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Sample records for giant proteoglycan molecules

  1. Proteoglycans and more – from molecules to biology

    PubMed Central

    Heinegård, Dick

    2009-01-01

    In this article the organization and functional details of the extracellular matrix, with particular focus on cartilage, are described. All tissues contain a set of molecules that are arranged to contribute structural elements. Examples are fibril-forming collagens forming major fibrillar networks in most tissues. The assembly process is regulated by a number of proteins (thrombospondins, LRR-proteins, matrilins and other collagens) that can bind to the collagen molecule and in many cases remain bound to the formed fibre providing additional stability and enhancing networking to other structural networks. One such network is formed by collagen VI molecules assembled to beaded filaments in the matrix catalysed by interactions with small proteoglycans of the LRR-family, which remain bound to the filament providing for interactions via a linker of a matrilin to other matrix constituents like collagen fibres and the large proteoglycans, e.g. aggrecan in cartilage. Aggrecan is contributing an extreme anionic charge density to the extracellular matrix, which by osmotic effects leads to water retention and strive to swelling, resisted by the tensile properties of the collagen fibres. Aggrecan is bound via one end to hyaluronan, including such molecules retained at the cell surface, to form very large molecular entities that interact with other constituents of the matrix, e.g. fibulins that can form their own network. Other important interactions are those with cell surface receptors such as integrins, heparan sulphfate proteoglycans, hyaluronan receptors and others. Many of the molecules with an ability to interact with these receptors can also bind to molecules in the matrix and provide a bridge from the matrix to the cell and induce various responses. In pathology, there is an imbalance in matrix turnover with often excessive proteolytic breakdown. This results in the formation of protein fragments, where cleavage provides information on the active enzyme. Those

  2. Mammalian eyes and associated tissues contain molecules that are immunologically related to cartilage proteoglycan and link protein

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monospecific antibodies to bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan monomer and link protein were used to demonstrate that immunologically related molecules are present in the bovine eye and associated tissues. With immunofluorescence microscopy, reactions for both proteoglycan and link protein were observed in the sclera, the anterior uveal tract, and the endoneurium of the optic nerve of the central nervous system. Antibody to bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan also reacted with some connective tissue sheaths of rectus muscle and the perineurium of the optic nerve of the central nervous system. Antibody to proteoglycan purified from rat brain cross-reacted with bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan, indicating structural similarities between these proteoglycans. ELISA studies and crossed immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that purified dermatan sulphate proteoglycans isolated from bovine sclera did not react with these antibodies but that the antibody to cartilage proteoglycan reacted with other molecules extracted from sclera. Two molecular species resembling bovine nasal link protein in size and reactivity with antibody were also demonstrated in scleral extracts: the larger molecule was more common. Antibody to link protein reacted with the media of arterial vessels demonstrating the localization of arterial link protein described earlier. Tissues that were unstained for either molecule included the connective tissue stroma of the iris, retina, vitreous body, cornea, and the remainder of the uveal tract. These observations clearly demonstrate that tissues other than cartilage contain molecules that are immunologically related to cartilage-derived proteoglycans and link proteins. PMID:7119004

  3. Trace Molecules in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Smith, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Chemical kinetics matters in the upper atmospheres of giant planets in our solar system and in extrasolar systems. The composition of a volume of gas depends not only on where it is, but also on how it got there. The giant planets in our own solar system still have much to teach us about what we will be observing on extrasolar giant planets and how to interpret what we observe. Some molecules, such as CO, C2H2, C2H6, PH3, and NH3, which we call tracer molecules, provide remotely observable signatures of vertical transport. PH3 and NH3 especially have complicated thermochemistry and chemical kinetics that, until recently, have been poorly understood. Based on analysis of recent literature, we have identified new chemical mechanisms for interconverting NH3 and N2 and for interconverting PH3 and NH4-H2PO4.

  4. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance.

  5. Classical and quantum magnetism in giant Keplerate magnetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Luban, M; Schröder, C; Modler, R; Kögerler, P; Axenovich, M; Schnack, J; Canfield, P; Bud'ko, S; Harrison, N

    2001-09-17

    Complementary theoretical modeling methods are presented for the classical and quantum Heisenberg model to explain the magnetic properties of nanometer-sized magnetic molecules. Excellent quantitative agreement is achieved between our experimental data down to 0.1 K and for fields up to 60 Tesla and our theoretical results for the giant Keplerate species {Mo72Fe30}, by far the largest paramagnetic molecule synthesized to date.

  6. Giant faraday rotation in conjugated, rod-like molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vleugels, Rick; Brullot, Ward; Verbiest, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Faraday rotation is a magneto-optic phenomenon in which the polarization plane of light is rotated due to magnetically induced circular birefringence. It can be used in a variety of applications such as optical isolators, magnetic field sensors and current sensors. So far, most of the applications use inorganic, paramagnetic materials, which have Verdet constants up to millions of degrees per tesla per meter in the visible spectrum range. They are performant at telecommunication wavelengths, though with smaller Verdet constants, so thicker materials are used. Disadvantages of these materials are their magnetic saturation at low magnetic fields and their strong temperature dependency. Organic, diamagnetic materials on the contrary, saturate at much larger magnetic fields and are less temperature dependent. Furthermore, they also have the advantage of their flexibility and processability. Up to now, magneto-optical research on organic materials has mostly characterized materials with low magneto-optical activity in regions without absorption, but there are some exceptions. Some pi-conjugated polymers have been shown to have very large magneto-optic responses. Furthermore, a mesogenic, organic molecule has been reported with a very high Verdet constant. Conclusive explanations for these large Verdet constants are still lacking, but different possible hypotheses were proposed. In our ongoing search for organic materials with exceptional magneto-optical properties, we examined conjugated, rod-like molecules. Structural, these molecules show close resemblances with the earlier reported mesogenic, organic molecule. We measured giant Verdet constants for thin films of these molecules, reaching values almost as giant as the previous reported mesogenic molecule. These findings shed first preliminary light on a structure-activity relationship for giant Faraday rotation in diamagnetic organic materials.

  7. Giant molecules composed of polar molecules and atoms in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ran; Tan, Shina

    2014-05-01

    Two or three polar molecules, confined to one or two dimensions, can form stable bound states with a single atom living in three dimensions, if the molecule and the atom can interact resonantly such that their mixed dimensional scattering length is large. We call these bound states ``giant molecules'' since it's a molecule composed of smaller molecules and atoms. We study their properties using techniques including exact numerical solution, exact qunatum diffusion Monte Carlo (QMC), Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), and semiclassical approximation. These bound states have a hierarchical structure reminiscent of the celestial systems.

  8. Proteoglycans in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects. PMID:26755884

  9. Transmembrane signaling proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins and their glycosaminoglycan chains is matched by diverse functions. However, all assume roles as coreceptors, often working alongside high-affinity growth factor receptors or adhesion receptors such as integrins. Other common themes are an ability to signal through their cytoplasmic domains, often to the actin cytoskeleton, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveals roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules.

  10. Precise Tetrahedral Giant Molecules Based on Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) Nano-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Mei, Shan; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The assembly of building blocks with specific shape and symmetry in 3D space is a long-lasting topic in scientific research. If ``nano-atoms'' are placed on the apexes of a rigid polyhedron linker to form a larger faceted giant molecule, such molecules would amplify the symmetry of the linkers and result in giant polyhedra molecules. When four POSS cages are linked to the apex of a tetrahedron, we obtain a giant tetrahedron. Depending on the linkers, it can be a semi-rigid or a rigid giant polyhedron. An interesting approach is to utilize the sp3-carbon or adamantane core to introduce the Td symmetry, and utilize ``click reaction'' to connect four hydrophobic isobutyl-POSS (BPOSS) at four corners. Our preliminary results show that the giant tetrahedron Tetra-4BPOSS forms an interdigitated diamondoid structure. In these giant polyhedra, we can use different ``nano-atoms'' with different functional groups, which may also act as an additional factor to affect the final ordered structures. The progresses of our research lead to three hydrophobic and one hydrophilic HPOSS (HPOSS represents seven hydroxyl group functionalized POSS), and two hydrophobic BPOSS and two hydrophilic HPOSS.

  11. Toward Controlled Hierarchical Heterogeneities in Giant Molecules with Precisely Arranged Nano Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein we introduce a unique synthetic methodology to prepare a library of giant molecules with multiple, precisely arranged nano building blocks, and illustrate the influence of minute structural differences on their self-assembly behaviors. The T8 polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are orthogonally functionalized and sequentially attached onto the end of a hydrophobic polymer chain in either linear or branched configuration. The heterogeneity of primary chemical structure in terms of composition, surface functionality, sequence, and topology can be precisely controlled and is reflected in the self-assembled supramolecular structures of these giant molecules in the condensed state. This strategy offers promising opportunities to manipulate the hierarchical heterogeneities of giant molecules via precise and modular assemblies of various nano building blocks. PMID:27163025

  12. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  13. Proteoglycans in Normal and Healing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret Mary; Melrose, James

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Proteoglycans have a distinct spatial localization in normal skin and are essential for the correct structural development, organization, hydration, and functional properties of this tissue. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is no longer considered to be just an inert supportive material but is a source of directive, spatial and temporal, contextual information to the cells via components such as the proteoglycans. There is a pressing need to improve our understanding of how these important molecules functionally interact with other matrix structures, cells and cellular mediators in normal skin and during wound healing. Recent Advances: New antibodies to glycosaminoglycan side chain components of skin proteoglycans have facilitated the elucidation of detailed localization patterns within skin. Other studies have revealed important proliferative activities of proteinase-generated fragments of proteoglycans and other ECM components (matricryptins). Knockout mice have further established the functional importance of skin proteoglycans in the assembly and homeostasis of the normal skin ECM. Critical Issues: Our comprehension of the molecular and structural complexity of skin as a complex, dynamic, constantly renewing, layered connective tissue is incomplete. The impact of changes in proteoglycans on skin pathology and the wound healing process is recognized as an important area of pathobiology and is an area of intense investigation. Future Directions: Advanced technology is allowing the development of new artificial skins. Recent knowledge on skin proteoglycans can be used to incorporate these molecules into useful adjunct therapies for wound healing and for maintenance of optimal tissue homeostasis in aging skin. PMID:25785238

  14. Epitopes of proteoglycans eliciting an anti-proteoglycan response in chronic immune synovitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.U.; Kresina, T.F.; Malemud, C.J.; Goldberg, V.M.

    1987-02-01

    This study details the immune response to cartilage proteoglycan in experimental chronic IgG-induced immune synovitis. With the use of radioimmunoassay, antibodies reactive with purified rabbit proteoglycan monomer were observed in nine of nine rabbits with immune synovitis. IgG-immunized but nonsynovitic control animals with no pathology showed no antibody response. A panel of murine monoclonal antibodies with defined specificity towards rabbit proteoglycan were utilized to characterize the epitope specificity of the immune synovitis polyclonal anti-proteoglycan response. One murine monoclonal antibody, 6C11, inhibited the binding of the polyclonal antisera to proteoglycan in all nine animals with significant (>40/sup 5/) inhibition in six of nine rabbits. Further inhibition studies utilizing DEAE-cellulose-resolved proteoglycan tryptic peptides revealed that peptides poor in chondroitin sulfate were strong inhibitors of binding of the polyclonal antibodies to the proteoglycan substrate. In particular, keratan sulfate-containing tryptic peptides were most inhibitory on a per weight basis. These results indicate that, in chromic IgG-induced immune synovitis, anti-proteoglycan antibodies elicited are heterogeneous with regard to specificity, but a relatively large proportion predominantly recognized a portion of the proteoglycan molecule containing core protein and associated keratan sulfate.

  15. Processing of giant graphene molecules by soft-landing mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Räder, Hans Joachim; Rouhanipour, Ali; Talarico, Anna Maria; Palermo, Vincenzo; Samorì, Paolo; Müllen, Klaus

    2006-04-01

    The processability of giant (macro)molecules into ultrapure and highly ordered structures at surfaces is of fundamental importance for studying chemical, physical and biological phenomena, as well as their exploitation as active units in the fabrication of hybrid devices. The possibility of handling larger and larger molecules provides access to increasingly complex functions. Unfortunately, larger molecules commonly imply lower processability due to either their low solubility in liquid media or the occurrence of thermal cracking during vacuum sublimation. The search for novel strategies to process and characterize giant building blocks is therefore a crucial goal in materials science. Here we describe a new general route to process, at surfaces, extraordinarily large molecules, that is, synthetic nanographenes, into ultrapure crystalline architectures. Our method relies on the soft-landing of ions generated by solvent-free matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The nanographenes are transferred to the gas phase, purified and adsorbed at surfaces. Scanning tunnelling microscopy reveals the formation of ordered nanoscale semiconducting supramolecular architectures. The unique flexibility of this approach allows the growth of ultrapure crystalline films of various systems, including organic, inorganic and biological molecules, and therefore it can be of interest for technological applications in the fields of electronics, (bio)catalysis and nanomedicine.

  16. Giant Acceleration of Diffusion Observed in a Single-Molecule Experiment on F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ryunosuke; Sasaki, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shuichi; Kudo, Seishi; Inoue, Yuichi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Kumiko

    2015-06-01

    The giant acceleration (GA) of diffusion is a universal phenomenon predicted by the theoretical analysis given by Reimann et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 010602 (2001)]. Here we apply the theory of the GA of diffusion to a single-molecule experiment on a rotary motor protein, F1 , which is a component of Fo F1 adenosine triphosphate synthase. We discuss the energetic properties of F1 and identify a high energy barrier of the rotary potential to be 20 kBT , with the condition that the adenosine diphosphates are tightly bound to the F1 catalytic sites. To conclude, the GA of diffusion is useful for measuring energy barriers in nonequilibrium and single-molecule experiments.

  17. Exact ground state properties of the classical Heisenberg model for giant magnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Axenovich, Maria; Luban, Marshall

    2001-03-01

    We find the exact ground state energy and magnetic moment for an arbitrary magnetic field H of the classical Heisenberg model of spins on the vertices of an icosidodecahedron. This model provides an accurate description of the magnetic properties of the giant paramagnetic molecule {l_brace}Mo{sub 72}Fe{sub 30}{r_brace} in which 30 Fe{sup 3+} ions are coupled via antiferromagnetic exchange. The strong frustration of the magnetic interaction in the molecule is relaxed when the angle between nearest-neighbor spins is 120{sup o}. We predict that the magnetic moment is linear with H until saturating at a critical field H{sub c}, and this is consistent with the results of a recent experiment at 0.46 K. We derive our results using a graph-theoretical construction and a special property, three-colorability, of the icosidodecahedron. We also consider spins on the vertices of an octahedron, icosahedron, and dodecahedron.

  18. Giant pumping of single-file water molecules in a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhao, Y J; Huang, J P

    2011-11-17

    Achieving a fast, unidirectional flow of single-file water molecules (UFSWM) across nanochannels is important for membrane-based water purification or seawater desalination. For this purpose, electro-osmosis methods are recognized as a very promising approach and have been extensively discussed in the literature. Utilizing molecular dynamics simulations, here we propose a design for pumping water molecules in a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of a linearly gradient electric (GE) field. Such a GE field is inspired by GE fields generated from charged ions located adjacent to biological membrane water nanochannels that can conduct water in and out of cells and can be experimentally achieved by using the charged tip of an atomic force microscope. As a result, the maximum speed of the UFSWM can be 1 or 2 orders of magnitude larger than that in a uniform electric (UE) field. Also, inverse transportation of water molecules does not exist in case of the GE field but can appear for the UE field. Thus, the GE field yields a much more efficient UFSWM than the UE field. The giant pumping ability as revealed is attributed to the nonzero net electrostatic force acting on each water molecule confined in the nanotube. These observations have significance for the design of nanoscale devices for readily achieving controllable UFSWM at high speed.

  19. Endocan: a novel circulating proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava; Shetty, K S Rathan

    2014-01-01

    Endocan is a novel endothelium derived soluble dermatan sulfate proteoglycan. It has the property of binding to a wide range of bioactive molecules associated with cellular signaling and adhesion and thus regulating proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion of different cell types in health and disease. An increase in tissue expression or serum level of endocan reflects endothelial activation and neovascularization which are prominent pathophysiological changes associated with inflammation and tumor progression. Consequently, endocan has been used as a blood-based and tissue-based biomarker for various cancers and inflammation and has shown promising results.

  20. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Stephane; Lamanna, William C.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are found at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, where they interact with a plethora of ligands. Over the last decade, new insights have emerged regarding the mechanism and biological significance of these interactions. Here, we discuss changing views on the specificity of protein–heparan sulfate binding and the activity of HSPGs as receptors and coreceptors. Although few in number, heparan sulfate proteoglycans have profound effects at the cellular, tissue, and organismal level. PMID:21690215

  1. [Biological activities of exogenous polysaccharides via controlling endogenous proteoglycan metabolism in vascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Chika; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2008-05-01

    Proteoglycan contains glycosmainoglycans, which are endogenous sulfated polysaccharides, in the molecule. The metabolism of proteoglycans regulates cell behavior and cellular events. It is possible that exogenous polysaccharide-related molecules exhibit their biological activities by two mechanisms. One is the interaction with cells and the other is the interaction with growth factors/cytokines that regulate proteoglycans. In this review, we describe sodium spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide obtained from a hot-water extract of the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, as an exogenous polysaccharide that stimulates the release of proteoglycans from vascular endothelial cells. Factors that regulate endothelial proteoglycan metabolism are also being described as possible target molecules of exogenous polysaccharides. Further research is required to obtain exogenous polysaccharide-related molecules that exhibit useful biological activities through controlling endothelial proteoglycan metabolism for protection against vascular lesions such as atheroslcerosis.

  2. Synthesis of extremely large mesoporous activated carbon and its unique adsorption for giant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Kakii, Takuhiro; Hirota, Yoshifumi

    1996-02-01

    The steam invigoration of pitches (softening points 85 and 280{degrees}C) homogenized with 1-3 wt% of organo rare0earth metal complexes such as Ln(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or Ln(acac) (Ln=Y, Yb) at 930{degrees}C provided activated carbons with an extremely high mesopore ration, >70%. The resulted activated carbon selectively adsorbs giant molecules such as Vitamin B{sub 12}, blue acid 90 dye, dextran, nystatin, and humic acid, reflecting their large mesopore volumes. To understand what kind of carbon skeleton in pitch is suited for generation of high mesopore ration, the steam invigoration of a series of condensed polynuclear aromatics (COPNA) resins prepared from naphthlene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, or perylene and p-xylene-{alpha},{alpha}{prime}-diol were conducted in the presence of rare-earth metal complexes. As a result, COPNA resins containing phenanthrene, perylene, and pyrene generated large mesopore volume. 35 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Heterogeneity of the chondroitin sulfate portion of phosphacan/6B4 proteoglycan regulates its binding affinity for pleiotrophin/heparin binding growth-associated molecule.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Nobuaki; He, Jue; Yajima, Yuki; Mikami, Tadahisa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Yabe, Tomio

    2003-09-12

    PTP zeta is a receptor-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is synthesized as a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and uses pleiotrophin as a ligand. The chondroitin sulfate portion of this receptor is essential for high affinity binding to pleiotrophin. Here, we purified phosphacan, which corresponds to the extracellular domain of PTP zeta, from postnatal day 7 (P7) and P12 rat cerebral cortex (PG-P7 and PG-P12, respectively) and from P20 rat whole brain (PG-P20). The chondroitin sulfate of these preparations displayed immunologically and compositionally different structures. In particular, only PG-P20 reacted with the monoclonal antibody MO-225, which recognizes chondroitin sulfate containing the GlcA(2S)beta 1-3GalNAc(6S) disaccharide unit (D unit). Analysis of the chondroitinase digestion products revealed that GlcA beta 1-3GalNAc(4S) disaccharide unit (A unit) was the major component in these preparations and that PG-P20 contained 1.3% D unit, which was not detected in PG-P7 and PG-P12. Interaction analysis using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that PG-P20 had approximately 5-fold stronger affinity for pleiotrophin (dissociation constant (KD) = 0.14 nM) than PG-P7 and PG-P12, although all these preparations showed similar low affinity binding to pleiotrophin after chondroitinase ABC digestion (KD = 1.4 approximately 1.6 nM). We also found that shark cartilage chondroitin sulfate D containing approximately 20% D unit bound to pleiotrophin with moderate affinity (KD = 2.7 nM), whereas whale cartilage chondroitin sulfate A showed no binding to this growth factor. These results suggest that variation of chondroitin sulfate plays important roles in the regulation of signal transduction in the brain.

  4. Surface Proteoglycans as Mediators in Bacterial Pathogens Infections

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Martin, Carla; Alcalde, Ignacio; Quirós, Luis M.; Vazquez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain an important global health problem. The interaction of a wide range of pathogen bacteria with host cells from many different tissues is frequently mediated by proteoglycans. These compounds are ubiquitous complex molecules which are not only involved in adherence and colonization, but can also participate in other steps of pathogenesis. To overcome the problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics new therapeutic agents could be developed based on the characteristics of the interaction of pathogens with proteoglycans. PMID:26941735

  5. Proteoglycans and neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex during development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans are major constituents of the extracellular matrix and the cell surface in the brain. Proteoglycans bind with many proteins including growth factors, chemokines, axon guidance molecules, and cell adhesion molecules through both the glycosaminoglycan and the core protein portions. The functions of proteoglycans are flexibly regulated due to the structural variability of glycosaminoglycans, which are generated by multiple glycosaminoglycan synthesis and modifying enzymes. Neuronal cell surface proteoglycans such as PTPζ, neuroglycan C and syndecan-3 function as direct receptors for heparin-binding growth factors that induce neuronal migration. The lectican family, secreted chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, forms large aggregates with hyaluronic acid and tenascins, in which many signaling molecules and enzymes including matrix proteases are preserved. In the developing cerebrum, secreted chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans such as neurocan, versican and phosphacan are richly expressed in the areas that are strategically important for neuronal migration such as the striatum, marginal zone, subplate and subventricular zone in the neocortex. These proteoglycans may anchor various attractive and/or repulsive cues, regulating the migration routes of inhibitory neurons. Recent studies demonstrated that the genes encoding proteoglycan core proteins and glycosaminoglycan synthesis and modifying enzymes are associated with various psychiatric and intellectual disorders, which may be related to the defects of neuronal migration. PMID:25852466

  6. Proteoglycan form and function: A comprehensive nomenclature of proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive classification of the proteoglycan gene families and respective protein cores. This updated nomenclature is based on three criteria: Cellular and subcellular location, overall gene/protein homology, and the utilization of specific protein modules within their respective protein cores. These three signatures were utilized to design four major classes of proteoglycans with distinct forms and functions: the intracellular, cell-surface, pericellular and extracellular proteoglycans. The proposed nomenclature encompasses forty-three distinct proteoglycan-encoding genes and many alternatively-spliced variants. The biological functions of these four proteoglycan families are critically assessed in development, cancer and angiogenesis, and in various acquired and genetic diseases where their expression is aberrant. PMID:25701227

  7. Recombinant production of proteoglycans and their bioactive domains.

    PubMed

    Lord, Megan S; Whitelock, John M

    2013-05-01

    Proteoglycans are ubiquitous dynamic molecules that are made up of a protein core to which specific linear glycosylation structures, known as glycosaminoglycans, have been covalently coupled. They have roles in many biological and pathological processes, which have been shown to be dependent on events involving the protein component and/or the glycosaminoglycan chains. This review focuses on the literature describing the recombinant expression and production of proteoglycans known to be present in the extracellular, cell surface and intracellular environments with an emphasis on how the structure of the molecule relates to its biological function and how this relationship has been explored using recombinant DNA technology for clinical applications.

  8. EDTA-insoluble, calcium-binding proteoglycan in bovine bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Lester, G. E.; Caterson, B.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A calcium ion precipitable, trypsin-generated proteoglycan fragment has been isolated from the demineralized, EDTA-insoluble matrices of bone. The demineralized matrix was completely digested with trypsin, increasing concentrations of CaCl2 were added to the supernatant, and the resulting precipitates were analyzed. The amount of precipitate gradually increased with higher concentrations of calcium and was reversibly solubilized by EDTA. After molecular sieve and anion exchange chromatography, a proteoglycan-containing peak was obtained. Immunochemical analysis showed that this peak contained chondroitin 4-sulfate and possibly keratan sulfate. Amino acid analysis showed that this proteoglycan contained high amounts of aspartic acid/asparagine (Asx), serine (Ser), glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx), proline (Pro), and glycine (Gly); however, it contained little leucine (Leu) which suggests that it is not a member of the leucine-rich small proteoglycan family. In addition, significant amounts of phosphoserine (P-Ser) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) were identified in hydrolysates of this fraction. A single band (M(r) 59 kDa) was obtained on SDS-PAGE that stained with Stains-all but not with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250. If bone powder was trypsinized prior to demineralization, this proteoglycan-containing fraction was not liberated. Collectively, these results indicate that a proteoglycan occurs in the demineralized matrix that is precipitated with CaCl2 and is closely associated with both mineral and collagen matrices. Such a molecule might facilitate the structural network for the induction of mineralization in bone.

  9. Thymus cDNA library survey uncovers novel features of immune molecules in Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Jiang-Di; Liao, Xiang-Yong; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-10-01

    A ranavirus-induced thymus cDNA library was constructed from Chinese giant salamander, the largest extant amphibian species. Among the 137 putative immune-related genes derived from this library, these molecules received particular focus: immunoglobulin heavy chains (IgM, IgD, and IgY), IFN-inducible protein 6 (IFI6), and T cell receptor beta chain (TCRβ). Several unusual features were uncovered: IgD displays a structure pattern distinct from those described for other amphibians by having only four constant domains plus a hinge region. A unique IgY form (IgY(ΔFc)), previously undescribed in amphibians, is present in serum. Alternative splicing is observed to generate IgH diversification. IFI6 is newly-identified in amphibians, which occurs in two forms divergent in subcelluar distribution and antiviral activity. TCRβ immunoscope profile follows the typical vertebrate pattern, implying a polyclonal T cell repertoire. Collectively, the pioneering survey of ranavirus-induced thymus cDNA library from Chinese giant salamander reveals immune components and characteristics in this primitive amphibian.

  10. Proteoglycans and orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G

    2001-12-01

    Proteoglycans represent an important and diverse family of extracellular matrix components within the connective tissues of the periodontium. This review focuses on the function and metabolism of the various proteoglycans in periodontal tissues, such as alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, and considers their potential fate in response to an orthodontic force. Such considerations provide an important background in evaluating the potential for proteoglycan metabolites, alongside other connective tissue metabolites, as biomarkers for assessing the deep-seated metabolic changes and as a diagnostic tool in monitoring orthodontic tooth movement.

  11. Proteoglycan synthesis in flat cell-free cultures of chick embryo retinal neurons and photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Needham, L K; Adler, R; Hewitt, A T

    1988-04-01

    Extracellular matrix and cell surface proteoglycans are thought to play important roles in neural development and regeneration. Central nervous system proteoglycans have been isolated and characterized from rat and sheep brain and from chick neural retina. An experimental advantage offered by the latter tissue is that it is avascular and can be isolated free of connective tissue and pigment epithelium. Therefore, proteoglycans synthesized by this tissue are derived exclusively from neural cells. However, it has not yet been determined whether neurons and photoreceptors contribute to proteoglycan synthesis or whether these molecules are largely glial in origin. In the present study we have addressed this question using cultures of chick neural retinal cells free of flat, glial-like cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of retinal neurons, photoreceptors, and undifferentiated, process-free round cells from 8-day embryonic chick neural retina were metabolically labeled in vitro using [35S]sulfate and [3H]glucosamine as precursors. Radiolabeled proteoglycans accumulated in the medium, and could also be extracted from the cell layer by sequential treatments with Triton X-100 and with guanidine HCl. The proteoglycans were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography, and characterized by gel filtration chromatography and by susceptibility to degradation by enzymatic and chemical treatments. Overall, heparan sulfate proteoglycans were the predominant type of proteoglycan synthesized in vitro by the cultured neural retinal cells at this developmental stage. The medium and the Triton extract contained different proportions of both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, while heparan sulfate was the only proteoglycan recovered from the guanidine extract. These studies demonstrate that heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are actively synthesized by cultures of neural retinal cells free of flat, glial-like cells.

  12. Giant Suppression of Photobleaching for Single Molecule Detection via the Purcell Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-18

    the molecule dissipates energy to emit another photon (spontaneous emission, or fluorescence, with rate kf) or to heat (intrinsic nonradiative process...enhancement gives rise to both enhanced radiation and enhanced nonradiation (energy dissipation due to Ohmic losses). The enhancement of

  13. Structure and properties of an under-sulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycan synthesized by a rat hepatoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A rat hepatoma cell line was shown to synthesize heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Unlike cultured hepatocytes, the hepatoma cells did not deposit these proteoglycans into an extracellular matrix, and most of the newly synthesized heparan sulfate proteoglycans were secreted into the culture medium. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans were also found associated with the cell surface. These proteoglycans could be solubilized by mild trypsin or detergent treatment of the cells but could not be displaced from the cells by incubation with heparin. The detergent-solubilized heparan sulfate proteoglycan had a hydrophobic segment that enabled it to bind to octyl- Sepharose. This segment could conceivably anchor the molecule in the lipid interior of the plasma membrane. The size of the hepatoma heparan sulfate proteoglycans was similar to that of proteoglycans isolated from rat liver microsomes or from primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel indicated that the hepatoma heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a lower average charge density than the rat liver heparan sulfate proteoglycans. The lower charge density of the hepatoma heparan sulfate can be largely attributed to a reduced number of N-sulfated glucosamine units in the polysaccharide chain compared with that of rat liver heparan sulfate. Hepatoma heparan sulfate proteoglycans purified from the culture medium had a considerably lower affinity for fibronectin-Sepharose compared with that of rat liver heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Furthermore, the hepatoma proteoglycan did not bind to the neoplastic cells, whereas heparan sulfate from normal rat liver bound to the hepatoma cells in a time-dependent reaction. The possible consequences of the reduced sulfation of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan produced by the hepatoma cells are discussed in terms of the postulated roles of heparan sulfate in the regulation of cell growth and extracellular matrix formation. PMID

  14. The Basement Membrane Proteoglycans Perlecan and Agrin: Something Old, Something New.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the proteoglycan family are integral components of basement membranes; other proteoglycan family members interact with or bind to molecular residents of the basement membrane. Proteoglycans are polyfunctional molecules, for they derive their inherent bioactivity from the amino acid motifs embedded in the core protein structure as well as the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that are covalently attached to the core protein. The presence of the covalently attached GAG chains significantly expands the "partnering" potential of proteoglycans, permitting them to interact with a broad spectrum of targets, including growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, and morphogens. Thus proteoglycans in the basement membrane are poised to exert diverse effects on the cells intimately associated with basement membranes.

  15. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process. PMID:26883278

  16. Electrophoresis of /sup 35/S-labeled proteoglycans of polyacrylamide-agarose composite gels and their visualization by fluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, S.L.; Bayliss, M.T.; Collier, J.M.; Muir, H.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for the electrophoresis of /sup 35/S-labeled proteoglycans on polyacrylamide-agarose gel slabs and subsequent fixation, impregnation, and fluorography of such electrophoretograms have been developed. The procedure permits the examination of newly synthesized proteoglycan subspecies using a rapid technique, previously unavailable for these labeled molecules.

  17. Self-Assembly of a Giant Tetrahedral 3 d-4 f Single-Molecule Magnet within a Polyoxometalate System.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Masooma; Mereacre, Valeriu; Leblanc, Nicolas; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2015-12-14

    A giant tetrahedral heterometallic polyoxometalate (POM) [Dy30 Co8 Ge12 W108 O408 (OH)42 (OH2 )30 ](56-) , which shows single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, is described. This hybrid contains the largest number of 4f ions of any polyoxometalate (POM) reported to date and is the first to incorporate two different 3d-4f and 4f coordination cluster assemblies within same POM framework.

  18. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and embryonic brain enlargement in the chick.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Pastor, J F; Represa, J J; Barbosa, E

    1993-07-01

    Previous studies of the early development of the neural tube have shown the existence of an intraneural fluid, which causes a positive pressure inside this primordium, and seems to play a key role in the early development of the central nervous system. In the present study we investigated the composition and synthesis of this intraneural fluid. By using a sequential method, which includes fixation with glutaraldehyde plus cetylpyridinium chloride, opening the neural cavity after critical point drying and scanning electron microscopy analysis, we found a water-soluble extracellular matrix that filled up the brain vesicles of chick embryos at the earliest stages of the neural tube. An ultrastructural study of the neural epithelium during these stages revealed the existence of a secretion process in the neural cells toward the apical side, the future neural cavity. An immunocytochemical study to assess the nature of the secreted material has shown that the intraneural matrix contains chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, which appeared homogeneously distributed throughout the neural cavity. Our findings demonstrate that the intraneural liquid is a fluid of complex composition and includes chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan as an osmotically active molecule. This suggests a morphogenetic role for the proteoglycan during early brain enlargement. The neural ectoderm is a polarized epithelium from early developmental stages and secretes the intraneural matrix.

  19. The collaggrecan: Synthesis and visualization of an artificial proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Raspanti, Mario; Caravà, Elena; Sgambato, Antonella; Natalello, Antonino; Russo, Laura; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-05-01

    An artificial aggrecan-like proteoglycan has been designed and synthesized in vitro. At variance with natural proteoglycans, whose glycosaminoglycan chains are always O-linked via a tetrasaccharide bridge to the serine residues of a specific protein core, the present structure consists of chondroitin-6-sulfate chains directly bound to the lysine and hydroxylysine residues of a collagen molecule backbone. The resulting macromolecule has been characterized by histochemistry, atomic force microscopy and FTIR. The number of variables involved (e.g., length and type of the collagen backbone, glycosaminoglycan species, sulfation type and pattern, molecular weight, number and length of side chains, etc.) makes possible to conceive an almost endless variety of artificial proteoglycans, each precisely tailored to a specific functional role. In addition to their use as biomaterials, glycated collagens interact with cells in complex ways and a previous study has already shown the ability of a glycated collagen to redirect fibroblastoma cells from proliferation to differentiation. The research is still underway.

  20. Giant increase in the metal-enhanced fluorescence of organic molecules in nanoporous alumina templates and large molecule-specific red/blue-shift of the fluorescence peak.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Kanchibotla, B; Nelson, J D; Edwards, J D; Anderson, J; Tepper, G C; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2014-10-08

    The fluorescence of organic fluorophore molecules is enhanced when they are placed in contact with certain metals (Al, Ag, Cu, Au, etc.) whose surface plasmon waves couple into the radiative modes of the molecules and increase the radiative efficiency. Here, we report a hitherto unknown size dependence of this metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect in the nanoscale. When the molecules are deposited in nanoporous anodic alumina films with exposed aluminum at the bottom of the pores, they form organic nanowires standing on aluminum nanoparticles whose plasmon waves have much larger amplitudes. This increases the MEF strongly, resulting in several orders of magnitude increase in the fluorescence intensity of the organic fluorophores. The increase in intensity shows an inverse superlinear dependence on nanowire diameter because the nanowires also act as plasmonic "waveguides" that concentrate the plasmons and increase the coupling of the plasmons with the radiative modes of the molecules. Furthermore, if the nanoporous template housing the nanowires has built-in electric fields due to space charges, a strong molecule-specific red- or blue-shift is induced in the fluorescence peak owing to a renormalization of the dipole moment of the molecule. This can be exploited to detect minute amounts of target molecules in a mixture using their optical signature (fluorescence) despite the presence of confounding background signals. It can result in a unique new technology for biosensing and chemical sensing.

  1. Electron-microscopic and electrophoretic studies of bovine femoral-head cartilage proteoglycan fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, D J; Nieduszynski, I A; Oates, K; Sheehan, J K

    1986-01-01

    Proteoglycans (A1D1) extracted from bovine femoral-head cartilage were examined by electron microscopy using benzyldimethylammonium chloride as a spreading agent. The preparation contained a mixture of particles, some with a 'beaded' structure and a contiguous filamentous 'tail' at one end and others which appeared as round 'blobs', some of which also had filamentous tails. Previous electron-microscopic studies of proteoglycan monomers have indicated that their length distributions were apparently unimodal, a finding that contrasted with agarose/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis results, which generally indicated two bands. In the present study proteoglycans isolated from the slowly migrating electrophoretic band were shown to be predominantly the larger molecules of beaded appearance, whereas the rapidly migrating proteoglycans were predominantly molecules with the 'blob-like' appearance. Gel-filtration, isopycnic-density-gradient-centrifugation and rate-zonal-centrifugation techniques were evaluated as means of proteoglycan fractionation by electron microscopy and agarose-gel electrophoresis. Rate-zonal centrifugation in mixed-salt gradients of caesium chloride/4 M-guanidinium chloride yielded the most effective fractionation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3827853

  2. Renal localization of heparan sulfate proteoglycan by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, D. J.; Oegema, T. R.; Eisenstein, R.; Furcht, L.; Michael, A. F.; Brown, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Glomerular localization of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS-proteoglycan) has been studied immunohistochemically with a highly purified antiserum to bovine aorta HS-proteoglycan core protein. The specificity of the antiserum was enhanced by consecutive fibronectin and chondroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan (CS-DS proteoglycan) affinity chromatography. The affinity-purified HS-proteoglycan antibody lacked cross-reactivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with CS-DS proteoglycan, fibronectin, laminin, and Type IV collagen. Reactivity of the antiserum with HS-proteoglycan antigen by ELISA was inhibited by HS core protein derived from CsCl density gradient centrifugation after heparinase treatment of the HS-proteoglycan. Immunofluorescent reactivity of the HS-proteoglycan antiserum was observed with bovine glomerular basement membrane, renal interstitium, Bowman's capsule, renal arterioles, and bovine aorta. No staining was seen with rat, mouse, or human glomeruli. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6222657

  3. From Soccer-Ball and Rugby-Ball to Giant Fullerene Molecules:. a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Sarid, Dror

    Thin films of carbon fullerene molecules, Cn, prepared on metallic substrates are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) under both ambient and ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The STM and AFM images provide real-space atomic-resolution views of these fascinating molecules and their monolayer growth on metal surfaces which reflect both the intermolecular interactions and interactions with the underlying substrates.

  4. Glomerular mesangial cells in vitro synthesize an aggregating proteoglycan immunologically related to versican.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G J; Bayliss, M T; Harper, K; Mason, R M; Davies, M

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mesangial cells derived from human adult glomeruli synthesize a number of 35S-labelled proteoglycans including a large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG), two dermatan sulphate proteoglycans (biglycan and decorin) and two heparan sulphate proteoglycans [Thomas, Mason and Davies (1991) Biochem. J. 277, 81-88]. In the present study we have examined the interaction of these proteoglycans with hyaluronan (HA) using associative gel chromatography. Only the large CSPG bound to HA, with 60% of those molecules in the medium and 80% of those in the cell layer being able to interact. Reduction and alkylation, or treatment of the monomer CSPG with proteinases, prevented the formation of aggregates, suggesting that the core protein was involved. The aggregates formed between purified CSPG and HA could be dissociated in the presence of HA-oligosaccharides of at least 10 monosaccharides in length. The inclusion of link protein with CSPG and HA promoted the formation of aggregates. Experiments with 3H-labelled mesangial-cell proteoglycans confirmed that only the large CSPG, with core protein molecular masses of 400 kDa and 500 kDa, interacted with HA. After chondroitin ABC lyase treatment of CSPG isolated from conditioned culture medium, several bands similar to those observed with 3H-labelled core proteins were identified using a polyclonal antiserum that recognizes versican. A monoclonal antibody recognizing the 1-C-6 epitope in the G1 and G2 globular regions of aggrecan did not recognize either mesangial-cell CSPG or bovine aortic versican. Northern-blot analysis confirmed that human mesangial cells express versican. Thus human mesangial large CSPG is a member of the versican family of proteoglycans. The interaction of CSPG and HA within the glomerulus may be important in glomerular cell migration and proliferation. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8068022

  5. Viscoelasticity of Concentrated Proteoglycan Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meechai, Nispa; Jamieson, Alex; Blackwell, John; Carrino, David

    2001-03-01

    Proteoglycan Aggregate (PGA) is the principal macromolecular component of the energy-absorbing matrix of cartilage and tendon. Its brush-like supramolecular structure consists of highly-ionic subunits, non-covalently bound to a hyaluronate chain. We report viscoelastic behavior of concentrated solutions of PGA, purified by column fractionation to remove free subunits. At physiological ionic strength, these preparations exhibit a sol-to-gel transition when the concentration is increased above molecular overlap. The strain dependence of concentrated solutions shows a pronounced non-linearity above a critical strain, at which the storage modulus decreases suddenly, and the loss modulus exhibits a maximum. This response is similar to that observed for close-packed dispersions of soft spheres, when the applied strain is sufficient to move a sphere past its neighbors. At low and high ionic strength, the elasticity of solutions near the overlap concentration decreases. The former is interpreted as due to a decrease in intramolecular and intermolecular electrostatic repulsions, because of strong trapping of counterions within the PGA brush, the latter to salt-induced brush collapse.

  6. Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Maytin, Edward V.; Mack, Judith A.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Atanelishvili, Ilia; Moreno Rodriguez, Ricardo; Markwald, Roger R.; Misra, Suniti

    2015-01-01

    A wound is a type of injury that damages living tissues. In this review, we will be referring mainly to healing responses in the organs including skin and the lungs. Fibrosis is a process of dysregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) production that leads to a dense and functionally abnormal connective tissue compartment (dermis). In tissues such as the skin, the repair of the dermis after wounding requires not only the fibroblasts that produce the ECM molecules, but also the overlying epithelial layer (keratinocytes), the endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel and white blood cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, which together orchestrate the cytokine-mediated signaling and paracrine interactions that are required to regulate the proper extent and timing of the repair process. This review will focus on the importance of extracellular molecules in the microenvironment, primarily the proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and their roles in wound healing. First, we will briefly summarize the physiological, cellular, and biochemical elements of wound healing, including the importance of cytokine cross-talk between cell types. Second, we will discuss the role of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in regulating these processes. Finally, approaches that utilize these concepts as potential therapies for fibrosis are discussed. PMID:26448760

  7. Characterization of proteoglycans synthesized by human adult glomerular mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G J; Mason, R M; Davies, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The newly synthesized proteoglycans from human adult glomerular mesangial cells labelled in vitro for 24 h with [35S]sulphate have been characterized using biochemical and immunological techniques. 2. The following proteoglycans were identified (% of total synthesized). (i) A large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, CSPG-I, Mr approximately 1 x 10(6) (10.6%). This proteoglycan consisted of a protein core of Mr approximately 4 x 10(5) and glycosaminoglycan chains of Mr 2.5 x 10(4), and was present in both the cell layer and the culture medium. (ii) A major small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan, DSPG-I, Mr 3.5 x 10(5) (46%), which was mainly located in the culture medium. (iii) A second minor small dermatan sulphate, DSPG-II, Mr approximately 2 x 10(5) (9.8%). This molecule was exclusively located in the culture medium. (iv) A large heparan sulphate proteoglycan, HSPG-I, Mr 8 x 10(5) (3.3%). (v) A second large heparan sulphate proteoglycan HSPG-II, Mr approximately 6 x 10(5) (23%). HSPG-I and HSPG-II were extracted from both the culture medium and the cell layer. 3. Western blot analysis of the core proteins released by chondroitin ABC lyase treatment of DSPG-I and DSPG-II identified these dermatan sulphate proteoglycans as biglycan and decorin respectively. Both DSPG-I and DSPG-II had core proteins of Mr 45,000. 4. The cell-layer-associated forms of CSPG-I, HSPG-I and HSPG-II were accessible to limited trypsin treatment, bound to octyl-Sepharose and could be inserted into liposomes, indicating a possible cell membrane location. 5. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the cell-layer-associated [35S]proteoglycans undergo limited metabolism to inorganic [35S]sulphate, the majority of which is accounted for by the degradation of HSPG-II and to a lesser extent DSPG-I. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1854350

  8. Corneal proteoglycan changes under vitamin A deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Twining, S.S.; Wilson, P.M.

    1986-05-01

    The vitamin A-deficient keratinized cornea is very susceptible to ulceration possibly due to altered stromal components. In this study the proteoglycans present in the corneal stroma of vitamin A-deficient, pair-fed and normal rabbits were compared. Rabbits after weaning were placed on a vitamin A deficient diet, the same diet with retinyl palmitate added (pair-fed) or normal rabbit chow. After 5 months, the corneas of the vitamin A-deficient animals became keratinized. The corneal components were then labeled by injection of /sup 3/H-leucine and Na/sup 35/SO/sub 4/ into the anterior chamber of the eyes on 3 successive days. On the 4th day the animals were sacrificed the corneas removed and dissected. The labeled corneal stromas were extracted with 4 M GuHCl and the components separated on a DEAE-Sepharose column. The proteoglycans were eluted with 0.5 M and 1.0 M NaCl. The 1.0 M NaCl fraction (mainly keratin sulfate proteoglycans) was increased 25% in the vitamin A-deficient corneas over that for the pair-fed and normal corneas. These proteoglycans from the deficient corneas gave a different elution pattern on Octyl-Sepharose eluted with a Triton X-100 gradient than those from the pair-fed corneas. The total labeled proteoglycans were similar in the stromas from the 3 types of rabbits. These results indicate the various corneal proteoglycan ratios differ under vitamin A deficiency conditions.

  9. Characterization of proteoglycans associated with mouse splenic AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Stenstad, T; Magnus, J H; Husby, G

    1994-01-01

    We here report for the first time on the chemical characteristics of proteoglycans associated with mouse splenic reactive AA amyloid. Amyloid was induced in CBA/J mice by two different procedures; conventional casein treatment and by employing Freund's complete adjuvant, accelerated by Trypan Blue. Pulse-labelling was employed at distinct stages during amyloid development, followed by [35S]proteoglycan characterization of organ extracts. Repetitive 35S injections were also administered during the phase where amyloid deposition occurred most rapidly. Proteoglycans were extracted with guanidine in the presence of protease inhibitors and purified. The results showed that the production of proteoglycans is dramatically enhanced during amyloidogenesis, the glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan accumulation being not only dependent on alterations in proteoglycan catabolism, but rather on increased synthesis. The increment could be demonstrated even at the stage before microscopic detection of amyloid deposits, clearly suggesting that the upregulation of proteoglycan expression precedes amyloid fibril formation. Two major proteoglycans were found to accumulate in advanced splenic amyloid; one a heparan sulphate proteoglycan of approx. 200 kDa with a core protein of 70 kDa, the other a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of smaller size. Moreover, free dermatan sulphate chains seemed to specifically accumulate in the organs during amyloid fibrillogenesis. We suggest that free glycosaminoglycans may be a specific feature of amyloidosis and that different proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans play a role in formation and stabilization of amyloid fibrils in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:7980430

  10. Study of Large Multimeric Biomolecules by Single-Molecule Manipulation and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Kai; Wijeratne, Sitara S.; Martinez, Jerahme; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Moake, Joel; Dong, Jing-Fei; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2012-02-01

    Single-molecule manipulation enables us to study the properties of long chain, multimeric biomolecules. Perlecan, a giant secreted heparin sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of basement membrane, bone stroma and blood vessels. It is involved in processes such as cell adhesion, migration and modulation of apoptosis. The changes in its synthesis and function are closely associated with many diseases, including cancer. Von Willebrand factor is a large multimeric protein circulating in blood, and is crucial for initiation of blood coagulation. We use atomic force microscope to obtain force curves and images of these proteins. We characterized the mechanical property of perlecan as well as the domain conformational changes of von Willebrand factor. The results demonstrate that single-molecule manipulation can probe directly the dynamics of large biomolecules that are usually not accessible with other methods.

  11. Role of proteoglycans in the regulation of the skeletal muscle fibrotic response.

    PubMed

    Brandan, Enrique; Gutierrez, Jaime

    2013-09-01

    Myogenesis consists of a highly organized and regulated sequence of cellular processes aimed at forming or repairing muscle tissue. Several processes occur during myogenesis, including cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Cytokines, proteinases, cell adhesion molecules and growth factors are involved, either activating or inhibiting these events, and are modulated by a group of molecules called proteoglycans (PGs), which play critical roles in skeletal muscle physiology. Particularly interesting are some of the factors responsible for the fibrotic response associated with skeletal muscular dystrophies. Transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor have gained great attention as factors participating in the fibrotic response in skeletal muscle. This review is focused on the advances achieved in understanding the roles of proteoglycans as modulators of profibrotic growth factors in fibrosis associated with diseases such as skeletal muscle dystrophies.

  12. Utilization of Glycosaminoglycans/Proteoglycans as Carriers for Targeted Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Suniti; Hascall, Vincent C.; Atanelishvili, Ilia; Moreno Rodriguez, Ricardo; Markwald, Roger R.; Ghatak, Shibnath

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with cancer has improved significantly in the past decade with the incorporation of drugs targeting cell surface adhesive receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, and modulation of several molecules of extracellular matrices (ECMs), the complex composite of collagens, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans that dictates tissue architecture. Cancer tissue invasive processes progress by various oncogenic strategies, including interfering with ECM molecules and their interactions with invasive cells. In this review, we describe how the ECM components, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, influence tumor cell signaling. In particular this review describes how the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) and its major receptor CD44 impact invasive behavior of tumor cells, and provides useful insight when designing new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26448753

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induces cellular polarization, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 redistribution, and multinucleated giant cell generation in human primary monocytes but not in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fais, S; Borghi, P; Gherardi, G; Logozzi, M; Belardelli, F; Gessani, S

    1996-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on some morphologic and functional changes in cultured human monocytes/macrophages at different stages of differentiation. Freshly isolated monocytes infected with HIV-1 24 hours after seeding exhibited marked morphologic changes such as uropod formation, polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the cytoplasmic projection, the redistribution of alpha-actinin on cell-membrane dots, and an increased release of soluble ICAM-1. These changes preceded the increase in monocyte-monocyte fusion and the formation of multinucleated giant cells. In contrast, HIV-1 infection did not affect monocyte-derived macrophages in terms of either cellular polarization or multinucleated giant cell formation. Immunocytochemistry showed that HIV-1 matrix protein was present mostly in bi- and trinucleated cells, which suggests that multinucleated giant cells may represent a long-lived and highly productive cellular source of HIV. The treatment of the HIV-1-infected monocytes with azidodeoxythymidine virtually abolished all viral-induced morphofunctional changes. On the whole, these results indicate that blood monocytes and differentiated macrophages may be affected differently by HIV infection, as monocytes seem to be much more prone to polarize, undergo homotypic fusion, and form multinucleated giant cells. These changes may confer to HIV-infected monocytes an increased ability to transmigrate through endothelia into tissues, whereas differentiated macrophages may have a predominant role as a widespread reservoir of HIV.

  14. Bone Proteoglycan Changes During Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Uzawa, K.; Pornprasertsuk, S.; Arnaud, S.; Grindeland, R.; Grzesik, W.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal adaptability to mechanical loads is well known since the last century. Disuse osteopenia due to the microgravity environment is one of the major concerns for space travelers. Several studies have indicated that a retardation of the mineralization process and a delay in matrix maturation occur during the space flight. Mineralizing fibrillar type I collagen possesses distinct cross-linking chemistries and their dynamic changes during mineralization correlate well with its function as a mineral organizer. Our previous studies suggested that a certain group of matrix proteoglycans in bone play an inhibitory role in the mineralization process through their interaction with collagen. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the altered mineralization during spaceflight is due in part to changes in matrix components secreted by cells in response to microgravity. In this study, we employed hindlimb elevation (tail suspension) rat model to study the effects of skeletal unloading on matrix proteoglycans in bone.

  15. Type I collagen reduces the degradation of basal lamina proteoglycan by mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    When mouse mammary epithelial cells are cultured on a plastic substratum, no basal lamina forms. When cultured on a type I collagen gel, the rate of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis is unchanged, but the rate of GAG degradation is markedly reduced and a GAG-rich, basal lamina-like structure accumulates. This effect of collagen was investigated by comparing the culture distribution, nature, and metabolic stability of the 35S-GAG-containing molecules produced by cells on plastic and collagen. During 48 h of labeling with 35SO4, cultures on collagen accumulate 1.4-fold more 35S-GAG per microgram of DNA. In these cultures, most of the extracellular 35S-GAG is immobilized with the lamina and collagen gel, whereas in cultures on plastic all extracellular 35S-GAG is soluble. On both substrata, the cells produce several heparan sulfate-rich 35S-proteoglycan fractions that are distinct by Sepharose CL-4B chromatography. The culture types contain similar amounts of each fraction, except that collagen cultures contain nearly four times more of a fraction that is found largely bound to the lamina and collagen gel. During a chase this proteoglycan fraction is stable in cultures on collagen, but is extensively degraded in cultures on plastic. Thus, collagen-induced formation of a basal lamina correlates with reduced degradation and enhanced accumulation of a specific heparan sulfate-rich proteoglycan fraction. Immobilization and stabilization of basal laminar proteoglycan(s) by interstitial collagen may be a physiological mechanism of basal lamina maintenance and assembly. PMID:7298723

  16. Proteoglycans as potential microenvironmental biomarkers for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Aidagulova, Svetlana V; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2015-09-01

    Glycosylation changes occur widely in colon tumours, suggesting glycosylated molecules as potential biomarkers for colon cancer diagnostics. In this study, proteoglycans (PGs) expression levels and their transcriptional patterns are investigated in human colon tumours in vivo and carcinoma cells in vitro. According to RT-PCR analysis, normal and cancer colon tissues expressed a specific set of PGs (syndecan-1, perlecan, decorin, biglycan, versican, NG2/CSPG4, serglycin, lumican, CD44), while the expression of glypican-1, brevican and aggrecan was almost undetectable. Overall transcriptional activity of the PGs in normal and cancer tissues was similar, although expression patterns were different. Expression of decorin and perlecan was down-regulated 2-fold in colon tumours, while biglycan and versican expression was significantly up-regulated (6-fold and 3-fold, respectively). Expression of collagen1A1 was also increased 6-fold in colon tumours. However, conventional HCT-116 colon carcinoma and AG2 colon cancer-initiating cells did not express biglycan and decorin and were versican-positive and -negative, respectively, demonstrating an extracellular origin of the PGs in cancer tissue. Selective expression of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans syndecan-1 and perlecan in the AG2 colon cancer-initiating cell line suggests these PGs as potential biomarkers for cancer stem cells. Overall transcriptional activity of the HS biosynthetic system was similar in normal and cancer tissues, although significant up-regulation of extracellular sulfatases SULF1/2 argues for a possible distortion of HS sulfation patterns in colon tumours. Taken together, the obtained results suggest versican, biglycan, collagen1A1 and SULF1/2 expression as potential microenvironmental biomarkers and/or targets for colon cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  17. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R L; Fox, C C; Lichtenstein, L M; Austen, K F

    1988-01-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of 35S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although [35S]heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. We here demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate [35S] sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an approximately equal to 2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin [35S]sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin [35S]sulfate E proteoglycans and the [35S]heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the [35S]sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of 35S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells. PMID:3353378

  18. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F. ); Fox, C.C.; Lichtenstein, L.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. The authors demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate ({sup 35}S)sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an {approx}2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate E proteoglycans and the ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the ({sup 35}S)sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells.

