01

    Adult giant cell hepatitis (AGCH) is a rare event and only about 100 cases have been reported within the last 20 years. The AGCH has been observed in association with viral infection, drug reactions or autoimmune disorders but in many cases its etiology remains unclear. AGCH manifests clinically as severe form of hepatitis histologically characterized by diffuse giant cell transformation of hepatocytes. We report the case of a 39-yr-old man with acute community-acquired hepatitis without previous pathology of the liver. Laboratory data revealed slight hypergammaglobulinemia and high titer of anti-smooth-muscle antibody with negative serology of hepatotropic viruses and absence of other known causes of hepatitis. Preliminary diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was established, additionally confirmed by excellent clinical and biochemical improvement during corticosteroid treatment. A liver biopsy showed the typical findings of panlobular syncytial giant cell hepatitis and positive HCV-RNA both in serum and liver. The above verified the diagnosis of acute type C hepatitis manifested histologically as adult giant cell hepatitis. After three months of treatment we withdrew corticosteroids as spontaneous clearance of HCV occurred and the lack of autoantibodies in serum as well as significant improvement of liver histology was ascertained. Within 30 months of the follow-up we have not observed biochemical and immunological abnormalities and control liver biopsy has shown no signs of hepatitis.

  4. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Akio; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Nishida, Kinya; Motomiya, Makoto; Yamada, Katsuhisa; Momma, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained. PMID:20592994

  5. Giant Cell Tumor of the Larynx Treated by Surgery and Adjuvant Denosumab: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Yancoskie, Aaron E; Frank, Douglas K; Fantasia, John E; Savona, Steven; Eiseler, Nicole; Reder, Ilan; Kahn, Leonard B

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumor of the larynx (GCTL) is a rare entity; only 34 cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of GCTL in a 46 year-old male presenting clinical, radiographic, histological and therapeutic features. Previously reported cases are also reviewed.

  6. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a hard-metal worker. Cytologic, histologic and analytical electron microscopic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatowski, K.; Roggli, V.L.; Fulkerson, W.J.; Langley, R.L.; Benning, T.; Johnston, W.W.

    1988-03-01

    A case of biopsy-proven giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a patient with occupational exposure to hard-metal dust is reported. Bronchial washings performed several days prior to open-lung biopsy yielded an almost exclusive population of nonpigmented alveolar macrophages and pleomorphic, phagocytic multinucleated giant cells. Microorganisms, viral inclusions in the giant cells, epithelioid histiocytes and well-formed granulomas were not seen. This cytologic picture strongly suggests the presence of giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a patient with restrictive lung disease, particularly when exposure to hard-metal dust is known or suspected. A specific diagnosis early in the course of the disease may facilitate removal of the individual from the workplace and forestall the development of end-stage interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, the working environment may be modified to minimize inhalational exposure. Recognition of this entity by the cytopathologist may direct diagnostic efforts toward accurate histologic evaluation and the identification of particulates by microprobe analysis of either cellular or biopsy material.

  7. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Preinvasive Tubal Lesions of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chene, G.; Ouellet, V.; Rahimi, K.; Barres, V.; Meunier, L.; De Ladurantaye, M.; Provencher, D.; Mes-Masson, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better understand the ovarian serous carcinogenic process with tubal origin, we investigated the expression of stem cell markers in premalignant tubal lesions (serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or STIC). We found an increased stem cell marker density in the normal fallopian tube followed by a high CD117 and a low ALDH and CD44 expression in STICs raising the question of the role of the stem cell markers in the serous carcinogenic process. PMID:26504831

  8. Electron microscopic demonstration of lesions in target cell membranes associated with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Dourmashkin, R R; Deteix, P; Simone, C B; Henkart, P

    1980-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that complement-mediated cell lysis and cell-mediated cytotoxicity operate by analogous mechanisms, cell membranes from two antibody-dependent cytotoxicity systems were examined by electron microscopy after negative staining. Ring-shaped membrane lesions generally similar to, but larger than, those previously described for complement lysis were observed. These findings are in agreement with recent measurements of larger functional pores for ADCC than complement. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7214742

  9. Circulating Epithelial Cells in Patients with Pancreatic Lesions: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Christy E; Pitman, Martha B; Zhou, Jiahua; Perkins, James; Kuleman, Birte; Liss, Andrew S; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Warshaw, Andrew L; Lillemoe, Keith D; Thayer, Sarah P

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating epithelial cell (CEC) isolation has provided diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of cancers, previously supporting their identity as circulating tumor cells in the literature. However, we report CEC findings in patients with benign, pre-malignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions using a size-selective filtration device. Study Design Peripheral blood samples were drawn from patients found to have pancreatic lesions on preoperative imaging at a surgical clinic. Blood was filtered using ScreenCell® devices, which were evaluated microscopically by a pancreatic cytopathologist. Pathological data and clinical outcomes of these patients were obtained from medical records over a one year follow-up period. Results Nine healthy volunteers formed the control group and were found to be negative for CECs. There were 179 patients with pancreatic lesions that formed the study cohort. CECs were morphologically similar in patients with a variety of pancreatic lesions. Specifically, CECs were identified in 51 of 105 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) (49%), 7 of 11 neuroendocrine tumors (64%), 13 of 21 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (62%), and 6 of 13 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Rates of CEC identification were similar in patients with benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions (p=0.41). In addition, CECs findings in PDAC patients were not associated with poor prognosis. Conclusions While CECs were not identified in healthy volunteers, they were identified in patients with benign, premalignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions. The presence of CECs in patients presenting with pancreatic lesions is not diagnostic of malignancy, nor is it prognostic for patients with PDAC. PMID:26209458

  10. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the renal pelvis with giant cell tumor-like features: case report with immunohistochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Kabukcuoglu, Sare; Can, Cavit

    2005-02-01

    Sarcomatoid transitional cell carcinoma is a rare entity, in which a malignant, overtly epithelial component coexists with areas having a sarcoma-like appearance. Histological distinction of sarcomatoid carcinomas from carcinosarcomas is often difficult and immunohistochemistry is a helpful diagnostic adjunct in the correct diagnosis. In the present report, we describe an uncommon case of sarcomatoid transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis, associated with giant cell tumor-like features. Immunoperoxidase staining for cytokeratin was positive in spindle cell component, indicating an epithelial origin. The carcinomatous component showed a diffuse membranous reactivity for E-cadherin, whereas the reactivity was sporadic and weaker in the sarcomatoid component, suggesting that the decrease of E-cadherin expression might be associated with the acquisition of sarcomatous morphology. Osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells were positive for CD68 and negative for p53 oncoprotein, suggesting that they represent a non-neoplastic component that is reactively induced in the tumor stroma.

  11. Development of Mega-Aorta Following Incompletely Treated Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Eton, Darwin; Shah, Atman P.; Merlo, Aurelie; Dill, Karin; Russo, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old male presented with a 9.3 cm ascending aorta and arch aneurysm with additional aneurysms of the innominate, right subclavian, and left common carotid arteries. The patient had a history of temporal arteritis that was only briefly treated in 1989 and a 6 cm ascending aortic aneurysm that was repaired in 1993. Our operative strategy was to construct a temporary parallel cerebrovascular circuit for cerebral protection during the redo-sternotomy and aortic arch reconstruction, with the added benefit of permanently excluding the branch arch vessel aneurysms. Pathological analysis of the aortic specimen at the first operation may have identified giant cell arteritis, prompting medical therapy against further disease progression. PMID:26798733

  12. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S

    2016-03-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures.

  13. Giant Cell Fibroma of the Buccal Mucosa with Laser Excision: Report of Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Fatemeh; Rahmani, Somayyeh; Azimi, Somayyeh; Bigom Taheri, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    Giant Cell Fibroma (GCF) was described as a new entity of fibrous hyperplastic soft tissue. It seems that stimulus from an unexplained origin can have a role in its etiology. Histopathologically GCF is consisted of multinucleated fibroblasts that have oval shape nuclei within the eosinophilic cytoplasm. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is very rare. Here we report a case of relatively large GCF in a 54-year-old man. Gingiva is the common location of GCF. As in our case, it may be mistaken as irritation fibroma especially if it is on the buccal mucosa, the most common location for fibroma. Correct diagnosis is based on biopsy and clinical examination to see surface texture roughness. To minimize bleeding because of its large size an excisional biopsy with Diod laser was performed under local anesthesia for this patient. PMID:26351504

  14. GIANT CELL TUMOR IN THE PROXIMAL PHALANX WITH PULMONARY METASTASIS: CASE REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Frederico Carvalho; de Medeiros, Fernando Carvalho; de Campos Carvalho Lopes, Izabella; de Medeiros, Guilherme Carvalho; de Medeiros, Eduardo Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report on a giant cell tumor (GCT) in the proximal phalanx of the third finger of the left hand, with pulmonary metastasis. The patient presented pain in the finger without any previous history of trauma. Clinical examination, radiographic imaging and magnetic resonance imaging were carried out. A histological evaluation was carried out from an incisional biopsy, taking the hypothesis of GCT. The patient underwent amputation of the finger and the diagnosis was confirmed by means of microscopy on the specimen. The patient was followed up because of the risk of lung metastasis, which was shown by radiographic examination and computed tomography on the chest, and thoracotomy was performed. Since then, there has been an improvement in the symptoms that had been reported preoperatively, and no local recurrence or new metastasis has been found. PMID:27027012

  15. Ulnar buttress arthroplasty after enbloc resection of a giant cell tumor of the distal ulna

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Monappa A; Sujir, Premjit; Rao, Sharath K; Tripathy, Sujit K

    2013-01-01

    Enbloc resection with or without ulnar stump stabilization is the recommended treatment for giant cell tumors (GCT) of the distal ulna. A few sporadic reports are available where authors have described various procedures to prevent ulnar stump instability and ulnar translation of carpal bones. We report a GCT of the distal ulna in a 43-year-old male which was resected enbloc. The distal radioulnar joint was reconstructed by fixing an iliac crest graft to the distal end of the radius (ulnar buttress arthroplasty) and the ulnar stump was stabilized with extensor carpi ulnaris tenodesis. After a followup at three years, there was no evidence of tumor recurrence or graft resorption; the patient had a normal range of movement of the wrist joint and the functional outcome was excellent as per the score of Ferracini et al. PMID:23682187

  16. Giant Cell Arteritis: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed with the Use of MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in western countries in individuals over the age of 50. It is typically characterised by the granulomatous involvement of large and medium sized blood vessels branching of the aorta with particular tendencies for involving the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. Generally the diagnosis is straightforward when characteristic symptoms such as headache, jaw claudication, or other ischemic complications are present. Atypical presentations of GCA without “overt” cranial ischemic manifestations have become increasingly recognised but we report for the first time a case of GCA presenting as mild upper abdominal pain and generalized weakness in the context of hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of vasculitis that was subsequently diagnosed by MRI scanning. This case adds to the literature and emphasises the importance of MRI in the evaluation of GCA patients without “classic” cranial ischemic symptoms. PMID:27493825

  17. Critical hypercalcemia following discontinuation of denosumab therapy for metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Gossai, Nathan; Hilgers, Megan V; Polgreen, Lynda E; Greengard, Emily G

    2015-06-01

    We report a 14 year-old female with Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, successfully treated with denosumab, who developed critical hypercalcemia after completion of therapy. Five months after her last denosumab treatment, serum calcium rose to 16.5 mg/dL (normal 8.7-10.8 mg/dL), nearly double her prior level of 8.4 mg/dL while receiving denosumab. She required emergent intervention to treat her hypercalcemia, which was attributed to rebound osteoclast activity and osteopetrotic bone. Denosumab is widely used in adults and increasingly in pediatric oncology populations and our experience demonstrates the need for close monitoring for electrolyte derangements following discontinuation.

  18. Current status and unanswered questions on the use of Denosumab in giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Czar Louie; Grimer, Robert J; Parry, Michael; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Gelderblom, Hans; Ferrari, Stefano; Baldi, Giacomo G; Jones, Robin L; Chawla, Sant; Casali, Paolo; LeCesne, Axel; Blay, Jean-Yves; Dijkstra, Sander P D; Thomas, David M; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody to RANK ligand approved for use in giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone. Due to its efficacy, Denosumab is recommended as the first option in inoperable or metastatic GCT. Denosumab has also been used pre-operatively to downstage tumours with large soft tissue extension to allow for less morbid surgery. The role of Denosumab for conventional limb GCT of bone is yet to be defined. Further studies are required to determine whether local recurrence rates will be decreased with the adjuvant use of Denosumab along with surgery. The long term use and toxicity of this agent is unknown as is the proportion of patients with primary or secondary resistance. It is advised that complicated cases of GCT requiring Denosumab treatment should be referred and followed up at expert centres. Collaborative studies involving further clinical trials and rigorous data collection are strongly recommended to identify the optimum use of this drug.

  19. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S.

    2016-01-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures. PMID:27069267

  20. Spinal cord infarction in giant cell arteritis associated with scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Khader N; Hadidy, Azmy; Joudeh, Anwar; Obeidat, Fatima Nouri; Abdulfattah, Khalid W

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). There are only four case reports in the literature. We describe a 65-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia and back pain of 4-days duration with sensory loss below the umbilicus and bilateral scalp necrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging finding was consistent with dorsal spinal cord infarction. Biopsy of the temporal artery confirmed the diagnosis of GCA. The patient was treated with high dose of corticosteroids, which resulted in healing of the scalp ulcerations in 3 weeks, but the paraplegia was irreversible. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal cord infarction and simultaneous occurrence of bilateral scalp necrosis in a histopathologically proven GCA. Although literature about spinal cord involvement in GCA is very limited, cord infarction is associated with high mortality and therapeutic challenges since little is understood regarding the pathogenesis that leads to infarction.

  1. [Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with massive pulmonary lesions].

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Asumi; Hashino, Satoshi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Takahata, Mutsumi; Okada, Kohei; Kahata, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Natsuko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kanako; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2010-05-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea on effort. Neither computed tomography scan nor chest X-ray film detected any specific findings that could explain hypoxemia. Since (67)Ga scintigraphy showed abnormal uptake in the bilateral lungs, transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) was performed. The TBLB specimen was diagnosed as intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). There was no involvement of any other organ considered typical of IVLBCL. In cases showing clinical findings such as hypoxia despite mild pulmonary radiographic changes, a definitive diagnosis should be made using methods such as TBLB with consideration given to the possibility of IVLBCL.

  2. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R; Verkman, A S; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-12-19

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica.

  3. Location and Density of Immune Cells in Precursor Lesions and Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Astrid M; Jaramillo, Roberto; Baena, Armando; Castaño, Jorge; Olaya, Natalia; Zea, Arnold H; Herrero, Rolando; Sanchez, Gloria I

    2013-04-01

    Only a small proportion of women infected with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) develop cervical cancer. Host immune response seems to play a role eliminating the viral infection and preventing progression to cancer. Characterization of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in cervical pre-neoplastic lesions and cervical cancer may be helpful to understand the mechanisms that mediate this protection. The aim of this study was to determine if there are differences in the localization and density (cells/mm(2)) of CD8+ T-cells, CD4+ T-cells and Tregs (CD25 + Foxp3+) in cervical pre-neoplastic lesions and cervical cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of sections of 96 (26 CIN1, 21 CIN2, 25 CIN3, and 24 SCC) samples revealed that regardless of CIN grades, CD8+ T-cells are more abundant than CD4+, CD25+ and Foxp3+ cells in both the stroma and epithelium. There was a higher density of CD8+ cells in the stroma of cervical cancer compared to CIN3 (OR = 4.20, 95% CI 1.2-15), CIN2 (OR = 7.86, 95% CI 1.7-36.4) and CIN1 (OR = 4.25, 95% CI 1.1-17). Studies evaluating whether these cells are recruited before or after cancer progression will be helpful to understand the role of these cells in the natural history of HPV-induced lesions.

  4. Proliferative lesions of intra-epidermal cytokeratin CAM5.2-positive cells in canine nipples.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, K; Nishiyama, S; Kobayashi, R; Yoshimura, H; Takahashi, K; Omachi, T; Kamiie, J; Shirota, K

    2014-01-01

    Non-keratinocyte cells with clear or vacuolated cytoplasm are frequently observed in the epidermis of canine nipples. Most of these cells express cytokeratin (CK) CAM5.2, a marker of luminal epithelial cells. The morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of these clear cells were investigated. Nipple tissue from 36 dogs of both sexes was collected and labelled immunohistochemically for CAM5.2, CK7, CK14, CK18, CK20, α-smooth muscle actin, p63, melan-A, E-cadherin, epidermal growth factor receptor and oestrogen receptor (OR). The intra-epidermal CAM5.2(+) clear cells were present singly or as small clusters, mostly within the basal layer, in 22 dogs (61%). These cells also expressed CK7, CK18, E-cadherin and OR. Electron microscopy revealed that some of these cells had surface microvilli. Multifocal proliferative lesions consisting of these cells were observed in the nipples of four dogs. In these lesions, proliferating cells formed bilayered tubules with CAM5.2(+) inner and CK14/p63(+) outer cells. This is the first report describing intra-epidermal CAM5.2(+) clear cells, distinct from melanocytes and Merkel cells in dog nipples. These cells might arise from the luminal epithelium of the papillary duct.

  5. Lesion-induced increase in survival and migration of human neural progenitor cells releasing GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Behrstock, Soshana; Ebert, Allison D.; Klein, Sandra; Schmitt, Melanie; Moore, Jeannette M.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) has been proposed to provide neuronal replacement or astrocytes delivering growth factors for brain disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Success in such studies likely requires migration from the site of transplantation and integration into host tissue in the face of ongoing damage. In the current study, hNPC modified to release glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (hNPCGDNF) were transplanted into either intact or lesioned animals. GDNF release itself had no effect on the survival, migration or differentiation of the cells. The most robust migration and survival was found using a direct lesion of striatum (Huntington’s model) with indirect lesions of the dopamine system (Parkinson’s model) or intact animals showing successively less migration and survival. No lesion affected differentiation patterns. We conclude that the type of brain injury dictates migration and integration of hNPC which has important consequences when considering transplantation of these cells as a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19044202

  6. The Macronuclear Genome of Stentor coeruleus Reveals Tiny Introns in a Giant Cell.

    PubMed

    Slabodnick, Mark M; Ruby, J Graham; Reiff, Sarah B; Swart, Estienne C; Gosai, Sager; Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Witkowska, Ewa; Larue, Graham E; Fisher, Susan; Freeman, Robert M; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Chu, William; Stover, Naomi A; Gregory, Brian D; Nowacki, Mariusz; Derisi, Joseph; Roy, Scott W; Marshall, Wallace F; Sood, Pranidhi

    2017-02-20

    The giant, single-celled organism Stentor coeruleus has a long history as a model system for studying pattern formation and regeneration in single cells. Stentor [1, 2] is a heterotrichous ciliate distantly related to familiar ciliate models, such as Tetrahymena or Paramecium. The primary distinguishing feature of Stentor is its incredible size: a single cell is 1 mm long. Early developmental biologists, including T.H. Morgan [3], were attracted to the system because of its regenerative abilities-if large portions of a cell are surgically removed, the remnant reorganizes into a normal-looking but smaller cell with correct proportionality [2, 3]. These biologists were also drawn to Stentor because it exhibits a rich repertoire of behaviors, including light avoidance, mechanosensitive contraction, food selection, and even the ability to habituate to touch, a simple form of learning usually seen in higher organisms [4]. While early microsurgical approaches demonstrated a startling array of regenerative and morphogenetic processes in this single-celled organism, Stentor was never developed as a molecular model system. We report the sequencing of the Stentor coeruleus macronuclear genome and reveal key features of the genome. First, we find that Stentor uses the standard genetic code, suggesting that ciliate-specific genetic codes arose after Stentor branched from other ciliates. We also discover that ploidy correlates with Stentor's cell size. Finally, in the Stentor genome, we discover the smallest spliceosomal introns reported for any species. The sequenced genome opens the door to molecular analysis of single-cell regeneration in Stentor.

  7. Danger signaling protein HMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death accompanied by formation of giant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Keith, Martina; Kopitz, Jürgen; Bergmann, Marion; Fassl, Anne; Weber, Alexander N R; George, Julie; Kees, Tim; Zentgraf, Hans-Walter; Wiestler, Otmar D; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2010-11-01

    Cells dying by necrosis release the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, which has immunostimulatory effects. However, little is known about the direct actions of extracellular HMGB1 protein on cancer cells. Here, we show that recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) exerts strong cytotoxic effects on malignant tumor cells. The rhHMGB1-induced cytotoxicity depends on the presence of mitochondria and leads to fast depletion of mitochondrial DNA, severe damage of the mitochondrial proteome by toxic malondialdehyde adducts, and formation of giant mitochondria. The formation of giant mitochondria is independent of direct nuclear signaling events, because giant mitochondria are also observed in cytoplasts lacking nuclei. Further, the reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine as well as c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase blockade inhibited the cytotoxic effect of rhHMGB1. Importantly, glioblastoma cells, but not normal astrocytes, were highly susceptible to rhHMGB1-induced cell death. Systemic treatment with rhHMGB1 results in significant growth inhibition of xenografted tumors in vivo. In summary, rhHMGB1 induces a distinct form of cell death in cancer cells, which differs from the known forms of apoptosis, autophagy, and senescence, possibly representing an important novel mechanism of specialized necrosis. Further, our findings suggest that rhHMGB1 may offer therapeutic applications in treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors.