  19. Plasma-membrane-intercalated heparan sulphate proteoglycans in an osteogenic cell line (UMR 106-01 BSP).

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, D J; Midura, R J; Hascall, V C; Yanagishita, M

    1992-01-01

    The heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycans associated with the cell layer of a rat osteosarcoma cell line [UMR 106-01 (BSP)] were compared with similar cell-associated proteoglycans from other cells, and their interaction with the plasma membrane was studied. HS proteoglycans were metabolically labelled by incubation of cell cultures with [3H]glucosamine or [3H]leucine and [35S]sulphate. HS proteoglycan core protein preparation generated by heparitinase digestion of the major species from UMR 106-01 (BSP) cells co-migrated on PAGE with identical preparations from ovarian granulosa cells and parathyroid cells (at approximately 70 kDa). The hydrophobic nature of the major HS proteoglycans from these diverse cell lines, based on elution position from octyl-Sepharose, were also comparable. Linkages of the HS proteoglycan to the cell membrane were investigated by labelling plasma-membrane preparations with a lipid soluble photoactivatable reagent, 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3- (m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine (TID), which selectively labels plasma-membrane-spanning peptide domains. Purified HS proteoglycan from UMR 106-01 (BSP) cells was shown to be accessible to the [125I]TID, and the core protein portion of the molecule was labelled, confirming its close association with the plasma membrane. Approx. 36% of 35S-labelled HS proteoglycans were released from the cell surface by phospholipase C (Bacillus thuringiensis), which specifically cleaves phosphatidylinositol-linked proteins. In the presence of insulin, the metabolism of the phospholipase C-sensitive population was unaltered; however, release of the phospholipase C-insensitive population into the medium was increased. These data indicate that a subpopulation of HS proteoglycans are covalently bound to the plasma membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure, with the remainder representing those species directly inserted into the plasma membrane via a hydrophobic peptide domain. These observations are similar to those

  20. Targeting phosphatase-dependent proteoglycan switch for rheumatoid arthritis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doody, Karen M.; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Svensson, Mattias N. D.; Coles, Charlotte H.; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Kiosses, William B.; Bartok, Beatrix; Fos, Camille; Cory, Esther; Sah, Robert L.; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Boyle, David L.; Arnett, Heather A.; Mustelin, Tomas; Corr, Maripat; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Firestein, Gary S.; Aricescu, A. Radu; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of several therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that target the immune system, a large number of RA patients fail to achieve remission. Joint-lining cells, called fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), become activated during RA and mediate joint inflammation and destruction of cartilage and bone. We identify RPTPσ, a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, as a therapeutic target for FLS-directed therapy. RPTPσ is reciprocally regulated by interactions with chondroitin sulfate or heparan sulfate containing extracellular proteoglycans in a mechanism called the proteoglycan switch. We show that the proteoglycan switch regulates FLS function. Incubation of FLS with a proteoglycan-binding RPTPσ decoy protein inhibited cell invasiveness and attachment to cartilage by disrupting a constitutive interaction between RPTPσ and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4. RPTPσ mediated the effect of proteoglycans on FLS signaling by regulating the phosphorylation and cytoskeletal localization of ezrin. Furthermore, administration of the RPTPσ decoy protein ameliorated in vivo human FLS invasiveness and arthritis severity in the K/BxN serum transfer model of RA. Our data demonstrate that FLS are regulated by an RPTPσ-dependent proteoglycan switch in vivo, which can be targeted for RA therapy. We envision that therapies targeting the proteoglycan switch or its intracellular pathway in FLS could be effective as a monotherapy or in combination with currently available immune-targeted agents to improve control of disease activity in RA patients. PMID:25995222

  1. Targeting phosphatase-dependent proteoglycan switch for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Doody, Karen M; Stanford, Stephanie M; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Svensson, Mattias N D; Coles, Charlotte H; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Kiosses, William B; Bartok, Beatrix; Fos, Camille; Cory, Esther; Sah, Robert L; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Boyle, David L; Arnett, Heather A; Mustelin, Tomas; Corr, Maripat; Esko, Jeffrey D; Tremblay, Michel L; Firestein, Gary S; Aricescu, A Radu; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-05-20

    Despite the availability of several therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that target the immune system, a large number of RA patients fail to achieve remission. Joint-lining cells, called fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), become activated during RA and mediate joint inflammation and destruction of cartilage and bone. We identify RPTPσ, a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, as a therapeutic target for FLS-directed therapy. RPTPσ is reciprocally regulated by interactions with chondroitin sulfate or heparan sulfate containing extracellular proteoglycans in a mechanism called the proteoglycan switch. We show that the proteoglycan switch regulates FLS function. Incubation of FLS with a proteoglycan-binding RPTPσ decoy protein inhibited cell invasiveness and attachment to cartilage by disrupting a constitutive interaction between RPTPσ and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4. RPTPσ mediated the effect of proteoglycans on FLS signaling by regulating the phosphorylation and cytoskeletal localization of ezrin. Furthermore, administration of the RPTPσ decoy protein ameliorated in vivo human FLS invasiveness and arthritis severity in the K/BxN serum transfer model of RA. Our data demonstrate that FLS are regulated by an RPTPσ-dependent proteoglycan switch in vivo, which can be targeted for RA therapy. We envision that therapies targeting the proteoglycan switch or its intracellular pathway in FLS could be effective as a monotherapy or in combination with currently available immune-targeted agents to improve control of disease activity in RA patients.

  2. Proteoglycan interactions with Sonic Hedgehog specify mitogenic responses

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Balasubramanian, Srividya; Witt, Rochelle M.; Nazemi, Kellie J.; Choi, Yoojin; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Walsh, Carolyn O.; Thompson, Margaret; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) has dual roles in vertebrate development, as it promotes progenitor cell proliferation and induces tissue patterning. Here we show mitogenic and patterning functions of Shh can be uncoupled from one another. Using a genetic approach to selectively inhibit Shh-proteoglycan interactions in a mouse model, we show binding of Shh to proteoglycans is required for proliferation of neural stem/precursor cells but not for tissue patterning. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulate both spatial and temporal features of Shh signaling. Proteoglycans localize Shh to specialized mitogenic niches and also act at the single cell level to regulate the duration of Shh signaling, thereby promoting a gene expression program important for cell division. As activation of the Shh pathway is a feature of diverse human cancers, selective stimulation of proliferation by Shh-proteoglycan interactions may also figure prominently in neoplastic growth. PMID:19287388

  3. Proteoglycan interactions with Sonic Hedgehog specify mitogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jennifer A; Balasubramanian, Srividya; Witt, Rochelle M; Nazemi, Kellie J; Choi, Yoojin; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Walsh, Carolyn O; Thompson, Margaret; Segal, Rosalind A

    2009-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) has dual roles in vertebrate development, promoting progenitor cell proliferation and inducing tissue patterning. We found that the mitogenic and patterning functions of Shh can be uncoupled from one another. Using a genetic approach to selectively inhibit Shh-proteoglycan interactions in a mouse model, we found that binding of Shh to proteoglycans was required for proliferation of neural stem/precursor cells, but not for tissue patterning. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulated both spatial and temporal features of Shh signaling. Proteoglycans localized Shh to specialized mitogenic niches and also acted at the single-cell level to regulate the duration of Shh signaling, thereby promoting a gene expression program that is important for cell division. Because activation of the Shh pathway is a feature of diverse human cancers, selective stimulation of proliferation by Shh-proteoglycan interactions may also figure prominently in neoplastic growth.

  4. Purification and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycan from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y; Yu, G; Gunay, N S; Linhardt, R J

    1999-01-01

    A heparan sulphate proteoglycan was purified from adult bovine brain tissues and its structure was characterized. The major heparan sulphate proteoglycan from whole bovine brain had a molecular mass of >200 kDa on denaturing SDS/PAGE and a core protein size of 66 kDa following the removal of glycosaminoglycan chains. Fractionation on DEAE-Sephacel showed that this proteoglycan consisted of three major forms having high, intermediate and low overall charge. All core proteins were identical in size and reacted with heparan sulphate proteoglycan-stub antibody and an antibody made to a synthetic peptide based on rat glypican. The three forms of proteoglycans had identical peptide maps and their amino acid compositional analysis did not match any of the known glypicans. The internal sequence of a major peptide showed only 37.5% sequence similarity with human glypican 5. The glycosaminoglycan chain sizes of the three forms of this proteoglycan, determined after beta-elimination by PAGE, were identical. The disaccharide compositional analysis on the heparan sulphate chains from the three forms of the proteoglycan, determined by treatment with a mixture of heparin lyases followed by high-resolution capillary electrophoresis, showed that they differed primarily by degree of sulphation. The most highly sulphated proteoglycan isolated had a disaccharide composition similar to heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans found in brain tissue. Based on their sensitivity to low pH nitrous acid treatment, the N-sulphate groups in these proteoglycans were found to be primarily in the smaller glycosaminoglycan chains. The heparan sulphate proteoglycans were also heavily glycosylated with O-linked glycans and no glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor could be detected. PMID:10585858

  5. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and derived peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C.; Krueger, R.C.; Schwartz, N.B. )

    1990-01-30

    In order to define the domain structure of proteoglycans as well as identify primary amino acid sequences specific for attachment of the various carbohydrate substituents, reliable techniques for deglycosylating proteoglycans are required. In this study, deglycosylation of cartilage chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) with minimal core protein cleavage was accomplished by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and keratanase, followed by treatment with anhydrous HF in pyridine. Nearly complete deglycosylation of secreted proteoglycan was verified within 45 min of HF treatment by loss of incorporated ({sup 3}H)glucosamine label from the proteoglycan as a function of time of treatment, as well as by direct analysis of carbohydrate content and xylosyltransferase acceptor activity of unlabeled core protein preparations. The deglycosylated CSPG preparations were homogeneous and of high molecular weight. Comparison of the intact deglycosylated core protein preparations with newly synthesized unprocessed precursors suggested that extensive proteolytic cleavage of the core protein did not occur during normal intracellular processing. Furthermore, peptide patterns generated after clostripain digestion of core protein precursor and of deglycosylated secreted proteoglycan were comparable. With the use of the clostripain digestion procedure, peptides were produced from unlabeled proteoglycan, and two predominant peptides from the most highly glycosylated regions were isolated, characterized, and deglycosylated. These peptides were found to follow similar kinetics of deglycosylation and to acquire xylose activity comparable to the intact core protein.

  6. Role of skeletal muscle proteoglycans during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brandan, Enrique; Gutierrez, Jaime

    2013-08-08

    Skeletal muscle formation during development and the adult mammal consists of a highly organised and regulated the sequence of cellular processes intending to form or repair muscle tissue. This sequence includes, cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Proteoglycans (PGs), macromolecules formed by a core protein and glycosaminoglycan chains (GAGs) present a great diversity of functions explained by their capacity to interact with different ligands and receptors forming part of their signalling complex and/or protecting them from proteolytic cleavage. Particularly attractive is the function of the different types of PGs present at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This review is focussed on the advances reached to understand the role of PGs during myogenesis and skeletal muscular dystrophies.

  7. Fate of a giant {Mo72Fe30}-type polyoxometalate cluster in an aqueous solution at higher temperature: understanding related Keplerate chemistry, from molecule to material.

    PubMed

    Mekala, Raju; Supriya, Sabbani; Das, Samar K

    2013-09-03

    When the giant icosahedral {Mo72Fe30} cluster containing compound [Mo72Fe30O252(CH3COO)12{Mo2O7(H2O)}2{H2Mo2O8(H2O)}(H2O)91]·150H2O (1) is refluxed in water for 36 h, it results in the formation of nanoiron molybdate, Fe2(MoO4)3, in the form of a yellow precipitate; this simple approach not only generates nanoferric molybdate at a moderate temperature but also helps to understand the stability of {Mo72Fe30} in terms of the linker-pentagon complementary relationship.

  8. Interaction of the NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan with type VI collagen

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is a membrane-associated molecule of approximately 500 kD with a core glycoprotein of 300 kD. Both the complete proteoglycan and a smaller quantity of the 300-kD core are immunoprecipitable with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against purified NG2. From some cell lines, the antibodies coprecipitate NG2 and type VI collagen, the latter appearing on SDS- PAGE as components of 140 and 250 kD under reducing conditions. The immunoprecipitation of type VI collagen does not seem to be due to recognition of the collagen by the antibodies, but rather to binding of the collagen to NG2. Studies on the NG2-type VI collagen complex suggest that binding between the two molecules is mediated by protein- protein interactions rather than by ionic interactions involving the glycosaminoglycans. Immunofluorescence double labeling in frozen sections of embryonic rat shows that NG2 and type VI collagen are colocalized in structures such as the intervertebral discs and arteries of the spinal column. In vitro the two molecules are highly colocalized on the surface of several cell lines. Treatment of these cells resulting in a change in the distribution of NG2 on the cell surface also causes a parallel change in type VI collagen distribution. Our results suggest that cell surface NG2 may mediate cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix by binding to type VI collagen. PMID:2269670

  9. Proteoglycans and their heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans at the atomic scale

    PubMed Central

    Sattelle, Benedict M.; Shakeri, Javad; Cliff, Matthew J.; Almond, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycan spatiotemporal organization underpins extracellular matrix biology but atomic scale glimpses of this microarchitecture are obscured by glycosaminoglycan size and complexity. To overcome this, multi-microsecond aqueous simulations of chondroitin and dermatan sulfates were abstracted into a prior coarse-grained model, which was extended to heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans and small leucine-rich proteoglycans. Exploration of relationships between sequence and shape led to hypotheses that proteoglycan size is dependent on glycosaminoglycan unit composition but independent of sequence permutation. Uronic acid conformational equilibria were modulated by adjacent hexosamine sulfonation and iduronic acid increased glycosaminoglycan chain volume and rigidity, while glucuronic acid imparted chain plasticity. Consequently, block copolymeric glycosaminoglycans contained microarchitectures capable of multivalent binding to growth factors and collagen, with potential for interactional synergy at greater chain number. The described atomic scale views of proteoglycans and heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans provide structural routes to understanding their fundamental signaling and mechanical biological roles and development of new biomaterials. PMID:25645947

  10. Immunolocalization of a 110 kD molecule and a 150 kD molecule in rat incisor and mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Chardin, H; Septier, D; Goldberg, M

    1991-03-01

    In the present study, antibodies against rat dental proteoglycans were used to characterize and localize the proteoglycans in rat incisor and mandibular tissues. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against a CPC-precipitated fraction of a sulfated dental extract. In unpurified dental extract these antibodies recognized two molecules of 110 kD and 150 kD. The 150 kD molecule was susceptible to chondroitinase ABC digestion but the 110 kD molecule resisted this enzymatic degradation. Immunocytochemically these two molecules were seen to be located in the pulp, the enamel organ and the mandibular bone. In each tissue only the periphery of the cells was stained and not the intracellular compartment. In the mineralized area of bone, dentin and forming enamel no staining was seen. These results indicate common epitopes in the proteoglycans from pulp, predentin, enamel organ and bone. Some differences were found in the nature of tooth and bone proteoglycans.

  11. Chemical Tumor Biology of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play vital roles in every step of tumor progression allowing cancer cells to proliferate, escape from immune response, invade neighboring tissues, and metastasize to distal sites away from the primary site. Several cancers including breast, lung, brain, pancreatic, skin, and colorectal cancers show aberrant modulation of several key HS biosynthetic enzymes such as 3-O Sulfotransferase and 6-O Sulfotransferase, and also catabolic enzymes such as HSulf-1, HSulf-2 and heparanase. The resulting tumor specific HS fine structures assist cancer cells to breakdown ECM to spread, misregulate signaling pathways to facilitate their proliferation, promote angiogenesis to receive nutrients, and protect themselves against natural killer cells. This review focuses on the changes in the expression of HS biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes in several cancers, the resulting changes in HS fine structures, and the effects of these tumor specific HS signatures on promoting invasion, proliferation, and metastasis. It is possible to retard tumor progression by modulating the deregulated biosynthetic and catabolic pathways of HS chains through novel chemical biology approaches. PMID:20596243

  12. Xylosylated-proteoglycan-induced Golgi alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Y S; Rosenzweig, L J; Jakubowski, M L

    1986-01-01

    The effect of p-nitrophenyl beta-D-xylopyranoside on the Golgi apparatus and proteoglycans (PG) of the renal glomerulus was investigated in an isolated kidney organ perfusion system and monitored by utilizing [35S]sulfate as the PG precursor. By electron microscopy, a selective intracytoplasmic vesiculization of Golgi apparatus of visceral epithelium was observed in the beta-xyloside-treated kidneys. Electron microscopic autoradiography revealed most grains localized to the intracytoplasmic Golgi-derived vesicles, while very few grains were associated with the extracellular matrix membranes. Biochemically, a 2.3-fold increase in cellular matrix and a reduction by a factor of 1.7 in extracellular matrix of [35S]sulfate incorporation was observed. Besides a larger macromolecular form (Kavg = 0.25; Mr = 130,000), lower molecular weight PGs were recovered in the cellular (Kavg = 0.46, Mr = 30,000) and matrical (Kavg = 0.42, Mr = 45,000) compartments after xyloside treatment. The xyloside treatment increased the incorporated radioactivity, mostly included in free glycosaminoglycans and small PGs, in the media fraction by 3.8-fold. These data indicate that xyloside induces a dramatic imbalance in the de novo-synthesized PGs of cellular and extracellular compartments and that cellular accumulation of xylosylated (sulfated) PGs selectively alters the Golgi apparatus of the glomerular epithelial cell, the cell that actively synthesizes PGs. Images PMID:3462708

  13. Antithetic roles of proteoglycans in cancer.

    PubMed

    Garusi, Elena; Rossi, Silvia; Perris, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs), a family of complex post-translationally sculptured macromolecules, are fundamental regulators of most normal and aberrant cellular functions. The unparalleled structural-functional diversity of PGs endows them with the ability to serve as critical mediators of the tumor cells' interaction with the host microenvironment, while directly contributing to the organization and dynamic remodeling of this milieu. Despite their indisputable importance during embryonic development and in the adult organism, and their frequent dysregulation in tumor lesions, their precise involvement in tumorigenesis awaits a more decisive demonstration. Particularly challenging is to ascertain to what extent selected PGs may catalyze tumor progression and to what extent they may inhibit it, implying antithetic functions of individual PGs. Integrated efforts are needed to consolidate the routine use of PGs in the clinical monitoring of cancer patients and to broaden the exploitation of these macromolecules as therapeutic targets. Several PGs have the required attributes to be contemplated as effective antigens for immunotherapeutic approaches, while the tangible results obtained in recent clinical trials targeting the NG2/CSPG4 transmembrane PG urge further development of PG-based cancer treatment modalities.

  14. Degradation of heparin proteoglycan in cultured mouse mastocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsson, K G; Lindahl, U

    1987-01-01

    Pulse-labelling of mouse mastocytoma cell cultures, established from ascites fluid, with inorganic [35S]sulphate for 1 h yielded labelled heparin proteoglycan containing polysaccharide chains of Mr 60,000-100,000. After chase incubation for 24 h most of the 35S appeared in intracellular polysaccharide fragments similar in size to commercially available heparin, Mr 5000-25,000, as indicated by gel chromatography. Products isolated from cultures after 6 h of chase incubation consisted of partially degraded free polysaccharide chains and, in addition, residual proteoglycans that were of smaller size than the proteoglycans initially pulse-labelled. The polysaccharide chains released by alkali treatment from the residual chase-incubated proteoglycans were of the same size as the chains derived from proteoglycans after 1 h of pulse labelling. These results suggest that the intracellular degradation of heparin proteoglycan to polysaccharide fragments is initiated by release of intact polysaccharide chains, probably by action of a peptidase, and is pursued through cleavage of these chains by an endoglycosidase. An endoglucuronidase with stringent substrate specificity [Thunberg, Bäckström, Wasteson, Ogren & Lindahl (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 10278-10282] has previously been implicated in the latter step. Cultures of more purified mastocytoma cells (essentially devoid of macrophages) did not metabolize [35S]heparin proteoglycan to polysaccharide fragments, but instead accumulated free intact polysaccharide chains, i.e. the postulated intermediate of the complete degradation pathway. When such purified cells were co-cultured with adherent mouse peritoneal cells, presumably macrophages, formation of polysaccharide fragments was observed. It is tentatively proposed that the expression of endoglucuronidase activity by the mast cells depends on collaboration between these cells and macrophages. PMID:3120695

  15. Role of proteoglycans in the onset of calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Tellone, C.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to inquire if the presence or absence of proteoglycans or their chemical subunits had a direct effect on the onset of calcification. High density spot cultures of limb bud mesenchyme obtained from mouse embryos on the 12th day of gestation were exposed to medium containing 30 mM phosphate. Calcium deposits observed after staining by the von Kossa method were confined to the non-cartilagenous intenodular areas. Electron microscopy illustrated that a large proportion of the calcium deposits were associated with collagen fibrils. A significant increase in the uptake of /sup 45/Ca was observed in cultures supplemented with 30 mM phosphate. Atomic absorption analysis of the cultures showed that they contained 2.00 ng calcium/ug DNA. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly reduced by phosphate and both extruded and cell associated GAG were affected. Exposure of mineralizing cultures to a biologically active anticalculus agent, ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate, resulted in a significant reduction in /sup 45/Ca uptake, providing confidence that the culture did response as a biological system. These data suggest that under the conditions employed, proteoglycans in the extracellular environment of limb bud mesenchyme inhibit calcium deposition. The inhibitory effect was observed only when proteoglycans were added as polymeric aggregates. The culture system employed was unable to detect the inhibitory effects, if any, of proteoglycan monomers or the subunits of proteoglycans, hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate.

  16. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium.

  17. Multi-scale modeling of soft fibrous tissues based on proteoglycan mechanics.

    PubMed

    Linka, Kevin; Khiêm, Vu Ngoc; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-08-16

    Collagen in the form of fibers or fibrils is an essential source of strength and structural integrity in most organs of the human body. Recently, with the help of complex experimental setups, a paradigm change concerning the mechanical contribution of proteoglycans (PGs) took place. Accordingly, PG connections protect the surrounding collagen fibrils from over-stretching rather than transmitting load between them. In this paper, we describe the reported PG mechanics and incorporate it into a multi-scale model of soft fibrous tissues. To this end, a nano-to-micro model of a single collagen fiber is developed by taking the entropic-energetic transition on the collagen molecule level into account. The microscopic damage occurring inside the collagen fiber is elucidated by sliding of PGs as well as by over-stretched collagen molecules. Predictions of this two-constituent-damage model are compared to experimental data available in the literature.

  18. Studies on the hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycans purified from articular chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sandy, J.D.; Plaas, A.H.

    1989-06-01

    Primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes have been maintained for 10 days and labeled with (35S)sulfate, (3H)leucine, and (35S)cysteine in pulse-chase protocols to study the structure and hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycan monomers. Radiolabeled monomers were purified from medium and cell-layer fractions by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation with bovine carrier monomer, and analyzed for hyaluronate binding affinity on Sepharose CL-2B in 0.5 M Na acetate, 0.1% Triton X-100, pH 6.8. Detergent was necessary to prevent self-association of newly synthesized monomers during chromatography. Monomers secreted during a 30-min pulse labeling with (35S)sulfate had a low affinity relative to carrier. Those molecules released into the medium during the first 12 h of chase remained in the low affinity form whereas those retained by the cell layer rapidly acquired high affinity. In cultures where more than 90% of the preformed cell-layer proteoglycan was removed by hyaluronidase digestion before radiolabeling the newly synthesized low affinity monomers also rapidly acquired high affinity if retained in the cell layer. Cultures labeled with amino acid precursors were used to establish the purity of monomer preparations and to isolate core proteins for study. Leucine- or cysteine-labeled core proteins derived from either low or high affinity monomer preparations migrated as a single major species on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with electrophoretic mobility very similar to that of core protein derived from extracted proteoglycan monomer. Purified low affinity monomers were converted to the high affinity form by treatment at pH 8.6; however, this change was prevented by guanidinium-HCl at concentrations above 0.8 M.

  19. Proteoglycans in bones of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Perez, C; Suarez, C; Kofoed, J

    1990-01-01

    Insulin seems to regulate the biosynthesis of proteoglycans in some tissues such as growth plate and glomeruli. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the ex vivo influence of insulin on proteoglycan metabolism in bones. Mandible and femur bones were used. Xiphoid cartilage was used as a control tissue of high glycosaminoglycan content. Diabetes was induced by 0.12 mg/g b.w. streptozotocin in male Sprague-Dawley rats, a number of which was treated with insulin (1 I.U./100 g b.w.) for 6 days. As compared with control animals, diabetic rats exhibited a decreased [35S]sulfate uptake as well as a shift to the right in Sephacryl S-500 chromatography. In addition, they showed lower density of proteoglycans in sucrose gradient and shorter glycosaminoglycan side chains in Sephadex G-200 chromatography. These changes were partly reversed by insulin.

  20. A comparative study of the proteoglycan of growth cartilage of normal and rachitic chicks.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, I R; Roughley, P J

    1978-01-01

    1. Proteoglycan was isolated from growth cartilage of normal and rachitic chicks. 2. The proteoglycan from normal cartilage showed differences in chemical composition and physical properties from a comparable fraction isolated from bovine nasal cartilage. 3. The proteoglycan from rachitic-chick cartilage was of smaller size than tis normal counterpart, though of similar average chemical composition. 4. Differences between proteoglycan from normal and rachitic cartilages can be explained in terms of limited proteolytic cleavage. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:666731

  1. Endothelial proteoglycans inhibit bFGF binding and mitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Forsten, K E; Courant, N A; Nugent, M A

    1997-08-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells and has been implicated as having a role in a number of proliferative vascular disorders. Binding of bFGF to heparin or heparan sulfate has been demonstrated to both stimulate and inhibit growth factor activity. The activity, towards bFGF, of heparan sulfate proteoglycans present within the vascular system is likely related to the chemical characteristics of the glycosaminoglycan as well as the structure and pericellular location of the intact proteoglycans. We have previously shown that endothelial conditioned medium inhibits both bFGF binding to vascular smooth muscle cells and bFGF stimulated cell proliferation in vitro. In the present study, we have isolated proteoglycans from endothelial cell conditioned medium and demonstrated that they are responsible for the bFGF inhibitory activity. We further separated endothelial secreted proteoglycans into two fractions, PG-A and PG-B. The large sized fraction (PG-A) had greater inhibitory activity than did PG-B for both bFGF binding and bFGF stimulation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The increased relative activity of PG-A was attributed, in part, to larger heparan sulfate chains which were more potent inhibitors of bFGF binding than the smaller heparan sulfate chains on PG-B. Both proteoglycan fractions contained perlecan-like core proteins; however, PG-A contained an additional core protein (approximately 190 kDa) that was not observed in PG-B. Both proteoglycan fractions bound bFGF directly, and PG-A bound a significantly greater relative amount of bFGF than did PG-B. Thus the ability of endothelial heparan sulfate proteoglycans to bind bFGF and prevent its association with vascular smooth muscle cells appears essential for inhibition of bFGF-induced mitogenesis. The production of potent bFGF inhibitory heparan sulfate proteoglycans by endothelial cells might contribute to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis.

  2. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and dexamethasone stimulates cell-associated and soluble chondroitin 4-sulfate proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, J.C.; Rodbard, D.; Katki, A.; Chernick, S.; Yanagishita, M. )

    1991-06-15

    The proteoglycans (cell-associated and culture media) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in culture were analyzed before and during differentiation into adipocytes. Cells were metabolically labeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H) glucosamine for 24 h and then extracted and analyzed. There was a 1.68 {plus minus} 0.07-fold increase in the 35S in medium proteoglycan during differentiation, whereas cell-associated proteoglycan radioactivity showed no increase. Analyses of radiolabeled molecules using ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and high performance liquid chromatography after enzymatic or alkaline digestion indicated that all of the 35S label was recovered as two major species of chondroitin 4-sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG-I and CSPG-II) and 7% as heparan sulfate proteoglycan. CSPG-I has a mass of {approximately} 970 kDa with multiple chondroitin sulfate chains (average of 50 kDa each) and a core protein of {approximately} 370 kDa including oligosaccharides. CSPG-II has a mass of 140 kDa with one or two chondroitin sulfate chains (average of 68 kDa each) and a core protein of 41 kDa including oligosaccharides. CSPG-I appears to be similar to versican, whereas CSPG-II is similar to decorin and/or biglycan, found in other fibroblastic cells. Cell differentiation was associated with a specific increase in CSPG-I (4.0 {plus minus} 0.2-fold in media and 3.2 {plus minus} 0.5-fold in the cell-associated form). This system should facilitate study of the functional roles of proteoglycans during growth and differentiation.

  3. Chronic barium intoxication disrupts sulphated proteoglycan synthesis: a hypothesis for the origins of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2004-01-01

    High level contamination by natural and industrial sources of the alkali earth metal, barium (Ba) has been identified in the ecosystems/workplaces that are associated with high incidence clustering of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases such as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Analyses of ecosystems supporting the most renowned MS clusters in Saskatchewan, Sardinia, Massachusetts, Colorado, Guam, NE Scotland demonstrated consistently elevated levels of Ba in soils (mean: 1428 ppm) and vegetation (mean: 74 ppm) in relation to mean levels of 345 and 19 ppm recorded in MS-free regions adjoining. The high levels of Ba stemmed from local quarrying for Ba ores and/or use of Ba in paper/foundry/welding/textile/oil and gas well related industries, as well as from the use of Ba as an atmospheric aerosol spray for enhancing/refracting the signalling of radio/radar waves along military jet flight paths, missile test ranges, etc. It is proposed that chronic contamination of the biosystem with the reactive types of Ba salts can initiate the pathogenesis of MS; due to the conjugation of Ba with free sulphate, which subsequently deprives the endogenous sulphated proteoglycan molecules (heparan sulfates) of their sulphate co partner, thereby disrupting synthesis of S-proteoglycans and their crucial role in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling which induces oligodendrocyte progenitors to maintain the growth and structural integrity of the myelin sheath. Loss of S-proteoglycan activity explains other key facets of MS pathogenesis; such as the aggregation of platelets and the proliferation of superoxide generated oxidative stress. Ba intoxications disturb the sodium-potassium ion pump--another key feature of the MS profile. The co-clustering of various neurodegenerative diseases in these Ba-contaminated ecosystems suggests that the pathogenesis of all of these diseases could pivot upon a

  4. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage.

  5. Characterization of chicken syndecan-3 as a heparan sulfate proteoglycan and its expression during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gould, S E; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1995-04-01

    Syndecan-3 is one of four identified members of a family of transmembrane proteoglycans (the syndecans) that possess highly similar cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains and may function as extracellular matrix receptors and/or low affinity receptors for signaling molecules such as FGF. We previously reported the cloning of a partial cDNA for chicken syndecan-3. Here we report the isolation of a syndecan-3 cDNA containing additional 5' sequence which includes a potential methionine start codon and putative signal sequence. In vitro translation of syndecan-3 cDNA in the presence and absence of microsomes suggests that the putative signal sequence is functional, suggesting that the cDNA may encompass the full coding sequence. We also identify syndecan-3 as a heparan sulfate proteoglycan and report its expression pattern during chicken embryogenesis using polyclonal antibodies raised against a recombinant fusion protein. We detect abundant syndecan-3 expression in the developing brain and neural tube, including a striking expression in the floor plate of the neural tube. During limb development, syndecan-3 is expressed in the distal mesenchymal cells of the limb bud which are undergoing outgrowth in response to the apical ectodermal ridge. Syndecan-3 is also transiently expressed during the formation of the precartilage condensations of the skeletal elements of the limb and subsequently in association with the differentiating osteoblasts of the periosteum. Expression is also observed in several areas of tissue interactions including the developing lens, otic vesicle, genital ridge, sclerotome, and feather buds.

  6. Three distinct molecular species of proteoglycan synthesized by the rat limb bud at the prechondrogenic stage

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, F.; Oohira, A.; Shoji, R.; Nogami, H. )

    1989-11-15

    To characterize proteoglycans in the prechondrogenic limb bud, proteoglycans were extracted with 4 M guanidine HCl containing a detergent and protease inhibitors from Day 13 fetal rat limb buds which had been labeled with (35S)sulfate for 3 h in vitro. About 90% of 35S-labeled proteoglycans was solubilized under the conditions used. The proteoglycan preparation was separated by DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography into three peaks; peak I eluted at 0.45 M NaCl concentration, peak II at 0.52 M, and peak III at 1.4 M. Peaks I and III were identified as proteoglycans bearing heparan sulfate side chains. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan in peak III was larger in hydrodynamic size than the proteoglycan in peak I. The heparan sulfate side chains of peak III proteoglycan were smaller in the size and more abundant in N-sulfated glucosamine than those of peak I proteoglycan. Peak II contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan with a core protein of a doublet of Mr 550,000 and 500,000. The chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan was easily solubilized with a physiological salt solution and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan in peak I was partially solubilized with the physiological salt solution. The remainder of the proteoglycan in peak I and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan in peak III could be solubilized effectively only with a solution containing a detergent, such as nonanoyl-N-methylglucamide. This observation indicates the difference in the localization among these three proteoglycans in the developing rat limb bud.

  7. Proteoglycan and collagen expression during human air conducting system development

    PubMed Central

    Godoy-Guzmán, C.; San Martin, S.; Pereda, J.

    2012-01-01

    The lung is formed from a bud that grows and divides in a dichotomous way. A bud is a new growth center which is determined by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions where proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) might be involved. To understand this protein participation during human lung development, we examined the expression and distribution of proteoglycans in relation to the different types of collagens during the period in which the air conducting system is installed. Using light microscopy and immunohistochemistry we evaluate the expression of collagens (I, III and VI) and proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan and lumican) between 8 to 10 weeks post fertilization and 11 to 14 weeks of gestational age of human embryo and fetus lungs. We show that decorin, lumican and all the collagen types investigated were expressed at the epithelium-mesenchymal interface, forming a sleeve around the bronchiolar ducts. In addition, biglycan was expressed in both the endothelial cells and the smooth muscle of the blood vessels. Thus, the similar distribution pattern of collagen and proteoglycans in the early developmental stages of the human lung may be closely related to the process of dichotomous division of the bronchial tree. This study provides a new insight concerning the participation of collagens and proteoglycans in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface during the period in which the air conducting system is installed in the human fetal lung. PMID:23027345

  8. Proteoglycans maintain lung stability in an elastase-treated mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2014-07-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema.

  9. Source of peritoneal proteoglycans. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells synthesize and secrete mainly small dermatan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, S.; Thomas, G. J.; Stylianou, E.; Williams, J. D.; Coles, G. A.; Davies, M.

    1995-01-01

    This study describes experiments that compare the proteoglycans (PGs) extracted from the dialysate from patients receiving continuous peritoneal ambulatory dialysis (CAPD) with those secreted by metabolically labeled human peritoneal mesothelial cells in vitro. The PGs isolated from both sources were predominantly small chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate PGs. Western blot of the core proteins obtained after chondroitin ABC lyase treatment with specific antibodies identified decorin and biglycan. With [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine as labeling precursors it was shown that dermatan sulfate rather than chondroitin sulfate were the major glycosaminoglycan chains and that decorin was the predominant species. These data provide the first evidence that human peritoneal mesothelial cells may be the principal source of PGs in the peritoneum. Given the proposed functions of decorin and biglycan, the results suggest that these PGs may be involved in the control of transforming growth factor-beta activity and collagen fibril formation in the peritoneum. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856761

  10. Functions of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Development: Insights From Drosophila Models.

    PubMed

    Nakato, H; Li, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are a class of carbohydrate-modified proteins involved in key biological processes, including growth factor signaling, cell adhesion, and enzymatic catalysis. HSPGs serve as coreceptors for a number of ligand molecules to regulate their signaling and distribution. These HS-dependent factors include fibroblast growth factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, Wnt-related factors, hedgehog, and cytokines. Several classes of HSPGs are evolutionarily conserved from humans to the genetically tractable model organism Drosophila. Sophisticated molecular genetic tools available in Drosophila provide for a powerful system to address unanswered questions regarding in vivo functions of HSPGs. These studies have highlighted the functions of HSPGs in the regulation of significant developmental events, such as morphogen gradient formation, nervous system formation, and the stem cell niche. Drosophila genetics has also established HSPGs as key factors in feedback controls that ensure robustness in developmental systems.

  11. Evidence for the presence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan in the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D C; Henning, A; Winkler, M; Rath, W; Haubeck, H D; Greiling, H

    1996-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the uterine cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue is remodelled extensively. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process, we have analysed the proteoglycan pattern in the human cervix from pregnant and non-pregnant women. Proteoglycans of the cervix tissue specimen were extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and precipitated with 80% ethanol. Purification of proteoglycans was performed by several chromatographic steps. Characterization of proteoglycans was done by SDS/PAGE before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes. Proteoglycans were detected by combined Alcian Blue/silver staining or, after blotting of biotin-labelled proteoglycans on to poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane, with peroxidase-conjugated avidin or by the use of keratan sulphate- or decorin-specific monoclonal antibodies. In contrast with previous reports, where only chondroitin/dermatan sulphate proteoglycans have been found in the uterine cervix, we have shown in the present study the existence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan with an M(r) > 220,000 in cervix samples from non-pregnant and pregnant women. This proteoglycan showed a strong reaction with the keratan sulphate-specific monoclonal antibody 5D4 and could be degraded by keratanases. The size of the core protein of this keratan sulphate proteoglycan was estimated to be about M(r) 220,000. PMID:8973545

  12. The Role of NG2 Proteoglycan in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Hwang, Eugene I.; Packer, Roger J.; Nazarian, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Neuron glia antigen-2 ((NG2), also known as chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 4, or melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan) is a type-1 membrane protein expressed by many central nervous system (CNS) cells during development and differentiation and plays a critical role in proliferation and angiogenesis. ‘NG2’ often references either the protein itself or the highly proliferative and undifferentiated glial cells expressing high levels of NG2 protein. NG2 glia represent the fourth major type of neuroglia in the mammalian nervous system and are classified as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells by virtue of their committed oligodendrocyte generation in developing and adult brain. Here, we discuss NG2 glial cells as well as NG2 protein and its expression and role with regards to CNS neoplasms as well as its potential as a therapeutic target for treating childhood CNS cancers. PMID:26947882

  13. Detection of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Sabbatino, Francesco; Wang, Xinhui; Ferrone, Soldano

    2014-01-01

    The tumor antigen chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) appears to be a useful biomarker to identify melanoma cells and an attractive target to apply antibody-based immunotherapy for the treatment of melanoma. Here we described the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method and the immunohistochemical (IHC) staining method to detect the expression of CSPG4 in melanoma cells and tissues.

  14. Border Patrol: Insights into the Unique Role of Perlecan/Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan2 at Cell and Tissue Borders

    PubMed Central

    Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Warren, Curtis R.; Harrington, Daniel A.; Carson, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix proteoglycan (ECM) perlecan, also known as heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 or HSPG2, is one of the largest (>200 nm) and oldest (>550M years) extracellular matrix molecules. In vertebrates, perlecan’s five-domain structure contains numerous independently folding modules with sequence similarities to other ECM proteins, all connected like cars into one long, diverse complex train following a unique N-terminal domain I decorated with three long glycosaminoglycan chains, and an additional glycosaminoglycan attachment site in the C-terminal domain V. In lower invertebrates, perlecan is not typically a proteoglycan, possessing the majority of the core protein modules, but lacking domain I where the attachment sites for glycosaminoglycan chains are located. This suggests that uniting the heparan sulfate binding growth factor functions of domain I and the core protein functions of the rest of the molecule in domains II-V occurred later in evolution for a new functional purpose. In this review, we surveyed several decades of pertinent literature to ask a fundamental question: Why did nature design this protein uniquely as an extraordinarily long multifunctional proteoglycan with a single promoter regulating expression, rather than separating these functions into individual proteins that could be independently regulated? We arrived at the conclusion that the concentration of perlecan at functional borders separating tissues and tissue layers is an ancient key function of the core protein. The addition of the heparan sulfate chains in domain I likely occurred as an additional means of binding the core protein to other ECM proteins in territorial matrices and basement membranes, and as a means to reserve growth factors in an on-site depot to assist with rapid repair of those borders when compromised, such as would occur during wounding. We propose a function for perlecan that extends its role from that of an extracellular scaffold, as we previously

  15. Border patrol: insights into the unique role of perlecan/heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 at cell and tissue borders.

    PubMed

    Farach-Carson, Mary C; Warren, Curtis R; Harrington, Daniel A; Carson, Daniel D

    2014-02-01

    The extracellular matrix proteoglycan (ECM) perlecan, also known as heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 or HSPG2, is one of the largest (>200 nm) and oldest (>550 M years) extracellular matrix molecules. In vertebrates, perlecan's five-domain structure contains numerous independently folding modules with sequence similarities to other ECM proteins, all connected like cars into one long, diverse complex train following a unique N-terminal domain I decorated with three long glycosaminoglycan chains, and an additional glycosaminoglycan attachment site in the C-terminal domain V. In lower invertebrates, perlecan is not typically a proteoglycan, possessing the majority of the core protein modules, but lacking domain I where the attachment sites for glycosaminoglycan chains are located. This suggests that uniting the heparan sulfate binding growth factor functions of domain I and the core protein functions of the rest of the molecule in domains II-V occurred later in evolution for a new functional purpose. In this review, we surveyed several decades of pertinent literature to ask a fundamental question: Why did nature design this protein uniquely as an extraordinarily long multifunctional proteoglycan with a single promoter regulating expression, rather than separating these functions into individual proteins that could be independently regulated? We arrived at the conclusion that the concentration of perlecan at functional borders separating tissues and tissue layers is an ancient key function of the core protein. The addition of the heparan sulfate chains in domain I likely occurred as an additional means of binding the core protein to other ECM proteins in territorial matrices and basement membranes, and as a means to reserve growth factors in an on-site depot to assist with rapid repair of those borders when compromised, such as would occur during wounding. We propose a function for perlecan that extends its role from that of an extracellular scaffold, as we previously

  16. Proteoglycan synthesis in normal and Lowe syndrome fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, G.S.; Hascall, V.C.; Yanagishita, M.; Gahl, W.A.

    1987-04-25

    Lowe (oculocerebrorenal) syndrome (LS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, generalized hypotonia, mental retardation, and renal Fanconi syndrome. The basic defect remains unknown, but the possibility that fibroblasts express reduced sulfation of glycosaminoglycans has been studied in several laboratories. A mechanism involving overproduction of an enzyme (nucleotide pyrophosphatase) active against adenosine 3'-phosphate, 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) has been postulated. Decreased synthesis of normally sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also reported. We measured the synthesis of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans by incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and Na/sub 2/(/sup 35/)SO/sub 4/ into cultured fibroblasts from four LS patients and related it directly to the synthesis in six normal fibroblast cultures. We found that the rate of synthesis varied greatly among the normal cultures (cv, 30%), but not significantly between LS and the normal. The LS fibroblasts' ability to sulfate glycosaminoglycans was assayed as the amount of /sup 3/H-glycosaminoglycan eluting at low ionic strength on anion exchange chromatography, the amount of non-sulfated disaccharide present in chondroitinase digests of labeled proteoglycans, and the ratio of /sup 35/S to 3H incorporation into proteoglycans. Each parameter suggested that the LS cells were synthesizing normally sulfated glycosaminoglycans (e.g. % delta Di-0S, 21 +/- 6 in normal; 27 +/- 6 in LS). The cells' ability to sulfate glycosaminoglycans was tested under conditions of markedly stimulated glycosaminoglycan synthesis, by treating the cultures with a beta-D-xyloside.

  17. Primary mesenchyme cell migration requires a chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Lane, M C; Solursh, M

    1991-02-01

    Primary mesenchyme cell migration in the sea urchin embryo is inhibited by sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous beta-D-xylosides, two treatments known to disrupt proteoglycan synthesis. We show that in the developing sea urchin, exogenous xyloside affects the synthesis by the primary mesenchyme cells of a very large, cell surface chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan. This proteoglycan is present in a partially purified fraction that restores migratory ability to defective cells in vitro. The integrity of this chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan appears essential for primary mesenchyme cell migration since treatment of actively migrating cells with chondroitinase ABC reversibly inhibited their migration in vitro.

  18. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  19. Structure of newly synthesized (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans and (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycan turnover products of cartilage explant cultures from dogs with experimental osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, S.L.; Billingham, M.E.; Muir, H.; Sandy, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of newly synthesized proteoglycans from explant cultures of cartilage from joints subjected to transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (osteoarthritic) and from normal (non- or sham-operated) joints was examined. The structure of the products of proteoglycan turnover was also examined using explants of normal and osteoarthritic cartilage maintained in culture for a 48 h chase period. The findings were as follows: Newly synthesized (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans extracted from cartilage explants from osteoarthritic joints whether examined 3 weeks, 3 months, or 6 months after surgery were larger than those from corresponding normal cartilage. This can be explained by the synthesis in osteoarthritic cartilage of abnormally long chondroitin sulfate chains on newly synthesised proteoglycans. The extracts also contained a newly formed small proteoglycan species that was unable to interact with hyaluronic acid. The proportion of this species was higher in osteoarthritic cartilage compared with normal, examined 3 weeks after surgery, but was generally absent from cartilage obtained 3 and 6 months after surgery. Compared with controls, a smaller proportion of the (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans released into the maintenance medium of explant cultures of osteoarthritic cartilage during a 48 h chase period was able to interact with hyaluronic acid. However, although furnished with longer (/sup 35/S)-glycosaminoglycan chains, these proteoglycans were smaller than those from control explants.

  20. Identity of the core proteins of the large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by skeletal muscle and prechondrogenic mesenchyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carrino, D A; Dennis, J E; Drushel, R F; Haynesworth, S E; Caplan, A I

    1994-01-01

    Large, chondroitin sulphate-containing proteoglycans are synthesized by three prominent tissue in the embryonic chick limb. One of these proteoglycans is aggrecan, the phenotype-specific proteoglycan of cartilage. Another, PG-M, is produced by prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells. The third, M-CSPG, is made by developing skeletal muscle cells. While the carbohydrate components of PG-M and M-CSPG share some similarities, both of these proteoglycans clearly have different carbohydrate moieties from those of aggrecan. To compare these three proteoglycans at another level, their core protein structures were analysed in three ways: by the presence or absence of monoclonal antibody epitopes, by one-dimensional peptide display of the cyanogen bromide-cleaved core proteins and by electron microscopic imaging of the molecules. Monoclonal antibodies whose epitopes are present in aggrecan core protein were tested with core protein preparations from M-CSPG and PG-M. One of these, 7D1, recognizes both PG-M and M-CSPG, while another, 1C6, shows no reactivity for the non-cartilage proteoglycans. The absence of 1C6 reactivity is of interest, as its epitope is in a region of the aggrecan core protein known to have a functional homologue in the core proteins of PG-M and M-CSPG. The cyanogen bromide-fragmented peptide pattern of M-CSPG is the same as that of PG-M, and both are different from that of aggrecan. The aggrecan pattern has one prominent large band (molecular mass 130 kDa), some less prominent large bands (molecular mass 70-100 kDa) and several smaller bands. In contrast, the PG-M and M-CSPG patterns show no bands with molecular masses > 73 kDa, and the smaller bands (molecular mass < 40 kDa) have a different pattern to that of the smaller bands from aggrecan. The electron microscopic images of aggrecan show a core protein with one end having two globular regions separated by a short linear segment; adjacent to this is a long linear segment, which sometimes contains a third

  1. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  2. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T. )

    1990-03-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H)serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in (35S)sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of (3H)serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion.

  3. Proteoglycans Maintain Lung Stability in an Elastase-Treated Mouse Model of Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema. PMID:24450478

  4. Localization of human serum amyloid P component and heparan sulfate proteoglycan in in vitro-formed Abeta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Holm Nielsen, E; Nybo, M; Junker, K; Toftedal Hansen, P; Rasmussen, I M; Svehag, S E

    2000-08-01

    Ultrastructural studies of the localization of serum amyloid P component (SAP) in amyloid fibrils have given divergent results. We here report for the first time that electron microscopy of SAP coincubated with Abeta1-42 peptides or with mature Abeta1-42 fibrils, revealed SAP molecules coating the surface of the mature fibrils and that protofibrils of Abeta1-42 did not bind SAP. Also when incubated with extracted amyloid light chain (AL)-fibrils the SAP molecules aligned on the fibril surface. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan bound to the surface of the Abeta fibrils with a spacing of about 50 nm. We conclude that SAP does not bind to protofibrils but to the surface of mature Abeta fibrils and that it may stabilize and protect the fibrils.

  5. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-05-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis.

  6. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. PMID:23369989

  7. Diverse functions of uterine proteoglycans in human reproduction (review).

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Kotaro; Tada, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Terumi; Taguchi, Sagiri; Funabiki, Miyako; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Yasuo, Tadahiro

    2012-06-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are a group of heavily glycosylated proteins that are present throughout the mammalian body and are involved in a wide variety of biological phenomena, including structural maintenance, tissue remodeling, molecular presentation, cell adhesion and signal transmission. Previous studies have revealed an increasing number of roles for PGs in human reproduction. Several PGs are currently utilized or regarded as biomarkers for the diagnosis of certain pathological uterine conditions associated with infertility and obstetrical complications. The aim of this review was to discuss the involvement of PGs in the human uterus in reproductive biology and pathophysiology.

  8. Sonic hedgehog processing and release are regulated by glypican heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Corinna; Pickhinke, Ute; Exner, Sebastian; Ohlig, Stefanie; Lawrence, Roger; Jboor, Hamodah; Dreier, Rita; Grobe, Kay

    2015-06-15

    All Hedgehog morphogens are released from producing cells, despite being synthesized as N- and C-terminally lipidated molecules, a modification that firmly tethers them to the cell membrane. We have previously shown that proteolytic removal of both lipidated peptides, called shedding, releases bioactive Sonic hedgehog (Shh) morphogens from the surface of transfected Bosc23 cells. Using in vivo knockdown together with in vitro cell culture studies, we now show that glypican heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate this process, through their heparan sulfate chains, in a cell autonomous manner. Heparan sulfate specifically modifies Shh processing at the cell surface, and purified glycosaminoglycans enhance the proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal Shh peptides under cell-free conditions. The most likely explanation for these observations is direct Shh processing in the extracellular compartment, suggesting that heparan sulfate acts as a scaffold or activator for Shh ligands and the factors required for their turnover. We also show that purified heparan sulfate isolated from specific cell types and tissues mediates the release of bioactive Shh from pancreatic cancer cells, revealing a previously unknown regulatory role for these versatile molecules in a pathological context.

  9. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  10. Patterns of proteoglycan degradation by a neutral protease from human growth-plate epiphyseal cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, M.G.; Armstrong, A.L.; Neuman, R.G.; Davis, M.W.; Mankin, H.J.

    1982-12-01

    The hypothesis is widely held that proteolytic degradation of proteoglycans in the lower hypertrophic zone of the growth plate may be involved in the initiation of mineralization in the zone of provisional calcification. However, a neutral protease that is responsible for the degradation of proteoglycans in the growth plate has not been identified, isolated, and characterized. In the work reported here, neutral protease activity in the growth plate is demonstrated for the first time, and some of the properties of the enzyme are described. Proteoglycans subunits were prepared from bovine nasal cartilage and calf costal cartilage by equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation under dissociative conditions. The proteoglycan subunits were labeled with /sup 14/C-formaldehyde. Homogenates from human growth plates were examined for neutral protease activity using the proteoglycan subunits as substrates. Following incubation of the proteoglycan subunits with growth-plate homogenates at pH 5.3 and at pH 7.5 in the presence and absence of ten-millimolar magnesium chloride and calcium chloride, the digestion products were examined by gel chromatography on Sepharose-2B and 6B columns. Column eluants containing proteoglycan-subunit degradation products were monitored for uronic acid, hexose, and radio-activity. Maximum extensive degradation of proteoglycan subunits occurred at pH 7.5 in the presence of ten-millimolar magnesium chloride and calcium chloride.

  11. Structural characterization of proteoglycans produced by testicular peritubular cells and Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.K.; Fritz, I.B.

    1985-09-25

    The structural characteristics of proteoglycans produced by seminiferous peritubular cells and by Sertoli cells are defined. Peritubular cells secrete two proteoglycans designated PC I and PC II. PC I is a high molecular mass protein containing chondroitin glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains (maximum 70 kDa). PC II has a protein core of 45 kDa and also contains chondroitin GAG chains (maximum 70 kDa). Preliminary results imply that PC II may be a degraded or processed form of PC I. Sertoli cells secrete two different proteoglycans, designated SC I and SC II. SC I is a large protein containing both chondroitin (maximum 62 kDa) and heparin (maximum 15 kDa) GAG chains. Results obtained suggest that this novel proteoglycan contains both chondroitin and heparin GAG chains bound to the same core protein. SC II has a 50-kDa protein core and contains chondroitin (maximum 25 kDa) GAG chains. A proteoglycan obtained from extracts of Sertoli cells is described which contains heparin (maximum 48 kDa) GAG chains. In addition, Sertoli cells secrete a sulfoprotein, SC III, which is not a proteoglycan. The stimulation by follicle-stimulating hormone of the incorporation of (TVS)SO2) U) into moieties secreted by Sertoli cells is shown to represent an increased production or sulfation of SC III, and not an increased production or sulfation of proteoglycans. Results are discussed in relation to the possible functions of proteoglycans in the seminiferous tubule.

  12. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  13. Detection and quantitation of proteoglycans extracted from cell culture medium and cultured cartilage slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hronowski, L.J.; Anastassiades, T.P.

    1988-11-01

    Detection and quantitation of extracted proteoglycans, by staining with the dye Alcian blue on cellulose acetate followed by dissolution of the stained cellulose acetate strips in dimethyl sulfoxide containing 0.5% (v/v) sulfuric acid for absorbance measurement, is described. It is shown that, in the present system, the dye uptake by the proteoglycan is dependent only on the glycosaminoglycan content of the proteoglycan. The method is applied to the quantitation and characterization of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, which have been extracted from radiolabeled bovine ankle cartilage and from mononuclear cell supernatant and which have been separated by DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography. The high sensitivity of the method allows detection of proteoglycans in 25-microliters samples of solutions containing as little as 1 microgram of glycosaminoglycan per milliliter of solution.

  14. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulate maturation of olfactory glomerular circuitry.

    PubMed

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Datta, Sandeep R; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-12-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (Shh(Ala/Ala)), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature Shh(Ala/Ala) mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry.

  15. Shh-Proteoglycan Interactions Regulate Maturation of Olfactory Glomerular Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M.; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L.; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Datta, Sandeep R.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (ShhAla/Ala), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature ShhAla/Ala mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry. PMID:24913191

  16. Immunological characterization of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Reichert's membrane, an extraembryonic membrane present in developing rodents, has been proposed as an in vivo model for the study of basement membranes. We have used this membrane as a source for isolation of basement membrane proteoglycans. Reichert's membranes were extracted in a guanidine/3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1- propanesulfonate buffer followed by cesium chloride density-gradient ultracentrifugation under dissociative conditions. The proteoglycans were subsequently purified from the two most dense fractions (greater than 1.3 g/ml) by ion-exchange chromatography. Mice were immunized with the proteoglycan preparation and four mAbs recognizing the core protein of a high-density, buoyant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were raised. Confirmation of antibody specificity was carried out by the preparation of affinity columns made from each of the mAbs. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) were purified from both supernatant and tissue fractions of Reichert's membranes incubated in short-term organ culture in the presence of radiolabel. The resultant affinity-purified proteoglycan samples were examined by gel filtration, SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotting. This proteoglycan is of high molecular weight (Mr = 5-6 x 10(5)), with a core protein of Mr = approximately 1.5-1.6 x 10(5) and composed exclusively of chondroitin sulfate chains with an average Mr = 1.6-1.8 x 10(4). In addition, a CSPG was purified from adult rat kidney, whose core protein was also Mr = 1.6 x 10(5). The proteoglycan and its core protein were also recognized by all four mAbs. Indirect immunofluorescence of rat tissue sections stained with these antibodies reveal a widespread distribution of this proteoglycan, localized specifically to Reichert's membrane and nearly all basement membranes of rat tissues. In addition to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, it therefore appears that at least one CSPG is a widespread basement membrane component. PMID:2592422

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  19. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  20. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-04-15

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an

  1. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an

  2. Synthesis by Schwann cells of basal lamina and membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Primary cultures that contain only Schwann cells and sensory nerve cells synthesize basal lamina. The assembly of this basal lamina appears to be essential for normal Schwann cell development. In this study, we demonstrate that Schwann cells synthesize two major heparan sulfate-containing proteoglycans. Both proteoglycans band in dissociative CsCl gradients at densities less than 1.4 g/ml, and therefore, presumably, have relatively low carbohydrate-to-protein ratios. The larger of these proteoglycans elutes from Sepharose CL-4B in 4 M guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) at a Kav of 0.21 and contains heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains of Mr 21,000 in a ratio of approximately 3:1. This proteoglycan is extracted from cultures by 4 M GuHCl but not Triton X-100 and accumulates only when Schwann cells are actively synthesizing basal lamina. The smaller proteoglycan elutes from Sepharose CL-4B at a Kav of 0.44 and contains heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains of Mr 18,000 in a ratio of approximately 4:1. This proteoglycan is extracted by 4 M GuHCl or by Triton X-100. The accumulation of this proteoglycan is independent of basal lamina production. PMID:3160714

  3. Structural characteristics of articular cartilage proteoglycan in IgG induced experimental immune synovitis.

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, C J; Yoo, J U; Goldberg, V M; Kresina, T F

    1987-01-01

    The early changes (five weeks) in the structure of newly synthesised and endogenous articular cartilage sulphated proteoglycans were studied in lapine IgG induced experimental immune synovitis. Rabbits with immune synovitis (IS-IgG) were compared with animals with a developed hypersensitivity to IgG (I-IgG) and with non-treated normal weight matched controls. Medial and lateral femoral condyle and tibial plateau cartilage was pooled and radiolabelled for 24 h in vitro with 35SO4. The samples constituted tissue from regions underlying pannus and from pannus free sites. Cartilage from animals with IS-IgG showed a significantly diminished amount of newly synthesised and endogenous proteoglycan aggregate and an increased amount of hydrodynamically small proteoglycans. Newly synthesised (obtained by in vivo radiosulphate labelling) and endogenous proteoglycans showed a similar profile. The proteoglycan monomer fraction from animals with IS-IgG failed to form proteoglycan aggregates in the presence of excess hyaluronic acid. In the group with IS-IgG linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between the synovial pathology scores (but not cartilage pathology score) and diminished newly synthesised and endogenous proteoglycan aggregate. PMID:3662640

  4. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Neill, Thomas; Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Hubo, Mario; Frey, Helena; Gopal, Sandeep; Gomes, Angélica; Afratis, Nikos; Lim, Hooi Ching; Couchman, John R.; Filmus, Jorge; Sanderson, Ralph D.; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V.; Karamanos, Nikos K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans control numerous normal and pathological processes, among which are morphogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, vascularization and cancer metastasis. During tumor development and growth, proteoglycan expression is markedly modified in the tumor microenvironment. Altered expression of proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor microenvironment suggests their potential as pharmacological targets in this type of cancer. It has been recently suggested that pharmacological treatment may target proteoglycan metabolism, their utilization as targets for immunotherapy or their direct use as therapeutic agents. The diversity inherent in the proteoglycans that will be presented herein provides the potential for multiple layers of regulation of breast tumor behavior. This review summarizes recent developments concerning the biology of selected proteoglycans in breast cancer, and presents potential targeted therapeutic approaches based on their novel key roles in breast cancer. PMID:25829250

  5. Proteoglycan biosynthesis in murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells before and after differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillan, D.J.; Yanagishita, M.; Hascall, V.C.; Bickel, M. )

    1989-08-05

    Murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells were cultured in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine and ({sup 35}S)sulfate. Labeled proteoglycans were purified by anion exchange chromatography and characterized by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with chemical and enzymatic degradation. M1 cells synthesize a single predominant species of proteoglycan which distributes almost equally between the cell and medium after 17 h labeling. The cell-associated proteoglycan has an overall size of about 135 kDa and contains three to five chondroitin sulfate chains (28-31 kDa each) attached to a chondroitinase-generated core protein of 28 kDa. The synthesis and subsequent secretion of this proteoglycan was enhanced 4-5-fold in cells induced to differentiate into macrophages. This was not a phenomenon of arrest in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle, since density inhibited undifferentiated cells arrested at this stage did not increase proteoglycan synthesis. The chondroitin sulfate chains contained exclusively chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate; however, the ratio of these two disaccharides differed between the medium- and cell-associated proteoglycans, and changed during progression of the cells into a fully differentiated phenotype. Pulse-chase kinetics indicate the presence of two distinct pools of proteoglycan; one that is secreted very rapidly from the cell after a approximately 1-h lag, and a second pool that is turned over in the cell with a half-time of approximately 3.5 h. Subtle differences in the glycosylation patterns of the medium- and cell-associated species are consistent with synthesis of two pools. Papain digestion suggests that the chondroitin sulfate chains are clustered on a small protease resistant peptide. The data suggest that this proteoglycan is similar to the serglycin proteoglycan family.

  6. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: a sugar code for vertebrate development?

    PubMed Central

    Poulain, Fabienne E.; Yost, H. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have long been implicated in a wide range of cell-cell signaling and cell-matrix interactions, both in vitro and in vivo in invertebrate models. Although many of the genes that encode HSPG core proteins and the biosynthetic enzymes that generate and modify HSPG sugar chains have not yet been analyzed by genetics in vertebrates, recent studies have shown that HSPGs do indeed mediate a wide range of functions in early vertebrate development, for example during left-right patterning and in cardiovascular and neural development. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the various roles of HSPGs in these systems and explore the concept of an instructive heparan sulfate sugar code for modulating vertebrate development. PMID:26487777

  7. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: a sugar code for vertebrate development?

    PubMed

    Poulain, Fabienne E; Yost, H Joseph

    2015-10-15

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have long been implicated in a wide range of cell-cell signaling and cell-matrix interactions, both in vitro and in vivo in invertebrate models. Although many of the genes that encode HSPG core proteins and the biosynthetic enzymes that generate and modify HSPG sugar chains have not yet been analyzed by genetics in vertebrates, recent studies have shown that HSPGs do indeed mediate a wide range of functions in early vertebrate development, for example during left-right patterning and in cardiovascular and neural development. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the various roles of HSPGs in these systems and explore the concept of an instructive heparan sulfate sugar code for modulating vertebrate development.

  8. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  9. The identification of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in archaeological human bones and teeth.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Norton, Andrew L; Gesteira, Tarsis F; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Z; Martins, João R; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is mineralized dense connective tissue consisting mainly of a mineral component (hydroxyapatite) and an organic matrix comprised of collagens, non-collagenous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs). Extracellular matrix proteins and PGs bind tightly to hydroxyapatite which would protect these molecules from the destructive effects of temperature and chemical agents after death. DNA and proteins have been successfully extracted from archaeological skeletons from which valuable information has been obtained; however, to date neither PGs nor glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains have been studied in archaeological skeletons. PGs and GAGs play a major role in bone morphogenesis, homeostasis and degenerative bone disease. The ability to isolate and characterize PG and GAG content from archaeological skeletons would unveil valuable paleontological information. We therefore optimized methods for the extraction of both PGs and GAGs from archaeological human skeletons. PGs and GAGs were successfully extracted from both archaeological human bones and teeth, and characterized by their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel, degradation by specific enzymes and HPLC. The GAG populations isolated were chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA). In addition, a CSPG was detected. The localization of CS, HA, three small leucine rich PGs (biglycan, decorin and fibromodulin) and glypican was analyzed in archaeological human bone slices. Staining patterns were different for juvenile and adult bones, whilst adolescent bones had a similar staining pattern to adult bones. The finding that significant quantities of PGs and GAGs persist in archaeological bones and teeth opens novel venues for the field of Paleontology.

  10. The regulatory roles of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in extracellular assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shoujun; Birk, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are involved in a variety of biological and pathological processes. This review focuses on their regulatory roles in matrix assembly. SLRPs have protein cores and hypervariable glycosylation with multivalent binding abilities. During development, differential interactions of SLRPs with other molecules results in tissue-specific spatial and temporal distributions. The changing expression patterns play a critical role in the regulation of tissue-specific matrix assembly and, therefore, tissue function. SLRPs have significant structural roles within extracellular matrices. In addition, they have instructive roles, regulating collagen fibril growth, fibril organization, and extracellular matrix assembly. Moreover, they are involved in mediating cell-matrix interactions. Abnormal SLRP expression and/or structures result in dysfunctional extracellular matrices and pathophysiology. Altered expression of SLRPs has been found in many disease models, and structural deficiency also causes altered matrix assembly. SLRPs regulate the assembly of the extracellular matrix, which defines the microenvironment, modulating both the extracellular matrix and cellular functions leading to an impact on tissue function. PMID:23331954

  11. Key roles for the small leucine-rich proteoglycans in renal and pulmonary pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nastase, Madalina V.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are molecules that have signaling roles in a multitude of biological processes. In this respect, SLRPs play key roles in the evolution of a variety of diseases throughout the human body. Scope of Review We will critically review current developments in the roles of SLRPs in several types of disease of the kidney and lungs. Particular emphasis will be given to the roles of decorin and biglycan, the best characterized members of the SLRP gene family. Major Conclusions In both renal and pulmonary disorders, SLRPs are essential elements that regulate several pathophysiological processes including fibrosis, inflammation and tumor progression. Decorin has remarkable antifibrotic and antitumorigenic properties and is considered a valuable potential treatment of these diseases. Biglycan can modulate inflammatory processes in lung and renal inflammation and is a potential target in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. General significance SLRPs can serve as either treatment targets or as potential treatment in renal or lung disease. PMID:24508120

  12. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the developing vertebral column of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Hannesson, Kirsten O; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Takle, Harald; Enersen, Grethe; Bæverfjord, Grete; Pedersen, Mona E

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the developing vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at 700, 900, 1100 and 1400 d° was examined by light microscopy. The mineralization pattern was outlined by Alizarin red S and soft structures by Alcian blue. The temporal and spatial distribution patterns of different types of GAGs: chondroitin-4-sulphate/dermatan sulphate, chondroitin-6-sulphate, chondroitin-0-sulphate and keratan sulphate were addressed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the different GAGs. The specific pattern obtained with the different antibodies suggests a unique role of the different GAG types in pattern formation and mineralization. In addition, the distribution of the different GAG types in normal and malformed vertebral columns from 15 g salmon was compared. A changed expression pattern of GAGs was found in the malformed vertebrae, indicating the involvement of these molecules during the pathogenesis. The molecular size of proteoglycans (PGs) in the vertebrae carrying GAGs was analysed with western blotting, and mRNA transcription of the PGs aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican by real-time qPCR. Our study reveals the importance of GAGs in development of vertebral column also in Atlantic salmon and indicates that a more comprehensive approach is necessary to completely understand the processes involved.

  13. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  14. NG2 PROTEOGLYCAN-DEPENDENT CONTRIBUTIONS OF PERICYTES AND MACROPHAGES TO BRAIN TUMOR VASCULARIZATION AND PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Stallcup, William B.; You, Weon-Kyoo; Kucharova, Karolina; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; Yotsumoto, Fusanori

    2015-01-01

    The NG2 proteoglycan promotes tumor growth as a component of both tumor and stromal cells. Using intracranial, NG2-negative B16F10 melanomas, we have investigated the importance of pericyte and macrophage NG2 in brain tumor progression. Reduced melanoma growth in myeloid-specific NG2 null (Mac-NG2ko) and pericyte-specific NG2 null (PC-NG2ko) mice demonstrates the importance of NG2 in both stromal compartments. In each genotype, loss of pericyte-endothelial cell interaction diminishes formation of endothelial junctions and assembly of the basal lamina. Tumor vessels in Mac-NG2ko mice have smaller diameters, reduced patency, and increased leakiness compared to PC-NG2ko mice, thus decreasing tumor blood supply and increasing hypoxia. While reduced pericyte interaction with endothelial cells in PC-NG2ko mice results from loss of pericyte activation of β1 integrin signaling in endothelial cells, reduced pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko mice results from 90% reduced macrophage recruitment. The absence of macrophage-derived signals in Mac-NG2ko mice causes loss of pericyte association with endothelial cells. Reduced macrophage recruitment may be due to diminished activation of integrins in the absence of NG2, causing decreased macrophage interaction with endothelial adhesion molecules that are needed for extravasation. These results reflect the complex interplay that occurs between macrophages, pericytes, and endothelial cells during tumor vascularization. PMID:26465118

  15. Small Leucine Rich Proteoglycans Exhibit Unique Spatiotemporal Expression Profiles During Cardiac Valve Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Loren E.; Kern, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Small Leucine Rich Proteoglycans (SLRPs) play a role in collagen fiber formation and also function as signaling molecules. Given the importance of collagen synthesis to the cardiovascular extracellular matrix (ECM), we examined the spatiotemporal expression of SLRPs, not previously investigated in the murine heart. Results Cardiac expression using antibodies specific for biglycan (BGN), decorin (DCN), fibromodulin (FMOD) and lumican (LUM) revealed distinct patterns among the SLRPs in mesenchymal-derived tissues. DCN showed the most intense localization within the developing valve cusps, while LUM was evident primarily in the hinge region of postnatal cardiac valves. BGN, DCN and FMOD were immunolocalized to regions where cardiac valves anchor into adjacent tissues. Medial (BGN), and adventitial (BGN, DCN, FMOD and LUM) layers of the pulmonary and aortic arteries also showed intense staining of SLRPs but this spatiotemporal expression varied with developmental age. Conclusions The unique expression patterns of SLRPs suggest they have adapted to specialized roles in the cardiovascular ECM. SLRP expression patterns overlap with areas where TGFβ signaling is critical to the developing heart. Therefore we speculate that SLRPs may not only be required to facilitate collagen fiber formation but may also regulate TGFβ signaling in the murine heart. PMID:24272803

  16. Influence of orthodontic forces on the distribution of proteoglycans in rat hypofunctional periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Esashika, Mayumi; Kaneko, Sawa; Yanagishita, Masaki; Soma, Kunimichi

    2003-06-01

    During orthodontic treatment, it is often necessary to move the hypofunctional teeth. In this study, we revealed an influence of orthodontic forces in the hypofunctional periodontal ligament, and focused on the distribution of proteoglycans, major extracellular matrix molecules. Five-week-old rats were divided into normal group and hypofunctional group. To induce occlusal hypofunction, occluding teeth of the mandibular first molar were extracted. At 8-week-old, orthodontic force by 15 or 2 gf titanium-nickel alloy closed coil spring was applied to the mandibular first molar toward the mesial direction. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using antibodies for chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS). In normal group, CS was observed throughout the extracellular matrix, while HS was observed on the endothelial cells and the osteoclastic cells on compressive side. In hypofunctional group without orthodontic appliance, CS and HS were detected in less amounts. With 15 gf, CS was observed at the compressive area where no cells and fibers were present, and HS was observed at the periphery of this area. With 2 gf, however, the distribution of CS and HS was similar to the normal control. These findings indicate that CS and HS were affected by orthodontic forces, and suggest their distinct functions in tissue remodeling.

  17. The Identification of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Archaeological Human Bones and Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M.; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Norton, Andrew L.; Gesteira, Tarsis F.; Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Z.; Martins, João R.; Dixon, Ronald A.; Nader, Helena B.

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is mineralized dense connective tissue consisting mainly of a mineral component (hydroxyapatite) and an organic matrix comprised of collagens, non-collagenous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs). Extracellular matrix proteins and PGs bind tightly to hydroxyapatite which would protect these molecules from the destructive effects of temperature and chemical agents after death. DNA and proteins have been successfully extracted from archaeological skeletons from which valuable information has been obtained; however, to date neither PGs nor glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains have been studied in archaeological skeletons. PGs and GAGs play a major role in bone morphogenesis, homeostasis and degenerative bone disease. The ability to isolate and characterize PG and GAG content from archaeological skeletons would unveil valuable paleontological information. We therefore optimized methods for the extraction of both PGs and GAGs from archaeological human skeletons. PGs and GAGs were successfully extracted from both archaeological human bones and teeth, and characterized by their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel, degradation by specific enzymes and HPLC. The GAG populations isolated were chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA). In addition, a CSPG was detected. The localization of CS, HA, three small leucine rich PGs (biglycan, decorin and fibromodulin) and glypican was analyzed in archaeological human bone slices. Staining patterns were different for juvenile and adult bones, whilst adolescent bones had a similar staining pattern to adult bones. The finding that significant quantities of PGs and GAGs persist in archaeological bones and teeth opens novel venues for the field of Paleontology. PMID:26107959

  18. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-06

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan.

  19. MOLECULAR RESURFACING OF CARTILAGE WITH PROTEOGLYCAN 4 (PRG4)

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kanika; Ham, Hyun Ok; Nguyen, Trung; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2010-01-01

    Early loss of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), a lubricating glycoprotein implicated in boundary lubrication, from the cartilage surface has been associated with degeneration of cartilage and early onset of osteoarthritis. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid and other macromolecules has been proposed as a treatment of osteoarthritis, however efficacy of viscosupplementation is variable and may be influenced by the short residence time of lubricant in the knee joint after injection. Recent studies have demonstrated the use of aldehyde (CHO) modified extracellular matrix proteins for targeted adherence to a biological tissue surface. We hypothesized that CHO could be exploited to enhance binding of lubricating proteoglycans to the surface of PRG4 depleted cartilage. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of molecular resurfacing of cartilage with aldehyde modified PRG4. PRG4 was chemically functionalized with aldehyde (PRG4-CHO), and aldehyde plus Oregon Green (OG) fluorophore (PRG4-OG-CHO) to allow for differentiation of endogenous and exogenous PRG4. Cartilage disks depleted of native PRG4 were then treated with solutions of PRG4, PRG4-CHO, or PRG4-OG-CHO and then assayed for the presence of PRG4 by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and fluorescence imaging. Repletion of cartilage surfaces was significantly enhanced with the inclusion of CHO compared to repletion with unmodified PRG4. These findings suggest a generalized approach that may be used for molecular resurfacing of tissue surfaces with PRG4 and other lubricating biomolecules, perhaps leading in the future to a convenient method for overcoming loss of lubrication during the early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:20338268

  20. Functional and clinical relevance of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4.

    PubMed

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano; Wang, Xinhui

    2010-01-01

    The lack of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage melanoma has stimulated interest in the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with malignant melanoma. Among them, immunotherapy has attracted much attention because of the potential role played by immunological events in the clinical course of melanoma. For many years, T cell-based immunotherapy has been emphasized in part because of the disappointing results of the monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based clinical trials conducted in the early 1980s and in part because of the postulated major role played by T cells in tumor growth control. More recently, mAb-based therapies have gained in popularity given their clinical and commercial success for a variety of malignant diseases. As a result, there has been increased interest in identifying and characterizing antibody-defined melanoma antigens. Among them, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), also known as high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen (HMW-MAA) or melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP), has attracted much attention in recent years because of the growing experimental evidence that it fulfills two requirements for immunotherapy to be therapeutically effective: (1) targeting of cancer stem cells (CSC) and (2) development of combinatorial therapies to counteract the escape mechanisms driven by the genetic instability of tumor cells. With this in mind, in this chapter, we have reviewed recent information related to the distribution of CSPG4 on various types of tumors, including CSC, its expression on pericytes in the tumor microenvironment, its recognition by T cells, its role in cell biology as well as the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of CSPG4-specific immunity to control malignant cell growth.

  1. Giant Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a number of Herbig-Haro flows which extend over parsec-scale distances. The largest of these is the well known HH 111 jet complex, which is shown, through CCD images and a proper motion study, to have an angular extent of almost one degree on the sky, corresponding to 7.7 pc, making it the largest known HH flow. In our imaging survey we also found that T Tauri is at the center of a huge bipolar HH flow, HH 355, with a total extent of 38 arcmin, corresponding to 1.55 pc, and aligned with the axis of the tiny HH 255 flow surrounding the infrared companion T Tau S. We additionally have found a number of other giant HH flow candidates, including HH 315 at PV Cep, HH 41/295 at Haro 5a/6a, HH 300 in Bl8w, HH 354 in Li 165, HH 376 in Li 152, and HH 114/115 and HH 243/244/245/179 in the X Orionis molecular ring. It thus appears that it is common for HH flows to attain parsec-scale dimensions. The ubiquity of parsec-scale HH flows profoundly alters our view of the impact of young stars on their environment. Giant flows have dynamical ages comparable to the duration of the accretion phase of the sources, and provide a fossil record of their mass loss and accretion history. Multiple internal working surfaces and their S-shaped point symmetry provide evidence for variability of ejection velocity and orientation of the source jets. Giant HH flows are either longer or comparable in length to associated CO outflows, providing evidence for unified models in which HH flows power CO flows. Many giant flows have burst out of their source cloud cores and are dissociating molecules and injecting momentum and kinetic energy into the interclump medium of the host clouds. They contribute to the UV radiation field, and may produce C I and C ii in cloud interiors. Giant flows may contribute to the chemical rejuvenation of clouds, the generation of turbulent motions, and the self-regulation of star formation. The terminal working surfaces of giant flows may be

  2. Stimulation by concanavalin A of cartilage-matrix proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.Q.; Nakashima, K.; Iwamoto, M.; Kato, Y. )

    1990-06-15

    The effect of concanavalin A on proteoglycan synthesis by rabbit costal and articular chondrocytes was examined. Chondrocytes were seeded at low density and grown to confluency in medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, and then the serum concentration was reduced to 0.3%. At the low serum concentration, chondrocytes adopted a fibroblastic morphology. Addition of concanavalin A to the culture medium induced a morphologic alteration of the fibroblastic cells to spherical chondrocytes and increased by 3- to 4-fold incorporation of (35S)sulfate and (3H)glucosamine into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that was characteristically found in cartilage. The stimulation of incorporation of labeled precursors reflected real increases in proteoglycan synthesis, as chemical analyses showed a 4-fold increase in the accumulation of macromolecules containing hexuronic acid in concanavalin A-maintained cultures. Furthermore, the effect of concanavalin A on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans was greater than that of various growth factors or hormones. However, concanavalin A had smaller effects on (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans and (3H)glucosamine incorporation into hyaluronic acid and chondroitinase AC-resistant glycosaminoglycans. Since other lectins tested, such as wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, and phytohemagglutinin, had little effect on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans, the concanavalin A action on chondrocytes seems specific. Although concanavalin A decreased (3H)thymidine incorporation in chondrocytes, the stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis could be observed in chondrocytes exposed to the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, cytosine arabinoside. These results indicate that concanavalin A is a potent modulator of proteoglycan synthesis by chondrocytes.

  3. On the shape of giant soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Reyssat, Etienne; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2017-03-07

    We study the effect of gravity on giant soap bubbles and show that it becomes dominant above the critical size [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the mean thickness of the soap film and [Formula: see text] is the capillary length ([Formula: see text] stands for vapor-liquid surface tension, and [Formula: see text] stands for the liquid density). We first show experimentally that large soap bubbles do not retain a spherical shape but flatten when increasing their size. A theoretical model is then developed to account for this effect, predicting the shape based on mechanical equilibrium. In stark contrast to liquid drops, we show that there is no mechanical limit of the height of giant bubble shapes. In practice, the physicochemical constraints imposed by surfactant molecules limit the access to this large asymptotic domain. However, by an exact analogy, it is shown how the giant bubble shapes can be realized by large inflatable structures.

  4. Characterization of proteoglycan metabolites in human gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G; Samuels, R H

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have identified glycosaminoglycans in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) associated with a variety of clinical conditions, notably those involving bone resorptive activity. GCF was here collected from around teeth undergoing active orthodontic movement. Proteoglycan metabolites were purified from GCF by anion-exchange chromatography using fast performance liquid chromatography. Sulphated glycosaminoglycan was associated with the most highly anionic protein fractions IV, V and VI, and biochemical analysis was restricted to these fractions. Analysis included glycosaminoglycan content by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, molecular size by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and amino acid analyses. Fraction IV contained hyaluronan (18.7%) and chondroitin sulphate (10.9%), fraction V heparan sulphate (29.5%) and chondroitin sulphate (19.6%) and fraction VI chondroitin sulphate only (21.3%). SDS-PAGE revealed two Coomassie blue bands in fraction V of 72 and 60 kDa and two further bands in fraction VI of 71 and 56 kDa. These proteoglycans appeared resistant to digestion by chondroitinase ABC or heparinase III, although the glycosaminoglycan chains underwent degradation after protein-core removal. The molecular mass and amino acid composition of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan fractions showed a close similarity to those of human alveolar bone proteoglycan. The presence of heparan sulphate proteoglycan in GCF in association with orthodontic movement is in accord with previous reports. The findings support the view that proteoglycans in GCF are 'biomarkers', notably those associated with active resorption of alveolar bone.

  5. Proteoglycans contain a 4.6 A repeat in muscular dystrophy corneas: x-ray diffraction evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Quantock, A J; Klintworth, G K; Schanzlin, D J; Capel, M S; Lenz, M E; Thonar, E J

    1996-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction patterns from macular corneal dystrophy (MCD) corneas contain an unusual reflection that arises because of an undefined ultrastructure with a periodic repeat in the region of 4.6 A. In this study, we compared with wide-angle x-ray diffraction patterns obtained from four normal human corneas and four MCD corneas. Moreover, portions of two of the MCD corneas were pretreated with a specific glycosidase to shed light on the origin of the 4.6 A reflection. None of the normal corneas produced an x-ray reflection in the region of 4.6 A, whereas all four of the MCD corneas did (MCD type I at 4.65 A and 4.63 A, MCD type II at 4.63 A and 4.67 A). This reflection was diminished after incubation of the MCD tissues with either chondroitinase ABC or N-glycanase. The findings indicate that glycosaminoglycans or proteoglycans contribute to the unusual MCD x-ray reflection and hence most likely contain a periodic 4.6 A ultrastructure. Furthermore, the results imply that periodic 4.6 A MCD ultrastructures reside in either intact, unsulfated lumican molecules and regions of the CS/DS-containing molecules or in a region of a hybrid macromolecular aggregate formed by the interaction of the two molecules. PMID:8785355

  6. Immunoablation of cells expressing the NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giampaolo; Rattray, Marcus; Fulton, Daniel; Rivera, Andrea; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the transmembrane NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) defines a distinct population of NG2-glia. NG2-glia serve as a regenerative pool of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the adult central nervous system (CNS), which is important for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and are a major component of the glial scar that inhibits axon regeneration after CNS injury. In addition, NG2-glia form unique neuron–glial synapses with unresolved functions. However, to date it has proven difficult to study the importance of NG2-glia in any of these functions using conventional transgenic NG2 ‘knockout' mice. To overcome this, we aimed to determine whether NG2-glia can be targeted using an immunotoxin approach. We demonstrate that incubation in primary anti-NG2 antibody in combination with secondary saporin-conjugated antibody selectively kills NG2-expressing cells in vitro. In addition, we provide evidence that the same protocol induces the loss of NG2-glia without affecting astrocyte or neuronal numbers in cerebellar brain slices from postnatal mice. This study shows that targeting the NG2 CSPG with immunotoxins is an effective and selective means for killing NG2-glia, which has important implications for studying the functions of these enigmatic cells both in the normal CNS, and in demyelination and degeneration. PMID:24252088

  7. Immunoablation of cells expressing the NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giampaolo; Rattray, Marcus; Fulton, Daniel; Rivera, Andrea; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-02-01

    Expression of the transmembrane NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) defines a distinct population of NG2-glia. NG2-glia serve as a regenerative pool of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the adult central nervous system (CNS), which is important for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and are a major component of the glial scar that inhibits axon regeneration after CNS injury. In addition, NG2-glia form unique neuron-glial synapses with unresolved functions. However, to date it has proven difficult to study the importance of NG2-glia in any of these functions using conventional transgenic NG2 'knockout' mice. To overcome this, we aimed to determine whether NG2-glia can be targeted using an immunotoxin approach. We demonstrate that incubation in primary anti-NG2 antibody in combination with secondary saporin-conjugated antibody selectively kills NG2-expressing cells in vitro. In addition, we provide evidence that the same protocol induces the loss of NG2-glia without affecting astrocyte or neuronal numbers in cerebellar brain slices from postnatal mice. This study shows that targeting the NG2 CSPG with immunotoxins is an effective and selective means for killing NG2-glia, which has important implications for studying the functions of these enigmatic cells both in the normal CNS, and in demyelination and degeneration.

  8. Theranostic impact of NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan in cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Dallatomasina, Alice; Perris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is an unusual cell-membrane integral proteoglycan widely recognized to be a prognostic factor, a valuable tool for ex vivo and non-invasive molecular diagnostics and, by virtue of its tight association with malignancy, a tantalizing therapeutic target in several tumour types. Although the biology behind its involvement in cancer progression needs to be better understood, implementation of NG2/CSPG4 in the routine clinical practice is attainable and has the potential to contribute to an improved individualized management of cancer patients. In this context, its polymorphic nature seems to be particularly valuable in the effort to standardize informative diagnostic procedures and consolidate forcible immunotherapeutic treatment strategies. We discuss here the underpinnings for this potential and highlight the benefits of taking advantage of the intra-tumour and inter-patient variability in the regulation of NG2/CSPG4 expression. We envision that NG2/CSPG4 may effectively be exploited in therapeutic interventions aimed at averting resistance to target therapy agents and at interfering with secondary lesion formation and/or tumour recurrence.

  9. Theranostic Impact of NG2/CSPG4 Proteoglycan in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Dallatomasina, Alice; Perris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is an unusual cell-membrane integral proteoglycan widely recognized to be a prognostic factor, a valuable tool for ex vivo and non-invasive molecular diagnostics and, by virtue of its tight association with malignancy, a tantalizing therapeutic target in several tumour types. Although the biology behind its involvement in cancer progression needs to be better understood, implementation of NG2/CSPG4 in the routine clinical practice is attainable and has the potential to contribute to an improved individualized management of cancer patients. In this context, its polymorphic nature seems to be particularly valuable in the effort to standardize informative diagnostic procedures and consolidate forcible immunotherapeutic treatment strategies. We discuss here the underpinnings for this potential and highlight the benefits of taking advantage of the intra-tumour and inter-patient variability in the regulation of NG2/CSPG4 expression. We envision that NG2/CSPG4 may effectively be exploited in therapeutic interventions aimed at averting resistance to target therapy agents and at interfering with secondary lesion formation and/or tumour recurrence. PMID:25767619

  10. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of ({sup 35}S)-sodium sulfate and ({sup 3}H)-serine or ({sup 3}H)-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of {sup 35}S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect.

  11. Structural and functional modifications of human aorta proteoglycans in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, G M; Coinu, R; Demuro, P; Formato, M; Sanna, G; Tidore, M; Tira, M E; De Luca, G

    1990-12-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) were extracted from minced normal human aorta intima and media and adjacent atherosclerotic plaques. Samples obtained from each individual artery which showed different degrees of atherosclerotic involvement were studied separately. Comparing normal and atherosclerotic areas from the same aorta, the hexuronic acid content was always lower in the atherosclerotic minces. Atherosclerotic samples always contained a higher percentage amount of chondroitinase AC resistant material. PGs were sequentially extracted with increasing guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) concentrations. 0.4 M GuHCl extracted about 13% of total PGs, containing mostly chondroitin sulphate (CS), whilst 4 M GuHCl extracted about 50% of total PGs, containing CS, dermatan sulphate (DS), heparan sulphate and hyaluronic acid. PGs from atherosclerotic minces showed a higher DS amount, based on electrophoretic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis. PGs extracted with 4 M GuHCl were further characterized by gel-chromatography and by CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The relative content of PGs with highest hydrodynamic size appeared to be markedly reduced in all the atherosclerotic samples. LDL/GAGs and LDL/PGs interactions were studied by affinity chromatography. GAGs obtained by papain digestion of PGs extracted from atherosclerotic areas contained a glycosaminoglycuronan interacting more strongly with human LDL than GAGs from normal areas of the same artery. The complete elution of PGs required higher NaCl concentration than GAGs. Moreover, PGs from atherosclerotic samples showed higher affinity for LDL than PGs from normal areas of the same aorta.

  12. Hippocampal proteoglycans brevican and versican are linked to spatial memory of Sprague-Dawley rats in the morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Sase, Ajinkya; Kircher, Susanne G; Wan, Jia; Berger, Johannes; Höger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2014-09-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are major constituents of the extracellular matrix and have recently been proposed to contribute to synaptic plasticity. Hippocampal PGs have not yet been studied or linked to memory. The aim of the study, therefore, was to isolate and characterize rat hippocampal PGs and determine their possible role in spatial memory. PGs were extracted from rat hippocampi by anion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by nano LC-MS/MS. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were tested in the morris water maze. PGs agrin, amyloid beta A4 protein, brevican, glypican-1, neurocan, phosphacan, syndecan-4, and versican were identified in the hippocampi. Brevican and versican levels in the membrane fraction were higher in the trained group, correlating with the time spent in the target quadrant. α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor GluR1 was co-precipitated with brevican and versican. Levels for a receptor complex containing GluR1 was higher in trained while GluR2 and GluR3-containing complex levels were higher in yoked rats. The findings provide information about the PGs present in the rat hippocampus, demonstrating that versican and brevican are linked to memory retrieval in the morris water maze and that PGs interact with α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor GluR1, which is linked to memory retrieval. Proteoglycans (PGs) are major constituents of the extracellular matrix of the brain and were proposed to contribute to synaptic plasticity. This report addressed PGs in rat hippocampus and suggests that PGs brevican and versican are linked to spatial memory, and form a complex with the GluR1 subunit of the AMPA receptor, a key signaling molecule in memory mechanisms.

  13. Basement membrane of mouse bone marrow sinusoids shows distinctive structure and proteoglycan composition: a high resolution ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Osmond, D G

    2001-11-01

    Venous sinusoids in bone marrow are the site of a large-scale traffic of cells between the extravascular hemopoietic compartment and the blood stream. The wall of the sinusoids consists solely of a basement membrane interposed between a layer of endothelial cells and an incomplete covering of adventitial cells. To examine its possible structural specialization, the basement membrane of bone marrow sinusoids has now been examined by high resolution electron microscopy of perfusion-fixed mouse bone marrow. The basement membrane layer was discontinuous, consisting of irregular masses of amorphous material within a uniform 60-nm-wide space between apposing endothelial cells and adventitial cell processes. At maximal magnifications, the material was resolved as a random arrangement of components lacking the "cord network" formation seen in basement membranes elsewhere. Individual components exhibited distinctive ultrastructural features whose molecular identity has previously been established. By these morphological criteria, the basement membrane contained unusually abundant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) revealed by 3-nm-wide "double tracks," and moderate amounts of both laminin as dense irregular coils and type IV collagen as 1-1.5-nm-wide filaments, together with less conspicuous amounts of amyloid P forming pentagonal frames. In contrast, 4.5-5-nm-wide "double tracks" characteristic of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) were absent. The findings demonstrate that, in comparison with "typical" basement membranes in other tissues, the bone marrow sinusoidal basement membrane is uniquely specialized in several respects. Its discontinuous nature, lack of network organization, and absence of HSPG, a molecule that normally helps to maintain membrane integrity, may facilitate disassembly and reassembly of basement membrane material in concert with movements of adventitial cell processes as maturing hemopoietic cells pass through the sinusoidal wall: the

  14. Altered Signaling in the G1 Phase Deregulates Chondrocyte Growth in a Mouse Model With Proteoglycan Undersulfation

    PubMed Central

    Leonardis, Fabio De; Monti, Luca; Gualeni, Benedetta; Tenni, Ruggero; Forlino, Antonella; Rossi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In several skeletal dysplasias defects in extracellular matrix molecules affect not only the structural and mechanical properties of cartilage, but also the complex network of signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Sulfated proteoglycans, besides playing an important structural role in cartilage, are crucial in modulating the transport, diffusion, and interactions of growth factors with their specific targets, taking part in the regulation of signaling pathways involved in skeletal development and growth. In this work, we investigated by real time PCR and Western blots of the microdissected growth plate and by immunohistochemistry the molecular basis of reduced chondrocyte proliferation in the growth plate of the dtd mouse, a chondrodysplastic model with defective chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan sulfation of articular and growth plate cartilage. We detected activation of the Wnt pathway, leading to an increase in the non-phosphorylated form of nuclear β-catenin and subsequent up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. β-Catenin was further stabilized by up-regulation of Smad3 expression through TGF-β pathway synergistic activation. We demonstrate that notwithstanding cyclin D1 expression increase, cell cycle progression is compromised in the G1 phase due to reduced phosphorylation of the pocket protein p130 leading to inhibition of transcription factors of the E2F family which are crucial for cell cycle progression and DNA replication. These data, together with altered Indian hedgehox signaling detected previously, explain at the molecular level the reduced chondrocyte proliferation rate of the dtd growth plate leading to reduced skeletal growth. J. Cell. Biochem. 115: 1779–1786, 2014. PMID:24820054

  15. Secretion of an articular cartilage proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity by murine T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, G M; Sapolsky, A I; Malemud, C J

    1985-01-01

    Destruction of articular cartilage is the hallmark of inflammatory arthritides. Enzymes elaborated by mononuclear cells infiltrating the synovium mediate, in part, the degradation of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Since mononuclear cells are the dominant cell type found in chronic inflammatory synovitis, we investigated whether interaction of immune mononuclear cells with antigen initiated the synthesis and secretion of a proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. Proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity was monitored by the capacity of murine spleen cell conditioned medium to release [3H]serine/35SO4 incorporated into rabbit cartilage proteoglycan monomer fraction (A1D1), and by the relative change in specific viscosity of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan monomer. The results demonstrated that both virgin and immune mononuclear cells spontaneously generated proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity and that cellular activation and proliferation induced by the antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin or the mitogen phytohemagglutinin was not required. Kinetic studies demonstrated stable release of the enzyme activity over 72 h. Cell separation studies showed that T lymphocytes, a thymoma line, and macrophages separately produced proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. The enzyme activity has been partially characterized and appears to belong to a class of neutral pH metal-dependent proteinases. These observations, the first to demonstrate that T lymphocytes secrete an enzyme capable of degrading cartilage proteoglycan, raise the possibility that this enzyme activity contributes to cartilage extracellular matrix destruction in vivo. Moreover, these data support the conclusion that production of this enzyme by T lymphocytes is independent of an antigen-specific stimulus. PMID:3897284

  16. Water in K and M giant stars unveiled by ISO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.

    2001-09-01

    Based on the spectra obtained with Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, we detected the 6.3 mu m bands of water in the late K giant Aldebaran (alpha Tau) and several early M giant stars (between M0 and M3.5), which have been deemed to be too warm for tri-atomic H2O molecule to reside in their photospheres. The water column densities range (0.2 - 2) *E18 molecules cm-2 in our sample of K and M giant stars and the excitation temperatures are 1500 K or higher. Thus, the water bands are not originating in cool stellar winds either. The presence of water in the K and early M giant stars was quite unexpected from the traditional picture of the atmosphere of the red giant star consisting of the photosphere, hot chromosphere, and cool wind. We confirm that a rather warm molecule forming region should exist as a new component of the atmosphere of red giant stars and that this should be a general phenomenon in late-type stars. Based on the data archives of ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, The Netherlands, and the UK) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  17. Giant Kerr nonlinearities in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Rebić, Stojan; Twamley, Jason; Milburn, Gerard J

    2009-10-09

    The very small size of optical nonlinearities places strict restrictions on the types of novel physics one can explore. This work describes how a single artificial multilevel Cooper pair box molecule, interacting with a superconducting microwave coplanar resonator, when suitably driven, can generate extremely large optical nonlinearities at microwave frequencies, with no associated absorption. We describe how the giant self-Kerr effect can be detected by measuring the second-order correlation function and quadrature squeezing spectrum.

  18. Proteoglycans from bovine fetal epiphyseal cartilage. Sedimentation velocity and light scattering studies of the effect of link protein on proteoglycan aggregate size and stability.

    PubMed

    Tang, L H; Rosenberg, L C; Reihanian, H; Jamieson, A M; Blackwell, J

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycan monomer and link proteins were isolated from bovine fetal epiphyseal cartilage and characterized. The physical characteristics of proteoglycan monomer were: s0(20) = 21.3 S, D0t,z = 4.25 x 10(-8)cm2/sec, Mw = 3 x 10(6) and Rg,z = 980A. Link protein preparations contained link proteins 1 and 2, but little or none of the fragment, link protein 3. Link protein-stabilized and link protein-free proteoglycan aggregates were reassembled from proteoglycan monomer, link protein and hyaluronate. The effect of epiphyseal cartilage link protein on aggregate size and stability was examined in sedimentation velocity studies. Compared with link protein from mature bovine nasal and articular cartilages, which contain appreciable amounts of link protein 3, epiphyseal cartilage link protein dramatically stabilized aggregates at pH 5. In the presence of link protein, 92% of the proteoglycan monomers were bound as aggregate at pH 7, and 81% were bound at pH 5. In the absence of link protein, 51% of monomers were bound at pH 7, and only 32% were bound at pH 5. The progressive dissociation of link protein-free aggregates as a function of decreasing pH, and of increasing temperature, was also examined in dynamic light scattering studies. The results of the light scattering studies were in perfect accord with the results of the sedimentation velocity studies. However, compared with the sedimentation velocity studies, the dynamic light scattering studies provided a more detailed and informative description of the dissociation of the link-free aggregate as a function of pH, as a function of temperature, and of the capacity of link protein to stabilize aggregate against dissociation at decreased pH or elevated temperature.

  19. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  20. Complex Cooperative Functions of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Shape Nervous System Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Lázaro-Peña, María I.; Tecle, Eillen; Gomez, Nathali; Bülow, Hannes E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the nervous system is a complex process requiring the integration of numerous molecular cues to form functional circuits. Many cues are regulated by heparan sulfates, a class of linear glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides. These sugars contain distinct modification patterns that regulate protein–protein interactions. Misexpressing the homolog of KAL-1/anosmin-1, a neural cell adhesion molecule mutant in Kallmann syndrome, in Caenorhabditis elegans causes a highly penetrant, heparan sulfate–dependent axonal branching phenotype in AIY interneurons. In an extended forward genetic screen for modifiers of this phenotype, we identified alleles in new as well as previously identified genes involved in HS biosynthesis and modification, namely the xylosyltransferase sqv-6, the HS-6-O-sulfotransferase hst-6, and the HS-3-O-sulfotransferase hst-3.2. Cell-specific rescue experiments showed that different HS biosynthetic and modification enzymes can be provided cell-nonautonomously by different tissues to allow kal-1-dependent branching of AIY. In addition, we show that heparan sulfate proteoglycan core proteins that carry the heparan sulfate chains act genetically in a highly redundant fashion to mediate kal-1-dependent branching in AIY neurons. Specifically, lon-2/glypican and unc-52/perlecan act in parallel genetic pathways and display synergistic interactions with sdn-1/syndecan to mediate kal-1 function. Because all of these heparan sulfate core proteins have been shown to act in different tissues, these studies indicate that KAL-1/anosmin-1 requires heparan sulfate with distinct modification patterns of different cellular origin for function. Our results support a model in which a three-dimensional scaffold of heparan sulfate mediates KAL-1/anosmin-1 and intercellular communication through complex and cooperative interactions. In addition, the genes we have identified could contribute to the etiology of Kallmann syndrome in humans. PMID:25098771

  1. Benoxaprofen stimulates proteoglycan synthesis in normal canine knee cartilage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Palmoski, M.J.; Brandt, K.D.

    1983-06-01

    Several nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs which are cyclooxygenase inhibitors (e.g., salicylates, fenoprofen, ibuprofen) have been shown to suppress proteoglycan synthesis by normal joint cartilage in vitro. We examined the effect of benoxaprofen, a long-acting proprionic acid derivative which inhibits lipoxygenase in addition to causing moderate cyclooxygenase inhibition. When added to the culture medium in concentrations comparable with those obtainable in serum of patients treated with the drug (e.g., 10 and 50 micrograms/ml), benoxaprofen increased proteoglycan synthesis in slices of normal canine knee cartilage to 126% and 135%, respectively, of control levels. These concentrations of the drug augmented net protein synthesis to 154% and 123%, respectively, of control levels. Incorporation of /sup 3/H glucosamine into 9-aminoacridine precipitable material was increased by benoxaprofen, showing that it stimulates net proteoglycan synthesis, and not merely sulfation. At concentrations of either 10 or 50 micrograms/ml, the drug had no effect on proteoglycan catabolism or on the ability of proteoglycans to interact with cartilage hyaluronic acid to form macromolecular aggregates. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a free radical scavenger which, like benoxaprofen, inhibits the lipoxygenase as well as cyclooxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, also increased /sup 35/S glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cartilage slices. The stimulation of glycosaminoglycan and protein synthesis by benoxaprofen suggests that its action on the chondrocyte may be different from that of most other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  2. Effects of Decorin Proteoglycan on Fibrillogenesis, Ultrastructure, and Mechanics of Type I Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Shawn P.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The proteoglycan decorin is known to affect both the fibrillogenesis and the resulting ultrastructure of in vitro polymerized collagen gels. However, little is known about its effects on mechanical properties. In this study, 3D collagen gels were polymerized into tensile test specimens in the presence of decorin proteoglycan, decorin core protein, or dermatan sulfate (DS). Collagen fibrillogenesis, ultrastructure, and mechanical properties were then quantified using a turbidity assay, 2 forms of microscopy (SEM and confocal), and tensile testing. The presence of decorin proteoglycan or core protein decreased the rate and ultimate turbidity during fibrillogenesis and decreased the number of fibril aggregates (fibers) compared to control gels. The addition of decorin and core protein increased the linear modulus by a factor of 2 compared to controls, while the addition of DS reduced the linear modulus by a factor of 3. Adding decorin after fibrillogenesis had no effect, suggesting that decorin must be present during fibrillogenesis to increase the mechanical properties of the resulting gels. These results show that the inclusion of decorin proteoglycan during fibrillogenesis of Type I collagen increases the modulus and tensile strength of resulting collagen gels. The increase in mechanical properties when polymerization occurs in the presence of the decorin proteoglycan is due to a reduction in the aggregation of fibrils into larger order structures such as fibers and fiber bundles. PMID:23608680

  3. The heterogeneity of the non-aggregating proteoglycans of the human intervertebral disc.

    PubMed Central

    DiFabio, J L; Pearce, R H; Caterson, B; Hughes, H

    1987-01-01

    Non-aggregating proteoglycans of differing average hydrodynamic volumes were prepared from nuclei pulposi and anuli fibrosi of three human lumbar spines and characterized by biochemical and immunochemical analyses. The hexose-to-hexuronate and protein-to-hexuronate ratios increased with decreasing hydrodynamic volume. Analysis by composite agarose/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis has demonstrated two aggregating subpopulations [McDevitt, Jahnke & Green (1982) Trans. Annu. Meet. Orthop. Res. Soc. 7, 50]. In the present study, electrophoresis of the non-aggregating pools has shown three additional subpopulations, here named bands III, IV and V. The two smallest proteoglycan pools from each tissue contained two and three components respectively. These components were isolated by preparative electrophoresis and analysed. Band III was a proteoglycan richer in keratan sulphate than in chondroitin sulphate; band IV was a proteoglycan richer in chondroitin sulphate than in keratan sulphate; band V contained only chondroitin sulphate. Unsaturated disaccharides prepared from the chondroitin sulphate of all bands were predominantly 6-sulphated, with only 5-15% 4-sulphated. The molecular masses of the chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate did not differ between the bands. The amino acid composition of band III differed from that of band IV. Thus three distinct subpopulations of non-aggregating proteoglycan were demonstrated in the human intervertebral disc. PMID:3117036

  4. 1980 Volvo award in basic science. Proteoglycans in experimental intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lipson, S J; Muir, H

    1981-01-01

    An animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration induced surgically by ventral nuclear herniation in the rabbit produces morphologic changes of disc degeneration. Histologic characteristics and proteoglycan changes have been studied at various times after herniation. After injury, there was metaplasia into fibrocartilage originating from the cells along the margins of the annular wound, with proliferation of cells changing almost the entire disc space into fibrocartilage. A vertebral osteophyte occurred through an endochondral ossification sequence. Aggregating proteoglycans had two periods of repletion in the early course of degeneration. The water content of the disc was rapidly but only transiently restored in the first two days after herniation, whilst the changes in the total proteoglycan content of the disc paralleled these changes. Hyaluronic acid content decreased rapidly after herniation, but the size of the proteoglycan monomers did not change with degeneration. It is suggested that loss of confined fluid mechanics signals an abortive repair attempt rather than that of biochemical changes in proteoglycans initiate disc degeneration.