  8. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  9. MicroRNA-106b inhibits osteoclastogenesis and osteolysis by targeting RANKL in giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Yin, Huabin; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhenxi; Wei, Haifeng; Liu, Zhi'an; Wu, Zhipeng; Yan, Wangjun; Liu, Tielong; Song, Dianwen; Yang, Xinghai; Huang, Quan; Zhou, Wang; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone consists of three major cell types: giant cells, monocytic cells, and stromal cells. From microarray analysis, we found that miR-106b was down-regulated in GCT clinical samples and further determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, the expression of novel potential target of miR-106b, RANKL, was elevated in GCT along with previously determined targets in other tumors such as IL-8, MMP2 and TWIST. In a RANKL 3′UTR luciferase reporter assays, agomiR-106b repressed the luciferase activity and the effect was eliminated when the targeting site in the reporter was mutated, suggesting a direct regulation of miR-106b on RANKL mRNA. Moreover, overexpression of miR-106b in GCTSCs through TALEN-mediated site-specific knockin clearly inhibited osteoclastogenesis and osteolysis. By grafting the GCT onto the chick CAM, we confirmed the inhibitory effect of miR-106b on RANKL expression and giant cell formation. Furthermore, in an OVX mouse model, silencing of miR-106b increased RANKL protein expression and promoted bone resorption, while up-regulation of miR-106b inhibited bone resorption. These results suggest that miR-106b is a novel suppressor of osteolysis by targeting RANKL and some other cytokines, which indicates that miR-106b may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GCT. PMID:26053181

  10. Huge undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sungho

    2014-03-14

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) is very rare, less than 1% of all pancreatic malignancies, and shows worse prognosis than that of invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We present a case of en bloc resection for a huge undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs that invaded the stomach and transverse mesocolon. A 67-year female was admitted for left upper quadrant pain and computed tomography demonstrated a mass occupying the lesser sac and abutting the stomach and pancreas. There were no distant metastases and the patient underwent subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, total gastrectomy, and segmental resection of the transverse colon. Histopathological examination confirmed an 11 cm-sized undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with OGCs. Immunohistochemical staining revealed reactivity with pan-cytokeratin in adenocarcinoma component, with vimentin in neoplastic multi-nucleated cells, with CD45/CD68 in OGCs, and with p53 in tumor cells, respectively. The patient had suffered from multiple bone metastases and survived 9 mo after surgery. This case supports the ductal epithelial origin of undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs and early diagnosis could result in favorable surgical outcomes. Investigations on the surgical role and prognostic factors need to be warranted in this tumor.

  11. Identification of differentially expressed genes and their subpathways in recurrent versus primary bone giant cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuxin; Li, Chunquan; Wu, Bingli; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Cheng; Lin, Xiaoxu; Wu, Xiangqiao; Sun, Lingling; Liu, Chunpeng; Chen, Bo; Zhong, Zhigang; Xu, Liyan; Li, Enmin

    2014-09-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone is a benign but locally aggressive bone neoplasm with a strong tendency to develop local recurrent and metastatic disease. Thus, it provides a useful model system for the identification of biological mechanisms involved in bone tumor progression and metastasis. This study profiled 24 cases of recurrent versus primary bone GCT tissues using QuantiGene 2.0 Multiplex Arrays that included Human p53 80-Plex Panels and Human Stem Cell 80-Plex Panels. A total of 32 differentially expressed genes were identified, including the 20 most upregulated genes and the 12 most downregulated genes in recurrent GCT. The genes identified are related to cell growth, adhesion, apoptosis, signal transduction and bone formation. Furthermore, iSubpathwayMiner analyses were performed to identify significant biological pathway regions (subpathway) associated with this disease. The pathway analysis identified 11 statistically significant enriched subpathways, including pathways in cancer, p53 signaling pathway, osteoclast differentiation pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. Among these subpathways, four genes (IGF1, MDM2, STAT1 and RAC1) were presumed to play an important role in bone GCT recurrence. The differentially expressed MDM2 protein was immunohistochemically confirmed in the recurrent versus primary bone GCT tissues. This study identified differentially expressed genes and their subpathways in recurrent GCT, which may serve as potential biomarkers for the prediction of GCT recurrence.

  12. Neutrophil Elastase Is Produced by Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Is Linked to Neointimal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Mee; Haghighat, Leila; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Sawada, Hirofumi; Alvira, Cristina M.; Wang, Lingli; Acharya, Swati; Rodriguez-Colon, Gabriela; Orton, Andrew; Zhao, Mingming; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (M1-MHV-68) induces pulmonary artery (PA) neointimal lesions in S100A4-overexpressing, but not in wild-type (C57), mice. Lesions were associated with heightened lung elastase activity and PA elastin degradation. We now investigate a direct relationship between elastase and PA neointimal lesions, the nature and source of the enzyme, and its presence in clinical disease. We found an association exists between the percentage of PAs with neointimal lesions and elastin fragmentation in S100A4 mice 6 months after viral infection. Confocal microscopy documented the heightened susceptibility of S100A4 versus C57 PA elastin to degradation by elastase. A transient increase in lung elastase activity occurs in S100A4 mice, 7 days after M1-MHV-68, unrelated to inflammation or viral load and before neointimal lesions. Administration of recombinant elafin, an elastase-specific inhibitor, ameliorates early increases in serine elastase and attenuates later development of neointimal lesions. Neutrophils are the source of elevated elastase (NE) in the S100A4 lung, and NE mRNA and protein levels are greater in PA smooth muscle cells (SMC) from S100A4 mice than from C57 mice. Furthermore, elevated NE is observed in cultured PA SMC from idiopathic PA hypertension versus that in control lungs and localizes to neointimal lesions. Thus, PA SMC produce NE, and heightened production and activity of NE is linked to experimental and clinical pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:21763677

  13. PCNA--a cell proliferation marker in vocal chord cancer. Part I: Premalignant laryngeal lesions.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, L D; Broich, G; Lavezzi, A M; Biondo, B; Ottaviani, F

    1995-01-01

    Laryngeal hyperkeratotic lesions can progress to fully developed malignant carcinoma in some cases. These premalignant lesions are proliferative disorders whose potential for further tumour progression is perhaps difficult to assess by mere histology. Immunostaining with PCNA, a protein correlated with cell proliferation, has been used to study tissue behavior in 30 cases of premalignant laryngeal vocal chord lesions treated by epithelial stripping in microlaryngoscopy, 15 of whom had no progression and 15 had recurrence and final development of full malignancy. The results showed a statistically significantly higher PCNA-index in the cases which underwent further tumour progression towards malignancy. PCNA testing may thus be suggested as a marker for tumour progression potential and help in determining clinical treatment choices.

  14. Differentiation of focal intrahepatic lesions with /sup 99m/Tc-red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.A.; Marks, D.S.; Sandler, M.A.; Shetty, P.

    1983-03-01

    The appearance of focal hepatic lesions on /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid images is nonspecific. As it is important to distinguish hemangiomas from other lesions prior to biopsy, a prospective study was performed using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells. Dynamic perfusion and delayed blood-pool images (1-2 hours) were obtained and lesion activity categorized as increased, equal, or decreased compared with the liver. Of 21 patients studied, 9 (43%) had one or more hepatic hemangiomas, and 8 of these 9 patients (89%) demonstrated increased blood-pool activity. The 12 nonhemangiomatous lesions consisted of 7 metastatic tumors, 2 hepatomas, 1 cirrhotic nodule, and 2 hepatic cysts. None of these 12 patients had increased activity on delayed blood-pool images. Early dynamic images of hepatic hemangiomas demonstrated variable activity (vascularity) and were not useful in differentiating hemangiomas from other lesions. Sensitivity was 89% and specificity 100%. Although liver enzymes are usually normal with hepatic hemangiomas, they may also be normal in metastatic disease. The authors recommend that delayed blood-pool imaging be performed prior to biopsy, particularly in patients without a known primary tumor or those with normal liver enzyme levels.

  15. Differentiation of focal intrahepatic lesions with 99mTc-red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.A.; Marks, D.S.; Sandler, M.A.; Shetty, P.

    1983-03-01

    The appearance of focal hepatic lesions on 99mTc-sulfur colloid images is nonspecific. As it is important to distinguish hemangiomas from other lesions prior to biopsy, a prospective study was performed using 99mTc-labeled red blood cells. Dynamic perfusion and delayed blood-pool images (1-2 hours) were obtained and lesion activity categorized as increased, equal, or decreased compared with the liver. Of 21 patients studied, 9 (43%) had one or more hepatic hemangiomas, and 8 of these 9 patients (89%) demonstrated increased blood-pool activity. The 12 nonhemangiomatous lesions consisted of 7 metastatic tumors, 2 hepatomas, 1 cirrhotic nodule, and 2 hepatic cysts. None of these 12 patients had increased activity on delayed blood-pool images. Early dynamic images of hepatic hemangiomas demonstrated variable activity (vascularity) and were not useful in differentiating hemangiomas from other lesions. Sensitivity was 89% and specificity 100%. Although liver enzymes are usually normal with hepatic hemangiomas, they may also be normal in metastatic disease. The authors recommend that delayed blood-pool imaging be performed prior to biopsy, particularly in patients without a known primary tumor or those with normal liver enzyme levels.

  16. Medial entorhinal cortex lesions only partially disrupt hippocampal place cells and hippocampus-dependent place memory

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Jena B; Schlesiger, Magdalene I; Leutgeb, Jill K; Squire, Larry R; Leutgeb, Stefan; Clark, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Entorhinal cortex provides the primary cortical projections to the hippocampus, a brain structure critical for memory. However, it remains unclear how the precise firing patterns of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) cells influence hippocampal physiology and hippocampus-dependent behavior. We found that complete bilateral lesions of MEC resulted in a lower proportion of active hippocampal cells. The remaining active cells had place fields, but with decreased spatial precision and decreased long-term spatial stability. In addition, MEC rats were as impaired at acquiring the watermaze as hippocampus rats, while rats with combined MEC and hippocampal lesions had an even greater deficit. However, MEC rats were not impaired on other hippocampus-dependent tasks, including those in which an object location or context was remembered. Thus, MEC is not necessary for all types of spatial coding, nor for all types of hippocampus-dependent memory, but is necessary for the normal acquisition of place memory. PMID:25437546

  17. Identification of potentially cytotoxic lesions induced by UVA photoactivation of DNA 4-thiothymidine in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reelfs, Olivier; Macpherson, Peter; Ren, Xiaolin; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter; Young, Antony R.

    2011-01-01

    Photochemotherapy—in which a photosensitizing drug is combined with ultraviolet or visible radiation—has proven therapeutic effectiveness. Existing approaches have drawbacks, however, and there is a clinical need to develop alternatives offering improved target cell selectivity. DNA substitution by 4-thiothymidine (S4TdR) sensitizes cells to killing by ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. Here, we demonstrate that UVA photoactivation of DNA S4TdR does not generate reactive oxygen or cause direct DNA breakage and is only minimally mutagenic. In an organotypic human skin model, UVA penetration is sufficiently robust to kill S4TdR-photosensitized epidermal cells. We have investigated the DNA lesions responsible for toxicity. Although thymidine is the predominant UVA photoproduct of S4TdR in dilute solution, more complex lesions are formed when S4TdR-containing oligonucleotides are irradiated. One of these, a thietane/S5-(6-4)T:T, is structurally related to the (6-4) pyrimidine:pyrimidone [(6-4) Py:Py] photoproducts induced by UVB/C radiation. These lesions are detectable in DNA from S4TdR/UVA-treated cells and are excised from DNA more efficiently by keratinocytes than by leukaemia cells. UVA irradiation also induces DNA interstrand crosslinking of S4TdR-containing duplex oligonucleotides. Cells defective in repairing (6-4) Py:Py DNA adducts or processing DNA crosslinks are extremely sensitive to S4TdR/UVA indicating that these lesions contribute significantly to S4TdR/UVA cytotoxicity. PMID:21890905

  18. Internal carotid artery stenosis associated with giant cell arteritis: case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Zarar, Amna; Zafar, Taqi T; Khan, Asif A; Suri, M Fareed K; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrovascular ischemic events associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) are uncommon and have been reported in 3%–4% of patients. We describe a case report of GCA associated with intracranial stenosis and review various angiographic findings. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with worsening headache and vision loss. A recent magnetic resonance angiogram of the head and neck showed multiple intracranial stenosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis demonstrated increased protein of 135.6 mg/dL, with two white blood cells/µL. No bacteria were observed in the CSF on gram staining, and cultures were negative for bacterial growth. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was noted to be 14 mm/h, and C-reactive protein was 1.514 mg/L at admission. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis panels were negative. On digital subtraction angiography, patient had predominantly narrowing and irregularities in petrous and cavernous segments of the internal carotid arteries bilaterally. The diagnosis of GCA was confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. He was treated with steroids, and a followup angiogram 6 weeks later showed minimal resolution of the angiographic findings. Patient reported complete resolution of headaches and visual loss. Conclusion Bilateral internal carotid arteries stenosis may be seen in patients presenting with typical symptoms of GCA and may persist after steroid treatment despite resolution of clinical symptoms. PMID:25566338

  19. Foreign Body Giant Cell-Related Encapsulation of a Synthetic Material Three Years After Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Jonas; Barbeck, Mike; Sader, Robert A; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Russe, Philippe; Choukroun, Joseph; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2016-06-01

    Bone substitute materials of different origin and chemical compositions are frequently used in augmentation procedures to enlarge the local bone amount. However, relatively little data exist on the long-term tissue reactions. The presented case reports for the first time histological and histomorphometrical analyses of a nanocrystaline hydroxyapatite-based bone substitute material implanted in the human sinus cavity after an integration period of 3 years. The extracted biopsy was analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically with focus on the tissue reactions, vascularization, new bone formation, and the induction of a foreign body reaction. A comparably high rate of connective tissue (48.25%) surrounding the remaining bone substitute granules (42.13%) was observed. Accordingly, the amount of bone tissue (9.62%) built the smallest fraction within the biopsy. Further, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive and -negative multinucleated giant cells (4.35 and 3.93 cells/mm(2), respectively) were detected on the material-tissue interfaces. The implantation bed showed a mild vascularization of 10.03 vessels/mm(2) and 0.78%. The present case report shows that after 3 years, a comparable small amount of bone tissue was observable. Thus, the foreign body response to the bone substitute seems to be folded without further degradation or regeneration.

  20. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  1. Significance of image analysis in the diagnosis of bone tumors and tumor-like lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Thomas; Gahm, Thomas; Delling, Guenter

    1990-11-01

    The distinction between different types of giant-cell containing lesions often represents a challenge for pathologists since wide ranges and overlappings of their morphological features are common. But despite of their similarities the treatment is very different and depends on an accurate morpological diagnostic. Our present study was undertaken to investigate the nuclear DNA content (NDC) of giant-cell containing lesions and its value for the diagnostic. Furthermore we studied the significance of NDC to predict the biological behavior of giant-cell tumors. 12 aneurysmal bone cysts 25 central osteosarcomas (biopsies) and 16 giant-cell tumors of the Hamburger Knochentumorregister were included in this study. In all cases fresh material was available. 20 imprintcytologies from each specimen of each case were prepared . 10 were used for Feulgen-staining to perform quantitative DNA-measurements. 10 were used for Pappenheim-staining for morphological examination. Conventionally prepared sections of each specimen of each patient radiological findings and clinical data served as control-system. The recently developed DNA measuring program CESAR based on image analysis (IBAS I Kontron Germany) was used for this study. The obtained DNA distributions were classified according to a new developed DNAgrading system for imprintcytologies (s. table 1). All investigated aneurysmal bone cysts were 0 I (euploid). 23 central osteosarcomas were G III (aneuploid). 2 central osteosarcomas (predominantly cartilage producing) were G II (only a small number of hypertetraploid cells). 9 giant-cell tumors were G II. 7 Giant

  2. Rare liver tumor: symptomatic giant von Meyenburg complex

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yardesh; Cawich, Shamir O.; Ramjit, Chunilal; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    von Meyenburg complexes are hamartomas that arise from intra-hepatic bile ducts. Symptomatic lesions are uncommon and giant lesions are exceedingly rare. When encountered, they should be excised because there are reports of malignant change in large, symptomatic lesions. We report a case of a symptomatic giant von Meyenburg complex. PMID:28068648

  3. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for giant cell tumor of distal radius

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Kabul C; Borgohain, Munin; Bhuyan, Sanjeev K; Goswami, Sanjiv; Bora, Anjan; Ahmed, Firoz

    2010-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the distal radius poses problems for reconstruction after resection. Several reconstructive procedures like vascularized and non-vascularized fibular graft, osteo-articular allograft, ceramic prosthesis and megaprosthesis are in use for substitution of the defect in the distal radius following resection. Most authors advocate wrist arthrodesis following resection of distal radius and non vascularized fibular graft. Here we have analyzed the results of aggressive benign GCTs of the distal radius treated by resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized fibular graft. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four cases of giant cell tumor of the distal radius (mean age 32 years, mean follow-up 6.6 years) treated by en-bloc resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized ipsilateral fibular graft with a minimum followup of two years have been included in this retrospective study. Nineteen cases were of Campanacci grade III and five were of Grade II recurrence. The mean resected length of the radius was 9.5 (8-12) cm. Routine radiographs and clinical assessments regarding pain, instability, recurrence, hand grip strength and functional status were done at regular intervals and functional results were assessed using (musculoskeletal tumor society) MSTS-87 scoring. Results: Early radiological union at host-graft junction was achieved at mean 12.5 weeks, (range 12-14 weeks) and solid incorporation with callus formation was observed in mean 29 weeks (range 28-32 weeks) in all the cases. Satisfactory range of motion (mean 63%, range 52-78%) of the wrist was achieved in 18 cases. Grip strength compared to the contralateral hand was found to be 67% (range 58-74%). Functional results were excellent in six cases (25%), good in 14 cases (58.3%) and four (16.7%) cases had fair results. Soft tissue recurrence was seen in one patient. The most commonly encountered complication was fibulo

  4. Systemic B-cell lymphoma presenting as an isolated lesion on the ear.

    PubMed

    Darvay, A; Russell-Jones, R; Acland, K M; Lampert, I; Chu, A C

    2001-03-01

    We report a case of systemic B-cell lymphoma that presented as an isolated cutaneous lesion on the ear, mimicking a primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Although there was no clinical evidence of systemic disease, bone marrow involvement was found on further investigation and subsequent immunoglobulin gene analysis revealed an identical clone in the skin lesion and bone marrow aspirate. Evidence of a t(14 : 18) translocation was not identified. This case is unusual for several reasons. First, involvement of the pinna as a presenting feature of systemic lymphoma has not been reported previously. Second, the cutaneous lesion had been present for 3 years prior to diagnosis and there has been no clinical progression of systemic lymphoma during 2 years of follow-up. Third, the lymphoma does not correspond exactly to any of the entities in the REAL classification of systemic B-cell lymphoma. This case underlines the indolent nature of some systemic B-cell lymphomas and the need to investigate thoroughly patients with disease apparently confined to the skin.

  5. [Observation of cells tolerant of tobacco mosaic virus in virus-induced local lesions in Datura stramonium L. leaves].

    PubMed

    Reunov, A V; Lega, S N; Nagorskaia, V P; Lapshina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of tobacco mosaic virus-induced local lesions developing in leaves of Datura stramonium plants demonstrated that, in the central area of the lesions, the cell response to viral invasion was not uniform. Most cells exhibited an acute hypersensitive reaction and underwent rapid and complete necrosis. However, some cells, despite considerable virus accumulation and immediate contact with completely collapsed cells, maintained a certain degree of structural integrity. Analysis performed showed that the proportion of collapsed and uncollapsed cells in the lesion centre 3 to 5 days after infection did not change essentially. These data suggest that the absence of hypersensitive response in some cells in the lesion centre is not due to an early stage of infection but is likely caused by cell tolerance of the virus.

  6. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  7. Unusual chromatin status and organization of the inactive X chromosome in murine trophoblast giant cells.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Catherine; Diabangouaya, Patricia; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Chow, Jennifer C; Heard, Edith

    2013-02-01

    Mammalian X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) enables dosage compensation between XX females and XY males. It is an essential process and its absence in XX individuals results in early lethality due primarily to extra-embryonic defects. This sensitivity to X-linked gene dosage in extra-embryonic tissues is difficult to reconcile with the reported tendency of escape from XCI in these tissues. The precise transcriptional status of the inactive X chromosome in different lineages has mainly been examined using transgenes or in in vitro differentiated stem cells and the degree to which endogenous X-linked genes are silenced in embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages during early postimplantation stages is unclear. Here we investigate the precise temporal and lineage-specific X-inactivation status of several genes in postimplantation mouse embryos. We find stable gene silencing in most lineages, with significant levels of escape from XCI mainly in one extra-embryonic cell type: trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). To investigate the basis of this epigenetic instability, we examined the chromatin structure and organization of the inactive X chromosome in TGCs obtained from ectoplacental cone explants. We find that the Xist RNA-coated X chromosome has a highly unusual chromatin content in TGCs, presenting both heterochromatic marks such as H3K27me3 and euchromatic marks such as histone H4 acetylation and H3K4 methylation. Strikingly, Xist RNA does not form an overt silent nuclear compartment or Cot1 hole in these cells. This unusual combination of silent and active features is likely to reflect, and might underlie, the partial activity of the X chromosome in TGCs.

  8. BUBR1 expression in benign oral lesions and squamous cell carcinomas: correlation with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lira, Régia C P; Miranda, Fabiana A; Guimarães, Márcia C M; Simões, Renata T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Soares, Christiane P; Soares, Edson G

    2010-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common head and neck cancer. Only in Brazil, the estimate is for 14,160 new cases in 2009. HPV is associated with increasing risk of oral cancer, but its role in carcinogenesis is still controversial. BUBR1, an important protein in the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), has been associated with some virus-encoded proteins and cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of BUBR1 in non-malignant oral lesions and OSCC with and without metastasis associated with HPV infection. We performed immunohistochemistry for BUBR1 in 70 OSCC biopsies divided into three groups (in situ tumors, invasive tumors without metastasis and invasive tumors with metastasis) with their respective lymph nodes from samples with metastasis and in 16 non-malignant oral lesions. PCR was performed in order to detect HPV DNA. Significantly higher BUBR1 expression associated with shorter survival (p=0.0479) was observed in malignant lesions. There was also a significant correlation (r=1.000) with BUBR1 expression in lesions with metastasis and their lymph nodes. Ninety percent of OSCC and 100% of benign lesions were HPV positive. HPV16 and HVP18 were present in 13 and 24% of HPV-positive OSCC samples, respectively. HPV was more prevalent (76%) in samples with a high BUBR1 expression and the absence of viral DNA had no influence on BUBR1 expression. These findings suggest that HPV could be associated with overexpression of BUBR1 in OSCC, but not in benign oral lesions.