  5. Epidermal and hair follicle progenitor cells express melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Lucy; Wong, Soon-Tee; Tidman, Nick; Quinn, Anthony; Philpott, Michael P; Leigh, Irene M

    2004-02-01

    Basal keratinocytes in the epidermis and hair follicle are biologically heterogeneous but must include a stable subpopulation of epidermal stem cells. In animal models these can be identified by their retention of radioactive label due to their slow cycle (label-retaining cells) but human studies largely depend on in vitro characterization of colony forming efficiency and clonogenicity. Differential integrin expression has been used to detect cells of increased proliferative potential but further stem cell markers are urgently required for in vivo and in vitro characterization. Using LHM2, a monoclonal antibody reacting with a high molecular weight melanoma-associated proteoglycan core protein, a subset of basal keratinocytes in both the interfollicular epidermis and the hair follicle has been identified. Coexpression of melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan with keratins 15 and 19 as well as beta 1 and alpha 6 integrins has been examined in adult and fetal human skin from hair bearing, nonhair bearing, and palmoplantar regions. Although melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan coexpression with a subset of beta 1 integrin bright basal keratinocytes within the epidermis suggests that melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan colocalizes with epidermal stem cells, melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression within the hair follicle was more complex and multiple subpopulations of basal outer root sheath keratinocytes are described. These data suggest that epithelial compartmentalization of the outer root sheath is more complex than interfollicular epidermis and further supports the hypothesis that more than one hair follicle stem cell compartment may exist.

  6. Purification and partial characterization of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans from cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatino, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans synthesized by cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells were isolated after incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Glycosaminoglycans were quantitated by two-dimensional electrophoresis after proteolytic digestion of the cell layers and media. The results show that the presence of serum has no effect on the chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate content of the cell layers. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid of the cell layers was three times higher in the presence of serum. In the medium , the quantity of hyaluronic was two times higher in the presence of serum while the other glycosaminoglycans remained unchanged. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid was unaffected by the presence of serum. Specific proteoglycans were isolated from medium after with (/sup 35/S)-sulfate and (/sup 3/H)-serine by isopycnic ultracentrifugation and chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and DEAE-cellulose. Preparations contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a condroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans synthesized by rabbit aorta smooth muscle cells are similar to those from human aorta.

  7. Differential expression of proteoglycan epitopes by ovine intervertebral disc cells

    PubMed Central

    MELROSE, JAMES; SMITH, SUSAN; GHOSH, PETER

    2000-01-01

    The alginate bead culture system has been utilised by several groups to examine the in vitro proteoglycan (PG) metabolism of chondrocytes and intervertebral disc cells, but the nature of the PGs produced has not been examined in detail. This is largely due to the difficulty of separating the anionically charged sodium alginate support matrix from PGs which are similarly charged. In the present study ovine annulus fibrosus, transitional zone and nucleus pulposus cells were dissociated enzymatically from their respective matrices by sequential digestion with pronase/clostridial collagenase and DNAase and then cultured in alginate beads for 10 d. The beads were solubilised and subjected to DEAE Sepharose CL6B anion exchange chromatography to separate the sodium alginate bead support matrix material quantitatively from the disc cell PGs. The alginate free bead PGs were then subjected to composite agarose polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to resolve PG populations and the PGs were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes by semidry electroblotting. The PGs were identified by probing the blots with a panel of antibodies to defined PG core protein and glycosaminoglycan side chain epitopes. Alginate beads of disc cells were also embedded in paraffin wax and 4μm sections cut to immunolocalise decorin, biglycan, versican, and the 7-D-4 PG epitope within the beads. Decorin and biglycan had similar distributions in the beads, being localised on the cell surface whereas versican and the 7-D-4 PG epitope were immunolocalised interterritoriarly. This study is the first to demonstrate that ovine disc cells synthesise versican in alginate bead culture. Furthermore the immunoblotting studies also showed that a proportion of the 7-D-4 PG epitope was colocalised with versican. PMID:11005711

  8. Influence of genetics on the nephritogenic potential of proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Lelongt, B.; Kashihara, N.; Makino, H.; Kanwar, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    Nephritogenic potential of antibodies directed against one of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) components, i.e., heparan sulfate-proteoglycan (HS-PG), was investigated in different strain of rats, i.e., Brown Norway, Lewis, Long Evans, and Sprague-Dawley. The rats were given two intravenous injections of anti-HS-PG antibody on days 1 and 3, and killed 2 to 8 weeks later. Before killing, blood and urine were collected for determination of anti-rabbit IgG levels and excretion of proteins, respectively. In addition, the right kidney was perfused with 125I-anti-rat IgG to quantitate the amount of immune-complexes present within the GBM. The tissues were processed for morphologic, autoradiographic, and immunofluorescent studies. The anti-HS-PG antibody was seen uniformly bound to GBM equally in all strains of rats. However, the protein-uric response was as follows: Brown Norway much much greater than Lewis much greater than Long Evans greater than Sprague Dawley. Also, the glomerular cells, monocytes in the glomerular capillaries, immunoreactivity of rat IgG and C3 frequency of subepithelial immune deposits, serum levels of anti-rabbit IgG, and the amount of 125I-anti-rat IgG bound to the GBM were proportionately increased among different strains of rats. The data suggest that the sustained presence of anti-HS-PG antibodies in the subepithelial aspect of the GBM with differential humoral response in the production of the antibody by the host most likely attributed to the variable glomerular damage in different strains of rats. Thus, it seems that the genetic makeup of a given strain of rat heavily influences the nephritogenic potential of an antibody and consequentially the outcome of the immune complex-mediated glomerular injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1519664

  9. Optical Clearing in Collagen- and Proteoglycan-Rich Osteochondral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Corey P.; Novak, Tyler; Gilliland, Kateri Fites; Marshall, Peter; Calve, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent developments in optical clearing and microscopy technology have enabled the imaging of intact tissues at the millimeter scale to characterize cells via fluorescence labeling. While these techniques have facilitated the three-dimensional cellular characterization within brain and heart, study of dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system have been largely unexplored. Here, we quantify how optical clearing impacted the cell and tissue morphology of collagen-, proteoglycan-, and mineral-rich cartilage and bone from the articulating knee joint. Methods Water-based fructose solutions were used for optical clearing of bovine osteochondral tissues, followed by imaging with transmission and confocal microscopy. To confirm preservation of tissue structure during the clearing process, samples were mechanically tested in unconfined compression and visualized by cryoSEM. Results Optical clearing enhanced light transmission through cartilage, but not subchondral bone regions. Fluorescent staining and immunolabeling was preserved through sample preparations, enabling imaging to cartilage depths 5 times deeper than previously reported, limited only by the working distance of the microscope objective. Chondrocyte volume remained unchanged in response to, and upon the reversal, of clearing. Equilibrium modulus increased in cleared samples, and was attributed to exchange of interstitial fluid with the more viscous fructose solution, but returned to control levels upon unclearing. In addition, cryoSEM-based analysis of cartilage showed no ultrastructural changes. Conclusion We anticipate large-scale microscopy of diverse connective tissues will enable the study of intact, three-dimensional interfaces (e.g. osteochondral) and cellular connectivity as a function of development, disease, and regeneration, which have been previously hindered by specimen opacity. PMID:25454370

  10. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  11. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  12. The in vivo regulation of pioneer axon growth by FGF-2 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cultured embryos of the cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nyhus, J K; Denburg, J L

    1998-08-01

    Antibody perturbation experiments on cultured cockroach embryos demonstrated that a localized source of an FGF-2-like immunoreactive molecule in the head is required for the proper growth of pioneer axons in the leg. The study of axon growth in various fragments of cultured embryos and in the presence of various conditioned media showed that FGF-2 is needed to counteract the effects of an inhibitor of axon growth produced in the body trunk of the embryo. Endogenous heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate these effects of FGF-2 on axon growth. The results of experiments with FGF-2 and/or body trunk axon growth inhibitor added to the culture medium indicate that more globally and uniformly distributed molecules may play as important a role in axon guidance as the more spatially restricted guidance cues. The results are interpreted in terms of a model that is consistent with a role for the FGF-2 receptor in axon growth.

  13. Sweet on Hedgehogs: regulatory roles of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in Hedgehog-dependent cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bandari, Shyam; Exner, Sebastian; Ortmann, Corinna; Bachvarova, Velina; Vortkamp, Andrea; Grobe, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Morphogens exert their effects over long distances, typically by spreading from cell to cell to activate signal transduction in surrounding tissues in concentration-dependent manner. One example of a morphogen is the signaling molecule Hedgehog (Hh), which controls growth and patterning during development and has also been implicated in the progression of numerous cancers. To this end, accessory mechanisms that release, transport, and receive Hhs are required to elicit temporally and spatially specific responses in cells and tissues. The Hh spreading mechanism is especially intriguing, because all Hhs are released from the producing cells despite being synthesized as dually lipidated, membrane-tethered molecules. In addition to this cellular association, Hhs bind strongly to extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which is expected to further reduce their spreading. Paradoxically, several lines of evidence suggest that Hh gradient formation actually requires HSPG expression, and that HSPGs act as both positive and negative regulators of Hh function. This article reviews the multiple roles that HSPGs play in Hh morphogen function, and discusses their congruity with proposed mechanisms of Hh solubilization, transport, and signal reception in vertebrate and invertebrate tissues.

  14. Embryonic lung morphogenesis in organ culture: experimental evidence for a proteoglycan function in the extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Bassett, K. E.; Spooner, B. S. Jr

    1993-01-01

    The lung rudiment, isolated from mid-gestation (11 day) mouse embryos, can undergo morphogenesis in organ culture. Observation of living rudiments, in culture, reveals both growth and ongoing bronchiolar branching activity. To detect proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, and deposition in the extracellular matrix, rudiments were metabolically labeled with radioactive sulfate, then fixed, embedded, sectioned and processed for autoradiography. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) types, composing the carbohydrate component of the proteoglycans, were evaluated by selective GAG degradative approaches that showed chondroitin sulfate PG principally associated with the interstitial matrix, and heparan sulfate PG principally associated with the basement membrane. Experiments using the proteoglycan biosynthesis disrupter, beta-xyloside, suggest that when chondroitin sulfate PG deposition into the ECM is perturbed, branching morphogenesis is compromised.

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering studies from solutions of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Stivala, S.S.; Damle, S.P.; Gregory, J.D.; Bunick, G.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, of the proteoglycan subunit of bovine nasal cartilage in 0.15N LiCl at 25/sup 0/C yielded the radius of gyration, R/sub g/, radius of gyration of the cross-section, R/sub q/, persistence length, a, and the molecular weight, M. The following values were obtained: M = 3.9 x 10/sup 6/, R/sub g/ = 745 A, R/sub q/ = 34.6 A and a = 35.2 A. These values compare favorably with those that were obtained from small angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, of a similar extract. The scattering curve of the proteoglycan subunit in D/sub 2/O showed a characteristic broad peak in the specified angular range similar to that observed from SAXS, thus confirming the polyelectrolyte nature of the proteoglycan. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  16. Proteoglycan and Collagen Biochemical Variations during Fluoroquinolone-Induced Chondrotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Marie-Agnès; Gegout-Pottie, Pascale; Minn, Alain; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Terlain, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Although fluoroquinolone antibacterials have a broad therapeutic use, with a relatively low incidence of severe side effects, they have been reported to induce lesions in the cartilage of growing animals by a mechanism that remains unclear. This study was undertaken to determine the potentially deleterious effect of a high dose of pefloxacin (400 mg/kg of body weight) on two main constituents of cartilage in mice, i.e., proteoglycans and collagen. Variations in levels of proteoglycan anabolism measured by in vivo [35S]sulfate incorporation into cartilage and oxidative modifications of collagen assessed by detection of carbonyl derivatives were monitored after administration of pefloxacin. Treatment of mice with 1 day of pefloxacin treatment significantly decreased the rate of biosynthesis of proteoglycan for the first 24 h. However, no difference was observed after 48 h. The decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was accompanied by a marked drop in serum sulfate concentration and a concomitant increase in urinary sulfate excretion. The decrease in proteoglycan synthesis, also observed ex vivo, may suggest a direct effect of pefloxacin on this process, rather than it being a consequence of a low concentration of sulfate. On the other hand, treatment with pefloxacin for 10 days induced oxidative damage to collagen. In conclusion, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that pefloxacin administration to mice leads to modifications in the metabolism and integrity of extracellular proteins, such as collagen and proteoglycans, which may account for the side effects observed. These results offer new insights to explain quinolone-induced disorders in growing articular cartilage. PMID:10582882

  17. Distribution of proteoglycans during the hair growth cycle in human skin.

    PubMed

    Westgate, G E; Messenger, A G; Watson, L P; Gibson, W T

    1991-02-01

    The involvement of proteoglycans in hair growth has been recognized through the observation of increased hair growth in diseases such as the mucopolysaccharidoses and pre-tibial myxedema, which involve an increase in skin proteoglycan content. In an attempt to understand this, we have examined the distribution of chondroitin 6 sulphate (C6S), unsulphated chondroitin (COS), dermatan sulphate (DS), and heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG) in frozen tissue sections of normal scalp by immunostaining. Results show that during anagen, the thick connective tissue sheath around the follicle strains strongly for C6S, COS, and DS. COS is uniquely associated with this region and is not found beneath the epidermis or infundibular epithelium. HSPG is, however, localized in the basement membrane zone adjacent to the outer root sheath. In addition, all of these proteoglycans are localized in the dermal papilla. In mid-catagen, we observed significant loss of C6S and COS staining from both the dermal papilla and the connective tissue sheath, but no decrease in staining for HSPG. In late catagen, very little staining of C6S and COS was observed. In early anagen, we observed that C6S was again present in the connective tissue sheath and dermal papilla; however, COS staining appeared to be weaker and less closely associated with the follicle. HSPG staining was observed in early anagen in a pattern very similar to that found for other basement membrane components. Results for DS were not obtained for catagen or early anagen. These results provide further evidence that hair growth is associated with the presence of chondroitin proteoglycans in the follicle environment and that the cessation of growth is associated with their removal. Further studies are underway to characterize the relationship between hair growth and proteoglycans.

  18. Adjuvant neurotrophic factors in peripheral nerve repair with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-reduced acellular nerve allografts

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Richard B.; Sexton, Kevin W.; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles L.; Nookala, Ratnam; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Tisdale, Keonna Y.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Shack, R. Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular nerve allografts are now standard tools in peripheral nerve repair due to decreased donor site morbidity and operative time savings. Preparation of nerve allografts involves several steps of decellularization and modification of extracellular matrix to remove chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth through a poorly understood mechanism involving RhoA and ECM-integrin interactions. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is an enzyme that degrades CSPG molecules and has been shown to promote neurite outgrowth following injury of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Variable results following chondroitinase ABC treatment make it difficult to predict the effects of this drug in human nerve allografts, especially in the presence of native extracellular signaling molecules. Several studies have shown cross-talk between neurotrophic factor and CSPG signaling pathways, but their interaction remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the adjuvant effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neurite outgrowth post-injury in CSPG-reduced substrates and acellular nerve allografts. Materials and Methods E12 chicken DRG explants were cultured in medium containing ChABC, ChABC + NGF, ChABC + GDNF or control media. Explants were imaged at 3 d and neurite outgrowths measured. The rat sciatic nerve injury model involved a 1-cm sciatic nerve gap that was microsurgically repaired with ChABC pre-treated acellular nerve allografts. Prior to implantation, nerve allografts were incubated in NGF, GDNF or sterile water. Nerve histology was evaluated at 5d and 8wk post-injury. Results The addition of GDNF in vitro produced significant increase in sensory neurite length at 3 d compared to ChABC alone (P < 0.01), while NGF was not significantly different from control. In vivo adjuvant NGF produced increases in total myelinated axon count (P < 0.005) and motor axon

  19. Effect of testosterone on proteoglycans in the submandibular glands of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, J A; Tumilasci, O R; Curbelo, H M; Fernandez Lemos, S M; Arias, N H; Houssay, A B

    1990-12-01

    The proteoglycans in the submandibular salivary glands of castrated male Wistar rats were studied before and after the daily administration of testosterone propionate (TP) for one month. Castration decreased the weight of the glands and their uronic acid content. The administration of TP reversed these effects. Chromatographic separation of the uronic acid fractions was performed on cellulose microcolumns. The principal fractions were hyaluronic acid, heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. There were also changes in the physical properties of the proteoglycans. Castration decreased the range of distribution of molecular weight and the density, while the lateral chains of smaller length disappeared. TP administration to castrated rats reversed these effects.

  20. Effect of beta-D-xyloside on the glomerular proteoglycans. I. Biochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The effect of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside on glomerular extracellular matrices (glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix) proteoglycans was studied. The proteoglycans of rat kidneys were labeled with [35S]sulfate in the presence or absence of beta- xyloside (2.5 mM) by using an isolated organ perfusion system. The proteoglycans from the glomeruli and perfusion medium were isolated and characterized by Sepharose CL-6B chromatography and by their behavior in CsCl density gradients. With xyloside treatment there was a twofold decrease in 35S-labeled macromolecules in the tissues but a twofold increase in those recovered in the medium as compared with the control. The labeled proteoglycans extracted from control kidneys eluted as a single peak with Kav = 0.25 (Mr = approximately 130,000), and approximately 95% of the radioactivity was associated with heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS-PG), the remainder with chondroitin (or dermatan) sulfate proteoglycan (CS-PG). In the xyloside-treated kidneys, the proteoglycans extracted from the tissue eluted as two peaks, Kav = 0.25 (Mr = approximately 130,000) and 0.41 (Mr = approximately 46,000), which contained approximately 40 and approximately 60% of the total radioactivity, respectively. The first peak contained mostly the HS-PG (approximately 90%) while the second peak had a mixture of HS-PG (approximately 70%) and CS-PG (approximately 30%). In controls, approximately 90% of the radioactivity, mostly HS-PG, was confined to high density fractions of a CsCl density gradient. In contrast, in xyloside experiments, both HS- PG and CS-PG were distributed in variable proportions throughout the gradient. The incorporated 35S activity in the medium of xyloside- treated kidneys was twice that of the controls and had three to four times the amount of free chondroitin (or dermatan) sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains. The data suggest that beta-xyloside inhibits the addition of de novo synthesized glycosaminoglycan chains

  1. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans and Their Binding Proteins in Embryo Implantation and Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Kirn-Safran, Catherine; D’Souza, Sonia S.; Carson, Daniel D.

    2008-01-01

    Complex interactions occur among embryonic, placental and maternal tissues during embryo implantation. Many of these interactions are controlled by growth factors, extracellular matrix and cell surface components that share the ability to bind heparan sulfate (HS) polysaccharides. HS is carried by several classes of cell surface and secreted proteins called HS proteoglycan that are expressed in restricted patterns during implantation and placentation. This review will discuss the expression of HS proteoglycans and various HS binding growth factors as well as extracellular matrix components and HS-modifying enzymes that can release HS-bound proteins in the context of implantation and placentation. PMID:17766150

  2. Multivalent proteoglycan modulation of FGF mitogenic responses in perivascular cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzza, Sabrina; Ozerdem, Ugur; Denzel, Martin; Ranscht, Barbara; Bulian, Pietro; Cavallaro, Ugo; Zanocco, Daniela; Colombatti, Alfonso; Stallcup, William B; Perris, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Sprouting of angiogenic perivascular cells is thought to be highly dependent upon autocrine and paracrine growth factor stimulation. Accordingly, we report that corneal angiogenesis induced by ectopic FGF implantation is strongly impaired in NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan (PG) null mice known to harbour a putative deficit in pericyte proliferation/mobilization. Conversely, no significant differences were seen between wild type and knockout corneas when VEGF was used as an angiocrine factor. Perturbed responsiveness of NG2-deficient pericytes to paracrine and autocrine stimulation by several FGFs could be confirmed in cells isolated from NG2 null mice, while proliferation induced by other growth factors was equivalent in wild type and knockout cells. Identical results were obtained after siRNA-mediated knock-down of NG2 in human smooth muscle-like cell lines, as also demonstrated by the decreased levels of FGF receptor phosphorylation detected in these NG2 deprived cells. Binding assays with recombinant proteins and molecular interactions examined on live cells asserted that FGF-2 bound to NG2 in a glycosaminoglycan-independent, core protein-mediated manner and that the PG was alone capable of retaining FGF-2 on the cell membrane for subsequent receptor presentation. The use of dominant-negative mutant cells, engineered by combined transduction of NG2 deletion constructs and siRNA knock-down of the endogenous PG, allowed us to establish that the FGF co-receptor activity of NG2 is entirely mediated by its extracellular portion. In fact, forced overexpression of the NG2 ectodomain in human smooth muscle-like cells increased their FGF-2-induced mitosis and compensated for low levels of FGF receptor surface expression, in a manner equivalent to that produced by overexpression of the full-length NG2. Upon FGF binding, the cytoplasmic domain of NG2 is phosphorylated, but there is no evidence that this event elicits signal transductions that could bypass the FGFR-mediated ones

  3. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-06-16

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species.

  4. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  5. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  6. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  7. Immune Recognition of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan Epitopes in Mice with Proteoglycan-Induced Arthritis and in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Markovics, Adrienn; Ocskó, Tímea; Katz, Robert S.; Buzás, Edit I.; Glant, Tibor T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting the joints. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are frequently found in RA. Previous studies identified a citrullinated epitope in cartilage proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan that elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine production by RA T cells. We recently reported the presence of ACPA-reactive (citrullinated) PG in RA cartilage. Herein, we sought to identify additional citrullinated epitopes in human PG that are recognized by T cells or antibodies from RA patients. Methods We used mice with PG-induced arthritis (PGIA) as a screening tool to select citrulline (Cit)-containing PG peptides that were more immunogenic than the arginine (R)-containing counterparts. The selected peptide pairs were tested for induction of pro-inflammatory T-cell cytokine production in RA and healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures using ELISA and flow cytometry. Anti-Cit and anti-R peptide antibodies were detected by ELISA. Results Splenocytes from mice with PGIA exhibited greater T-cell cytokine secretion in response to the Cit than the R version of PG peptide 49 (P49) and anti-P49 antibodies were found in PGIA serum. PBMC from ACPA+ and ACPA- RA patients, but not from healthy controls, responded to Cit49 with robust cytokine production. High levels of anti-Cit49 antibodies were found in the plasma of a subset of ACPA+ RA patients. Another PG peptide (Cit13) similar to the previously described T-cell epitope induced greater cytokine responses than R13 by control (but not RA) PBMC, however, anti-Cit13 antibodies were rarely detected in human plasma. Conclusions We identified a novel citrullinated PG epitope (Cit49) that is highly immunogenic in mice with PGIA and in RA patients. We also describe T-cell and antibody reactivity with Cit49 in ACPA+ RA. As citrullinated PG might be present in RA articular cartilage, Cit PG epitope-induced T-cell activation or antibody deposition may

  8. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  9. The syndecan family of proteoglycans. Novel receptors mediating internalization of atherogenic lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuki, I V; Kuhn, K M; Lomazov, I R; Rothman, V L; Tuszynski, G P; Iozzo, R V; Swenson, T L; Fisher, E A; Williams, K J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to participate in lipoprotein catabolism, but the roles of specific proteoglycan classes have not been examined previously. Here, we studied the involvement of the syndecan proteoglycan family. First, transfection of CHO cells with expression vectors for several syndecan core proteins produced parallel increases in the cell association and degradation of lipoproteins enriched in lipoprotein lipase, a heparan-binding protein. Second, a chimeric construct, FcR-Synd1, that consists of the ectodomain of the IgG Fc receptor Ia linked to the highly conserved transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of syndecan-1 directly mediated efficient internalization, in a process triggered by ligand clustering. Third, internalization of lipase-enriched lipoproteins via syndecan-1 and of clustered IgGs via the chimera showed identical kinetics (t1/2 = 1 h) and identical dose-response sensitivities to cytochalasin B, which disrupts microfilaments, and to genistein, which inhibits tyrosine kinases. In contrast, internalization of the receptor-associated protein, which proceeds via coated pits, showed a t1/2 < 15 min, limited sensitivity to cytochalasin B, and complete insensitivity to genistein. Thus, syndecan proteoglycans can directly mediate ligand catabolism through a pathway with characteristics distinct from coated pits, and might act as receptors for atherogenic lipoproteins and other ligands in vivo. PMID:9294130

  10. Unique glycoprotein-proteoglycan complex defined by monoclonal antibody on human melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bumol, T F; Reisfeld, R A

    1982-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 9.2.27, with a high specificity for human melanoma cell surfaces has been utilized for biosynthetic studies in M21 human melanoma cells to define a unique antigenic complex consisting of a 250-kilodalton N-linked glycoprotein and a high molecular weight proteoglycan component larger than 400 kilodaltons. The 250-kilodalton glycoprotein has endoglycosidase H-sensitive precursors and shows a lower apparent molecular weight after treatment with neuraminidase. The biosynthesis of the proteoglycan component is inhibited by exposure of M21 cells to the monovalent ionophore monensin, this component can be labeled biosynthetically with 35SO4, is sensitive to beta-elimination in dilute base, and is degraded by both chondroitinase AC and ABC lyases, suggesting that it is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. These data demonstrate that the antigenic determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 9.2.27 is located on a glycoprotein-proteoglycan complex which may have unique implications for the interaction of glycoconjugates at the human melanoma tumor cell surface. Images PMID:6175965

  11. Heparin sequences in the heparan sulfate chains of an endothelial cell proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Nader, H.B.; Dietrich, C.P.; Buonassisi, V.; Colburn, P.

    1987-06-01

    The structure of the glycosaminoglycan chain of a heparan sulfate proteoglycan isolated from the conditioned medium of an endothelial cell line has been analyzed by using various degradative enzymes (heparitinase I, heparitinase II, heparinase, glycuronidase, sulfatases) from Flavobacterium heparinum. (/sup 35/S)sulfuric acid and/or (/sup 3/H) glucosamine ucre used in preparing heparan sulfate proteoglycan. This proteoglycan inhibits the thromboplastin-activated pathway of coagulation; as a consequence, the catalytic conversion of prothrombin to thrombin is arrested. Heparitinase I, an enzyme with specificity restricted to the heparan sulfate portion of the polysaccharide, releases fragments with the electrophoretic mobility and the structure of heparin. Conversely, as assessment of the size and distribution of the heparan sulfate regions has been provided by the use of heparinase, which, by degrading the heparin sections of the chain, releases two segments that exhibit the structure of heparan sulfate. One of these segments is attached to the protein core. On the basis of these findings, the heparan sulfate chain can be defined as a copolymer containing heparin regions in its structure. The combined use of these enzymes has made it possible to establish the disaccharide sequence of parts of the glycosaminoglycan moiety of this proteoglycan.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, T.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated (35S)sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function.

  13. Uncoupling of stem cell inhibition from monocyte chemoattraction in MIP-1alpha by mutagenesis of the proteoglycan binding site.

    PubMed

    Graham, G J; Wilkinson, P C; Nibbs, R J; Lowe, S; Kolset, S O; Parker, A; Freshney, M G; Tsang, M L; Pragnell, I B

    1996-12-02

    We have studied the role of proteoglycans in the function of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), a member of the proteoglycan binding chemokine family. Sequence and peptide analysis has identified a basic region within MIP-1alpha which appears to be the major determinant of proteoglycan binding and we have now produced a mutant of MIP-1alpha lacking the basic charges on two of the amino acids within this proteoglycan binding site. This mutant (Hep Mut) appears to have lost the ability to bind to proteoglycans. Bioassay of Hep Mut indicates that it has retained stem cell inhibitory properties but has a compromised activity as a monocyte chemoattractant, thus suggesting uncoupling of these two properties of MIP-1alpha. Receptor studies have indicated that the inactivity of Hep Mut on human monocytes correlates with its inability to bind to CCR1, a cloned human MIP-1alpha receptor. In addition, studies using proteoglycan deficient cells transfected with CCR1 have indicated that the proteoglycan binding site in MIP-1alpha is a site that is also involved in the docking of MIP-1alpha to the monocyte receptor. The site for interaction with the stem cell receptor must therefore be distinct, suggesting that MIP-1alpha utilizes different receptors for these two different biological processes.

  14. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  15. Uncoupling of stem cell inhibition from monocyte chemoattraction in MIP-1alpha by mutagenesis of the proteoglycan binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, G J; Wilkinson, P C; Nibbs, R J; Lowe, S; Kolset, S O; Parker, A; Freshney, M G; Tsang, M L; Pragnell, I B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the role of proteoglycans in the function of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), a member of the proteoglycan binding chemokine family. Sequence and peptide analysis has identified a basic region within MIP-1alpha which appears to be the major determinant of proteoglycan binding and we have now produced a mutant of MIP-1alpha lacking the basic charges on two of the amino acids within this proteoglycan binding site. This mutant (Hep Mut) appears to have lost the ability to bind to proteoglycans. Bioassay of Hep Mut indicates that it has retained stem cell inhibitory properties but has a compromised activity as a monocyte chemoattractant, thus suggesting uncoupling of these two properties of MIP-1alpha. Receptor studies have indicated that the inactivity of Hep Mut on human monocytes correlates with its inability to bind to CCR1, a cloned human MIP-1alpha receptor. In addition, studies using proteoglycan deficient cells transfected with CCR1 have indicated that the proteoglycan binding site in MIP-1alpha is a site that is also involved in the docking of MIP-1alpha to the monocyte receptor. The site for interaction with the stem cell receptor must therefore be distinct, suggesting that MIP-1alpha utilizes different receptors for these two different biological processes. Images PMID:8978677

  16. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  17. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  18. Function of Membrane-Associated Proteoglycans in the Regulation of Satellite Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Muscle growth can be divided into embryonic and postnatal periods. During the embryonic period, mesenchymal stem cells proliferate and differentiate to form muscle fibers. Postnatal muscle growth (hypertrophy) is characterized by the enlargement of existing muscle fiber size. Satellite cells (also known as adult myoblasts) are responsible for hypertrophy. The activity of satellite cells can be regulated by their extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is composed of collagens, proteoglycans, non-collagenous glycoproteins, cytokines and growth factors. Proteoglycans contain a central core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycans (GAGs: chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate) and N- or O-linked glycosylation chains. Membrane-associated proteoglycans attach to the cell membrane either through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor or transmembrane domain. The GAGs can bind proteins including cytokines and growth factors. Both cytokines and growth factors play important roles in regulating satellite cell growth and development. Cytokines are generally associated with immune cells. However, cytokines can also affect muscle cell development. For instance, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leukemia inhibitory factor have been reported to affect the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and myoblasts. Growth factors are potent stimulators or inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. The proper function of some cytokines and growth factors requires an interaction with the cell membrane-associated proteoglycans to enhance the affinity to bind to their primary receptors to initiate downstream signal transduction. This chapter is focused on the interaction of membrane-associated proteoglycans with cytokines and growth factors, and their role in satellite cell growth and development.

  19. Proteoglycans in the microvasculature. I. Histochemical localization in microvessels of the rabbit eye.

    PubMed Central

    Ausprunk, D. H.; Boudreau, C. L.; Nelson, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of ruthenium red (RR) stainable material within small blood vessels located in the limbus of the rabbit eye was studied. Proteoglycans were identified in this material by digesting tissues with Streptomyces hyaluronidase, testicular hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC, or heparinase before ruthenium red staining. Neuraminidase digestion enabled separate identification of sialoglycoprotein. The luminal surface of endothelial cells demonstrates an RR-stained glycocalyx containing both sialoglycoprotein and proteoglycans, which are removed by testicular hyaluronidase and crude heparinase. The basal coat of endothelial cells and small granules (10-20 nm in diameter) located within the basal lamina stain with RR and are removed only by crude heparinase. The surface coat of smooth muscle cells and small granules (10-20 nm) within their basal laminas are also digested by crude heparinase. Large proteoglycan granules (20-50 nm), which are completely removed by testicular hyaluronidase and partially digested by Streptomyces hyaluronidase, are deposited between the connective tissue fibers of the media and adventitia. Other large granules that are attached to collagen fibers contain enzyme-resistant anionic materials. The surface coat of adventitial fibroblasts is removed only by crude heparinase. Thin filaments (3-5 nm in diameter) interconnect the cell coat material, basal lamina granules, and large connective tissue granules, to form a network of proteoglycans that traverses the intima, media, and adventitia. The highly ordered arrangement of proteoglycans in the microvascular wall suggests that these macromolecules play several roles in microvascular function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6165246

  20. Mechanical interactions between collagen and proteoglycans: implications for the stability of lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Francisco S A; Ito, Satoru; Brewer, Kelly; Sakai, Hiroaki; Alencar, Adriano M; Almeida, Murilo P; Andrade, José S; Majumdar, Arnab; Ingenito, Edward P; Suki, Béla

    2005-02-01

    Collagen and elastin are thought to dominate the elasticity of the connective tissue including lung parenchyma. The glycosaminoglycans on the proteoglycans may also play a role because osmolarity of interstitial fluid can alter the repulsive forces on the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans, allowing them to collapse or inflate, which can affect the stretching and folding pattern of the fibers. Hence, we hypothesized that the elasticity of lung tissue arises primarily from 1) the topology of the collagen-elastin network and 2) the mechanical interaction between proteoglycans and fibers. We measured the quasi-static, uniaxial stress-strain curves of lung tissue sheets in hypotonic, normal, and hypertonic solutions. We found that the stress-strain curve was sensitive to osmolarity, but this sensitivity decreased after proteoglycan digestion. Images of immunofluorescently labeled collagen networks showed that the fibers follow the alveolar walls that form a hexagonal-like structure. Despite the large heterogeneity, the aspect ratio of the hexagons at 30% uniaxial strain increased linearly with osmolarity. We developed a two-dimensional hexagonal network model of the alveolar structure incorporating the mechanical properties of the collagen-elastin fibers and their interaction with proteoglycans. The model accounted for the stress-strain curves observed under all experimental conditions. The model also predicted how aspect ratio changed with osmolarity and strain, which allowed us to estimate the Young's modulus of a single alveolar wall and a collagen fiber. We therefore identify a novel and important role for the proteoglycans: they stabilize the collagen-elastin network of connective tissues and contribute to lung elasticity and alveolar stability at low to medium lung volumes.

  1. Effect of interleukin 17 on proteoglycan degradation in murine knee joints

    PubMed Central

    Dudler, J.; Renggli-Zulliger, N.; Busso, N.; Lotz, M.; So, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the effect of murine interleukin 17 (IL17) on cartilage catabolism and joint inflammation by direct intra-articular injection of the cytokine into murine knee joints.
METHODS—Knees of normal C57 Bl mice were injected once or repeatedly with recombinant IL17 or IL1β. Inflammation was estimated by technetium-99m pertechnetate (99Tc) uptake and histological scoring of tissue sections. Proteoglycan depletion was evaluated by histological scoring of safranin O stained sections. Effects on proteoglycan synthesis were studied by 35SO4 incorporation.
RESULTS—A single intra-articular injection of IL17 (10 ng/knee) produced effects very similar to those of IL1β (10 ng/knee). No inflammation was detected at six or 24 hours by 99Tc uptake. However, safranin O staining showed depletion of proteoglycan at 48 hours. Repeated injections of IL17 induced joint inflammation and cartilage proteoglycan depletion as shown by histological scoring. Unlike IL1β, proteoglycan depletion induced by IL17 seemed to be the result of increased degradation only, as no suppression of 35SO4 incorporation was seen.
CONCLUSION—These findings confirm, in vivo, the catabolic effects of IL17 on cartilage. IL17 is thus the first T cell cytokine showing a direct catabolic effect on cartilage in addition to stimulatory effects on macrophages and synoviocytes, making it a potentially important cytokine in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

 PMID:10873962

  2. Ovarian carcinoma cells synthesize both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate cell surface proteoglycans that mediate cell adhesion to interstitial matrix.

    PubMed

    Kokenyesi, R

    Metastatic ovarian carcinoma metastasizes by intra-peritoneal, non-hematogenous dissemination. The adhesion of the ovarian carcinoma cells to extracellular matrix components, such as types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, is essential for intra-peritoneal dissemination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cell surface proteoglycans (a class of matrix receptors) are produced by ovarian carcinoma cells, and whether these proteoglycans have a role in the adhesion of ovarian carcinoma cells to types I and III collagen and fibronectin. Proteoglycans were metabolically labeled for biochemical studies. Both phosphatidylinositol-anchored and integral membrane-type cell surface proteoglycans were found to be present on the SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cell lines. Three proteoglycan populations of differing hydrodynamic size were detected in both SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. Digestions with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC showed that cell surface proteoglycans of SK-OV-3 cells had higher proportion of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (75:25 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio), while NIH:OVCAR-3 cells had higher proportion of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (10:90 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio). RT-PCR indicated the synthesis of a unique assortment of syndecans, glypicans, and CD44 by the two cell lines. In adhesion assays performed on matrix-coated titer plates both cell lines adhered to types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, and cell adhesion was inhibited by preincubation of the matrix with heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, or chondroitin glycosaminoglycans. Treatment of the cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, or methylumbelliferyl xyloside also interfered with adhesion confirming the role of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface proteoglycans as matrix receptors on ovarian carcinoma cells.

  3. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  4. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of proteoglycan 4 by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jennifer S; Akula Suresh Babu, Ramya; Navarro, Mary M; LeBaron, Richard G

    2014-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the population of the USA, with the majority of those seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Owing to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that sex hormones play a role in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints; however, its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5' flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and reduced expression of PRG4 mRNA in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients.

  6. High resistance of the mechanical properties of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix to proteoglycan digestion by chondroitinase, aggrecanase, or hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Wilusz, Rebecca E; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-10-01

    In articular cartilage, the extracellular matrix (ECM) and chondrocyte-associated pericellular matrix (PCM) are characterized by a high concentration of proteoglycans (PGs) and their associated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). These molecules serve important biochemical, structural, and biomechanical roles in the tissue and differences in their regional distributions suggest that different GAG/PG species contribute to the specific biomechanical properties of the ECM and PCM. The objective of this study was to investigate region-specific contributions of aggrecan, chondroitin and dermatan sulfate, and hyaluronan to the micromechanical properties of articular cartilage PCM and ECM in situ. Cryosections of porcine cartilage underwent digestion with ADAMTS-4, chondroitinase ABC, bacterial hyaluronidase or human leukocyte elastase. Guided by immunofluorescence for type VI collagen, AFM stiffness mapping was used to evaluate the elastic properties of matched PCM and ECM regions in paired control and digested cartilage sections. These methods were used to test the hypotheses that specific enzymatic digestion of GAGs or PGs would reduce both PCM and ECM elastic moduli. Elastase, which digests a number of PGs, some types of collagen, and non-collagenous proteins, was used as a positive control. ECM elastic moduli were significantly reduced by all enzyme treatments. However, PCM micromechanical properties were unaffected by enzymatic digestion of aggrecan, chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, and hyaluronan but were significantly reduced by 24% following elastase digestion. Our results provide new evidence for high resistance of PCM micromechanical properties to PG digestion and suggest a potential role for elastase in the degradation of the ECM and PCM.

  7. Melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan as a new target antigen for CD4+ T cells in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Erfurt, Cornelia; Müller, Esther; Emmerling, Sonja; Klotz, Claudia; Hertl, Michael; Schuler, Gerold; Schultz, Erwin S

    2009-05-15

    Melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) (also known as high molecular weight-melanoma-associated antigen) represents an interesting target antigen for cancer immunotherapy which is expressed on human melanomas and other tumors such as breast carcinomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas and acute leukemias. MCSP seems to play an important functional role in melanoma as it is involved in tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In this study, we isolated CD4(+) T helper cells from the blood of a healthy donor, recognizing a peptide from the MCSP core protein presented by HLA-DBR1*1101 molecules. T cell reactivity against the identified peptide could be detected in the blood of healthy donors and melanoma patients. MCSP specific T cells from the blood of a patient could be readily expanded by repeated peptide stimulation and recognized MCSP and HLA-DR expressing tumor cells. Our findings suggest that vaccination against MCSP helper T cell epitopes might be a promising approach to fight melanoma.

  8. Nursery of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the

  9. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) shares binding sites in collagen with heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Atsushi; Okano-Kosugi, Hitomi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Koide, Takaki

    2011-07-29

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a collagen-binding protein that is abundantly distributed in various tissues, including the eye. It exhibits various biological functions, such as anti-angiogenic, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective activities. PEDF also interacts with extracellular matrix components such as collagen, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), and hyaluronan. The collagen-binding property has been elucidated to be important for the anti-angiogenic activity in vivo (Hosomichi, J., Yasui, N., Koide, T., Soma, K., and Morita, I. (2005) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 335, 756-761). Here, we investigated the collagen recognition mechanism by PEDF. We first narrowed down candidate PEDF-binding sequences by taking advantage of previously reported structural requirements in collagen. Subsequent searches for PEDF-binding sequences employing synthetic collagen-like peptides resulted in the identification of one of the critical binding sites for PEDF, human α1(I)(929-938) (IKGHRGFSGL). Further analysis revealed that the collagen recognition by PEDF is sequence- and conformation-specific, and the high affinity binding motif is KGXRGFXGL in the triple helix. The PEDF-binding motif significantly overlapped with the heparin/HSPG-binding motif, KGHRG(F/Y). The interaction of PEDF with collagen I was specifically competed with by heparin but not by chondroitin sulfate-C or hyaluronan. The binding sequences for PEDF and heparin/HSPG also overlapped with the covalent cross-linking sites between collagen molecules. These findings imply a functional relationship between PEDF and HSPGs during angiogenesis, and the interaction of these molecules is regulated by collagen modifications.

  10. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  11. Carbohydrate-containing molecules as potential biomarkers in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Ji; Weyers, Amanda; Li, Guoyun; Gasimli, Leyla; Li, Lingyun; Choi, Won Jun; Lee, Kyung Bok; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Glycans play a critical role in physiological and pathological processes through interaction with a variety of ligands. Altered expression and dysregulation of these molecules can cause aberrant cellular function such as malignancy. Glycomics provide information of the structure and function of glycans, glycolipids, and glycoproteins such as proteoglycans, and may help to predict cancer development and progression as biomarkers. In this report, we compared the expression of proteoglycans, the content and structure of glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids between patient-matched normal and cancer tissues obtained from colon cancer patients. Tumor-related proteoglycans, glypican-3, and syndecan-1 showed downregulation in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues. In cancer tissue, the total amount of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate were lower and, interestingly, the level of disaccharide units of both 4S6S (CS-E) and 6S (CS-C) were higher compared to normal tissue. Also, overall lipids including glycolipids, a major glycomics target, were analyzed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Increase of lyso-phosphatidylcholine (phospholipid), sphingomyelin (sphigolipid), and four types of glycolipids (glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, monosialic acid ganglioside, and globoside 4) in cancer tissue showed the possibility as potential biomarkers in colon cancer. While requiring the need for careful interpretation, this type of broad investigation gives us a better understanding of pathophysiological roles on glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids and might be a powerful tool for colon cancer diagnosis.

  12. Carbohydrate-Containing Molecules as Potential Biomarkers in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Ji; Weyers, Amanda; Li, Guoyun; Gasimli, Leyla; Li, Lingyun; Choi, Won Jun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glycans play a critical role in physiological and pathological processes through interaction with a variety of ligands. Altered expression and dysregulation of these molecules can cause aberrant cellular function such as malignancy. Glycomics provide information of the structure and function of glycans, glycolipids, and glycoproteins such as proteoglycans, and may help to predict cancer development and progression as biomarkers. In this report, we compared the expression of proteoglycans, the content and structure of glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids between patient-matched normal and cancer tissues obtained from colon cancer patients. Tumor-related proteoglycans, glypican-3, and syndecan-1 showed downregulation in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues. In cancer tissue, the total amount of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate were lower and, interestingly, the level of disaccharide units of both 4S6S (CS-E) and 6S (CS-C) were higher compared to normal tissue. Also, overall lipids including glycolipids, a major glycomics target, were analyzed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Increase of lyso-phosphatidylcholine (phospholipid), sphingomyelin (sphigolipid), and four types of glycolipids (glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, monosialic acid ganglioside, and globoside 4) in cancer tissue showed the possibility as potential biomarkers in colon cancer. While requiring the need for careful interpretation, this type of broad investigation gives us a better understanding of pathophysiological roles on glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids and might be a powerful tool for colon cancer diagnosis. PMID:24502776

  13. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-10-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron-perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance.

  14. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules.

    PubMed

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H; Ott, Herwig

    2016-10-05

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron-perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance.

  15. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    PubMed Central

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron–perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance. PMID:27703143

  16. Distinct Secondary Structures of the Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteoglycans Decorin and Biglycan: Glycosylation-Dependent Conformational Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Priya; Hocking, Anne M.; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick; Holik, Kimberly K.; McQuillan, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Biglycan and decorin, closely related small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, have been overexpressed in eukaryotic cers and two major glycoforms isolated under native conditions: a proteoglycan substituted with glycosaminoglycan chains; and a core protein form secreted devoid of glycosaminoglycans. A comparative biophysical study of these glycoforms has revealed that the overall secondary structures of biglycan and decorin are different. Far-UV Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of decorin and biglycan proteoglycans indicates that, although they are predominantly Beta-sheet, biglycan has a significantly higher content of alpha-helical structure. Decorin proteoglycan and core protein are very similar, whereas the biglycan core protein exhibits closer similarity to the decorin glycoforms than to. the biglycan proteoglycan form. However, enzymatic removal of the chondroitin sulfate chains from biglycan proteoglycan does not induce a shift to the core protein structure, suggesting that the fmal form is influenced by polysaccharide addition only during biosynthesis. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy demonstrated that the single tryptophan residue, which is at a conserved position at the C-terminal domain of both biglycan and decorin, is found in similar microenvironments. This indicates that at least in this specific domain, the different glycoforms do exhibit apparent conservation of structure. Exposure of decorin and biglycan to 10 M urea resulted in an increase in fluorescent intensity, which indicates that the emission from tryptophan in the native state is quenched. Comparison of urea-induced protein unfolding curves provided further evidence that decorin and biglycan assume different structures in solution. Decorin proteoglycan and core protein unfold in a manner similar to a classic two-state model, in which there is a steep transition to an unfolded state between 1-2 M urea. The biglycan core protein also shows a similar steep transition. However, biglycan

  17. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  18. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  19. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  20. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  1. PAPST1 regulates sulfation of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in epithelial MDCK II cells.

    PubMed

    Dick, Gunnar; Akslen-Hoel, Linn Kristin; Grøndahl, Frøy; Kjos, Ingrid; Maccarana, Marco; Prydz, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycan (PG) sulfation depends on activated nucleotide sulfate, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). Transporters in the Golgi membrane translocate PAPS from the cytoplasm into the organelle lumen where PG sulfation occurs. Silencing of PAPS transporter (PAPST) 1 in epithelial MDCK cells reduced PAPS uptake into Golgi vesicles. Surprisingly, at the same time sulfation of heparan sulfate (HS) was stimulated. The effect was pathway specific in polarized epithelial cells. Basolaterally secreted proteoglycans (PGs) displayed an altered HS sulfation pattern and increased growth factor binding capacity. In contrast, the sulfation pattern of apically secreted PGs was unchanged while the secretion was reduced. Regulation of PAPST1 allows epithelial cells to prioritize between PG sulfation in the apical and basolateral secretory routes at the level of the Golgi apparatus. This provides sulfation patterns that ensure PG functions at the extracellular level, such as growth factor binding.

  2. Proteoglycan regulation of goldfish retinal explant growth on optic tectal membranes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yung-Kang; Elam, John S

    2003-05-14

    Regenerating goldfish retinal explants cultured on poly-L-lysine overlaid with membranes isolated from 21-day regenerating 1/3 anterior optic tectum (Ant. OTec) exhibited extensive defasciculated neurite outgrowth. Heparatinase treatment of membranes caused the complete inhibition of neurite outgrowth on that substrate. Western blot analysis showed that the OTec membranes contain a 300 kDa heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Explants cultured on 21-day regenerating 1/3 Ant. OTec membranes in the presence of 1 mM beta-xyloside, an axonal proteoglycan synthesis inhibitor, showed a significant reduction in the number of neurites per explant and in the average neurite length. Taken all together, the present results provide evidence that a 300-kDa membrane HSPG present in the Ant. OTec is necessary for axonal outgrowth and that axonal PGs are involved in modulating outgrowth on 21-day regenerating 1/3 Ant. OTec membranes.

  3. Ultrastructure of unstained, hydrated proteoglycan aggregates and monomer: a new method of imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa, B J; Hoffman, P; Warren, J B; McCorkle, R A; Coleman, G

    1980-01-01

    The application of a new method for imaging delicate hydrated biological materials is reported, and the structure of isolated proteoglycan aggregates and monomer is demonstrated at better than 30 nm resolution. This new method for high resolution examination of labile hydrated biological materials, employing a wet cell and pulsed plasma x-ray source, permits short exposure times, minimal specimen damage, and sufficient radiation dosages for imaging. (ERB)

  4. Salmon cartilage proteoglycan suppresses mouse experimental colitis through induction of Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Toshihito; Sashinami, Hiroshi; Sato, Fuyuki; Kijima, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Yoh; Fukuda, Shinsaku; Yoshihara, Shuichi; Hakamada, Ken-Ichi; Nakane, Akio

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses IL-10{sup -/-} cell transfer-induced colitis progression. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses Th1- and Th17-related factors in colitis mice. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan enhances Foxp3 expression. -- Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are complex glycohydrates which are widely distributed in extracellular matrix (ECM). PGs are involved in the construction of ECM, cell proliferation and differentiation. ECM components are involved in transduction of proinflammatory responses, but it is still unknown whether PGs are involved in inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of PG extracted from salmon cartilage on the progression of experimental colitis-induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by cell transfer from interleukin-10 (IL-10){sup -/-} mice. IL-10{sup -/-} cell-transferred mice showed weight loss, colon shortening and histological appearance of mild colitis. Daily oral administration of PG attenuated the clinical progression of colitis in a dose-dependent manner. Colitis-induced mice showed the elevated expression of IFN-{gamma}, IL-12, TNF-{alpha}, IL-21, IL-23p19, IL-6, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor {gamma}t (ROR{gamma}t) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) and oral administration of PG suppressed the expression of these factors. Conversely, expression of Foxp3 that induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells in LPMCs was enhanced by PG administration. These findings suggested that salmon PG attenuated the progression of colitis due to suppression of inflammatory response by enhancement of regulatory T cell induction.

  5. Physiological Loading Can Restore the Proteoglycan Content in a Model of Early IVD Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gawri, Rahul; Moir, Janet; Ouellet, Jean; Beckman, Lorne; Steffen, Thomas; Roughley, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of early IVD degeneration is a decrease in proteoglycan content. Progression will eventually lead to matrix degradation, a decrease in weight bearing capacity and loss of disc height. In the final stages of IVD degradation, fissures appear in the annular ring allowing extrusion of the NP. It is crucial to understand the interplay between mechanobiology, disc composition and metabolism to be able to provide exercise recommendations to patients with early signs of disc degeneration. This study evaluates the effect of physiological loading compared to no loading on matrix homeostasis in bovine discs with induced degeneration. Bovine discs with trypsin-induced degeneration were cultured for 14 days in a bioreactor under dynamic loading with maintained metabolic activity. Chondroadherin abundance and structure was used to confirm that a functional matrix was preserved in the chosen loading environment. No change was observed in chondroadherin integrity and a non-significant increase in abundance was detected in trypsin-treated loaded discs compared to unloaded discs. The proteoglycan concentration in loaded trypsin-treated discs was significantly higher than in unloaded disc and the newly synthesised proteoglycans were of the same size range as those found in control samples. The proteoglycan showed an even distribution throughout the NP region, similar to that of control discs. Significantly more newly synthesised type II collagen was detected in trypsin-treated loaded discs compared to unloaded discs, demonstrating that physiological load not only stimulates aggrecan production, but also that of type II collagen. Taken together, this study shows that dynamic physiological load has the ability to repair the extracellular matrix depletion typical of early disc degeneration. PMID:24992586

  6. Proteoglycan synthesis by skeletal muscle undergoing bone matrix-directed transformation into cartilage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, M A

    1983-09-10

    Myoblasts and fibroblasts of embryonic skeletal muscle reproducibly form chondrocytes when cultured on demineralized bone in vitro. The transformation occurs in 3 morphologically defined phases, with disappearance of the myoblast phenotype preceding the appearance of fibroblast-like cells and finally chondrocytes. Proteoglycan synthesis in these cultures was investigated by labeling at prechondrogenic (5 days) and postchondrogenic (6-12 days) stages with (35S)sulfate and [6-3H]glucosamine. Labeled material elutes from associative Sepharose CL-2B columns as two major included peaks, which correspond to proteoglycan monomer and a material of lower molecular size. Control cultures, cultured upon gels of type I collagen, fail to synthesize monomer-like material and contain solely a material of lower molecular size. Demineralized bone-derived monomer was rechromatographed under dissociative conditions in an attempt to detect the presence of small aggregates. Again, only a single peak of sulfate and glucosamine-labeled material appears. The data further show that the monomer resembles that of embryonic cartilage in glycosaminoglycan chain size (Mr = 8.6-12.2 X 10(3] and composition (mainly chondroitin 4-sulfate). Aggregated monomer forms a shoulder of the monomeric peak and comprises only 5% of the sulfated material. Fifteen to thirty-four per cent of the monomer elutes as aggregate after addition of rooster comb hyaluronic acid (HA). Failure to aggregate appears to be related to endogenous synthesis of short chain HA. Synthesis of long chain HA may constitute a rate-limiting step in chondrogenesis. Material of lower molecular size, from cultures grown on demineralized bone, bind to exogenous HA, whereas the elution pattern of sulfated material from control cultures remains essentially unchanged. These latter data suggest that proteoglycans of low hydrodynamic size may participate in the early formation of proteoglycan aggregate.

  7. Vascular wall proteoglycan synthesis and structure as a target for the prevention of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Little, Peter J; Ballinger, Mandy L; Osman, Narin

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology of most cardiovascular disease and it represents the major cause of premature death in modern societies. Current therapies target risk factors being hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia when diabetes is present however the maximum efficacy of these strategies is often 30% or less. Areas of vascular biology that may lead to the development of a complementary vascular wall directed therapy are: inflammation, oxidation, endothelial dysfunction, diabetes-specific factors—hyperglycemia and advanced glycation endproducts and lipid retention by vascular matrix specifically proteoglycans. The major structural features of proteoglycans that determine low-density lipoprotein (LDL) binding are the length and sulfation pattern on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. Emerging data discussed in this review indicates that these structural properties are subject to considerable regulation by vasoactive substances possibly using novel signaling pathways. For example, GAG elongation stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor is not blocked by the receptor tyrosine kinase antagonist, genistein suggesting that there may be a previously unknown signaling pathway involved in this response. Thus, modifying proteoglycan synthesis and structure may represent a prime target to prevent LDL binding and entrapment in the vessel wall and thus prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:17583182

  8. Induction of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan synthesis and secretion in lymphocytes and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The ability of mononuclear leukocytes to synthesize and secrete proteoglycans was evaluated. Using radiolabeling with H2 35SO4, it is shown that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their major subpopulations (B cells, T cells, and monocytes), as well as mouse spleen cells, all secreted easily detectable proteoglycan. After 24-h labeling periods, 90% of macromolecular 35S could be detected in culture media. This material was primarily (greater than 95%) chondroitin-4-sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG). Production and secretion of CSPG could be stimulated more than 200% in PBMC and 300% in T cell populations by high concentrations of concanavalin A and phorbol 12- myristate-13-acetate; lipopolysaccharide induced a small (twofold) but reproducible increase in CSPG secretion by adherent mononuclear leukocytes. The CSPG secreted by PBMC was relatively small in size compared to chondrocyte CSPG (130,000 daltons vs. 2-4 million daltons) but possessed similar sizes of glycosaminoglycan chains and greater solubility in low ionic strength solutions. This sulfated polyanion, which was produced endogenously by leukocytes and was actively secreted, might function as a co-mediator or "second messenger" in certain immune responses. PMID:6604059

  9. De novo cellular synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans of the developing renal glomerulus in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Y S; Jakubowski, M L; Rosenzweig, L J; Gibbons, J T

    1984-01-01

    The site of cellular synthesis of glomerular proteoglycans was investigated in developing glomeruli of 4- to 5-day-old rats. [35S]Sulfate was administered intravenously and animals were sacrificed 15 min to 12 hr later. The outermost layers of the kidney cortices were utilized for characterization of proteoglycans and electron microscopic autoradiography. Sepharose CL-6B chromatography and cellulose acetate electrophoresis revealed that most (approximately equal to 96%) of the radioactivity was associated with heparan sulfate-proteoglycan synthesized during maturation of glomerular capillaries. Tissue autoradiography revealed the following: (i) during the S-shaped body stage, there is rapid incorporation of [35S]sulfate by mesenchymal cells into the cleft region (site for development of future glomerular extracellular matrices); (ii) during the precapillary stage, mesenchyme-derived cells showed higher incorporation of radioisotope than did epithelial cells; and (iii) during the mature capillary stage, all glomerular cell types (mesangial, endothelial, and epithelial) incorporated [35S]sulfate, incorporation by mesangial cells being the greatest. Radiolabeling was also higher in the mesangial matrix than in the glomerular basement membrane of peripheral capillary loops. Synthesis of a single major species of sulfated glycosaminoglycan by cells of different embryologic origin may be unique to glomerular capillaries. Images PMID:6239287

  10. Heterogeneous distribution of a basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan in rat tissues

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) synthesized by murine parietal yolk sac (PYS-2) cells has been characterized and purified from culture supernatants. A monospecific polyclonal antiserum was raised against it which showed activity against the HSPG core protein and basement membrane specificity in immunohistochemical studies on frozen tissue sections from many rat organs. However, there was no reactivity with some basement membranes, notably those of several smooth muscle types and cardiac muscle. In addition, it was found that pancreatic acinar basement membranes also lacked the HSPG type recognized by this antiserum. Those basement membranes that lacked the HSPG strongly stained with antisera against laminin and type IV collagen. The striking distribution pattern is possibly indicative of multiple species of basement membrane HSPGs of which one type is recognized by this antiserum. Further evidence for multiple HSPGs was derived from the finding that skeletal neuromuscular junction and liver epithelia also did not contain this type of HSPG, though previous reports have indicated the presence of HSPGs at these sites. The PYS-2 HSPG was shown to be antigenically related to the large, low buoyant density HSPG from the murine Engelbreth-Holm swarm tumor. It was, however, confirmed that only a single population of antibodies was present in the serum. Despite the presence of similar epitopes on these two proteoglycans of different hydrodynamic properties, it was apparent that the PYS-2 HSPG represents a basement membrane proteoglycan of distinct properties reflected in its restricted distribution in vivo. PMID:2959669

  11. Proteoglycans in articular cartilage revealed with a quick freezing and deep etching method.

    PubMed Central

    Toriumi, H; Nakagawa, H; Ueda, H; Leng, C G; Fujii, Y; Ohno, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To clarify the three dimensional ultrastructure of proteoglycans, and their relationship with other matrix components in articular cartilage. METHODS: Specimens from rat femoral heads were examined using three techniques: (1) Histochemical staining with cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI), using a pre-embedding or a postembedding method. Some tissues were pretreated with chondroitinase ABC or hyaluronidase. (2) Quick freezing and deep etching (QF-DE). Some specimens were fixed with paraformaldehyde and washed in buffer solution before quick freezing; others were frozen directly. (3) Ultrathin sections were studied after conventional preparation. RESULTS: Proteoglycans were observed as aggregated clumps with PEI staining by the pre-embedding method, but as fine filaments by the postembedding method. They were lost with enzyme digestion; this was also demonstrated by the QF-DE method. The ultrastructure was well preserved by the QF-DE method when fixation and washing procedures were included, but not without these procedures. A fine mesh-like structure was connected to the cell membrane in the pericellular matrix. Filamentous structures suggestive of aggrecans were observed among collagen fibrils. They had side chains, approximately 50 nm in length, which branched from the central filaments at intervals of 10-20 nm, and were occasionally linked to other structures. Many thin filaments were also attached to the collagen fibrils. CONCLUSIONS: The QF-DE method incorporating paraformaldehyde fixation and buffer washing procedures revealed three dimensional, extended structures suggestive of proteoglycans. Images PMID:8774166

  12. Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis as a systemic disorder characterized by proteoglycan accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kim, Byoungjae; Khan, Ahrar; Yoon, Jung Hae; Mueller, PO Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD) is a debilitating disorder thought to be limited to suspensory ligaments of Peruvian Pasos, Peruvian Paso crosses, Arabians, American Saddlebreds, American Quarter Horses, Thoroughbreds, and some European breeds. It frequently leads to persistent, incurable lameness and need to euthanize affected horses. The pathogenesis remains unclear, though the disease appears to run in families. Treatment and prevention are empirical and supportive, and not effective in halting the progression of the disease. Presently, the presumptive diagnosis of DSLD is obtained from patient signalment and history, clinical examination, and ultrasonographic examination of clinically affected horses, and is confirmed at post mortem examination. Presently, there are no reliable methods of diagnosing DSLD in asymptomatic horses. The goal of this study was to characterize and define the disorder in terms of tissue involvement at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Results We examined tissues and organs from 28 affected horses (22 Peruvian Pasos, 6 horses of other breeds) and from 8 control horses. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of excessive amounts of proteoglycans in the following tissues removed from DSLD-affected horses: suspensory ligaments, superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, patellar and nuchal ligaments, cardiovascular system, and sclerae. Electron microscopy demonstrated changes in diameters of collagen fibrils in the tendon, and in smooth muscle cells of the media of the aorta compatible with increased cell permeability in DSLD-affected cells. Separation of tendon extracts by gel chromatography revealed the presence of additional proteoglycan(s) in extracts from affected, but not control extracts. Conclusion This study demonstrates for the first time that DSLD, a disease process previously thought to be limited to the suspensory ligaments of the distal limbs of affected horses, is in fact a

  13. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  14. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  15. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  16. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  17. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  18. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  19. Giant left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sumi; Garg, Nadish; Xie, Gong-Yuan; Dellsperger, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm (PS) is an uncommon, often fatal complication associated with myocardial infarction, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, and, rarely, infective endocarditis. A 28-year-old man with prior history of bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement presented with congestive heart failure and bacteremia with Abiotrophia granulitica. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed bioprosthesis dysfunction, large vegetations, mitral regurgitation, and probable PS. Cardiac and chest CT confirmed a PS communicating with the left ventricle Patient had pulseless electrical activity and died. Autopsy showed a giant PS with layered thrombus and pseudo-endothelialized cavity. Our case highlights the importance of multimodality imaging as an important tool in management of PS.

  20. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter J. H.; MacKay, Dylan. S.; Senanayake, Vijitha K.; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J. A.; Connelly, Philip W.; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; West, Sheila G.; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets; 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p=0.0005 and p=0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p=0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p=0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p=0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding. PMID:25528432

  1. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J H; MacKay, Dylan S; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J A; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; Hantgan, Roy R; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-02-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets: 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p = 0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p = 0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p = 0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding.

  2. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  3. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  4. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  5. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  6. Metastasis Stimulation by Hypoxia and Acidosis-Induced Extracellular Lipid Uptake Is Mediated by Proteoglycan-Dependent Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Menard, Julien A; Christianson, Helena C; Kucharzewska, Paulina; Bourseau-Guilmain, Erika; Svensson, Katrin J; Lindqvist, Eva; Indira Chandran, Vineesh; Kjellén, Lena; Welinder, Charlotte; Bengzon, Johan; Johansson, Maria C; Belting, Mattias

    2016-08-15

    Hypoxia and acidosis are inherent stress factors of the tumor microenvironment and have been linked to increased tumor aggressiveness and treatment resistance. Molecules involved in the adaptive mechanisms that drive stress-induced disease progression constitute interesting candidates of therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide evidence of a novel role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) in the adaptive response of tumor cells to hypoxia and acidosis through increased internalization of lipoproteins, resulting in a lipid-storing phenotype and enhanced tumor-forming capacity. Patient glioblastoma tumors and cells under hypoxic and acidic stress acquired a lipid droplet (LD)-loaded phenotype, and showed an increased recruitment of all major lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, and VLDL. Stress-induced LD accumulation was associated with increased spheroid-forming capacity during reoxygenation in vitro and lung metastatic potential in vivo On a mechanistic level, we found no apparent effect of hypoxia on HSPGs, whereas lipoprotein receptors (VLDLR and SR-B1) were transiently upregulated by hypoxia. Importantly, however, using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we show that stress-mediated lipoprotein uptake is highly dependent on intact HSPG expression. The functional relevance of HSPG in the context of tumor cell stress was evidenced by HSPG-dependent lipoprotein cell signaling activation through the ERK/MAPK pathway and by reversal of the LD-loaded phenotype by targeting of HSPGs. We conclude that HSPGs may have an important role in the adaptive response to major stress factors of the tumor microenvironment, with functional consequences on tumor cell signaling and metastatic potential. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4828-40. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and microglia prevent migration and integration of grafted Müller stem cells into degenerating retina.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Shweta; Lawrence, Jean M; Bhatia, Bhairavi; Ellis, James S; Kwan, Anthony S; Macneil, Angus; Luthert, Philip J; Fawcett, James W; Perez, Maria-Thereza; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, G Astrid

    2008-04-01

    At present, there are severe limitations to the successful migration and integration of stem cells transplanted into the degenerated retina to restore visual function. This study investigated the potential role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and microglia in the migration of human Müller glia with neural stem cell characteristics following subretinal injection into the Lister hooded (LH) and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat retinae. Neonate LH rat retina showed minimal baseline microglial accumulation (CD68-positive cells) that increased significantly 2 weeks after transplantation (p < .001), particularly in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner plexiform layer. In contrast, nontransplanted 5-week-old RCS rat retina showed considerable baseline microglial accumulation in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and photoreceptor outer segment debris zone (DZ) that further increased (p < .05) throughout the retina 2 weeks after transplantation. Marked deposition of the N-terminal fragment of CSPGs, as well as neurocan and versican, was observed in the DZ of 5-week-old RCS rat retinae, which contrasted with the limited expression of these proteins in the GCL of the adult and neonate LH rat retinae. Staining for CSPGs and CD68 revealed colocalization of these two molecules in cells infiltrating the ONL and DZ of the degenerating RCS rat retina. Enhanced immune suppression with oral prednisolone and intraperitoneal injections of indomethacin caused a reduction in the number of microglia but did not facilitate Müller stem cell migration. However, injection of cells with chondroitinase ABC combined with enhanced immune suppression caused a dramatic increase in the migration of Müller stem cells into all the retinal cell layers. These observations suggest that both microglia and CSPGs constitute a barrier for stem cell migration following transplantation into experimental models of retinal degeneration and that control of matrix deposition and the innate

  8. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  9. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  10. Expression of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Syaidah, Rahimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ramadhani, Dini; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix and comprise a specific core protein substituted with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan chains. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are a major family of proteoglycans and have key roles as potent effectors in cellular signaling pathways. Research during the last two decades has shown that SLRPs regulate biological functions in many tissues such as skin, tendon, kidney, liver, and heart. However, little is known of the expression of SLRPs, or the characteristics of the cells that produce them, in the anterior pituitary gland. Therefore, we have determined whether SLRPs are present in rat anterior pituitary gland. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of SLRP genes and have identified the cells that produce SLRPs by using in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probe. We have clearly detected the mRNA expression of SLRP genes, and cells expressing decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), and osteoglycin are located in the anterior pituitary gland. We have also investigated the possible double-staining of SLRP mRNA and pituitary hormones, S100 protein (a marker of folliculostellate cells), desmin (a marker of capillary pericytes), and isolectin B4 (a marker of endothelial cells). Decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, PRELP, and osteoglycin mRNA have been identified in S100-protein-positive and desmin-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that folliculostellate cells and pericytes produce SLRPs in rat anterior pituitary gland.

  11. The study of optical properties and proteoglycan content of tendons by PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Rupani, Asha; Weightman, Alan; Wimpenny, Ian; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Ahearne, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Tendons are load-bearing collagenous tissues consisting mainly of type I collagen and various proteoglycans (PGs) including decorin and versican. It is widely accepted that highly orientated collagen fibers in tendons a play critical role for transferring tensile stress and demonstrate birefringent optical properties. However, the influence that proteoglycans have on the optical properties of tendons is yet to be fully elucidated. Tendinopathy (defined as a syndrome of tendon pain, tenderness and swelling that affects the normal function of the tissue) is a common disease associated with sporting injuries or degeneration. PG's are the essential components of the tendon extracellular matrix; changes in their quantities and compositions have been associated with tendinopathy. In this study, polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been used to reveal the relationship between proteoglycan content/location and birefringent properties of tendons. Tendons dissected from freshly slaughtered chickens were imaged at regular intervals by PS-OCT and polarizing light microscope during the extraction of PGs or glycosaminoglycans using established protocols (guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) or proteinase K solution). The macroscopic and microscopic time lapsed images are complimentary; mutually demonstrating that there was a higher concentration of PG's in the outer sheath region than in the fascicles; and the integrity of the sheath affected extraction process and the OCT birefringence bands. Extraction of PGs using GuHCl disturbed the organization of local collagen bundles, which corresponded to a reduction in the frequency of birefringence bands and the band width by PS-OCT. The feature of OCT penetration depth helped us to define the heterogeneous distribution of PG's in tendon, which was complimented by polarizing light microscopy. The results provide new insight of tendon structure and also demonstrate a great potential for using PS-OCT as a

  12. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  13. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan is involved in lens vesicle morphogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Martinez-Alvarez, C; Moro, J A

    2001-10-01

    Proteoglycans have been implicated in the invagination and formation of various embryonal cavitied primordia. In this paper the expression of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) is analysed in the lens primordium during lens vesicle formation, and demonstrate that this proteoglycan has a specific distribution pattern with regard to invagination and fusion processes in the transformation of placode into lens vesicle. More specifically, CSPG was detected in: (1) the apical surface of lens epithelial cells, where early CSPG expression was observed in the whole of the lens placode whilst in the vesicle phase it was restricted to the posterior epithelium; (2) intense CSPG expression in the basal lamina, which remained constant for the entire period under study; (3) CSPG expression in the intercellular spaces of the lens primordium epithelium, which increased during the invagination of the primordium and which at the vesicle stage was more evident in the posterior epithelium; and (4) CSPG expression on the edges of the lens placode both prior to and during fusion. Treatment with beta- D -xyloside causes significant CSPG depletion in the lens primordium together with severe alterations in the invagination and fusion of the lens vesicle; this leads to the formation of lens primordia which in some cases remain practically flat or show partial invagination defects or fusion disruption. Similar results were obtained by enzyme digestion with chondroitinase AC but not with type II heparinase, which indicates that alterations induced by beta- D -xyloside were due to interference in CSPG synthesis. The findings demonstrate that CSPG is a common component of the lens primordium at the earliest developmental stages during which it undergoes specific modifications. It also includes experimental evidence to show that 'in vivo' CSPG plays an important role in the invagination and fusion processes of the lens primordium.

  14. Induction of Syndecan-4 by Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Molecules with a 1,10-Phenanthroline Structure in Cultured Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Takato; Kojima, Takayuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroka; Nakamura, Takehiro; Yoshida, Eiko; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Chika; Saito, Shinichi; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid molecules constitute analytical tools used in biological systems. Vascular endothelial cells synthesize and secrete proteoglycans, which are macromolecules consisting of a core protein and glycosaminoglycan side chains. Although the expression of endothelial proteoglycans is regulated by several cytokines/growth factors, there may be alternative pathways for proteoglycan synthesis aside from downstream pathways activated by these cytokines/growth factors. Here, we investigated organic–inorganic hybrid molecules to determine a variant capable of analyzing the expression of syndecan-4, a transmembrane heparan-sulfate proteoglycan, and identified 1,10-phenanthroline (o-Phen) with or without zinc (Zn-Phen) or rhodium (Rh-Phen). Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were treated with these compounds, and the expression of syndecan-4 mRNA and core proteins was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our findings indicated that o-Phen and Zn-Phen specifically and strongly induced syndecan-4 expression in cultured vascular endothelial cells through activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β pathway via inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase-domain-containing protein 2. These results demonstrated an alternative pathway involved in mediating induction of endothelial syndecan-4 expression and revealed organic–inorganic hybrid molecules as effective tools for analyzing biological systems. PMID:28208699

  15. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  16. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Giant Hedge-Hogs: Spikes on Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2004-01-28

    We consider giant gravitons on the maximally supersymmetric plane-wave background of type IIB string theory. Fixing the light-cone gauge, we work out the low energy effective light-cone Hamiltonian of the three-sphere giant graviton. At first order, this is a U(1) gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}. We place sources in this effective gauge theory. Although non-vanishing net electric charge configurations are disallowed by Gauss' law, electric dipoles can be formed. From the string theory point of view these dipoles can be understood as open strings piercing the three-sphere, generalizing the usual BIons to the giant gravitons, BIGGons. Our results can be used to give a two dimensional (worldsheet) description of giant gravitons, similar to Polchinski's description for the usual D-branes, in agreement with the discussions of hep-th/0204196.

  18. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  19. Both hyaluronan and collagen type II keep proteoglycan 4 (lubricin) at the cartilage surface in a condition that provides low friction during boundary lubrication.

    PubMed

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Köwitsch, Alexander; Groth, Thomas; Schmidt, Tannin A; Sharma, Prashant K

    2014-12-09

    Wear resistant and ultralow friction in synovial joints is the outcome of a sophisticated synergy between the major macromolecules of the synovial fluid, e.g., hyaluronan (HA) and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), with collagen type II fibrils and other non-collagenous macromolecules of the cartilage superficial zone (SZ). This study aimed at better understanding the mechanism of PRG4 localization at the cartilage surface. We show direct interactions between surface bound HA and freely floating PRG4 using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Freely floating PRG4 was also shown to bind with surface bound collagen type II fibrils. Albumin, the most abundant protein of the synovial fluid, effectively blocked the adsorption of PRG4 with HA, through interaction with C and N terminals on PRG4, but not that of PRG4 with collagen type II fibrils. The above results indicate that collagen type II fibrils strongly contribute in keeping PRG4 in the SZ during cartilage articulation in situ. Furthermore, PRG4 molecules adsorbed very well on mimicked SZ of absorbed HA molecules with entangled collagen type II fibrils and albumin was not able to block this interaction. In this last condition PRG4 adsorption resulted in a coefficient of friction (COF) of the same order of magnitude as the COF of natural cartilage, measured with an atomic force microscope in lateral mode.

  20. Changes in cartilage metabolism in arthritis are reflected by altered serum and synovial fluid levels of the cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan. Implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, A R; Ionescu, M; Swan, A; Dieppe, P A

    1994-01-01

    The metabolism of the cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan was studied in patients with osteoarthritis (OA, n = 83), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 127), and in controls (n = 117) using monoclonal antibody-based radioimmunoassays for glycosaminoglycans in the serum and synovial fluid (SF) to detect epitope 846 on chondroitin sulfate (probably only on recently synthesized molecules) and a keratan sulfate (KS) epitope AN9PI, present on intact and degraded molecules. Epitope 846 levels were always elevated in SF over serum (mean 38-fold in OA and 8.6-fold in RA) being highest in OA patients with the longest disease duration and greatest loss of cartilage, and lowest in RA joints with high leucocyte counts. Serum levels were more often elevated in RA (56%) than in OA (19%) and probably reflect increased aggrecan synthesis in diseased joints. KS levels were higher in SF than in serum in 69% of patients (up to 2.3-fold); levels were inversely (OA) and directly (RA) related to SF leucocyte counts. Serum KS was reduced in both diseases and in RA was inversely related to both systemic and joint inflammation markers. SF 846 levels were inversely related to SF KS in both diseases. These epitopes may provide a measure of the balance between cartilage synthesis and degradation in these diseases. PMID:7518830

  1. Apolipoprotein AV accelerates plasma hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by interaction with proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-06-03

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences in triglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasma triglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In human APOA5 transgenic mice (hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by cross-breeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knock-out and the hAPOA5tr to an lpl-deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5-deficient mice; however, overexpression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr high density lipoprotein, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL-mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line. A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting. It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycan-bound LPL for lipolysis.

  2. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  3. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  4. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  5. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  6. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  7. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  8. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Thach, Lyna; Zheng, Wenhua; Osman, Narin

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch's membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of drusen. AMD manifests as early and late stage; the latter involves cell proliferation and neovascularization in wet AMD. Current therapies target the later hyperproliferative and invasive wet stage whilst none target early developmental stages of AMD. In the lipid deposition disease atherosclerosis modified proteoglycans bind and retain apolipoproteins in the artery wall. Chemically modified trapped lipids are immunogenic and can initiate a chronic inflammatory process manifesting as atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent artery blockages, heart attacks, or strokes. As plasma derived lipoprotein deposits are found in BM in early AMD, it is possible that they arise by a similar process within the macula. In this review we consider aspects of the pathological processes underlying AMD with a focus on the potential role of modifications to secreted proteoglycans being a cause and therefore a target for the treatment of early AMD. PMID:27563459

  9. Lectin binding pattern and proteoglycan distribution in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Sames, K; Moll, I; van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Schumacher, U

    1999-11-01

    The distribution pattern of glycoconjugates in human eccrine sweat glands has been studied by the binding of newly discovered lectins and by antibodies against a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and chondroitin sulphate glycosaminoglycans. Mannose-specific lectins labelled large intracellular granules, part of which could be extended cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. In contrast, lectins specific for terminal mannose/glucose residues predominantly labelled basement membranes and the glycocalyx. Lectins recognizing terminal N-acetylgalactosamine groups left most parts of the glands unstained, but stained some dark cells intensely. These last cells were also intensively labelled by N-acetylglucosamine-specific and by fucose-specific lectins. Sialic acid residues were preferentially located in luminal borders of secretory coils. No terminal galactose residues were detected. All antibodies against chondroitin glycoconjugates stained large granules similar to those revealed by the mannose-specific lectins in the secretory cells. The basement membrane is only stained by the proteoglycan antibody and the chondroitin-6-sulphate antibody. Thus, a complex composition of glycoconjugates exists not only in matrix elements but also in the cells of eccrine glands of the human skin. A possible secretion of glycoconjugates is discussed.

  10. Isolation and partial characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycans from human hepatic amyloid.

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, J H; Stenstad, T; Husby, G; Kolset, S O

    1992-01-01

    Proteoglycans were isolated from human amyloidotic liver by extraction with guanidine, followed by trichloroacetic acid precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, and Sepharose CL-6B gel chromatography. A significant portion of the material was found to be free chondroitin/dermatan sulphate chains (30%), whereas the predominant part was heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) (70%). The approx. molecular mass of the HSPG was 200 kDa, as measured by gel electrophoresis and gel chromatography. The molecular mass of the core protein was shown to be 60 kDa by SDS/PAGE following de-aminative cleavage of the heparan sulphate chains. The heparan sulphate chains were liberated from the core protein by alkali treatment and found to have a molecular mass of approx. 35 kDa by Sepharose CL-6B gel chromatography. The core protein was shown, by immunoblotting, to react with a monoclonal antibody against bovine basement membrane HSPG. The presence of HSPG in amyloid deposits was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry on tissue sections from amyloidotic liver using the same antibody. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1445267

  11. LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate increases proteoglycan binding and promotes atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in humans and animals suggest that LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate (CO) is associated with increased atherosclerosis. Diet enrichment with MUFAs enhances LDL CO content. Steroyl O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of much of the CO found in LDL, and gene deletion of SOAT2 minimizes CO in LDL and protects against atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increased atherosclerosis associated with LDL core enrichment in CO results from an increased affinity of the LDL particle for arterial proteoglycans. ApoB-100-only Ldlr−/− mice with and without Soat2 gene deletions were fed diets enriched in either cis-MUFA or n-3 PUFA, and LDL particles were isolated. LDL:proteogylcan binding was measured using surface plasmon resonance. Particles with higher CO content consistently bound with higher affinity to human biglycan and the amount of binding was shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerosis of the LDL donor mice. The data strongly support the thesis that atherosclerosis was induced through enhanced proteoglycan binding of LDL resulting from LDL core CO enrichment. PMID:23804810

  12. Vascular accumulation of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Zhang, Xiaojie; Wang, Michael M

    2014-09-10

    Small penetrating brain artery thickening is a major feature of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Although affected fibrotic arteries of CADASIL have been shown to accumulate collagen, other components that compose pathological arterial walls remain incompletely characterized. We investigated the expression of decorin (DCN), the first collagen-binding small leucine-rich proteoglycan identified, in CADASIL. DCN was markedly upregulated in pathologically affected leptomeningeal and small penetrating arteries in CADASIL and was notably weaker in normal arteries from control brains. DCN protein was localized principally to the media and adventitia and only occasionally expressed in the intima. Immunoblotting of brain lysates showed a three-fold increase of DCN in CADASIL brains (compared with controls). Messenger RNA encoding DCN was five-fold increased in CADASIL. We conclude that DCN is the first identified proteoglycan to be identified in CADASIL arteries and may accumulate through transcriptional mechanisms. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether DCN localizes broadly to pathological small vessels in other cerebrovascular disorders.

  13. High chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 expression correlates with poor outcome in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nicholas C; Nien, Pei-Yung; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2013-11-15

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), a transmembrane proteoglycan originally identified in melanoma cells, has been reported to be expressed in breast cancer cells. This study was performed to examine the expression and significance of CSPG4 in a cohort of breast cancer patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of CSPG4 was performed on tissue microarrays constructed from tissue specimens from 240 breast cancer patients. CSPG4 staining was correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics, overall survival (OS), and disease recurrence. Contradicting to a previous report, our results showed that high CSPG4 expression was not related to triple-negative status of breast cancer patients. The Kaplan-Meier method showed that high CSPG4 expression was significantly associated with shorter time to recurrence (TTR). Patients with high CSPG4 expression had poorer OS and shorter TTR in a multivariate survival analysis after adjustment for stage, tumor grade, expression of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and HER2 overexpression. This study showed that high CSPG4 expression correlates with disease recurrence and OS in breast cancers.

  14. Site-specific identification of heparan and chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans in hybrid proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Noborn, Fredrik; Gomez Toledo, Alejandro; Green, Anders; Nasir, Waqas; Sihlbom, Carina; Nilsson, Jonas; Larson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) are complex polysaccharides that regulate important biological pathways in virtually all metazoan organisms. The polysaccharides often display opposite effects on cell functions with HS and CS structural motifs presenting unique binding sites for specific ligands. Still, the mechanisms by which glycan biosynthesis generates complex HS and CS polysaccharides required for the regulation of mammalian physiology remain elusive. Here we present a glycoproteomic approach that identifies and differentiates between HS and CS attachment sites and provides identity to the core proteins. Glycopeptides were prepared from perlecan, a complex proteoglycan known to be substituted with both HS and CS chains, further digested with heparinase or chondroitinase ABC to reduce the HS and CS chain lengths respectively, and thereafter analyzed by nLC-MS/MS. This protocol enabled the identification of three consensus HS sites and one hybrid site, carrying either a HS or a CS chain. Inspection of the amino acid sequence at the hybrid attachment locus indicates that certain peptide motifs may encode for the chain type selection process. This analytical approach will become useful when addressing fundamental questions in basic biology specifically in elucidating the functional roles of site-specific glycosylations of proteoglycans. PMID:27694851

  15. Evidence against proteoglycan mediated collagen fibril load transmission and dynamic viscoelasticity in tendon.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G

    2009-10-01

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate side-chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans have been increasingly posited to act as molecular cross links between adjacent collagen fibrils and to directly contribute to tendon elasticity. GAGs have also been implicated in tendon viscoelasticity, supposedly affecting frictional loss during elongation or fluid flow through the extra cellular matrix. The current study sought to systematically test these theories of tendon structure-function by investigating the mechanical repercussions of enzymatic depletion of GAG complexes by chondroitinase ABC in a reproducible tendon structure-function model (rat tail tendon fascicles). The extent of GAG removal (at least 93%) was verified by relevant spectrophotometric assays and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic viscoelastic tensile tests on GAG depleted rat tail tendon fascicle were not mechanically different from controls in storage modulus (elastic behavior) over a wide range of strain-rates (0.05, 0.5, and 5% change in length per second) in either the linear or nonlinear regions of the material curve. Loss modulus (viscoelastic behavior) was only affected in the nonlinear region at the highest strain-rate, and even this effect was marginal (19% increased loss modulus, p=0.035). Thus glycosaminoglycan chains of small leucine-rich proteoglycans do not appear to mediate dynamic elastic behavior nor do they appear to regulate the dynamic viscoelastic properties in rat tail tendon fascicles.

  16. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4: a biomarker and a potential immunotherapeutic target for canine malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mayayo, Saray Lorda; Prestigio, Simone; Maniscalco, Lorella; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Aricò, Arianna; De Maria, Raffaella; Cavallo, Federica; Ferrone, Soldano; Buracco, Paolo; Iussich, Selina

    2011-11-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4), also known as high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen (HMW-MAA), is a membrane-bound chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed by human melanoma cells. This phylogenetically conserved tumour antigen plays an important biological role in human melanoma, where it is used as a marker to diagnose forms with unusual characteristics, such as desmoplastic melanoma, and to detect melanoma cells in lymph nodes and peripheral blood, and as a target for immunotherapy because of its restricted distribution in normal tissues. To identify suitable targets to develop novel approaches of treating canine melanoma, CSPG4 was studies to see whether it is expressed in canine malignant melanomas. Immunohistochemical staining of 65 canine malignant melanomas with an anti-human CSPG4-specific antibody detected CSPG4 in 37 cases (56.9%). Positive staining was more frequent, albeit not significantly, in amelanotic compared to melanotic tumours and was statistically associated with tumours having both melanin and the epithelioid histotype. The frequency of CSPG4 expression was similar to that of other melanoma antigens used as diagnostic markers for canine malignant melanoma, such as Melan A and the protein recognized by the PNL2 monoclonal antibody. The results suggest that CSPG4 constitutes a new potential immunohistochemical marker of canine malignant melanoma and may represent an immunotherapeutic target as in humans.

  17. Melanoma Proteoglycan Modifies Gene Expression to Stimulate Tumor Cell Motility, Growth and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Price, Matthew A.; Li, GuiYuan; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Salgia, Ravi; Jagedeeswaran, Ramasamy; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Ferrone, Soldano; Turley, Eva A.; McCarthy, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) is a plasma membrane-associated proteoglycan that facilitates the growth, motility and invasion of tumor cells. MCSP expression in melanoma cells enhances integrin function and constitutive activation of Erk 1,2. The current studies were performed to determine the mechanism by which MCSP expression promotes tumor growth and motility. The results demonstrate that MCSP expression in radial growth phase (RGP), vertical growth phase (VGP) or metastatic cell lines causes sustained activation of Erk 1,2, enhanced growth and motility which all require the cytoplasmic domain of the MCSP core protein. MCSP expression in an RGP cell line also promotes an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) based on changes in cell morphology and the expression of several EMT markers. Finally MCSP enhances the expression of c-Met and HGF, and inhibiting c-Met expression or activation limits the increased growth and motility of multiple melanoma cell lines. The studies collectively demonstrate an importance for MCSP in promoting progression by an epigenetic mechanism and they indicate that MCSP could be targeted to delay or inhibit tumor progression in patients. PMID:19738072

  18. Studies on the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides from cartilage-specific proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Chondrocytes synthesize and secrete a cartilage-specific proteoglycan (PG-H) as one of their major products. This proteoglycan has attached to it several types of carbohydrate chains, including chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, O-linked oligosaccharides, and asparagine-linked oligosaccharides. The asparagine-linked oligosaccharides found on PG-H were investigated in these studies. Methodology was developed for the isolation and separation of standard of standard complex and high mannose type oligosaccharides. This included digesting glycoproteins with N-glycanase and separation of the oligosaccharides according to type by concanavalin-A lectin chromatography. The different oligosaccharide types were then analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography. This methodology was used in the subsequent studies on the PG-H asparagine-linked oligosaccharides. Initially, the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides recovered from the culture medium (CM) and cell-associated (Ma) fractions of PG-H from of tibial chondrocytes were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-mannose and the oligosaccharides were isolated and analyzed.

  19. Glycosidases during chick embryo lung development and their colocalization with proteoglycans and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Stabellini, G; Calvitti, M; Baroni, T; Marinucci, L; Calastrini, C; Carinci, P; Becchetti, E

    2002-01-01

    During development, the epithelial component of the lung goes through a complex orderly process of branching, following strict patterns of space and time. Proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and growth factors are fundamental components of the extracellular matrix and perform a key role in differentiative processes. The embryonic chick lung shows a specific glycosaminoglycan composition at different levels of branching and at different embryonic stages. Proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan accumulation is the result of secretion, absorption and degradation processes. In this pathway, enzymes, such as glycosidases, growth factors and cytokines are involved. We examined the behaviour of glycosidases, such as beta-hexosaminidases (beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, beta-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminidase), beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase, during the development of the lung bud. Our data show that the activity of the enzymes is closely linked to the processes of epithelial proliferation, bronchial tubule lengthening and infiltration of the surrounding mesenchyme. The glycosaminoglycans colocalize with transforming growth factor beta2 and interleukin-1 in the basement membrane and in the mesenchymal areas where the epithelium grows, and are complementary to the presence of the glycosidases. In conclusion, the activity of these glycosidases is spatially and temporally programmed and favors the release of the factors and the events which they influence.

  20. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Al Gwairi, Othman; Thach, Lyna; Zheng, Wenhua; Osman, Narin; Little, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch's membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of drusen. AMD manifests as early and late stage; the latter involves cell proliferation and neovascularization in wet AMD. Current therapies target the later hyperproliferative and invasive wet stage whilst none target early developmental stages of AMD. In the lipid deposition disease atherosclerosis modified proteoglycans bind and retain apolipoproteins in the artery wall. Chemically modified trapped lipids are immunogenic and can initiate a chronic inflammatory process manifesting as atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent artery blockages, heart attacks, or strokes. As plasma derived lipoprotein deposits are found in BM in early AMD, it is possible that they arise by a similar process within the macula. In this review we consider aspects of the pathological processes underlying AMD with a focus on the potential role of modifications to secreted proteoglycans being a cause and therefore a target for the treatment of early AMD.

  1. Transforming growth factor-β2 is sequestered in preterm human milk by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Coffing, Hayley P; Sankaranarayanan, Nehru Viji; Jin, Yingzi; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Frost, Brandy L; Blanco, Cynthia L; Patel, Aloka L; Meier, Paula P; Garzon, Steven A; Desai, Umesh R; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-08-01

    Human milk contains biologically important amounts of transforming growth factor-β2 isoform (TGF-β2), which is presumed to protect against inflammatory gut mucosal injury in the neonate. In preclinical models, enterally administered TGF-β2 can protect against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis, an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In this study, we investigated whether TGF-β bioactivity in human preterm milk could be enhanced for therapeutic purposes by adding recombinant TGF-β2 (rTGF-β2) to milk prior to feeding. Milk-borne TGF-β bioactivity was measured by established luciferase reporter assays. Molecular interactions of TGF-β2 were investigated by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and immunoblots, computational molecular modeling, and affinity capillary electrophoresis. Addition of rTGF-β2 (20-40 nM) to human preterm milk samples failed to increase TGF-β bioactivity in milk. Milk-borne TGF-β2 was bound to chondroitin sulfate (CS) containing proteoglycan(s) such as biglycan, which are expressed in high concentrations in milk. Chondroitinase treatment of milk increased the bioactivity of both endogenous and rTGF-β2, and consequently, enhanced the ability of preterm milk to suppress LPS-induced NF-κB activation in macrophages. These findings provide a mechanism for the normally low bioavailability of milk-borne TGF-β2 and identify chondroitinase digestion of milk as a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of preterm milk.

  2. THE NG2 PROTEOGLYCAN PROMOTES OLIGODENDROCYTE PROGENITOR PROLIFERATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL MYELINATION

    PubMed Central

    Kucharova, Karolina; Stallcup, William B.

    2010-01-01

    The NG2 proteoglycan has been shown to promote proliferation and motility in a variety of cell types. The presence of NG2 on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) suggests that the proteoglycan may be a factor in expansion of the OPC pool to fill the entire central nervous system prior to OPC differentiation to form myelinating oligodendrocytes. Comparisons of postnatal cerebellar myelination in wild type and NG2 null mice reveal reduced numbers of OPCs in developing white matter of the NG2 null mouse. Quantification of BrdU incorporation shows that reduced proliferation is a key reason for this OPC shortage, with the peak of OPC proliferation delayed by 4-5 days in the absence of NG2. As a result of the subnormal pool of OPCs, there is also a delay in production of mature oligodendrocytes and myelinating processes in the NG2 null cerebellum. NG2 may promote OPC proliferation via enhancement of growth factor signaling or mediation of OPC interaction with unmyelinated axons. PMID:20006679

  3. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  4. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x <= 0.5, is associated with a first order magnetic phase transition and it reaches values of 3 to 4 K and 6 to 10 J/kg K per 1 T field change, respectively. The refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 <= x <= 1 allowed us to obtain a qualitative understanding of the basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  5. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  6. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  7. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  8. DSD-1-Proteoglycan/Phosphacan and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-beta isoforms during development and regeneration of neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Faissner, Andreas; Heck, Nicolas; Dobbertin, Alexandre; Garwood, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between neurons and glial cells play important roles in regulating key events of development and regeneration of the CNS. Thus, migrating neurons are partly guided by radial glia to their target, and glial scaffolds direct the growth and directional choice of advancing axons, e.g., at the midline. In the adult, reactive astrocytes and myelin components play a pivotal role in the inhibition of regeneration. The past years have shown that astrocytic functions are mediated on the molecular level by extracellular matrix components, which include various glycoproteins and proteoglycans. One important, developmentally regulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is DSD-1-PG/phosphacan, a glial derived proteoglycan which represents a splice variant of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)-beta (also known as PTP-zeta). Current evidence suggests that this proteoglycan influences axon growth in development and regeneration, displaying inhibitory or stimulatory effects dependent on the mode of presentation, and the neuronal lineage. These effects seem to be mediated by neuronal receptors of the Ig-CAM superfamily.

  9. Quantitation of proteoglycans as glycosaminoglycans in biological fluids using an alcian blue dot blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, S

    1998-02-15

    A method for quantitation of intact proteoglycans as GAGs in biological fluids (blood plasma, synovial fluid) or 4 M guanidine extracts of tissues has been published previously (S. Björnsson, Anal. Biochem. 210, 282-291, 1993). The method is based on the specific interaction between sulfated polymers and the tetravalent cationic dye Alcian blue at pH 1.5 in 0.4 M guanidine-HCl and in the presence of 0.25% Triton. The absorbance assay has a measuring range of 1-20 microgram of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which is not sensitive enough to measure the low contents of proteoglycans in blood plasma, urine, or wound fluid. A dot blot assay is now described in which the Alcian blue-GAG complexes are collected on a polyvinylidene fluoride membrane, by filtration in a dot blot apparatus, and the stain is quantitated as reflectance by scanning and densitometry. The assay requires 10 microliter of sample and has a measuring range of 10-800 ng of GAG, corresponding to a concentration of 1-80 mg/liter, suitable for proteoglycans in biological fluids. The procedures for chemistry, scanning, densitometry, and curve fitting were each evaluated separately. The error contributed by chemistry accounted for a minor portion of the imprecision. The imprecision contributed by scanning was the most important source of within-run and between-run imprecision, and was caused by inequalities of the charge-coupled device along the scanning arm. Unexpectedly, curve fitting was also a major source of total imprecision in dot blot quantitation and differed with the type of equation used. The between-run imprecision calculated as CV (SD/mean . 100) was 13.0% at 8 mg/liter. The response of the assay was identical for six different commercial preparations of GAGs (chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, dermatan sulfate, keratan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and heparin) despite differences in degree of sulfation known to exist. There was no positive or negative interference by blood plasma, apart

  10. Open questions about giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of giant viruses exhibiting double-stranded DNA genomes larger than a million base pairs, encoding more than a thousand proteins and packed in near micron-sized icosahedral particles, opened a new and unexpected chapter in virology. As of today, these giant viruses and their closest relatives of lesser dimensions infect unicellular eukaryotes found in aquatic environments, but belonging to a wide diversity of early branching phyla. This broad phylogenetic distribution of hosts is consistent with the hypothesis that giant viruses originated prior to the radiation of the eukaryotic domain and/or might have been involved in the partition of nuclear versus cytoplasmic functions in ancestral cells. The distinctive features of the known giant viruses, in particular the recurrent presence of components of the translation apparatus in their proteome, raise a number of fundamental questions about their origin, their mode of evolution, and the relationship they may entertain with other dsDNA viruses, the genome size of which exhibits the widest distribution among all biological entities, from less than 5 kb to more than 1.25 Mb (a ratio of 1:250). At a more conceptual level, the convergence between the discovery of increasingly reduced parasitic cellular organisms and that of giant viruses exhibiting a widening array of cellular-like functions may ultimately abolish the historical discontinuity between the viral and the cellular world.

  11. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  12. Two Faces of Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan in Spinal Cord Repair: A Role in Microglia/Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    London, Anat; Segev, Yifat; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmin; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gidon; Schwartz, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Background Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) is a major component of the glial scar. It is considered to be a major obstacle for central nervous system (CNS) recovery after injury, especially in light of its well-known activity in limiting axonal growth. Therefore, its degradation has become a key therapeutic goal in the field of CNS regeneration. Yet, the abundant de novo synthesis of CSPG in response to CNS injury is puzzling. This apparent dichotomy led us to hypothesize that CSPG plays a beneficial role in the repair process, which might have been previously overlooked because of nonoptimal regulation of its levels. This hypothesis is tested in the present study. Methods and Findings We inflicted spinal cord injury in adult mice and examined the effects of CSPG on the recovery process. We used xyloside to inhibit CSPG formation at different time points after the injury and analyzed the phenotype acquired by the microglia/macrophages in the lesion site. To distinguish between the resident microglia and infiltrating monocytes, we used chimeric mice whose bone marrow-derived myeloid cells expressed GFP. We found that CSPG plays a key role during the acute recovery stage after spinal cord injury in mice. Inhibition of CSPG synthesis immediately after injury impaired functional motor recovery and increased tissue loss. Using the chimeric mice we found that the immediate inhibition of CSPG production caused a dramatic effect on the spatial organization of the infiltrating myeloid cells around the lesion site, decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) production by microglia/macrophages, and increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels. In contrast, delayed inhibition, allowing CSPG synthesis during the first 2 d following injury, with subsequent inhibition, improved recovery. Using in vitro studies, we showed that CSPG directly activated microglia/macrophages via the CD44 receptor and modulated neurotrophic factor secretion by these cells

  13. Elevated expression of transforming growth factor-beta and proteoglycan production in experimental glomerulonephritis. Possible role in expansion of the mesangial extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, S; Languino, L R; Ruoslahti, E; Border, W A

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular accumulation of extracellular matrix is a prominent feature of progressive glomerulonephritis. Previously, we have shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is unique among growth factors in regulating the production of the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin by glomerular mesangial cells in vitro. We now provide evidence of an elevated expression of TGF-beta, proteoglycans, and fibronectin in glomerulonephritis induced in rats by injection of anti-thymocyte serum (ATS). Glomeruli were cultured from rat kidneys at 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 d after ATS administration. Increased proteoglycan synthesis was detected beginning on day 4, which peaked at a 4,900% increase compared with control on day 7, and returned toward control levels by day 28. The increased proteoglycan synthesis by cultured nephritic glomeruli, as well as that of fibronectin, were greatly reduced by addition of antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide from TGF-beta. Conditioned media from ATS glomerular cultures, when added to normal cultured mesangial cells, induced elevated proteoglycan synthesis that also peaked on day 7 and that mimicked the response to added exogenous TGF-beta. The stimulatory activity of the conditioned media was blocked by addition of TGF-beta antiserum. Prior addition of the immunizing peptide to the antiserum abolished the blocking effect. The main induced proteoglycans were identified as biglycan and decorin by immunoprecipitation with antiserum made against synthetic peptides from the proteoglycan core proteins. Glomerular histology showed mesangial matrix expansion in a time course that roughly paralleled both the elevated proteoglycan synthesis by the ATS glomeruli and the ability of the conditioned media from these glomeruli to induce proteoglycan synthesis. At the same time there was an increased expression of TGF-beta mRNA and TGF-beta protein in the glomeruli. These results suggest a central role for TGF-beta in the accumulation of pathological

  14. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Journal Articles Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis May 2016 Questions and Answers about Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis This publication contains general information about polymyalgia ...

  15. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  16. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  17. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  18. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  19. Structural and functional analysis of two small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, fibromodulin and chondroadherin.

    PubMed

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Hohenester, Erhard

    2017-02-17

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are important regulators of extracellular matrix assembly and cell signalling. We have determined crystal structures at ~2.2Å resolution of human fibromodulin and chondroadherin, two collagen-binding SLRPs. Their overall fold is similar to that of the prototypical SLRP, decorin, but unlike decorin neither fibromodulin nor chondroadherin forms a stable dimer. A previously identified binding site for integrin α2β1 maps to an α-helix in the C-terminal cap region of chondroadherin. Interrogation of the Collagen Toolkits revealed a unique binding site for chondroadherin in collagen II, and no binding to collagen III. A triple-helical peptide containing the sequence GAOGPSGFQGLOGPOGPO (O is hydroxyproline) forms a stable complex with chondroadherin in solution. In fibrillar collagen I and II, this sequence is aligned with the collagen cross-linking site KGHR, suggesting a role for chondroadherin in cross-linking.

  20. Hypothalamic proteoglycan syndecan-3 is a novel cocaine addiction resilience factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jihuan; Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; Kawamura, Tomoya; Lefebvre, Celine; Shin, William; Howell, Leonard L; Hemby, Scott E; Harvey, Brandon K; Califano, Andrea; Morales, Marisela; Koob, George F; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans like syndecan-3 have complex signaling roles in addition to their function as structural components of the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that syndecan-3 in the lateral hypothalamus has an unexpected new role in limiting compulsive cocaine intake. In particular, we observe that syndecan-3 null mice self-administer greater amounts of cocaine than wild-type mice. This effect can be rescued by re-expression of syndecan-3 in the lateral hypothalamus with an adeno-associated viral vector. Adeno-associated viral vector delivery of syndecan-3 to the lateral hypothalamus also reduces motivation for cocaine in normal mice. Syndecan-3 limits cocaine intake by modulating the effects of glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor, which uses syndecan-3 as an alternative receptor. Our findings indicate syndecan-3-dependent signaling as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction.

  1. An inhibitor of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan synthesis promotes central nervous system remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Rogers, James A.; Zhang, Ping; Jensen, Samuel K.; Stephenson, Erin L.; Chen, Tieyu; Hurlbert, Mitchel G.; Lau, Lorraine W.; Rawji, Khalil S.; Plemel, Jason R.; Koch, Marcus; Ling, Chang-Chun; Yong, V. Wee

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is the generation of new myelin sheaths after injury facilitated by processes of differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Although this repair phenomenon occurs in lesions of multiple sclerosis patients, many lesions fail to completely remyelinate. A number of factors have been identified that contribute to remyelination failure, including the upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) that comprise part of the astrogliotic scar. We show that in vitro, OPCs have dramatically reduced process outgrowth in the presence of CSPGs, and a medication library that includes a number of recently reported OPC differentiation drugs failed to rescue this inhibitory phenotype on CSPGs. We introduce a novel CSPG synthesis inhibitor to reduce CSPG content and find rescued process outgrowth from OPCs in vitro and accelerated remyelination following focal demyelination in mice. Preventing CSPG deposition into the lesion microenvironment may be a useful strategy to promote repair in multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders. PMID:27115988

  2. Characterization of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan-positive Recycling Endosomes Isolated from Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    A. PODYMA-INOUE, KATARZYNA; MORIWAKI, TAKUYA; R. RAJAPAKSHE, ANUPAMA; TERASAWA, KAZUE; HARA-YOKOYAMA, MIKI

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs)-dependent endocytic events have been involved in glioma progression. Thus, comprehensive understanding of the intracellular trafficking complexes formed in presence of HSPGs would be important for development of glioma treatments. Materials and Methods: Subcellular fractionation was used to separate vesicles containing HSPGs from the rat C6 glioma cell line. Isolated HSPG-positive vesicles were further characterized with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: The HSPG-positive vesicular fractions, distinct from plasma membrane-derived material, were enriched in endocytic marker, Rab11. Proteomic analysis identified more than two hundred proteins to be associated with vesicular membrane, among them, over eighty were related to endosomal uptake, recycling or vesicular transport. Conclusion: Part of HSPGs in glioma cells is internalized through clathrin-dependent endocytosis and undergo recycling. The development of compounds regulating HSPG-mediated trafficking will likely enable design of effective glioma treatment. PMID:27807067

  3. Cell surface receptors for herpes simplex virus are heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The role of cell surface heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was investigated using CHO cell mutants defective in various aspects of glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Binding of radiolabeled virus to the cells and infection were assessed in mutant and wild-type cells. Virus bound efficiently to wild-type cells and initiated an abortive infection in which immediate-early or alpha viral genes were expressed, despite limited production of late viral proteins and progeny virus. Binding of virus to heparan sulfate-deficient mutant cells was severely impaired and mutant cells were resistant to HSV infection. Intermediate levels of binding and infection were observed for a CHO cell mutant that produced undersulfated heparan sulfate. These results show that heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for HSV. PMID:1310996

  4. Glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and sulodexide and the endothelium: biological roles and pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Masola, V; Zaza, G; Onisto, M; Lupo, A; Gambaro, G

    2014-06-01

    The glycocalyx is a jelly layer covering the endothelium constituted by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), proteoglycans and adsorbed plasma proteins. This structure take part in several physiological and pathological vascular events. The glycocalyx acts as mechanosensor to shear stress and participates to regulation of vascular tone, permeability, coagulation and complement activation. Moreover it regulates the interaction and activation of blood cells with endothelial cells. The presence of a thick, normal glycocalyx is required for physiological vascular functions, whereas these functions are impaired by its damage by noxious agents. Indeed, glycocalyx alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion and diabetic vascular complications. GAGs such as sulodexide are promising agents to control endothelial dysfunction. They act at multiple levels: they promote glycocalyx reconstitution, control glycocalyx degrading enzymes, exert anti-inflammatory effects and have anti-apoptotic and anti-senescence effects on endothelial cells. Clinical studies support the evidence that glycosaminoglycans are useful to restore a normal endothelial function.

  5. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography of radioactively labeled carbohydrate components of proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmander, L.S.

    1986-04-01

    Methods were developed for the separation of radioactively labeled carbohydrate components of proteoglycans by isocratic ion-moderated partition HPLC. Neutral sugars were separated after hydrolysis in trifluoroacetic acid with baseline separation between glucose, xylose, galactose, fucose, and mannose. N-Acetylneuraminic acid, N-acetylated hexosamines, glucose, galactose, and xylitol were likewise well separated from each other under isocratic elution conditions. Glucuronic acid, iduronic acid, and their lactones were separated after hydrolysis in formic acid and sulfuric acid. Glucosamine, galactosamine, galactosaminitol, and glucosaminitol were separated by HPLC on a cation exchanger with neutral buffer after hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid. THe separation techniques also proved useful in fractionation of exoglycosidase digests of O- and N-linked oligosaccharides. Separations of aldoses, hexosamines, and uronic acids were adapted to sensitive photometric detection.