  9. Glutathione Depletion and Carbon Ion Radiation Potentiate Clustered DNA Lesions, Cell Death and Prevent Chromosomal Changes in Cancer Cells Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape. This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and l-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  10. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

    PubMed

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  11. Undifferentiated Carcinoma with Osteoclast-Like Giant Cells of the Pancreas in a Patient with New Diagnosis of Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Freid, Lauren; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells are rare, with only 50 cases published to date. We report a case of a 67-year-old male with a new diagnosis of follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an incidental pancreatic body mass on abdominal imaging. Cytology from the pancreatic mass obtained via endoscopic ultrasound-directed fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells.

  12. Case Report: A giant myopericytoma involving the occipital region of the scalp - a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Chaudhary, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report a rare case of a giant myopericytoma presenting in a 16-year-old girl as a slowly progressive swelling involving the scalp in the occipital region. It was managed by complete excision. Histological examination of the lesion revealed  spindle-shaped cells forming characteristic rosettes around the blood vessels, and positive staining with smooth muscle actin.

  13. Function of Sox2 in ependymal cells of lesioned spinal cords in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ogai, Kazuhiro; Nakatani, Kumi; Hisano, Suguru; Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kato, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    The sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2) is related not only to pluripotency, but also to cell proliferation. Zebrafish can regain their motor function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Following SCI, new motor neurons are produced from proliferating ependymal cells. Here, we investigated the expression and function of Sox2 after SCI in zebrafish. Sox2 was upregulated as early as 1 day post-lesion (dpl) in ependymal cells, which was followed by cell proliferation. Sox2 knockdown significantly decreased the number of proliferating cells at 5dpl. The results of this study suggest a role of Sox2 as one of the proliferation initiators in ependymal cells after SCI.

  14. Perivascular inflammatory cells in ovine Visna/maedi encephalitis and their possible role in virus infection and lesion progression.

    PubMed

    Polledo, Laura; González, Jorge; Benavides, Julio; Martínez-Fernández, Beatriz; Ferreras, Ma Carmen; Marín, Juan F García

    2012-12-01

    We examined the distribution in the perivascular spaces of Visna/maedi antigen, T cells (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+), B cells and macrophages by immunohistochemistry in 22 natural cases of Visna/maedi encephalitis. Sheep showed lymphocytic or histiocytic lesions. In mild lymphocytic lesions, the viral antigen was detected in perivascular cuffs where CD8+ T cells predominated, but in severe lymphocytic lesions, sparse antigen was identified, and CD8+/CD4+ T cells appeared in a similar proportion in multilayer perivascular sleeves. In histiocytic lesions, vessels were surrounded by macrophages with abundant viral antigen, with CD8+/CD4+ T cells and B cells in the periphery. These results could reflect different stages of virus neuroinvasion and clarify the neuropathogenesis of Visna/maedi encephalitis.

  15. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Profiling of the Neoplastic Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Stromal Cells by RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Kwok, Jamie S L; Tsui, Joseph C C; Huang, Lin; Yang, Kevin Y; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2016-11-15

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is the most common non-malignant primary bone tumor reported in Hong Kong. Failure of treatment in advanced GCTB with aggressive local recurrence remains a clinical challenge. In order to reveal the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of this tumor, we aimed to examine the transcriptome profiling of the neoplastic stromal cells of GCTB in this study. RNA-sequencing was performed on three GCTB stromal cell samples and one bone marrow-derived MSC sample and 174 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between these two cell types. The top five up-regulated genes are SPP1, F3, TSPAN12, MMP13, and LGALS3BP and further validated by qPCR and Western Blotting. Knockdown of SPP1 was found to induce RUNX2 and OPG expression in GCTB stromal cells but not the MSCs. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) of the 174 DEGs revealed significant alternations in 23 pathways; variant calling analysis revealed 1915 somatic variants of 384 genes with high or moderate impacts. Interestingly, four canonical pathways were found overlapping in both analyses; from which VEGFA, CSF1, PLAUR, and F3 genes with somatic mutation were found up-regulated in GCTB stromal cells. The STRING diagram showed two main clusters of the DEGs; one cluster of histone genes that are down-regulated in GCTB samples and another related to osteoblast differentiation, angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, and tumor growth. The DEGs and somatic mutations found in our study warrant further investigation and validation, nevertheless, our study add new insights in the search for new therapeutic targets in treating GCTB. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-12, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cytometric measurement of cell proliferation in echo-guided biopsies from focal lesions of the liver.

    PubMed

    Faccioli, S; Chieco, P; Gramantieri, L; Stecca, B A; Bolondi, L

    1996-02-01

    Increased proliferative activity determined in surgical specimens of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been associated with tumor grade and patient survival. The measurement of cell proliferation in echo-guided biopsies of small focal liver lesions might provide useful information for the early recognition of malignancy and for predicting the aggressiveness of small HCCs. We assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of cell proliferation in 91 echo-guided needle biopsies of focal liver lesions using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67, which detects a human nuclear antigen that is present in proliferating cells. Measurements were performed by image cytometry as the percentage of Ki-67 positive hepatocytes nuclei over total hepatocyte nuclei in the biopsy. At the histological examination, 27 lesions were diagnosed as chronic hepatitis, 10 as cirrhosis, 11 as macroregenerative nodule, and 43 as HCC in cirrhotic liver. Although the highest Ki-67 values (> 20%) were found in less-differentiated HCCs, most well-differentiated HCCs and nine borderline nodules were completely devoid of Ki-67-positive hepatocytes. A sustained Ki-67 labeling (up to 16%) was found in hepatitis and cirrhosis, similar to that found in several malignant tumors. In the HCC subset, Ki-67 labeling was strongly correlated to the Edmondson-Steiner histological grade. However, survival analysis did not indicate a better outcome for those patients with low-proliferating tumors.

  17. Diminished number or complete loss of myoepithelial cells associated with metaplastic and neoplastic apocrine lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Tramm, Trine; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A

    2011-02-01

    The presence of myoepithelial (ME) cells is considered an important feature in the vast majority of benign breast lesions. Recently, a case showing the absence of myoepithelium in a mammary duct with apocrine metaplasia was reported. To investigate the status of ME cells associated with apocrine metaplasia, the distribution of ME cells in 59 metaplastic and intraductal proliferative apocrine lesions was evaluated using immunohistochemical expression of p63 and Calponin. p63 showed a diminished number of ME cells and increased intermyoepithelial nuclear distance in ducts with all variants of apocrine metaplasia and proliferation compared with normal glands. In the majority of cases, Calponin showed a continuous ME layer. In 6 cases, including an apocrine papilloma, there were definitive ME gaps confirmed by both markers, in the absence of atypia and with preservation of the basement membrane. In all cases, there was frequent heterogeneity in the distribution of ME cells in ducts harboring apocrine cells and even in various papillae within papillary lesions. In summary, benign and noninvasive apocrine lesions can show reduction and occasional complete loss of ME cells. This observation is particularly important when evaluating apocrine papillary proliferations, in which the absence of ME cells may lead to overdiagnosis of atypia and/or malignancy. The observation suggests that at least 2 ME markers should be used when evaluating apocrine lesions, and that a malignant diagnosis should be based on features of the proliferating cells until more data become available on the significance, if any, of the absence of ME cells in apocrine lesions.

  18. High circulating leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in patients with giant cell arteritis: independent regulation of LIF and IL-6 under corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lecron, J C; Roblot, P; Chevalier, S; Morel, F; Alderman, E; Gombert, J; Gascan, H

    1993-01-01

    Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine which possesses a wide range of biological activities including, like IL-6, the capacity to stimulate acute phase protein (APP) synthesis. We have developed a sensitive and specific ELISA for human LIF, and tested the circulating cytokine levels in various disease states, some of which are associated with inflammation. LIF was detected in 11/20 sera from patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA), a vasculitis syndrome affecting particularly the temporal artery, characterized by panarteritis with inflammatory cell infiltration. LIF levels were considerably elevated in some patients who also displayed elevated levels of IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP); however, no correlation was observed between the levels of circulating LIF and levels of IL-6 or CRP. Furthermore, LIF levels were not affected by corticosteroid therapy, whereas IL-6 and CRP decreased rapidly, as clinical symptoms resolved. A putative role for LIF in the persistence of histological lesions is discussed. This is the first report of the presence of circulating LIF in sera. These results are in agreement with the complexity of induced inflammatory cytokines and corticoid regulation of APP synthesis observed in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8096803

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma arising from an oral lichenoid lesion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Attaran, Rana; Bahramian, Ayla; Emamverdi Zadeh, Paria

    2012-01-01

    Lichenoid reactions represent a family of lesions with different etiologic factors and a common clinical and histologic ap-pearance. Lichen planus is included with lichenoid reactions and is a relatively common chronic mucocutaneous disorder. The most important complication of lichenoid reactions is the possibility of malignant transformation. That is why it has been considered a precancerous condition. Although the malignant transformation rate varies widely in the literature, from 0.4 to 6.5 percent, in most studies it does not exceed 1%. The aim of this paper is to report a rare case of squamous cell car-cinoma (SCC) arising within an oral lichenoid lesion in a 17-year-old woman, where SCC is very uncommon. The patient did not have any risk factors and was healthy. The lesion was located on the border of the tongue. In view of thecommon occurrence of OLP (oral lichen planus) and the unresolved issues regarding its premalignant potential, this case report illus-trates the need for histologic confirmation and a close follow-up of clinical lesions with lichenoid features.

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multifocal bone lesions: comparative clinical features between single and multi-systems.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kinugawa, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Akinobu; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Ohki, Kentaro; Shioda, Yoko; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) can be a single system or multi-system disease. Both disease types can be associated with multi-focal bone lesions, but their bone involvement patterns have not been compared systematically. Of the new pediatric LCH cases enrolled into the JLSG-02 study during 2002-2007, 67 cases of single system multifocal bone (SMFB) LCH and 97 cases of multi-system bone (MSB) LCH were analyzed to determine if the bone involvement patterns differ in these two types, and whether these differences correlate with outcome. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and other measures. Onset ages were higher for SMFB (P < 0.001), but the two types did not differ in the number of bone lesions per patient. The skull was most frequently affected in both types, followed by the spine. Lesions in the temporal bone (P = 0.002), ear-petrous bone (P < 0.001), orbita (P = 0.003), and zygomatic bone (P = 0.016) were significantly more common in MSB. The two types did not differ in response to treatment, but MSB was associated with a significantly higher incidence of diabetes insipidus (DI) (P < 0.001). Novel measures are required in preventing the development of DI in MSB-type LCH patients with "risk" bone lesions.

  1. Giant radiolytic dissolution rates of aqueous ceria observed in-situ by liquid-cell TEM.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Muhammad Sajid Ali; Inkson, Beverley J; Moebus, Guenter

    2017-03-09

    Dynamics of cerium oxide nanoparticle aqueous corrosion are revealed in-situ. We use innovative liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with deliberate high-intensity electron-beam irradiation of nanoparticle suspensions. This enables life video-recording of materials reactions in liquid, with nm-resolution. We introduce image-quantification to measure detailed rates of dissolution as a function of time and particle size to be compared with literature data. Giant dissolution rates, exceeding any previous reports for chemical dissolution rates at room temperature by many orders of magnitude, are discovered. Reasons for accelerated dissolution are outlined, including the importance of radiolysis of water preceding ceria-attack. Electron-water interaction generates radicals, ions and hydrated electrons, which assist in hydration and reductive dissolution of oxide minerals. The presented methodology has the potential to become a novel accelerated testing procedure to compare multiple nanoscale materials for relative aqueous durability. The ceria-water system is of crucial importance for the fields of catalysis, abrasive polishing, environmental remediation, and as simulant for actinide-oxide behaviour in contact with liquid for nuclear engineering.

  2. Giant cell arteritis mimicking infiltrative leptomeningeal disease of the optic nerves.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, Michael D; Ratchford, John N; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Probasco, John C

    2015-04-09

    A 67-year-old man presented with several days of progressive, painless left eye vision loss. He reported mild jaw claudication but denied headache, scalp tenderness or constitutional symptoms. Examination revealed palpable temporal arteries, blurring of the left optic disc, and 20/100 vision in the left eye with mild relative afferent pupillary defect. Inflammatory markers were sent, and methylprednisolone was initiated for presumptive giant cell arteritis (GCA). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was normal, however, and C reactive protein was only mildly elevated, prompting further investigation. Orbital MRI revealed nodular enhancement of the optic nerve sheaths bilaterally from optic nerve head to chiasm, raising concern for an infiltrative leptomeningeal process such as sarcoidosis or lymphoma. Methylprednisolone was temporarily stopped while a broad work up for inflammatory and neoplastic causes was pursued. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ultimately revealed hypermetabolism in the temporal, ophthalmic and occipital arteries suggesting GCA, which was confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. Steroids were restarted, and the patient's vision stabilised.

  3. The thromboembolic risk in giant cell arteritis: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guida, A; Tufano, A; Perna, P; Moscato, P; De Donato, M T; Finelli, R; Caputo, D; Di Minno, M N D

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic vasculitis characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the aorta and its main vessels. Cardiovascular risk, both for arterial and venous thromboembolism, is increased in these patients, but the role of thromboprophylaxis is still debated. It should be suspected in elderly patients suffering from sudden onset severe headaches, jaw claudication, and visual disease. Early diagnosis is necessary because prognosis depends on the timeliness of treatment: this kind of arteritis can be complicated by vision loss and cerebrovascular strokes. Corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of the pharmacological treatment of GCA. Aspirin seems to be effective in cardiovascular prevention, while the use of anticoagulant therapy is controversial. Association with other rheumatological disease, particularly with polymyalgia rheumatica is well known, while possible association with antiphospholipid syndrome is not established. Large future trials may provide information about the optimal therapy. Other approaches with new drugs, such as TNF-alpha blockades, Il-6 and IL-1 blockade agents, need to be tested in larger trials.

  4. The Thromboembolic Risk in Giant Cell Arteritis: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Guida, A.; Tufano, A.; Perna, P.; Moscato, P.; De Donato, M. T.; Finelli, R.; Caputo, D.; Di Minno, M. N. D.

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic vasculitis characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the aorta and its main vessels. Cardiovascular risk, both for arterial and venous thromboembolism, is increased in these patients, but the role of thromboprophylaxis is still debated. It should be suspected in elderly patients suffering from sudden onset severe headaches, jaw claudication, and visual disease. Early diagnosis is necessary because prognosis depends on the timeliness of treatment: this kind of arteritis can be complicated by vision loss and cerebrovascular strokes. Corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of the pharmacological treatment of GCA. Aspirin seems to be effective in cardiovascular prevention, while the use of anticoagulant therapy is controversial. Association with other rheumatological disease, particularly with polymyalgia rheumatica is well known, while possible association with antiphospholipid syndrome is not established. Large future trials may provide information about the optimal therapy. Other approaches with new drugs, such as TNF-alpha blockades, Il-6 and IL-1 blockade agents, need to be tested in larger trials. PMID:24963300

  5. Wide excision and ulno-carpal arthrodesis for primary aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M.; Jandhyala, R.; Sharma, H.; Amin, P.; Pandit, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five patients underwent wide resection of the distal radial giant cell tumours (GCTs) followed by ulno-carpal arthrodesis. There were 15 male and ten female patients, with an average age of 21.5 years. Tumours included ten primary aggressive and 15 recurrent GCTs. Mean follow up was 2.4 years. Pain, swelling and reduced range of movement (ROM) were noted. Average time to fusion was 7.6 months. Five patients had persistent pain in the proximal forearm. Grip strength was 65% compared to the uninvolved side. Two patients had superficial wound infection, two underwent additional bone grafting and three implant removals due to hardware prominence were carried out. There was no evidence of carpal instability or arthritis on clinical or radiological examination at the time of final follow up. Fusion of the carpus to the ulna is a simple method of producing a painless stable wrist, though at the expense of mobility. The procedure allows wide resection with a lower rate of recurrence. Pain in the proximal forearm seems to persist for 3 to 4 months only to improve at subsequent follow up. The procedure provides a valid option for the management of primary aggressive and recurrent GCTs of distal radius. PMID:17643243

  6. Acute vision loss and choroidal filling delay in the absence of giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Ling; Lee, Iris; Lee, Michael S; Van Stavern, Greg P; McClelland, Collin M

    2016-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a visually devastating disease that often progresses to severe bilateral vision loss if untreated. Diagnosis of GCA is made challenging by the protean nature of the disease and the lack of a simple test that is both highly sensitive and specific. Choroidal filling delay on fluorescein angiography (FA) has been touted as a highly characteristic feature of GCA-related vision loss, although knowledge of both the sensitivity and specificity of this finding remains unproven. We report our experience of delayed choroidal filling on FA in a series of seven patients referred to an academic neuro-ophthalmology practice due to concern for GCA. Despite the FA findings, our examination, diagnostic testing, and long-term follow-up excluded the diagnosis of GCA in all cases, suggesting that choroidal perfusion abnormalities may occur in the absence of GCA. When evaluating a patient for acute vision loss, the astute clinician must remain cognizant of the limitations of FA in the diagnosis of GCA. PMID:27695279

  7. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  8. ZNF687 Mutations in Severe Paget Disease of Bone Associated with Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Divisato, Giuseppina; Formicola, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Merlotti, Daniela; Pazzaglia, Laura; Del Fattore, Andrea; Siris, Ethel; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P.; Nuti, Ranuccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Benassi, Maria Serena; Cancela, M. Leonor; Michou, Laetitia; Rendina, Domenico; Gennari, Luigi; Gianfrancesco, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Paget disease of bone (PDB) is a skeletal disorder characterized by focal abnormalities of bone remodeling, which result in enlarged and deformed bones in one or more regions of the skeleton. In some cases, the pagetic tissue undergoes neoplastic transformation, resulting in osteosarcoma and, less frequently, in giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). We performed whole-exome sequencing in a large family with 14 PDB-affected members, four of whom developed GCT at multiple pagetic skeletal sites, and we identified the c.2810C>G (p.Pro937Arg) missense mutation in the zinc finger protein 687 gene (ZNF687). The mutation precisely co-segregated with the clinical phenotype in all affected family members. The sequencing of seven unrelated individuals with GCT associated with PDB (GCT/PDB) identified the same mutation in all individuals, unravelling a founder effect. ZNF687 is highly expressed during osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and is dramatically upregulated in the tumor tissue of individuals with GCT/PDB. Interestingly, our preliminary findings showed that ZNF687, indicated as a target gene of the NFkB transcription factor by ChIP-seq analysis, is also upregulated in the peripheral blood of PDB-affected individuals with (n = 5) or without (n = 6) mutations in SQSTM1, encouraging additional studies to investigate its potential role as a biomarker of PDB risk. PMID:26849110

  9. Molluscum Contagiosum Virus Transcriptome in Abortively Infected Cultured Cells and a Human Skin Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Rios, Jorge D.; Yang, Zhilong; Erlandson, Karl J.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Martens, Craig A.; Bruno, Daniel P.; Porcella, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molluscum contagiosum virus (MOCV), the only circulating human-specific poxvirus, has a worldwide distribution and causes benign skin lesions that may persist for months in young children and severe infections in immunosuppressed adults. Studies of MOCV are restricted by the lack of an efficient animal model or a cell culture replication system. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze and compare polyadenylated RNAs from abortive MOCV infections of several cell lines and a human skin lesion. Viral RNAs were detected for 14 days after MOCV infection of cultured cells; however, there was little change in the RNA species during this time and a similar pattern occurred in the presence of an inhibitor of protein synthesis, indicating a block preventing postreplicative gene expression. Moreover, a considerable number of MOCV RNAs mapped to homologs of orthopoxvirus early genes, but few did so to homologs of intermediate or late genes. The RNAs made during in vitro infections represent a subset of RNAs detected in human skin lesions which mapped to homologs of numerous postreplicative as well as early orthopoxvirus genes. Transfection experiments using fluorescent protein and luciferase reporters demonstrated that vaccinia virus recognized MOCV intermediate and late promoters, indicating similar gene regulation. The specific recognition of the intermediate promoter in MOCV-infected cells provided evidence for the synthesis of intermediate transcription factors, which are products of early genes, but not for late transcription factors. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) and reporter gene assays may be useful for testing engineered cell lines and conditions that ultimately could provide an in vitro replication system. IMPORTANCE The inability to propagate molluscum contagiosum virus, which causes benign skin lesions in young children and more extensive infections in immunosuppressed adults, has constrained our understanding of the biology of this human

  10. β1 Integrins Mediate Attachment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Cartilage Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zwolanek, Daniela; Flicker, Magdalena; Kirstätter, Elisabeth; Zaucke, Frank; van Osch, Gerjo J.V.M.; Erben, Reinhold G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may have great potential for cell-based therapies of osteoarthritis. However, after injection in the joint, only few cells adhere to defective articular cartilage and contribute to cartilage regeneration. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of MSC attachment to defective articular cartilage. Here, we developed an ex vivo attachment system, using rat osteochondral explants with artificially created full-thickness cartilage defects in combination with genetically labeled MSC isolated from bone marrow of human placental alkaline phosphatase transgenic rats. Binding of MSC to full-thickness cartilage lesions was improved by serum, but not hyaluronic acid, and was dependent on the presence of divalent cations. Additional in vitro tests showed that rat MSC attach, in a divalent cation-dependent manner, to collagen I, collagen II, and fibronectin, but not to collagen XXII or cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). RGD peptides partially blocked the adhesion of MSC to fibronectin in vitro and to cartilage lesions ex vivo. Furthermore, the attachment of MSC to collagen I and II in vitro and to cartilage lesions ex vivo was almost completely abolished in the presence of a β1 integrin blocking antibody. In conclusion, our data suggest that attachment of MSC to ex vivo full-thickness cartilage lesions is almost entirely β1 integrin-mediated, whereby both RGD- and collagen-binding integrins are involved. These findings suggest a key role of integrins during MSC attachment to defective cartilage and may pave the way for improved MSC-based therapies in the future. PMID:26309781

  11. Regeneration of a Tooth in a Tissue-Engineered Mandible After Resection of a Central Giant Cell Tumor. Demonstrating Evidence of Functional Matrix Theory and Ectodermal Origin of Teeth in a Human Model-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Melville, James C; Couey, Marcus A; Tong, Matthew S; Marx, Robert E

    2016-09-29

    Central giant cell tumors (CGCTs) are uncommon lesions occurring in the jaw. They are benign but locally destructive osteolytic lesions. They usually occur in pediatric patients 5 to 15 years of age. Multiple noninvasive modalities of treatment (intralesional steroids, interferon, calcitonin, and denosumab) have been described for those lesions, but for those that are refractory to treatment, enucleation and curettage or resection is a curative surgery. This case report describes a pediatric patient who was diagnosed with an aggressive CGCT of the left mandible encompassing the right angle to the condyle. The lesion became refractory to noninvasive treatments and immediate resection and reconstruction was performed using principles of tissue engineering. After 5 years of close observation, the patient showed normal morphology and growth of his mandible, but surprisingly developed a left mandibular third molar (tooth 17) in the site of the mandibular resection and reconstruction. This is the first case report in the literature to show the spontaneous development of teeth in a human reconstructed mandible, contributing evidence toward the functional matrix theory of mandibular growth and ectodermal origin of teeth.

  12. The path of anti-tuberculosis drugs: from blood to lesions to mycobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    For the successful treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, drugs need to penetrate complex lung lesions and permeate the mycobacterial cell wall in order to reach their intracellular targets. However, most currently used anti-tuberculosis drugs were introduced into clinical use without considering the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that influence drug distribution, and this has contributed to the long duration and limited success of current therapies. In this Progress article, I describe new methods to quantify and image drug distribution in infected lung tissue and in mycobacterial cells, and I explore how this technology could be used to design optimized multidrug regimens. PMID:24487820

  13. Giant cell tumors of the spine: has denosumab changed the treatment paradigm?

    PubMed

    Goldschlager, Tony; Dea, Nicolas; Boyd, Michael; Reynolds, Jeremy; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Rhines, Laurence D; Mendel, Ehud; Pacheco, Marina; Ramos, Edwin; Mattei, Tobias A; Fisher, Charles G

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the spine are rare and complex to treat. They have a propensity for local recurrence and the potential to metastasize. Treatment is currently surgical and presents unique challenges due to the proximity of neural structures and the need for reconstruction. Denosumab has been shown in clinical trials to be an effective treatment for GCT, but has not yet been studied specifically in GCT of the spine or as a surgical adjunct. To the authors' knowledge this is the first such reported series. METHODS A multicenter, prospective series of 5 patients with GCT of the spine treated with denosumab were included. Patient demographic data, oncological history, neurological status, tumor staging, treatment details and adverse events, surgical procedure, complications, radiological and histological responses, and patient outcome were analyzed. RESULTS All patients were women, with a mean age of 38 years, and presented with pain; 2 patients had additional neurological signs and symptoms. The mean duration of symptoms was 62 weeks. No patient had a prior tumor or metastatic disease at presentation. All patients had Enneking Stage III tumors and were treated with monthly cycles of 120 mg of denosumab, with initial additional loading doses on Days 8 and 15. Patients were given daily supplements of calcium (500 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). There were no denosumab-related adverse events. All patients had a radiological response to denosumab. One patient failed to have a histological response to denosumab, with > 90% of tumor cells found to be viable on histological investigation. CONCLUSIONS This study reports the early experience of using denosumab in the treatment of spinal GCT. The results demonstrate a clinically beneficial radiological response and an impressive histological response in most but not all patients. Further experience with denosumab and longer patient follow-up is required. Denosumab has the potential to change the treatment paradigm

  14. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  15. Giant oral lipoma: a rare entity*

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, José Burgos; Ferreira, Gustavo Zanna; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are very common benign slow-growing soft tissue neoplasms composed of mature adipose tissue mostly diagnosed in the fifth decade of life. These tumors rarely present in the oral cavity, representing less than approximately 5% of all benign mouth tumors. They are usually less than 2cm in size and etiology remains unclear. We report a young male patient presenting with a giant lipoma in the buccal mucosa. Histopathology revealed a large area of mature fat cells consistent with conventional lipoma and an area of the mucosal lining of the lesion suggestive of morsicatio buccarum. In the present article, we emphasize the clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of the disease.

  16. Iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS) reduces brain cell damage in rats intrastriatally lesioned by quinolinate.

    PubMed

    González-Cortés, Carolina; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Gómez-López, Marcos Artemio; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Gómez-Ruiz, Celedonio; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is involved in the neurotoxic pattern produced by quinolinic acid in the rat brain [V. Pérez-De La Cruz, C. González-Cortés, S. Galván-Arzate, O.N. Medina-Campos, F. Pérez-Severiano, S.F. Ali, J. Pedraza-Chaverrí, A. Santamaría, Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III), Neuroscience 135 (2005) 463-474.]. The aim of this work was to investigate whether ONOO(-) can also be responsible for morphological alterations and inflammatory events in the same paradigm. For this purpose, we evaluated the effect of a pre-treatment with the iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS), a well-known ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst (10 mg/kg, i.p., 120 min before lesion), on the quinolinate-induced striatal cell damage and immunoreactivities to glial-fibrilar acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), one and seven days after the intrastriatal infusion of quinolinate (240 nmol/microl) to rats. The striatal tissue from animals lesioned by quinolinate showed a significant degree of damage and enhanced immunoreactivities to GFAP, IL-6 and iNOS, both at 1 and 7 days post-lesion. Pre-treatment of rats with Fe(TPPS) significantly attenuated or prevented all these markers at both post-lesion times tested, except for GFAP immunoreactivity at 7 days post-lesion and iNOS immunoreactivity at 1 day post-lesion. Altogether, our results suggest that ONOO(-) is actively participating in triggering inflammatory events and morphological alterations in the toxic model produced by quinolinate, since the use of agents affecting its formation, such as Fe(TPPS), are effective experimental tools to reduce the brain lesions associated to excitotoxic and oxidative damage.

  17. /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell scintigraphy in evaluating focal liver lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, S.A.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-07-01

    To determine the accuracy of blood-pool imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas, 39 patients with various focal hepatic lesions were studied. The diagnoses in these patients were made by biopsy, angiography, surgical exploration, or clinical stability for a minimum of 14 months. The diagnoses were: hemangiomas (13 patients), hepatoma (three), metastases (19), abscesses (two), and liver cysts (two). After modified in vivo labeling of red blood cells with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate, an initial flow study and early (1-15 min) and delayed (1-2 hr) static images were obtained. Increased blood-pool activity with a discordant flow pattern was seen in 11 of 13 patients with hemangiomas. False-negative scans occurred in two hemangiomas with extensive fibrosis. None of the metastatic, abscess, or cystic lesions had increased blood-pool activity at any time after injection. It is concluded that /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell imaging can distinguish hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions.

  18. 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy in evaluating focal liver lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, S.A.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-07-01

    To determine the accuracy of blood-pool imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas, 39 patients with various focal hepatic lesions were studied. The diagnoses in these patients were made by biopsy, angiography, surgical exploration, or clinical stability for a minimum of 14 months. The diagnoses were: hemangiomas (13 patients), hepatoma (three), metastases (19), abscesses (two), and liver cysts (two). After modified in vivo labeling of red blood cells with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc pertechnetate, an initial flow study and early (1-15 min) and delayed (1-2 hr) static images were obtained. Increased blood-pool activity with a discordant flow pattern was seen in 11 of 13 patients with hemangiomas. False-negative scans occurred in two hemangiomas with extensive fibrosis. Two of three hepatomas had increased blood-pool activity associated with increased flow in a pattern identical to the increased blood-pool activity. None of the metastatic, abscess, or cystic lesions had increased blood-pool activity at any time after injection. It is concluded that 99mTc red blood cell imaging can distinguish hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions.

  19. Processus and recessus adhaerentes: giant adherens cell junction systems connect and attract human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Patrick; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Straub, Beate K; Grund, Christine; Kuhn, Caecilia; Krause, Ulf; Seckinger, Anja; Peitsch, Wiebke K; Spring, Herbert; Ho, Anthony D; Franke, Werner W

    2007-06-01

    Substrate-adherent cultured cells derived from human bone marrow or umbilical cord blood ("mesenchymal stem cells") are of special interest for regenerative medicine. We report that such cells, which can display considerable heterogeneity with respect to their cytoskeletal protein complement, are often interconnected by special tentacle-like cell processes contacting one or several other cells. These processus adhaerentes, studded with many (usually small) puncta adhaerentia and varying greatly in length (up to more than 400 microm long), either contact each other in the intercellular space ("ET touches") or insert in a tight-fitting manner into deep plasma membrane invaginations (recessus adhaerentes), thus forming a novel kind of long (up to 50 microm) continuous cuff-like junction (manubria adhaerentia). The cell processes contain an actin microfilament core that is stabilized with ezrin, alpha-actinin, and myosin and accompanied by microtubules, and their adhering junctions are characterized by a molecular complement comprising the transmembrane glycoproteins N-cadherin and cadherin-11, in combination with the cytoplasmic plaque proteins alpha- and beta-catenin, together with p120(ctn), plakoglobin, and afadin. The processes are also highly dynamic and rapidly foreshorten as cell colonies approach a denser state of cell packing. These structures are obviously able to establish cell-cell connections, even over long distances, and can form deep-rooted and tight cell-cell adhesions. The possible relationship to similar cell processes in the embryonic primary mesenchyme and their potential in cell sorting and tissue formation processes in the body are discussed.

  20. Metabolites of the biocide o-phenylphenol generate oxidative DNA lesions in V 79 cells.

    PubMed

    Henschke, P; Almstadt, E; Lüttgert, S; Appel, K E

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of the o-phenylphenol (OPP) metabolites, o-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) and o-phenylbenzoquinone (PBQ) with V 79 Chinese hamster cells led to a significant enhancement of the amount of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in nuclear DNA. With OPP no distinct induction of this lesion could be observed. In addition, PHQ and PBQ were able to generate DNA single-strand breaks (DNA SSB), while OPP failed to induce this lesion. All incubations were performed for 1 h without exogenous metabolic activations and the lowest effective concentration tested was 20 microM. It is concluded that these metabolites may contribute to the carcinogenicity of OPP and sodium o-phenylphenolate (SOPP) observed in rats, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) through their redox cycling properties.

  1. A Comparative Study of Immunohistochemical Myoepithelial Cell Markers in Cutaneous Benign Cystic Apocrine Lesions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew; Houghton, Sinatra L; Biswas, Asok

    2016-07-01

    The use of immunohistochemical markers for myoepithelial cells (MEC) is a useful tool in the distinction of benign from malignant epithelial neoplasms. Although their use in breast tumors is well recognized, little is known concerning its application in comparable cutaneous lesions. Using benign cutaneous cystic apocrine lesions as a study model, the aim of this study was to compare 5 immunohistochemical markers [calponin, p63, smooth muscle actin (SMA), cytokeratin 14, and CD10] in their effectiveness to highlight MEC. Cases of apocrine hidrocystoma and cystadenoma (n = 44) were reviewed with a particular emphasis on proliferative features and apocrine change. The MEC staining pattern and the intensity and distribution scores in proliferative (n = 29) and nonproliferative (n = 15) lesions were assessed, and the differences between the 2 groups were statistically analyzed using Fisher exact test. Calponin and SMA stained MEC in the most consistent manner. Being a nuclear stain, p63 was easy to interpret but typically showed discontinuous staining. Cytokeratin 14 not only effectively highlighted MEC but also stained some luminal epithelial cells in an unpredictable manner. Because of prominent background dermal fibroblast staining, CD10 was often difficult to interpret. Only SMA and p63 showed a statistically significant difference in MEC staining intensity scores between the proliferative and nonproliferative groups. Our results show that immunohistological staining for MEC in benign cystic apocrine lesions of the skin is variable. The authors recommend that a panel of markers that includes calponin and p63 be used and highlight the need for awareness of specific caveats associated with individual markers.

  2. Whole-mount confocal imaging of nuclei in giant feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2012-07-01

    • Excellent visualization of nuclei was obtained here using a whole-mount procedure adapted to provide high-resolution images of large, irregularly shaped nuclei. The procedure is based on tissue clearing, and fluorescent staining of nuclear DNA with the dye propidium iodide. • The method developed for standard confocal imaging was applied to large multicellular root swellings, named galls, induced in plant hosts by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. • Here, we performed a functional analysis, and examined the nuclear structure in giant feeding cells overexpressing the cell cycle inhibitor Kip-related protein 4 (KRP4). Ectopic KRP4 expression in galls led to aberrant nuclear structure, disturbing giant cell expansion and nematode reproduction. In vivo live-cell imaging of GFP-KRP4 demonstrated that this protein co-localizes to chromosomes from prophase to late anaphase during cell cycle progression. • The data presented here suggest the involvement of KRP4 during mitotic progression in plant cells. The detailed results obtained using confocal analysis also demonstrate the potential utility of a rapid, easy-to-use clearing method for the analysis of the nuclei of certain Arabidopsis mutants and other complex plant nuclei.

  3. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment.

  4. Effects of Cultured Adrenal Chromaffin Cell Implants on Hindlimb Reflexes of the 6-OHDA Lesioned Rat

    PubMed Central

    Pulford, Bruce E.; Mihajlov, Andrea R.; Nornes, Howard O.; Whalen, L. Ray

    1994-01-01

    The effects of implantation of cultured adrenal medullary cells on the recovery of neurotransmitter specific reflex activity were studied in the rat spinal cord using electrophysiological testing methods. Cell suspensions of cultured neonatal adrenal medullary chromaffin (AM) cells (which produce catecholamines), or Schwann (Sc) cells (controls) were implanted into the lumbar region of the spinal cord 2 weeks after catecholamine (CA) denervation by intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). All cells were taken from 7 day neonates and cultured for 10 days in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Three months after implantation, the extent of implant-associated recovery of reflex activity was determined by measuring electromyogram (EMG) activity and force associated with the long latency component of the hindlimb withdrawal reflex (which is CA modulated). After the electrophysiological testing, rats were anesthetized, and the spinal cords were rapidly removed and frozen. Spinal cords were sectioned longitudinally, and implanted cells were visualized using glyoxylic acid techniques. Labelled sections were examined to determine cell survival. Results indicate that 1) chromaffin cells survive for 3 months in the segments of the cord into which they have been implanted and 2) rats implanted with AM cells have significantly more forceful withdrawal reflexes than those that received Sc cells or received no implant after lesioning. PMID:7703294

  5. Histological Lesions, Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and T Cell Subsets Changes of Spleen in Chicken Fed Aflatoxin-contaminated Corn

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi; Zhang, Keying; Bai, Shiping; Ding, Xuemei; Zeng, Qiufeng; Yang, Jun; Fang, Jing; Chen, Kejie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of corn naturally contaminated with aflatoxin B1 and aflatoxin B2 on pathological lesions, apoptosis, cell cycle phases and T lymphocyte subsets of spleen, and to provide an experimental basis for understanding the mechanism of aflatoxin-induced immunosuppression. A total of 900 COBB500 male broilers were randomly allocated into five groups with six replicates per group and 30 birds per replicate. The experiment lasted for 6 weeks and the five dietary treatments consisted of control, 25% contaminated corn, 50% contaminated corn, 75% contaminated corn and 100% contaminated corn groups. The histopathological spleen lesions from the contaminated corn groups was characterized as congestion of red pulp, increased necrotic cells and vacuoles in the splenic corpuscle and periarterial lymphatic sheath. The contaminated corn intake significantly increased relative weight of spleen, percentages of apoptotic splenocytes, induced cell cycle arrest of splenocytes, increased the percentages of CD3+CD8+ T cells and decreased the ratios of CD3+CD4+ to CD3+CD8+. The results suggest that AFB-induced immunosuppression maybe closely related to the lesions of spleen. PMID:25141002

  6. Omics markers of the red cell storage lesion and metabolic linkage

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Reisz, Julie; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J.; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of omics technologies in the field of Transfusion Medicine has significantly advanced our understanding of the red cell storage lesion. While the clinical relevance of such a lesion is still a matter of debate, quantitative and redox proteomics approaches, as well quantitative metabolic flux analysis and metabolic tracing experiments promise to revolutionise our understanding of the role of blood processing strategies, inform the design and testing of novel additives or technologies (such as pathogen reduction), and evaluate the clinical relevance of donor and recipient biological variability with respect to red cell storability and transfusion outcomes. By reviewing existing literature in this rapidly expanding research endeavour, we highlight for the first time a correlation between metabolic markers of the red cell storage age and protein markers of haemolysis. Finally, we introduce the concept of metabolic linkage, i.e. the appreciation of a network of highly correlated small molecule metabolites which results from biochemical constraints of erythrocyte metabolic enzyme activities. For the foreseeable future, red cell studies will advance Transfusion Medicine and haematology by addressing the alteration of metabolic linkage phenotypes in response to stimuli, including, but not limited to, storage additives, enzymopathies (e.g. glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency), hypoxia, sepsis or haemorrhage. PMID:28263171

  7. Is vascular endothelial growth factor a useful biomarker in giant cell arteritis?

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Nicola; Morlet, Julien; Singh, Surjeet; Sabokbar, Afsie; Hutchings, Andrew; Sharma, Vanshika; Vaskova, Jana; Masters, Shauna; Zarei, Allahdad; Luqmani, Raashid

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the performance of circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels as a tool for diagnosing giant cell arteritis (GCA) in a cohort of patients referred for assessment of suspected GCA. Methods We selected 298 patients recruited to the multicentre study Temporal Artery Biopsy versus Ultrasound in diagnosis of suspected GCA (TABUL). In a random subset of 26 biopsy-proven GCA cases and 26 controls, serum from weeks 0, 2 and 26 was analysed for VEGF concentration using ELISA. VEGF concentration at week 0 was used to generate a receiver-operating characteristic curve and thereby identify a cut-off for an abnormal result which was used to analyse the full patient cohort. Sections of paraffin-embedded temporal artery were stained by immunohistochemistry for VEGF. Results The mean (95% CI) VEGF concentration at week 0 was 873 pg/mL (631 to 1110) in 26 patients versus 476 pg/mL (328 to 625) in 26 controls (p=0.017). This difference was not observed at any other time point. The optimal cut-off of 713 pg/mL was applied to the whole patient cohort (n=298), yielding sensitivity of 32% and specificity of 85%. This was not improved by combination with any clinical parameters. When patients with biopsy-proven GCA were compared with controls, sensitivity was 58% and specificity remained 85%. Sections of biopsy from biopsy-positive GCA showed intense staining in the adventitia which was not seen in controls. Conclusions Serum VEGF concentration predicts biopsy positivity but is not useful for differentiating clinical cases of GCA from controls. Further studies into VEGF as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target are warranted. Trial registration number NCT00974883; Post-results.

  8. Surgical Outcomes in Patients with High Spinal Instability Neoplasm Score Secondary to Spinal Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Sankey, Eric W.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Lo, Sheng-Fu L.; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To describe the surgical outcomes in patients with high preoperative Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) secondary to spinal giant cell tumors (GCT) and evaluate the impact of en bloc versus intralesional resection and preoperative embolization on postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 14 patients with GCTs of the spine who underwent surgical treatment prior to the use of denosumab. A univariate analysis was performed comparing the patient demographics, perioperative characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients who underwent en bloc marginal (n = 6) compared with those who had intralesional (n = 8) resection. Results Six patients underwent en bloc resections and eight underwent intralesional resection. Preoperative embolization was performed in eight patients. All patients were alive at last follow-up, with a mean follow-up length of 43 months. Patients who underwent en bloc resection had longer average operative times (p = 0.0251), higher rates of early (p = 0.0182) and late (p = 0.0389) complications, and a higher rate of surgical revision (p = 0.0120). There was a 25% (2/8 patients) local recurrence rate for intralesional resection and a 0% (0/6 patients) local recurrence rate for en bloc resection (p = 0.0929). Conclusions Surgical excision of spinal GCTs causing significant instability, assessed by SINS, is associated with high intraoperative blood loss despite embolization and independent of resection method. En bloc resection requires a longer operative duration and is associated with a higher risk of complications when compared with intralesional resection. However, the increased morbidity associated with en bloc resection may be justified as it may minimize the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26835198

  9. Ocular pulse amplitude as a diagnostic adjunct in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, P B; Bachmann, L M; Thiel, M A; Landau, K; Kaufmann, C

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop an algorithm based on the ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) to predict the probability of a positive temporal artery biopsy (TAB) result in the acute phase of suspected giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods Unilateral TAB was performed and ipsilateral OPA measurements were taken by Dynamic Contour Tonometry. Among the clinical signs and laboratory findings tested in univariate analyses, OPA, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and thrombocyte count showed a strong association with a positive TAB result. Algorithm parameters were categorized into three groups (OPA >3.5, 2.5–3.5, and <2.5 mm Hg; ESR <25, 25–60, and >60 mm/h; thrombocyte count <250'000, 250'000–500'000, and >500'000/μl). Score values (0, 1, and 2) were attributed to each group, resulting in a total score range from 0 to 6. A univariate logistic regression analysis using the GCA diagnosis as the dependent and the total score as the independent variate was fitted and probability estimates were calculated. Results Thirty-one patients with suspected GCA undergoing TAB during an eighteen-month observation period were enrolled. Twenty patients showed histologically proven GCA. Four patients had score values ≤2, fourteen between 3 and 4, and thirteen of ≥5. The corresponding estimated probabilities of GCA were<7, 52.6, and >95%. Conclusion The present study confirms previous findings of reduced OPA levels, elevated ESR, and elevated thrombocyte counts in GCA. It indicates that a sum score based on OPA, ESR, and thrombocyte count can be helpful in predicting TAB results, especially at the upper and the lower end of the sum score range. PMID:26088675

  10. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G.; Johnson, Jay R.; Miller, Federick W.; Matteson, Eric L.; Crowson, C. S.; Gabriel, S. E.