  6. Effect of indomethacin on swelling, lymphocyte influx, and cartilage proteoglycan depletion in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Pettipher, E R; Henderson, B; Edwards, J C; Higgs, G A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of indomethacin on antigen induced arthritis in rabbits have been investigated. Arthritis was induced in the knee joints of sensitised rabbits by intra-articular injection of antigen. Swelling of the joints was measured for 14 days after antigen challenge, and groups of animals were killed on days 1, 7, or 14 for collection of synovial fluids and tissues. Indomethacin (1 mg/kg, three times daily) reduced joint swelling and the prostaglandin E2 concentrations in synovial fluid. In addition, indomethacin increased the loss of proteoglycan from articular cartilage and the numbers of lymphocytes in the inflamed synovial lining. These findings suggest that the symptomatic benefits of indomethacin and related drugs in inflammatory arthritis may be achieved at the expense of significant adverse effects on joint tissues. PMID:2782971

  7. Dynamic Structure of Proteoglycans/Glycosaminoglycans in the Lungs of Mice with Chronic Granulomatous Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, L B; Shkurupy, V A; Putyatina, A N

    2016-02-01

    Structure of proteoglycans in the lungs and total glycosaminoglycan content in blood serum were studied on mouse model of BCG-induced granulomatous inflammation in mice (without destructive processes in the lung parenchyma and granulomas). The maximum level of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the lungs was detected on postinfection day 30 and was related to their involvement in initiation granulomogenesis and development of granulomas. The maximum level of total glycosaminoglycans in mouse serum on postinfection day 90 coincided with minimum level of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the lungs. This blood/lungs ratio of glycosaminoglycans can be related to the prevalence of low-molecular-weight hyaluronan fragments promoting inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs observed at the end of the experiment (postinfection day 180).

  8. The small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans in tissue repair and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Borén, Jan; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans consist of a protein core with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains, and have multiple roles in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we discuss the potential and known functions of a group of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) in atherosclerosis. We focus on five SLRPs, decorin, biglycan lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP, because these have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques or demonstrated to have a role in animal models of atherosclerosis. Decorin and biglycan are modified post translationally by substitution with chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAGs, whereas lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP have keratan sulfate side chains, and the core proteins have leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs that are characteristic of the LRR superfamily. The chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAG side chains have been implicated in lipid retention in atherosclerosis. The core proteins are discussed here in the context of: (i) interactions with collagens and their implications in tissue integrity, fibrosis, and wound repair; and (ii) interactions with growth factors, cytokines, pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and cell surface receptors that impact normal physiology and disease processes such as inflammation, innate immune responses, and wound healing (i.e processes that are all important in plaque development and progression). Thus, studies of these SLRPs in the context of wound healing are providing clues about their functions that may be important in early stages of atherosclerosis to plaque vulnerability and cardiovascular disease at later stages. Understanding of signal transduction pathways regulated by the core protein interactions is leading to novel roles and therapeutic potential for these proteins in wound repair and atherosclerosis. PMID:26477596

  9. Developmental and functional significance of the CSF-1 proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate chain

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Sayan; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Seifert, Mark F.; Dai, Xu-Ming; Stanley, E. Richard

    2006-01-01

    The primary macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1), is homodimeric and exists in 3 biologically active isoforms: a membrane-spanning, cell-surface glycoprotein (csCSF-1) and secreted glycoprotein (sgCSF-1) and proteoglycan (spCSF-1) isoforms. To investigate the in vivo role of the chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain of spCSF-1, we created mice that exclusively express, in a normal tissue-specific and developmental manner, either the secreted precursor of spCSF-1 or the corresponding precursor in which the GAG addition site was mutated. The reproductive, hematopoietic tooth eruption and tissue macrophage defects of CSF-1-deficient, osteopetrotic Csf1op/Csf1op mice were corrected by transgenic expression of the precursors of either sgCSF-1 or spCSF-1. Furthermore, in contrast to the transgene encoding csCSF-1, both failed to completely correct growth retardation, suggesting a role for csCSF-1 in the regulation of body weight. However, spCSF-1, in contrast to sgCSF-1, completely resolved the osteopetrotic phenotype. Furthermore, in transgenic lines expressing different concentrations of sgCSF-1 or spCSF-1, spCSF-1 more efficiently corrected Csf1op/Csf1op defects of tooth eruption, eyelid opening, macrophage morphology, and B-cell deficiency than sgCSF-1. These results indicate an important role of the CSF-1 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in in vivo signaling by secreted CSF-1. (Blood. 2006;107:786-795) PMID:16210339

  10. Contaminants in commercial preparations of 'purified' small leucine-rich proteoglycans may distort mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon J; Fuller, Heidi R; Jones, Philip; Caterson, Bruce; Shirran, Sally L; Botting, Catherine H; Roberts, Sally

    2017-02-28

    The present study reports the perplexing results that came about because of seriously impure commercially available reagents. Commercial reagents and chemicals are routinely ordered by scientists and expected to have been rigorously assessed for their purity. Unfortunately, we found this assumption to be risky. Extensive work was carried out within our laboratory using commercially sourced preparations of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), decorin and biglycan, to investigate their influence on nerve cell growth. Unusual results compelled us to analyse the composition and purity of both preparations of these proteoglycans (PGs) using both mass spectrometry (MS) and Western blotting, with and without various enzymatic deglycosylations. Commercial 'decorin' and 'biglycan' were found to contain a mixture of PGs including not only both decorin and biglycan but also fibromodulin and aggrecan. The unexpected effects of 'decorin' and 'biglycan' on nerve cell growth could be explained by these impurities. Decorin and biglycan contain either chondroitin or dermatan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains whereas fibromodulin only contains keratan sulfate and the large (>2500 kDa), highly glycosylated aggrecan contains both keratan and chondroitin sulfate. The different structure, molecular weight and composition of these impurities significantly affected our work and any conclusions that could be made. These findings beg the question as to whether scientists need to verify the purity of each commercially obtained reagent used in their experiments. The implications of these findings are vast, since the effects of these impurities may already have led to inaccurate conclusions and reports in the literature with concomitant loss of researchers' funds and time.

  11. Ctr2 regulates mast cell maturation by affecting the storage and expression of tryptase and proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Öhrvik, Helena; Logeman, Brandon; Noguchi, Glyn; Eriksson, Inger; Kjellén, Lena; Thiele, Dennis J.; Pejler, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential for multiple cellular functions. Cellular uptake of Cu+ is carried out by the Ctr1 high affinity Cu transporter. The mobilization of endosomal Cu pools is regulated by a protein structurally similar to Ctr1, called Ctr2. It was recently shown that ablation of Ctr2 caused an increase in the concentration of Cu localized to endolysosomes. However, the biological significance of excess endolysosomal Cu accumulation has not been assessed. Here we addressed this issue by investigating the impact of Ctr2 deficiency on mast cells, a cell type unusually rich in endolysosomal organelles (secretory granules). We show that Ctr2−/− mast cells have increased intracellular Cu concentrations and that the absence of Ctr2 results in increased metachromatic staining, the latter indicating an impact of Ctr2 on the storage of proteoglycans in the secretory granules. In agreement with this, the absence of Ctr2 caused a skewed ratio between proteoglycans of heparin and chondroitin sulfate type, with increased amounts of heparin accompanied by a reduction of chondroitin sulfate. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a higher number of electron dense granules in Ctr2−/− mast cells than in wild-type cells. The increase in granular staining and heparin content is compatible with an impact of Ctr2 on mast cell maturation and, in support of this, the absence of Ctr2 resulted in markedly increased mRNA expression, storage and enzymatic activity of tryptase. Taken together, the present study introduces Ctr2 and Cu as novel actors in the regulation of mast cell maturation and granule homeostasis. PMID:26342034

  12. Keratocan, a Cornea-specific Keratan Sulfate Proteoglycan, Is Regulated by Lumican*

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Eric C.; Liu, Chia-Yang; Chikama, Tai-ichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhito; Kao, Candace W.-C.; Birk, David E.; Funderburgh, James L.; Jester, James V.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    Lumican is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein widely distributed in mammalian connective tissues. Corneal lumican modified with keratan sulfate constitutes one of the major proteoglycans of the stroma. Lumican-null mice exhibit altered collagen fibril organization and loss of corneal transparency. A closely related protein, keratocan, carries the remaining keratan sulfate of the cornea, but keratocan-null mice exhibit a less severe corneal phenotype. In the current study, we examined the effect of lumican overexpression in corneas of wild type mice. These mice showed no alteration in collagen organization or transparency but had increased keratocan expression at both protein and mRNA levels. Corneas of lumican-null mice showed decreased keratocan. This coupling of keratocan expression with lumican also was observed after intrastromal injection of a lumican expression minigene into the corneal stroma of Lum–/– mice. Small interfering RNA knockdown of lumican in vitro reduced keratocan expression, whereas co-injection of a lumican-expressing minigene with a β-galactosidase reporter driven by the keratocan promoter demonstrated an increase of keratocan transcriptional activity in response to lumican expression in Lum–/– corneas in vivo. These observations demonstrate that lumican has a novel regulatory role in keratocan expression at the transcriptional level. Such results help provide an explanation for the differences in severity of corneal manifestation found in Lum–/– and Kera–/– mice. The results also suggest a critical level of small proteoglycans to be essential for collagen organization but that overabundance is not detrimental to extracellular matrix morphogenesis. PMID:15849191

  13. Transient expression of a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (syndecan) during limb development.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Reiter, R S; Jensen, K L; Kato, M; Bernfield, M

    1990-07-01

    Syndecan is an integral membrane proteoglycan that contains both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains and that links the cytoskeleton to interstitial extracellular matrix components, including collagen and fibronectin. Immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody directed to the core protein of the syndecan ectodomain has been used to analyze the distribution of this proteoglycan in the developing mouse limb bud and in high-density cultures of limb mesenchyme cells. By Day 9 of gestation when the limb buds are just apparent, syndecan is detected on cells throughout the limb region, including both ectodermal and mesenchymal components. This distribution does not change as the limb bud elongates along its proximodistal axis, except for its reduction in the apical ectodermal ridge. By Day 11, the intensity of immunofluorescence in the central core decreases relative to other regions. By Day 13 immunostaining is lost in the regions destined for chondrogenesis and myogenesis but persists in the limb ectoderm and peripheral and distal mesenchyme. In the limb mesenchyme cell cultures, syndecan is initially undetected, but is found throughout the culture by 24 hr. With further culture the antigen becomes reduced in chondrogenic foci and in association with myogenic cells. When chick limb ectoderm is placed on the high-density cultures, immunoreactivity in the mouse mesenchyme is enhanced suggesting that epithelial-mesenchymal interactions modulate syndecan expression in the limb bud. Based on analysis of 35S-labeled syndecan from the cultures, syndecan from limb mesenchyme cells contains more glycosaminoglycan chains and is larger in size than the previously described polymorphic forms of syndecan from various epithelia. The high affinity of syndecan for components of the extracellular matrix and its distribution in the early limb bud are consistent with a role in maintaining the morphologic integrity of the limb bud during the period of initiation and rapid

  14. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Ramos Cuadra, José Angel; Lara Toral, Juan; Lozano Cabezas, Cristobal; Fernández Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery.

  15. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Cuadra, José Ángel Ramos; Toral, Juan Lara; Cabezas, Cristobal Lozano; Guerrero, Juan Carlos Fernández

    2008-01-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery. PMID:18401474

  16. Cabergoline treatment in invasive giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  17. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  18. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  19. Differential compartmentalization of mRNAs in squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of mRNAs that includes beta-actin, beta-tubulin, kinesin, neurofilament proteins, and enolase. To define the absolute levels and relative distribution of these mRNAs, we have used competitive reverse transcription-PCR to quantify the levels of five mRNAs present in the giant axon and giant fiber lobe (GFL), the location of the parental cell soma. In the GFL, the number of transcripts for these mRNAs varied over a fourfold range, with beta-tubulin being the most abundant mRNA species (1.25 x 10(9) molecules per GFL). Based on transcript number, the rank order of mRNA levels in the GFL was beta-tubulin > beta-actin > kinesin > enolase > microtubule-associated protein (MAP) H1. In contrast, kinesin mRNA was most abundant in the axon (4.1 x 10(7) molecules per axon) with individual mRNA levels varying 15-fold. The rank order of mRNA levels in the axon was kinesin > beta-tubulin > MAP H1 > beta-actin > enolase. The relative abundance of the mRNA species in the axon did not correlate with the size of the transcript, nor was it directly related to their corresponding levels in the GFL. Taken together, these findings confirm that significant amounts of mRNA are present in the giant axon and suggest that specific mRNAs are differentially transported into the axonal domain.

  20. Targeting of Proteoglycan Synthesis Pathway: A New Strategy to Counteract Excessive Matrix Proteoglycan Deposition and Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced Fibrotic Phenotype in Lung Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Irfan; Barré, Lydia; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Li, Dong; Jaquinet, Jean-Claude; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and deposition plays an important role in the pathophysiology of fibrosis and is an early and dominant feature of pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a major cytokine associated with fibrosis that induces excessive synthesis of matrix proteins, particularly PGs. Owing to the importance of PGs in matrix assembly and in mediating cytokine and growth factor signaling, a strategy based on the inhibition of PG synthesis may prevent excessive matrix PG deposition and attenuates profibrotic effects of TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts. Here, we showed that 4-MU4-deoxy-β-D-xylopyranoside, a competitive inhibitor of β4-galactosyltransferase7, inhibited PG synthesis and secretion in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing the level of both chondroitin/dermatan- and heparin-sulfate PG in primary lung fibroblasts. Importantly, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside was able to counteract TGF-β1-induced synthesis of PGs, activation of fibroblast proliferation and fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation. Mechanistically, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside treatment inhibited TGF-β1-induced activation of canonical Smads2/3 signaling pathway in lung primary fibroblasts. The knockdown of β4-galactosyltransferase7 mimicked 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside effects, indicating selective inhibition of β4-galactosyltransferase7 by this compound. Collectively, this study reveals the anti-fibrotic activity of 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside and indicates that inhibition of PG synthesis represents a novel strategy for the treatment of lung fibrosis.

  1. Targeting of Proteoglycan Synthesis Pathway: A New Strategy to Counteract Excessive Matrix Proteoglycan Deposition and Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced Fibrotic Phenotype in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Irfan; Barré, Lydia; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Li, Dong; Jaquinet, Jean-Claude; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and deposition plays an important role in the pathophysiology of fibrosis and is an early and dominant feature of pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a major cytokine associated with fibrosis that induces excessive synthesis of matrix proteins, particularly PGs. Owing to the importance of PGs in matrix assembly and in mediating cytokine and growth factor signaling, a strategy based on the inhibition of PG synthesis may prevent excessive matrix PG deposition and attenuates profibrotic effects of TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts. Here, we showed that 4-MU4-deoxy-β-D-xylopyranoside, a competitive inhibitor of β4-galactosyltransferase7, inhibited PG synthesis and secretion in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing the level of both chondroitin/dermatan- and heparin-sulfate PG in primary lung fibroblasts. Importantly, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside was able to counteract TGF-β1-induced synthesis of PGs, activation of fibroblast proliferation and fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation. Mechanistically, 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside treatment inhibited TGF-β1-induced activation of canonical Smads2/3 signaling pathway in lung primary fibroblasts. The knockdown of β4-galactosyltransferase7 mimicked 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside effects, indicating selective inhibition of β4-galactosyltransferase7 by this compound. Collectively, this study reveals the anti-fibrotic activity of 4-MU4-deoxy-xyloside and indicates that inhibition of PG synthesis represents a novel strategy for the treatment of lung fibrosis. PMID:26751072

  2. Giant absorption of light by molecular vibrations on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Karabchevsky, A.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational overtone spectroscopy of molecules is a powerful tool for drawing information on molecular structure and dynamics. It relies on absorption of near infrared radiation (NIR) by molecular vibrations. Here we show the experimental evidence of giant enhancement of the absorption of light in solutions of organic molecules due to the switch from ballistic to diffusive propagation of light through a channel silicate glass waveguide. We also experimentally address a dynamics of absorption as a function of time of adsorption of the organic molecules on a waveguide. The observed enhancement in diffusion regime is by a factor of 300 in N-Methylaniline and by factor of 80 in Aniline compared to the expected values in the case of ballistic propagation of light in a waveguide. Our results underscore the importance of a guide surface modification and the disordered molecular nano-layer in enhancement of absorption by amines on engineered integrated system. PMID:26887658

  3. Giant absorption of light by molecular vibrations on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabchevsky, A.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational overtone spectroscopy of molecules is a powerful tool for drawing information on molecular structure and dynamics. It relies on absorption of near infrared radiation (NIR) by molecular vibrations. Here we show the experimental evidence of giant enhancement of the absorption of light in solutions of organic molecules due to the switch from ballistic to diffusive propagation of light through a channel silicate glass waveguide. We also experimentally address a dynamics of absorption as a function of time of adsorption of the organic molecules on a waveguide. The observed enhancement in diffusion regime is by a factor of 300 in N-Methylaniline and by factor of 80 in Aniline compared to the expected values in the case of ballistic propagation of light in a waveguide. Our results underscore the importance of a guide surface modification and the disordered molecular nano-layer in enhancement of absorption by amines on engineered integrated system.

  4. Formation of Hydrocarbons in the Outflows from Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne; Kress, Monika; Tielens, Alexander G.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of hydrocarbons in the oxygen-rich outflows from red giants was studied. The existence of organic molecules in such outflows has been known for several years; however, their surprisingly high abundances has been a mystery since all of the carbon had been thought to be irretrievably locked up in CO, the most strongly bound molecule. CO is the first molecule to form from the atoms present in the star's extended atmosphere, and as strong stellar winds drive a cooling outflow, dust grains condense out. In oxygen-rich outflows, the dust is thought to be composed mainly of silicates and other metal oxides. Perhaps the noble metals can condense out in metallic form, in particular the relatively abundant transition metals iron and nickel. We proposed that perhaps the carbon reservoir held as CO can be accessed through a catalytic process involving the chemisorption of CO and H2 onto grains rich in metallic iron. CO and H2 are the two most abundant molecules in circumstellar outflows, and they both are known to dissociate on transition metal surfaces at elevated temperatures, freeing carbon to form organic molecules such as methane. We believe methane is a precursor molecule to the organics observed in oxygen-rich red giants. We have developed a nonequilibrium numerical model of a surface chemical (catalytic) process. Based on this model, we believe that methane can be formed under the conditions present in circumstellar outflows. Although the methane formation rates are exceptionally low under these conditions, over dynamical timescales, a significant amount of CO can be converted to methane and driven further out in the envelope, explaining the presence of organics there.

  5. The submillimeter giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. H.

    1985-08-01

    The construction of new radiotelescopes to study the 0.3-1 mm radio band is being carried out at arid and high altitude sites around the world to avoid absorption of the radiation by atmospheric water vapor. The band offers data on the distribution of astromonical molecules in dark and dust clouds and quasars. A 30-m dish is being built at 9300 ft altitude in southern Spain, a synthesis array at 8400 ft ASL in the French Alps, and a 15-m dish at La Silla. Kitt Peak has received a new 12-m-diameter reflector and three 10.4-m dishes are operating in Owens Valley in California. A 10.4-m submillimeter dish is being constructed on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The need to protect the devices from distortions due to moisture and vibrations is spurring the use of composite materials to retain accuracies in the tens of microns in focusing.

  6. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  7. On the Shoulders of Giants...

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REFERENCES 1. Newton I. Turnbull HW, ed. Correspondence of Isaac Newton . Vol I: 1661Y1675. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press; 1959:416...calendar), Sir Isaac Newtonopined to Robert Hooke, ‘‘If I have seen further [than you and Descartes], it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.’’1 That

  8. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  9. Effects of limited exposure of rabbit chondrocyte cultures to parathyroid hormone and dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate on cartilage-characteristic proteoglycan synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Koike, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Sato, K.; Hiraki, Y.; Suzuki, F.

    1988-05-01

    Treatment of rabbit chondrocyte cultures with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for 30 h increased by 2- to 3-fold the incorporation of (35S)sulfate and 3H radioactivity with glucosamine as the precursor into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans characteristically found in cartilage matrix. However, PTH and (Bu)2cAMP did not increase either (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans or the incorporation of 3H radioactivity into hyaluronic acid and other glycosaminoglycans. PTH and (Bu)2cAMP also increased the incorporation of (3H) serine into both proteoglycans and total protein. In all cultures described above, the stimulation of (3H)serine incorporation into proteoglycans exceeded that of (3H)serine incorporation into total protein. These data indicate that PTH and (Bu)2cAMP selectively stimulate cartilage proteoglycan synthesis while they increase total protein synthesis. Since cAMP seems to play a mediatory role in the action of PTH, we elected to examine the effects of a limited exposure of chondrocytes to PTH or (Bu)2cAMP on the synthesis of proteoglycans. Treatment with PTH or (Bu)2cAMP for only the initial 2-7 h did not increase the rates of incorporation of (35S)sulfate, the 3H radioactivity with glucosamine, and (3H)serine into proteoglycans, as measured at 30 h, despite the fact that this treatment brought about a rapid and transient rise in the cAMP level. Furthermore, the application of prostaglandin I2 at concentrations that increased cAMP levels in a similar fashion as did PTH did not affect (35S) sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans.

  10. Rapidly Developing Yeast Microcolonies Differentiate in a Similar Way to Aging Giant Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Váchová, Libuše; Hatáková, Ladislava; Čáp, Michal; Pokorná, Michaela; Palková, Zdena

    2013-01-01

    During their development and aging on solid substrates, yeast giant colonies produce ammonia, which acts as a quorum sensing molecule. Ammonia production is connected with alkalization of the surrounding medium and with extensive reprogramming of cell metabolism. In addition, ammonia signaling is important for both horizontal (colony centre versus colony margin) and vertical (upper versus lower cell layers) colony differentiations. The centre of an aging differentiated giant colony is thus composed of two major cell subpopulations, the subpopulation of long-living, metabolically active and stress-resistant cells that form the upper layers of the colony and the subpopulation of stress-sensitive starving cells in the colony interior. Here, we show that microcolonies originating from one cell pass through similar developmental phases as giant colonies. Microcolony differentiation is linked to ammonia signaling, and cells similar to the upper and lower cells of aged giant colonies are formed even in relatively young microcolonies. A comparison of the properties of these cells revealed a number of features that are similar in microcolonies and giant colonies as well as a few that are only typical of chronologically aged giant colonies. These findings show that colony age per se is not crucial for colony differentiation. PMID:23970946

  11. 1988 Volvo award in basic science. Proteoglycan synthesis in the human intervertebral disc. Variation with age, region and pathology.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, M T; Johnstone, B; O'Brien, J P

    1988-09-01

    Slices of human annulus fibrosus were cultured under conditions that controlled their hydration and prevented loss of proteoglycans from the extracellular matrix. A quantitative analysis of proteoglycan synthesis was carried out. Both the absolute rate of synthesis and the topographical variation in chondrocyte activity changed with age; the most active cells in the adult were found in the mid-annulus region, whereas in the fetal disc the cells in the inner annulus were the most active. The conditions under which the tissue was stored, and changes in hydration during culture, had considerable effects on synthesis. Pathological discs had a wide range of biological activity that reflected the heterogeneous properties of these specimens. It is suggested that this culture method provides a means of investigating the way in which the synthesis of the macromolecular components of the intervertebral disc are coordinated and subsequently incorporated into the extracellular matrix.

  12. Altered Liver Proteoglycan/Glycosaminoglycan Structure as a Manifestation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling upon BCG-induced Granulomatosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, L B; Shkurupy, V A; Putyatina, A N

    2017-01-01

    Experimental BCG-induced granulomatosis in mice was used to study changes in the dynamics of individual liver proteoglycan components reflecting phasic extracellular matrix remodeling, determined by the host-parasite interaction and associated with granuloma development. In the early BCG-granulomatosis period, the increase in individual proteoglycan components promotes granuloma formation, providing conditions for mycobacteria adhesion to host cells, migration of phagocytic cells from circulation, and cell-cell interaction leading to granuloma development and fibrosis. Later, reduced reserve capacity of the extracellular matrix, development of interstitial fibrosis and granuloma fibrosis can lead to trophic shortage for cells within the granulomas, migration of macrophages out of them, and development of spontaneous necrosis and apoptosis typical of tuberculosis.

  13. Proteoglycan expression correlates with the phenotype of malignant and non-malignant EBV-positive B-cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsidulko, Alexandra Y.; Matskova, Liudmila; Astakhova, Lidiia A.; Ernberg, Ingemar; Grigorieva, Elvira V.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of proteoglycans (PGs) in EBV-host interactions and lymphomagenesis remains poorly investigated. In this study, expression of major proteoglycans (syndecan-1, glypican-1, perlecan, versican, brevican, aggrecan, NG2, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, lumican, CD44), heparan sulphate (HS) metabolic system (EXT1/2, NDST1/2, GLCE, HS2ST1, HS3ST1/2, HS6ST1/2, SULF1/2, HPSE) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen 1A1, fibronectin, elastin) in primary B cells and EBV carrying cell lines with different phenotypes, patterns of EBV-host cell interaction and viral latency stages (type I-III) was investigated. Primary B cells expressed a wide repertoire of PGs (dominated by serglycin and CD44) and ECM components. Lymphoblastoid EBV+ B cell lines (LCLs) showed specific PG expression with down-regulation of CD44 and ECM components and up-regulation of serglycin and perlecan/HSPG2. For Burkitt's lymphoma cells (BL), serglycin was down-regulated in BL type III cells and perlecan in type I BL cells. The biosynthetic machinery for HS was active in all cell lines, with some tendency to be down-regulated in BL cells. 5′-aza-dC and/or Trichostatin A resulted in transcriptional upregulation of the genes, suggesting that low expression of ECM components, proteoglycan core proteins and HS biosynthetic system is due to epigenetic suppression in type I cells. Taken together, our data show that proteoglycans are expressed in primary B lymphocytes whereas they are not or only partly expressed in EBV-carrying cell lines, depending on their latency type program. PMID:26527314

  14. Identification of phosphatase that dephosphorylates xylose in the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region of proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Koike, Toshiyasu; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Sato, Ban; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-03-07

    Recently, we demonstrated that FAM20B is a kinase that phosphorylates the xylose (Xyl) residue in the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region of proteoglycans. The phosphorylation of Xyl residues by FAM20B enhances the formation of the linkage region. Rapid dephosphorylation is probably induced just after synthesis of the linker and just before polymerization initiates. Indeed, in vitro chondroitin or heparan sulfate polymerization does not occur when the Xyl residue of the tetrasaccharide linkage region is phosphorylated. However, the enzyme responsible for the dephosphorylation of Xyl remains unknown. Here, we identified a novel protein that dephosphorylates the Xyl residue and designated it 2-phosphoxylose phosphatase. The phosphatase efficiently removed the phosphate from the phosphorylated trisaccharide, Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate), but not from phosphorylated tetrasaccharide, GlcUAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate). Additionally, RNA interference-mediated inhibition of 2-phosphoxylose phosphatase resulted in increased amounts of GlcNAcα1-4GlcUAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate), Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate), and Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate) in the cells. Gel filtration analysis of the glycosaminoglycan chains synthesized in the knockdown cells revealed that these cells produced decreased amounts of glycosaminoglycan chains and that the chains had similar lengths to those in the mock-transfected cells. Transcripts encoding this phosphatase were ubiquitously, but differentially, expressed in human tissues. Moreover, the phosphatase localized to the Golgi and interacted with the glucuronyltransferase-I involved in the completion of the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region. Based on these findings, we conclude that transient phosphorylation of the Xyl residue in the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region controls the formation of glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans.

  15. Murine T lymphocytes and T-lymphoma cells produce chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate proteoglycans and free heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycan.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A P; Rider, C C

    1991-01-01

    Normal murine splenic T lymphocytes and T-lymphoma cells were incubated with [35S]sulphate in low-sulphate medium for 4 hr. Gel filtration and SDS-PAGE revealed that the radiolabelled macromolecules secreted by these cells were almost exclusively chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate proteoglycans of relatively low molecular weight (MW), 100,000-200,000. Triton X-100 extracts of the cells contained similar proteoglycans. Under the conditions employed the incorporation of radiolabel by cells grown in vivo was equally distributed between cell-retained and secreted fractions, whereas cells grown in vitro retained some 75% of incorporated label. In general heparan sulphate predominated over chondroitin sulphate in both secreted and cell-retained fractions. Cell extracts also contained a minor proportion of free glycosaminoglycan, which is almost exclusively heparan sulphate. These chains, like those incorporated into the proteoglycan, were around 12,000 MW. The T-lymphoma cells RDM-4, whether grown in vitro or in vivo, also incorporated a substantial proportion of [35S]sulphate into a single, cell-retained protein, 100,000 MW. No such radiolabelled protein was detectable in T cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1900056

  16. Influence of cytochalasin D-induced changes in cell shape on proteoglycan synthesis by cultured articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-10-01

    There is growing evidence that cell shape regulates both proliferation and differentiated gene expression in a variety of cell types. The authors have explored the relationship between the morphology of articular chondrocytes in culture and the amount and type of proteoglycan they synthesize, using cytochalasin D to induce reversible cell rounding. When chondrocytes were prevented from spreading or when spread cells were induced to round up, {sup 35}SO{sub 4} incorporation into proteoglycan was stimulated. Incorporation into the cell layer was stimulated more than into the medium. When the cells were allowed to respread by removing cytochalasin D, proteoglycan synthesis returned to control levels. Cytochalasin D-induced stimulation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} incorporation reflected an increase in core protein synthesis rather than lengthening of glycosaminoglycan chains, because ({sup 3}H)serine incorporation into core protein was also stimulated. Cytochalasm D-treatment of cells in suspension caused no further stimulation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} incorporation, suggesting that the observed effects were due to cell rounding rather than exposure to cytochalasin D per se.

  17. Defects in Tendon, Ligament, and Enthesis in Response to Genetic Alterations in Key Proteoglycans and Glycoproteins: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the genetic alterations and knockdown approaches published in the literature to assess the role of key proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the structural development, function, and repair of tendon, ligament, and enthesis. The information was collected from (i) genetically altered mice, (ii) in vitro knockdown studies, (iii) genetic variants predisposition to injury, and (iv) human genetic diseases. The genes reviewed are for small leucine-rich proteoglycans (lumican, fibromodulin, biglycan, decorin, and asporin); dermatan sulfate epimerase (Dse) that alters structure of glycosaminoglycan and hence the function of small leucine-rich proteoglycans by converting glucuronic to iduronic acid; matricellular proteins (thrombospondin 2, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc), periostin, and tenascin X) including human tenascin C variants; and others, such as tenomodulin, leukocyte cell derived chemotaxin 1 (chondromodulin-I, ChM-I), CD44 antigen (Cd44), lubricin (Prg4), and aggrecan degrading gene, a disintegrin-like and metallopeptidase (reprolysin type) with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 5 (Adamts5). Understanding these genes represents drug targets for disrupting pathological mechanisms that lead to tendinopathy, ligamentopathy, enthesopathy, enthesitis and tendon/ligament injury, that is, osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:24324885

  18. Effect of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and basic fibroblast growth factor on the expression of cell surface proteoglycans in human lung fibroblasts. Enhanced glycanation and fibronectin-binding of CD44 proteoglycan, and down-regulation of glypican.

    PubMed Central

    Romarís, M; Bassols, A; David, G

    1995-01-01

    We have tested the effects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and TGF-beta 1 + bFGF on the expression of the cell surface proteoglycans (CD44, syndecans and glypican) in cultures of human lung fibroblasts (HLF). Cell surface proteoglycan expression was monitored by quantitative immunoprecipitation from metabolically labelled cells. Western and Northern blotting and evaluation of the glycanation of the proteoglycans. Stimulation of the cells with TGF-beta 1 increased the length of the chondroitin sulphate (CS) chains on CD44 (approximately 1.6-fold). bFGF, administered solely, also increased the length of the CS chains on CD44 (approximately 1.4-fold), whereas the combination of TGF-beta 1 + bFGF nearly doubled both the length and the number of the CS chains on CD44. None of these treatments lead to changes in CD44 message or core-protein expression. This enhanced glycanation of CD44 after the TGF-beta 1, bFGF and combined treatments correlated with a 2-fold increase in the affinity of the proteoglycan for fibronectin but had no influence on the binding to type I collagen. TGF-beta 1, alone or in combination with bFGF, also stimulated the CS content of syndecan-1, but none of the other syndecans was significantly affected by any of the factors or combinations tested. The expression of glypican however was significantly decreased (nearly halved) by the combination of TGF-beta 1 + bFGF, less so by TGF-beta 1 and not at all by bFGF. This decrease occurred both at the level of the message and of the core protein. These data demonstrate specific and differential effects of TGF-beta 1 and bFGF on the structure, expression and interactions of the cell surface proteoglycans of HLF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7544118

  19. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-10-04

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.

  20. Giant viruses come of age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G

    2016-06-01

    Viruses with genomes up to a few megabases in length are a common occurrence in nature, even though they have escaped our notice until recently. These giant viruses infect mainly single-celled eukaryotes and isolation efforts concentrating on amoebal hosts alone have spawned hundreds of viral isolates, featuring viruses with previously unseen virion morphologies and the largest known viral genomes and particles. One of the challenges that lie ahead is to analyze and categorize the available data and to establish an approved classification system that reflects the evolutionary relationships and biological properties of these viruses. Extensive sampling of Acanthamoeba-infecting mimiviruses and initial characterization of their virophage parasites have provided a first blueprint of the genetic diversity and composition of a giant virus clade that will facilitate the taxonomic grouping of these fascinating microorganisms.

  1. Giant thermoelectric effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.

    2007-11-01

    The paper predicts a giant thermoelectric coefficient in a nanostructure consisting of metallic electrodes periodically patterned over graphene, which is deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate. The Seebeck coefficient in this device attains 30mV/K, this value being among the largest reported ever. The calculations are based on a transfer matrix approach that takes a particular form for graphene-based devices. The results are important for future nanogenerators with applications in the area of sensors, energy harvesting, and scavenging.

  2. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  3. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  4. Electrodynamics in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets such as HD209458b are strongly ionized by the UV flux of their host stars. We show that photoionization on such planets creates a dayside ionosphere that extends from the thermosphere to the 100 mbar level. The resulting peak electron density near the 1 mbar level is higher than that encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the model conductivity is in fact comparable to the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. As a result, the momentum and energy balance in the upper atmosphere of HD209458b and similar planets can be strongly affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Despite much weaker ionization, electrodynamics is nevertheless also important on the giant planets of the solar system. We use a generic framework to constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in extrasolar planets, and compare the results with conductivites based on the same approach for Jupiter and Saturn. By using a generalized Ohm's law and assumed magnetic fields, we then demonstrate the basic effects of wind-driven ion drag in giant planet atmospheres. Our results show that ion drag is often significant in the upper atmosphere where it can also substantially alter the energy budget through resistive heating.

  5. Discovery of novel sulfonated small molecules that inhibit vascular tube formation

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Karuturi, Rajesh; Swarup, Vimal P.; Desai, Umesh R.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated angiogenesis is a complex process that involves the interplay among several molecular players such as cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, vascular endothelial growth factors and their cognate receptors. PI-88, a highly sulfonated oligosaccharide, has been shown to have potent anti-angiogenic activity and is currently in clinical trials. However, one of the major drawbacks of large oligosaccharides such as PI-88 is that their synthesis often requires numerous complex synthetic steps. In this study, several novel polysulfonated small molecule carbohydrate mimetics, which can easily be synthesized in fewer steps, are identified as promising inhibitors of angiogenesis in an in vitro tube formation assay. PMID:22627041

  6. Alteration of Intestinal Microbiota in Mice Orally Administered with Salmon Cartilage Proteoglycan, a Prophylactic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Krisana; Yoshimura, Sayuri; Nakane, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycan (PG) extracted from salmon nasal cartilage has potential to be a prophylactic agent. Daily oral administration of the PG attenuates systemic inflammatory response in the experimental mouse models. In this study, we applied the culture-independent approach to investigate an alteration of intestinal microbiota composition in PG-administered mice. The results indicated that the population level of bacilli increased in the small and large intestine upon PG administration. On the other hand, the population level of clostridia decreased in the large intestine. The proportion of bacteria that are able to ferment saccharides and produce short-chain fatty acids increased in the small intestine and decreased in the large intestine. Importantly, population level of probiotic lactobacilli and bacteria exhibiting the immunomodulatory effect increased in the PG-administered mice. In addition, several disease-associated bacteria decreased upon PG administration. These results provided an understanding of the specific role of PG involved in host immune modulation and supported our hypothesis that daily oral administration of PG improves the overall balance in composition of the intestinal microbial community. PMID:24040376

  7. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan: An Arbovirus Attachment Factor Integral to Mosquito Salivary Gland Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Ciano, Kristen A.; Saredy, Jason J.; Bowers, Doria F.

    2014-01-01

    Variants of the prototype Alphavirus, Sindbis (SINV), were used in per os infections of adult female mosquitoes to investigate arbovirus interaction with the salivary gland (SG). Infection of Aedine mosquitoes with AR339, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-dependent variant, resulted in gross pathology in the SG lateral lobes while infection with TR339, a HSPG-independent variant, resulted in minimal SG pathology. HSPG was detected in the internal ducts of the SG lateral lobes by immunolabeling but not in the median lobe, or beyond the triad structure and external ducts. Reports that human lactoferrin interacts with HSPG, suggested an interference with virus attachment to receptors on vertebrate cells. Pre-incubation of Aedes albopictus cultured C7-10 cells with bovine lactoferrin (bLF) followed by adsorption of SINV resulted in earlier and greater intensity of cytopathic response to TR339 compared with AR339. Following pre-treatment of C7-10 cells with bLF, plaques from tissue culture-adapted high-titer SINVTaV-GFP-TC were observed at 48 h post-infection (p.i.), while plaques from low-titer SINVTaV-GFP-TC were not observed until 120 h p.i. Confocal optics detected this reporter virus at 30 days p.i. in the SG proximal lateral lobe, a region of HSPG-immunolocalization. Altogether these data suggest an association between SINV and HSPG in the host mosquito. PMID:25533661

  8. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan: an arbovirus attachment factor integral to mosquito salivary gland ducts.

    PubMed

    Ciano, Kristen A; Saredy, Jason J; Bowers, Doria F

    2014-12-22

    Variants of the prototype Alphavirus, Sindbis (SINV), were used in per os infections of adult female mosquitoes to investigate arbovirus interaction with the salivary gland (SG). Infection of Aedine mosquitoes with AR339, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-dependent variant, resulted in gross pathology in the SG lateral lobes while infection with TR339, a HSPG-independent variant, resulted in minimal SG pathology. HSPG was detected in the internal ducts of the SG lateral lobes by immunolabeling but not in the median lobe, or beyond the triad structure and external ducts. Reports that human lactoferrin interacts with HSPG, suggested an interference with virus attachment to receptors on vertebrate cells. Pre-incubation of Aedes albopictus cultured C7-10 cells with bovine lactoferrin (bLF) followed by adsorption of SINV resulted in earlier and greater intensity of cytopathic response to TR339 compared with AR339. Following pre-treatment of C7-10 cells with bLF, plaques from tissue culture-adapted high-titer SINVTaV-GFP-TC were observed at 48 h post-infection (p.i.), while plaques from low-titer SINVTaV-GFP-TC were not observed until 120 h p.i. Confocal optics detected this reporter virus at 30 days p.i. in the SG proximal lateral lobe, a region of HSPG-immunolocalization. Altogether these data suggest an association between SINV and HSPG in the host mosquito.

  9. Systemic Administration of Proteoglycan Protects BALB/c Retired Breeder Mice from Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Fraga-Silva, Thais Fernanda de Campos; Mimura, Luiza Ayumi Nishiyama; França, Thais Graziela Donegá; Zorzella-Pezavento, Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Marcolino, Larissa Doddi; Marques, Camila; Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valerio; Sartori, Alexandrina

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the prophylactic potential of proteoglycan (PG) administration in experimental arthritis. Female BALB/c retired breeder mice received two (2xPG50 and 2xPG100 groups) or three (3xPG50 group) intraperitoneal doses of bovine PG (50 μg or 100 μg) every three days. A week later the animals were submitted to arthritis induction by immunization with three i.p. doses of bovine PG associated with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide adjuvant at intervals of 21 days. Disease severity was daily assessed after the third dose by score evaluation. The 3xPG50 group showed significant reduction in prevalence and clinical scores. This protective effect was associated with lower production of IFN-γ and IL-17 and increased production of IL-5 and IL-10 by spleen cells restimulated in vitro with PG. Even though previous PG administration restrained dendritic cells maturation this procedure did not alter the frequency of regulatory Foxp3(+) T cells. Lower TNF-α and IL-6 levels and higher expression of ROR-γ and GATA-3 were detected in the paws of protected animals. A delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction confirmed specific tolerance induction. Taken together, these results indicate that previous PG inoculation determines a specific tolerogenic effect that is able to decrease severity of subsequently induced arthritis.

  10. Systemic Administration of Proteoglycan Protects BALB/c Retired Breeder Mice from Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Fraga-Silva, Thais Fernanda de Campos; Mimura, Luiza Ayumi Nishiyama; França, Thais Graziela Donegá; Zorzella-Pezavento, Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Marcolino, Larissa Doddi; Marques, Camila; Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valerio; Sartori, Alexandrina

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the prophylactic potential of proteoglycan (PG) administration in experimental arthritis. Female BALB/c retired breeder mice received two (2xPG50 and 2xPG100 groups) or three (3xPG50 group) intraperitoneal doses of bovine PG (50 μg or 100 μg) every three days. A week later the animals were submitted to arthritis induction by immunization with three i.p. doses of bovine PG associated with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide adjuvant at intervals of 21 days. Disease severity was daily assessed after the third dose by score evaluation. The 3xPG50 group showed significant reduction in prevalence and clinical scores. This protective effect was associated with lower production of IFN-γ and IL-17 and increased production of IL-5 and IL-10 by spleen cells restimulated in vitro with PG. Even though previous PG administration restrained dendritic cells maturation this procedure did not alter the frequency of regulatory Foxp3+ T cells. Lower TNF-α and IL-6 levels and higher expression of ROR-γ and GATA-3 were detected in the paws of protected animals. A delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction confirmed specific tolerance induction. Taken together, these results indicate that previous PG inoculation determines a specific tolerogenic effect that is able to decrease severity of subsequently induced arthritis. PMID:27294161

  11. The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Soumi; Xiong, Anqi; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  12. The contribution of proteoglycans to the mechanical behavior of mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Bertassoni, Luiz E; Swain, Michael V

    2014-10-01

    It has been widely shown that proteoglycans (PG) and their glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side-chains form supramolecular aggregates that interconnect the collagenous network in connective tissues and play a significant role in regulating the mechanical behavior of the extracellular matrix, particularly in soft tissues. However, collective evidence of the mechanical participation of PGs and GAGs in mineralized tissues remains poorly explored in the literature. Here, we address this knowledge gap and discuss the participation of PGs on the biomechanics of mineralized tissues including dentine, cementum and bone. We review evidence suggesting that, on a microscale, PGs regulate the hydrostatic and osmotic pressure, as well as the poroelastic behavior of dentine and bone. On the nanoscale, we review the so-called sliding filament theory and intramolecular stretching of GAGs. We also discuss recent interpretations whereby folding and unfolding of the PG protein core, potentially in association with SIBLING proteins, may be a contributing factor to the mechanical behavior of mineralized tissues. Finally, we review in vitro and in vivo studies of mineralized tissues with targeted disruption or digestion of specific PG family members, which provide further insights into their relevance to the mechanical properties of load bearing hard tissues. In summary, this review brings forth collective evidence suggesting that PGs and GAGs, although less than 5% of the tissue matrix, may play a role in the mechanical behavior and durability of mineralized tissues.

  13. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Saud A.; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I. A.; Khan, Adnan A.; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark. PMID:26167294

  14. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-based extracellular matrix in chicken (Gallus domesticus) brain.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Markus; Alpár, Alán; Brückner, Gert; Fiedler, Anja; Jäger, Carsten; Gati, Georgina; Stieler, Jens T; Arendt, Thomas

    2009-06-12

    A specialised form of extracellular matrix consisting of large aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans connected to hyaluronan and tenascins, as main components, is termed perineuronal nets. These perineuronal nets surround subpopulations of neurons in many vertebrates including man. In this study we investigated the distribution and the postnatal development of perineuronal nets in the brain of the domestic chicken using immunohistochemical, lectin-histochemical and biochemical methods. Perineuronal nets could be identified very early, already on the first postnatal day throughout various regions and nuclei in chicken fore- and midbrains, most expressively in nidopallium, hyperpallium, lateral striatum, globus pallidus and mesopallium. These mostly delicate, scanty structures around the cell bodies of neurons thicken and complete during the first 2 weeks, however, differ in shape and clearness of contours from the mature form of perineuronal nets found in the adult, 3 year old animals. Perineuronal nets frequently co-localized with the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1b characteristic for fast spiking neurons but remained unrevealed around cholinergic or monoaminergic neurons. The early appearance of perineuronal nets in the precocial birds' brain is probably due to the rapid establishment of neuronal morphology and function which is required for the immediate functional and behavioural performance of chicken.

  15. Heparanase Facilitates Cell Adhesion and Spreading by Clustering of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Adam, Flonia; Feld, Sari; Suss-Toby, Edith; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2008-01-01

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS) degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys158-Asp171, termed KKDC) was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity. PMID:18545691

  16. Attenuation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by salmon proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Sayuri; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious autoimmune disease caused by chronic inflammation of connective tissues. The basic principle of RA treatment is aimed to reduce joint inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated that salmon cartilage proteoglycan (PG) suppresses excess inflammation in different mouse inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the prophylactic effect of PG on the progression of RA using an experimental mouse model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical and histological severity of CIA was attenuated by daily oral administration of PG. In the joints of PG-administered mice, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and also osteoclast accumulation were limited. In comparison to nonadministered mice, anti-collagen antibodies in the sera of PG-administered mice did not alter. On the other hand, local expression of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, IL-1 β, interferon- γ (IFN- γ), C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), C-X-C chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL1), and CXCL2 in the joints of PG-administered mice decreased. Moreover, in the response of type II collagen- (CII-) restimulation ex vivo, IL-17A and IFN- γ production by splenocytes from PG-administered mice was less than that of control mice. These data suggested that daily ingested PG attenuated CIA pathogenesis by modulating immune response of splenocytes to CII stimulation and local production inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the joints.

  17. The role of proteoglycans in the nanoindentation creep behavior of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Bertassoni, Luiz E; Kury, Matheus; Rathsam, Catherine; Little, Christopher B; Swain, Michael V

    2015-03-01

    Attempts to understand the mechanical behavior of dentin and other mineralized tissues have been primarily focused on the role of their more abundant matrix components, such as collagen and hydroxyapatite. The structural mechanisms endowing these biological materials with outstanding load bearing properties, however, remain elusive to date. Furthermore, while their response to deformation has been extensively studied, mechanisms contributing to their recovery from induced deformation remain poorly described in the literature. Here, we offer novel insights into the participation of proteoglycans (PG) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in regulating the nanoindentation creep deformation and recovery of mineralized and demineralized dentin. Accordingly, after the enzymatic digestion of either PGs and associated GAGs or only GAGs, the nanoindentation creep deformation of dentin increased significantly, while the relative recovery of both the mineralized and demineralized dentin dropped by 40-70%. In summary, our results suggest that PGs and GAGs may participate in a nanoscale mechanism that contributes significantly to the outstanding durability of dentin and possibly other mineralized tissues of similar composition.

  18. Removal of dentin matrix proteoglycans by trypsin digestion and its effect on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B; Pereira, Patricia N R; Duarte, Wagner R; Okuyama, Katsushi; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of trypsin digestion on removal of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CS-PGs) in demineralized dentin, and subsequent dentin bonding. Bovine dentin fragments were demineralized, treated with or without trypsin, stained with cupromeronic blue, and observed under transmission electron microscopy. Demineralized sections with or without trypsin digestion were also subjected to immunohistochemical analysis with anti-chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) monoclonal antibody, 2-B-6. The presence of galactosamine and glucosamine in the trypsin digest was confirmed by amino acid analysis. Bond strength testing was performed on trypsin treated and control specimens where samples were either kept moist or dried and re-wet, then bonded. Bond strength significantly decreased after trypsin treatment (p < 0.05). TEM, immunohistochemical, and amino acid analyses demonstrated that trypsin digestion efficiently removed C4S-PGs from demineralized dentin matrix. This study indicates that the detrimental effects observed on dentin bonding by trypsinization may be due in part to the removal/cleavage of the C4S-PGs, and further underscore the importance of C4S-PGs on dentin bonding.

  19. Coupling of vinculin to F-actin demands Syndecan-4 proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, R P; Lima, M A; Jarrouge-Bouças, T R; Viana, G M; Lopes, C C; Coulson-Thomas, V J; Dreyfuss, J L; Yates, E A; Tersariol, I L S; Nader, H B

    2017-01-04

    Syndecans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans characterized as transmembrane receptors that act cooperatively with the cell surface and extracellular matrix proteins. Syn4 knockdown was performed in order to address its role in endothelial cells (EC) behavior. Normal EC and shRNA-Syn4-EC cells were studied comparatively using complementary confocal, super-resolution and non-linear microscopic techniques. Confocal and super-resolution microscopy revealed that Syn4 knockdown alters the level and arrangement of essential proteins for focal adhesion, evidenced by the decoupling of vinculin from F-actin filaments. Furthermore, Syn4 knockdown alters the actin network leading to filopodial protrusions connected by VE-cadherin-rich junction. shRNA-Syn4-EC showed reduced adhesion and increased migration. Also, Syn4 silencing alters cell cycle as well as cell proliferation. Moreover, the ability of EC to form tube-like structures in matrigel is reduced when Syn4 is silenced. Together, the results suggest a mechanism in which Syndecan-4 acts as a central mediator that bridges fibronectin, integrin and intracellular components (actin and vinculin) and once silenced, the cytoskeleton protein network is disrupted. Ultimately, the results highlight Syn4 relevance for balanced cell behavior.

  20. Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan enhances FAK and ERK activation by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianbo; Price, Matthew A; Neudauer, Cheryl L; Wilson, Christopher; Ferrone, Soldano; Xia, Hong; Iida, Joji; Simpson, Melanie A; McCarthy, James B

    2004-06-21

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) is an early cell surface melanoma progression marker implicated in stimulating tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a pivotal role in integrating growth factor and adhesion-related signaling pathways, facilitating cell spreading and migration. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, implicated in tumor growth and survival, has also been linked to clinical melanoma progression. We have cloned the MCSP core protein and expressed it in the MCSP-negative melanoma cell line WM1552C. Expression of MCSP enhances integrin-mediated cell spreading, FAK phosphorylation, and activation of ERK1/2. MCSP transfectants exhibit extensive MCSP-rich microspikes on adherent cells, where it also colocalizes with alpha4 integrin. Enhanced activation of FAK and ERK1/2 by MCSP appears to involve independent mechanisms because inhibition of FAK activation had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These results indicate that MCSP may facilitate primary melanoma progression by enhancing the activation of key signaling pathways important for tumor invasion and growth.

  1. Roles of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 in fibrogenic/adipogenic differentiation in skeletal muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shiho; Nakano, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Ozoe, Atsufumi; Chien, Peggie; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Saeki, Yasushi; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2016-10-01

    Intramuscular adipose tissue and fibrous tissue are observed in some skeletal muscle pathologies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia, and affect muscle strength and myogenesis. They originate from common fibrogenic/adipogenic cells in the skeletal muscle. Thus, elucidating the regulatory mechanisms underlying fibrogenic/adipogenic cell differentiation is an important step toward the mediation of these disorders. Previously, we established a highly adipogenic progenitor clone, 2G11, from rat skeletal muscle and showed that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is pro-adipogenic in these cells. Here, we demonstrated that 2G11 cells give rise to fibroblasts upon transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulation, indicating that they possess mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC)-like characteristics. The previously reported MPC marker PDGFRα is expressed in other cell populations. Accordingly, we produced monoclonal antibodies that specifically bind to 2G11 cell surface antigens and identified chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) as a potential MPC marker. Based on an RNA interference analysis, we found that CSPG4 is involved in both the pro-adipogenic effect of bFGF and in TGF-β-induced alpha smooth muscle actin expression and stress fiber formation. By establishing an additional marker for MPC detection and characterizing its role in fibrogenic/adipogenic differentiation, these results will facilitate the development of effective treatments for skeletal muscle pathologies.

  2. Role of melanoma chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan in patterning stem cells in human interfollicular epidermis.

    PubMed

    Legg, James; Jensen, Uffe B; Broad, Simon; Leigh, Irene; Watt, Fiona M

    2003-12-01

    Human interfollicular epidermis is renewed by stem cells that are clustered in the basal layer in a patterned, non-random distribution. Stem cells can be distinguished from other keratinocytes by high expression of beta1 integrins and lack of expression of terminal differentiation markers; they divide infrequently in vivo but form actively growing colonies in culture. In a search for additional stem cell markers, we observed heterogeneous epidermal expression of melanoma chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP). MCSP was expressed by those keratinocytes with the highest beta1 integrin levels. In interfollicular epidermis, expression was confined to non-cycling cells and, in culture, to self-renewing clones. However, fluorescence-activated cell sorting on the basis of MCSP and beta1 integrin expression gave no more enrichment for clonogenic keratinocytes than sorting for beta1 integrins alone. To interfere with endogenous MCSP, we retrovirally infected keratinocytes with a chimera of the CD8 extracellular domain and the MCSP cytoplasmic domain. CD8/MCSP did not affect keratinocyte proliferation or differentiation but the cohesiveness of keratinocytes in isolated clones or reconstituted epidermal sheets was greatly reduced. CD8/MCSP caused stem cell progeny to scatter without differentiating. CD8/MCSP did not alter keratinocyte motility but disturbed cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and the cortical actin cytoskeleton, effects that could be mimicked by inhibiting Rho. We conclude that MCSP is a novel marker for epidermal stem cells that contributes to their patterned distribution by promoting stem cell clustering.