    2015-05-15

    Our objective was to examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We used data from patients with GCA (1950-2004) and RA (1955-2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results: The correlation of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0-1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5-7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4-5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8-11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions: AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4-5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. Lastly, the link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases.

  11. Prevalence and distribution of VZV in temporal arteries of patients with giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    White, Teresa; Khmeleva, Nelly; Heintzman, Anna; Choe, Alexander; Boyer, Philip J.; Grose, Charles; Carpenter, John E.; Rempel, April; Bos, Nathan; Kandasamy, Balasubramaniyam; Lear-Kaul, Kelly; Holmes, Dawn B.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mandava, Naresh; Eberhart, Charles G.; Bockelman, Brian; Poppiti, Robert J.; Tamhankar, Madhura A.; Fogt, Franz; Amato, Malena; Wood, Edward; Durairaj, Vikram; Rasmussen, Steve; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Pollak, Lea; Mendlovic, Sonia; Chatelain, Denis; Keyvani, Kathy; Brueck, Wolfgang; Nagel, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection may trigger the inflammatory cascade that characterizes giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded GCA-positive temporal artery (TA) biopsies (50 sections/TA) including adjacent skeletal muscle and normal TAs obtained postmortem from subjects >50 years of age were examined by immunohistochemistry for presence and distribution of VZV antigen and by ultrastructural examination for virions. Adjacent regions were examined by hematoxylin & eosin staining. VZV antigen–positive slides were analyzed by PCR for VZV DNA. Results: VZV antigen was found in 61/82 (74%) GCA-positive TAs compared with 1/13 (8%) normal TAs (p < 0.0001, relative risk 9.67, 95% confidence interval 1.46, 63.69). Most GCA-positive TAs contained viral antigen in skip areas. VZV antigen was present mostly in adventitia, followed by media and intima. VZV antigen was found in 12/32 (38%) skeletal muscles adjacent to VZV antigen–positive TAs. Despite formalin fixation, VZV DNA was detected in 18/45 (40%) GCA-positive VZV antigen–positive TAs, in 6/10 (60%) VZV antigen–positive skeletal muscles, and in one VZV antigen–positive normal TA. Varicella-zoster virions were found in a GCA-positive TA. In sections adjacent to those containing VZV, GCA pathology was seen in 89% of GCA-positive TAs but in none of 18 adjacent sections from normal TAs. Conclusions: Most GCA-positive TAs contained VZV in skip areas that correlated with adjacent GCA pathology, supporting the hypothesis that VZV triggers GCA immunopathology. Antiviral treatment may confer additional benefit to patients with GCA treated with corticosteroids, although the optimal antiviral regimen remains to be determined. PMID:25695965

  12. MicroRNA expression profiles in metastatic and non-metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Mosakhani, Neda; Pazzaglia, Laura; Benassi, Maria Serena; Borze, Ioana; Quattrini, Irene; Picci, Piero; Knuutila, Sakari

    2013-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a skeletal neoplasm, a locally aggressive tumor that occasionally metastasizes to the lungs. To identify novel biomarkers associated with GCTB progression and metastasis, we performed a miRNA microarray on ten primary tumors of GCTB, of which five developed lung metastases and the rest remained metastasis-free. Between metastatic and non-metastatic GCTB, 12 miRNAs were differentially expressed (such as miR-136, miR-513a-5p, miR-494, miR-224, and miR-542-5p). A decreased level of miR-136 in metastatic versus non-metastatic GCTB was significantly confirmed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (p=0.04). To identify potential target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs, we used three target prediction databases. Then, to functionally validate the potential target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, we re-analyzed our previous gene expression data from the same ten patients. Eight genes such as NFIB, TNC, and FLRT2 were inversely expressed relative to their predicted miRNA regulators. NFIB expression correlated in metastatic GCTB with no or low expression of miR-136, and this gene was selected for further verification with qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Verification of NFIB mRNA and protein by qRT-PCR showed elevated expression levels in metastatic GCTBs. Further, the protein expression level of NFIB was tested in an independent validation cohort of 74 primary archival GCTB specimens. In the primary tumors that developed metastases compared to the disease-free group, NFIB protein was moderately to strongly expressed at a higher frequency. Thus, in GCTB, miR-136 and NFIB may serve as prognostic makers.

  13. Giant Cell Tumor with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Shows Heterogeneous Metabolic Pattern on (18)F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  14. Myelin-specific T cells induce interleukin-1beta expression in lesion-reactive microglial-like cells in zones of axonal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grebing, Manuela; Nielsen, Helle H; Fenger, Christina D; T Jensen, Katrine; von Linstow, Christian U; Clausen, Bettina H; Söderman, Martin; Lambertsen, Kate L; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Finsen, Bente

    2016-03-01

    Infiltration of myelin-specific T cells into the central nervous system induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We have previously shown that myelin-specific T cells are recruited into zones of axonal degeneration, where they stimulate lesion-reactive microglia. To gain mechanistic insight, we used RNA microarray analysis to compare the transcript profile in hippocampi from perforant pathway axonal-lesioned mice with and without adoptively transferred myelin-specific T cells 2 days postlesion, when microglia are clearly lesion reactive. Pathway analysis revealed that, among the 1,447 differently expressed transcripts, the interleukin (IL)-1 pathway including all IL-1 receptor ligands was upregulated in the presence of myelin-specific T cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed increased mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the T-cell-infiltrated hippocampi from axonal-lesioned mice. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed a T-cell-enhanced lesion-specific expression of IL-1β mRNA and protein, respectively, and induction of the apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, ASC, in CD11b(+) cells. Double in situ hybridization showed colocalization of IL-1β mRNA in a subset of CD11b mRNA(+) cells, of which many were part of cellular doublets or clusters, characteristic of proliferating, lesion-reactive microglia. Double-immunofluorescence showed a T-cell-enhanced colocalization of IL-1β to CD11b(+) cells, including lesion-reactive CD11b(+) ramified microglia. These results suggest that myelin-specific T cells stimulate lesion-reactive microglial-like cells to produce IL-1β. These findings are relevant to understand the consequences of T-cell infiltration in white and gray matter lesions in patients with MS.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells in post-surgical cavities of large maxillary bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bertolai, Roberto; Catelani, Carlo; Signorini, Mattia; Rossi, Alessandro; Giannini, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent studies have highlighted that MSCs are capable of regenerating large bone defects when used in combination with bone substitutes and increasing allo-graft osteointegration. We investigated the hypothesis that autologous MSCs may lead to increased bone regeneration and reduced healing time in post-surgical cavities of large maxillary bone lesions. Methods This study involved 10 patients (TEST GROUP) (6 males and 4 females). All patients had expansive mandibular lesions larger than 3 cm. From the surgical point of view, the 10 patients were treated with MSCs (withdrawal of the iliac crest bone marrow BMMSs) directly into the post-surgical cavity, without the addition of filler. Results and radiological data, in the postoperative, were compared to those of patients who did not receive any grafting of MSCs. The 7 patients with mandibular lesions showed a rapid and very good healing with an 85–90% ossification of the major defect at 12 months. Conclusions Through the use of stem cells a greater ossification of the residual cavity (85–90%) was observed at 12 months after surgical enucleation in contenitive defects. PMID:28228785

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma developing in a cutaneous lichen planus lesion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Kotne, Sivasankar; Ananda Rao, P B; Turlapati, S P V; Kumar Soren, Dillip

    2014-01-01

    Lichen planus is a benign disorder characterized by an itchy, noninfectious skin rash. Though lichen planus is a common papulosquamous disorder affecting about 1-2% of the population, neoplastic transformation of cutaneous lichen planus lesions occurs very rarely and should be borne in mind while treating nonhealing longstanding lesions of lichen planus. Studies suggest an estimated 0.3-3% risk of malignancy in patients with oral lichen planus, however, cutaneous lichen planus does not carry an increased risk of malignant degeneration. We present a case of a 36-year-old male with a 10-year-long history of hypertrophic lichen planus who presented with a nonhealing ulcer in the left popliteal fossa. The patient underwent wide local excision with superficial skin grafting. Postoperative histopathological examination revealed verrucous squamous cell carcinoma complicating lichen planus. In view of underlying structure involvement, adjuvant radiation therapy was given. This case is being reported to emphasize the infrequent possibility of development of malignancy in cutaneous lichen planus, especially if it presents as a longstanding, nonhealing, itchy lesion with patchy areas of depigmentation in the lower limbs.

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma-like and pox lesions occurring simultaneously in chorioallantoic membranes of chicken embryos inoculated with materials from squamous cell carcinoma and pox lesions in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Fallavena, L C; Rodrigues, N C; Moraes, H L; Salle, C T; da Silva, A B; Nascimento, V P; Rodrigues, O

    1997-01-01

    The finding of closely associated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)-like lesions and pox lesions in chorioallantoic membranes (CAMs) inoculated with skin and palate samples taken from broilers is described. The samples were obtained from two broilers coming from different flocks that were not vaccinated against fowl pox. Both birds presented skin lesions, which were diagnosed in one bird as fowl pox, and in the other as SCC. After inoculation of CAMs with fresh tissues from both birds, histologic examination revealed, in all CAMs, lesions that were characteristic of fowl pox together with lesions consistent with those seen in the skin of broilers affected with SCC. This finding was unexpected and may shed some light on the etiology of SCC.

  18. Predictive value of red blood cell distribution width for coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Fu, Songling; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Jian; Gao, Lichao; Zhu, Weihua; Gong, Fangqi

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with poor outcome in cardiovascular diseases. In order to assess the predictive value of red blood cell distribution width, before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, for coronary artery lesions in patient with Kawasaki disease, we compared 83 patients with coronary artery lesions and 339 patients without coronary artery lesions before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. Clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical values were evaluated along with red blood cell distribution width. A total of 422 consecutive patients with Kawasaki disease were enrolled into our study. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the optimal red blood cell distribution width cut-off value for predicting coronary artery lesions was 14.55% (area under the curve was 0.721; p=0.000); eighty-three patients (19.7%) had coronary artery lesions, and 70% of the patients with coronary artery lesions had red blood cell distribution width level >14.55%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that fever duration >14 days (odds ratio was 3.42, 95% confidence interval was 1.27-9.22; p=0.015), intravenous immunoglobulin resistance (odds ratio was 2.33, 95% confidence interval was 1.02-5.29; p=0.04), and red blood cell distribution width >14.55% (odds ratio was 3.49, 95% confidence interval was 2.01-6.05; p=0.000) were independent predictors of coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease. In Conclusion, red blood cell distribution width may be helpful for predicting coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  19. Platelets Direct Monocyte Differentiation Into Epithelioid-Like Multinucleated Giant Foam Cells With Suppressive Capacity Upon Mycobacterial Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yonghong; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Yin, Hongyun; Dong, Zhengwei; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Jun; Bi, Aixiao; Weber, Stephan; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Chen, Gang; Chen, Yang; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Epithelioid, foam, and multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are characteristics of tuberculosis granulomas, yet the precise genesis and functions of these transformed macrophages are unclear. We evaluated the role of platelets as drivers of macrophage transformation in mycobacterial infection. Methods. We employed flow cytometry and microscopy to assess cellular phenotype and phagocytosis. Immune assays allowed quantification of cytokines and chemokines, whereas gene microarray technology was applied to estimate global transcriptome alterations. Immunohistochemical investigations of tuberculosis granulomas substantiated our findings at the site of infection. Results. Monocytes differentiated in presence of platelets (MP-Macs) acquired a foamy, epithelioid appearance and gave rise to MNGCs (MP-MNGCs). MP-Macs up-regulated activation markers, phagocytosed mycobacteria, and released abundant interleukin 10. Upon extended culture, MP-Macs shared transcriptional features with epithelioid cells and M2 macrophages and up-regulated CXCL5 transcripts. In line with this, CXCL5 concentrations were significantly increased in airways of active tuberculosis patients. The platelet-specific CD42b antigen was detected in MP-Macs, likewise in macrophages, MNGCs, and epithelioid cells within tuberculosis granulomas, along with the platelet aggregation-inducing factor PDPN. Conclusions. Platelets drive macrophage differentiation into MNGCs with characteristics of epithelioid, foam, and giant cells observed in tuberculosis granulomas. Our data define platelets as novel participants in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24987031

  20. Perianal giant condyloma acuminata [buschke lowenstein tumour] - first case report from the Kashmir valley.

    PubMed

    Chowdri, Nisar A; Gagloo, Mushtaq A; Parray, Fazal Q; Sheikh, Zahoor A; Rouf, A; Wani, A

    2007-10-01

    Buschke Lowenstein tumour or giant condyloma acuminata is a rare entity with only less then 50 cases reported in English literature so far. No such case has been reported from the Kashmir valley. They are considered as intermediate lesions between simple condyloma acuminata and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. A 57-year-old heterosexual male presented with a giant perianal condyloma. The lesion was surgically excised completely. Postoperatively patient was put on topical 5-FU ointment. Patient is recurrence free 6 months after surgery. The giant condyloma acuminate is an aggressive tumour with propensity for recurrance and malignant transformation. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. One such rare case is discussed with review of literature.

  1. The hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation current (In ) adjusts the membrane properties, excitability, and activity pattern of the giant cells in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Pál, Balázs; Kőszeghy, Aron; Fu, Yuhong; Szücs, Géza; Paxinos, George

    2013-03-01

    Giant cells of the cochlear nucleus are thought to integrate multimodal sensory inputs and participate in monaural sound source localization. Our aim was to explore the significance of a hyperpolarization-activated current in determining the activity of giant neurones in slices prepared from 10 to 14-day-old rats. When subjected to hyperpolarizing stimuli, giant cells produced a 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyridinium chloride (ZD7288)-sensitive inward current with a reversal potential and half-activation voltage of -36 and -88 mV, respectively. Consequently, the current was identified as the hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cationic current (Ih ). At the resting membrane potential, 3.5% of the maximum Ih conductance was available. Immunohistochemistry experiments suggested that hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, cation non-selective (HCN)1, HCN2, and HCN4 subunits contribute to the assembly of the functional channels. Inhibition of Ih hyperpolarized the membrane by 6 mV and impeded spontaneous firing. The frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents reaching the giant cell bodies were reduced but no significant change was observed when evoked postsynaptic currents were recorded. Giant cells are affected by biphasic postsynaptic currents consisting of an excitatory and a subsequent inhibitory component. Inhibition of Ih reduced the frequency of these biphasic events by 65% and increased the decay time constants of the inhibitory component. We conclude that Ih adjusts the resting membrane potential, contributes to spontaneous action potential firing, and may participate in the dendritic integration of the synaptic inputs of the giant neurones. Because its amplitude was higher in young than in adult rats, Ih of the giant cells may be especially important during the postnatal maturation of the auditory system.

  2. Live or let die - retinal ganglion cell death and survival during development and in the lesioned adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Bähr, M

    2000-10-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is a common and widespread phenomenon that is important for proper development of the nervous system. In the adult CNS, however, apoptosis contributes to secondary cell loss after various types of lesions. The retino-tectal system has been successfully used as a convenient model system to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis and survival during development and in the lesioned adult CNS. This review describes the current knowledge about the interactions of cell death and survival pathways in general and for retinal ganglion cells specifically.

  3. Disseminated giant porokeratosis and porokeratosis of Mibelli in Bankura and Bardhaman districts, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Koley, Sankha; Mandal, Rajesh Kumar; Bar, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Porokeratosis of Mibelli (PM) is a rare genodermatosis. It is caused by proliferation of abnormal clones of epidermal cells in response to several stimuli, the most important of which is sunlight. Giant porokeratosis is thought to be a variant of PM. We report two cases of disseminated PM and one case of disseminated giant porokeratosis from the Bankura and Bardhaman districts of West Bengal in India; presenting to a single observer in the summer of 2012. Interestingly we have noted that the majority of cases of porokeratosis in India have been reported from West Bengal. Few patients with a single lesion of giant porokeratosis have been reported in world literature. As far as we know, this is the first case report of disseminated giant porokeratosis in world literature.

  4. Predicting drug susceptibility of non–small cell lung cancers based on genetic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sos, Martin L.; Michel, Kathrin; Zander, Thomas; Weiss, Jonathan; Frommolt, Peter; Peifer, Martin; Li, Danan; Ullrich, Roland; Koker, Mirjam; Fischer, Florian; Shimamura, Takeshi; Rauh, Daniel; Mermel, Craig; Fischer, Stefanie; Stückrath, Isabel; Heynck, Stefanie; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lin, William; Winckler, Wendy; Shah, Kinjal; LaFramboise, Thomas; Moriarty, Whei F.; Hanna, Megan; Tolosi, Laura; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Verhaak, Roel; Chiang, Derek; Getz, Gad; Hellmich, Martin; Wolf, Jürgen; Girard, Luc; Peyton, Michael; Weir, Barbara A.; Chen, Tzu-Hsiu; Greulich, Heidi; Barretina, Jordi; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Garraway, Levi A.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Meyerson, Matthew; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Thomas, Roman K.

    2009-01-01

    Somatic genetic alterations in cancers have been linked with response to targeted therapeutics by creation of specific dependency on activated oncogenic signaling pathways. However, no tools currently exist to systematically connect such genetic lesions to therapeutic vulnerability. We have therefore developed a genomics approach to identify lesions associated with therapeutically relevant oncogene dependency. Using integrated genomic profiling, we have demonstrated that the genomes of a large panel of human non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines are highly representative of those of primary NSCLC tumors. Using cell-based compound screening coupled with diverse computational approaches to integrate orthogonal genomic and biochemical data sets, we identified molecular and genomic predictors of therapeutic response to clinically relevant compounds. Using this approach, we showed that v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations confer enhanced Hsp90 dependency and validated this finding in mice with KRAS-driven lung adenocarcinoma, as these mice exhibited dramatic tumor regression when treated with an Hsp90 inhibitor. In addition, we found that cells with copy number enhancement of v-abl Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (ABL2) and ephrin receptor kinase and v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) (SRC) kinase family genes were exquisitely sensitive to treatment with the SRC/ABL inhibitor dasatinib, both in vitro and when it xenografted into mice. Thus, genomically annotated cell-line collections may help translate cancer genomics information into clinical practice by defining critical pathway dependencies amenable to therapeutic inhibition. PMID:19451690

  5. Painless giant cell thyroiditis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration and associated with intense thyroidal uptake of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, L.R.; Moreno, A.J.; Pittman, D.L.; Jones, J.D.; Spicer, M.J.; Tracy, K.P.

    1986-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with fever, goiter, and no evidence of pain or tenderness in the thyroid. A diagnosis of silent thyroiditis was made after obtaining evidence of biochemical thyrotoxicosis, intense gallium-67 citrate thyroidal localization, and cytologic thyroiditis. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid revealed numerous giant cells in all areas of the thyroid, typical of subacute thyroiditis. This is believed to be the first time painless thyroiditis is reported with the classic cytologic feature of painful subacute thyroiditis.

  6. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de; Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi; Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de

    2016-02-15

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  7. Small bowel intussusception caused by multiple intestinal metastases from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Y; de Gheldere, C; Vanclooster, P

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) due to intussusception in adults is a rare condition. Diagnosis at the time of admission is usually challenging. More often than not, a bowel intussusception in adults is secondary to an organic condition, frequently malignancies. Therefore, a surgical approach is indicated most of the times. We report the case of a forty-nine years old lady presenting with a SBO secondary to small bowel metastases with two ileo-ileal intussusceptions, one of which was missed at initial surgical exploration. A giant cell carcinoma of the lung (GCCL) with small bowel metastases was diagnosed subsequently. The case is presented as well as a brief review of literature.

  8. Small Bowel Intussusception Caused by Multiple Intestinal Metastases from a Giant Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Y; de Gheldere, C; Vanclooster, P

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) due to intussusception in adults is a rare condition. Diagnosis at the time of admission is usually challenging. More often than not, a bowel intussusception in adults is secondary to an organic condition, frequently malignancies. Therefore, a surgical approach is indicated most of the times. We report the case of a forty-nine years old lady presenting with a SBO secondary to small bowel metastases with two ileo-ileal intussusceptions, one of which was missed at initial surgical exploration. A giant cell carcinoma of the lung (GCCL) with small bowel metastases was diagnosed subsequently. The case is presented as well as a brief review of literature.

  9. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    PubMed Central

    Beilby, Mary J.