  3. "On-The-Spot" Arresting of Chondroitin Sulphate Proteoglycans: Implications for Ovarian Adenocarcinoma Recognition and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Priyamvada; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-18

    Ovarian Cancer (OC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-associated death among women. The underlying biochemical cause of OC proliferation is usually attributed to the over-expression of Chondroitin Sulphate Proteoglycans (CSPGs) wherein the CS-E subgroup plays a major role in tumor cell proliferation by over-expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hereby hypothesize that by targeting the OC extracellular matrix using a CS-E-specific antibody, GD3G7, we could provide spatial delivery of crosslinkers and anti-VEGF agents to firstly induce in vivo crosslinking and complexation (arresting) of CS-E into a "biogel mass" for efficient and effective detection, detachment and reduction of tumorous tissue, and secondly inhibit angiogenesis in OC. It is further proposed that the antibody-assisted targeted delivery of CS-E crosslinkers can bind to highly anionic CS-E to form a polyelectrolyte complex to inhibit the formation of ovarian tumor spheroids that are responsible for spheroid-induced mesothelial clearance and progression of OC. The hypothesis also describes the potential in vivo "On-The-Spot" CSPG crosslinkers such as sodium trimetaphosphate (physical crosslinker), 1,12-diaminododecane (chemical crosslinker), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (synthetic polymer), and chitosan (natural polyelectrolyte-forming agent). In conclusion, this hypothesis proposes in vivo spatial crosslinking of CSPGs as a potential theranostic intervention strategy for OC-a first in the field of cancer research.

  4. Nanofibrillar hydrogel scaffolds from recombinant protein-based polymers with integrin- and proteoglycan-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K; Werten, Marc W T; Posadowska, Urszula; Storm, Ingeborg M; de Wolf, Frits A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-12-01

    This study describes the design, production, and testing of functionalized variants of a recombinant protein-based polymer that forms nanofibrillar hydrogels with self-healing properties. With a view to bone tissue engineering applications, we equipped these variants with N-terminal extensions containing either (1) integrin-binding (RGD) or (2) less commonly studied proteoglycan-binding (KRSR) cell-adhesive motifs. The polymers were efficiently produced as secreted proteins using the yeast Pichia pastoris and were essentially monodisperse. The pH-responsive protein-based polymers are soluble at low pH and self-assemble into supramolecular fibrils and hydrogels at physiological pH. By mixing functionalized and nonfunctionalized proteins in different ratios, and adjusting pH, hydrogel scaffolds with the same protein concentration but varying content of the two types of cell-adhesive motifs were readily obtained. The scaffolds were used for the two-dimensional culture of MG-63 osteoblastic cells. RGD domains had a slightly stronger effect than KRSR domains on adhesion, activity, and spreading. However, scaffolds featuring both functional domains revealed a clear synergistic effect on cell metabolic activity and spreading, and provided the highest final degree of cell confluency. The mixed functionalized hydrogels presented here thus allowed to tailor the osteoblastic cell response, offering prospects for their further development as scaffolds for bone regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3082-3092, 2016.

  5. Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan enhances FAK and ERK activation by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Price, Matthew A.; Neudauer, Cheryl L.; Wilson, Christopher; Ferrone, Soldano; Xia, Hong; Iida, Joji; Simpson, Melanie A.; McCarthy, James B.

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) is an early cell surface melanoma progression marker implicated in stimulating tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a pivotal role in integrating growth factor and adhesion-related signaling pathways, facilitating cell spreading and migration. Extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, implicated in tumor growth and survival, has also been linked to clinical melanoma progression. We have cloned the MCSP core protein and expressed it in the MCSP-negative melanoma cell line WM1552C. Expression of MCSP enhances integrin-mediated cell spreading, FAK phosphorylation, and activation of ERK1/2. MCSP transfectants exhibit extensive MCSP-rich microspikes on adherent cells, where it also colocalizes with α4 integrin. Enhanced activation of FAK and ERK1/2 by MCSP appears to involve independent mechanisms because inhibition of FAK activation had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These results indicate that MCSP may facilitate primary melanoma progression by enhancing the activation of key signaling pathways important for tumor invasion and growth. PMID:15210734

  6. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs): characteristics and function in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Liao, Jingwen; Klineberg, Eric; Leung, Victor Yl; Huang, Shishu

    2017-03-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is responsible for normal spinal motion and load distribution. However, degeneration may occur due to age- and non-age-related processes and is primarily characterized by a reduction in the number of chondrocyte-like cells and abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) structure in the nucleus pulposus. Although IVD progenitor cells have been identified, the local microenvironment components regulating the behaviour of these progenitor cell populations remain unknown. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are bioactive components of the ECM associated with fibrillogenesis, cellular growth and apoptosis and tissue remodelling. SLRPs support the survival of IVD progenitor cells under hypoxic conditions via the activation of specific hypoxia-inducible factors. Additionally, SLRPs deficiency (biglycan) in knockout mice is sufficient to accelerate the IVD degenerative process. These data suggest that SLRPs play an important role in the homeostasis of IVD. Given their specific properties and physiological functions, we propose a role of SLRPs in IVD degeneration and potential application in its regeneration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor-2 promotes keratan sulfate proteoglycan expression by keratocytes in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, C. J.; Roth, M. R.; Tasheva, E. S.; Funderburgh, M.; Smit, R.; Conrad, G. W.; Funderburgh, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Keratocytes of the corneal stroma produce a specialized extracellular matrix responsible for corneal transparency. Corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycans (KSPG) are unique products of keratocytes that are down-regulated in corneal wounds and in vitro. This study used cultures of primary bovine keratocytes to define factors affecting KSPG expression in vitro. KSPG metabolically labeled with [(35)S]sulfate decreased during the initial 2-4 days of culture in quiescent cultures with low serum concentrations (0.1%). Addition of fetal bovine serum, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor beta, or platelet derived growth factor all stimulated cell division, but only FGF-2 stimulated KSPG secretion. Combined with serum, FGF-2 also prevented serum-induced KSPG down-regulation. KSPG secretion was lost during serial subculture with or without FGF-2. Expression of KSPG core proteins (lumican, mimecan, and keratocan) was stimulated by FGF-2, and steady state mRNA pools for these proteins, particularly keratocan, were significantly increased by FGF-2 treatment. KSPG expression therefore is supported by exogenous FGF-2 and eliminated by subculture of the cells in presence of serum. FGF-2 stimulates KSPG core protein expression primarily through an increase in mRNA pools.

  8. Activation of B lymphocytes by GLIS, a bioactive proteoglycan from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingsong; Tang, Qingjiu; Zimmerman-Kordmann, Martin; Reutter, Werner; Fan, Hua

    2002-06-28

    A bioactive fraction (GLIS) was isolated from the fruiting body of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum using successive chromatographic steps. GLIS is a proteoglycan and has a carbohydrate: protein ratio of 11.5 : 1. The carbohydrate portion is composed of seven different monosaccharides, predominantly D-glucose, D-galactose and D-mannose in the molar ratio of 3.0 : 1 : 1.GLIS stimulated the proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes, resulting in a three to four-fold increase in the percentage of B cells. GLIS also activated mouse spleen lymphocytes, and most of the activated cells were B cells. The B cells were enlarged, expressed CD71 and CD25 on the cell surface, and showed an increase in the secretion of immunoglobulin. Lymphocytes also showed a slightly increased production of IL-2, whereas the secretion of IL-4 was not influenced by GLIS. Furthermore, GLIS did not influence the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of lymphocytes, but it enhanced the expression of protein kinase C alpha and protein kinase C gamma in B cells. According to our results GLIS is a new B cell-stimulating factor.

  9. Osteonectin, bone proteoglycan, and phosphophoryn defects in a form of bovine osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Termine, J D; Robey, P G; Fisher, L W; Shimokawa, H; Drum, M A; Conn, K M; Hawkins, G R; Cruz, J B; Thompson, K G

    1984-01-01

    Bovine osteogenesis imperfecta is a congenital disease in Holstein cattle having several characteristics in common with human osteogenesis imperfecta syndromes. In particular, affected calves have multiple bone fractures and friable teeth. Bone collagen isolated from the affected animals (Texas variant) showed slightly decreased alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chain electrophoretic mobility and increased hydroxylysine content. Overall collagen was present in the affected bones at 80-90% of normal values. However, osteonectin, a 32,000 Mr bone-specific protein found previously to promote collagen mineralization in vitro and present in abundance (approximately equal to 3% of total protein) in normal calf bone, was severely depleted (less than 2% of normal levels) in the osteogenesis imperfecta bone and dentin. The bone proteoglycan was similarly depleted. In contrast, the bone sialoprotein was not as severely affected. Further, the diseased teeth lacked (less than 10% of normal values) phosphophoryn, a dentin-specific protein normally present as 4-5% of the total calf dentin matrix. The data suggest multiple hard tissue matrix protein deletions, perhaps due to impaired cell development. Images PMID:6585794

  10. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Saud A; Almubrad, Turki; AlIbrahim, Ahmad I A; Khan, Adnan A; Akhtar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF) and proteoglycans (PGs) of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark.

  11. Giant-cell granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Emilio; Santamarta, David; Lomas-García, Jesús; Ibáñez-Plágaro, F Javier; Fernández-Fernández, J Javier; Ariño, Teresa Ribas; García-Cosamalón, José

    2012-02-01

    Giant-cell granuloma is a benign and nonneoplastic lesion with an expansive and locally destructive behavior. It typically involves the mandible and the maxilla. Only 1 case arising from the odontoid process of the axis has been reported previously. The authors report on a 64-year-old man with a giant-cell granuloma of the axis. They review this uncommon entity, emphasizing the complexity of differentiating between this lesion and other giant-cell tumors.

  12. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  13. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without

  14. Red giants: then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, John

    Fred Hoyle's work on the structure and evolution of red giants, particularly his pathbreaking contribution with Martin Schwarzschild (Hoyle and Schwarzschild 1955), is both lauded and critically assessed. In his later lectures and work with students in the early 1960s, Hoyle presented more physical ways of understanding some of the approximations used, and results obtained, in that seminal paper. Although later ideas by other investigators will be touched upon, Hoyle's viewpoint - that low-mass red giants are essentially white dwarfs with a serious mass-storage problem - is still extremely fruitful. Over the years, I have further developed his method of attack. Relatively recently, I have been able to deepen and broaden the approach, finally extending the theory to provide a unifying treatment of the structure of low-mass stars from the main sequence though both the red-giant and horizontal-branch phases of evolution. Many aspects of these stars that had remained puzzling, even mysterious, for decades have now fallen into place, and some questions have been answered that were not even posed before. With low-mass red giants as the simplest example, this recent work emphasizes that stars, in general, may have at least two distinct but very important centres: (I) a geometrical centre, and (II) a separate nuclear centre, residing in a shell outside a zero-luminosity dense core for example. This two-centre perspective leads to an explicit, analytical, asymptotic theory of low-mass red-giant structure. It enables one to appreciate that the problem of understanding why such stars become red giants is one of anticipating a remarkable yet natural structural bifurcation that occurs in them. This bifurcation occurs because of a combination of known and understandable facts just summarized namely that, following central hydrogen exhaustion, a thin nuclear-burning shell does develop outside a more-or-less dense core. In the resulting theory, both ρsh/ρolinec and

  15. Biosynthesis of dermatan sulphate proteoglycans. The effect of beta-D-xyloside addition on the polymer-modification process in fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Cöster, L; Hernnäs, J; Malmström, A

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of cultured fibroblasts with p-nitrophenyl beta-D-xyloside resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in galactosaminoglycan synthesis. At low concentration of added xyloside large and small radiolabelled proteoglycans and xyloside-bound polysaccharides were recovered from the medium, whereas at high concentrations only xyloside-bound polysaccharides were found. In the cell layer proteoglycans and xyloside-bound polysaccharides were found at all concentrations tested. Only galactosaminoglycan chains were polymerized on the xyloside primer. At low concentrations of added xyloside the structure of the galactosaminoglycans formed on the xyloside was similar to that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan, i.e. mainly composed of L-iduronic acid-containing 4-sulphated disaccharides. With increasing concentration of added xyloside the co-polymeric structure of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan and the xyloside-bound polysaccharide was changed to contain a larger proportion of D-glucuronosyl residues with only slight changes in the sulphation pattern. No structural change in the polysaccharide chains of the large glucuronic acid-rich proteoglycans occurred. At 1 mM-xyloside, where no proteoglycans were formed, the polysaccharide was shorter and composed mainly of D-glucuronosyl-containing disaccharides with a ratio of 4-sulphate to 6-sulphate substituents of 1:2. This is similar to the structure of the large glucuronic acid-rich proteoglycan synthesized by these cells. Thus the main difference induced by the xyloside treatment was changed polymer modification at high xyloside concentrations. The specific activities of the polymer-modifying enzymes, uronosyl C-5-epimerase and 4-sulphotransferase, were therefore measured and found to be decreased by 30-50% in fibroblasts treated with high xyloside concentrations. It is suggested that the protein core is of importance for regulating the activity of the polymer-modifying enzymes. PMID:2049079

  16. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  17. ORIGIN OF LITHIUM ENRICHMENT IN K GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Reddy, Bacham E.; Lambert, David L.

    2011-03-20

    In this Letter, we report on a low-resolution spectroscopic survey for Li-rich K giants among 2000 low-mass (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}) giants spanning the luminosity range from below to above the luminosity of the clump. Fifteen new Li-rich giants including four super Li-rich K giants (log {epsilon}(Li) {>=}3.2) were discovered. A significant finding is that there is a concentration of Li-rich K giants at the luminosity of the clump or red horizontal branch. This new finding is partly a consequence of the fact that our low-resolution survey is the first large survey to include giants well below and above the red giant branch (RGB) bump and clump locations in the H-R diagram. Origin of the lithium enrichment may be plausibly attributed to the conversion of {sup 3}He via {sup 7}Be to {sup 7}Li by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism but the location for the onset of the conversion is uncertain. Two possible opportunities to effect this conversion are discussed: the bump in the first ascent of the RGB and the He-core flash at the tip of the RGB. The finite luminosity spread of the Li-rich giants serves to reject the idea that Li enhancement is, in general, a consequence of a giant swallowing a large planet.

  18. Giant Surfactants based on Precisely Functionalized POSS Nano-atoms: Tuning from Crystals to Frank-Kasper Phases and Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    In creating new functional materials for advanced technologies, precisely control over functionality and their hierarchical ordered structures are vital for obtaining the desired properties. Giant polyhedra are a class of materials which are designed and constructed via deliberately placing precisely functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) and fullerene (C60) molecular nano-particles (MNPs) (so-called ``nano-atoms'') at the vertices of a polyhedron. Giant surfactants are consisted of polymer tail-tethered ``nano-atoms'' which are deliberately and precisely functionalized POSS or C60 molecular nano-particles (MNPs). The ``nano-atom'' heads and polymer tails thus have drastic chemical differences to impart amphiphilicity. These giant surfactants capture the essential structural features of their small-molecule counterparts in many ways but possess much larger sizes, and therefore, they are recognized as size-amplified versions of small molecule surfactants. Two of the most illustrating examples are a series of novel giant tetrahedra and a series of giant giant surfactants as building blocks to construct into hierarchical ordered super-lattice structures ranging from crystals, Frank-Kasper phases and quasicrystals in the condensed bulk states, reveals evidently the interconnections between soft matters and hard matters in sharing their common structures and fundamental knowledge. This work was supported by National Science Foundation (DMR-1409972).

  19. Identification of the human melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan antigen epitope recognized by the antitumor monoclonal antibody 763.74 from a peptide phage library.

    PubMed

    Geiser, M; Schultz, D; Le Cardinal, A; Voshol, H; García-Echeverría, C

    1999-02-15

    To identify the epitope of the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 763.74, we first expressed random DNA fragments obtained from the complete coding sequence of the MCSP core glycoproteins in phages and selected without success for binders to the murine mAb 763.74. We then used a library of random heptapeptides displayed at the surface of the filamentous M13 phage as fusion protein to the NH2-terminal portion of the minor coat protein III. After three rounds of selection on the bound mAb, several phages displaying related binding peptides were identified, yielding the consensus sequence Val-His-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Glu-His. Competitive ELISA experiments showed that this peptide can be specifically prevented from binding to mAb 763.74 by an anti-idiotypic MK2-23 mouse:human chimeric mAb and by A375 melanoma cells expressing the antigen MCSP. We screened the amino acid sequence of the MCSP molecule for a region of homology to the consensus sequence and found that the amino acid sequence Val-His-Ile-Asn-Ala-His spanning positions 289 and 294 has high homology. Synthetic linear peptides corresponding to the consensus sequence as well as to the MCSP-derived epitope inhibit the binding of mAb 763.74 to the phages displaying the consensus amino acid sequence. Finally, the biotinylated consensus peptide absorbed to streptavidin-microtiter plates can be used for the detection of mAb 763.74 in human serum. These results show clearly that the MCSP epitope defined by mAb 763.74 has been identified.

  20. Human Single-Chain Fv Immunoconjugates Targeted to a Melanoma-Associated Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan Mediate Specific Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells by Natural Killer Cells and Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baiyang; Chen, Yi-Bin; Ayalon, Oran; Bender, Jeffrey; Garen, Alan

    1999-02-01

    Two antimelanoma immunoconjugates containing a human single-chain Fv (scFv) targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1 were synthesized as secreted two-chain molecules in Chinese hamster ovary and Drosophila S2 cells, and purified by affinity chromatography on protein A. The scFv targeting domains originally were isolated as melanoma-specific clones from a scFv fusion-phage library, derived from the antibody repertoire of a vaccinated melanoma patient. The purified immunoconjugates showed similar binding specificity as did the fusion-phage clones. Binding occurred to human melanoma cells but not to human melanocytes or to several other types of normal cells and tumor cells. A 250-kDa melanoma protein was immunoprecipitated by the immunoconjugates and analyzed by mass spectrometry, using two independent procedures. A screen of protein sequence databases showed an exact match of several peptide masses between the immunoprecipitated protein and the core protein of a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, which is expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. The Fc effector domain of the immunoconjugates binds natural killer (NK) cells and also the C1q protein that initiates the complement cascade; both NK cells and complement can activate powerful cytolytic responses against the targeted tumor cells. An in vitro cytolysis assay was used to test for an immunoconjugate-dependent specific cytolytic response against cultured human melanoma cells by NK cells and complement. The melanoma cells, but not the human fibroblast cells used as the control, were efficiently lysed by both NK cells and complement in the presence of the immunoconjugates. The in vitro results suggest that the immunoconjugates also could activate a specific cytolytic immune response against melanoma tumors in vivo.

  1. Transmembrane proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4, receptor candidates for the impact of HGF and FGF2 on semaphorin 3A expression in early-differentiated myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Do, Mai-Khoi Q; Shimizu, Naomi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ohtsubo, Hideaki; Mizunoya, Wataru; Nakamura, Mako; Sawano, Shoko; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Anderson, Judy E; Tatsumi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative mechanisms that regulate intramuscular motor innervation are thought to reside in the spatiotemporal expression of axon-guidance molecules. Our previous studies proposed an unexplored role of resident myogenic stem cell (satellite cell)-derived myoblasts as a key presenter of a secreted neural chemorepellent semaphorin 3A (Sema3A); hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) triggered its expression exclusively at the early differentiation phase. In order to advance this concept, the present study described that transmembrane heparan/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4 may be the plausible receptor candidates for HGF and FGF2 to signal Sema3A expression. Results showed that mRNA expression of syndecan-2, 4 was abundant (two magnitudes higher than syndecan-1, 3) in early-differentiated myoblasts and their in vitro knockdown diminished the HGF/FGF2-induced expression of Sema3A down to a baseline level. Pretreatment with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC decreased the HGF and FGF2 responses, respectively, in non–knockdown cultures, supporting a possible model that HGF and FGF2 may bind to heparan and chondroitin sulfate chains of syndecan-2, 4 to signal Sema3A expression. The findings, therefore, extend our understanding that HGF/FGF2-syndecan-2, 4 association may stimulate a burst of Sema3A secretion by myoblasts recruited to the site of muscle injury; this would ensure a coordinated delay in the attachment of motoneuron terminals onto fibers early in muscle regeneration, and thus synchronize the recovery of muscle fiber integrity and the early resolution of inflammation after injury with reinnervation toward functional recovery. PMID:26381016

  2. From planetesimals to planets: volatile molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Alibert, Yann; Cabral, Nahuel; Benz, Willy

    2014-10-01

    Context. Solar and extrasolar planets are the subject of numerous studies aiming to determine their chemical composition and internal structure. In the case of extrasolar planets, the composition is important as it partly governs their potential habitability. Moreover, observational determination of chemical composition of planetary atmospheres are becoming available, especially for transiting planets. Aims: The present works aims at determining the chemical composition of planets formed in stellar systems of solar chemical composition. The main objective of this work is to provide valuable theoretical data for models of planet formation and evolution, and future interpretation of chemical composition of solar and extrasolar planets. Methods: We have developed a model that computes the composition of ices in planets in different stellar systems with the use of models of ice and planetary formation. Results: We provide the chemical composition, ice/rock mass ratio and C:O molar ratio for planets in stellar systems of solar chemical composition. From an initial homogeneous composition of the nebula, we produce a wide variety of planetary chemical compositions as a function of the mass of the disk and distance to the star. The volatile species incorporated in planets are mainly composed of H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3. Icy or ocean planets have systematically higher values of molecular abundances compared to giant and rocky planets. Gas giant planets are depleted in highly volatile molecules such as CH4, CO, and N2 compared to icy or ocean planets. The ice/rock mass ratio in icy or ocean and gas giant planets is, respectively, equal at maximum to 1.01 ± 0.33 and 0.8 ± 0.5, and is different from the usual assumptions made in planet formation models, which suggested this ratio to be 2-3. The C:O molar ratio in the atmosphere of gas giant planets is depleted by at least 30% compared to solar value.

  3. Perlecan is recruited by dystroglycan to nodes of Ranvier and binds the clustering molecule gliomedin

    PubMed Central

    Colombelli, Cristina; Palmisano, Marilena; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Zambroni, Desirée; Pavoni, Ernesto; Ferri, Cinzia; Saccucci, Stefania; Nicole, Sophie; Soininen, Raija; McKee, Karen K.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Peles, Elior; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Fast neural conduction requires accumulation of Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier. Dedicated adhesion molecules on myelinating cells and axons govern node organization. Among those, specific laminins and dystroglycan complexes contribute to Na+ channel clustering at peripheral nodes by unknown mechanisms. We show that in addition to facing the basal lamina, dystroglycan is found near the nodal matrix around axons, binds matrix components, and participates in initial events of nodogenesis. We identify the dystroglycan-ligand perlecan as a novel nodal component and show that dystroglycan is required for the selective accumulation of perlecan at nodes. Perlecan binds the clustering molecule gliomedin and enhances clustering of node of Ranvier components. These data show that proteoglycans have specific roles in peripheral nodes and indicate that peripheral and central axons use similar strategies but different molecules to form nodes of Ranvier. Further, our data indicate that dystroglycan binds free matrix that is not organized in a basal lamina. PMID:25646087

  4. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  5. Biomedical-grade, high mannuronic acid content (BioMVM) alginate enhances the proteoglycan production of primary human meniscal fibrochondrocytes in a 3-D microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Klich, Angelique; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Alginates are important hydrogels for meniscus tissue engineering as they support the meniscal fibrochondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan production, the extracellular matrix (ECM) component chiefly responsible for its viscoelastic properties. Here, we systematically evaluated four biomedical- and two nonbiomedical-grade alginates for their capacity to provide the best three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment and to support proteoglycan synthesis of encapsulated human meniscal fibrochondrocytes in vitro. Biomedical-grade, high mannuronic acid alginate spheres (BioLVM, BioMVM) were the most uniform in size, indicating an effect of the purity of alginate on the shape of the spheres. Interestingly, the purity of alginates did not affect cell viability. Of note, only fibrochondrocytes encapsulated in BioMVM alginate produced and retained significant amounts of proteoglycans. Following transplantation in an explant culture model, the alginate spheres containing fibrochondrocytes remained in close proximity with the meniscal tissue adjacent to the defect. The results reveal a promising role of BioMVM alginate to enhance the proteoglycan production of primary human meniscal fibrochondrocytes in a 3-D hydrogel microenvironment. These findings have significant implications for cell-based translational studies aiming at restoring lost meniscal tissue in regions containing high amounts of proteoglycans. PMID:27302206

  6. Crystal structure of syndesmos and its interaction with Syndecan-4 proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Heeyoun; Yoo, Jiho; Lee, Inhwan; Kang, Ying Jin; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Weontae

    2015-08-07

    Syndesmos, nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)-type motif 16-like 1 (Nudt16l1), is evolutionarily divergent from the Nudt16 family. Syndesmos, which is co-localized with syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain (Syn4{sup cyto}) in focal contacts, interacts with various cell adhesion adaptor proteins to control cell signaling. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of syndesmos; it is composed of seven α-helices and seven β-strands. Although syndesmos has a molecular topology similar to that of nudix hydrolase proteins, the structure of the nudix motif differs from that of X29. The dimeric interface of syndesmos is composed of α-helix 4, 7 and β-strand 2, 7, which primarily form hydrophobic interactions. The binding interaction between syndesmos and syn4{sup cyto} was characterized as a low-affinity interaction (K{sub d} = 62 μM) by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR resonances of Lys (177, 178, 179), Gly182, and Ser183 in the C1 region and Lys193 and Lys194 in the V region of syndecan-4 are perturbed upon syndesmos binding. Our results provide structural insight into the molecular function of syndesmos in the regulation of cell signaling via binding to syndecan-4. - Highlights: • Crystal structure of syndesmos has been determined as a dimer at 2.01 Å resolution. • The molecular topology of syndesmos resembles that of the Nudix hydrolase protein. • The structure of the Nudix motif of syndesmos is quite different from that of X29. • Syndesmos binds cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 proteoglycan with low affinity.

  7. Glucosamine exposure reduces proteoglycan synthesis in primary human endothelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reine, Trine M.; Jenssen, Trond Geir; Kolset, Svein Olav

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Glucosamine (GlcN) supplements are promoted for medical reasons, for example, for patients with arthritis and other joint-related diseases. Oral intake of GlcN is followed by uptake in the intestine, transport in the circulation and thereafter delivery to chondrocytes. Here, it is postulated to have an effect on synthesis and turnover of extracellular matrix constituents expressed by these cells. Following uptake in the intestine, serum levels are transiently increased, and the endothelium is exposed to increased levels of GlcN. We investigated the possible effects of GlcN on synthesis of proteoglycans (PGs), an important matrix component, in primary human endothelial cells. Methods Primary human endothelial cells were cultured in vitro in medium with 5 mM glucose and 0–10 mM GlcN. PGs were recovered and analysed by western blotting, or by SDS-PAGE, gel chromatography or ion-exchange chromatography of 35S-PGs after 35S-sulphate labelling of the cells. Results The synthesis and secretion of 35S-PGs from cultured endothelial cells were reduced in a dose- and time-dependent manner after exposure to GlcN. PGs are substituted with sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, vital for PG function. The reduction in 35S-PGs was not related to an effect on GAG chain length, number or sulphation, but rather to the total expression of PGs. Conclusion Exposure of endothelial cells to GlcN leads to a general decrease in 35S-PG synthesis. These results suggest that exposure to high levels of GlcN can lead to decreased matrix synthesis, contrary to what has been claimed by supporters of such supplements. PMID:27667774

  8. Proteoglycans regulate the chemotaxis of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which play an essential role in the immune system. The transition from immature DC (iDCs) to mature DCs (mDCs) requires appropriate maturation stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines or pathogen-derived components. Proteoglycans (PGs), which are composed of core proteins and the glycosaminoglycans that bind to them, are one of the main components of the extracellular matrix around pathogens such as bacteria. This study investigated the effects of PG extracted from the nasal septum cartilage of whale (W-PG) on the maturation of DCs derived from human peripheral blood monocytes. iDCs were prepared from human monocytes using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The iDCs were stimulated by W-PG alone. In another type of experiment, the iDCs were stimulated by MIX (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))) or a combination of MIX plus W-PG. The stimulation of W-PG alone did not induce the phenotypic maturation from iDCs. However, W-PG promoted the up-regulation of chemokine receptor CCR7-surface expression and the chemotactic responsiveness to CCR7 ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3beta on MIX-stimulated mDCs although W-PG did not influence matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity which is an important factor in DC migration through the extracellular matrix. The findings that W-PG can selectively regulate the chemotactic activity of DCs in vitro under inflammatory conditions therefore indicate that the interaction of PGs with immune cells including DCs plays an important role in the immune response under the milieu of innate immunity.

  9. Proteoglycans as Target for an Innovative Therapeutic Approach in Chondrosarcoma: Preclinical Proof of Concept.

    PubMed

    Peyrode, Caroline; Weber, Valérie; Voissière, Aurélien; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie; Vidal, Aurélien; Auzeloux, Philippe; Gaumet, Vincent; Borel, Michèle; Dauplat, Marie-Mélanie; Quintana, Mercedes; Degoul, Françoise; Rédini, Françoise; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    To date, surgery remains the only option for the treatment of chondrosarcoma, which is radio- and chemoresistant due in part to its large extracellular matrix (ECM) and poor vascularity. In case of unresectable locally advanced or metastatic diseases with a poor prognosis, improving the management of chondrosarcoma still remains a challenge. Our team developed an attractive approach of improvement of the therapeutic index of chemotherapy by targeting proteoglycan (PG)-rich tissues using a quaternary ammonium (QA) function conjugated to melphalan (Mel). First of all, we demonstrated the crucial role of the QA carrier for binding to aggrecan by surface plasmon resonance. In the orthotopic model of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma, an in vivo biodistribution study of Mel and its QA derivative (Mel-QA), radiolabeled with tritium, showed rapid radioactivity accumulation in healthy cartilaginous tissues and tumor after [(3)H]-Mel-QA injection. The higher T/M ratio of the QA derivative suggests some advantage of QA-active targeting of chondrosarcoma. The antitumoral effects were characterized by tumor volume assessment, in vivo (99m)Tc-NTP 15-5 scintigraphic imaging of PGs, (1)H-HRMAS NMR spectroscopy, and histology. The conjugation of a QA function to Mel did not hamper its in vivo efficiency and strongly improved the tolerability of Mel leading to a significant decrease of side effects (hematologic analyses and body weight monitoring). Thus, QA conjugation leads to a significant improvement of the therapeutic index, which is essential in oncology and enable repeated cycles of chemotherapy in patients with chondrosarcoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2575-85. ©2016 AACR.

  10. The small leucine-rich proteoglycan BGN accumulates in CADASIL and binds to NOTCH3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Lee, Soo Jung; Young, Marian F; Wang, Michael M

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited form of cerebral small vessel disease caused by mutations in conserved residues of NOTCH3. Affected arteries of CADASIL feature fibrosis and accumulation of NOTCH3. A variety of collagen subtypes (types I, III, IV, and VI) have been identified in fibrotic CADASIL vessels. Biglycan (BGN) and decorin (DCN) are class I members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family that regulate collagen fibril size. Because DCN has been shown to deposit in arteries in cerebral small vessel disease, we tested whether BGN accumulates in arteries of CADASIL brains. BGN was strongly expressed in both small penetrating and leptomeningeal arteries of CADASIL brain. BGN protein was localized to all three layers of arteries (intima, media, and adventitia). Substantially, more immunoreactivity was observed in CADASIL brains compared to controls. Immunoblotting of brain lysates showed a fourfold increase in CADASIL brains (compared to controls). Messenger RNA encoding BGN was also increased in CADASIL and was localized by in situ hybridization to all three vascular layers in CADASIL. Human cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells exposed to purified NOTCH3 ectodomain upregulated BGN, DCN, and COL4A1 through mechanisms that are sensitive to rapamycin, a potent mTOR inhibitor. In addition, BGN protein interacted directly with NOTCH3 protein in cell culture and in direct protein interaction assays. In conclusion, BGN is a CADASIL-enriched protein that potentially accumulates in vessels by mTOR-mediated transcriptional activation and/or post-translational accumulation via protein interactions with NOTCH3 and collagen.

  11. NG2, a member of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family mediates the inflammatory response of activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q; Lu, J; Huo, Y; Baby, N; Ling, E A; Dheen, S T

    2010-01-20

    Activation of microglial cells, the resident immune cells of the CNS causes neurotoxicity through the release of a wide array of inflammatory mediators including proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we have investigated the expression of NG2 (also known as CSPG4), one of the members of transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family, in microglial cells and its role on inflammatory reaction of microglia by analyzing the expression of the proinflammation cytokines (interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), chemokines (stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). NG2 expression was not detectable in microglial cells expressing OX-42 in the brains of 1-day old postnatal rat pups and adult rats; it was, however, induced in activated microglial cells in pups and adult rats injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In vitro analysis further confirmed that LPS induced the expression of NG2 in primary microglial cells and this was inhibited by dexamethasone. It has been well demonstrated that LPS induces the expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines in microglia. However in this study, LPS did not induce the mRNA expression of iNOS and cytokines including IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha in microglial cells transfected with CSPG4 siRNA. On the contrary, mRNA expression of chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) was significantly increased in LPS-activated microglial cells after CSPG4 siRNA transfection in comparison with the control. The above results indicate that NG2 mediates the induction of iNOS and inflammatory cytokine expression, but not the chemokine expression in activated microglia.

  12. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 functions as the cellular receptor for Clostridium difficile toxin B.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Pengfei; Zhang, Hongmin; Cai, Changzu; Zhu, Shiyou; Zhou, Yuexin; Yang, Xiaozhou; He, Ruina; Li, Chan; Guo, Shengjie; Li, Shan; Huang, Tuxiong; Perez-Cordon, Gregorio; Feng, Hanping; Wei, Wensheng

    2015-02-01

    As a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacillus, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is responsible for severe and fatal pseudomembranous colitis, and poses the most urgent antibiotic resistance threat worldwide. Epidemic C. difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea globally, especially diarrhoea due to the emergence of hypervirulent strains associated with high mortality and morbidity. TcdB, one of the key virulence factors secreted by this bacterium, enters host cells through a poorly understood mechanism to elicit its pathogenic effect. Here we report the first identification of the TcdB cellular receptor, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4). CSPG4 was initially isolated from a whole-genome human shRNAmir library screening, and its role was confirmed by both TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in human cells. CSPG4 is critical for TcdB binding to the cell surface, inducing cytoskeleton disruption and cell death. A direct interaction between the N-terminus of CSPG4 and the C-terminus of TcdB was confirmed, and the soluble peptide of the toxin-binding domain of CSPG4 could protect cells from the action of TcdB. Notably, the complete loss of CSPG4/NG2 decreased TcdB-triggered interleukin-8 induction in mice without significantly affecting animal mortality. Based on both the in vitro and in vivo studies, we propose a dual-receptor model for TcdB endocytosis. The discovery of the first TcdB receptor reveals a previously unsuspected role for CSPG4 and provides a new therapeutic target for the treatment of C. difficile infection.

  13. TGF-beta(3)-induced chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan mediates palatal shelf adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martinez, M L; Tudela, C; Alonso, I; Moro, J A; Formoso, M A; Ferguson, M W J; Martínez-Alvarez, C

    2002-10-15

    In mammals, the adhesion and fusion of the palatal shelves are essential mechanisms in the development of the secondary palate. Failure of any of these processes leads to the formation of cleft palate. The mechanisms underlying palatal shelf adhesion are poorly understood, although the presence of filopodia on the apical surfaces of the superficial medial edge epithelial (MEE) cells seems to play an important role in the adhesion of the opposing MEE. We demonstrate here the appearance of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) on the apical surface of MEE cells only immediately prior to contact between the palatal shelves. This apical CSPG has a functional role in palatal shelf adhesion, as either the alteration of CSPG synthesis by beta-D-Xyloside or its specific digestion by chondroitinase AC strikingly alters the in vitro adhesion of palatal shelves. We also demonstrate the absence of this apical CSPG in the clefted palates of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-beta(3)) null mutant mice, and its induction, together with palatal shelf adhesion, when TGF-beta(3) is added to TGF-beta(3) null mutant palatal shelves in culture. When chick palatal shelves (that do not adherein vivo nor express TGF-beta(3), nor CSPG in the MEE) are cultured in vitro, they do not express CSPG and partially adhere, but when TGF-beta(3) is added to the media, they express CSPG and their adhesion increases strikingly. We therefore conclude that the expression of CSPG on the apical surface of MEE cells is a key factor in palatal shelf adhesion and that this expression is regulated by TGF-beta(3).

  14. LARGE2-dependent glycosylation confers laminin-binding ability on proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Beedle, Aaron M; de Bernabé, Daniel Beltrán-Valero; Wright, Michael E; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-01-01

    Both LARGE1 (formerly LARGE) and its paralog LARGE2 are bifunctional glycosyltransferases with xylosy- and glucuronyltransferase activities, and are capable of synthesizing polymers composed of a repeating disaccharide [-3Xylα1,3GlcAβ1-]. Post-translational modification of the O-mannosyl glycan of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) with the polysaccharide is essential for it to act as a receptor for ligands in the extracellular matrix (ECM), and both LARGE paralogs contribute to the modification in vivo. LARGE1 and LARGE2 have different tissue distribution profiles and enzymatic properties; however, the functional difference of the homologs remains to be determined, and α-DG is the only known substrate for the modification by LARGE1 or LARGE2. Here we show that LARGE2 can modify proteoglycans (PGs) with the laminin-binding glycan. We found that overexpression of LARGE2, but not LARGE1, mediates the functional modification on the surface of DG−/−, Pomt1−/− and Fktn−/− embryonic stem cells. We identified a heparan sulfate-PG glypican-4 as a substrate for the LARGE2-dependent modification by affinity purification and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. Furthermore, we showed that LARGE2 could modify several additional PGs with the laminin-binding glycan, most likely within the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-protein linkage region. Our results indicate that LARGE2 can modify PGs with the GAG-like polysaccharide composed of xylose and glucuronic acid to confer laminin binding. Thus, LARGE2 may play a differential role in stabilizing the basement membrane and modifying its functions by augmenting the interactions between laminin globular domain-containing ECM proteins and PGs. PMID:27496765

  15. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the vertebrae of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mona E; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Kohler, Achim; Baeverfjord, Grete; Enersen, Grethe; Ruyter, Bente; Takle, Harald; Hannesson, Kirsten O

    2013-09-24

    We analysed the distribution and expression of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) decorin, biglycan and lumican in vertebral columns of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. with and without radiographically detectable deformities. Vertebral deformities are a reoccurring problem in salmon and other intensively farmed species, and an understanding of the components involved in the pathologic development of the vertebrae is important in order to find adequate solutions to this problem. Using immunohistology and light microscopy, we found that in non-deformed vertebrae biglycan, lumican and decorin were all expressed in osteoblasts at the vertebral growth zones and at the ossification front of the chondrocytic arches. Hence, the SLRPs are expressed in regions where intramembranous and endochondral ossification take place. In addition, mRNA expression of biglycan, decorin and lumican was demonstrated in a primary osteoblast culture established from Atlantic salmon, supporting the in vivo findings. Transcription of the SLRPs increased during differentiation of the osteoblasts in vitro and where lumican mRNA expression increased later in the differentiation compared with decorin and biglycan. Intriguingly, in vertebral fusions, biglycan, decorin and lumican protein expression was extended to trans-differentiating cells at the border between arch centra and osteoblast growth zones. In addition, mRNA expression of biglycan, decorin and lumican differed between non-deformed and fused vertebrae, as shown by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Western blotting revealed an additional band of biglycan in fused vertebrae which had a higher molecular weight than in non-deformed vertebrae. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed more spectral focality in the endplates of vertebral fusions and significantly more non-reducible collagen crosslinks compared with non-deformed vertebrae, thus identifying differences in bone structure.

  16. Mutations in IMPG2, Encoding Interphotoreceptor Matrix Proteoglycan 2, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Collin, Rob W.J.; Banin, Eyal; Ingeborgh van den Born, L.; Coene, Karlien L.M.; Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Zelinger, Lina; Khan, Muhammad I.; Lefeber, Dirk J.; Erdinest, Inbar; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Voesenek, Krysta; Blokland, Ellen A.W.; Strom, Tim M.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Qamar, Raheel; Banfi, Sandro; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases caused by progressive degeneration of the photoreceptor cells. Using autozygosity mapping, we identified two families, each with three affected siblings sharing large overlapping homozygous regions that harbored the IMPG2 gene on chromosome 3. Sequence analysis of IMPG2 in the two index cases revealed homozygous mutations cosegregating with the disease in the respective families: three affected siblings of Iraqi Jewish ancestry displayed a nonsense mutation, and a Dutch family displayed a 1.8 kb genomic deletion that removes exon 9 and results in the absence of seven amino acids in a conserved SEA domain of the IMPG2 protein. Transient transfection of COS-1 cells showed that a construct expressing the wild-type SEA domain is properly targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas the mutant lacking the seven amino acids appears to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutation analysis in ten additional index cases that were of Dutch, Israeli, Italian, and Pakistani origin and had homozygous regions encompassing IMPG2 revealed five additional mutations; four nonsense mutations and one missense mutation affecting a highly conserved phenylalanine residue. Most patients with IMPG2 mutations showed an early-onset form of RP with progressive visual-field loss and deterioration of visual acuity. The patient with the missense mutation, however, was diagnosed with maculopathy. The IMPG2 gene encodes the interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan IMPG2, which is a constituent of the interphotoreceptor matrix. Our data therefore show that mutations in a structural component of the interphotoreceptor matrix can cause arRP. PMID:20673862

  17. Figuration and detection of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevels, R.; Welch, G. R.; Cremer, P. S.; Hemmer, P.; Phillips, T.; Scully, S.; Sokolov, A. V.; Svidzinsky, A. A.; Xia, H.; Zheltikov, A.; Scully, M. O.

    2012-08-01

    Recent advances in the description of atoms and molecules based on Dimensional scaling analysis, developed by Dudley Herschbach and co-workers, provided new insights into visualization of molecular structure and chemical bonding. Prof. Herschbach is also a giant in the field of single molecule scattering. We here report on the engineering of molecular detectors. Such systems have a wide range of application from medical diagnostics to the monitoring of chemical, biological and environmental hazards. We discuss ways to identify preselected molecules, in particular, mycotoxin contaminants using coherent laser spectroscopy. Mycotoxin contaminants, e.g. aflatoxin B1 which is present in corn and peanuts, are usually analysed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. We present a new approach that derives from recent experiments in which molecules are prepared by one (or more) femtosecond laser(s) and probed by another set. We call this technique FAST CARS (femto second adaptive spectroscopic technique for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). We propose and analyse ways in which FAST CARS can be used to identify preselected molecules, e.g. aflatoxin, rapidly and economically.

  18. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  19. Dual effects of 17ß-oestradiol on interleukin 1ß-induced proteoglycan degradation in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richette, P; Dumontier, M; Francois, M; Tsagris, L; Korwin-Zmijowska, C; Rannou, F; Corvol, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether 17ß-oestradiol (E2) modulates interleukin (IL) 1ß-induced proteoglycan degradation in chondrocytes, and to analyse the part played by metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process. Methods: Primary cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes were prepared and treated with 10 ng/ml IL1ß combined or not with 0.1–10 nM E2. Neosynthesised proteoglycans (PGs) were evaluated after incorporation of [35SO4]sulphate and further analysed after chromatography on a Sepharose 2B column. Chondrocyte mRNA levels of aggrecan, MMP-1, -3, -13, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were studied by northern blot. MMP-1 activity was measured by zymography. MMP-1 gene transcription was studied by transient transfection of chondrocytes with an MMP-1-luciferase construct. Results: E2 modulated the IL1ß-induced total sulphated PGs in rabbit articular chondrocytes, which decreased as the E2 concentration was increased. At a low concentration (0.1 nmol/l) E2 counteracts the IL1ß-induced decrease in sulphated PG, while at high concentration (10 nmol/l) E2 enhances the IL1ß effects. A biphasic E2 effect was also observed on IL1ß-induced disaggregation of PG, 53–58 kDa gelatinolytic activity, and MMP-1, -3, and -13 mRNA levels. In contrast, E2 did not modify the level of aggrecan mRNA and had no effect on TIMP-1 mRNA expression. Finally, simultaneous addition of IL1ß and E2 (0.1–10 nmol/l) did not modify IL1ß-induced MMP-1-luciferase activity, suggesting that E2 effects probably occur at the post-transcriptional level of MMP gene expression. Conclusion: Oestrogen concentration may have an inverse effect on IL1ß stimulated proteoglycan degradation and MMP production by chondrocytes. PMID:14722210

  20. Natural proteoglycan receptor analogs determine the dynamics of Opa adhesin-mediated gonococcal infection of Chang epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    van Putten, J P; Hayes, S F; Duensing, T D

    1997-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens possess a complex machinery for the induction and/or secretion of factors that promote their uptake by mammalian cells. We searched for the molecular basis of the 60- to 90-min lag time in the interaction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carrying the heparin-binding Opa adhesin with Chang epithelial cells. Infection assays in the presence of chloramphenicol demonstrated that the Opa-mediated gonococcal infection of Chang cells required bacterial protein synthesis when the microorganisms were derived from GC agar but not when grown in liquid media. Further analysis indicated that contact with agar ingredients rather than the growth state of the microorganisms determined the infection dynamics. DEAE chromatography of GC agar extracts and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and testing of collected fractions in infection assays identified negatively charged high-molecular-weight polysaccharides in the agar as inhibitors of the cellular infection. Electron microscopy showed that agar-grown gonococci were surrounded by a coat of alcian blue-positive material, probably representing accreted polysaccharides. Similar antiphagocytic material was isolated from bovine serum, indicating that in biological fluids gonococci producing the heparin-binding Opa adhesin may become covered with externally derived polysaccharides as well. Binding assays with gonococci and epithelial proteoglycan receptors revealed that polysaccharides derived from agar or serum compete with the proteoglycans for binding of the heparin-binding Opa adhesin and thus act as receptor analogs. Growth of gonococci in a polysaccharide-free environment resulted in optimal proteoglycan receptor binding and rapid bacterial entry into Chang cells. The recognition that gonococci with certain phenotypes can recruit surface polysaccharides that determine in vitro infection dynamics adds a different dimension to the well-recognized biological significance of genetic

  1. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  2. Homoserine as an Aspartic Acid Precursor for Synthesis of Proteoglycan Glycopeptide Containing Aspartic Acid and a Sulfated Glycan Chain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizhun; Ramadan, Sherif; Yang, Bo; Yoshida, Keisuke; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-12-02

    Among many hurdles in synthesizing proteoglycan glycopeptides, one challenge is the incorporation of aspartic acid in the peptide backbone and acid sensitive O-sulfated glycan chains. To overcome this, a new strategy was developed utilizing homoserine as an aspartic acid precursor. The conversion of homoserine to aspartic acid in the glycopeptide was successfully accomplished by late stage oxidation using (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and bis(acetoxy)iodobenzene (BAIB). This is the first time that a glycopeptide containing aspartic acid and an O-sulfated glycan was synthesized.

  3. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  4. Enhancing FTIR imaging capabilities with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS): A study of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Eric Y.; Rieppo, Jarno

    2006-11-01

    This paper explores a new application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) in FTIR spectroscopic imaging analysis of biological samples. A particular example demonstrated in this paper is the characterization of concentration gradients of collagen and proteoglycans in human patellar cartilage. A focal plane array detector-based FTIR imaging system has been proven to be an efficient tool to detect early collagen and proteoglycans degradation in developing osteoarthrosis through evaluating compositional changes of osteoarthritic cartilage along the depth. However, the closely overlapped bands of collagen and proteoglycans make normal spectral and spatial analysis difficult. With 2DCOS analysis of the imaging data, it is possible to enhance the spectral resolution and reveal distinctive compositional changes that are normally hidden with conventional approaches. The combined technique, FTIR imaging enhanced with 2DCOS, provides new possibilities to solve challenging problems in the analysis of complex biological systems.

  5. Undersulfation of proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes from a patient with achondrogenesis type 1B homozygous for an L483P substitution in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bonaventure, J; Delezoide, A L; Cetta, G; Superti-Furga, A

    1996-08-02

    Achondrogenesis type 1B is an autosomal recessive, lethal chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the gene encoding a sulfate/chloride antiporter of the cell membrane (Superti-Furga, A., Hästbacka, J., Wilcox, W. R., Cohn, D. H., van der Harten, J. J., Rossi, A., Blau, N., Rimoin, D. L., Steinmann, B., Lander, E. S., and Gitzelmann, R.(1996) Nat. Genet. 12, 100-102). To ascertain the consequences of the sulfate transport defect on proteoglycan synthesis, we studied the structure and sulfation of proteoglycans in cartilage tissue and in fibroblast and chondrocyte cultures from a fetus with achondrogenesis 1B. Proteoglycans extracted from epiphyseal cartilage and separated on agarose gels migrated more slowly than controls and stained poorly with alcian blue. The patient's cultured cells showed reduced incorporation of [35S]sulfate relative to [3H]glucosamine, impaired uptake of sulfate, and higher resistance to chromate toxicity compared to control cells. Epiphyseal chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads synthesized proteoglycans of normal molecular size as judged by gel filtration chromatography, but undersulfated as judged by ion exchange chromatography and by the amount of nonsulfated disaccharide. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of chondroitinase-digested proteoglycans showed that sulfated disaccharides were present, although in reduced amounts, indicating that at least in vitro, other sources of sulfate can partially compensate for sulfate deficiency. A t1475c transition causing a L483P substitution in the eleventh transmembrane domain of the sulfate/chloride antiporter was present on both alleles in the patient who was the product of a consanguineous marriage. The results indicate that the defect of sulfate transport is expressed in both chondrocytes and fibroblasts and results in the synthesis of proteoglycans bearing glycosaminoglycan chains which are poorly sulfated but of normal length.

  6. Regional differences in the distribution of the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin in the extracellular matrix of atherosclerotic and restenotic human coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Riessen, R.; Isner, J. M.; Blessing, E.; Loushin, C.; Nikol, S.; Wight, T. N.

    1994-01-01

    Proteoglycans are important constituents of blood vessels and accumulate in various forms of vascular disease. Little is known concerning the proteoglycan composition of restenotic lesions formed after angioplasty and whether the proteoglycan composition of these lesions differs from that of primary atherosclerosis. Accordingly, we sought to characterize the distribution of two proteoglycans, biglycan and decorin, in primary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions of human coronary arteries. Restenosis (n = 37) and primary (n = 11) lesions obtained from 48 patients by directional atherectomy of human coronary arteries were stained with antibodies against biglycan and decorin. To further characterize the extracellular matrix of restenotic tissues, we studied the co-distribution of these proteoglycans with collagen types I, III, and IV. The loose fibroproliferative tissue seen predominantly in restenosis lesions consistently stained positively for biglycan in patterns of deposition ranging from disseminated to homogeneous. The density and intensity of biglycan staining was correlated with the density of collagen type I and III fiber networks, both of which were observed to interweave among the loose fibroproliferative tissue. The compact connective tissue of primary atherosclerotic plaque was characterized by strong biglycan staining which co-localized with intense collagen type I and III staining. Only basement membrane-like structures rich in collagen type IV demonstrated negative biglycan staining. In contrast, loose fibroproliferative tissue exhibited no significant staining for decorin. Strong immunostaining for decorin, however, was found in primary atherosclerotic plaque. There are thus regional differences in the distribution of extracellular matrix proteoglycans of restenotic and primary human atherosclerotic lesions; these observations suggest that differences established for the biological roles of biglycan and decorin in other organ systems may extend as

  7. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar system giant planets come in two flavours: gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes, and ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~cm sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. Unlike gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the solar system. Furthermore, unlike planetesimal-driven accretion scenarios, our model allows core formation and envelope attraction within disc life-times, provided that solids in protoplanetary discs are predominantly made up of pebbles. Our results imply that the outer regions of planetary systems, where the mass required to halt pebble accretion is large, are dominated by ice giants and that gas-giant exoplanets in wide orbits are enriched by more than 50 Earth masses of solids.