    2015-01-01

    Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i) very large cell size, (ii) position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii) continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt sensitive C. australis succumbs to 50–100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells are discussed in

  10. Advanced lytic lesion is a poor mobilization factor in peripheral blood stem cell collection in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the incidence and predictors of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization failure in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Retrospective data for 104 patients who received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone or with cyclophosphamide as mobilization regimens were analyzed. The rates of mobilization failure using two definitions of failure (< 2 × 10(6) and < 4 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg) following the first collection attempt were 16.3 and 33.7%, respectively. Predictors of mobilization failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis which included age, advanced osteolytic lesions, bone marrow cellularity before mobilization, platelet count, body mass index before mobilization, and mobilization method. Lytic bone lesions were assessed using a conventional skeletal survey, and advanced osteolytic lesions were defined as lytic lesions in more than three skeletal sites regardless of the number of lytic lesions. On multivariate analysis, advanced osteolytic lesions [hazard ratio (HR) = 10.95, P = 0.001] and age ≥60 years (HR = 5.45, P = 0.016) were associated with a PBSC yield < 2 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg, and advanced osteolytic lesions (HR = 5.08, P = 0.006), white blood cell count ≤4,000/µL before mobilization (HR = 4.72, P = 0.005), and G-CSF only mobilization (HR 10.52, P < 0.001) were associated with PBSC yield < 4 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg. The data suggest that an advanced osteolytic lesion is a significant predictor of mobilization failure in MM patients.

  11. Gene Therapy Inhibiting Neointimal Vascular Lesion: In vivo Transfer of Endothelial Cell Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Leyen, Heiko E.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Morishita, Ryuichi; Lewis, Neil P.; Zhang, Lunan; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Cooke, John P.; Dzau, Victor J.

    1995-02-01

    It is postulated that vascular disease involves a disturbance in the homeostatic balance of factors regulating vascular tone and structure. Recent developments in gene transfer techniques have emerged as an exciting therapeutic option to treat vascular disease. Several studies have established the feasibility of direct in vivo gene transfer into the vasculature by using reporter genes such as β-galactosidase or luciferase. To date no study has documented therapeutic effects with in vivo gene transfer of a cDNA encoding a functional enzyme. This study tests the hypothesis that endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation. After denudation by balloon injury of the endothelium of rat carotid arteries, we restored endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase (ec-NOS) expression in the vessel wall by using the highly efficient Sendai virus/liposome in vivo gene transfer technique. ec-NOS gene transfection not only restored NO production to levels seen in normal untreated vessels but also increased vascular reactivity of the injured vessel. Neointima formation at day 14 after balloon injury was inhibited by 70%. These findings provide direct evidence that NO is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation in vivo (by inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration) and suggest the possibility of ec-NOS transfection as a potential therapeutic approach to treat neointimal hyperplasia.

  12. Objective tumor response to denosumab in patients with giant cell tumor of bone: a multicenter phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T.; Morioka, H.; Nishida, Y.; Kakunaga, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Asami, Y.; Inoue, T.; Yoneda, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare primary bone tumor, characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that express receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (RANK), and stromal cells that express RANK ligand (RANKL), a key mediator of osteoclast activation. A RANKL-specific inhibitor, denosumab, was predicted to reduce osteolysis and control disease progression in patients with GCTB. Patients and methods Seventeen patients with GCTB were enrolled. Patients were treated with denosumab at 120 mg every 4 weeks, with a loading dose of 120 mg on days 8 and 15. To evaluate efficacy, objective tumor response was evaluated prospectively by an independent imaging facility on the basis of prespecified criteria. Results The proportion of patients with an objective tumor response was 88% based on best response using any tumor response criteria. The proportion of patients with an objective tumor response using individual response criteria was 35% based on the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria, 82% based on the modified European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria, and 71% based on inverse Choi criteria. The median time of study treatment was 13.1 months. Conclusion The findings demonstrate that denosumab has robust clinical efficacy in the treatment of GCTB. PMID:26205395

  13. Human DNA polymerase β, but not λ, can bypass a 2-deoxyribonolactone lesion together with proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Pasi, Emanuela; Imoto, Shuhei; Hübscher, Ulrich; Greenberg, Marc M.; Maga, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The C1′-oxidized lesion 2-deoxyribonolactone (L) is induced by free radical attack of DNA. This lesion is mutagenic, inhibits base excision repair, and can lead to strand scission. In double stranded DNA L is repaired by long-patch base excision repair, but it induces replication fork arrest in a single-strand template. Translesion synthesis requires a specialized DNA polymerase (Pol). In E. coli, Pol V is responsible for bypassing L, while in yeast Pol ζ has been shown to be required for efficient bypass. Very little is known about the identity of human Pols capable of bypassing L. For instance, the activity of family X enzymes has never been investigated. We examined the ability of different family X Pols: Pols β, λ and TdT from human cells and Pol IV from S. cerevisiae to act on DNA containing an isolated 2-deoxyribonolactone, as well as when the lesion comprises the 5′-component of a tandem lesion. We show that Pol β, but not Pol λ, can bypass a single L lesion in the template, and its activity is increased by the auxiliary protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), while both enzymes were completely blocked by a tandem lesion. Yeast Pol IV was able to bypass the single L and the tandem lesion but with little nucleotide insertion specificity. Finally, L did not affect the polymerization activity of the template-independent enzyme TdT. PMID:23101935

  14. Steroid-sparing effect and toxicity of dapsone treatment in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Kim Heang; Dalmay, François; Gondran, Guillaume; Palat, Sylvain; Bezanahary, Holy; Cypierre, Anne; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Liozon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although a glucocorticoid (GC)-sparing strategy is needed for patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffering from refractory disease or serious treatment-related complications, evidence of efficacy in this setting of immunosuppressive drugs and biotherapies is lacking. Herein, we evaluated the GC-sparing effects and tolerability of addition of dapsone (DDS) to prednisone therapy in patients with GCA. We retrospectively assessed data on 18 GCA patients who received DDS as a first-line treatment (DDS-1 group) and 52 patients who received it as a second- or third-line treatment for refractory GCA, with or without excessive GC-related toxicity (DDS-2 group). Of these 70 patients, 63 belonged to an inception cohort of 478 patients, whereas the remaining 7 were referred to our department for resistant GCA. In all, 52 patients were assessable for DDS efficacy. The baseline characteristics of the DDS-1 patients were similar to those of 395 GCA patients (control group) who received prednisone alone. DDS-1 patients had a more sustained decrease in GC dose with a lower mean prednisone dose at 12 months, and they comprised higher proportions who achieved GC withdrawal within the first year, who stopped prednisone treatment, and who recovered from GCA (P < 0.001 for each variable). Patients in the DDS-2 group achieved a mean rate of prednisone reduction of 65% and a prednisone dose reduction of 16.9 ± 13.3 mg/d. The monthly decreases in the prednisone dose were 2.4 and 1.25 mg in DDS-1 and DDS-2 patients, respectively. DDS-induced side effects were recorded in 44 (64%) assessable patients. These side effects led to lowering of the DDS dose by 25 mg/d in 11 (16%) patients and permanent cessation of DDS in 14 patients (20%), due to allergic skin rash in 7, agranulocytosis in 2, icteric hepatitis in 2, and excessive hemolysis in 2 patients. DDS is a potent GC-sparing agent in GCA that should be evaluated in prospective studies. However, DDS use should

  15. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G; Johnson, Jay R; Miller, Federick W; Matteson, Eric L; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We used data from patients with GCA (1950–2004) and RA (1955–2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results The correlation of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0–1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5–7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4–5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8–11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4–5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. The link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25979866

  16. Reconstructive procedures for segmental resection of bone in giant cell tumors around the knee

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aditya N; Jain, Anil K; Kumar, Sudhir; Dhammi, Ish K; Prashad, Bhagwat

    2007-01-01

    Background: Segmental resection of bone in Giant Cell Tumor (GCT) around the knee, in indicated cases, leaves a gap which requires a complex reconstructive procedure. The present study analyzes various reconstructive procedures in terms of morbidity and various complications encountered. Materials and Methods: Thirteen cases (M-six and F-seven; lower end femur-six and upper end tibia -seven) of GCT around the knee, radiologically either Campanacci Grade II, Grade II with pathological fracture or Grade III were included. Mean age was 25.6 years (range 19-30 years). Resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening) over intramedullary nail (n=5), resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail (n=3) and resection arthrodesis with intercalary fibular autograft and simultaneous limb lengthening (n=5) were the procedure performed. Results: Shortening was the major problem following resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening) over intramedullary nail. Only two patients agreed for subsequent limb lengthening. The rest continued to walk with shortening. Infection was the major problem in all cases of resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail and required multiple drainage procedures. Fusion was achieved after two years in two patients. In the third patient the allograft sequestrated. The patient underwent sequestrectomy, telescoping of fragments and ilizarov fixator application with subsequent limb lengthening. The patient was finally given an ischial weight relieving orthosis, 54 months after the index procedure. After resection arthrodesis with intercalary autograft and simultaneous lengthening the resultant gap (∼15cm) was partially bridged by intercalary nonvascularized dual fibular strut graft (6-7cm) and additional corticocancellous bone graft from ipsilateral patella. Simultaneous limb lengthening with a distal tibial corticotomy was performed on an ilizarov

  17. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    DOE PAGES

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G.; Johnson, Jay R.; ...

    2015-05-15

    Our objective was to examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We used data from patients with GCA (1950-2004) and RA (1955-2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results: The correlationmore » of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0-1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5-7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4-5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8-11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions: AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4-5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. Lastly, the link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases.« less

  18. Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumors of anogenital mammary-like glands: a series of 13 neoplasms in 12 cases, including mammary-type juvenile fibroadenoma, fibroadenoma with lactation changes, and neurofibromatosis-associated pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated giant cells.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Stewart, Colin J; Thompson, Jane; Agaimy, Abbas; Magro, Gaetano; Bisceglia, Michele; Vazmitel, Marina; Kacerovska, Denisa; Kutzner, Heinz; Mukensnabl, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a series of 13 fibroepithelial neoplasms involving anogenital mammary-like glands, all occurring in 12 female patients, whose age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 51 years (mean, 38 y; median, 42 y). All women presented with a solitary asymptomatic nodule in the vulva (n=8), perineum (n=2), or near the anus (n=2) ranging in size from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Microscopically, 8 lesions were classified as fibroadenoma, and 5, including 1 recurrent tumor, as phyllodes tumor, of which 1 was benign and 4 low-grade malignant. In addition to conventional findings, we describe several hitherto unreported features including juvenile fibroadenoma-like proliferation, fibroadenoma with lactation change, and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells in a patient with neurofibromatosis, type 1 all constituting potential diagnostic pitfalls, which are best averted by using the same approach to diagnosis as for their analogous mammary counterparts.

  19. CoCl2, a Mimic of Hypoxia, Induces Formation of Polyploid Giant Cells with Stem Characteristics in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sánchez, Laura M.; Jimenez, Carla; Valverde, Araceli; Hernandez, Vanessa; Peñarando, Jon; Martinez, Antonio; Lopez-Pedrera, Chary; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R.; De la Haba-Rodríguez, Juan R.; Aranda, Enrique; Rodriguez-Ariza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The induction of polyploidy is considered the reproductive end of cells, but there is evidence that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) contribute to cell repopulation during tumor relapse. However, the role of these cells in the development, progression and response to therapy in colon cancer remains undefined. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the generation of PGCCs in colon cancer cells and identify mechanisms of formation. Treatment of HCT-116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the hypoxia mimic CoCl2 induced the formation of cells with larger cell and nuclear size (PGCCs), while the cells with normal morphology were selectively eliminated. Cytometric analysis showed that CoCl2 treatment induced G2 cell cycle arrest and the generation of a polyploid cell subpopulation with increased cellular DNA content. Polyploidy of hypoxia-induced PGCCs was confirmed by FISH analysis. Furthermore, CoCl2 treatment effectively induced the stabilization of HIF-1α, the differential expression of a truncated form of p53 (p47) and decreased levels of cyclin D1, indicating molecular mechanisms associated with cell cycle arrest at G2. Generation of PGCCs also contributed to expansion of a cell subpopulation with cancer stem cells (CSCs) characteristics, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays, and enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. In conclusion, the pharmacological induction of hypoxia in colon cancer cells causes the formation of PGCCs, the expansion of a cell subpopulation with CSC characteristics and chemoresistance. The molecular mechanisms involved, including the stabilization of HIF-1 α, the involvement of p53/p47 isoform and cell cycle arrest at G2, suggest novel targets to prevent tumor relapse and treatment failure in colon cancer. PMID:24932611

  20. Predicting malignant transformation of esophageal squamous cell lesions by combined biomarkers in an endoscopic screening program

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Hao; Ma, Qing; Yang, Fang-Yan; Diao, Tao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association of p53, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA19-9 protein expression with esophageal carcinogenesis. METHODS An iodine staining endoscopic screening program of esophageal lesions was carried out in the high-incidence area of Feicheng County, China. Seventy-seven patients with basal cell hyperplasia (BCH), 247 with low-grade dysplasia (LGD), 51 with high-grade dysplasia (HGD), 134 with invasive cancer, and 80 normal controls diagnosed by mucous membrane biopsy pathology were enrolled. Immunohistochemical detection of p53, CEA and CA19-9 proteins was performed. In the ROC curve analysis, the expression of a single biomarker and the expression of a combination of biomarkers were used to predict the risk of these four esophageal lesions. RESULTS The positive rates of p53 protein expression in invasive cancer, HGD, LGD, BCH and the normal control groups were 53.0%, 52.9%, 35.6%, 27.3% and 20.0%, respectively; the positive rates of CA19-9 protein expression were 44.0%, 33.3%, 16.5%, 9.2% and 6.2%, respectively; the positive rates of CEA protein expression were 74.6%, 60.8%, 23.3%, 23.7% and 16.2%, respectively. The positive rates of the combined expression of the three biomarkers were 84.3%, 76.5%, 47.6%, 42.9% and 27.5%, respectively. In the receiver operating characteristic curves of the combination of the three biomarkers, the specificity was 88.8% for the normal controls, and the sensitivity was 58.2% for invasive cancer, 25.5% for HGD, 11.2% for LGD, and 6.5% for BCH. CONCLUSION p53, CEA and CA19-9 protein expression was correlated with esophageal carcinogenesis, and testing for the combination of these biomarkers is useful for identifying high-risk patients with precancerous lesions. PMID:27818592

  1. Role of FNAC in the diagnosis of intraosseous jaw lesions

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Surbhi; Kotru, Mrinalini; Gupta, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Background FNAC of intraosseous jaw lesions has not been widely utilized for diagnosis due to rarity and diversity of these lesions, limited experience and lack of well established cytological features. Aim of the study was to determine the role of FNAC in the diagnosis of intraosseous jaw swellings. Material and Methods 42 patients underwent FNAC over a period of 7 years (2007-2013), of which 37 (88.1%) aspirates were diagnostic. Histopathology correlation was available in 33 cases and diagnostic accuracy of FNAC was calculated. Results Lesions were categorized into inflammatory 3, cysts/hamartomas 15 and neoplasms 19. Mandibular and maxillary involvement was seen in 21 and 16 patients respectively. Of these, benign cysts and malignant lesions were commonest, accounting for 27% lesions (10 cases) each. One case of cystic ameloblastoma was misdiagnosed as odontogenic cyst on cytology. Overall, sensitivity and specificity of FNAC were 94.7% and 100% respectively with a diagnostic accuracy of 97.3%. Definitive categorization of giant cell lesions, fibro-osseous lesions, odontogenic tumors and cystic lesions was not feasible on FNAC. Conclusions FNAC is a simple, safe and minimally invasive first line investigation which can render an accurate preoperative diagnosis of intraosseous jaw lesions, especially the malignant ones in the light of clinic-radiological correlation. Key words: Jaw swellings, intraosseous, FNAC. PMID:25662547

  2. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  3. Induction of multinucleated giant cells in response to small sized bovine bone substitute (Bio-Oss™) results in an enhanced early implantation bed vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Barbeck, M.; Udeabor, S. E.; Lorenz, J.; Kubesch, A.; Choukroun, J.; Sader, R. A.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.; Ghanaati, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The host tissue reaction to the xenogeneic bone substitute Bio-Oss™ (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhousen, Switzerland) was investigated focusing on the participating inflammatory cells and implantation bed vascularization. Materials and Methods: Bio-Oss™ was implanted subcutaneously into CD1 mice for up to 60 days and analyzed by means of specialized histological and histomorphometrical techniques after explantation. Results: Bio-Oss™ induced within the first 15 days an early high vascularization combined with a marked presence of multinucleated giant cells. The latter cells were associated mainly with the smaller sized granules within the implantation bed. Toward the end of the study the number of multinucleated giant cells decreased while the tissue reaction to the larger granules was mainly mononuclear. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that smaller xenogeneic bone substitute granules induce multinucleated giant cells, whereas the larger-sized ones became integrated within the implantation bed by means of a mononuclear cell-triggered granulation tissue. Obviously, the presence of multinucleated giant cells within biomaterial implantation beds is not only related to the type of synthetic bone substitute material, but also to the granule size of the natural-based xenogeneic bone substitute material. PMID:25593863

  4. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value <0.05. Results Erythropoietin, when added to red blood cell units, has a half-life >6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 μmol/L; p-value = 0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05). Conclusions Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. PMID:26969770

  5. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Zhengduo; Zhang, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs) induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs. PMID:27843459

  6. Introducing Micrometer-Sized Artificial Objects into Live Cells: A Method for Cell–Giant Unilamellar Vesicle Electrofusion

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akira C.; Ogura, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Kei; Murata, Satoshi; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC) field to induce a linear cell–GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC) pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami) into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines) in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation. PMID:25229561

  7. A novel approach to juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumours: resection arthrodesis using bone transport over an intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sharath K.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive juxta-articular giant cell tumours of the lower limbs occurring in young patients are a challenge to the average orthopaedic surgeon. Although it is the treatment of choice for these tumours, wide resection creates a problem for the reconstruction of large bone gaps. We describe our results after resection arthrodesis of such tumours using the technique of bone transport over a long intramedullary nail in 27 patients. This is the first and largest study of its kind in the management of giant cell tumours in the literature. All our patients fared well with this mode of treatment, and none had recurrence or major complications. PMID:16724184

  8. Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum Infection With a Destructive Nasal Lesion Mimicking Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Takanori; Ishii, Makoto; Kikuchi, Taku; Kameyama, Kaori; Namkoong, Ho; Nakata, Noboru; Sugita, Kayoko; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Shimizu, Takayuki; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium marinum is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that mainly causes skin infection in immunocompetent patients, and its disseminated infection is rare. Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL) usually localizes at the nasal and/or paranasal area, but occasionally disseminates into the skin/soft tissue and gastrointestinal tract. Compromised immunity is a risk factor for developing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection and malignant lymphoma, and the 2 diseases may share similar clinical presentation; however, only a few reports have described NTM infection mimicking malignant lymphoma. A 43-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of multiple progressive skin nodules and purulent nasal discharge for 3 weeks. He was diagnosed with Crohn disease with refractory enteropathic arthritis and has been treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents for 25 years. Fiberoptic nasal examination revealed septal perforation with hemorrhagic mucus and purulent rhinorrhea. Histological examination of the nasal septum revealed the infiltration of atypical medium-to-large-sized cells with erosion. The cells were positive for cytoplasmic CD3, granzyme B, and Epstein–Barr virus-encoded small RNA. Histological examination of the skin nodules and auricle also showed infiltration of atypical lymphocytes. The patient was tentatively diagnosed with ENKL, and chemotherapy was considered. However, the skin lesions decreased in size after discontinuation of immunosuppressive agents and minocycline administration. Two weeks later, nasal septum and lavage fluid and left leg skin cultures were positive for M marinum, and minocycline was discontinued. The skin and the nasal lesions improved after 2 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of disseminated M marinum infection with a destructive nasal lesion mimicking ENKL. The differentiation between M marinum infection and ENKL is clinically important because

  9. Multinucleated giant cell cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as Mycobacterium bovis, induce a characteristic lesion known as a granulomas. Granulomas represent a specific host response to chronic antigenic stimuli, such as foreign bodies, certain bacterial components, or persistent pathoge...

  10. Characterization of keratin and cell cycle protein expression in cell lines from squamous intraepithelial lesions progressing towards a malignant phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Hietanen, S.; Syrjänen, K.; Syrjänen, S.

    1998-01-01

    Two cell lines derived from vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias (VAINs) expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) 33 (VAIN I, UT-DEC-1) and 16 (VAIN II, UT-DEC-2) E6-E7 mRNA were studied in organotypic culture for their keratins and cell cycle regulatory proteins in relation to replicative aging. Early-passage UT-DEC-1 and UT-DEC-2 cells reproduced epithelial patterns consistent with VAIN. Cells from later passages resembled full-thickness intraepithelial neoplasia (UT-DEC-1) and microinvasive cancer (UT-DEC-2). The morphological changes were compatible with these cell lines' ability for anchorage-independent growth at later passages. Simple epithelial keratins were aberrantly expressed in both cell lines. K18 (absent in normal vaginal keratinocytes) and K17 expression increased in UT-DEC-1 and UT-DEC-2 cells at late passages. No marked differences in expression of p53 (wild type in both cell lines), mdm-2 or PCNA were detected in parallel with progression. The expression of p21WAF1/cip1 localized mostly to the upper half of the epithelium at early passage and was more intense in the HPV 16-positive UT-DEC-2 cell line expressing K10. In Northern blot analyses, the transcription pattern of the HPV 33 E6-E7 of the UT-DEC-1 cell line changed during later passages, whereas that of the HPV 16 E6-E7 of the UT-DEC-2 cell line remained unaltered. The present characterization of the phenotype of these cell lines derived from natural squamous intraepithelial lesions shows an association between simple epithelial-type keratin expression and progressive changes in growth and morphology, but fails to demonstrate consistent changes in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins studied in parallel with progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9514056

  11. Morphology, cytochemical staining, and ultrastructural characteristics of the blood cells of the giant lizard of El Hierro (Gallotia simonyi).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Silvestre, A; Marco, I; Rodriguez-Dominguez, M A; Lavín, S; Cuenca, R

    2005-04-01

    The object of this study was to examine the erythrocytes, leukocytes and thrombocytes of the giant lizard of El Hierro (Gallotia simonyi) by light and electron (TEM) microscopy, and cytochemical staining. Smears were prepared from blood from the ventral coccygeal vein of 10 healthy adult lizards (five males and five females) from the Giant Lizard of El Hierro Reproduction and Research Centre, Canary Islands, Spain. The cytochemical stains used were: benzidine peroxidase (BP), chloroacetate esterase (CAE), alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE), acid phosphatase (AP), periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), toluidine blue (TB) and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG). Electron microscopy was also performed on all samples. Heterophils had granules that were heterogeneous in both size and electron density, and stained with BP, PAS and ANAE. Eosinophil granules were homogeneously electron-dense and stained for AP, CAE and ANAE. Basophils had both highly and moderately electron-dense granules, and stained with TB and ANAE. Azurophil granules were of low electron-density and stained for AP, CAE and ANAE. Azurophil cytoplasm was vacuolated on TEM. The cytoplasm of lymphocytes contained many ribosomes and was positive for AP. Monocytes had a large nucleus and a vacuolated cytoplasm but did not stain by any of the cytochemical methods used. Thrombocytes had a relatively large nucleus but little cytoplasm; they did not stain cytochemically. The blood cells of the giant lizards of El Hierro differ from those of other members of the Order Squamata both morphologically and cytochemically. The variation in cytochemical responses in the blood of reptiles makes it necessary to study species individually if meaningful clinical decisions are to be made.