  8. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans including syndecan-3 modulate BMP activity during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Melanie C; Li, Yingcui; Seghatoleslami, M Reza; Dealy, Caroline N; Kosher, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are involved in multiple aspects of limb development including regulation of cartilage differentiation. Several BMPs bind strongly to heparin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) at the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix have recently been implicated as modulators of BMP signaling in some developing systems. Here we have explored the role of HSPGs in regulating BMP activity during limb chondrogenesis by evaluating the effects of exogenous heparan sulfate (HS), heparitinase treatment, and overexpression of the HSPG syndecan-3 on the ability of BMP2 to modulate the chondrogenic differentiation of limb mesenchymal cells in micromass culture. Exogenous HS dramatically enhances the ability of BMP2 to stimulate chondrogenesis and cartilage specific gene expression, and reduces the concentration of BMP2 needed to stimulate chondrogenesis. Furthermore, HS stimulates BMP2-mediated phosphorylation of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8, transcriptional mediators of BMP2 signaling, indicating that HS enhances the interaction of BMP2 with its receptors. Pretreatment of micromass cultures with heparitinase to degrade endogenous HSPGs also enhances the chondrogenic activity of BMP2, and reduces the concentration of BMP2 needed to promote chondrogenesis. Taken together these results indicate that exogenous HS or heparitinase enhance the chondrogenic activity of BMP2 by interfering with its interaction with endogenous HSPGs that would normally restrict its interaction with its receptors. Consistent with the possibility that HSPGs are negative modulators of BMP signaling during chondrogenesis, we have found that overexpression of syndecan-3, which is one of the major HSPGs normally expressed during chondrogenesis, greatly impairs the ability of BMP2 to promote cartilage differentiation. Furthermore, retroviral overexpression of syndecan-3 inhibits BMP2-mediated Smad phosphorylation in the regions of the cultures in which chondrogenesis is

  9. Effect of proteoglycans at interfaces as related to location, architecture, and mechanical cues

    PubMed Central

    Kurylo, Michael P.; Grandfield, Kathryn; Marshall, Grayson W.; Altoe, Virginia; Aloni, Shaul; Ho, Sunita P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Covalently bound functional GAGs orchestrate tissue mechanics through time-dependent characteristics. Objective The role of specific glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at the ligament–cementum and cementum–dentin interfaces within a human periodontal complex were examined. Matrix swelling and resistance to compression under health and modeled diseased states was investigated. Materials and methods The presence of keratin sulfate (KS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) GAGs at the ligament–cementum and cementum–dentin interfaces in human molars (N = 5) was illustrated by using enzymes, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and AFM-based nanoindentation. The change in physical characteristics of modeled diseased states through sequential digestion of keratin sulfate (KS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) GAGs was investigated. One-way ANOVA tests with P < 0.05 were performed to determine significant differences between groups. Additionally, the presence of mineral within the seemingly hygroscopic interfaces was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Results Immunohistochemistry (N = 3) indicated presence of biglycan and fibromodulin small leucine rich proteoglycans at the interfaces. Digestion of matrices with enzymes confirmed the presence of KS and CS GAGs at the interfaces by illustrating a change in tissue architecture and mechanics. A significant increase in height (nm), decrease in elastic modulus (GPa), and tissue deformation rate (nm/s) of the PDL-C attachment site (215 ± 63–424 ± 94 nm; 1.5 ± 0.7–0.4 ± 0.2 GPa; 21 ±7–48 ± 22 nm/s), and cementum–dentin interface (122 ± 69–360 ± 159 nm; 2.9 ±1.3–0.7 ±0.3 GPa; 18 ± 4–30 ± 6 nm/s) was observed. Conclusions The sequential removal of GAGs indicated loss in intricate structural hierarchy of hygroscopic interfaces. From a mechanics perspective, GAGs provide tissue recovery/resilience. The results of this study provide insights into the role of GAGs toward conserved tooth movement in

  10. Laminin and collagen modulate expression of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan fibromodulin in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Syaidah, Rahimi; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    The anterior pituitary is a complex organ consisting of five types of hormone-producing cells, non–hormone-producing cells such as folliculostellate (FS) cells and vascular cells (endothelial cells and pericytes). We have previously shown that FS cells and pericytes produce fibromodulin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP). SLRPs are major proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and are important in regulating cell signaling pathways and ECM assembly. However, the mechanism regulating fibromodulin expression in the anterior pituitary has not been elucidated. Here, we investigate whether fibromodulin expression is modulated by major anterior pituitary ECM components such as laminin and type I collagen. Using transgenic rats expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) specifically in FS cells, we examine fibromodulin expression in GFP-positive (FS cells) and GFP-negative cells (e.g., pericytes, endocrine cells and endothelial cells). Immunostaining and Western blot analysis were used to assess protein expression in the presence and absence of laminin or type I collagen. We confirmed fibromodulin expression in the pituitary and observed the up-regulation of fibromodulin in FS cells in the presence of ECM components. However, neither laminin nor type I collagen affected expression in GFP-negative cells. This suggests that laminin and type I collagen support the function of FS cells by increasing fibromodulin protein expression in the anterior pituitary.

  11. Crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the archetypal small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Scott, Paul G; McEwan, Paul A; Dodd, Carole M; Bergmann, Ernst M; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2004-11-02

    Decorin is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix proteoglycan with a variety of important biological functions that are mediated by its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, cytokines, and cell surface receptors. Decorin is the prototype of the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans and proteins (SLRPs), characterized by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), flanked by two cysteine-rich regions. We report here the crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the best characterized member of the SLRP family. Each monomer adopts the curved solenoid fold characteristic of LRR domains, with a parallel beta-sheet on the inside interwoven with loops containing short segments of beta-strands, 3(10) helices, and polyproline II helices on the outside. Two main features are unique to this structure. First, decorin dimerizes through the concave surfaces of the LRR domains, which have been implicated previously in protein-ligand interactions. The amount of surface buried in this dimer rivals the buried surfaces of some of the highest-affinity macromolecular complexes reported to date. Second, the C-terminal region adopts an unusual capping motif that involves a laterally extended LRR and a disulfide bond. This motif seems to be unique to SLRPs and has not been observed in any other LRR protein structure to date. Possible implications of these features for decorin ligand binding and SLRP function are discussed.

  12. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4)-specific monoclonal antibody 225.28 in detection of acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Moon; Whiteside, Theresa L; Ferrone, Soldano; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4), a membrane-bound proteoglycan known to be expressed on the surface of malignant cells, has a restricted distribution in normal tissues. CSPG4 is a potential candidate tumor marker. We investigate CSPG4 expression on blasts in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and its relation with cytogenetic abnormalities and molecular markers known to have prognostic significance in this disease. Using hybridoma technology, we generated a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), mAb 225.28, reactive with CSPG4. Blast samples obtained from the peripheral blood of newly diagnosed AML patients were analyzed for CSPG4 expression using the CSPG4-specific mAb and multiparameter flow cytometry. The results were correlated with cytogenetic and molecular characteristics of AML. CSPG4 was found to be expressed on a variable fraction of leukemic blasts in all AML patients with different leukemia morphology, including monoblastic cases. Reactivity of CSPG4-specific mAb with leukemic blasts was not limited to those with the rearranged MLL gene. CSPG4 was also expressed on AML blasts with a complex karyotype, FLT3 mutation, or NPM1 mutation. The results indicate that CSPG4 is expressed and detectable by flow cytometry using the mAb 225.28 on a proportion of blasts of all subtypes of AML irrespective of cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. mAb 225.28 could be useful in detecting AML blasts by flow cytometry.

  13. Laminins, via heparan sulfate proteoglycans, participate in zebrafish myotome morphogenesis by modulating the pattern of Bmp responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Dolez, Morgane; Nicolas, Jean-François; Hirsinger, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    In zebrafish, Hedgehog-induced Engrailed expression defines a muscle fibre population that includes both slow and fast fibre types and exhibits an organisational role on myotome and surrounding tissues, such as motoneurons and lateral line. This Engrailed-positive population is restricted in the myotome to a central domain. To understand how this population is established, we have analysed the phenotype of the sly/lamc1 mutation in the Laminin γ1 chain that was shown to specifically affect Engrailed expression in pioneers. We find that the sly mutation affects Engrailed expression in the entire central domain and that Hedgehog signalling does not mediate this effect. We show that Bmp-responding cells are excluded from the central domain and that this pattern is modulated by laminins, but not by Hedgehog signalling. Knockdown of Bmp signalling rescues Engrailed expression in the sly mutant and ectopically activates Engrailed expression in slow and fast lineages in wild-type embryos. Last, extracellular matrix-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans are absent in sly and their enzymatic removal mimics the sly phenotype. Our results therefore show that laminins, via heparan sulfate proteoglycans, are instrumental in patterning Bmp responsiveness and that Bmp signalling restricts Engrailed expression to the central domain. This study underlines the importance of extracellular cues for the precise spatial modulation of cell response to morphogens.

  14. Fibrils of different collagen types containing immobilised proteoglycans (PGs) as coatings: characterisation and influence on osteoblast behaviour.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T; Hempel, U; Mietrach, C; Heinemann, S; Scharnweber, D; Worch, H

    2007-11-01

    Collagen, the main organic component of bone, is used as a coating on titanium implants and as a scaffold material in bone tissue engineering. Surface modifications of titanium which promote osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and synthesis of collagen by osteoblasts are desirable. One biomimetic approach is the coating of titanium with collagen in fibrillar form. Other organic components of bone may be bound to fibrils and exert additional effects. In this study, the collagen types I-III were compared regarding their ability to bind the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan, which are found in bone. More collagen was bound to collagen II fibrils than to those of types I and III. Therefore, titanium surfaces were coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the effect of the proteoglycans on human primary osteoblast behaviour. In addition, the growth factor TGF-beta1 was adsorbed onto surfaces coated with fibrils of collagen type II containing biglycan or decorin or neither to investigate the influence of decorin and biglycan on the effect of TGF-beta1 on osteoblasts. Fibril-bound biglycan and decorin influence primary osteoblast behaviour by themselves. The presence of substrate-bound biglycan or decorin influences the effect of TGF-beta1. These results may be important when designing collagen-based coatings or scaffolds for tissue engineering, including those loaded with growth factors.

  15. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  16. [Endovascular treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Bracard, S; Derelle, A L; Tonnelet, R; Barbier, C; Proust, F; Anxionnat, R

    2016-02-01

    Giant aneurysms are defined as having a maximal diameter higher than 25mm. The dynamic aspect of giant aneurysms, in particular, is its growth, which was responsible for parenchyma sequellae either due to haemorrhagic complications or a compression of cranial nerves. The treatment of these giant aneurysms was challenging because of its size, the mass effect and the neck diameter. These morphologic conditions required complex endovascular procedures such as remodelling, stenting, using flow diverters. Subsequently, the complex procedures increased the risk of morbidity because of ischemic complications. Despite these procedures, the risk of recurrence was high.

  17. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  18. Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; S., Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults. The patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless a cardiac transplantation is performed. We are reporting here an autopsy case of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis with no symptoms in a 27-year old -worker who died suddenly. The purpose of this report was to emphasize that idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was a rare disease and that it could exist in the absence of any symptomatic heart disease. PMID:23205365

  19. A giant pancreatic pseudocyst treated by cystogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Grace C; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a giant pancreatic pseudocyst in a 65-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, loss of appetite and abdominal distension. CT scans demonstrated a giant pancreatic pseudocyst measuring 25.7 cm×15.3 cm×10.9 cm anteroposteriorly, with significant compression of surrounding organs. An open cystogastrostomy was performed through a midline incision, and 3 L of fluid was drained from the giant pseudocyst. Recovery has been uneventful. PMID:25804943

  20. Rotation and macroturbulence in bright giants

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1986-11-01

    Spectral line profiles of 35 F, G, and K bright giants were analyzed to obtain rotation rates, v sin i, and macroturbulence dispersion. This sample indicates that rotation rates of cool class II giants is less than 11 km/s, in contrast with some recent periodicity measurements. Macroturbulence dispersion generally increases with effective temperature, but the range of values at a given effective temperature is much larger than seen for lower luminosity classes; this is interpreted in terms of red-giant and blue-loop evolution. No evidence is found for angular momentum dissipation on the first crossing of the H-R diagram. 57 references.

  1. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  2. Direct Imaging of Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide

    Since the first detection of exoplanets around a Sun-like star 51 Peg in 1995, their detection and characterization are mainly led by indirect methods such as radial velocity and transit methods. However, recent progresses of observational techniques have finally enabled the direct imaging observations of giant planets of solar-system-scale orbit (with their semi-major axes less than about 50 AU) around A-type stars (e.g., Marois et al. 2008, 2010) and G-type stars (e.g., Kuzuhara et al. 2013). Direct imaging is useful to obtain the physical and atmospheric parameters of exoplanets. In fact not only colors but also a medium-resolution spectroscopy of such planets has been successfully obtained for their atmospheric characterization (Barman et al. 2013). Their masses are typically a few to ~10 Jupiter masses and they orbit at a Saturn- to-Pluto distance. Therefore, like hot-Jupiters and super-Earths they are unlike any solar-system planets, and called wide-orbit giant planets. A recent large search for planets and disk on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope (SEEDS project) has detected a 3-5 Jupiter-masses planet around a Sun-like star GJ 504 (Kuzuhara et al. 2013). It is the coolest planetary companion so far directly imaged and its near-infrared color is “bluer” than that of other directly imaged planets. In this contribution, I will review the recent progresses on direct imaging of exoplanets, highlight the results of the SEEDS project, and discuss the future developments.

  3. Lithium Abundance in M3 Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givens, Rashad; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance of lithium in the red giant star vZ 1050 (SK 291) in the globular cluster M3. A previous survey of giants in the cluster showed that like IV-101, vZ 1050 displays a prominent Li I 6707 Å feature. vZ 1050 lies on the blue side of the red giant branch about 1.3 magnitudes above the level of the horizontal branch, and may be an asymptotic giant branch star. A high resolution spectrum of M3 vZ1050 was obtained with the ARC 3.5m telescope and the ARC Echelle Spectrograph (ARCES). Atmospheric parameters were determined using Fe I and Fe II lines from the spectrum using the MOOG spectral analysis program, and the lithium abundance was determined using spectrum synthesis.

  4. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-07-07

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness.

  5. Mass loss in red giants and supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanner, F.

    1975-01-01

    The circumstellar envelopes surrounding late-type giants and supergiants were studied using high resolution, photoelectric scans of strong optical resonance lines. A method for extracting the circumstellar from the stellar components of the lines allowed a quantitative determination of the physical conditions in the envelopes and the rates of mass loss at various positions in the red giant region of the HR diagram. The observed strengthening of the circumstellar spectrum with increasing luminosity and later spectral type is probably caused by an increase in the mass of the envelopes. The mass loss rate for individual stars is proportional to the visual luminosity; high rates for the supergiants suggest that mass loss is important in their evolution. The bulk of the mass return to the interstellar medium in the red giant region comes from the normal giants, at a rate comparable to that of planetary nebulae.

  6. "GIANT" Steps to Create Online Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    Online orientation is provided due to the flexibility of online learning. The online orientation consists of the GIANT steps which stands for Get support, Identify your curriculum, Assemble your program, Navigate students through the pilot project and Test students.

  7. Tests of the Giant Impact Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The giant impact hypothesis has gained popularity as a means of explaining a volatile-depleted Moon that still has a chemical affinity to the Earth. As Taylor's Axiom decrees, the best models of lunar origin are testable, but this is difficult with the giant impact model. The energy associated with the impact would be sufficient to totally melt and partially vaporize the Earth. And this means that there should he no geological vestige of Barber times. Accordingly, it is important to devise tests that may be used to evaluate the giant impact hypothesis. Three such tests are discussed here. None of these is supportive of the giant impact model, but neither do they disprove it.

  8. Giant salivary calculi of the submandibular gland

    PubMed Central

    Fowell, C; MacBean, A

    2012-01-01

    Sialolithasis is the most common salivary gland disease. A case of an unusually large sialolith arising in the submandibular gland is presented, along with a review of the management of giant salivary gland calculi. PMID:24960792

  9. [Current progress in functions of axon guidance molecule Robo and underlying molecular mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Tong; Zhou, Qi-Sheng; Yu, Qi; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-06-25

    The axon guidance molecule Robo is a transmembrane protein which is conserved during evolution. Robo and its ligand, Slit, have been implicated in regulating many developmental processes, such as axon guidance, neuronal migration, tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, lung morphogenesis, kidney morphogenesis, heart morphogenesis, ovary development and gonad development. Robo function mainly depends on the binding of its Ig1 domain to the LRR-2 domain of Slit ligand. Meanwhile, Robo function is also mediated by binding to some signaling molecules, including the heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and tyrosine kinase Abelson. Several transcription factors, including Hox, Midline and Nkx2.9, were shown to regulate robo expression. In addition, alternative splicing and transport regulation also affect Robo function. In this review, we summarized the studies on the molecular structure, functions and molecular mechanism of Robo, which would propose a novel strategy for the research of neural development, as well as prevention and treatment of nervous system diseases and cancers.

  10. Arterial Embolization of Giant Hepatic Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Giavroglou, Constantinos; Economou, Hippolete; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2003-02-15

    Hepatic cavernous hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. They are usually discovered incidentally and only a few require treatment. However, giant hemangiomas may cause symptoms,which are indications for treatment. We describe four cases of symptomatic giant hepatic hemangiomas successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, performed with polyvinyl alcohol particles. There were no complications. Follow-up with clinical and imaging examinations showed disappearance of symptoms and decrease in size of lesions.

  11. Ultrastructural and biochemical observations on proteoglycans and collagen in the mutable connective tissue of the feather star Antedon bifida (Echinodermata, Crinoidea).

    PubMed Central

    Erlinger, R; Welsch, U; Scott, J E

    1993-01-01

    Mutable connective tissue, unique to echinoderms, changes its mechanical behaviour within seconds of nervous stimulation. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon is not understood. In this study proteoglycans and collagen of the brachial ligaments connecting neighbouring ossicles of the arms of the feather star Antedon bifida have been investigated by biochemistry, light and electron microscopy and the critical electrolyte concentration (CEC) technique using the dye Cupromeronic Blue (CB). The ligaments consist mainly of parallel cross-striated collagen fibrils, 82 +/- 12 nm in diameter, with a characteristic banding pattern and a D-period of 52.8 +/- 3.2 nm. Some fibrils were disaggregated into bundles of 10-11 nm protofibrils, lying between the normal fibrils. Proteoglycans occur at the surface of the fibrils with 2 binding sites (each with a different CEC) per D-period and also inside the fibrils. The surface proteoglycans are more highly sulphated (i.e. their CECs are > 1.3 M) than the intrafibrillar proteoglycans (CEC < 0.9 M). The glycosaminoglycans consist of a highly sulphated chondroitin sulphate, possibly with fucose residues. The results are consistent with the theory that disaggregation of the fibrils into protofibrils and reaggregation might be a mechanism of mutability, without excluding the possibility that fibrils may slide alongside each other during movements in the viscous phase of the ligament. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:8270464

  12. Increase in decorin and biglycan in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: role of fibroblasts as cell source of these proteoglycans in the disease

    PubMed Central

    Fadic, Ricardo; Mezzano, Valeria; Alvarez, Karin; Cabrera, Daniel; Holmgren, Jenny; Brandan, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Fibrosis is a common pathological feature observed in muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Biglycan and decorin are small chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans in the muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) that belong to the family of structurally related proteoglycans called small leucine-rich repeat proteins. Decorin is considered an anti-fibrotic agent, preventing the process by blocking TGF-β activity. There is no information about their expression in DMD patients. We found an increased amount of both proteoglycans in the ECM of skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from DMD patients. Both biglycan and decorin were augmented in the perimysium of muscle tissue, but only decorin increased in the endomysium as seen by immunohistochemical analyses. Fibroblasts were isolated from explants obtained from muscle of DMD patients and the incorporation of radioactive sulfate showed an increased synthesis of both decorin and biglycan in cultured fibroblasts compared to controls. The size of decorin and biglycan synthesized by DMD and control fibroblasts seems to be similar in size and anion charge. These findings show that decorin and biglycan are increased in DMD skeletal muscle and suggest that fibroblasts would be, at least, one source for these proteoglycans likely playing a role in the muscle response to dystrophic cell damage. PMID:16989735

  13. Altered expression of small proteoglycans, collagen, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in developing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Westergren-Thorsson, G; Hernnäs, J; Särnstrand, B; Oldberg, A; Heinegård, D; Malmström, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats was studied over a period of 21 d after an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. The expression of three small proteoglycans (biglycan, decorin, and fibromodulin), collagen III and TGF-beta 1 was studied by RNA-transfer blot analysis. The proteoglycans were also studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots. TGF-beta 1 mRNA increased threefold already on day 3 and remained elevated until day 10. After the increase of TGF-beta 1 mRNA the messages for biglycan and collagen III steadily increased to reach a maximum 10 d after bleomycin instillation. The mRNA for biglycan increased maximally fourfold and that of collagen III 2.5-fold. Decorin mRNA, in contrast to biglycan decreased and reached 20% of control on day 10. The message for fibromodulin remained constant throughout the study period. The amounts of biglycan and decorin in the tissue changed in accordance with the mRNA levels. The results corroborate and extend previous in vitro studies concerning the effect of TGF-beta 1 on the metabolism of small proteoglycans and show that these macromolecules are regulated differently also in vivo. The marked alterations of biglycan and decorin during the development of fibrosis suggests that these proteoglycans have a regulating role in this process. Images PMID:7688761

  14. Giant photostriction in organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge–orbital–lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices. PMID:27044485

  15. Giant photostriction in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-04-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge-orbital-lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices.

  16. Ammonium Ion Currents in the Squid Giant Axon

    PubMed Central

    Binstock, Leonard; Lecar, Harold

    1969-01-01

    Voltage-clamp studies on intact and internally perfused squid giant axons demonstrate that ammonium can substitute partially for either sodium or potassium. Ammonium carries the early transient current with 0.3 times the permeability of sodium and it carries the delayed current with 0.3 times the potassium permeability. The conductance changes observed in voltage clamp show approximately the same time course in ammonium solutions as in the normal physiological solutions. These ammonium ion permeabilities account for the known effects of ammonium on nerve excitability. Experiments with the drugs tetrodotoxin (TTX) and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (TEA) demonstrate that these molecules block the early and late components of the current selectively, even when both components are carried by the same ion, ammonium. PMID:5767336

  17. Is mass loss from red giant stars dust driven?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, J. A.

    1992-12-01

    Long period variable stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch are observed to be losing mass in the form of cool dusty molecular stellar winds at rates from 10-7 to 10-4 Msunyr-1. The driving force for this mass loss is thought to be radiation pressure on dust particles. The dust transfers its momentum to gas molecules via collisions. This paper discusses the existing evidence for this scenario. New results, from analysis of 22 GHz H2O maser observations made by Merlin, show that the cruical acceleration past the stellar escape velocity of the central star takes place in the inner circumstellar envelope around the central star. The analysis of the velocity fields of the circumstellar envelopes of VX Sgr and VY CMa using the model described by Chapman and Cohen (1986) are discussed.

  18. Bayesian Inference of Giant Exoplanet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorngren, Daniel; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    The physical processes within a giant planet directly set its observed radius for a given mass, age, and insolation. The important aspects are the planet’s bulk composition and its interior thermal evolution. By studying many giant planets as an ensemble, we can gain insight into this physics. We demonstrate two novel examples here. We examine 50 cooler transiting giant planets, whose insolation is sufficiently low (T_eff < 1000 K) that they are not affected by the hot Jupiter radius inflation effect. For these planets, the thermal evolution is relatively well understood, and we show that the bulk planet metallicity increases with the total planet mass, which directly impacts plans for future atmospheric studies. We also examine the relation with stellar metallicity and discuss how these relations place new constraints on the core accretion model of planet formation. Our newest work seeks to quantify the flow of energy into hot Jupiters needed to explain their enlarged radii, in addition to their bulk composition. Because the former is related to stellar insolation and the latter is related to mass, we are able to create a hierarchical Bayesian model to disentangle the two effects in our sample of ~300 transiting giant planets. Our results show conclusively that the inflation power is not a simple fraction of stellar insolation: instead, the power increases with incident flux at a much higher rate. We use these results to test published models of giant planet inflation and to provide accurate empirical mass-radius relations for giant planets.

  19. Formation of Giant Planets and Brown Dwarves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2003-01-01

    According to the prevailing core instability model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Ongoing theoretical modeling of accretion of giant planet atmospheres, as well as observations of protoplanetary disks, will help decide this issue. Observations of extrasolar planets around main sequence stars can only provide a lower limit on giant planet formation frequency . This is because after giant planets form, gravitational interactions with material within the protoplanetary disk may cause them to migrat inwards and be lost to the central star. The core instability model can only produce planets greater than a few jovian masses within protoplanetary disks that are more viscous than most such disks are believed to be. Thus, few brown dwarves (objects massive enough to undergo substantial deuterium fusion, estimated to occur above approximately 13 jovian masses) are likely to be formed in this manner. Most brown dwarves, as well as an unknown number of free-floating objects of planetary mass, are probably formed as are stars, by the collapse of extended gas/dust clouds into more compact objects.

  20. Management of giant liver hemangiomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Lisette T; Bieze, Matthanja; Erdogan, Deha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Beuers, Ulrich H W; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-03-01

    Liver hemangiomas are the most common benign liver tumors and are usually incidental findings. Liver hemangiomas are readily demonstrated by abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Giant liver hemangiomas are defined by a diameter larger than 5 cm. In patients with a giant liver hemangioma, observation is justified in the absence of symptoms. Surgical resection is indicated in patients with abdominal (mechanical) complaints or complications, or when diagnosis remains inconclusive. Enucleation is the preferred surgical method, according to existing literature and our own experience. Spontaneous or traumatic rupture of a giant hepatic hemangioma is rare, however, the mortality rate is high (36-39%). An uncommon complication of a giant hemangioma is disseminated intravascular coagulation (Kasabach-Merritt syndrome); intervention is then required. Herein, the authors provide a literature update of the current evidence concerning the management of giant hepatic hemangiomas. In addition, the authors assessed treatment strategies and outcomes in a series of patients with giant liver hemangiomas managed in our department.

  1. Recognition of lactoferrin and aminopeptidase M-modified lactoferrin by the liver: involvement of proteoglycans and the remnant receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ziere, G J; Kruijt, J K; Bijsterbosch, M K; van Berkel, T J

    1996-01-01

    1. Lactoferrin and aminopeptidase M-modified lactoferrin (APM-lactoferrin; which lacks its 14 N-terminal amino acids) inhibit the liver uptake of lipoprotein remnant. In the present study, the role of proteoglycans in the initial interaction of beta-migrating very-low-density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), native and APM-lactoferrin with isolated rat parenchymal liver cells was investigated. Treatment of the cells with chondroitinase lowered the Kd of lactoferrin binding (from 10 to 2.4 microM), and the number of sites/cell (from 20 x 10(6) to 7 x 10(6)), while heparinase treatment did not affect the binding. The binding characteristics of APM-lactoferrin and beta-VLDL were not altered by treatment of the cells with chondroitinase or heparinase. It is concluded that proteoglycans are not involved in the initial binding of APM-lactoferrin and beta-VLDL to parenchymal cells, while chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans are mainly responsible for the massive, low-affinity binding of native lactoferrin..2. The binding of lactoferrin, APM-lactoferrin and beta-VLDL to parenchymal liver cells was not influenced by the glutathione S-transferase-receptor-associated protein (GST-RAP) (97.2% +/- 4.0%, 95.5 +/- 3.7% and 98.5% of the control binding), while the binding of alpha 2-macroglobulin was fully blocked at 10 micrograms/ml GST-RAP (1.8 +/- 0.5% of the control binding). Since GST-RAP blocks the binding of all the known ligands to the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-related protein (LRP), it is concluded that LRP is not the initial primary recognition site for lactoferrin, APM-lactoferrin and beta-VLDL on parenchymal liver cells. 3. We showed earlier that.APM-lactoferrin, as compared with lactoferrin, is a more effective inhibitor of the liver uptake of lipoprotein remnants (49.4 +/- 4.0% versus 80.8 +/- 4.8% of the control at 500 micrograms/ml respectively). We found in the present study that beta-VLDL is able to inhibit the binding of APM-lactoferrin to parenchymal liver

  2. Reactivating the extracellular matrix synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans to improve the human skin aspect and its mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Chajra, Hanane; Auriol, Daniel; Joly, Francine; Pagnon, Aurélie; Rodrigues, Magda; Allart, Sophie; Redziniak, Gérard; Lefevre, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to demonstrate that a defined cosmetic composition is able to induce an increase in the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) and/or proteoglycans and finally to demonstrate that the composition, through its combined action of enzyme production and synthesis of macromolecules, modulates organization and skin surface aspect with a benefit in antiaging applications. Materials and methods Gene expression was studied by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from a 45-year-old donor skin dermis. De novo synthesis of sGAGs and proteoglycans was determined using Blyscan™ assay and/or immunohistochemical techniques. These studies were performed on normal human dermal fibroblasts (41- and 62-year-old donors) and on human skin explants. Dermis organization was studied either ex vivo on skin explants using bi-photon microscopy and transmission electron microscopy or directly in vivo on human volunteers by ultrasound technique. Skin surface modification was investigated in vivo using silicone replicas coupled with macrophotography, and the mechanical properties of the skin were studied using Cutometer. Results It was first shown that mRNA expression of several genes involved in the synthesis pathway of sGAG was stimulated. An increase in the de novo synthesis of sGAGs was shown at the cellular level despite the age of cells, and this phenomenon was clearly related to the previously observed stimulation of mRNA expression of genes. An increase in the expression of the corresponding core protein of decorin, perlecan, and versican and a stimulation of their respective sGAGs, such as chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate, were found on skin explants. The biosynthesis of macromolecules seems to be correlated at the microscopic level to a better organization and quality of the dermis, with collagen fibrils having homogenous diameters. The dermis seems to be

  3. Geometric Phases in Single Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenochio, Brian Canchola

    The characterization of the material properties of Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs) has grown in importance over the last few decades with the rise of novel applications such as high-density magnetic storage and quantum computation. Many of the applications require the probing of SMMs with spectroscopic methods that make use of electromagnetic radiation. The interaction with these time-dependent fields leads to energy shifts, which can be attributed to the geometric phase acquired by the system or the Bloch-Siegert shift. We model an SMM by a giant spin Hamiltonian, and use Floquet perturbation theory to find the geometric phase shifts. The locations where the phase shift between two levels is zero is useful for performing accurate spectroscopies, whereas the regions where relative phase differences exist are useful in applications like quantum computing. Using the same giant spin Hamiltonian, we can use Floquet theory and Salwen perturbation theory to determine the Bloch-Siegert shift and derive a modified version of the Rabi formula for transition probabilities between the energy states Ealpha → Ealpha+/-1, Ealpha → Ealpha+/-3, and Ealpha → Ealpha+/-5 , where alpha is the index of an arbitrary initial state. The shifted eigenvalues and modified transition probabilities can be useful in spectroscopies where accurate values for the energy-splitting between magnetic states needs to be determined.

  4. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Robin

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  5. Biomass yield comparisons of giant miscanthus, giant reed, and miscane grown under irrigated and rainfed conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated efforts to decrease the nation’s dependence on imported oil by developing domestic renewable sources of cellulosic-derived bioenergy. In this study, giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus), sugarcane (complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.), and giant reed (Ar...

  6. Migration of accreting giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Bitsch, B.; Raibaldi, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of 2D hydro simulations of giant planets in proto-planetary discs, which accrete gas at a more or less high rate. First, starting from a solid core of 20 Earth masses, we show that as soon as the runaway accretion of gas turns on, the planet is saved from type I migration : the gap opening mass is reached before the planet is lost into its host star. Furthermore, gas accretion helps opening the gap in low mass discs. Consequently, if the accretion rate is limited to the disc supply, then the planet is already inside a gap and in type II migration. We further show that the type II migration of a Jupiter mass planet actually depends on its accretion rate. Only when the accretion is high do we retrieve the classical picture where no gas crosses the gap and the planet follows the disc spreading. These results impact our understanding of planet migration and planet population synthesis models. The e-poster presenting these results in French can be found here: L'e-poster présentant ces résultats en français est disponible à cette adresse: http://sf2a.eu/semaine-sf2a/2016/posterpdfs/156_179_49.pdf.

  7. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., Io, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  8. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-06

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009.

  9. Atmospheres of the Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    The giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, are fluid objects. They have no solid surfaces because the light elements constituting them do not condense at solar-system temperatures. Instead, their deep atmospheres grade downward until the distinction between gas and liquid becomes meaningless. The preceding chapter delved into the hot, dark interiors of the Jovian planets. This one focuses on their atmospheres, especially the observable layers from the base of the clouds to the edge of space. These veneers arc only a few hundred kilometers thick, less than one percent of each planet's radius, but they exhibit an incredible variety of dynamic phenomena. The mixtures of elements in these outer layers resemble a cooled-down piece of the Sun. Clouds precipitate out of this gaseous soup in a variety of colors. The cloud patterns are organized by winds, which are powered by heat derived from sunlight (as on Earth) and by internal heat left over from planetary formation. Thus the atmospheres of the Jovian planets are distinctly different both compositionally and dynamically from those of the terrestrial planets. Such differences make them fascinating objects for study, providing clues about the origin and evolution of the planets and the formation of the solar system.

  10. Treatment of Giant Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report on report the clinical outcome obtained in treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms (GAs). Between 2005 and 2007, 51 patients with 51 GAs presented at our hospital. Twentynine were treated with primary parent vessel occlusion without distal bypass and ten underwent treatment preserving the parent artery. Twelve patients could not be treated endovascularly. Selective embolization (including two remodeling techniques and two stent-coil embolizations) resulted in only one cure. Two patients died as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage periprocedurely. Twenty-nine patients treated primarily with parent vessel occlusion and three patients treated with covered stent were considered cured after their treatments. Only one patient treated with parent vessel occlusion experienced ischemia during follow-up, which resulted in a mild neurological deficit. Of the twelve patients who could not be treated endovascularly, one succumbed to surgery, four died while being treated conservatively, and three were lost to follow-up. Parent artery occlusion, covered stent and coil occlusion provide effective protection against bleeding. In treatment of paraclinoid GAs of the internal carotid artery, the use of a stent, and stent-assisted coil embolization may be a pitfall. PMID:20465907

  11. Giant electrocaloric effect around Tc.

    PubMed

    Rose, Maimon C; Cohen, R E

    2012-11-02

    We use molecular dynamics with a first-principles-based shell model potential to study the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in lithium niobate, LiNbO(3), and find a giant electrocaloric effect along a line passing through the ferroelectric transition. With an applied electric field, a line of maximum ECE passes through the zero field ferroelectric transition, continuing along a Widom line at high temperatures with increasing fields, and along the instability that leads to homogeneous ferroelectric switching below T(c) with an applied field antiparallel to the spontaneous polarization. This line is defined as the minimum in the inverse capacitance under an applied electric field. We investigate the effects of pressure, temperature and an applied electric field on the ECE. The behavior we observe in LiNbO(3) should generally apply to ferroelectrics; we therefore suggest that the operating temperature for refrigeration and energy scavenging applications should be above the ferroelectric transition region to obtain a large electrocaloric response. The relationship between T(c), the Widom line, and homogeneous switching should be universal among ferroelectrics, relaxors, multiferroics, and the same behavior should be found under applied magnetic fields in ferromagnets.

  12. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  13. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  14. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-04-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that the effect of a fullerene shell on the photoionization of a “caged” atom in an endohedral can result in the formation of giant endohedral resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of the Xe@C60 photoionization cross section that, at 17 eV, exhibits a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5 p 6 electron photoionization cross section of Xe@C60 takes place due to the strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and the oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5 p 6 cross section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25. We also present the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves, but not modified by C60 polarization.

  15. Giant resonances of endohedral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, Arkadiy; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2008-05-01

    We demonstrate for that the effect of fullerene shell upon photoionization of the ``caged'' atom in an endohedral can result in formation of Giant Endohedral Resonances or GER. This is illustrated by the concrete case of Xe@C60 photoionization cross-section that exhibits at 17 eV a powerful resonance with total oscillator strengths of about 25. The prominent modification of the 5p^6 electron photoionization cross-section of Xe@C60 takes place due to strong fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and oscillation of this cross-section due to the reflection of the photoelectron from Xe by the C60. These two factors transform the smoothly decreasing 5p^6 cross-section of Xe into a rather complex curve with a powerful maximum for Xe@C60, with the oscillator strength of it being equal to 25! We present also the results for the dipole angular anisotropy parameter that is strongly affected by the reflection of the photoelectron waves but not modified by C60 polarization.

  16. Biosynthesis of heparan sulfate proteoglycan by human colon carcinoma cells and its localization at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    After 24 h of continuous labeling with radioactive precursors, a high molecular weight heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HS-PG) was isolated from both the medium and cell layer of human colon carcinoma cells (WiDr) in culture. The medium HS-PG eluted from a diethylaminoethyl anion exchange column with 0.45-0.50 M NaCl, had an average density of 1.46- 1.49 g/ml on dissociative CsCl density-gradient ultracentrifugation, and eluted from Sepharose CL-2B with a Kav = 0.57. This proteoglycan had an estimated Mr of congruent to 8.5 X 10(5), with glycosaminoglycan chains of Mr = 3 X 10(4) which were all susceptible to HNO2 deaminative cleavage. Deglycosylation of the HS-PG with polyhydrogen fluoride resulted in a 3H-core protein with Mr congruent to 2.4 X 10(5). The cell layer contained a population of HS-PG with characteristics almost identical to that released into the medium but with a larger Mr = 9.5 X 10(5). Furthermore, an intracellular pool contained smaller heparan sulfate chains (Mr congruent to 1 X 10(4)) which were mostly devoid of protein core. In pulse chase experiments, only the large cell- associated HS-PG was released (approximately 58%) into the medium as intact proteoglycan and/or internalized and degraded (approximately 42%), with a t1/2 = 6 h. However, the small intracellular component was never released into the medium and was degraded at a much slower rate. When the cells were subjected to mild proteolytic treatment, only the large cell-associated HS-PG, but none of the small component, was displaced. Addition of exogenous heparin did not displace any HS-PG into the medium. Both light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed that the cell surface reacted with antibody against an HS-PG isolated from a basement membrane-producing tumor. Electron microscopic histochemistry using ruthenium red and/or cuprolinic blue revealed numerous 10-50-nm diam granules and 70-220-nm- long electron-dense filaments, respectively, on the surface of the tumor

  17. Podocalyxin as a major pluripotent marker and novel keratan sulfate proteoglycan in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidenao; Nagai, Yuko; Kojima, Aya; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko

    2017-04-01

    Podocalyxin (PC) was first identified as a heavily sialylated transmembrane protein of glomerular podocytes. Recent studies suggest that PC is a remarkable glycoconjugate that acts as a universal glyco-carrier. The glycoforms of PC are responsible for multiple functions in normal tissue, human cancer cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). PC is employed as a major pluripotent marker of hESCs and hiPSCs. Among the general antibodies for human PC, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 recognize the keratan sulfate (KS)-related structures. Therefore, It is worthwhile to summarize the outstanding chemical characteristic of PC, including the KS-related structures. Here, we review the glycoforms of PC and discuss the potential of PC as a novel KS proteoglycan in undifferentiated hESCs and hiPSCs.

  18. Proteoglycan concentrations in healthy and diseased articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis.

  19. Proteoglycan Concentrations in Healthy and Diseased Articular Cartilage by Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Principal Component Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis. PMID:25000570

  20. 2- and 6-O-sulfated proteoglycans have distinct and complementary roles in cranial axon guidance and motor neuron migration

    PubMed Central

    Maden, Charlotte H.; Davidson, Kathryn; Fantin, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The correct migration and axon extension of neurons in the developing nervous system is essential for the appropriate wiring and function of neural networks. Here, we report that O-sulfotransferases, a class of enzymes that modify heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), are essential to regulate neuronal migration and axon development. We show that the 6-O-sulfotransferases HS6ST1 and HS6ST2 are essential for cranial axon patterning, whilst the 2-O-sulfotransferase HS2ST (also known as HS2ST1) is important to regulate the migration of facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons in the hindbrain. We have also investigated how HS2ST interacts with other signals in the hindbrain and show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling regulates FBM neuron migration in an HS2ST-dependent manner. PMID:27048738

  1. The abundance spread in the giants of NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Freeman, K. C.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1981-02-01

    A spectroscopic survey has been performed of 69 stars on or near the giant branches of the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 6752. Our basic results are: (i) There is a large range in the strength of the violet cyanogen bands on the red giant branch, with the available evidence strongly suggesting that the distribution is bimodal. (ii) The cyanogen variations on the giant branch appear to be accompanied by an anticorrelated variation in the abundance of the CH molecule. Spectrum synthesis analysis of a (CN strong)/(CN weak) pair of stars for which relatively high resolution data are available shows that there is a variation of Δ[N/A] ˜+0.9, and Δ[C/A] ˜-0.3, indicative of the CN cycle. (iii) On the red giant branch there are variations in the strength of the lines of Al I which correlate positively with the cyanogen variations. The size of the variations is consistent with the hypothesis that the same phenomenon has occurred in NGC 6752 and ω Centauri, but to a much smaller extent in the former. (iv) On the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), the features of CH are weaker than on the red giant branch at the same color or magnitude, and there are no examples of stars in the strong CN group. Spectrum synthesis suggests that the behavior of the CH features is consistent, on the average, with the effective temperature and gravities of the AGB stars, but that the absence of strong CN stars cannot be explained in this way. We set an upper limit of Δ[C/H] ˜0.3 to the possible range of carbon on the AGB at log L/L -- stars: individual: ˜2.3, and between this group and stars of similar color on the red giant branch. (v) Most of the stars on the anomalously low luminosity end of the AGB are not members of NGC 6752. Two stars, (CS 41 and CS 44), however, deserve further study, since they could be examples of partially mixed stars. No definitive statement can be made concerning the origin of the abundance anomalies. if mixing is responsible, the data require this process to

  2. The "Giant Virus Finder" discovers an abundance of giant viruses in the Antarctic dry valleys.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2017-02-28

    Mimivirus was identified in 2003 from a biofilm of an industrial water-cooling tower in England. Later, numerous new giant viruses were found in oceans and freshwater habitats, some of them having 2,500 genes. We have demonstrated their likely presence in four soil samples taken from the Kutch Desert (Gujarat, India). Here we describe a bioinformatics work-flow, called the "Giant Virus Finder" that is capable of discovering the likely presence of the genomes of giant viruses in metagenomic shotgun-sequenced datasets. The new workflow is applied to numerous hot and cold desert soil samples as well as some tundra- and forest soils. We show that most of these samples contain giant viruses, especially in the Antarctic dry valleys. The results imply that giant viruses could be frequent not only in aqueous habitats, but in a wide spectrum of soils on our planet.

  3. Atoms and Molecules in Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelcher, P.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    Selected topics on atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields are reviewed. The enormous progress made for the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field and its impact on different areas like, for example, modern semi-classics and dynamics of non-integrable systems as well as laser spectroscopy are outlined. Due to the non-separability of the centre of mass and electronic motion of atoms/molecules in magnetic fields a variety of two-body phenomena can be observed in highly excited systems. Examples are the classical diffusion of the centre of mass and the giant dipole states for crossed fields. For ions energy transfer processes lead to the so-called self-ionisation process. Magnetically induced crossovers for the ground states of atoms are investigated. The increasing complexity of the ground state behaviour of magnetically dressed multi-electron atoms due to changes of the spin polarisation as well as spatial orbitals is demonstrated. For molecules, both fundamental aspects as well as the electronic structure of few-electron diatomics are reviewed.

  4. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  5. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David

    2011-12-15

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside {approx}15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  6. Requirement of keratan sulfate proteoglycan phosphacan with a specific sulfation pattern for critical period plasticity in the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Takeda-Uchimura, Yoshiko; Uchimura, Kenji; Sugimura, Taketoshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Komatsu, Yukio; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating the development and functions of the brain. They consist of a core protein and glycosaminoglycans, which are long sugar chains of repeating disaccharide units with sulfation. A recent study demonstrated that the sulfation pattern of chondroitin sulfate on proteoglycans contributes to regulation of the critical period of experience-dependent plasticity in the mouse visual cortex. In the present study, we investigated the role of keratan sulfate (KS), another glycosaminoglycan, in critical period plasticity in the mouse visual cortex. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated the presence of KS containing disaccharide units of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-sulfate and nonsulfated galactose during the critical period, although KS containing disaccharide units of GlcNAc-6-sulfate and galactose-6-sulfate was already known to disappear before that period. The KS chains were distributed diffusely in the extracellular space and densely around the soma of a large population of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the KS was localized within the perisynaptic spaces and dendrites but not in presynaptic sites. KS was mainly located on phosphacan. In mice deficient in GlcNAc-6-O-sulfotransferase 1, which is one of the enzymes necessary for the synthesis of KS chains, the expression of KS was one half that in wild-type mice. In the knockout mice, monocular deprivation during the critical period resulted in a depression of deprived-eye responses but failed to produce potentiation of nondeprived-eye responses. In addition, T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP), which occurs only during the critical period, was not observed. These results suggest that regulation by KS-phosphacan with a specific sulfation pattern is necessary for the generation of LTP and hence the potentiation of nondeprived-eye responses after monocular deprivation.

  7. TGF-beta and TNF-a affect cell surface proteoglycan and sialic acid expression on vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Amber L; Kirkpatrick, Allison P; Rinker, Kristina D

    2004-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the formation of plaques in the arterial wall brought about by numerous events including the accumulation of oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL), stimulation of inflammatory responses, the release of cytokines, and the attachment of monocytes to the arterial wall. Proteoglycans are implicated in many aspects of atherosclerosis including the metabolism of lipoproteins, regulation of cytokine activity, cell adhesion, and modification of the extracellular matrix. Due to their complex role in molecular recognition and cellular adhesion, the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains attached to the proteoglycan core and sialic acids on the terminal ends of the glycan chains are of interest. This study investigated the effects of exposure to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) on the expression of cell surface GAGs and sialic acids on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Initial results show that TGF-beta 1 affected GAG expression compared to a control condition. Results also show that the combination of TGF-beta 1 and TNF-a affected GAG expression differently than does TGF-beta 1 alone. Additionally, TNF-a decreased the number of sialic acid residues per cell and TGF-beta 1 slightly upregulated sialic acid expression as compared to the control. The combination of the two cytokines showed a larger upward trend in this value. These data indicate that TNF-a and TGF-beta 1 play a role in the expression of GAG chains and sialic acids on the cell surface. Further study may clarify the implications of these findings for atherosclerosis.

  8. Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge promotes in vitro wound healing of fibroblast monolayers via the CD44 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Gen; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takeda, Yoshie; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge (SNC-PG) promoted wound healing in fibroblast monolayers. • SNC-PG stimulated both cell proliferation and cell migration. • Interaction between chondroitin sulfate-units and CD44 is responsible for the effect. - Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are involved in various cellular functions including cell growth, adhesion, and differentiation; however, their physiological roles are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effect of PG purified from salmon nasal cartilage (SNC-PG) on wound closure using tissue-cultured cell monolayers, an in vitro wound-healing assay. The results indicated that SNC-PG significantly promoted wound closure in NIH/3T3 cell monolayers by stimulating both cell proliferation and cell migration. SNC-PG was effective in concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μg/ml, but showed much less effect at higher concentrations (100–1000 μg/ml). The effect of SNC-PG was abolished by chondroitinase ABC, indicating that chondroitin sulfates (CSs), a major component of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in SNC-PG, are crucial for the SNC-PG effect. Furthermore, chondroitin 6-sulfate (C-6-S), a major CS of SNC-PG GAGs, could partially reproduce the SNC-PG effect and partially inhibit the binding of SNC-PG to cells, suggesting that SNC-PG exerts its effect through an interaction between the GAGs in SNC-PG and the cell surface. Neutralization by anti-CD44 antibodies or CD44 knockdown abolished SNC-PG binding to the cells and the SNC-PG effect on wound closure. These results suggest that interactions between CS-rich GAG-chains of SNC-PG and CD44 on the cell surface are responsible for the SNC-PG effect on wound closure.

  9. Contaminants in commercial preparations of ‘purified’ small leucine-rich proteoglycans may distort mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon J.; Fuller, Heidi R.; Jones, Philip; Caterson, Bruce; Shirran, Sally L.; Botting, Catherine H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the perplexing results that came about because of seriously impure commercially available reagents. Commercial reagents and chemicals are routinely ordered by scientists and expected to have been rigorously assessed for their purity. Unfortunately, we found this assumption to be risky. Extensive work was carried out within our laboratory using commercially sourced preparations of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), decorin and biglycan, to investigate their influence on nerve cell growth. Unusual results compelled us to analyse the composition and purity of both preparations of these proteoglycans (PGs) using both mass spectrometry (MS) and Western blotting, with and without various enzymatic deglycosylations. Commercial ‘decorin’ and ‘biglycan’ were found to contain a mixture of PGs including not only both decorin and biglycan but also fibromodulin and aggrecan. The unexpected effects of ‘decorin’ and ‘biglycan’ on nerve cell growth could be explained by these impurities. Decorin and biglycan contain either chondroitin or dermatan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains whereas fibromodulin only contains keratan sulfate and the large (>2500 kDa), highly glycosylated aggrecan contains both keratan and chondroitin sulfate. The different structure, molecular weight and composition of these impurities significantly affected our work and any conclusions that could be made. These findings beg the question as to whether scientists need to verify the purity of each commercially obtained reagent used in their experiments. The implications of these findings are vast, since the effects of these impurities may already have led to inaccurate conclusions and reports in the literature with concomitant loss of researchers’ funds and time. PMID:27994047

  10. A step towards developing the expertise to control hunger and satiety: regulatory role of satiomem--a membrane proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Upreti, R K; Kidwai, A M

    1995-04-01

    Regulation of hunger and satiety is a complex process thought to be controlled by a complex interplay of neurotransmitters in the hypothalamic region of the brain. Reduced food intake or anorexia has also been observed under various disease or disorder conditions including AIDS and cancer. On the other hand, increased appetite because of some impairment of central mechanisms regulating the food intake could also cause/obesity. A large number of substances including neuropeptides, hormones, drugs, and synthetic peptides have been implicated in the regulation of appetite and food intake behavior in normal as well as disease or disorder conditions. Most of these substances are not directly involved in the regulation of normal hunger and satiety but exert their effect indirectly via other media. Some of them are involved under certain pathologic conditions and during the course they become involved directly or indirectly in the triggering of hunger and satiety regulatory mechanism. Recently, we have been able to isolate and purify an endogenous proteoglycan from membranes of animal and plant sources. This membrane anchored proteoglycan termed as 'Satiomem' reduces food intake without any rebound effects and has no apparent toxicity. It also fulfils all the criteria of a true satiety or anorexigenic substance. The release of satiomem from the cell surface could be mediated by a specific phospholipase-C. Satiomem seems to be involved in transducing activating signals and may also act as a source of second messenger for the regulatory mechanism of appetite. This article summarizes the regulatory aspects of hunger and satiety mechanisms controlled by endogenous substances with the emphasis on our present knowledge about satiomem.

  11. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  12. Therapeutic Antibodies Targeting CSF1 Impede Macrophage Recruitment in a Xenograft Model of Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongwei; Clarkson, Paul W.; Gao, Dongxia; Pacheco, Marina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2010-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor is a neoplastic disease of joints that can cause severe morbidity. Recurrences are common following local therapy, and no effective medical therapy currently exists. Recent work has demonstrated that all cases overexpress macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1), usually as a consequence of an activating gene translocation, resulting in an influx of macrophages that form the bulk of the tumor. New anti-CSF1 drugs have been developed; however there are no preclinical models suitable for evaluation of drug benefits in this disease. In this paper, we describe a novel renal subcapsular xenograft model of tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Using this model, we demonstrate that an anti-CSF1 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibits host macrophage infiltration into this tumor. The results from this model support clinical trials of equivalent humanized agents and anti-CSF1R small molecule drugs in cases of tenosynovial giant cell tumor refractory to conventional local therapy. PMID:20981142

  13. Sunspots and Giant-Cell Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Ed J.

    2000-01-01

    From analysis of Doppler velocity images from SOHO/MDI, Hathaway et al (2000, Solar Phys., in press) have found clear evidence for giant convection cells that fill the solar surface, have diameters 3 - 10 times that typical of supergranules, and have lifetimes approx. greater than 10 days. Analogous to the superposition of the granular convection on the supergranular convection, the approx. 30,000 km diameter supergranules are superposed on these still larger giant cells. Because the giant cells make up the large-scale end of a continuous power spectrum that peaks at the size scale of supergranules, it appears that the giant cells are made by the same mode of convection as the supergranules. This suggests that the giant cells are similar to supergranules, just longer-lived, larger in diameter, and deeper. Here we point out that the range of lengths of large bipolar sunspot groups is similar to the size range of giant cells. This, along with the long lives (weeks) of large sunspots, suggests that large sunspots sit in long-lived, deep downflows at the corners of giant cells, and that the distance from leader to follower sunspots in large bipolar groups is the distance from one giant-cell corner to the next. By this line of reasoning, an unusually large and strong downdraft might pull in both legs of a rising spot-group magnetic flux loop, resulting in the formation of a delta sunspot. This leads us to suggest that a large, strong giant-cell corner downdraft should be present at the birthplaces of large delta sunspots for some time (days to weeks) before the birth. Thus, early detection of such downdrafts by local helioscismology might provide an early warning for the formation of those active regions (large delta sunspot groups) that produce the Sun's most violent flares and coronal mass ejections. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Solar Physics Branch of its Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  14. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S.; Zhang, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Yuan, F. E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  15. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  16. Opportunities for Laboratory Opacity Chemistry Studies to Facilitate Characterization of Young Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark; Freedman, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal emission spectra of young giant planets is shaped by the opacity of atoms and molecules residing in their atmospheres. While great strides have been made in improving the opacities of important molecules, particularly NH3 and CH4, at high temperatures, much more work is needed to understand the opacity and chemistry of atomic Na and K. The highly pressure broadened fundamental band of Na and K in the optical stretches into the near-infrared, strongly influencing the shape of the Y and K spectral bands. Since young giant planets are bright in these bands it is important to understand the influences on the spectral shape. Discerning gravity and atmospheric composition is difficult, if not impossible, without both good atomic opacities as well as an excellent understanding of the relevant atmospheric chemistry. Since Na and K condense at temperatures near 500 to 600 K, the chemistry of the condensation process must be well understood as well, particularly any disequilibrium chemical pathways. Comparisons of the current generation of sophisticated atmospheric models and available data, however, reveal important shortcomings in the models. We will review the current state of observations and theory of young giant planets and will discuss these and other specific examples where improved laboratory measurements for alkali compounds have the potential of substantially improving our understanding of these atmospheres.

  17. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J. Y-K.

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of H and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion dr