  12. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  13. Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-related genes in giant breast fibroadenoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Giant fibroadenoma is an uncommon variant of benign breast lesions. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions is known to be involved in the silencing of genes (for example, tumor-suppressor genes) and appears to be an early event in the etiology of breast carcinogenesis. Only hypermethylation of p16INK4a has been reported in non-giant breast fibroadenoma. In this particular case, there are no previously published data on epigenetic alterations in giant fibroadenomas. Our previous results, based on the analysis of 49 cancer-related CpG islands have confirmed that the aberrant methylation is specific to malignant breast tumors and that it is completely absent in normal breast tissue and breast fibroadenomas. Case presentation A 13-year-old Hispanic girl was referred after she had noted a progressive development of a mass in her left breast. On physical examination, a 10 × 10 cm lump was detected and axillary lymph nodes were not enlarged. After surgical removal the lump was diagnosed as a giant fibroadenoma. Because of the high growth rate of this benign tumor, we decided to analyze the methylation status of 49 CpG islands related to cell growth control. We have identified the methylation of five cancer-related CpG islands in the giant fibroadenoma tissue: ESR1, MGMT, WT-1, BRCA2 and CD44. Conclusion In this case report we show for the first time the methylation analysis of a giant fibroadenoma. The detection of methylation of these five cancer-related regions indicates substantial epigenomic differences with non-giant fibroadenomas. Epigenetic alterations could explain the higher growth rate of this tumor. Our data contribute to the growing knowledge of aberrant methylation in breast diseases. In this particular case, there exist no previous data regarding the role of methylation in giant fibroadenomas, considered by definition as a benign breast lesion. PMID:22011321

  14. Recruitment of CD8+ T cells expressing granzymeA is associated with lesion progression in human cutaneous leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Faria, D.R.; Souza, P.E.A.; Durães, F.V; Carvalho, E.M.; Gollob, K.J.; Machado, P.R.; Dutra, W.O.

    2009-01-01

    Human infection with Leishmania braziliensis leads to the establishment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), characterized by the appearance of skin lesions that progress from non-ulcerated to ulcerated forms. Our goal was to characterize the immunological kinetics associated with this progression, comparing the cellular composition, cytokines and granzyme expression between lesions of patients with early (E-CL) and late stages (L-CL) of CL. Histopathological analysis showed that lesions from L-CL had more exuberant inflammatory infiltrate as compared to E-CL. Although E-CL and L-CL lesions were predominantly mononuclear, lesions from E-CL patients presented higher neutrophil and eosinophil counts than L-CL. While percentages of CD4+ and of CD68+ cells were slightly higher in L-CL, a five-fold increase of CD8+ cells was observed in L-CL, as compared to E-CL. Moreover, CD8+ T-cells from L-CL expressed significantly higher levels of granzymeA than E-CL. Interestingly, granzymeA expression was positively correlated with intensity of the inflammatory infiltrate in L-CL but not E-CL. Lastly, percentages of IFN-γ+ and IL-10+ cells were higher in L-CL as compared to E-CL, with CD4+ T-cells and CD68+ monocytes as the main sources of these cytokines, respectively. These results suggest that recruitment of CD8+granzymeA+ T-cells is involved in lesion progression in human CL. PMID:19646207

  15. Regulation and Biological Significance of Formation of Osteoclasts and Foreign Body Giant Cells in an Extraskeletal Implantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gazi Jased; Tatsukawa, Eri; Morishita, Kota; Shibata, Yasuaki; Suehiro, Fumio; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Yokoi, Taishi; Koji, Takehiko; Umeda, Masahiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of biomaterials induces a granulomatous reaction accompanied by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). The characterization of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone substitutes implanted in bone defects is more complicated because of healing with bone admixed with residual bone substitutes and their hybrid, and the appearance of two kinds of MNGCs, osteoclasts and FBGCs. Furthermore, the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs in the healing of implanted regions remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize MNGCs around bone substitutes using an extraskeletal implantation model and evaluate the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules were implanted into rat subcutaneous tissue with or without bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMCs), which include osteogenic progenitor cells. We also compared the biological significance of plasma and purified fibrin, which were used as binders for implants. Twelve weeks after implantation, osteogenesis was only detected in specimens implanted with BMMCs. The expression of two typical osteoclast markers, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin-K (CTSK), was analyzed, and TRAP-positive and CTSK-positive osteoclasts were only detected beside bone. In contrast, most of the MNGCs in specimens without the implantation of BMMCs were FBGCs that were negative for TRAP, whereas the degradation of β-TCP was detected. In the region implanted with β-TCP granules with plasma, FBGCs tested positive for CTSK, and when β-TCP granules were implanted with purified fibrin, FBGCs tested negative for CTSK. These results showed that osteogenesis was essential to osteoclastogenesis, two kinds of FBGCs, CTSK-positive and CTSK-negative, were induced, and the expression of CTSK was plasma-dependent. In addition, the implantation of BMMCs was suggested to contribute to osteogenesis and the replacement of implanted β-TCP granules to bone. PMID

  16. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  17. How did bacterial ancestors reproduce? Lessons from L-form cells and giant lipid vesicles: multiplication similarities between lipid vesicles and L-form bacteria.

    PubMed

    Briers, Yves; Walde, Peter; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J

    2012-12-01

    In possible scenarios on the origin of life, protocells represent the precursors of the first living cells. To study such hypothetical protocells, giant vesicles are being widely used as a simple model. Lipid vesicles can undergo complex morphological changes enabling self-reproduction such as growth, fission, and extra- and intravesicular budding. These properties of vesicular systems may in some way reflect the mechanism of reproduction used by protocells. Moreover, remarkable similarities exist between the morphological changes observed in giant vesicles and bacterial L-form cells, which represent bacteria that have lost their rigid cell wall, but retain the ability to reproduce. L-forms feature a dismantled cellular structure and are unable to carry out classical binary fission. We propose that the striking similarities in morphological transitions of L-forms and giant lipid vesicles may provide insights into primitive reproductive mechanisms and contribute to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of mechanisms of cell reproduction. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Synthesizing artificial cells from giant unilamellar vesicles: State-of-the art in the development of microfluidic technology Abstract.

  18. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago.

  19. Mutational spectrum of Barrett's stem cells suggests paths to initiation of a precancerous lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Wang, Xia; Bertrand, Denis; Kern, Florian; Zhang, Ting; Duleba, Marcin; Srivastava, Supriya; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hu, Yuanyu; Wilson, Lane H.; Blaszyk, Hagen; Rolshud, Daniil; Teh, Ming; Liu, Jianjun; Howitt, Brooke E.; Vincent, Matthew; Crum, Christopher P.; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Ho, Khek Yu; McKeon, Frank; Xian, Wa

    2016-01-01

    The precancerous lesion known as Barrett's oesophagus can evolve to oesophageal adenocarcinoma in decades-long processes of regenerative growth. Here we report the isolation and propagation of distinct, patient-matched stem cells of Barrett's, gastric and oesophageal epithelia that yield divergent tumour types following in vitro transformation and xenografting. Genomic analyses reveal a broad mutational spectrum unique to Barrett's stem cells that likely reflects their risk for oncogenesis. Remarkably, 25% of cases show no cancer-related genomic changes, suggesting that Barrett's initiates without driver mutations. Most cases, however, sustain patterns of deletions almost identical to adenocarcinoma though tumour-associated gene amplifications were absent. Notably, those suspected of low-grade dysplasia have p53 mutations or undergo amplifications of proto-oncogenes and receptor tyrosine kinases, implicating these events in lethal transitions. Our findings suggest paths for the initiation and progression of Barrett's and define a discrete stem cell underlying its regenerative growth whose eradication could prevent oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26783136

  20. Lipoprotein(a) Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Dedifferentiation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Human Apo(a) Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Unoki, Hiroyuki; Sun, Huijun; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Marcovina, Santica; Shikama, Hisataka; Watanabe, Teruo; Fan, Jianglin

    2002-01-01

    Elevated plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels constitute an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying Lp(a) atherogenicity is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that Lp(a) may potentially be proatherogenic in transgenic rabbits expressing human apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. In this study, we further investigated atherosclerotic lesions of transgenic rabbits by morphometry and immunohistochemistry. On a cholesterol diet, human apo(a) transgenic rabbits had more extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, carotid artery, iliac artery, and coronary artery than did nontransgenic littermate rabbits as defined by increased intimal lesion area. Enhanced lesion development in transgenic rabbits was characterized by increased accumulation of smooth muscle cells, that was often associated with the Lp(a) deposition. To explore the possibility that Lp(a) may be involved in the smooth-muscle cell phenotypic modulation, we stained the lesions using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against smooth-muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms (SM1, SM2, and SMemb) and basic transcriptional element binding protein-2 (BTEB2). We found that a large number of smooth muscle cells located in the apo(a)-containing areas of transgenic rabbits were positive for SMemb and BTEB2, suggesting that these smooth muscle cells were either immature or in the state of activation. In addition, transgenic rabbits showed delayed fibrinolytic activity accompanied by increased plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We conclude that Lp(a) may enhance the lesion development by mediating smooth muscle cell proliferation and dedifferentiation possibly because of impaired fibrinolytic activity. PMID:11786416

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Alterations in Bone Marrow Lesions in Patients With Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T. Mark; Churchman, Sarah M.; Gomez, Alejandro; McGonagle, Dennis; Conaghan, Philip G.; Ponchel, Frederique

    2016-01-01

    Objective In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), bone marrow lesions (BMLs) are intimately linked to disease progression. We hypothesized that aberrant multipotential stromal cell (also known as mesenchymal stem cell [MSC]) responses within bone tissue contributes to BML pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate BML and non‐BML native subchondral bone MSCs for numeric, topographic, in vitro functional, and gene expression differences. Methods Ex vivo 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the femoral heads of 20 patients with hip OA was performed. MRI‐determined BML and non‐BML regions were excised and enzymatically treated to extract cells and quantify MSCs using flow cytometry and colony‐forming unit–fibroblast (CFU‐F) assay. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine in vivo CD271+ MSC distribution. Culture‐expanded CD271+ cells were analyzed for tripotentiality and gene expression. Results BML regions were associated with greater trabecular bone area and cartilage damage compared with non‐BML regions. The proportion of CD45−CD271+ MSCs was higher in BML regions compared with non‐BML regions (median difference 5.6‐fold; P < 0.001); the CFU‐F assay showed a similar trend (median difference 4.3‐fold; P = 0.013). Immunohistochemistry revealed CD271+ cell accumulation in bone adjacent to cartilage defects and areas of osteochondral angiogenesis. BML MSCs had lower proliferation and mineralization capacities in vitro and altered expression of TNFSF11/RANKL and CXCR4/stromal cell–derived factor 1 receptor. OA MSCs showed up‐regulated transcripts for CXCR1 and CCR6 compared with MSCs derived from healthy or osteoporotic bone. Conclusion This study is the first to show numeric and topographic alterations in native MSCs in the diseased bone of patients with hip OA. Given the associated functional perturbation of MSCs, these data suggest that subchondral bone MSC manipulation may be an OA treatment target. PMID

  2. Cannibalism in a benign soft tissue tumor (giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath, localized type): a study of 66 cases.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular cannibalism refers to a phenomenon where a living cell is phagocytosed into a tumoral cell, where it eventually dies. With the exception of cells in suspension, cellular cannibalism has only been observed with malignant tumors. The finding of occasional images of cannibalism in our daily biopsies of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath led us to examine this phenomenon further in a retrospective study of 66 cases from our archives. In each case, four morphological features were evaluated: evidence of giant cells, cannibalism, xanthomatous cells, and hemosiderin deposits. Five cases were randomly selected for further immunohistochemical study with the following antibodies: CD68, vimentin, leukocytary common antigen (LCA), Bcl-2 oncoprotein, p53, caspase-3, and Bax. Patients included 35 (53.03%) females and 31 (46.97%) males. Mean age was 50.73 years (range from 14 to 75 years). Giant cells were found in all cases but one (98.48%). Cannibalism was found in 56 cases (84.34%) and this phenomenon was graded as 1 in 35 cases, 2 in 13 cases, and 3 in six cases. The internalized cells frequently appeared apoptotic. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the internalized cells as well as the cannibal cells expressed CD68.

  3. Adenoid basal hyperplasia of the uterine cervix: a lesion of reserve cell type, distinct from adenoid basal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kerdraon, Olivier; Cornélius, Aurélie; Farine, Marie-Odile; Boulanger, Loïc; Wacrenier, Agnès

    2012-12-01

    Adenoid basal hyperplasia is an underrecognized cervical lesion, resembling adenoid basal carcinoma, except the absence of deep invasion into the stroma. We report a series of 10 cases, all extending less than 1 mm from the basement membrane. Our results support the hypothesis that adenoid basal hyperplasia arises from reserve cells of the cervix. Lesions were found close to the squamocolumnar junction, in continuity with the nearby subcolumnar reserve cells. They shared the same morphology and immunoprofile using a panel of 4 antibodies (keratin 5/6, keratin 14, keratin 7 and p63) designed to differentiate reserve cells from mature squamous cells and endocervical columnar cells. We detected no human papillomavirus infection by in situ hybridization targeting high-risk human papillomavirus, which was concordant with the absence of immunohistochemical p16 expression. We demonstrated human papillomavirus infection in 4 (80%) of 5 adenoid basal carcinoma, which is in the same range as previous studies (88%). Thus, adenoid basal hyperplasia should be distinguished from adenoid basal carcinoma because they imply different risk of human papillomavirus infection and of subsequent association with high-grade invasive carcinoma. In our series, the most reliable morphological parameters to differentiate adenoid basal hyperplasia from adenoid basal carcinoma were the depth of the lesion and the size of the lesion nests. Furthermore, squamous differentiation was rare in adenoid basal hyperplasia and constant in adenoid basal carcinoma. Finally, any mitotic activity and/or an increase of Ki67 labeling index should raise the hypothesis of adenoid basal carcinoma.

  4. Use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells and cultured bone marrow stromal cells in dogs with orthopaedic lesions.

    PubMed

    Crovace, A; Favia, A; Lacitignola, L; Di Comite, M S; Staffieri, F; Francioso, E

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical application in veterinary orthopedics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs) for the treatment of some orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The authors carried out a clinical study on 14 dogs of different breed, age and size with the following lesions: 1 bone cyst of the glenoid rime; 2 nonunion of the tibia; 3 nonunion of the femur; 2 lengthening of the radius; 1 large bone defect of the distal radius;1 nonunion with carpus valgus; 4 Legg-Calvé-Perthés disease. In 9 cases the BMMCNs were used in combination with a three dimensional resorbable osteogenic scaffold the chemical composition and size of which facilitates the ingrowth of bone. In these cases the BMMNCs were suspended in an adequate amount of fibrin glue and then distribuited uniformly on a Tricalcium-Phosphate (TCP) scaffold onto which were also added some drops of thrombin. In 1 case of nonunion of the tibia and in 3 cases of Legg-Calvè-Perthés (LCP) disease the cultured BMSCs were used instead because of the small size of the dogs and of the little amount of aspirated bone marrow. X-ray examinations were performed immediately after the surgery. Clinical, ultrasounds and X-ray examinations were performed after 20 days and then every month. Until now the treated dogs have shown very good clinical and X-ray results. One of the objectives of the study was to use the BMMNCs in clinical application in orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The advantages of using the cells immediately after the bone marrow is collected, are that the surgery can be performed the same day, the cells do not need to be expanded in vitro, they preserve their osteogenic potential to form bone and promote the proper integration of the implant with the bone and lastly, the technique is easier and the costs are lower.

  5. Clonal Expansions of Cd8+ T Cells Dominate the T Cell Infiltrate in Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions as Shown by Micromanipulation and Single Cell Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Babbe, Holger; Roers, Axel; Waisman, Ari; Lassmann, Hans; Goebels, Norbert; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Friese, Michael; Schröder, Roland; Deckert, Martina; Schmidt, Stephan; Ravid, Rivka; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Clonal composition and T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrating actively demyelinating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions were determined with unprecedented resolution at the level of single cells. Individual CD4+ or CD8+ T cells were isolated from frozen sections of lesional tissue by micromanipulation and subjected to single target amplification of TCR-β gene rearrangements. This strategy allows the assignment of a TCR variable region (V region) sequence to the particular T cell from which it was amplified. Sequence analysis revealed that in both cases investigated, the majority of CD8+ T cells belonged to few clones. One of these clones accounted for 35% of CD8+ T cells in case 1. V region sequence comparison revealed signs of selection for common peptide specificities for some of the CD8+ T cells in case 1. In both cases, the CD4+ T cell population was more heterogeneous. Most CD4+ and CD8+ clones were represented in perivascular infiltrates as well as among parenchymal T cells. In case 2, two of the CD8+ clones identified in brain tissue were also detected in peripheral blood. Investigation of the antigenic specificities of expanded clones may help to elucidate their functional properties. PMID:10934227

  6. Tongue necrosis as an initial manifestation of giant cell arteritis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Jose R; Vernon, Natalia; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis of medium and large arteries that mainly affects the external carotid artery. It is a diagnosis of the elderly that typically presents as low-grade fever, temporal tenderness, claudication of the jaw, and in some patients vision loss. In cases where GCA presents with atypical manifestations, the diagnosis may be more difficult, causing a delay in both diagnosis and treatment and ultimately leading to irreversible complications. In this paper, we present an atypical presentation of GCA with symptoms of neck swelling and lingual pain in an elderly female. These symptoms progressed to bilateral necrosis and eventual dislodgement of the tongue. Lingual necrosis is a severe potential complication in GCA. In patients presenting with lingual swelling, pain, and discoloration, GCA should be suspected and prompt therapy should be initiated to avoid irreversible complications.

  7. Tongue Necrosis as an Initial Manifestation of Giant Cell Arteritis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Jose R.; Vernon, Natalia; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis of medium and large arteries that mainly affects the external carotid artery. It is a diagnosis of the elderly that typically presents as low-grade fever, temporal tenderness, claudication of the jaw, and in some patients vision loss. In cases where GCA presents with atypical manifestations, the diagnosis may be more difficult, causing a delay in both diagnosis and treatment and ultimately leading to irreversible complications. In this paper, we present an atypical presentation of GCA with symptoms of neck swelling and lingual pain in an elderly female. These symptoms progressed to bilateral necrosis and eventual dislodgement of the tongue. Lingual necrosis is a severe potential complication in GCA. In patients presenting with lingual swelling, pain, and discoloration, GCA should be suspected and prompt therapy should be initiated to avoid irreversible complications. PMID:25802790

  8. PET/CT in giant cell arteritis: High (18)F-FDG uptake in the temporal, occipital and vertebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rehak, Z; Vasina, J; Ptacek, J; Kazda, T; Fojtik, Z; Nemec, P

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging is useful in patients with fever of unknown origin and can detect giant cell arteritis in extracranial large arteries. However, it is usually assumed that temporal arteries cannot be visualized with a PET/CT scanner due to their small diameter. Three patients with clinical symptoms of temporal arteritis were examined using a standard whole body PET/CT protocol (skull base - mid thighs) followed by a head PET/CT scan using the brain protocol. High (18)F-FDG uptake in the aorta and some arterial branches were detected in all 3 patients with the whole body protocol. Using the brain protocol, head imaging led to detection of high (18)F-FDG uptake in temporal arteries as well as in their branches (3 patients), in occipital arteries (2 patients) and also in vertebral arteries (3 patients).

  9. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shambhu K; Li, Ying; Li, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCPOGC) is an extremely rare non-endocrine pancreatic tumor. To date, some cases have been reported, however, histogenesis and biologic behavior of UCPOGC remain controversial. We report a case of an UCPOGC in a 54-year-old female, who presented with a three-month history of recurrent abdominal pain without any incentive. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a large cystic mass of 10.5 × 9.3 cm in the body and tail of the pancreas compressing the adjacent bowel loop and stomach. The preliminary diagnosis was considered as a malignant tumor of body and tail of the pancreas. The patient had open distal pancreatic mass resection with splenectomy and according to the results of histopathological and immunohistochemical studies, the diagnosis of an UCPOGC was established.

  10. The treatment of giant cell tumors by curettage and filling with acrylic cement. Long-term functional results.

    PubMed

    Segura, J; Albareda, J; Bueno, A L; Nuez, A; Palanca, D; Seral, F

    1997-01-01

    Curettage and filling with acrylic cement in the treatment of para-articular giant cell tumor (GCT) has multiple advantages as compared to other methods; nonetheless, the possibility of progression in arthrosis is still a drawback. The literature does not report long-term functional results when this method was used. Four cases are presented with a mean long-term follow-up of 13.5 years (minimum 11, maximum 18). Clinical results, evaluated by the Enneking system (18), were excellent, and there were no radiological modifications, so that we believe that this is the method to choose for Campanacci stage I and II GCT (1), and in some stage III cases, as joint function is not compromised in time.

  11. Measurement of oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions using a novel adaptation of single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay).

    PubMed

    Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Holt, Stewart M; Hair, Jessica M; Loftin, Charles W

    2010-12-01

    The two basic groups of complex DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSBs) and non-DSB oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs). The single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay has been widely used for the detection of low levels of various types of DNA lesions including single-strand breaks (SSBs), DSBs, and oxidized bases per individual cell. There are limited data on the use of the comet assay for the detection of non-DSB clustered DNA lesions using different repair enzymes as enzymatic probes. This unit discusses a novel adaptation of the comet assay used to measure these unique types of lesions. Until now OCDL yields have been measured using primarily pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis. The advantages offered by the current approach are: (1) measurement of OCDL levels per individual cell; (2) use of a small number of cells (∼10,000) and relatively low doses of ionizing radiation (1 to 2 Gy) or low levels of oxidative stress, which are not compatible with standard agarose gel electrophoresis; and finally, (3) the assay is fast and allows direct comparison with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results.

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and the risk of subsequent aortic complications in giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Liozon, Eric; Lambert, Marc; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Artigues, Nicolas; Geffray, Loïk; Boutemy, Jonathan; Ollivier, Yann; Maigné, Gwénola; Ly, Kim; Huglo, Damien; Hachulla, Eric; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Aouba, Achille; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies reported a 2- to 17-fold higher risk of aortic complications (dilation or dissection) in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We aimed to determine whether or not GCA patients with large-vessel involvement demonstrated by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) have a higher risk of aortic complications. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study between 1995 and 2014. Patients were included if they fulfilled at least 3 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with extratemporal biopsy-proven giant-cell vasculitis; they underwent at least 1 FDG-PET/CT scan at diagnosis or during follow-up; and the morphology of the aorta was assessed by medical imaging at diagnosis. Patients with an aortic complication at the time of diagnosis were excluded. Of the 130 patients included [85 women (65%), median age 70 (50–86)], GCA was biopsy proven in 77 (59%). FDG-PET/CT was performed at diagnosis in 63 (48%) patients and during the follow-up period in the 67 (52%) remaining patients. FDG-PET/CT was positive in 38/63 (60%) patients at diagnosis and in 31/67 (46%) patients when performed during follow-up (P = NS). One hundred four patients (80%) underwent at least 1 morphological assessment of the aorta during follow-up. Nine (9%) patients developed aortic complications (dilation in all and dissection in 1) at a median time of 33 (6–129) months after diagnosis. All of them displayed large-vessel inflammation on previous FDG-PET/CT. A positive FDG-PET/CT was significantly associated with a higher risk of aortic complications (P = 0.004). In our study, a positive FDG-PET/CT was associated with an increased risk of aortic complications at 5 years. PMID:27367985

  13. Tibial stress reaction presenting as bilateral shin pain in a man taking denosumab for giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sian Yik; Rastalsky, Naina; Choy, Edwin; Bolster, Marcy B

    2015-12-01

    Prolonged bisphosphonate use has been associated with increased risk of atypical femoral fractures. Very few cases of atypical femoral fractures have been reported with denosumab. We report a case of bilateral tibial stress reactions in a 60-year-old man with no history of osteoporosis who was on prolonged high-dose denosumab for the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone. He presented with a 3-month history of pain in his bilateral shins worsening with activity and improving with rest. Although initial radiographs were unremarkable, he was found to have changes consistent with a stress reaction on magnetic resonance imaging of the distal tibia. To our knowledge, bilateral tibial stress reactions have not been previously reported with anti-resorptive therapies (neither bisphosphonates nor denosumab). Our case is intriguing in terms of the development of stress reactions as a precursor to stress fractures which may also relate to atypical fractures. Our case suggests a possible association between denosumab use and stress reactions. Of note the indication for denosumab in our case was for the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone where the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved dose is substantially higher than the FDA approved dose for osteoporosis treatment. Although rare, clinicians should consider the possibility of stress fractures in patients on anti-resorptive medications such as denosumab, especially when a patient presents with new onset thigh pain, hip pain or pain over an area affecting the long bones. Evaluation by imaging of affected areas should be pursued to enable early detection and intervention, as well as prevention of morbidity and associated ongoing risk to the patient.

  14. Increased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; van Kooten, P J; Thepen, T; Bihari, I C; Rutten, V P; Koeman, J P; Willemse, T

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize T cells in the skin of cats with an allergic dermatitis histologically compatible with atopic dermatitis, since T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in humans. We observed a significantly greater number of T cells in lesional skin of domestic short-haired cats with allergic dermatitis (n = 10; median age 5.8 years) than in the skin of healthy control animals (n = 10; median age 5.0 years). In the skin of the healthy control animals, one or two CD4+ cells and no CD8+ cells were found. A predominant increase of CD4+ T cells and a CD4+/CD8+ ratio (mean +/- SD: 3.9 +/- 2.0) was found in the lesional skin of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the skin of healthy control animals could not be determined because of the absence of CD8+ cells. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the peripheral blood of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis (mean +/- SD: 1.9 +/- 0.4) did not differ significantly from that in 10 healthy control animals (2.2 +/- 0.4). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and predominance of CD4+ T cells in the lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis is comparable to that found in atopic dermatitis in humans. In addition, the observed increase of CD4+ T cells in the nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis compared to the skin of healthy cats is similar to what is seen in humans. Cytokines produced by T cells and antigen-specific T cells are important mediators in the inflammatory cascade resulting in atopic dermatitis in humans. This study is a first step to investigate their role in feline allergic dermatitis.

  15. Giant cell tumor occurring in familial Paget's disease of bone: report of clinical characteristics and linkage analysis of a large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Rendina, Domenico; Merlotti, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Amyere, Mustapha; Formicola, Daniela; Muscariello, Riccardo; De Filippo, Gianpaolo; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Nuti, Ranuccio; Vikkula, Mikka; Gennari, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    Neoplastic degeneration represents a rare but serious complication of Paget's disease of bone (PDB). Although osteosarcomas have been described in up to 1% of PDB cases, giant cell tumors are less frequent and mainly occur in patients with polyostotic disease. We recently characterized a large pedigree with 14 affected members of whom four developed giant cell tumors at pagetic sites. The high number of affected subjects across multiple generations allowed us to better characterize the clinical phenotype and look for possible susceptibility loci. Of interest, all the affected members had polyostotic PDB, but subjects developing giant cell tumors showed an increased disease severity with a reduced clinical response to bisphosphonate treatment and an increased prevalence of bone pain, deformities, and fractures. Together with an increased occurrence of common pagetic complications, affected patients of this pedigree also evidenced a fivefold higher prevalence of coronary artery disease with respect to either the unaffected family members or a comparative cohort of 150 unrelated PDB cases from the same geographical area. This association was further enhanced in the four cases with PDB and giant cell tumors, all of them developing coronary artery disease before 60 years of age. Despite the early onset and the severe phenotype, PDB patients from this pedigree were negative for the presence of SQSTM1 or TNFRSF11A mutations, previously associated with enhanced disease severity. Genome-wide linkage analysis identified six possible candidate regions on chromosomes 1, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 20. Because the chromosome 8 and 10 loci were next to the TNFRSF11B and OPTN genes, we extended the genetic screening to these two genes, but we failed to identify any causative mutation at both the genomic and transcription level, suggesting that a different genetic defect is associated with PDB and potentially giant cell tumor of bone in this pedigree.

  16. Oxidative Glial Cell Damage Associated with White Matter Lesions in the Aging Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Mashhadi, Sufana; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Dickman, Mark; Forster, Gillian; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B

    2015-09-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are common in brain aging and are associated with dementia. We aimed to investigate whether oxidative DNA damage and occur in WML and in apparently normal white matter in cases with lesions. Tissue from WML and control white matter from brains with lesions (controls lesional) and without lesions (controls non-lesional) were obtained, using post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging-guided sampling, from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Oxidative damage was assessed by immunohistochemistry to 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxoguanosine (8-OHdG) and Western blotting for malondialdehyde. DNA response was assessed by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), p53, senescence markers and by quantitative Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) panel for candidate DNA damage-associated genes. 8-OHdG was expressed in glia and endothelium, with increased expression in both WML and controls lesional compared with controls non-lesional (P < 0.001). γH2Ax showed a similar, although attenuated difference among groups (P = 0.03). Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16 suggested induction of senescence mechanisms in glia. Oxidative DNA damage and a DNA damage response are features of WML pathogenesis and suggest candidate mechanisms for glial dysfunction. Their expression in apparently normal white matter in cases with WML suggests that white matter dysfunction is not restricted to lesions. The role of this field-effect lesion pathogenesis and cognitive impairment are areas to be defined.

  17. A type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma presenting as an intracystic necrotic lesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    FU, ZHENYU; SUN, LIGUO; HUANG, YUHUA; ZHANG, JIE; ZHANG, ZICHAO; WANG, LIJUN; WANG, SHENGYU; ZHANG, GE

    2013-01-01

    Papillary renal carcinoma (papillary RCC) is a histological subtype of the renal carcinoma, which in turn, has two morphological subtypes that correlate with prognosis. The present study reported an unexpected finding of type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (papillary RCC) presenting intracystic necrosis cavity. A cystic renal lesion was identified incidentally in a 66-year-old man during an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan performed for the evaluation of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Subsequent contrast material-enhanced CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination labeled the mass as category III degree on the basis of the Bosniak classification scheme. Surgical exploration by laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed to determine the diagnosis. Definitive pathological study confirmed a type 2 papillary RCC with an intracystic necrosis cavity. To the best of our knowledge, this case demonstrated for the first time a cavity within a papillary RCC, supporting the hypothesis that type 2 papillary RCC could develop cavity avascular necrosis during its cystic degeneration. PMID:24649168

  18. Identification of target antigens of anti-endothelial cell and anti-vascular smooth muscle cell antibodies in patients with giant cell arteritis: a proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Immunological studies of giant cell arteritis (GCA) suggest that a triggering antigen of unknown nature could generate a specific immune response. We thus decided to detect autoantibodies directed against endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the serum of GCA patients and to identify their target antigens. Methods Sera from 15 GCA patients were tested in 5 pools of 3 patients' sera and compared to a sera pool from 12 healthy controls (HCs). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivity was analysed by 2-D electrophoresis and immunoblotting with antigens from human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) and mammary artery VSMCs. Target antigens were identified by mass spectrometry. Results Serum IgG from GCA patients recognised 162 ± 3 (mean ± SD) and 100 ± 17 (mean ± SD) protein spots from HUVECs and VSMCs, respectively, and that from HCs recognised 79 and 94 protein spots, respectively. In total, 30 spots from HUVECs and 19 from VSMCs were recognised by at least two-thirds and three-fifths, respectively, of the pools of sera from GCA patients and not by sera from HCs. Among identified proteins, we found vinculin, lamin A/C, voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2, annexin V and other proteins involved in cell energy metabolism and key cellular pathways. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that most identified target antigens interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2. Conclusions IgG antibodies to proteins in the proteome of ECs and VSMCs are present in the sera of GCA patients and recognise cellular targets that play key roles in cell biology and maintenance of homeostasis. Their potential pathogenic role remains to be determined. PMID:21711540

  19. Embryonic Cell Grafts in a Culture Model of Spinal Cord Lesion: Neuronal Relay Formation Is Essential for Functional Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tscherter, Anne; Heidemann, Martina; Kleinlogel, Sonja; Streit, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Presently there exists no cure for spinal cord injury (SCI). However, transplantation of embryonic tissue into spinal cord (SC) lesions resulted in axon outgrowth across the lesion site and some functional recovery, fostering hope for future stem cell therapies. Although in vivo evidence for functional recovery is given, the exact cellular mechanism of the graft support remains elusive: either the grafted cells provide a permissive environment for the host tissue to regenerate itself or the grafts actually integrate functionally into the host neuronal network reconnecting the separated SC circuits. We tested the two hypotheses in an in vitro SC lesion model that is based on propagation of activity between two rat organotypic SC slices in culture. Transplantation of dissociated cells from E14 rat SC or forebrain (FB) re-established the relay of activity over the lesion site and thus, provoked functional regeneration. Combining patch-clamp recordings from transplanted cells with network activity measurements from the host tissue on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) we here show that neurons differentiate from the grafted cells and integrate into the host circuits. Optogenetic silencing of neurons developed from transplanted embryonic mouse FB cells provides clear evidence that they replace the lost neuronal connections to relay and synchronize activity between the separated SC circuits. In contrast, transplantation of neurospheres (NS) induced neither the differentiation of mature neurons from the grafts nor an improvement of functional regeneration. Together these findings suggest, that the formation of neuronal relays from grafted embryonic cells is essential to re-connect segregated SC circuits. PMID:27708562

  20. Genetic alterations of IL-1 receptor antagonist in mice affect plasma cholesterol level and foam cell lesion size.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Cecilia M; Kuriakose, George; Hirsch, Emmet; Tabas, Ira

    2002-04-30

    Inflammatory cytokines have been linked to atherosclerosis by using cell culture models and acute inflammation in animals. The goal of this study was to examine lipoprotein levels and early atherosclerosis in chronic animal models of altered IL-1 physiology by using mice with deficient or excess IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). IL-1ra knockout C57BL/6J mice fed a cholesterol/cholate diet for 3 mo had a 3-fold decrease in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a trend toward increased foam-cell lesion area compared to wild-type littermate controls. IL-1ra transgenic/low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice fed a cholesterol-saturated fat diet for 10 wk showed a 40% increase in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, consistent with the IL-1ra knockout data, although there was no change in lesion size. When these IL1-ra overexpressing transgenic mice on the LDLR knockout background were fed a high-cholesterol/high-fat diet containing cholate, however, a statistically significant 40% decrease in lesion area was observed compared to LDLR knockout mice lacking the transgene. By immunohistochemistry, IL-1ra was present in C57BL/6J and LDLR knockout aortae, absent in IL-1ra knockout aortae, and present at high levels in LDLR knockout/IL-1ra transgene aortae. In summary, IL-1ra tended to increase plasma lipoprotein levels and, when fed a cholate-containing diet, decrease foam-cell lesion size. These data demonstrate that in selected models of murine atherosclerosis, chronic IL-1ra depletion or overexpression has potentially important effects on lipoprotein metabolism and foam-cell lesion development.

  1. Crossed unilateral lesions of temporal lobe structures and cholinergic cell bodies impair visual conditional and object discrimination learning in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barefoot, H C; Baker, H F; Ridley, R M

    2002-02-01

    Monkeys with excitotoxic lesions of the CA1/subiculum region in the right hemisphere and with immunotoxic lesions of the cholinergic cells of the diagonal band in the left hemisphere were impaired on a visual conditional task. In this task, correct choice of one of two objects depends on which of two background fields both objects are presented against, irrespective of the spatial positions of the objects. They were not impaired on simple object or shape discrimination tasks. The pattern of impairments is the same as that seen after bilateral excitotoxic lesions of CA1/subiculum, implying that the diagonal band lesion disables the ipsilateral CA1/subiculum. It also argues that CA1/subiculum, sustained by its cholinergic input, is necessary for some forms of nonspatial conditional learning. Addition of an inferotemporal (IT) cortical ablation to the left hemisphere did not affect simple visual discrimination learning, although all the monkeys then failed to learn a new visual conditional task. This demonstrates that intact IT cortex in only one hemisphere is sufficient to sustain simple visual discrimination learning but implies that the cholinergic input and the inferotemporal cortical input to the hippocampus both contribute to visual conditional learning. The subsequent addition of an immunotoxic lesion of the basal nucleus of Meynert in the right hemisphere resulted in an additional impairment on a difficult shape discrimination. This argues that it is the cholinergic projection to the inferotemporal cortex, rather than to the rest of the cortex, which contributes to visual discrimination learning and memory.

  2. Multicentric lymphoma in a giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Sanches, Adrien W D; Werner, Pedro R; Margarido, Tereza C C; Pachaly, Jose R

    2013-03-01

    Neoplastic disease is not well documented in giant anteaters. This report describes a disseminated lymphoma in an adult male giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) from the City Zoo of Curitiba, State of Paraná, Brazil. No clinical signs were noticed before its death, except for a slight inappetence. At postmortem examination, pale white to yellow, variably sized nodules infiltrated the heart, liver, and intestinal lymph nodes. Histologically, two distinct cell populations were present in the nodular lesions: one characterized by smaller cells, primarily lymphocytic in nature, and another characterized by larger rounded cells with loose chromatin and frequently indented nuclei resembling histiocytes. Giant binucleated cells were occasionally observed. Mitotic figures numbered 2-3 mitotic figures/x400 field. Both cellular populations presented with moderate pleomorphism, large nuclei, a high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, distinct nucleoli, and coarse nuclear chromatin. The neoplasia was classified as a form of multicentric lymphohistiocytic lymphoma (Rappaport Classification) and as an intermediate grade lymphoma (National Cancer Institute Working Formulation).

  3. Giant hepatic metastasis in a patient with coin-like small cell lung carcinoma incidentally diagnosed at autopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Decebal; Gurzu, Simona; Contac, Anca Otilia; Jung, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Encephalopathy is a rare complication of hepatic metastases. In this paper we present a case of a patient with lung cancer and metastatic-related giant hepatomegaly. Patient concerns: A 78-year-old previously healthy male was admitted in the Emergency room in hepatic coma. Diagnoses: The abdominal CT scan examination revealed a huge liver filled with solid nodules. Interventions: No interventions were performed. Outcomes: The patient died at few hours after hospitalization. The autopsy showed a 6.5 kilograms liver with several whitish metastatic nodules and an occult prostate adenocarcinoma. The hilum of both lungs was free of tumor and a 10 mm white nodule was identified surrounding a small bronchus. No peripheral nodules were macroscopically identified. Under microscope, cluster of small cells were observed encasing a small bronchus with multiple minute coin-shaped subpleural foci. A massive intrapulmonary angiolymphatic invasion and metastases from small cell carcinoma in liver, lymph nodes and iliac crest bone marrow were also diagnosed. Lessons: This case highlights the difficulty of diagnosis of aggressive lung carcinomas and the necessity of checking for metachronous tumors. The encephalopathy might be the result of metastatic damage of the liver parenchyma combined with the paraneoplastic effect of the tumor cells. Few than 25 cases of SCLCs with diffuse liver metastases and fulminant liver failure were reported to December 2016. This is the first reported case with a synchronous prostate cancer and a “coin-like” aspect of the SCLC. PMID:28296775

  4. Electron microscopy and computational studies of Ebh, a giant cell-wall-associated protein from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Sou; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Isao; Takei, Toshiaki; Yu, Jian; Kuroda, Makoto; Yao Min; Ohta, Toshiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2008-11-14

    Ebh, a giant protein found in staphylococci, contains several domains, including a large central region with 52 imperfect repeats of a domain composed of 126 amino acids. We used electron microscopy to observe the rod-like structure of a partial Ebh protein containing 10 repeating units. This is the first report of the direct observation of an Ebh structure containing a large number of repeating units, although structures containing one, two, or four repeating units have been reported. The observed structure of the partial Ebh protein was distorted and had a length of ca. 520 A and a width of ca. 21 A. The observed structures were consistent with those deduced from crystal structure analysis, suggesting that the Ebh domains are connected to form a rod-like structure. The crystal structure data revealed distorted, string-like features in the simulated structure of the whole-length Ebh protein. Superposition of fragments of the simulated whole-length structure of the Ebh protein onto each electron micrograph showed a high level of correlation between the observed and calculated structures. These results suggest that Ebh is composed of highly flexible filate molecules. The highly repetitive structure and the associated unique structural flexibility of Ebh support the proposed function of this protein, i.e. binding to sugars in the cell wall. This binding might result in intra-cell-wall cross-linking that contributes to the rigidity of bacterial cells.

  5. Electron microscopy and computational studies of Ebh, a giant cell-wall-associated protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Sou; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Isao; Takei, Toshiaki; Yu, Jian; Kuroda, Makoto; Yao, Min; Ohta, Toshiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2008-11-14

    Ebh, a giant protein found in staphylococci, contains several domains, including a large central region with 52 imperfect repeats of a domain composed of 126 amino acids. We used electron microscopy to observe the rod-like structure of a partial Ebh protein containing 10 repeating units. This is the first report of the direct observation of an Ebh structure containing a large number of repeating units, although structures containing one, two, or four repeating units have been reported. The observed structure of the partial Ebh protein was distorted and had a length of ca. 520A and a width of ca. 21A. The observed structures were consistent with those deduced from crystal structure analysis, suggesting that the Ebh domains are connected to form a rod-like structure. The crystal structure data revealed distorted, string-like features in the simulated structure of the whole-length Ebh protein. Superposition of fragments of the simulated whole-length structure of the Ebh protein onto each electron micrograph showed a high level of correlation between the observed and calculated structures. These results suggest that Ebh is composed of highly flexible filate molecules. The highly repetitive structure and the associated unique structural flexibility of Ebh support the proposed function of this protein, i.e. binding to sugars in the cell wall. This binding might result in intra-cell-wall cross-linking that contributes to the rigidity of bacterial cells.

  6. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis is maintained by Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA lesions in neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Hildrestrand, Gunn Annette; Sejersted, Yngve; Medin, Tirill; Moldestad, Olve; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Zandstra; Suganthan, Rajikala; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar; Bergersen, Linda H

    2012-09-27

    Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3(-/-) mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3(-/-) mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3(-/-) mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears th