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Sample records for giant surfactant aggregates

  1. Efficacy of glyphosate and five surfactants for controlling giant salvinia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Allert, A.L.; Riddle, J.S.; Gladwin, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta Mitchell) is a non-native, invasive aquatic fern that was recently introduced to the southern United States. The aggressive nature of the species has led to concerns over its potential adverse impacts to native plants, fish, and invertebrates. We conducted a study to determine the efficacy of glyphosate [isopropylamine salt of N-(phosphono-methyl)glycine] and several surfactants for control of giant salvinia. Studies were conducted over a 42-day period using static renewals (twice weekly) with 4% Hoagland's medium (10 mg/L N equivalent) in replicated 2-L containers. Five concentrations of glyphosate (0, 0.45, 0.91, 1.82, and 3.60% v:v) and five surfactants (0.25% concentration, v:v; Optima???, Kinetic???, Mon 0818???, Cygnet Plus???, and LI-700???) were applied with a pressurized sprayer as a single surface application in a fully nested experimental design. Untreated giant salvinia grew rapidly and exhibited an increase of 800% wet weight biomass over the 42-day test duration. Glyphosate, with and without surfactants, exhibited efficacy at concentrations as low as 0.45% of the commercial formulation. Glyphosate with Optima was the only mixture that resulted in complete mortality of plants with no regrowth.

  2. Aqueous self-assembly of giant bottlebrush block copolymer surfactants as shape-tunable building blocks.

    PubMed

    Fenyves, Ryan; Schmutz, Marc; Horner, Ian J; Bright, Frank V; Rzayev, Javid

    2014-05-28

    Programmed self-assembly of well-defined molecular building blocks enables the fabrication of precisely structured nanomaterials. In this work, we explore a new class of giant polymeric surfactants (Mn = (0.7-4.4) × 10(6) g/mol) with bottlebrush architecture and show that their persistent molecular shape leads to the formation of uniform aggregates in a predictable manner. Amphiphilic bottlebrush block copolymers containing polylactide (PLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) side chains were synthesized by a grafting-from method, and their self-assembly in aqueous environment was studied by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. The produced micelle structures with varying interfacial curvatures and core radii (19-55 nm) boasted rod-like hydrophilic PEO brushes protruding from the hydrophobic PLA cores normal to the interface. Highly uniform spherical micelles with low dispersities were obtained from bottlebrush amphiphiles with packing parameters of ∼0.3, estimated from the polymer structural data. Long cylindrical micelles and other nonspherical aggregates were observed for the first time for compositionally less asymmetric bottlebrush surfactants. Critical micelle concentration values of 1 nM, measured for PEO-rich bottlebrush amphiphiles, indicated an enhanced thermodynamic stability of the produced micelle aggregates. Shape-dependent assembly of bottlebrush surfactants allows for the rational fabrication of a range of micelle structures in narrow morphological windows.

  3. Influence of polymer-surfactant aggregates on fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Malcher, Tadeusz; Gzyl-Malcher, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the influence of interactions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles on drag reduction. Since the interactions between PEO and CTAB micelles alone are weak, salicylate ions were used as CTAB counterions. They facilitate formation of polymer-micelle aggregates by screening the electrostatic repulsions between the charged surfactant headgroups. The influence of polymer-surfactant interactions on drag reduction is of biomedical engineering importance. Drag reducing additives introduced to blood produce beneficial effects on blood circulation, representing a novel way to treat cardiovascular disorders. PEO is a blood-compatible polymer. However, it quickly mechanically degrades when subjected to high shear stresses. Thus, there is a need to search for other additives able to reduce drag, which would be more mechanically stable, e.g. polymer-surfactant aggregates. Numerical simulations of the flow were performed using the CFX software. Based on the internal structure of the polymer-surfactant solution, a hypothesis explaining the reason of increase of drag reduction and decrease in dynamic viscosity with increasing shear rate was proposed. It was suggested that the probable reason for the abrupt increase in friction factor, observed when the critical Reynolds number was exceeded, was the disappearance of the difference in the dynamic viscosity.

  4. Lipid bilayer elasticity measurements in giant liposomes in contact with a solubilizing surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Perzynski, Régine; Lesieur, Sylviane; Cabuil, Valérie

    2008-05-01

    A new method to probe the modification of the elasticity of phospholipid bilayers is presented. The purpose here concerns the action of a solubilizing surfactant on a vesicle bilayer. This method is based on the measure of the under-field elongation of giant magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes. The addition of the nonionic surfactant octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (OG) to vesicles at sublytic levels increases the elasticity of the membrane, as shown by the value of the bending modulus K(b), which decreases. K(b) measured around 20 kT for a pure 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer indeed reaches a few kT in the case of the mixed OG-DOPC bilayer. The purpose and interest of this study are to allow the determination of the membrane bending modulus before and after the addition of OG on the same magnetic liposome. Moreover, the experimental conditions used in this work allow the control of lipid and surfactant molar fractions in the mixed aggregates. Then, optical microscopy observation can be performed on samples in well-defined regions of the OG-phospholipid state diagram. PMID:18363418

  5. Aggregation behavior of a tetrameric cationic surfactant in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanbo; Han, Yuchun; Deng, Manli; Xiang, Junfen; Wang, Yilin

    2010-01-01

    A star-shaped tetrameric quaternary ammonium surfactant PATC, which has four hydrophobic chains and charged hydrophilic headgroups connected by amide-type spacer group, has been synthesized in this work. Surface tension, electrical conductivity, ITC, DLS, and NMR have been used to investigate the relationship between its chemical structure and its aggregation properties. Interestingly, a large size distribution around 75 nm is observed below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of PATC, and the large size distribution starts to decrease beyond the cmc and finally transfers to a small size distribution. It is proved that the large size premicellar aggregates may display network-like structure, and the size decrease beyond the cmc is the transition of the network-like aggregates to micelles. The possible reason is that intramolecular electrostatic repulsion among the charged headgroups below the cmc leads to a star-shaped molecular configuration, which may form the network-like aggregates through intermolecular hydrophobic interaction between hydrocarbon chains, while the hydrophobic effect becomes strong enough to turn the molecular configuration into pyramid-like shape beyond the cmc, which make the transition of network-like aggregates to micelles available. PMID:19947615

  6. Comparative characterization of pulmonary surfactant aggregates and alkaline phosphatase isozymes in human lung carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Iino, Nozomi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Harada, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Seiji; Koyama, Iwao; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2007-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes are surfactant-associated proteins (SPs). Since several different AP isozymes have been detected in the pneumocytes of lung cancer patients, we attempted to identify the relationship between pulmonary surfactant aggregate subtypes and AP isozymes. Pulmonary surfactant aggregates were isolated from carcinoma and non-carcinoma tissues of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Upon analysis, ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates were detected in the non-carcinoma tissues, but no ultraheavy surfactant aggregates were found in the carcinoma tissues. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) was detected as two bands (a 27-kDa band and a 54-kDa band) in the ultraheavy, heavy, and light surfactant aggregates found in the non-carcinoma tissues. Although both SP-A bands were detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues, the 54-kDa band was not detected in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. Liver AP (LAP) was detected in the heavy and light surfactant aggregates from both non-carcinoma and squamous carcinoma tissues, but not in heavy surfactant aggregates from adenocarcinoma tissues. A larger amount of bone type AP (BAP) was found in light surfactant aggregate fractions from squamous cell carcinomas than those from adenocarcinoma tissues or non-carcinoma tissues from patients with either type of cancer. LAP, BAP, and SP-A were identified immunohistochemically in type II pneumocytes from non-carcinoma tissues and adenocarcinoma cells, but no distinct SP-A staining was observed in squamous cell carcinoma tissues. The present study has thus revealed several differences in pulmonary surfactant aggregates and AP isozymes between adenocarcinoma tissue and squamous cell carcinoma tissue.

  7. Aggregate-based sub-CMC Solubilization of Hexadecane by Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangming; Brusseau, Mark L.; Wang, Yake; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhifeng; Yuan, Xingzhong; Tan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Solubilization of hexadecane by two surfactants, SDBS and Triton X-100, at concentrations near the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the related aggregation behavior was investigated in this study. Solubilization was observed at surfactant concentrations lower than CMC, and the apparent solubility of hexadecane increased linearly with surfactant concentration for both surfactants. The capacity of SDBS to solubilize hexadecane is stronger at concentrations below CMC than above CMC. In contrast, Triton X-100 shows no difference. The results of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and cryogenic TEM analysis show aggregate formation at surfactant concentrations lower than CMC. DLS-based size of the aggregates (d) decreases with increasing surfactant concentration. Zeta potential of the SDBS aggregates decreases with increasing SDBS concentration, whereas it increases for Triton X-100. The surface excess (Γ) of SDBS calculated based on hexadecane solubility and aggregate size data increases rapidly with increasing bulk concentration, and then asymptotically approaches the maximum surface excess (Γmax). Conversely, there is only a minor increase in Γ for Triton X-100. Comparison of Γ and d indicates that excess of surfactant molecules at aggregate surface has great impact on surface curvature. The results of this study demonstrate formation of aggregates at surfactant concentrations below CMC for hexadecane solubilization, and indicate the potential of employing low-concentration strategy for surfactant application such as remediation of HOC contaminated sites. PMID:26925230

  8. Hierarchical Structure from the Self-Assembly of Giant Gemini Surfactants in Condensed State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Cheng, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    In the past a few years, a new class of amphiphiles with both asymmetrical shapes and interactions named ``shape amphiphiles'' has been significantly intensified. Recently, a new kind of shape amphiphiles called ``Giant Gemini Surfactants'' consisting of two hydrophilic carboxylic acid-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (APOSS) heads and two hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) tails covalently linked via rigid spacers (p-phenylene versus biphenylene) has been successful behavior of giant gemini surfactants. We currently continue to investigate the spacer effects on the self-assembly behaviors of giant gemini surfactants in condensed state by utilizing DCS, SAXS and TEM. Preliminary results showed that giant gemini surfactants with different spacers have diverse phase behaviors. As we use the same 3.2k PS chains, the giant gemini surfactant with p-phenylene spacer showed double gyroid morphology, while the one with biphenylene spacer revealed cylindrical morphology. This study expands the scope of giant gemini surfactants and contributes a lot to the basic physical principles in self-assembly behavior.

  9. Polyelectrolyte/surfactant films spread from neutral aggregates.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard A; Tummino, Andrea; Noskov, Boris A; Varga, Imre

    2016-06-28

    We describe a new methodology to prepare loaded polyelectrolyte/surfactant films at the air/water interface by exploiting Marangoni spreading resulting from the dynamic dissociation of hydrophobic neutral aggregates dispensed from an aqueous dispersion. The system studied is mixtures of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) with dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide. Our approach results in the interfacial confinement of more than one third of the macromolecules in the system even though they are not even surface-active without the surfactant. The interfacial stoichiometry of the films was resolved during measurements of surface pressure isotherms in situ for the first time using a new implementation of neutron reflectometry. The interfacial coverage is determined by the minimum surface area reached when the films are compressed beyond a single complete surface layer. The films exhibit linear ripples on a length scale of hundreds of micrometers during the squeezing out of material, after which they behave as perfectly insoluble membranes with consistent stoichiometric charge binding. We discuss our findings in terms of scope for the preparation of loaded membranes for encapsulation applications and in deposition-based technologies. PMID:27221521

  10. Surfactant induced aggregation behavior of Merocyanine-540 adsorbed on polymer coated positively charged gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, K.; Uppal, A.; Saini, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant induced aggregation behavior of Merocyanine 540 adsorbed on polymer (PDD) coated gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is reported. The absorption band of the dye shifts to higher energy in the presence of free polymer and polymer coated AuNP implying aggregation. Addition of a negatively charged surfactant (SDS) induces multiple bands in the extinction spectrum of the dye adsorbed on nanoparticle surface. The highest (460 nm) and lowest (564 nm) energy bands of the dye become prominent at 10 and >50 μM SDS concentrations respectively (dye: 10 μM; AuNP: 100-200 pM). Based on earlier results the high energy band is likely to originate from dye aggregates and the low energy band is likely to originate from dye monomers. This is attributed to the interplay between polymer-surfactant and polymer-dye interactions at the AuNP surface. The extinction spectra of dye adsorbed at AuNP surface remain unaffected in the presence of a positively charged (CTAB) or a neutral surfactant (Tx-100), at low surfactant concentrations. However at higher surfactant concentrations (>60 μM) dye aggregation takes place which is attributed to dye-surfactant interactions. The fluorescence intensity of the dye quenched significantly but its lifetime increased in the presence of polymer coated AuNP. This is attributed to aggregation and reduction in the photoisomerization rate of the dye adsorbed on AuNP surface.

  11. Determination of aggregation thresholds of UV absorbing anionic surfactants by frontal analysis continuous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Thomas; Varenne, Anne; Gareil, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Aggregation of anionic surfactants was investigated by frontal analysis continuous capillary electrophoresis (FACCE), a method involving the continuous electrokinetic introduction of the surfactant sample into the separation capillary. This process results in a partial separation of the monomeric and aggregated forms without perturbing the monomer-aggregate equilibrium. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) can then be easily derived from the height of the firstly detected migration front, corresponding to the monomeric form. This approach is exemplified with octyl and dodecylbenzenesulfonates and compared with conductimetry and surface tension measurements. FACCE turns out to be an effective method for the determination of CMC and intermediate aggregation phenomena with very small sample and short time requirements.

  12. Synthesis of polymer-biohybrids: from small to giant surfactants.

    PubMed

    Reynhout, Irene C; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2009-06-16

    Amphiphiles or surfactants, more popularly known as soaps, are among the oldest known chemical compounds used by man. Written text on a clay tablet dated to 2200 B.C. indicates that the Babylonians were familiar with soap-like substances. According to the Ebers papyrus (1550 B.C.), the ancient Egyptians bathed regularly in a mixture of animal oils, vegetable extracts, and alkaline salts, and a soap factory with bars of scented soap was found in the ruins of Pompeii (79 A.D.). In modern times, the use of soap has become universal, and we now understand reasonably well what happens when soap molecules are dispersed in aqueous solution and how the cleaning properties of soap work. The latter is related to the surface-active behavior of soap molecules, which is a result of their amphiphilic, also called amphipathic, character. Although the cleaning aspect is still an important issue, scientists are increasingly focusing on other properties of soaps, for example, self-assembling behavior and how this can be used in the design and non-covalent synthesis of new (macro)molecular architectures. These new molecules can be employed in nanotechnology and drug delivery, among other applications. This Account will focus on three different classes of amphiphiles. The first is the low molecular weight amphiphiles, also called classical amphiphiles in this context. A short overview will be given on the research carried out by our group and others on the self-assembly behavior and properties of these compounds; in particular, we focus on the ones that can be stabilized by polymerization (polymerized vesicles). Next, we will introduce the still relatively young field of superamphiphiles, macromolecules consisting of a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic polymeric block. Finally, and this constitutes the main part of this Account, we will provide an overview of a new class of amphiphiles, the so-called giant amphiphiles. These macromolecules have an enzyme or protein as the polar head group

  13. Synthesis of polymer-biohybrids: from small to giant surfactants.

    PubMed

    Reynhout, Irene C; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2009-06-16

    Amphiphiles or surfactants, more popularly known as soaps, are among the oldest known chemical compounds used by man. Written text on a clay tablet dated to 2200 B.C. indicates that the Babylonians were familiar with soap-like substances. According to the Ebers papyrus (1550 B.C.), the ancient Egyptians bathed regularly in a mixture of animal oils, vegetable extracts, and alkaline salts, and a soap factory with bars of scented soap was found in the ruins of Pompeii (79 A.D.). In modern times, the use of soap has become universal, and we now understand reasonably well what happens when soap molecules are dispersed in aqueous solution and how the cleaning properties of soap work. The latter is related to the surface-active behavior of soap molecules, which is a result of their amphiphilic, also called amphipathic, character. Although the cleaning aspect is still an important issue, scientists are increasingly focusing on other properties of soaps, for example, self-assembling behavior and how this can be used in the design and non-covalent synthesis of new (macro)molecular architectures. These new molecules can be employed in nanotechnology and drug delivery, among other applications. This Account will focus on three different classes of amphiphiles. The first is the low molecular weight amphiphiles, also called classical amphiphiles in this context. A short overview will be given on the research carried out by our group and others on the self-assembly behavior and properties of these compounds; in particular, we focus on the ones that can be stabilized by polymerization (polymerized vesicles). Next, we will introduce the still relatively young field of superamphiphiles, macromolecules consisting of a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic polymeric block. Finally, and this constitutes the main part of this Account, we will provide an overview of a new class of amphiphiles, the so-called giant amphiphiles. These macromolecules have an enzyme or protein as the polar head group

  14. The effect of surfactant and solid phase concentration on drug aggregates in model aerosol propellent suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bower, C; Washington, C; Purewal, T S

    1996-04-01

    The effect of increasing solid phase concentration on the morphology and flocculation rate of model aerosol suspensions has been investigated. Suspensions of micronized salbutamol sulphate and lactose in trichlorotrifluoroethane (P113) were studied under conditions of increasing shear stress. By use of image analysis techniques, measurement of aggregate size, fractal dimension and rate of aggregation was performed. The effect of the surfactant sorbitan monooleate on morphology and flocculation rate was also studied. Increased solid phase concentration caused an increase in the rate of aggregation and average aggregate size at a given value of shear stress. Surfactant addition retarded the aggregation rate, and caused a shift from a diffusion-limited cluster aggregation to a reaction-limited cluster aggregation mechanism. The aggregate profiles showed a corresponding change from rugged and crenellated without surfactant, to increasingly smooth and Euclidian with increasing surfactant concentration. The morphological changes were characterized by a decrease in the average boundary fractal dimension which also correlated well with the corresponding reduction in aggregation rate.

  15. Size dependent fractal aggregation mediated through surfactant in silica nanoparticle solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2012-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles in presence of cationic surfactant (DTAB) in aqueous solution. The measurements were carried out for different sizes of nanoparticles (8.2, 16.4 and 26.4 nm) at fixed (1 wt%) nanoparticles and surfactant concentration. It is found that the adsorption of surfactant micelles on the silica nanoparticles leads to the aggregation of nanoparticles, which is characterized by a fractal structure. The number of adsorbed micelles on nanoparticle increases from 7 to 152 with the increase in the size of the nanoparticle from 8.2 to 26.4 nm, whereas interestingly the fractal dimension remains same. The aggregate morphology in these systems is expected to be governed by the diffusion limited aggregation.

  16. Surfactant-induced aggregation patterns of thiazole orange: a photophysical study.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Pal, Haridas; Mohanty, Jyotirmayee

    2011-10-18

    The aggregation behavior of the DNA marker dye thiazole orange (TO), has been investigated in two types of surfactant assemblies, namely, premicelles/micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and pre reverse micelles/reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT). In the case of an SDS/water system, absorption spectral changes of TO signify the formation of H-aggregates and H-dimers of the dye at premicellar concentrations, which subsequently convert to the monomeric form beyond the critical micellar concentration (cmc). Interestingly, the observed changes in the absorption and emission characteristics due to the surfactant-induced formation of H-aggregates/dimers of TO are found to be useful to estimate the surfactant concentration parameters for premicellar aggregation of SDS. In the case of an AOT/n-heptane system, similarly, H-aggregates/dimers are observed at low AOT concentrations, below the cmc. However, in this case, the H-dimers persist even beyond the cmc. This is attributed to the strong tendency of TO for self-aggregation and its favorable electrostatic interactions with the AOT head groups. With increasing water content in the AOT reverse micelles, the hydration of the dye leads to the conversion of H-dimers to the monomeric form. The steady-state fluorescence results are nicely corroborated with those from time-resolved fluorescence studies and demonstrate the interesting behavior of the surfactant-induced aggregation of TO dye.

  17. Supercritical or compressed CO2 as a stimulus for tuning surfactant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianling; Han, Buxing

    2013-02-19

    Surfactant assemblies have a wide range of applications in areas such as the chemical industry, material science, biology, and enhanced oil recovery. From both theoretical and practical perspectives, researchers have focused on tuning the aggregation behaviors of surfactants. Researchers commonly use solid and liquid compounds such as cosurfactants, acids, salts, and alcohols as stimuli for tuning the aggregation behaviors. However, these additives can present economic and environmental costs and can contaminate or modify the product. Therefore researchers would like to develop effective methods for tuning surfactant aggregation with easily removable, economical, and environmentally benign stimuli. Supercritical or compressed CO(2) is abundant, nontoxic, and nonflammable and can be recycled easily after use. Compressed CO(2) is quite soluble in many liquids, and the solubility depends on pressure and temperature. Therefore researchers can continuously influence the properties of liquid solvents by controlling the pressure or temperature of CO(2). In this Account, we briefly review our recent studies on tuning the aggregation behaviors of surfactants in different media using supercritical or compressed CO(2). Supercritical or compressed CO(2) serves as a versatile regulator of a variety of properties of surfactant assemblies. Using CO(2), we can switch the micellization of surfactants in water, adjust the properties of reverse micelles, enhance the stability of vesicles, and modify the switching transition between different surfactant assemblies. We can also tune the properties of emulsions, induce the formation of nanoemulsions, and construct novel microemulsions. With these CO(2)-responsive surfactant assemblies, we have synthesized functional materials, optimized chemical reaction conditions, and enhanced extraction and separation efficiencies. Compared with the conventional solid or liquid additives, CO(2) shows some obvious advantages as an agent for modifying

  18. Modeling Aggregation of Ionic Surfactants Using a Smeared Charge Approximation in Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Runfang; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2015-09-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, we explore the specifics of micellization in the solutions of anionic and cationic surfactants and their mixtures. Anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) are chosen as characteristic examples. Coarse-grained models of the surfactants are constructed and parameterized using a combination of atomistic molecular simulation and infinite dilution activity coefficient calibration. Electrostatic interactions of charged beads are treated using a smeared charge approximation: the surfactant heads and dissociated counterions are modeled as beads with charges distributed around the bead center in an implicit dielectric medium. The proposed models semiquantitatively describe self-assembly in solutions of SDS and CTAB at various surfactant concentrations and molarities of added electrolyte. In particular, the model predicts a decline in the free surfactant concentration with the increase of the total surfactant loading, as well as characteristic aggregation transitions in single-component surfactant solutions caused by the addition of salt. The calculated values of the critical micelle concentration reasonably agree with experimental observations. Modeling of catanionic SDS-CTAB mixtures show consecutive transitions to worm-like micelles and then to vesicles caused by the addition of CTAB to micellar solution of SDS. PMID:26241704

  19. Rational controlled morphological transitions in the self-assembled multi-headed giant surfactants in solution.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Xinlin; Mu, Gaoyan; Zhang, Baofang; Li, Yiwen; Cheng, Stephen Z D; Liu, Tianbo

    2016-07-01

    A series of multi-headed giant surfactants based on polystyrene (PS)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane(s) (POSS) conjugates, with a different number and topology of POSS heads, are found to self-assemble into different supramolecular structures including vesicles, cylindrical and spherical micelles in H2O/DMF mixed solvents. The transitions among different morphologies can be rationally controlled by tuning the number and topology of POSS heads, as well as the macromolecular concentration. PMID:27331607

  20. Model calculations on the transitions between surfactant aggregates on different shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, J.C.; Ljunggren, S. )

    1990-05-01

    In a series of papers published earlier, the authors presented theories about the formation of surfactant micelles which include detailed treatments of the mechanics, surface thermodynamics, and small system thermodynamics of spherical, rod-shaped, and disk-shaped aggregates. In the present paper, they develop a calculation scheme which yields the volume fractions of the various kinds of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles and also of SDS vesicles, at different solution states. The familiar hierarchy of surfactant aggregates of different shapes is generated automatically upon raising the salt concentration, i.e., without introducing any extraneous packing or geometrical constraints, and is due to the more rapid decrease of the electrostatic free energy for the less curved aggregate surfaces.

  1. Effects of molecular architectures and solvophobic additives on the aggregative properties of polymeric surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yung-Lung; Wu, Ming-Zher; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2012-03-01

    The aggregative behavior of the polymeric surfactants with various molecular architectures in dilute solutions is studied by dissipative particle dynamics. The effects of the solvophobic/solvophilic length, polymeric architecture (linear, star, dendritic, and cyclic type), chain rigidity, and solvophobic additives on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the aggregative patterns are systematically investigated. It is found that molecular architectures have a noteworthy impact on the aggregative properties. For linear diblock copolymers, the CMC declines with increasing solvophobic length but rises with increasing solvophilic length. Nonetheless, the solvophobic group has comparatively greater influence on the CMC. Imposition of the star, dendritic, or cyclic structures onto the solvophobic or solvophilic parts of the polymeric surfactant leads to an increase in the CMC. On the contrary, polymers imposed with the greater degree of the rigidity on the solvophobic or solvophilic block have lower CMC. The addition of solvophobic additives results in a decrease of CMC as well. The effects of the concentration and length of the additives on the aggregative behaviors of polymer surfactants were investigated. Interesting supramolecular structures such as caterpillar and worm-like micelles were observed.

  2. Inhibitory effect of copper nanoparticles on rosin modified surfactant induced aggregation of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ishtikhar, Mohd; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Gull, Nuzhat; Badr, Gamal; Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with many serious diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Protein aggregation is a primary problem related with the health of industrial workers who work with the surfactants, metal ions, and cosolvents. We have synthesized rosin-based surfactants, i.e., quaternary amines of rosin diethylaminoethyl esters (QRMAE), which is an ester of rosin acid with polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Here, we report the thermal aggregation of lysozyme induced by QRMAE at 65 °C and pH 7.4 for a given time period in which amorphous aggregates are formed and confirm that copper-nanoparticles have the ability to inhibit QRMAE-induced aggregation compared with zinc and silver-nanoparticles. Aggregation experiments was evaluated using several spectroscopic methods and dye binding assay, such as turbidity, Rayleigh light scattering, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), Thioflavin T (Th T), congo red (CR) and circular dichroism (CD), that was further supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM with EDX. The therapeutic use of nanoparticles and the fact that rosin possesses excellent film-forming properties, and that its derivatives have pharmaceuticals application such as micro encapsulation, coating and film forming, it's matrix materials are used for sustained and controlled release tablets, renders importance and application to the present study.

  3. Giant Surfactants based on Precisely Functionalized POSS Nano-atoms: Tuning from Crystals to Frank-Kasper Phases and Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    In creating new functional materials for advanced technologies, precisely control over functionality and their hierarchical ordered structures are vital for obtaining the desired properties. Giant polyhedra are a class of materials which are designed and constructed via deliberately placing precisely functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) and fullerene (C60) molecular nano-particles (MNPs) (so-called ``nano-atoms'') at the vertices of a polyhedron. Giant surfactants are consisted of polymer tail-tethered ``nano-atoms'' which are deliberately and precisely functionalized POSS or C60 molecular nano-particles (MNPs). The ``nano-atom'' heads and polymer tails thus have drastic chemical differences to impart amphiphilicity. These giant surfactants capture the essential structural features of their small-molecule counterparts in many ways but possess much larger sizes, and therefore, they are recognized as size-amplified versions of small molecule surfactants. Two of the most illustrating examples are a series of novel giant tetrahedra and a series of giant giant surfactants as building blocks to construct into hierarchical ordered super-lattice structures ranging from crystals, Frank-Kasper phases and quasicrystals in the condensed bulk states, reveals evidently the interconnections between soft matters and hard matters in sharing their common structures and fundamental knowledge. This work was supported by National Science Foundation (DMR-1409972).

  4. Fluorescence probe studies of the effect of concentration on the state of aggregation of surfactants in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lianos, P.; Zana, R.

    1981-11-01

    The results obtained in this study indicate that the aggregation numbers of a zwitterionic surfactant where the charges are well separated, and of various ionic surfactants, are independent of the surfactant concentration from the critical micelle concentration to ca. 0.3 M. In the absence of added salts these n values are consistent with the quasi-spherical oil drop model for micelles. The n values obtained for a zwitterionic surfactant where the 2 charges nearly neutralize each other and for a nonionic surfactant are large, and probably indicative of rod-like micelles. In addition the aggregation number for the nonionic surfactant has been found to increase with concentration, in the concentration range investigated. The values of the 14/13 ratio confirm that pyrene is solubilized preferentially in the micelle palisade layer rather than in the hydrophobic core. 41 references.

  5. Interfacial aggregation of a nonionic surfactant: Effect on the stability of silica suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano-Palmino, F.; Denoyel, R.; Rouquerol, J. . Centre de thermodynamique et Microcalorimetrie)

    1994-06-01

    Nonionic surfactants are in widespread use in technological applications such as flotation, detergency, suspension stabilization (paints, ceramic preparation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics), and enhanced oil recovery. The adsorption of the nonionic surfactant TX 100 in two silica suspensions (Ludox HS40 and Syton W30) has been studied with the aim of relating the structure of the adsorbed layer to the stability of the suspension. First, a thermodynamic study based on the determination of adsorption isotherms and displacement enthalpies as a function of pH and solid/liquid ratio was carried out and lead to the conclusion that such a surfactant forms micelle-like aggregates on the silica surface. Then, a stability study based on visual observation, turbidimetry, and particle size determination (by photon correlation spectroscopy) was performed in order to determine the TX 100 concentration range in which flocculation occurs. Considering that the surface is covered with micelle-like aggregates in the flocculation range and that the [zeta]-potential (determined by microelectrophoresis) has varied only slightly at the onset of flocculation, it is concluded that the flocculation mechanism is a bridging of particles by surface micelles. This bridging of particles by aggregates similar in size and shape could be an explanation of the presence, in such systems, of optimum flocculation at half surface coverage.

  6. Thermodynamics of Micellization of Surfactants of Low Aggregation Number: The Aggregation of Propranolol Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Mosquera; Ruso; Attwood; Jones; Prieto; Sarmiento

    1999-02-01

    The self-association of propranolol hydrochloride in aqueous solution has been studied as a function of temperature. The critical concentration (C*) and the degree of ionization (alpha) were determined by conductivity measurements at temperatures over the range 298.15 to 313.15 K. The enthalpy change on aggregation in water was measured by microcalorimetry. To calculate changes in the thermodynamic properties of aggregation the mass action model for high and low aggregation numbers was applied, the latter model giving better agreement between experimental and theoretical enthalpy changes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Phase transition analogous to Bose-Einstein condensation in systems of noninteracting surfactant aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, José A.; Sear, Richard P.

    2002-03-01

    Ideal bosons and a classical system of monomers that aggregate forming noninteracting ring polymers are known to have the same partition function. So, the ring polymers have a phase transition, the analogue of Bose-Einstein condensation of bosons. At this phase transition macroscopic polymers are formed. The link between these systems is made via Feynman's path integrals: these integrals are the same for the trajectories of the bosons in imaginary time and for the configurations of the polymers. We show that a transition of this general form occurs within a whole class of aggregating systems. Examples are the lamellae formation in suspensions of disclike micelles or the emulsification failure observed in water-oil-surfactant emulsions. As with bosons, the transition occurs even when aggregates do not interact. The λ-transition in 4He is believed to be Bose-Einstein condensation modified by interatomic interactions. We suggest that interaggregate interactions too only modify the transition we have found.

  8. Quantitation of tricyclic antidepressant drugs based on the formation of mixed aggregates with surfactants.

    PubMed

    San Andrés, M P; Sicilia, D; Rubio, S; Pérez-Bendito, D

    1998-07-01

    A new approach for the quantitation of drugs, based on the measurement of the critical micelle concentration of mixed surfactant-drug aggregates, is proposed. This methodology involves the photometric titration of drugs in an aqueous medium using a surfactant as titrant. The Coomassie Brilliant Blue G (CBBG) dye, negatively charged, is used as a photometric probe. The analytical applicability of this approach is demonstrated by quantifying tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as imipramine, desimipramine, amitriptylin, and nortriptylin. Aggregates studied included TCA-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TCA-Triton X-100 mixtures. Because of the opposite charge of TCAs and SDS, which causes strong synergistic effects in the mixture relative to the properties of their individual components, this anionic surfactant was selected for the quantitation of TCAs. Pharmaceutical preparations can be analyzed directly after dissolution of the samples in water or ethanol. The detection limit achieved for the studied drugs is about 0.12 mg L-1, so the proposed method surpasses existing alternative photometric methods in sensitivity and features a detection limit similar to fluorimetric methods. The relative standard deviation for 0.8 mg L-1 of TCA is 2.6%.

  9. Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants: automatic vertical alignment of nematic liquid crystal for the remote-controllable optical device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Yoon; Lee, Sang-A; Kang, Dong-Gue; Park, Minwook; Choi, Yu-Jin; Jeong, Kwang-Un

    2015-03-25

    Photoresponsive carbohydrate-based giant surfactants (abbreviated as CELAnD-OH) were specifically designed and synthesized for the automatic vertical alignment (VA) layer of nematic (N) liquid crystal (LC), which can be applied for the fabrication of remote-controllable optical devices. Without the conventional polymer-based LC alignment process, a perfect VA layer was automatically constructed by directly adding the 0.1 wt % CELA1D-OH in the N-LC media. The programmed CELA1D-OH giant surfactants in the N-LC media gradually diffused onto the substrates of LC cell and self-assembled to the expanded monolayer structure, which can provide enough empty spaces for N-LC molecules to crawl into the empty zones for the construction of VA layer. On the other hand, the CELA3D-OH giant surfactants forming the condensed monolayer structure on the substrates exhibited a planar alignment (PA) rather than a VA. Upon tuning the wavelength of light, the N-LC alignments were reversibly switched between VA and PA in the remote-controllable LC optical devices. Based on the experimental results, it was realized that understanding the interactions between N-LC molecules and amphiphilic giant surfactants is critical to design the suitable materials for the automatic LC alignment.

  10. Rosin Surfactant QRMAE Can Be Utilized as an Amorphous Aggregate Inducer: A Case Study of Mammalian Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Ishtikhar, Mohd; Chandel, Tajjali Ilm; Ahmad, Aamir; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Al-Lohadan, Hamad A; Atta, Ayman M; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary amine of diethylaminoethyl rosin ester (QRMAE), chemically synthesized biocompatible rosin based cationic surfactant, has various biological applications including its use as a food product additive. In this study, we examined the amorphous aggregation behavior of mammalian serum albumins at pH 7.5, i.e., two units above their isoelectric points (pI ~5.5), and the roles played by positive charge and hydrophobicity of exogenously added rosin surfactant QRMAE. The study was carried out on five mammalian serum albumins, using various spectroscopic methods, dye binding assay, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The thermodynamics of the binding of mammalian serum albumins to cationic rosin modified surfactant were established using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was observed that a suitable molar ratio of protein to QRMAE surfactant enthusiastically induces amorphous aggregate formation at a pH above two units of pI. Rosin surfactant QRMAE-albumins interactions revealed a unique interplay between the initial electrostatic and the subsequent hydrophobic interactions that play an important role towards the formation of hydrophobic interactions-driven amorphous aggregate. Amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with varying diseases, from the formation of protein wine haze to the expansion of the eye lenses in cataract, during the expression and purification of recombinant proteins. This study can be used for the design of novel biomolecules or drugs with the ability to neutralize factor(s) responsible for the aggregate formation, in addition to various other industrial applications.

  11. Rosin Surfactant QRMAE Can Be Utilized as an Amorphous Aggregate Inducer: A Case Study of Mammalian Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ishtikhar, Mohd; Chandel, Tajjali Ilm; Ahmad, Aamir; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Al-lohadan, Hamad A.; Atta, Ayman M.; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary amine of diethylaminoethyl rosin ester (QRMAE), chemically synthesized biocompatible rosin based cationic surfactant, has various biological applications including its use as a food product additive. In this study, we examined the amorphous aggregation behavior of mammalian serum albumins at pH 7.5, i.e., two units above their isoelectric points (pI ~5.5), and the roles played by positive charge and hydrophobicity of exogenously added rosin surfactant QRMAE. The study was carried out on five mammalian serum albumins, using various spectroscopic methods, dye binding assay, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The thermodynamics of the binding of mammalian serum albumins to cationic rosin modified surfactant were established using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was observed that a suitable molar ratio of protein to QRMAE surfactant enthusiastically induces amorphous aggregate formation at a pH above two units of pI. Rosin surfactant QRMAE-albumins interactions revealed a unique interplay between the initial electrostatic and the subsequent hydrophobic interactions that play an important role towards the formation of hydrophobic interactions-driven amorphous aggregate. Amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with varying diseases, from the formation of protein wine haze to the expansion of the eye lenses in cataract, during the expression and purification of recombinant proteins. This study can be used for the design of novel biomolecules or drugs with the ability to neutralize factor(s) responsible for the aggregate formation, in addition to various other industrial applications. PMID:26418451

  12. Rosin Surfactant QRMAE Can Be Utilized as an Amorphous Aggregate Inducer: A Case Study of Mammalian Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Ishtikhar, Mohd; Chandel, Tajjali Ilm; Ahmad, Aamir; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Al-Lohadan, Hamad A; Atta, Ayman M; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary amine of diethylaminoethyl rosin ester (QRMAE), chemically synthesized biocompatible rosin based cationic surfactant, has various biological applications including its use as a food product additive. In this study, we examined the amorphous aggregation behavior of mammalian serum albumins at pH 7.5, i.e., two units above their isoelectric points (pI ~5.5), and the roles played by positive charge and hydrophobicity of exogenously added rosin surfactant QRMAE. The study was carried out on five mammalian serum albumins, using various spectroscopic methods, dye binding assay, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The thermodynamics of the binding of mammalian serum albumins to cationic rosin modified surfactant were established using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was observed that a suitable molar ratio of protein to QRMAE surfactant enthusiastically induces amorphous aggregate formation at a pH above two units of pI. Rosin surfactant QRMAE-albumins interactions revealed a unique interplay between the initial electrostatic and the subsequent hydrophobic interactions that play an important role towards the formation of hydrophobic interactions-driven amorphous aggregate. Amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with varying diseases, from the formation of protein wine haze to the expansion of the eye lenses in cataract, during the expression and purification of recombinant proteins. This study can be used for the design of novel biomolecules or drugs with the ability to neutralize factor(s) responsible for the aggregate formation, in addition to various other industrial applications. PMID:26418451

  13. Protein binding-induced surfactant aggregation variation: a new strategy of developing fluorescent aqueous sensor for proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenting; Ding, Liping; Cao, Jianhua; Liu, Lili; Wei, Yuting; Fang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Novel strategies of developing fluorescent sensors for proteins are highly demanded. In this work, we particularly synthesized a cholesterol-derivatized pyrene probe. Its fluorescence emission is effectively tuned by the aggregation state of a cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). The used probe/DTAB assemblies exhibit highly sensitive ratiometric responses to pepsin and ovalbumin egg (o-egg) with detection limits of 4.8 and 18.9 nM, respectively. The fluorescence changes indicate the protein-surfactant interaction leads to further aggregation of DTAB assemblies. The results from Tyndall effect and dynamic light scattering verify this assumption. The responses to pepsin and o-egg are due to their strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interaction with DTAB assemblies at pH 7.4. The present noncovalent supramolecular sensor represents a novel and simple strategy for sensing proteins, which is based on the encapsulated fluorophore probing the aggregation variation of the surfactant assemblies.

  14. Lipid extraction mediates aggregation of carbon nanospheres in pulmonary surfactant monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tongtao; Xu, Yan; Li, Shixin; Zhang, Xianren; Huang, Fang

    2016-07-28

    Increasing evidence indicates that carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), which mainly originate from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, have an adverse impact on the respiratory system. Recent in vivo experiments have shown that the pulmonary toxicity of CNPs is attributed to their aggregation in pulmonary surfactant monolayers (PSMs) while the underlying mechanism of aggregation remains unclear. Here, by performing coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate for the first time that the aggregation of carbon nanospheres (CNSs) in PSMs is in fact size-dependent and mediated by lipid extractions. Upon CNS deposition, neighbouring lipid molecules are extracted from PSMs to cover CNSs from the top side. The extracted lipids induce clustering of CNSs to maximize the CNS-lipid interaction, by forming inverse micelles to wrap the aggregated CNSs cooperatively. The formed CNS clusters perturb the molecule structure of the PSM and thus affect its biofunction on respiration. Our simulations show that during the expiration process, CNSs form clusters that perturb the mechanical properties of the PSM in a manner depending on the CNS size. With deep inspiration, a high concentration of large CNSs may induce PSM rupture and thus have a potential impact on its biophysical properties. PMID:27353041

  15. Physicochemical perspectives (aggregation, structure and dynamics) of interaction between pluronic (L31) and surfactant (SDS).

    PubMed

    Prameela, G K S; Phani Kumar, B V N; Pan, A; Aswal, V K; Subramanian, J; Mandal, A B; Moulik, S P

    2015-11-11

    The influence of the water soluble non-ionic tri-block copolymer PEO-PPO-PEO [poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide)] i.e., E2P16E2 (L31) on the microstructure and self-aggregation dynamics of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution was investigated using cloud point (CP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. CP provided the thermodynamic information on the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes pertaining to the phase separation of the system at elevated temperature. The ITC and NMR self-diffusion measurements helped to understand the nature of the binding isotherms of SDS in the presence of L31 in terms of the formation of mixed aggregates and free SDS micelles in solution. EPR analysis provided the micro-viscosity of the spin probe 5-DSA in terms of rotational correlation time. The SANS study indicated the presence of prolate ellipsoidal mixed aggregates, whose size increased with the increasing addition of L31. At a large [L31], SANS also revealed the progressive decreasing size of the ellipsoidal mixed aggregates of SDS-L31 into nearly globular forms with the increasing SDS addition. Wrapping of the spherical SDS micelles by L31 was also corroborated from (13)C NMR and SANS measurements. PMID:26523917

  16. Static and Dynamic Aspects of Surfactant Surface Aggregates studied by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schniepp, Hannes; Saville, Dudley; Aksay, Ilhan

    2006-03-01

    Using AFM, we show that surfactants form micellar aggregates of varying morphology, depending on the surface structure. While all previous studies were limited to atomically flat substrates, we achieve imaging the micelles on rough gold. By gradually annealing these surfaces, we show the influence of roughness on the aggregate structures. For crystalline gold (111), aligned, hemi-cylindrical micelles that recognize the symmetry axes of the gold lattice are found. With increasing roughness, the degree of organization of the aggregates decreases. We also show that the micellar pattern on HOPG and gold(111) surfaces changes with time and responds to perturbations in a self-healing way. Our results suggest that this organization happens at the molecular scale. Theoretical analysis for HOPG, however, show that the micelle orientation cannot be explained on the molecular level, but the anisotropic van der Waals interaction between micelles and HOPG has to be considered as well [1]. [1] Saville, D. A.; Chun, J.; Li, J.-L.; Schniepp, H. C.; Car, R.; Aksay, I. A., accepted by Physical Review Letters.

  17. Unique influence of cholesterol on modifying the aggregation behavior of surfactant assemblies: investigation of photophysical and dynamical properties of 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3'-diol, BP(OH)2 in surfactant micelles, and surfactant/cholesterol forming vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surajit; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Banik, Debasis; Kundu, Niloy; Roy, Arpita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-08-01

    The binding and rotational properties of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) fluorophore, 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3'-diol, BP(OH)2 has been investigated in alkyltrimethylammonium bromide containing (CnTAB, n = 12, 14, and 16) micelles and alkyltrimethylammonium bromide/cholesterol (CnTAB (n = 14 and 16)/cholesterol) forming vesicles using fluorescence-based spectroscopy techniques. The formation of thermodynamically stable unilamellar self-assemblies of alkyltrimethylammonium bromide/cholesterol are characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Individually, aqueous solutions of all these alkyltrimethylammonium bromide form micelles after certain surfactant concentration (critical micelle concentration, cmc) of surfactant, whereas cholesterol molecules are insoluble in water. But with the variation of the cholesterol-to-surfactant molar ratio (Q = [cholesterol]/[surfactant]), uniform distribution of vesicular aggregates in aqueous solution can be obtained. The micelle-to-vesicle transition of surfactant solution upon addition of cholesterol also influences the steady state emission profile, fluorescence lifetime, and rotational dynamics of BP(OH)2 molecule. The diketo tautomer of BP(OH)2 molecule gets stabilized as the concentration of surfactant increases in aqueous solution. Fluorescence lifetime and rotational time constant of the BP(OH)2 molecule are also influenced by the variation of alkyl chain length of surfactant molecule. The emission quantum yield (Φ) is also found to be sensitive with surfactant concentration, variation in chain length of surfactants, and it saturates after the cmc of surfactants. The rigid and restricted microenvironment of vesicle bilayer enhance the lifetime and also rotational relaxation of BP(OH)2 significantly. The rotational behavior of BP(OH)2 in surfactant/cholesterol self-assemblies is also explained by using analytical parameters related to time

  18. Determination of anionic surface active agents using silica coated magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic surfactant aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Duarte, Regina M B O; Trindade, Tito; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-07-19

    The development of a novel methodology for extraction and preconcentration of the most commonly used anionic surface active agents (SAAs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), is presented herein. The present method, based on the use of silica-magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic surfactant aggregates, was developed for determination of C10-C13 LAS homologues. The proposed methodology allowed quantitative recoveries of C10-C13 LAS homologues by using a reduced amount of magnetic nanoparticles. Limits of detection were in the range 0.8-1.9μgL(-1) for C10-C13 LAS homologues, while the repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 2.0 to 3.9% (N=6). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of a variety of natural water samples.

  19. Mechanisms of Ag as a surfactant in giant magnetoresistance multilayer growth and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yukai; Zhang, Hongdi; Dai, Bo; Mai, Zhenhong; Cai, Jianwang; Wu, Zhonghua

    2006-07-01

    The mechanisms played by Ag as a surfactant in giant magnetoresistance multilayers were investigated using interface sensitive x-ray anomalous scattering techniques. Analysis on [Cu/Ni70Co30]20 and [Cu/Ag/Ni70Co30]20 multilayers revealed that 6Å thick NiCu and 6Å thick CuNi3Co intermixing regions are formed at the Ni70Co30-on-Cu interfaces of undoped and Ag-doped multilayers, respectively. The Cu-on-Ni70Co30 interfaces in both multilayers are sharp. Annealing causes severe diffusion across both types of interfaces in the undoped multilayer. But the interfaces in the Ag-doped multilayer do not change significantly upon annealing, except that Ag atoms diffuse into the whole Ni70Co30 layer and some parts of the Cu layer. The results suggest that addition of Ag during the deposition suppresses interfacial intermixing. X-ray diffuse scattering profiles show that the interfacial lateral correlation length of the Ag-doped multilayer is longer than that of the undoped multilayer and does not change significantly after annealing, suggesting that the addition of Ag gives rise to smoother interfaces and results in a good thermal stability.

  20. Effective short-range Coulomb correction to model the aggregation behavior of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Mármol, J Javier; Solans, Conxita; Patti, Alessandro

    2016-06-21

    We present a short-range correction to the Coulomb potential to investigate the aggregation of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solutions. The proposed modification allows to quantitatively reproduce the distribution of counterions above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) or, equivalently, the degree of ionization, α, of the micellar clusters. In particular, our theoretical framework has been applied to unveil the behavior of the cationic surfactant C24H49N2O2 (+) CH3SO4 (-), which offers a wide range of applications in the thriving and growing personal care market. A reliable and unambiguous estimation of α is essential to correctly understand many crucial features of the micellar solutions, such as their viscoelastic behavior and transport properties, in order to provide sound formulations for the above mentioned personal care solutions. We have validated our theory by performing extensive lattice Monte Carlo simulations, which show an excellent agreement with experimental observations. More specifically, our coarse-grained model is able to reproduce and predict the complex morphology of the micelles observed at equilibrium. Additionally, our simulation results disclose the existence of a transition from a monodisperse to a bidisperse size distribution of aggregates, unveiling the intriguing existence of a second CMC. PMID:27334191

  1. Effective short-range Coulomb correction to model the aggregation behavior of ionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Mármol, J. Javier; Solans, Conxita; Patti, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    We present a short-range correction to the Coulomb potential to investigate the aggregation of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solutions. The proposed modification allows to quantitatively reproduce the distribution of counterions above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) or, equivalently, the degree of ionization, α, of the micellar clusters. In particular, our theoretical framework has been applied to unveil the behavior of the cationic surfactant C24H49N2O2+ CH3SO4-, which offers a wide range of applications in the thriving and growing personal care market. A reliable and unambiguous estimation of α is essential to correctly understand many crucial features of the micellar solutions, such as their viscoelastic behavior and transport properties, in order to provide sound formulations for the above mentioned personal care solutions. We have validated our theory by performing extensive lattice Monte Carlo simulations, which show an excellent agreement with experimental observations. More specifically, our coarse-grained model is able to reproduce and predict the complex morphology of the micelles observed at equilibrium. Additionally, our simulation results disclose the existence of a transition from a monodisperse to a bidisperse size distribution of aggregates, unveiling the intriguing existence of a second CMC.

  2. Effective short-range Coulomb correction to model the aggregation behavior of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Mármol, J Javier; Solans, Conxita; Patti, Alessandro

    2016-06-21

    We present a short-range correction to the Coulomb potential to investigate the aggregation of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solutions. The proposed modification allows to quantitatively reproduce the distribution of counterions above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) or, equivalently, the degree of ionization, α, of the micellar clusters. In particular, our theoretical framework has been applied to unveil the behavior of the cationic surfactant C24H49N2O2 (+) CH3SO4 (-), which offers a wide range of applications in the thriving and growing personal care market. A reliable and unambiguous estimation of α is essential to correctly understand many crucial features of the micellar solutions, such as their viscoelastic behavior and transport properties, in order to provide sound formulations for the above mentioned personal care solutions. We have validated our theory by performing extensive lattice Monte Carlo simulations, which show an excellent agreement with experimental observations. More specifically, our coarse-grained model is able to reproduce and predict the complex morphology of the micelles observed at equilibrium. Additionally, our simulation results disclose the existence of a transition from a monodisperse to a bidisperse size distribution of aggregates, unveiling the intriguing existence of a second CMC.

  3. Giant Raman scattering from J-aggregated dyes inside carbon nanotubes for multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaufrès, E.; Tang, N. Y.-Wa; Lapointe, F.; Cabana, J.; Nadon, M.-A.; Cottenye, N.; Raymond, F.; Szkopek, T.; Martel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy uses visible light to acquire vibrational fingerprints of molecules, thus making it a powerful tool for chemical analysis in a wide range of media. However, its potential for optical imaging at high resolution is severely limited by the fact that the Raman effect is weak. Here, we report the discovery of a giant Raman scattering effect from encapsulated and aggregated dye molecules inside single-walled carbon nanotubes. Measurements performed on rod-like dyes such as α-sexithiophene and β-carotene, assembled inside single-walled carbon nanotubes as highly polarizable J-aggregates, indicate a resonant Raman cross-section of (3 +/- 2) × 10-21 cm2 sr-1, which is well above the cross-section required for detecting individual aggregates at the highest optical resolution. Free from fluorescence background and photobleaching, this giant Raman effect allows the realization of a library of functionalized nanoprobe labels for Raman imaging with robust detection using multispectral analysis.

  4. Hybrid surfactants decorated with copper ions: aggregation behavior, antimicrobial activity and anti-proliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep; Hassan, P A; Aswal, V K

    2016-09-14

    In the present study, the emphasis is laid on the self aggregation behavior of copper based inorganic-organic hybrids in aqueous media. The two complexes, cationic hexadecyl pyridinium trichloro cuprate (1 : 1), [Cp](+)[CuCl3](-), and bishexadecylpyridinium tetrachloro cuprate (2 : 1), [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-), were synthesized using the ligand insertion method. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The copper complexes were found to be thermally stable, and in the solid state, they possessed the perovskite arrangement with [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-) exhibiting superior stability and crystallinity. The self aggregation behavior of the prepared complexes was analyzed in solution phase (in aqueous medium) using surface tension, conductivity, XRD and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the presence of copper as a co-ion in both the stoichiometries results in lower critical micellization concentrations than their precursor. Micellization was thermodynamically spontaneous and micelles formed were ellipsoidal in shape and underwent a prolate ellipsoidal growth with an increase in the concentration of metallosurfactant, as estimated from the SANS. Furthermore, these metallosurfactants were investigated for biocompatibility (using hemolytic assay), antimicrobial activity (fungus and bacteria) and cytotoxicity using human cancerous cells. The hemolysis activity was found to depend on the aggregated state of the metallosurfactants, displaying the highest activity in the monomeric state, and the minimum for post micellar concentrations. The surfactants were found to enhance the antibacterial activity by twofold or more, with the addition of metal in both the stoichiometries. On the contrary, for anticancer and antifungal activities, barely any regular trend or generalization could be obtained

  5. Hybrid surfactants decorated with copper ions: aggregation behavior, antimicrobial activity and anti-proliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep; Hassan, P A; Aswal, V K

    2016-09-14

    In the present study, the emphasis is laid on the self aggregation behavior of copper based inorganic-organic hybrids in aqueous media. The two complexes, cationic hexadecyl pyridinium trichloro cuprate (1 : 1), [Cp](+)[CuCl3](-), and bishexadecylpyridinium tetrachloro cuprate (2 : 1), [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-), were synthesized using the ligand insertion method. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The copper complexes were found to be thermally stable, and in the solid state, they possessed the perovskite arrangement with [Cp2](2+)[CuCl4](2-) exhibiting superior stability and crystallinity. The self aggregation behavior of the prepared complexes was analyzed in solution phase (in aqueous medium) using surface tension, conductivity, XRD and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the presence of copper as a co-ion in both the stoichiometries results in lower critical micellization concentrations than their precursor. Micellization was thermodynamically spontaneous and micelles formed were ellipsoidal in shape and underwent a prolate ellipsoidal growth with an increase in the concentration of metallosurfactant, as estimated from the SANS. Furthermore, these metallosurfactants were investigated for biocompatibility (using hemolytic assay), antimicrobial activity (fungus and bacteria) and cytotoxicity using human cancerous cells. The hemolysis activity was found to depend on the aggregated state of the metallosurfactants, displaying the highest activity in the monomeric state, and the minimum for post micellar concentrations. The surfactants were found to enhance the antibacterial activity by twofold or more, with the addition of metal in both the stoichiometries. On the contrary, for anticancer and antifungal activities, barely any regular trend or generalization could be obtained

  6. Enhanced Molecular Recognition between Nucleobases and Guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) by Surfactant Aggregates in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang; Wang, Dong; Cao, Meiwen; Han, Yuchun; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yilin

    2015-07-15

    Only specific base pairs on DNA can bind with each other through hydrogen bonds, which is called the Watson-Crick (W/C) pairing rule. However, without the constraint of DNA chains, the nucleobases in bulk aqueous solution usually do not follow the W/C pairing rule anymore because of the strong competitive effect of water and the multi-interaction edges of nucleobases. The present work applied surfactant aggregates noncovalently functionalized by nucleotide to enhance the recognition between nucleobases without DNA chains in aqueous solution, and it revealed the effects of their self-assembling ability and morphologies on the recognition. The cationic ammonium monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric surfactants DTAB, 12-3-12, and 12-3-12-3-12 were chosen. The surfactants with guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) form micelles, vesicles, and fingerprint-like and plate-like aggregates bearing the hydrogen-bonding sites of GMP, respectively. The binding parameters of these aggregates with adenine (A), uracil (U), guanine (G), and cytosine(C) indicate that the surfactants can promote W/C recognitions in aqueous solution when they form vesicles (GMP/DTAB) or plate-like aggregates (GMP/12-3-12) with proper molecular packing compactness, which not only provide hydrophobic environments but also shield non-W/C recognition edges. However, the GMP/12-3-12 micelles with loose molecular packing, the GMP/12-3-12 fingerprint-like aggregates where the hydrogen bond sites of GMP are occupied by itself, and the GMP/12-3-12-3-12 vesicles with too strong self-assembling ability cannot promote W/C recognition. This work provides insight into how to design self-assemblies with the performance of enhanced molecule recognition.

  7. Self-aggregation of cationic dimeric surfactants in water-ionic liquid binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martín, Victoria Isabel; Rodríguez, Amalia; Laschewsky, André; Moyá, María Luisa

    2014-09-15

    The micellization of four dimeric cationic surfactants ("gemini surfactants") derived from N-dodecyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride was studied in pure water and in water-ionic liquid (IL) solutions by a wide range of techniques. The dimeric surfactants are distinguished by their rigid spacer groups separating the two surfactant motifs, which range from C3 to C5 in length. In order to minimize organic ion pairing effects as well as the role of the ionic liquids as potential co-surfactants, ILs with inorganic hydrophilic anions and organic cations of limited hydrophobicity were chosen, namely ethyl, butyl, and hexyl-3-imidazolium chlorides. (1)H NMR two-dimensional, 2D, rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy measurements, ROESY, supported this premise. The spacer nature hardly affects the micellization process, neither in water nor in water-IL solutions. However, it does influence the tendency of the dimeric surfactants to form elongated micelles when surfactant concentration increases. In order to have a better understanding of the ternary water-IL surfactant systems, the micellization of the surfactants was also studied in aqueous NaCl solutions, in water-ethylene glycol and in water-formamide binary mixtures. The combined results show that the ionic liquids play a double role in the mixed systems, operating simultaneously as background electrolytes and as polar organic solvents. The IL role as organic co-solvent becomes more dominant when its concentration increases, and when the IL alkyl chain length augments.

  8. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  9. Aggregation behaviors of gelatin with cationic gemini surfactant at air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Guiying; Feng, Yujun; Li, Yiming

    2007-03-10

    The dilational rheological properties of gelatin with cationic gemini surfactant 1,2-ethane bis(dimethyl dodecyl ammonium bromide) (C(12)C(2)C(12)) at air/water interface were investigated using oscillating barriers method at low frequency (0.005-0.1 Hz), which was compared with single-chain surfactant dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). The results indicate that the maximum dilational modulus and the film stability of gelatin-C(12)C(2)C(12) are higher than those of gelatin-DTAB. At high concentration of C(12)C(2)C(12) or DTAB, the dilational modulus of gelatin-surfactant system becomes close to that corresponding to pure surfactant, suggesting gelatin at interface is replaced by surfactant. This replacement is also observed by surface tension measurement. However, it is found that gelatin-C(12)C(2)C(12) system has two obvious breaks but gelatin-DTAB has not in surface tension isotherms. These phenomena are ascribed to the double charges and strong hydrophobicity of C(12)C(2)C(12). Based on these experimental results, a mechanism of gelatin-surfactant interaction at air/water interface is proposed.

  10. Ecotoxicities of polyquaterniums and their associated polyelectrolyte-surfactant aggregates (PSA) to Gambusia holbrooki.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Janet L; Hawker, Darryl W; Nugent, Kerry W; Chapman, Heather F

    2008-02-01

    The toxicity of 11 polyquaterniums used in cosmetic applications, and polydimethyldiallylammonium chloride (poly(DADMAC)) were studied for toxicity of the polyquaternium alone, and of a polyquaternium/anionic surfactant complex as occurs in some cosmetic formulations. The surfactant used in the study was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which is used in cosmetic formulations under its International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI) name Sodium Laurel Sulfate. In fish immobilization studies with Gambusia holbrooki, the EC(50) of the polyquaternium/surfactant complex was found to be the same as or similar to the EC(50) for the polyquaternium alone. The toxicity of the polyquaterniums investigated was similar to the published values for other cationic polyelectrolytes and cationic surfactants, in the range from < 1.0 to 10 mg/L, with the exception of low charge density cellulosic polyquaterniums. The anionic surfactant alone was not toxic to fish in the concentration range tested. Results thus showed the toxicity of the polyquaternium was not mitigated by the presence of the anionic surfactant.

  11. Ecotoxicities of polyquaterniums and their associated polyelectrolyte-surfactant aggregates (PSA) to Gambusia holbrooki.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Janet L; Hawker, Darryl W; Nugent, Kerry W; Chapman, Heather F

    2008-02-01

    The toxicity of 11 polyquaterniums used in cosmetic applications, and polydimethyldiallylammonium chloride (poly(DADMAC)) were studied for toxicity of the polyquaternium alone, and of a polyquaternium/anionic surfactant complex as occurs in some cosmetic formulations. The surfactant used in the study was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which is used in cosmetic formulations under its International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI) name Sodium Laurel Sulfate. In fish immobilization studies with Gambusia holbrooki, the EC(50) of the polyquaternium/surfactant complex was found to be the same as or similar to the EC(50) for the polyquaternium alone. The toxicity of the polyquaterniums investigated was similar to the published values for other cationic polyelectrolytes and cationic surfactants, in the range from < 1.0 to 10 mg/L, with the exception of low charge density cellulosic polyquaterniums. The anionic surfactant alone was not toxic to fish in the concentration range tested. Results thus showed the toxicity of the polyquaternium was not mitigated by the presence of the anionic surfactant. PMID:18172802

  12. Aggregation-Induced FRET via Polymer-Surfactant Complexation: A New Strategy for the Detection of Spermine.

    PubMed

    Malik, Akhtar Hussain; Hussain, Sameer; Iyer, Parameswar Krishnan

    2016-07-19

    A new water-soluble cationic conjugated polymer [9,9-bis(6'-methyl imidazolium bromide)hexyl)fluorene-co-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PFBT-MI) was designed and synthesized via Suzuki cross-coupling polymerization in good yields without any tedious purification steps. PFBT-MI showed excellent photophysical responses toward SDS and SDBS with a detection limit of 0.12 μM/(34 ppb) and 0.13 μM/(45 ppb), respectively. Furthermore, occurrence of FRET from the donor (fluorene) to acceptor (BT units), via surfactant-induced aggregation, results in naked-eye detection of these common anionic surfactants (SDS/SDBS) as the color changes from blue to yellowish green in aqueous solution. The polymer-surfactant nanoaggregates thus formed via electrostatic as well as hydrophobic interactions have been explored for the sensitive detection of spermine (considered as an excellent biomarker for early cancer diagnosis) with a detection limit of 66 ppb (0.33 μM), which is much below the range 1-10 μM pertinent for the early diagnosis of cancer in urinary samples. This highly sensitive technique would facilitate the direct and noninvasive detection of spermine from urine rapidly and is likely to have great significance in early cancer diagnosis. PMID:27322621

  13. Cationic Porphyrin-Anionic Surfactant Mixtures for the Promotion of Self-Organized 1:4 Ion Pairs in Water with Strong Aggregation Properties.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Vincent; Bijani, Christian; Stigliani, Jean-Luc; Blanzat, Muriel; Rico-Lattes, Isabelle; Pratviel, Geneviève

    2015-12-21

    We performed a systematic study on the spectroscopic and aggregation properties of stoichiometric mixtures (1:4) of the tetracationic meso-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridinium)porphyrin (H2 TMPyP) and three sodium alkylsulfate surfactants (tetradecyl, hexadecyl, and octadecylsulfate) in an aqueous solution. The objective was to build a supramolecular aggregate, which would favor the internalization of tetracationic porphyrins in cells without chemical modification of the structure of the porphyrin. We show that stoichiometric H2 TMPyP/alkylsulfate (1:4) mixtures lead to the formation of large hollow spherical aggregates (60-160 nm). The TEM images show that the membrane of these aggregates are composed of smaller aggregates, which are probably rod-like micelles. These rod-like micelles have a hydrophobic core composed of the alkyl chains of the alkylsulfate surfactant, whereas the charged surface corresponds to the tetracationic porphyrins.

  14. Determination of the aggregation number and charge of ionic surfactant micelles from the stepwise thinning of foam films.

    PubMed

    Anachkov, Svetoslav E; Danov, Krassimir D; Basheva, Elka S; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Ananthapadmanabhan, Kavssery P

    2012-11-15

    The stepwise thinning (stratification) of liquid films, which contain micelles of an ionic surfactant, depends on the micelle aggregation number, N(agg), and charge, Z. Vice versa, from the height of the step and the final film thickness one can determine N(agg), Z, and the degree of micelle ionization. The determination of N(agg) is based on the experimental fact that the step height is equal to the inverse cubic root of the micelle concentration. In addition, Z is determined from the final thickness of the film, which depends on the concentration of counterions dissociated from the micelles in the bulk. The method is applied to micellar solutions of six surfactants, both anionic and cationic: sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), sodium laurylethersulfates with 1 and 3 ethylene oxide groups (SLES-1EO and SLES-3EO), and potassium myristate. The method has the following advantages: (i) N(agg) and Z are determined simultaneously, from the same set of experimental data; (ii) N(agg) and Z are determined for each given surfactant concentration (i.e. their concentration dependence is obtained), and (iii) N(agg) and Z can be determined even for turbid solutions, like those of carboxylates, where the micelles coexist with acid-soap crystallites, so that the application of other methods is difficult. The results indicate that the micelles of greater aggregation number have a lower degree of ionization, which can be explained with the effect of counterion binding. The proposed method is applicable to the concentration range, in which the films stratify and the micelles are spherical. This is satisfied for numerous systems representing scientific and practical interest.

  15. Determination of the aggregation number and charge of ionic surfactant micelles from the stepwise thinning of foam films.

    PubMed

    Anachkov, Svetoslav E; Danov, Krassimir D; Basheva, Elka S; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Ananthapadmanabhan, Kavssery P

    2012-11-15

    The stepwise thinning (stratification) of liquid films, which contain micelles of an ionic surfactant, depends on the micelle aggregation number, N(agg), and charge, Z. Vice versa, from the height of the step and the final film thickness one can determine N(agg), Z, and the degree of micelle ionization. The determination of N(agg) is based on the experimental fact that the step height is equal to the inverse cubic root of the micelle concentration. In addition, Z is determined from the final thickness of the film, which depends on the concentration of counterions dissociated from the micelles in the bulk. The method is applied to micellar solutions of six surfactants, both anionic and cationic: sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), sodium laurylethersulfates with 1 and 3 ethylene oxide groups (SLES-1EO and SLES-3EO), and potassium myristate. The method has the following advantages: (i) N(agg) and Z are determined simultaneously, from the same set of experimental data; (ii) N(agg) and Z are determined for each given surfactant concentration (i.e. their concentration dependence is obtained), and (iii) N(agg) and Z can be determined even for turbid solutions, like those of carboxylates, where the micelles coexist with acid-soap crystallites, so that the application of other methods is difficult. The results indicate that the micelles of greater aggregation number have a lower degree of ionization, which can be explained with the effect of counterion binding. The proposed method is applicable to the concentration range, in which the films stratify and the micelles are spherical. This is satisfied for numerous systems representing scientific and practical interest. PMID:22935484

  16. The effect of the spacer rigidity on the aggregation behavior of two ester-containing Gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Peizhu; Guo, Yimin; Yang, Yan; Chen, Zhiyun; Wang, Xiaoyong; An, Xueqin; Shen, Weiguo

    2012-08-01

    Two Gemini surfactants with very similar structure but different spacer rigidity, namely 1-dodecanaminium,N,N'-[[(2E)-1,4-dioxo-2-butene-1,4-diyl]bis(oxy-2,1-ethanediyl)]bis[N,N-dimethyl-,bromide] (12-fo-12) and 1-dodecanaminium, N,N'-[(1,4-dioxo-1,4-butanediyl)bis(oxy-2,1-ethanediyl)] bis[N,N-dimethyl-, bromide] (12-su-12), and their monomeric counterpart 1-dodecanaminium, N-[2-(acetyloxy)ethyl]-N,N-dimethyl-, bromide (DTAAB) were synthesized and their aggregation behavior in aqueous solutions was studied by measurements of surface tension, conductivity, isothermal titration calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the Krafft point of 12-fo-12 was 18.6°C, significantly higher than that of 12-su-12 (7.6°C) and DTAAB (<0°C). The minimum surface areas per surfactant A(min) at the water-air interface of DTAAB, 12-su-12, and 12-fo-12 were determined. It was found that the value of A(min) of DTAAB was larger than half that of 12-su-12 but smaller than half that of 12-fo-12. The values of the degree of association β of the three surfactants were found to be in a sequence of DTAAB>12-su-12>12-fo-12, which was in accord with the sequence of the entropy of micellization. The enthalpies of micellization of the two Gemini surfactants were found to be more negative than double that of DTAAB, and 12-fo-12 had the most negative standard enthalpy of micellization. It was also found that 12-su-12 and DTAAB formed micelles in aqueous solutions, while 12-fo-12 could form micelles and vesicles dependent on the concentration.

  17. Effect of surfactants on the removal and acute toxicity of aqueous nC60 aggregates in water treatment process.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ling; Kirumba, George; Zhang, Bo; Pal, Amrita; He, Yiliang

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the effect of surfactants on the removal of aqueous nC60 aggregates by coagulation-filtration process and assess the acute toxicity of filtrates by Microtox test. Three surfactants including cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and Triton X-100 (TX100) were selected representing cationic, anionic, and nonionic types, respectively. Results showed that the change of physicochemical properties of nC60 associating with different types of surfactants determined nC60's removal efficiency and acute toxicity. CTAB increased the number of large particles. It also changed the zeta potential of nC60 from negative to positive, leading to the low removal rates (17.3-50.2%) when CTAB concentration was designed in the range of 0.03-1 g/L, and the filtrates showed acute toxicity to bioluminescent bacteria (inhibition rate > 80%). On the contrary, TX100 obviously increased the proportion of small particles, and it is noteworthy that even less than 1 mg/L of nC60 (20% of the initial concentration) with TX100 remaining in filtrates could evoke phototoxicity due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation under UV irradiation. Compared to CTAB and TX100, SDS exerted an effect on the removal process and toxicity of nC60 only when concentration was beyond the critical micelle concentration (CMC; 2.5 g/L). These findings collectively suggest that characteristics of nC60 are flexible and strongly dependent on surfactant modification, as a result of which these particles could potentially find their way through water treatment route and exert a potential toxicity risk.

  18. Interaction of giant extracellular Glossoscolex paulistus hemoglobin (HbGp) with ionic surfactants: a MALDI-TOF-MS study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marilene Silva; Moreira, Leonardo Marmo; Tabak, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    The giant extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (HbGp) is constituted by approximately 144 subunits containing heme groups with molecular masses in the range of 16-19kDa forming a monomer (d) and a trimer (abc), and around 36 non-heme structures, named linkers (L). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis was performed recently, to obtain directly information on the molecular masses of the different subunits from HbGp in the oxy-form. This technique demonstrated structural similarity between HbGp and the widely studied hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt). Indeed, two major isoforms (d(1) and d(2)) of identical proportions with masses of 16,355+/-25 and 16,428+/-24Da, respectively, and two minor isoforms (d(3) and d(4)) with masses around 16.6kDa were detected for monomer d of HbGp. In the present work, the effects of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cationic cethyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) on the oligomeric structure of HbGp have been studied by MALDI-TOF-MS in order to evaluate the interaction between ionic surfactants and HbGp. The data obtained with this technique show an effective interaction of cationic surfactant CTAC with the two isoforms of monomer d, d(1) and d(2), both in the whole protein as well as in the pure isolated monomer. The results show that up to 10 molecules of CTAC are bound to each isoform of the monomer. Differently, the mass spectra obtained for SDS-HbGp system showed that the addition of the anionic surfactant SDS does not originate any mass increment of the monomeric subunits, indicating that SDS-HbGp interaction is, probably, significantly less effective as compared to CTAC-HbGp one. The acid pI of the protein around 5.5 is, probably, responsible for this behavior. The results of this work suggest also some interaction of both surfactants with linker chains as well as with trimers, as judged from observed mass increments. Our data are consistent with a recent

  19. Interactions of Divalent and Trivalent Metal Counterions with Anionic Sulfonate Gemini Surfactant and Induced Aggregate Transitions in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang; Cao, Meiwen; Chen, Yao; Fan, Yaxun; Wang, Dong; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yilin

    2016-05-01

    Interactions of multivalent metal counterions with anionic sulfonate gemini surfactant 1,3-bis(N-dodecyl-N-propanesulfonate sodium)-propane (C12C3C12(SO3)2) and the induced aggregate transitions in aqueous solution have been studied. Divalent metal ions Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) and trivalent metal ions Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Cr(3+) were chosen. The results indicate that the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of C12C3C12(SO3)2 is greatly reduced by the ions, and the aggregate morphologies of C12C3C12(SO3)2 are adjusted by changing the nature and molar ratio of the metal ions. These metal ions can be classified into four groups because the ions in each group have very similar interaction mechanisms with C12C3C12(SO3)2: (I) Cu(2+) and Zn(2+); (II) Ca(2+), Mn(2+) and Mg(2+); (III) Ni(2+) and Co(2+); and (IV) Cr(3+), Al(3+) and Fe(3+). Cu(2+), Mg(2+), Ni(2+), and Al(3+) then were selected as representatives for each group to further study their interaction with C12C3C12(SO3)2. C12C3C12(SO3)2 interacts with the multivalent metal ions by electrostatic interaction and coordination interaction. C12C3C12(SO3)2 forms prolate micelles and plate-like micelles with Cu(2+), vesicles and wormlike micelles with Al(3+) or Ni(2+), and viscous three-dimensional network structure with Mg(2+). Moreover, precipitation does not take place in aqueous solution even at a high ion/surfactant ratio. The related mechanisms have been discussed. The present work provides guidance on how to apply the anionic surfactant into the solutions containing the multivalent metal ions, and those aggregates may have potential usage in separating heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  20. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures.

  1. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures. PMID:27043221

  2. [Aggregation Behavior of Collagen-Based Surfactant Molecules in Aqueous Solutions Based on Synchronization Fluorescence Spectrum Technology].

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-hu; Tian, Zhen-hua; Liu, Wen-tao; Li, Guo-ying

    2016-01-01

    Due to the intrinsic fluorescence characteristic of tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe), synchronization fluorescence spectrum technology which adopted the constant wavelength difference (Δλ = 15 nm) was selected to investigate the effects of collagen-based surfactant (CBS) concentration, pH, NaCt concentration and temperature on the aggregation state of CBS molecules in aqueous solutions. Meanwhile, temperature-dependent two-dimensional (2D) synchronization fluorescence correlation analyses was used to investigate the variation order of Tyr and Phe residues in CBS molecules with the change of temperature. The results showed that the characteristic absorption peaks located at 261 and 282 nm were attributed to Phe and Tyr, respectively. With the increase of CBS concentration, the amount of Phe and Tyr residues increased gradually which resulted in the increase of aggregate degree of CBS molecules and then led to the increase of fluorescence intensity. When the pH value (pH 5.0) of CBS solutions was close to the isoelectric point of CBS, the aggregate degree of CBS molecules increased due to the increase of the hydrophobic interaction and the formation ability of hydrogen bond. Additionally, with the increase of NaCl concentration, the repulsion force for inter/intra-molecules of CBS decreased, which helped to improve the aggregation behavior of CBS molecules. However, with the increase of temperature, the aggregation state of CBS was changed to be monomolecular state, and then resulted in the decrease of the fluorescence intensity gradually due to the quenching, the denaturation and the decrease of hydrogen bond formation ability. Furthermore, temperature-dependent 2D synchronization fluorescence correlation spectroscopy demonstrated that at lower temperature (10-40 degrees C), the aggregate state of CBS changed to be loose state and then Phe residues located in the inside of the aggregate varied before Tyr residues; while in the heating process of 45

  3. Static and Dynamic Microscopy of the Chemical Stability and Aggregation State of Silver Nanowires in Components of Murine Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Ioannis G; Botelho, Danielle; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D; Shaffer, Milo S P; Gow, Andrew; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E

    2015-07-01

    The increase of production volumes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and of consumer products incorporating them may lead to increased health risks from occupational and public exposures. There is currently limited information about the putative toxicity of AgNWs upon inhalation and incomplete understanding of the properties that control their bioreactivity. The lung lining fluid (LLF), which contains phospholipids and surfactant proteins, represents a first contact site with the respiratory system. In this work, the impact of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Curosurf, and murine LLF on the stability of AgNWs was examined. Both the phospholipid and protein components of the LLF modified the dissolution kinetics of AgNWs, due to the formation of a lipid corona or aggregation of the AgNWs. Moreover, the hydrophilic proteins, but neither the hydrophobic surfactant proteins nor the phospholipids, induced agglomeration of the AgNWs. Finally, the generation of a secondary population of nanosilver was observed and attributed to the reduction of Ag(+) ions by the surface capping of the AgNWs. Our findings highlight that combinations of spatially resolved dynamic and static techniques are required to develop a holistic understanding of which parameters govern AgNW behavior at the point of exposure and to accurately predict their risks on human health and the environment.

  4. Static and dynamic microscopy of the chemical stability and aggregation state of silver nanowires in components of murine pulmonary surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Botelho, Danielle; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Gow, Andrew; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2016-01-01

    The increase of production volumes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and of consumer products incorporating them, may lead to increased health risks from occupational and public exposures. There is currently limited information about the putative toxicity of AgNWs upon inhalation, and incomplete understanding of the properties that control their bioreactivity. The lung lining fluid (LLF), which contains phospholipids and surfactant proteins, represents a first contact site with the respiratory system. In this work, the impact of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Curosurf® and murine LLF on the stability of AgNWs was examined. Both the phospholipid and protein components of the LLF modified the dissolution kinetics of AgNWs, due to the formation of a lipid corona or aggregation of the AgNWs. Moreover, the hydrophilic, but neither the hydrophobic surfactant proteins nor the phospholipids, induced agglomeration of the AgNWs. Finally, the generation of a secondary population of nano-silver was observed and attributed to the reduction of Ag+ ions by the surface capping of the AgNWs. Our findings highlight that combinations of spatially resolved dynamic and static techniques are required to develop a holistic understanding of which parameters govern AgNW behavior at the point of exposure and to accurately predict their risks on human health and the environment. PMID:26061974

  5. Effects of Added Salts on Surface Tension and Aggregation of Crown Ether Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maki; Fujio, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Two crown ether surfactants, dodecanoyloxymethyl- (C11Φ6) and octanoyloxymethyl-18-crown-6 (C7Φ6), were synthesized and the surface tension dependence on surfactant concentration of their aqueous solutions was measured both in the absence and presence of alkali chlorides to confirm the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is highest for the added cation that have an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of the crown ether ring and that several break points on the surface tension vs. concentration curves occur for these crown ether surfactants. For C11Φ6 and C7Φ6, in the absence of salt, the surface tension vs. concentration curves had two break points. Using the solubilization of a water-insoluble dye as an indicator, we found that the break point at the higher concentration (m0) for C7Φ6 was due to micelle formation. Two break points were also observed for the aqueous solution of C11Φ6 in the presence of NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl salts at concentrations of 0.22 mol kg(-1) and for C7Φ6 with 0.22 mol kg(-1) KCl added. The CMC (m0) was found to be the highest for solutions containing K(+) salts because K(+) has an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of 18-crown-6 ring. Furthermore, the CMC decreased as the ionic diameters of the added cations deviated from the hole size. The molecular areas at two break points, estimated by the Gibbs adsorption isotherm, except for that at the break point at mI of C7Φ6, were very small for an adsorbed monolayer. Further investigation is required to elucidate the reason for the break point at mI. PMID:26666275

  6. Effects of Added Salts on Surface Tension and Aggregation of Crown Ether Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maki; Fujio, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Two crown ether surfactants, dodecanoyloxymethyl- (C11Φ6) and octanoyloxymethyl-18-crown-6 (C7Φ6), were synthesized and the surface tension dependence on surfactant concentration of their aqueous solutions was measured both in the absence and presence of alkali chlorides to confirm the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is highest for the added cation that have an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of the crown ether ring and that several break points on the surface tension vs. concentration curves occur for these crown ether surfactants. For C11Φ6 and C7Φ6, in the absence of salt, the surface tension vs. concentration curves had two break points. Using the solubilization of a water-insoluble dye as an indicator, we found that the break point at the higher concentration (m0) for C7Φ6 was due to micelle formation. Two break points were also observed for the aqueous solution of C11Φ6 in the presence of NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl salts at concentrations of 0.22 mol kg(-1) and for C7Φ6 with 0.22 mol kg(-1) KCl added. The CMC (m0) was found to be the highest for solutions containing K(+) salts because K(+) has an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of 18-crown-6 ring. Furthermore, the CMC decreased as the ionic diameters of the added cations deviated from the hole size. The molecular areas at two break points, estimated by the Gibbs adsorption isotherm, except for that at the break point at mI of C7Φ6, were very small for an adsorbed monolayer. Further investigation is required to elucidate the reason for the break point at mI.

  7. Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy as a practical method of investigating the formation of aggregates in aqueous solutions of dyes and surfactants.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Helinando P; de Melo, Celso P

    2011-06-01

    Molecular aggregation plays a key role in the physicochemical properties of dyes and surfactants. In this work, we show that electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) provides a practical method for the investigation of processes such as micellization in surfactants and dye dimerization. The electrical characterization of the structural phase transitions associated with aggregation events in these systems allows an accurate and direct determination of relevant parameters such as the corresponding critical concentrations for micelle formation and dimerization of these types of molecules, without the need of recurring to the use of auxiliary probe or reporter molecules. Because of its competitive advantages with respect to currently used methods (such as conductimetry and spectroscopic techniques), we argue that when implemented along the procedures described in this work, EIS becomes a simple and convenient technique for the characterization of aggregation processes in soft matter.

  8. Structure and dynamics of surfactant and hydrocarbon aggregates on graphite: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Haataja, Mikko

    2008-03-13

    We have examined the structure and dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecane (C12) molecular aggregates at varying surface coverages on the basal plane of graphite via classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that graphite-hydrocarbon chain interactions favor specific molecular orientations at the single-molecule level via alignment of the tail along the crystallographic directions. This orientational bias is reduced greatly upon increasing the surface coverage for both molecules due to intermolecular interactions, leading to very weak bias at intermediate surface coverages. Interestingly, for complete monolayers, we find a re-emergent orientational bias. Furthermore, by comparing the SDS behavior with C12, we demonstrate that the charged head group plays a key role in the aggregate structures: SDS molecules display a tendency to form linear file-like aggregates while C12 forms tightly bound planar ones. The observed orientational bias for SDS molecules is in agreement with experimental observations of hemimicelle orientation and provides support for the belief that an initial oriented layer governs the orientation of hemimicellar aggregates.

  9. Aggregation of Congo red with surfactants and Ag-nanoparticles in an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Thabaiti, Shaeel Ahmed; Aazam, Elham Shafik; Khan, Zaheer; Bashir, Ommer

    2016-03-01

    Self aggregation, sorption, and interaction of Congo red, with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), Ag+ ions and silver nanoparticles have been determined spectrophotometrically. Congo red self-aggregation was identified from UV-visible spectra due to the shrinkage in an absorption band at 495 nm. The shape of the absorbance spectrum changed entirely with increasing [Congo red] but wavelength maxima remain unchanged. The molar absorptivity was found to be 9804 mol- 1 dm3 cm- 1 at 495 nm. Absorption spectra of Congo red with Ag+ ions show an isosbestic point. The complex formation constant and difference in absorption coefficients were found to be 8.5 × 104 mol- 1 dm3 and 11,764 mol- 1 dm3 cm- 1, respectively. Silver nano-particles could not be used for the catalytic degradation of Congo red because it results in the formation of a strong complex with them. Sodium dodecylsulfate did not show any significant interaction with this dye. Congo red was also used as a probe to determine the critical micellar concentration of CTAB.

  10. Photoinduced electron transfer reaction in polymer-surfactant aggregates: Photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and 7-amino coumarin dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2008-05-28

    Photoinduced electron transfer between coumarin dyes and N,N-dimethylaniline has been investigated by using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles and PVP-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (SDS) polymer-surfactant aggregates. A slower rate of electron transfer is observed in PVP-SDS aggregates than in polymer-free SDS micelles. A Marcus type inversion is observed in the correlation of free energy change in comparison with the electron transfer rate. The careful investigation reveals that C-151 deviates from the normal Marcus inverted region compared to its analogs C-152 and C-481 due to slower rotational relaxation and smaller translational diffusion coefficient.

  11. Dielectric Analysis for the Spherical and Rodlike Micelle Aggregates Formed from a Gemini Surfactant: Driving Forces of Micellization and Stability of Micelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Kongshuang

    2016-08-01

    The self-aggregation behavior of Gemini surfactant 12-2-12 (ethanediyl-1,2-bis(dimethyldodecylammonium bromide)) in water was investigated by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) over a frequency range from 40 Hz to 110 MHz. Dielectric determination shows that well-defined spherical micelles formed when the concentration of the surfactant was above a critical micelle concentration CMC1 of 3 mM and rodlike micelles formed above CMC2, 16 mM. The formation mechanism of the spherical micelles and their transition mechanism to clubbed micelles were proposed by calculating the degree of counterion binding of the micelles. The interactions between the head groups and the hydrophobic chains of the surfactant led to the formation of the micelles, whereas the transition is mainly attributed to the interaction among the hydrophobic chains. By analyzing the dielectric relaxation observed at about 10(7) Hz based on the interface polarization theory, the permittivity and conductivity of micelle aggregates (spherical and clubbed) and volume fraction of micelles were calculated theoretically as well as the electrical properties of the solution medium. Furthermore, we also calculated the electrokinetic parameters of the micelle particle surface, surface conductivity, surface charge density, and zeta potential, using the relaxation parameters and phase parameters. On the basis of these results, the balance of forces controlling morphological transitions, interfacial electrokinetic properties, and the stability of the micelle aggregates was discussed. PMID:27396495

  12. Interaction of n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside with giant magnetic-fluid-loaded phosphatidylcholine vesicles: direct visualization of membrane curvature fluctuations as a function of surfactant partitioning between water and lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2010-10-01

    The present study deals with the morphological modifications of giant dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles (DOPC GUVs) induced by the nonionic surfactant n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside at sublytic levels, i.e., in the first steps of the vesicle-to-micelle transition process, when surfactant inserts into the vesicle bilayer without disruption. Experimental conditions were perfected to exactly control the surfactant bilayer composition of the vesicles, in line with former work focused on the mechanical properties of the membrane of magnetic-fluid-loaded DOPC GUVs submitted to a magnetic field. The purpose here was to systematically examine, in the absence of any external mechanical constraint, the dynamics of giant vesicle shape and membrane deformations as a function of surfactant partitioning between the aqueous phase and the lipid membrane, beforehand established by turbidity measurements from small unilamellar vesicles. PMID:20825201

  13. Spawning aggregation behavior and reproductive ecology of the giant bumphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, in a remote marine reserve.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Roldan C; Zgliczynski, Brian J; Teer, Bradford Z; Laughlin, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    The giant bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) has experienced precipitous population declines throughout its range due to its importance as a highly-prized fishery target and cultural resource. Because of its diet, Bolbometopon may serve as a keystone species on Indo-Pacific coral reefs, yet comprehensive descriptions of its reproductive ecology do not exist. We used a variety of underwater visual census (UVC) methods to study an intact population of Bolbometopon at Wake Atoll, a remote and protected coral atoll in the west Pacific. Key observations include spawning activities in the morning around the full and last quarter moon, with possible spawning extending to the new moon. We observed peaks in aggregation size just prior to and following the full and last quarter moon, respectively, and observed a distinct break in spawning at the site that persisted for four days; individuals returned to the aggregation site one day prior to the last quarter moon and resumed spawning the following day. The mating system was lek-based, characterized by early male arrival at the spawning site followed by vigorous defense (including head-butting between large males) of small territories. These territories were apparently used to attract females that arrived later in large schools, causing substantial changes in the sex ratio on the aggregation site at any given time during the morning spawning period. Aggression between males and courtship of females led to pair spawning within the upper water column. Mating interference was not witnessed but we noted instances suggesting that sperm competition might occur. Densities of Bolbometopon on the aggregation site averaged 10.07(±3.24 SE) fish per hectare (ha) with maximum densities of 51.5 fish per ha. By comparing our observations to the results of biennial surveys conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), we confirmed spatial consistency of the aggregation

  14. Spawning aggregation behavior and reproductive ecology of the giant bumphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, in a remote marine reserve

    PubMed Central

    Zgliczynski, Brian J.; Teer, Bradford Z.; Laughlin, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    The giant bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) has experienced precipitous population declines throughout its range due to its importance as a highly-prized fishery target and cultural resource. Because of its diet, Bolbometopon may serve as a keystone species on Indo-Pacific coral reefs, yet comprehensive descriptions of its reproductive ecology do not exist. We used a variety of underwater visual census (UVC) methods to study an intact population of Bolbometopon at Wake Atoll, a remote and protected coral atoll in the west Pacific. Key observations include spawning activities in the morning around the full and last quarter moon, with possible spawning extending to the new moon. We observed peaks in aggregation size just prior to and following the full and last quarter moon, respectively, and observed a distinct break in spawning at the site that persisted for four days; individuals returned to the aggregation site one day prior to the last quarter moon and resumed spawning the following day. The mating system was lek-based, characterized by early male arrival at the spawning site followed by vigorous defense (including head-butting between large males) of small territories. These territories were apparently used to attract females that arrived later in large schools, causing substantial changes in the sex ratio on the aggregation site at any given time during the morning spawning period. Aggression between males and courtship of females led to pair spawning within the upper water column. Mating interference was not witnessed but we noted instances suggesting that sperm competition might occur. Densities of Bolbometopon on the aggregation site averaged 10.07(±3.24 SE) fish per hectare (ha) with maximum densities of 51.5 fish per ha. By comparing our observations to the results of biennial surveys conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), we confirmed spatial consistency of the aggregation

  15. Spawning aggregation behavior and reproductive ecology of the giant bumphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, in a remote marine reserve.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Roldan C; Zgliczynski, Brian J; Teer, Bradford Z; Laughlin, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    The giant bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) has experienced precipitous population declines throughout its range due to its importance as a highly-prized fishery target and cultural resource. Because of its diet, Bolbometopon may serve as a keystone species on Indo-Pacific coral reefs, yet comprehensive descriptions of its reproductive ecology do not exist. We used a variety of underwater visual census (UVC) methods to study an intact population of Bolbometopon at Wake Atoll, a remote and protected coral atoll in the west Pacific. Key observations include spawning activities in the morning around the full and last quarter moon, with possible spawning extending to the new moon. We observed peaks in aggregation size just prior to and following the full and last quarter moon, respectively, and observed a distinct break in spawning at the site that persisted for four days; individuals returned to the aggregation site one day prior to the last quarter moon and resumed spawning the following day. The mating system was lek-based, characterized by early male arrival at the spawning site followed by vigorous defense (including head-butting between large males) of small territories. These territories were apparently used to attract females that arrived later in large schools, causing substantial changes in the sex ratio on the aggregation site at any given time during the morning spawning period. Aggression between males and courtship of females led to pair spawning within the upper water column. Mating interference was not witnessed but we noted instances suggesting that sperm competition might occur. Densities of Bolbometopon on the aggregation site averaged 10.07(±3.24 SE) fish per hectare (ha) with maximum densities of 51.5 fish per ha. By comparing our observations to the results of biennial surveys conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), we confirmed spatial consistency of the aggregation

  16. Fluorescence of aminofluoresceins as an indicative process allowing one to distinguish between micelles of cationic surfactants and micelle-like aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O.; Cheipesh, Tatiana A.; Roshal, Alexander D.; Doroshenko, Andrey O.; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A.

    2016-09-01

    Among the vast set of fluorescein derivatives, the double charged R2‑ anions of aminofluoresceins are known to exhibit only low quantum yields of fluorescence, \\varphi . The \\varphi value becomes as high as that of the fluorescein dianion when the lone electron pair of the amino group is involved in a covalent bond. According to Munkholm et al (1990 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 112 2608–12), a much smaller increase in the emission intensity can be observed in the presence of surfactant micelles. However, all these observations refer to aqueous or alcoholic solvents. In this paper, we show that in the non-hydrogen bond donor (or ‘aprotic’) solvents DMSO and acetone, the quantum yields, φ, of the 4‧- (or 5‧)-aminofluorescein R2‑ species amount to 61–67% and approach that of fluorescein (φ  =  87%), whereas in water φ is only 0.6–0.8%. In glycerol, a solvent with an extremely high viscosity, the φ value is only 6–10%. We report on the enhancement of the fluorescence of the aminofluorescein dianions as an indicative process, which allows us to distinguish between the micelle-like aggregates of cationic dendrimers of low generation, common spherical surfactant micelles, and surfactant bilayers. Some of these colloidal aggregates partly restore the fluorescence of aminofluoresceins in aqueous media. By contrast, other positively charged micellar-like aggregates do not enhance the quantum yield of aminofluorescein R2‑ species. Results for several related systems, such as CTAB-coated SiO2 particles and reverse microemulsions, are briefly described, and the possible reasons for the observed phenomena are discussed.

  17. Fluorescence of aminofluoresceins as an indicative process allowing one to distinguish between micelles of cationic surfactants and micelle-like aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O.; Cheipesh, Tatiana A.; Roshal, Alexander D.; Doroshenko, Andrey O.; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A.

    2016-09-01

    Among the vast set of fluorescein derivatives, the double charged R2- anions of aminofluoresceins are known to exhibit only low quantum yields of fluorescence, \\varphi . The \\varphi value becomes as high as that of the fluorescein dianion when the lone electron pair of the amino group is involved in a covalent bond. According to Munkholm et al (1990 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 112 2608-12), a much smaller increase in the emission intensity can be observed in the presence of surfactant micelles. However, all these observations refer to aqueous or alcoholic solvents. In this paper, we show that in the non-hydrogen bond donor (or ‘aprotic’) solvents DMSO and acetone, the quantum yields, φ, of the 4‧- (or 5‧)-aminofluorescein R2- species amount to 61-67% and approach that of fluorescein (φ  =  87%), whereas in water φ is only 0.6-0.8%. In glycerol, a solvent with an extremely high viscosity, the φ value is only 6-10%. We report on the enhancement of the fluorescence of the aminofluorescein dianions as an indicative process, which allows us to distinguish between the micelle-like aggregates of cationic dendrimers of low generation, common spherical surfactant micelles, and surfactant bilayers. Some of these colloidal aggregates partly restore the fluorescence of aminofluoresceins in aqueous media. By contrast, other positively charged micellar-like aggregates do not enhance the quantum yield of aminofluorescein R2- species. Results for several related systems, such as CTAB-coated SiO2 particles and reverse microemulsions, are briefly described, and the possible reasons for the observed phenomena are discussed.

  18. Interaction of Fe(III)- and Zn(II)-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrins with ionic and nonionic surfactants: aggregation and binding.

    PubMed

    Gandini, S C; Yushmanov, V E; Tabak, M

    2001-07-01

    Interactions of the water soluble Fe(III)- and Zn(II)-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrins, FeTPPS(4) and ZnTPPS(4), with ionic and nonionic micelles in aqueous solutions have been studied by optical absorption, fluorescence, resonance light-scattering (RLS), and 1H NMR spectroscopies. The presence of three different species of both Fe(III)- and Zn(II)TPPS(4) in cationic cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) solution has been unequivocally demonstrated: free metalloporphyrin monomers or dimers (pH 9), metalloporphyrin monomers or aggregates (possibly micro-oxo dimers) bound to the micelles, and nonmicellar metalloporphyrin/surfactant aggregates. The surfactant:metalloporphyrin ratio for the maximum nonmicellar aggregate formation is around 5-8 for Fe(III)TPPS(4) both at pH 4.0 and 9.0; for Zn(II)TPPS(4) this ratio is 8, and the spectral changes are practically independent of pH. In the case of zwitterionic N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (HPS) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (Brij-35) and t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyetanol (Triton X-100), the nonmicellar aggregates were not observed in the pH range from 2.0 to 12.0. Binding constants were calculated from optical absorption data and are of the order of 10(4) M(-1) for both CTAC and HPS, values which are similar to those previously obtained for the porphyrin in the free base form. For Brij-35 and Triton X-100 the binding constant for ZnTPPS(4) at pH 4.0 is a factor of 3-5 lower than those for CTAC and HPS, while in the case of FeTPPS(4) they are two orders of magnitude lower. Our data show that solubilization of ZnTPPS(4) within nonpolar regions of micelles is determined, in general, by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions, yet it is modulated by electrostatic factors. In the case of FeTPPS(4), the electrostatic factor seems to be more relevant. NMR data indicated that Fe(III)TPPS(4) is bound to the micelles predominantly as a monomer at pH 4.0, and at pH 9.0 the bound aggregated form

  19. Modification of surfactant protein D by reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates is accompanied by loss of aggregating activity, in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Matalon, Sadis; Shrestha, Kedar; Kirk, Marion; Waldheuser, Stephanie; McDonald, Barbara; Smith, Kelly; Gao, Zhiqian; Belaaouaj, Abderrazzak; Crouch, Erika C.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important effector of innate immunity. We have previously shown that SP-D accumulates at sites of acute bacterial infection and neutrophil infiltration, a setting associated with the release of reactive species such as peroxynitrite. Incubation of native SP-D or trimeric SP-D lectin domains (NCRDs) with peroxynitrite resulted in nitration and nondisulfide cross-linking. Modifications were blocked by peroxynitrite scavengers or pH inactivation of peroxynitrite, and mass spectroscopy confirmed nitration of conserved tyrosine residues within the C-terminal neck and lectin domains. Mutant NCRDs lacking one or more of the tyrosines allowed us to demonstrate preferential nitration of Tyr314 and the formation of Tyr228-dependent cross-links. Although there was no effect of peroxynitrite or tyrosine mutations on lectin activity, incubation of SP-D dodecamers or murine lavage with peroxynitrite decreased the SP-D-dependent aggregation of lipopolysaccharide-coated beads, supporting our hypothesis that defective aggregation results from abnormal cross-linking. We also observed nitration, cross-linking of SP-D, and a significant decrease in SP-D-dependent aggregating activity in the lavage of mice acutely exposed to nitrogen dioxide. Thus, modification of SP-D by reactive oxygen-nitrogen species could contribute to alterations in the structure and function of SP-D at sites of inflammation in vivo.—Matalon, S., Shrestha, K., Kirk, M., Waldheuser, S., McDonald, B., Smith, K., Gao, Z., Belaaouaj, A., Crouch, E. C. Modification of surfactant protein D by reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates is accompanied by loss of aggregating activity, in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19126597

  20. The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Irpan; Siauwantara, Alice

    2014-03-01

    The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200-2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 "Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture)". The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS's compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

  1. Using the giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) mass breeding aggregation to explore the life cycle of dicyemid parasites.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Sarah R; Whittington, Ian D; Donnellan, Stephen C; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2013-12-01

    Dicyemid mesozoan parasites, microscopic organisms found with high intensities in the renal appendages of benthic cephalopods, have a complex, partially unknown life cycle. It is uncertain at which host life cycle stage (i.e. eggs, juvenile, adult) new infection by the dispersive infusoriform embryo occurs. As adult cephalopods have a short lifespan and die shortly after reproducing only once, and juveniles are fast-moving, we hypothesize that the eggs are the life cycle stage where new infection occurs. Eggs are abundant and sessile, allowing a huge number of new individuals to be infected with low energy costs, and they also provide dicyemids with the maximum amount of time for survival compared with infection of juvenile and adult stages. In our study we collected giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) eggs at different stages of development and filtered seawater samples from the S. apama mass breeding aggregation area in South Australia, Australia, and tested these samples for the presence of dicyemid DNA. We did not recover dicyemid parasite cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) nucleotide sequences from any of the samples, suggesting eggs are not the stage where new infection occurs. To resolve this unknown in the dicyemid life cycle, we believe experimental infection is needed.

  2. Self-Propelled Oil Droplets and Their Morphological Change to Giant Vesicles Induced by a Surfactant Solution at Low pH.

    PubMed

    Banno, Taisuke; Tanaka, Yuki; Asakura, Kouichi; Toyota, Taro

    2016-09-20

    Unique dynamics using inanimate molecular assemblies based on soft matter have drawn much attention for demonstrating far-from-equilibrium chemical systems. However, there are no soft matter systems that exhibit a possible pathway linking the self-propelled oil droplets to formation of giant vesicles stimulated by low pH. In this study, we conceived an experimental oil-in-water emulsion system in which flocculated particles composed of a imine-containing oil transformed to spherical oil droplets that self-propelled and, after coming to rest, formed membranous figures. Finally, these figures became giant vesicles. From NMR, pH curves, and surface tension measurements, we determined that this far-from-equilibrium phenomenon was due to the acidic hydrolysis of the oil, which produced a benzaldehyde derivative as an oil component and a primary amine as a surfactant precursor, and the dynamic behavior of the hydrolytic products in the emulsion system. These findings afforded us a potential linkage between mobile droplet-based protocells and vesicle-based protocells stimulated by low pH. PMID:27580350

  3. Self-Propelled Oil Droplets and Their Morphological Change to Giant Vesicles Induced by a Surfactant Solution at Low pH.

    PubMed

    Banno, Taisuke; Tanaka, Yuki; Asakura, Kouichi; Toyota, Taro

    2016-09-20

    Unique dynamics using inanimate molecular assemblies based on soft matter have drawn much attention for demonstrating far-from-equilibrium chemical systems. However, there are no soft matter systems that exhibit a possible pathway linking the self-propelled oil droplets to formation of giant vesicles stimulated by low pH. In this study, we conceived an experimental oil-in-water emulsion system in which flocculated particles composed of a imine-containing oil transformed to spherical oil droplets that self-propelled and, after coming to rest, formed membranous figures. Finally, these figures became giant vesicles. From NMR, pH curves, and surface tension measurements, we determined that this far-from-equilibrium phenomenon was due to the acidic hydrolysis of the oil, which produced a benzaldehyde derivative as an oil component and a primary amine as a surfactant precursor, and the dynamic behavior of the hydrolytic products in the emulsion system. These findings afforded us a potential linkage between mobile droplet-based protocells and vesicle-based protocells stimulated by low pH.

  4. Adsorption properties of biologically active derivatives of quaternary ammonium surfactants and their mixtures at aqueous/air interface. I. Equilibrium surface tension, surfactant aggregation and wettability.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Monika; Biadasz, Andrzej; Kotkowiak, Michał; Olejnik, Anna; Rychlik, Joanna; Dudkowiak, Alina; Prochaska, Krystyna

    2013-10-01

    The adsorption properties of surfactant mixtures containing two types of quaternary derivatives of lysosomotropic substances: alkyl N,N-dimethylalaninates methobromides and alkyl N,N-dimethylglycinates methobromides were studied. Quantitative and qualitative description of the adsorption process was carried out on the basis of experimentally obtained equilibrium surface tension isotherms. The results indicated that most of the systems studied revealed synergistic effect both in adsorption and wetting properties. In vitro studies on human cancer cells were undertaken and the data obtained showed that the mixtures suppressed the cancer cells' proliferation more effectively than individual components. Results of preliminary research on the interaction of catanionic mixtures with phospholipids suggested a possibility of a strong penetration of cell membranes by the mixtures investigated.

  5. Dendrimer-surfactant interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiyun; Zhao, Libo; Li, Tianfu

    2014-04-28

    In this article, we reviewed the interactions between dendrimers and surfactants with particular focus on the interaction mechanisms and physicochemical properties of the yielding dendrimer-surfactant aggregates. In order to provide insight into the behavior of dendrimers in biological systems, the interactions of dendrimers with bio-surfactants such as phospholipids in bulk solutions, in solid-supported bilayers and at the interface of phases or solid-states were discussed. Applications of the dendrimer-surfactant aggregates as templates to guide the synthesis of nanoparticles and in drug or gene delivery were also mentioned.

  6. Diarmed (adamantyl/alkyl) surfactants from nitrilotriacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Trillo, Juan V; Vázquez Tato, José; Jover, Aida; de Frutos, Santiago; Soto, Victor H; Galantini, Luciano; Meijide, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The compounds presented here constitute a clear example of molecular biomimetics as their design is inspired on the structure and properties of natural phospholipids. Thus novel double-armed surfactants have been obtained in which nitrilotriacetic acid plays the role of glycerol in phospholipids. The hydrophobic arms are linked to the head group through amide bonds (which is also the case of sphingomyelin): (R1NHCOCH2)(R2NHCOCH2)NCH2CO2H (R1 being CH3(CH2)11, CH3(CH2)17, CH3(CH2)7CHCH(CH2)8, and adamantyl, and R2=adamantyl). The dependence of the surface tension with concentration shows the typical profile of surfactants since a breaking point, which corresponds to the critical aggregation concentration (cac), is observed in all cases. The cac of these diarmed derivatives are about 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those of classical monoalkyl derivatives used as reference compounds. In contrast to conventional surfactants, reversed trends in cac values and molecular areas at the solution-air interface have been observed. This anomalous behavior is tied to the structure of the surfactants and suggests that long and flexible alkyl chains should self-coil previous to the aggregation or adsorption phenomena. Above cac all compounds form large aggregates, globular in shape, which tend to associate forming giant aggregates. PMID:25465758

  7. Surfactant adsorption and aggregate structure of silica nanoparticles: a versatile stratagem for the regulation of particle size and surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Savita; Rohilla, Deepak; Mehta, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    The area of silica nanoparticles is incredibly polygonal. Silica particles have aroused exceptional deliberation in bio-analysis due to great progress in particular arenas, for instance, biocompatibility, unique properties of modifiable pore size and organization, huge facade areas and pore volumes, manageable morphology and amendable surfaces, elevated chemical and thermal stability. Currently, silica nanoparticles participate in crucial utilities in daily trade rationales such as power storage, chemical and genetic sensors, groceries dispensation and catalysis. Herein, the size-dependent interfacial relation of anionic silica nanoparticles with twelve altered categories of cationic surfactants has been carried out in terms of the physical chemical facets of colloid and interface science. The current analysis endeavours to investigate the virtual consequences of different surfactants through the development of the objective composite materials. The nanoparticle size controls, the surface-to-volume ratio and surface bend relating to its interaction with surfactant will also be addressed in this work. More importantly, the simulated stratagem developed in this work can be lengthened to formulate core-shell nanostructures with functional nanoparticles encapsulated in silica particles, making this approach valuable and extensively pertinent for employing sophisticated materials for catalysis and drug delivery.

  8. Surfactant anchoring and aggregate structure at silica nanoparticles: a persuasive facade for the adsorption of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Sood, Aastha; Mehta, S K

    2014-09-01

    Nanotechnology's aptitude to silhouette matter at the scale of the nanometer has unlocked the flap to new inventions of applications in material science and nanomedicine. Engineered silica nanoparticles are key actor of this strategy. The amphitheatre of silica nanoparticles is inexplicably bilateral. Silica particles play essential function in everyday commercial purposes for instance energy storage, chemical and biological sensors, food processing and catalysis. One of the most appealing applications to emerge in the recent years is the use of silica particles for cleaning up contaminants in groundwater, soil and sediments. Herein this work, surfactant modified silica nanoparticles with unique surface and pore properties as well as high surface areas have been extensively investigated as an alternative for the dye removal. The physical and chemical characterizations of adsorbent have been studied using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. The present investigation aims to explore the comparative effect of different surfactants during the formation of the target composite materials. The effects of various parameters like pH, adsorbent doses, dye concentration, addition of salt have also been investigated. These findings indicate that the nano silica particles are effective materials for dye removal and can be used to alleviate environmental problems. PMID:25924337

  9. Surfactant anchoring and aggregate structure at silica nanoparticles: a persuasive facade for the adsorption of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Sood, Aastha; Mehta, S K

    2014-09-01

    Nanotechnology's aptitude to silhouette matter at the scale of the nanometer has unlocked the flap to new inventions of applications in material science and nanomedicine. Engineered silica nanoparticles are key actor of this strategy. The amphitheatre of silica nanoparticles is inexplicably bilateral. Silica particles play essential function in everyday commercial purposes for instance energy storage, chemical and biological sensors, food processing and catalysis. One of the most appealing applications to emerge in the recent years is the use of silica particles for cleaning up contaminants in groundwater, soil and sediments. Herein this work, surfactant modified silica nanoparticles with unique surface and pore properties as well as high surface areas have been extensively investigated as an alternative for the dye removal. The physical and chemical characterizations of adsorbent have been studied using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. The present investigation aims to explore the comparative effect of different surfactants during the formation of the target composite materials. The effects of various parameters like pH, adsorbent doses, dye concentration, addition of salt have also been investigated. These findings indicate that the nano silica particles are effective materials for dye removal and can be used to alleviate environmental problems.

  10. "Giant surfactants" created by the fast and efficient functionalization of a DNA tetrahedron with a temperature-responsive polymer.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Thomas R; Bath, Jonathan; de Vries, Jan Willem; Raymond, Jeffery E; Herrmann, Andreas; Turberfield, Andrew J; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-10-22

    Copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) was employed to synthesize DNA block copolymers (DBCs) with a range of polymer blocks including temperature-responsive poly(N-isoproylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAM)) and highly hydrophobic poly(styrene). Exceptionally high yields were achieved at low DNA concentrations, in organic solvents, and in the absence of any solid support. The DNA segment of the DBC remained capable of sequence-specific hybridization: it was used to assemble a precisely defined nanostructure, a DNA tetrahedron, with pendant poly(NIPAM) segments. In the presence of an excess of poly(NIPAM) homopolymer, the tetrahedron-poly(NIPAM) conjugate nucleated the formation of large, well-defined nanoparticles at 40 °C, a temperature at which the homopolymer precipitated from solution. These composite nanoparticles were observed by dynamic light scattering and cryoTEM, and their hybrid nature was confirmed by AFM imaging. As a result of the large effective surface area of the tetrahedron, only very low concentrations of the conjugate were required in order for this surfactant-like behavior to be observed.

  11. Generation of a Chiral Giant Micelle.

    PubMed

    Ito, Thiago H; Salles, Airton G; Priebe, Jacks P; Miranda, Paulo C M L; Morgon, Nelson H; Danino, Dganit; Mancini, Giovanna; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2016-08-23

    Over the past few years, chiral supramolecular assemblies have been successfully used for recognition, sensing and enantioselective transformations. Several approaches are available to control chirality of discrete assemblies (e.g., cages and capsules), but few are efficient in assuring chirality for micellar aggregates. Optically active amino acid-derived surfactants are commonly used to generate chiral spherical micelles. To circumvent this limitation, we benefited from the uniaxial growth of spherical micelles into long cylindrical micelles usually called wormlike or giant micelles, upon the addition of cosolutes. This paper describes the unprecedented formation of chiral giant micelles in aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) upon increasing addition of enantiopure sodium salt of 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (Na-binaphtholate) as a cosolute. Depending on the concentrations of CTAB and Na-binaphtholate, chiral gel-like systems are obtained. The transition from spherical to giant micellar structures was probed using rheology, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, polarimetry, and electronic circular dichroism (CD). CD can be effectively used to monitor the incorporation of Na-binaphtholate into the micelle palisade as well as to determine its transition to giant micellar structures. Our approach expands the scope for chirality induction in micellar aggregates bringing the possibility to generate "smart" chiral systems and an alternative asymmetric chiral environment to perform enantioselective transformations. PMID:27499127

  12. Time resolved study of three ruthenium(II) complexes at micellar surfaces: A new long excited state lifetime probe for determining critical micelle concentration of surfactant nano-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Digambara; Chaaban, Ahmad H; Darwish, Shaza; Saad, Huda A; Nehme, Ali S; Ghaddar, Tarek H

    2016-02-01

    Three different ruthenium complexes have been synthesized and their luminescence properties in different solvent environments are reported. Luminescence intensities and excited state lifetimes of Ru-I, Ru-II and Ru-III vary with solvent viscosity. The excited state lifetime of Ru-I linearly increases in the viscosity range 1.76-12,100cP. Ru-II shows two linear increases: one in the low and another in the high viscosity ranges, whereas Ru-III illustrates a linear enhancement only in the low viscosity range. Interestingly, luminescence intensities and excited state lifetimes of Ru-I, Ru-II and Ru-III are found to be sensitive to nano-aggregation. However, the surfactant head charge and that of the ruthenium center as well as the hydrophobic tail of the ancillary ligand of the complexes have a great role in deciding the nature of the interaction and on the excited state properties at micellar surfaces. It is proposed that the long lifetime of Ru-III in water could be due to the coiling of the carbon chain of the ancillary ligand around the ruthenium center. At micelle surface, this coiling of the carbon chain is lost due to the parallel alignment with surfactants and thus quenching of the excited state lifetime is seen. Furthermore, it is shown that the variation of the excited state lifetime with respect to the change in surfactant concentration is a result of the formation of micelles from the surfactant monomer, thus, a novel technique for the determination of the critical micelle concentration (cmc) based on the long excited state lifetime of Ru-III located at the micellar nano-aggregates is reported.

  13. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-17

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles.

  14. Effect of the surfactant Tween 80 on the detachment and dispersal of Salmonella enterica Thompson single cells and aggregates from cilantro leaves as revealed by image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilms formed by human enteric pathogens on plants are a great concern to the produce industry. Salmonella enterica has the ability to form biofilms and large aggregates on leaf surfaces, including on cilantro leaves. Aggregates that remained attached after rigorous washing of cilantro leaves and ...

  15. Self-aggregation of ionic C(10) surfactants having different headgroups with special reference to the behavior of decyltrimethylammonium bromide in different salt environments: a calorimetric study with energetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Indranil; Moulik, Satya P

    2007-04-12

    Self-aggregation of C10 ionic surfactants with different head groups, viz., decylpyridinium chloride, sodium decylsulfate, decylammonium bromide, decyldimethylammonium bromide, and decyltrimethylammonium bromide, was studied in the aqueous medium by microcalorimetric and conductometric methods. The effects of temperature and different salts (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na2SO4, Na2S2O7, Na-benzoate, and Na-salicylate) were also studied on decyltrimethylammonium bromide representatives. The cmc, counterion binding, and energetics of micellization were evaluated and discussed. The energetic parameters, enthalpy, entropy, and specific heat of micellization obtained from direct calorimetry and the indirect van't Hoff method were compared and discussed.

  16. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  17. Cationic versus anionic surfactant in tuning the structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2014-08-26

    The structure and interaction in complexes of anionic Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and cationic dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) surfactant have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results are compared with similar complexes having anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant (Mehan, S; Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R. Langmuir 2013, 29, 11290). In both cases (DTAB and SDS), the structure in nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes is predominantly determined by the interactions of the individual two-component systems. The nanoparticle-surfactant (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for DTAB, but nanoparticle-protein (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for SDS, are found to be responsible for the resultant structure of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes. Irrespective of the charge on the surfactant, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micellelike clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The adsorption of these protein-surfactant complexes for DTAB on oppositely charged nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-surfactant complex-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles (similar to that of DTAB surfactant). It is unlike that of depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles with nonadsorption of protein-surfactant complexes for SDS in similarly charged nanoparticle systems (similar to that of protein alone). The modifications in nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein in these systems as compared to the corresponding two-component systems have also been examined by selectively contrast matching the constituents.

  18. Counter anion effect on the self-aggregation of dimethyl-di-N-octylammonium cation: a dual behavior between hydrotropes and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Collinet-Fressancourt, Marion; Leclercq, Loïc; Bauduin, Pierre; Aubry, Jean-Marie; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2011-10-13

    Self-aggregation of eight dimethyl-di-N-octylammonium salts ([DiC(8)]) has been investigated as a function of the nature of the counteranion. Tensiometry, conductimetry, and [DiC(8)]-selective electrode measurements highlighted three different behaviors and led to a rationalization of the aggregation process depending on the counteranion: "hydrophilic" anions (MoO(4)(2-), WO(4)(2-), SO(4)(2-), F(-)) give only unimers and micelles, whereas less hydrated anions form unimers, dimers, and either one micelle-like structure (NO(3)(-), Br(-)) or two micelle-like structures (CH(3)SO(3)(-), Cl(-)). Small-angle neutron and dynamic light scattering confirms the unusual behavior of [DiC(8)][Cl], which forms two types of aggregates: (i) disk or vesicles between 10 and 30 mM and (ii) ellipsoidal micelles above 30 mM. For [DiC(8)][MoO(4)(2-)], the formation of ellipsoidal micelles is supported between 10 and 300 mM. Finally, shapes and sizes of the aggregates are confirmed by molecular dynamic experiments.

  19. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  20. Aggregation behavior of sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate in aqueous ethylene glycol medium. A case of hydrogen bonding between surfactant and solvent and its manifestation in the surface tension isotherm.

    PubMed

    Das, D; Dey, J; Chandra, A K; Thapa, U; Ismail, K

    2012-11-13

    The dependence of critical micelle concentration (cmc) of sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (AOT) on the amount of ethylene glycol (EG) in water + EG medium was reported to be unusual and different from that of other surfactants to the extent that the cmc of AOT in EG is lower than in water. It is yet to be understood why AOT behaves so in water + EG medium, although AOT is known to have some special properties. Hence in the present study cmc of AOT in water + EG medium in the range from 0 to 100% (by weight) EG is measured by using surface tension and fluorescence emission methods. In contrast to what was reported, this study revealed that with respect to EG amount the cmc of AOT follows the general trend and AOT has higher cmc in EG than in water. On the other hand, it was surprisingly found that a break in the surface tension isotherm occurs in the premicellar region when the amount of EG exceeds 50% rendering a bisigmoidal shape to the surface tension isotherm. UV spectral study showed that AOT and EG undergo hydrogen bonding in the premicellar region when the EG amount is ≥50% and this hydrogen bonding becomes less on adding NaCl. The density functional theory calculations also showed formation of hydrogen bonds between EG and AOT through the sulfonate group of AOT providing thereby support to the experimental findings. The calculations predicted a highly stable AOT-EG-H(2)O trimer complex with a binding energy of -37.93 kcal mol(-1). The present system is an example, which is first of its kind, of a case where hydrogen bonding with surfactant and solvent molecules results in a surface tension break.

  1. Ionic surfactant aggregates in saline solutions: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence of excess sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)).

    PubMed

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Karttunen, Mikko; Haataja, Mikko

    2009-04-30

    The properties of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aggregates in saline solutions of excess sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) ions were studied through extensive molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. We find that the ionic strength of the solution affects not only the aggregate size of the resulting anionic micelles but also their structure. Specifically, the presence of CaCl(2) induces more compact and densely packed micelles with a significant reduction in gauche defects in the SDS hydrocarbon chains in comparison with NaCl. Furthermore, we observe significantly more stable salt bridges between the charged SDS head groups mediated by Ca(2+) than Na(+). The presence of these salt bridges helps stabilize the more densely packed micelles.

  2. Analysis of the aggregation of an anionic porphyrin with a cationic surfactant at the supercritical carbon dioxide-water interface using UV-visible external reflection spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akira; Yamagata, Akihiro; Kim, Haeng-Boo

    2014-10-01

    An external reflection (ER) spectrometric device was developed to directly measure adsorbates at the supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2)-water interface. The aggregation of diprotonated species of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinetetrasulfonic acid (H4tpps(2-)) at the positively charged SC-CO2-water interface, prepared by adsorption by the cetyltrimethylammonium ion (CTA(+)), was studied using this device. Orientations of the H4tpps(2-) monomers and J-aggregates at the SC-CO2-water interface were assessed using s- and p-polarized external reflection (ER) spectra. It appeared that the porphyrin plane of the H4tpps(2-) monomer was nearly parallel to the SC-CO2-water interface, and that the long axis of the rod-like H4tpps(2-) J-aggregate was also nearly parallel to the interface. Dependence of the ER spectra on CTA(+) concentration and CO2 pressure were investigated, and the interfacial CTA(+) concentration was found to cause changes in the interfacial H4tpps(2-) species present. Increasing the CO2 pressure changed the interfacial species from the H4tpps(2-) monomer to the H4tpps(2-) J-aggregate because the interfacial CTA(+) concentration increased as the pressure increased. This suggests that the interfacial chemical species can be changed by controlling the pressure and temperature of the SC-CO2. This is the first report of direct measurements of the chemical species at the SC-CO2-water interface, as far as we know.

  3. Neutron reflectometry of quaternary gemini surfactants as a function of alkyl chain length: anomalies arising from ion association and premicellar aggregation.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei Xun; Dong, Chu Chuan; Thomas, Robert K; Penfold, J; Wang, Yilin

    2011-03-15

    We have measured the structure and properties of a series of dicationic quaternary ammonium compounds α,ω-bis(N-alkyl dimethyl ammonium)hexane halides (Cn-C6-Cn) for values of the alkyl chain length n of 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 16, and a series of α,ω-bis(N-alkyl dimethyl ammonium)diethylether halides (Cn-C2OC2-Cn) for values of n of 8, 12, and 16, as well as C8-C12-C8 and C12-C10-C12 at the air/water interface. Although the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in the two series decreases in the normal way, that is, logarithmically, with increasing chain length, the limiting surface tension at the CMC and the limiting area per molecule both increase with chain length, in the opposite direction from comparable single chain surfactants. The structures of the surface layers, which were determined by neutron reflectometry, indicate that the anomalous behavior of the surface tension and area are probably caused by poor packing of the gemini side chains between adjacent molecules. Comparison of the directly determined surface coverage using neutron reflectometry and the apparent coverage determined by application of the Gibbs equation to surface tension data gives an experimental measurement of the prefactor in the Gibbs equation, which should be 3 for these geminis. It was found to vary from about 3 for the two C16 geminis down to about 1.5 for the two C8 geminis. We have devised a simple quantitative model that explains this variation and earlier observations that the Gibbs prefactor for C12-Cn-C12 (n varying from 3 to 12) is around 2. The model is consistent with the conductivity, NMR, and fluorescence measurements of other authors. This model shows that both dimerization and ion association are required to explain the surface tension behavior of cationic gemini bromide surfactants and that, in many cases, the prefactor itself varies with concentration.

  4. Filling the gap between the quantum and classical worlds of nanoscale magnetism: giant molecular aggregates based on paramagnetic 3d metal ions.

    PubMed

    Papatriantafyllopoulou, Constantina; Moushi, Eleni E; Christou, George; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2016-03-21

    In this review, aspects of the syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of giant 3d and 3d/4f paramagnetic metal clusters in moderate oxidation states are discussed. The term "giant clusters" is used herein to denote metal clusters with nuclearity of 30 or greater. Many synthetic strategies towards such species have been developed and are discussed in this paper. Attempts are made to categorize some of the most successful methods to giant clusters, but it will be pointed out that the characteristics of the crystal structures of such compounds including nuclearity, shape, architecture, etc. are unpredictable depending on the specific structural features of the included organic ligands, reaction conditions and other factors. The majority of the described compounds in this review are of special interest not only for their fascinating nanosized structures but also because they sometimes display interesting magnetic phenomena, such as ferromagnetic exchange interactions, large ground state spin values, single-molecule magnetism behaviour or impressively large magnetocaloric effects. In addition, they often possess the properties of both the quantum and the classical world, and thus their systematic study offers the potential for the discovery of new physical phenomena, as well as a better understanding of the existing ones. The research field of giant clusters is under continuous evolution and their intriguing structural characteristics and magnetism properties that attract the interest of synthetic Inorganic Chemists promise a brilliant future for this class of compounds.

  5. Preparation and characterization of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Runliang; Wei, Jingming; Tao, Qi; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping

    2011-08-15

    A series of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized using montmorillonite and three zwitterionic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths at different concentrations [0.2-4.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These ZSMMs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermo-gravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The zwitterionic surfactant could be intercalated into the interlayer spaces of montmorillonites and causing interlayer space-swelling. From XRD measurements, the amount of the surfactants loaded and the basal spacing increased with surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. One endothermic DTG peak occurred at ~390 °C, which was assigned to the decomposition of the zwitterionic surfactant on the organo-montmorillonites from 0.2 to 0.6 CEC. When the surfactant loading was increased, a new endothermic peak appeared at ~340 °C. From the microstructures of these ZSMMs, the mechanism of zwitterionic surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loadings of the zwitterionic surfactant, most of surfactants enter the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and are adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the zwitterionic surfactant exceeds the CEC of montmorillonite, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface-adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants enter the interlayers, whereas the others are attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increases further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants may occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure.

  6. Compartmentalization of amino acids in surfactant aggregates - Partitioning between water and aqueous micellar sodium dodecanoate and between hexane and dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendler, J. H.; Nome, F.; Nagyvary, J.

    1975-01-01

    The partitioning of amino acids (glycine, alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, histidine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, isoleucine, threonine, serine, valine, proline, arginine) in aqueous and nonaqueous micellar systems was studied experimentally. Partitioning from neat hexane into dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane was found to be dependent on both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which implies that the interior of dodecylammonium propionate aggregates is negatively charged and is capable of hydrogen bonding in addition to providing a hydrophobic environment. Unitary free energies of transfer of amino acid side chains from hexane to water were determined and solubilities of amino acids in neat hexane substantiated the amino acid hydrophobicity scale. The relevance of the experiments to prebiotic chemistry was examined.

  7. Microstructure of Mixed Surfactant Solutions by Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Surfactant mixtures add a new dimension to the design of complex fluid microstructure. By combining different surfactants it is not only possible to modify aggregate morphology and control the macrascopic properties of colloidal dispersions but also to produce a variety of novel synergistic phases. Mixed systems produce new microstructures by altering the intermolecular and interaggregate forces in ways impossible for single component systems. In this dissertation, we report on the phase behavior and microstructure of several synthetic and biological surfactant mixtures as elucidated by freeze-fracture and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. We have discovered that stable, spontaneous unilamellar vesicles can be prepared from aqueous mixtures of commercially available single-tailed cationic and anionic surfactants. Vesicle stability is determined by the length and volume of the hydrocarbon chains of the "catanionic" pairs. Mixtures containing bulky or branched surfactant pairs (C _{16}/C_{12 -14}) in water produce defect-free fairly monodisperse equilibrium vesicles at high dilution. In contrast, mixtures of catanionic surfactants with highly asymmetric tails (C_{16}/C_8 ) form phases of porous vesicles, dilute lamellar L_{alpha}, and anomalous isotropic L_3 phases. Images of the microstructure by freeze-fracture microscopy show that the L_3 phase consists of multiconnected self-avoiding bilayers with saddle shaped curvature. The forces between bilayers of vesicle-forming cationic and anionic surfactant mixtures were also measured using the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA). We find that the vesicles are stabilized by a long range electrostatic repulsion at large separations (>20 A) and an additional salt-independent repulsive force below 20 A. The measured forces correlate very well with the ternary phase diagram and the vesicle microstructures observed by electron microscopy. In addition to studying ionic surfactants, we have also done original work with

  8. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  9. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  10. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  11. Optical Properties and Aggregation of Graphene Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Melezhyk, A V; Kotov, V A; Tkachev, A G

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the optical density of dispersions of randomly oriented multilayer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) was estimated. Calculated and experimental data were compared for aqueous GNP dispersions stabilized with various surfactants. It was shown that the sonication of an expanded graphite compound (EGC) in aqueous surfactant solutions leads to the transformation of EGC worm-like particles into weak GNP aggregates which are able to pass into solution upon dilution and agitation of the system. They may be filtered and washed out of surfactants. The concentrated GNP dispersions containing these weak aggregates can be used to synthesize different graphene-based nanostructures and obtain novel composite materials. PMID:27398570

  12. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries.

  13. Kinematic viscosity of therapeutic pulmonary surfactants with added polymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Taeusch, H William

    2009-03-01

    The addition of various polymers to pulmonary surfactants improves surface activity in experiments both in vitro and in vivo. Although the viscosity of surfactants has been investigated, the viscosity of surfactant polymer mixtures has not. In this study, we have measured the viscosities of Survanta and Infasurf with and without the addition of polyethylene glycol, dextran or hyaluronan. The measurements were carried out over a range of surfactant concentrations using two concentrations of polymers at two temperatures. Our results indicate that at lower surfactant concentrations, the addition of any polymers increased the viscosity. However, the addition of polyethylene glycol and dextran to surfactants at clinically used concentrations can substantially lower viscosity. Addition of hyaluronan at clinical surfactant concentrations slightly increased Infasurf viscosity and produced little change in Survanta viscosity. Effects of polymers on viscosity correlate with changes in size and distribution of surfactant aggregates and the apparent free volume of liquid as estimated by light microscopy. Aggregation of surfactant vesicles caused by polymers may therefore not only improve surface activity as previously shown, but may also affect viscosity in ways that could improve surfactant distribution in vivo.

  14. Tuning of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in aqueous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of charged (anionic) silica nanoparticles with ionic and nonionic surfactants has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surfactants used are anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and nonionic decaoxyethylene n-dodecylether (C12E10). The measurements are carried out at fixed concentration (1 wt%) of silica nanoparticles and with surfactant concentration varied in the range 0-2 wt%. It is found that there is no direct interaction between the nanoparticles and the surfactant (SDS) when they both are similarly charged. Both the silica nanoparticles and micelles coexist individually with no significant change in the structure of the micelles with respect to that in the pure surfactant solution. On the other hand, the presence of oppositely charged surfactant (DTAB) leads to the aggregation of silica nanoparticles even with very low surfactant concentration. The aggregation of silica nanoparticles is characterized by fractal structure and its fractal dimension remains constant with the increase in the surfactant concentration. In the case of nonionic surfactant, it interacts with the individual silica nanoparticles. The interaction is examined using two models: one that considers the surfactant layer coating on silica nanoparticles and a second one where the surface of the nanoparticles is decorated by the micelles. Contrast variation SANS measurements confirm the uniform decoration of nonionic micelles on the nanoparticles.

  15. Aqueous dual-tailed surfactants simulated on the alumina surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yu, Jian-Guo; O'Rear, Edgar A; Striolo, Alberto

    2014-08-14

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to compare the morphology of aqueous surfactant self-assembled aggregates on a flat alumina substrate. The substrate was modeled using the CLAYFF force field, and it was considered fully protonated. Three ionic surfactants were considered, all with a sulfate headgroup. The first surfactant was the single-tailed, widely studied sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), for which previous simulation results are available on several substrates. The results obtained for this surfactant were used for benchmarking the behavior of two dual-tailed surfactants. These latter surfactants have equal structure, except that in one case both linear tails are composed by seven fully protonated carbon atoms [CH3(CH2)6CHOSO3(CH2)6CH3(-), 2H7], whereas in the other, one tail is composed by seven fully protonated carbon atoms and the other tail is composed by seven fully fluorinated carbon atoms [CF3(CF2)6CHOSO3(CH2)6CH3(-), H7F7]. Our results suggest that preferential interactions lead to surfactant aggregates for H7F7 that differ compared to both those obtained for SDS and 2H7. Although molecular-level geometric structural differences can be invoked to explain differences between H7F7 and SDS aggregates, those between H7F7 and 2H7 aggregates can only be ascribed to atomic-scale interactions. Because as the adsorbed amount of surfactant increases, the self-assembled surfactant aggregates change, suggesting that the substrate on which adsorption occurs effectively evolves as adsorption progresses, compared to bare alumina. The morphological differences observed in our simulations coupled with molecular-level microphase separation might explain, in part, the unusual retrograde adsorption isotherm that has been observed experimentally for H7F7 surfactants on alumina. PMID:25089638

  16. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  17. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  18. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  19. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  20. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  1. Photosensitive surfactants: micellization and interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  2. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrew P.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the "free" (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit).

  3. Characterization and control of surfactant-mediated Norovirus interactions.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Brittany S; Velev, Orlin D

    2015-11-28

    Understanding of the colloidal interactions of Norovirus particles in aqueous medium could provide insights on the origins of the notorious stability and infectivity of these widespread viral agents. We characterized the effects of solution pH and surfactant type and concentration on the aggregation, dispersion, and disassembly of Norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs) using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. Owing to net negative surface charge of the VLPs at neutral pH, low concentrations of cationic surfactant tend to aggregate the VLPs, whereas low concentrations of anionic surfactant tend to disperse the particles. Increasing the concentration of these surfactants beyond their critical micelle concentration leads to virus capsid disassembly and breakdown of aggregates. Non-ionic surfactants, however, had little effect on virus interactions and likely stabilized them additionally in suspension. The data were interpreted on the basis of simple models for surfactant binding and re-charging of the virus capsid. We used zeta potential data to characterize virus surface charge and interpret the mechanisms behind these demonstrated surfactant-virus interactions. The fundamental understanding and control of these interactions will aid in practical formulations for virus inactivation and removal from contaminated surfaces.

  4. Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    Beyond the inner solar system's terrestrial planets, with their compact orbits and rock -metal compositions, lies the realm of the outer solar system and the giant planets. Here the distance between planets jumps by an order of magnitude relative to the spacing of the terrestrial planets, and the masses of the giants are one to two orders of magnitude greater than Venus and Earth - the largest terrestrial bodies. Composition changes as well, since the giant planets are largely gaseous, with inferred admixtures of ice, rock, and metal, while the terrestrial planets are essentially pure rock and metal. The giant planets have many more moons than do the terrestrial planets, and the range of magnetic field strengths is larger in the outer solar system. It is the giant planets that sport rings, ranging from the magnificent ones around Saturn to the variable ring arcs of Neptune. Were it not for the fact that only Earth supports abundant life (with life possibly existing, but not proved to exist, in the martian crust and liquid water regions underneath the ice of Jupiter's moon Europa), the terrestrial planets would pale in interest next to the giant planets for any extraterrestrial visitor.

  5. Molecular simulation of surfactant-assisted protein refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Zhixia; Zhang, Minlian; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2005-04-01

    Protein refolding to its native state in vitro is a challenging problem in biotechnology, i.e., in the biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food industry. Protein aggregation and misfolding usually inhibit the recovery of proteins with their native states. These problems can be partially solved by adding a surfactant into a suitable solution environment. However, the process of this surfactant-assisted protein refolding is not well understood. In this paper, we wish to report on the first-ever simulations of surfactant-assisted protein refolding. For these studies, we defined a simple model for the protein and the surfactant and investigated how a surfactant affected the folding behavior of a two-dimensional lattice protein molecule. The model protein and model surfactant were chosen such that we could capture the important features of the folding process and the interaction between the protein and the surfactant, namely, the hydrophobic interaction. It was shown that, in the absence of surfactants, a protein in an "energy trap" conformation, i.e., a local energy minima, could not fold into the native form, which was characterized by a global energy minimum. The addition of surfactants created folding pathways via the formation of protein-surfactant complexes and thus enabled the conformations that fell into energy trap states to escape from these traps and to form the native proteins. The simulation results also showed that it was necessary to match the hydrophobicity of surfactant to the concentration of denaturant, which was added to control the folding or unfolding of a protein. The surfactants with different hydrophobicity had their own concentration range on assisting protein refolding. All of these simulations agreed well with experimental results reported elsewhere, indicating both the validity of the simulations presented here and the potential application of the simulations for the design of a surfactant on assisting protein refolding.

  6. Interactions of cationic trimeric, gemini and monomeric surfactants with trianionic curcumin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Wu, Chunxian; Tang, Yongqiang; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2014-05-21

    Interactions of trianionic curcumin (Cur(3-)) with a series of cationic surfactants, monomeric surfactant dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), dimeric surfactant hexamethylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) and trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD), have been investigated in aqueous solution of pH 13.0. Surface tension and spectral measurements indicate that the cationic surfactants display a similar surfactant concentration dependent interaction process with Cur(3-), involving three interaction stages. At first the three cationic surfactants electrostatically bind on Cur(3-) to form the surfactant-Cur(3-) complex. Then the bound and unbound cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) aggregate into surfactant-Cur(3-) mixed micelles through hydrophobic interactions above the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants (CMCC) in the presence of Cur(3-). Finally excess unbound surfactants self-assemble into micelles like those without Cur(3-). For all the three surfactants, the addition of Cur(3-) only decreases the critical micelle concentration of 12-6-12 but does not affect the critical micelle concentration of DTAB and DTAD. As the oligomeric degree of surfactants increases, the intermolecular interaction of the cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) increases and the surfactant amount needed for Cur(3-) encapsulation decreases. Compared with 12-6-12, either the weaker interaction of DTAB with Cur(3-) or stronger interaction of DTAD with Cur(3-) limits the stability or solubility of Cur(3-) in surfactant micelles. Therefore, gemini surfactant 12-6-12 is the best choice to effectively suppress Cur(3-) degradation at very low concentrations. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, surface tension and (1)H NMR results reveal that 12-6-12 and Cur(3-) form a (12-6-12)2-Cur(3-) complex and start to form micelles at extremely decreased concentrations, where either 12-6-12 or Cur(3-) works as a bridge

  7. Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol by single and mixed nonionic and anionic surfactants using graphene-TiO₂ as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; He, Xin; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-11-01

    The photodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a surfactant-containing (single and mixed) complex system using graphene-TiO2 (GT) as catalyst was investigated. The objective was to better understand the behavior of surfactants in a GT catalysis system for its possible use in remediation technology of soil contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). In a single-surfactant system, surfactant molecules aggregated on GT via hydrogen bonding and electrostatic force; nonideal mixing between nonionic and anionic surfactants rendered GT surface with mixed admicelles in a mixed surfactant system. Both effects helped incorporating PCP molecules into surfactant aggregates on catalyst surface. Hence, the targeted pollutants were rendered easily available to photo-yielded oxidative radicals, and photodegradation efficiency was significantly enhanced. Finally, real soil washing-photocatalysis trials proved that anionic-nonionic mixed surfactant soil washing coupled with graphene-TiO2 photocatalysis can be one promising technology for HOC-polluted soil remediation. PMID:26194233

  8. Length shortening and surfactant mixing behavior of nonionic/ionic mixed cylindrical micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghyun; Kwon, Su Yong; Moon, Jun hyuk; Kim, Mahn Won

    2008-10-01

    Cylindrical micelles, which are surfactant self-assembled structures with nm scale, usually grow in length as surfactant concentration increases. Small angle neutron scattering of nonionic/ionic (C 12E 5/DTAB) mixed cylindrical micellar solution showed the shape of aggregates maintained the cylindrical geometry while the micellar length shortened as the fraction of ionic surfactant increased. Unexpectedly, we observed, for the first time, the micellar length shortened as total surfactant concentration increased at constant DTAB mole fraction. This observation suggests that strong non-ideal mixing of the surfactants in the cylindrical micelles, leading to an end-cap energy lowering with increasing concentration, is responsible for the length shortening.

  9. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible.

  10. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible. PMID:26776022

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  12. Observation of two different fractal structures in nanoparticle, protein and surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering has been carried out from a complex of nanoparticle, protein and surfactant. Although all the components are similarly (anionic) charged, we have observed strong interactions in their complex formation. It is characterized by the coexistence of two different mass fractal structures. The first fractal structure is originated from the protein and surfactant interaction and second from the depletion effect of first fractal structure leading the nanoparticle aggregation. The fractal structure of protein-surfactant complex represents to bead necklace structure of micelle-like clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. Its fractal dimension depends on the surfactant to protein ratio (r) and decreases with the increase in r. However, fractal dimension of nanoparticle aggregates in nanoparticle-protein complex is found to be independent of protein concentration and governed by the diffusion limited aggregation like morphology.

  13. Observation of two different fractal structures in nanoparticle, protein and surfactant complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit Kumar, Sugam Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    Small angle neutron scattering has been carried out from a complex of nanoparticle, protein and surfactant. Although all the components are similarly (anionic) charged, we have observed strong interactions in their complex formation. It is characterized by the coexistence of two different mass fractal structures. The first fractal structure is originated from the protein and surfactant interaction and second from the depletion effect of first fractal structure leading the nanoparticle aggregation. The fractal structure of protein-surfactant complex represents to bead necklace structure of micelle-like clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. Its fractal dimension depends on the surfactant to protein ratio (r) and decreases with the increase in r. However, fractal dimension of nanoparticle aggregates in nanoparticle-protein complex is found to be independent of protein concentration and governed by the diffusion limited aggregation like morphology.

  14. Phase diagrams of DNA-photosensitive surfactant complexes: effect of ionic strength and surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Titov, Evgenii; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-10-28

    Realization of all-optically controlled and efficient DNA compaction is the major motivation in the study of interactions between DNA and photosensitive surfactants. In this article, using recently published approach of phase diagram construction [Y. Zakrevskyy, P. Cywinski, M. Cywinska, J. Paasche, N. Lomadze, O. Reich, H.-G. Löhmannsroben, and S. Santer, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044907 (2014)], a strategy for substantial reduction of compaction agent concentration and simultaneous maintaining the light-induced decompaction efficiency is proposed. The role of ionic strength (NaCl concentration), as a very important environmental parameter, and surfactant structure (spacer length) on the changes of positions of phase transitions is investigated. Increase of ionic strength leads to increase of the surfactant concentration needed to compact DNA molecule. However, elongation of the spacer results to substantial reduction of this concentration. DNA compaction by surfactants with longer tails starts to take place in diluted solutions at charge ratios Z < 1 and is driven by azobenzene-aggregation compaction mechanism, which is responsible for efficient decompaction. Comparison of phase diagrams for different DNA-photosensitive surfactant systems allowed explanation and proposal of a strategy to overcome previously reported limitations of the light-induced decompaction for complexes with increasing surfactant hydrophobicity.

  15. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  16. On the mesoscopic origins of high viscosities in some polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Ingo; Farago, Bela; Schweins, Ralf; Falus, Peter; Sharp, Melissa; Prévost, Sylvain; Gradzielski, Michael

    2015-08-21

    Oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant mixtures allow the control of rheological parameters of a solution even at fairly low concentrations. For example, addition of 0.3 wt. % of anionic surfactant to a 1 wt. % solution of the polycation JR 400 increases the viscosity by 4 orders of magnitude. Recently, we could show that this increase is related to the formation of mixed, rod-like PE/surfactant aggregates which interconnect several polyelectrolyte chains [Hoffmann et al., Europhys. Lett. 104, 28001 (2013)]. In this paper, we refine our structural model of the aggregates to obtain a more consistent picture of their internal structure for different anionic surfactants. Combining small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin-echo (NSE) allows us to determine the size of the aggregates. By comparing different contrasts, the internal structure of the aggregates can be elucidated and it is seen that the PE in the aggregates retains a relatively high freedom of movement. We proceeded to investigate the influence of the surfactant concentration and the surfactant type on structure and dynamics of the mixed aggregates. It is seen that the structural parameters of the aggregates depend very little on the surfactant concentration and headgroup. However, it is crucial to incorporate a sufficient amount of PE in the aggregates to increase the viscosity of the aggregates. By comparing viscous samples at 1 wt. % PE concentration with samples at a PE concentration of 0.3 wt. %, where no significant increase in viscosity is observed, we find that similar aggregates are formed already at this lower PE concentrations. However, the amount of PE incorporated in them is insufficient to interconnect several PE chains and therefore, they do not increase viscosity. So, our detailed investigation combining contrast variation SANS and NSE does not only allow to explain the viscosity behavior but also to deduced detailed information regarding the structures and

  17. The interfacial interactions of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles with surfactants and phospholipids revealed through the fluorescent response.

    PubMed

    Bochkova, Olga D; Mustafina, Asiya R; Mukhametshina, Alsu R; Burilov, Vladimir A; Skripacheva, Viktoriya V; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Konovalov, Alexander I; Soloveva, Svetlana E; Antipin, Igor S

    2012-04-01

    The quenching effect of dyes (phenol red and bromothymol blue) on Tb(III)-centered luminescence enables to sense the aggregation of cationic and anionic surfactants near the silica surface of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles (SN) in aqueous solutions. The Tb-centered luminescence of non-decorated SNs is diminished by the inner filter effect of both dyes. The decoration of the silica surface by cationic surfactants induces the quenching through the energy transfer between silica coated Tb(III) complexes and dye anions inserted into surfactant aggregates. Thus the distribution of surfactants aggregates at the silica/water interface and in the bulk of solution greatly affects dynamic quenching efficiency. The displacement of dye anions from the interfacial surfactant adlayer by anionic surfactants and phospholipids is accompanied by the "off-on" switching of Tb(III)-centered luminescence. PMID:22209651

  18. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  19. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  20. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes' properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate - for the first time - complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules. PMID:25669583

  1. Surfactant waterflood oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Kudchadker, M.V.; Whittington, L.E.

    1982-03-16

    Disclosed is a surfactant waterflooding oil recovery process for use in high salinity water-containing formations employing two separate surfactant-containing slugs or a single slug in which the composition is changed from the first to the last portion of the slug injected into the formation. The first portion of the surfactant fluid contains a surfactant combination which exhibits optimum low surface tension characteristics, and the second or latter portion of the surfactant slug contains a blend of surfactants which produces a high viscosity fluid. Use of hydrophilic viscosity-increasing polymer is thus avoided, eliminating the interaction between polymer and surfactant which causes a reduction in surfactant effectiveness.

  2. Mechanisms to explain surfactant responses.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant is now standard of care for infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant treatments are effective because of complex metabolic interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung. The large treatment dose functions as substrate; it is taken up by the preterm lung and is reprocessed and secreted with improved function. The components of the treatment surfactant remain in the preterm lung for days. If lung injury is avoided, then surfactant inhibition is minimized. Prenatal corticosteroids complement surfactant to further enhance lung function. The magic of surfactant therapy results from the multiple interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung.

  3. Effect of surfactant types and their concentration on the structural characteristics of nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawrah, M. F.; Khattab, R. M.; Saad, E. M.; Gado, R. A.

    2014-03-01

    A series of organo-modified nanoclays was synthesized using three different surfactants having different alkyl chain lengths and concentrations [0.5-5.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These surfactants were Ethanolamine (EA), Cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB) and Tetraoctadecylammoniumbromide (TO). The obtained modified nanoclays were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compared with unmodified nanoclay. The results of XRD analysis indicated that the basal d-spacing has increased with increasing alkyl chain length and surfactant concentration. From the obtained microstructures of these organo-modified nanoclays, the mechanism of surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loading of surfactant, most of surfactant entered the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and is adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the surfactant exceeds the CEC of clay, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants entered the interlayers, whereas the others were attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increased further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants might occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure.

  4. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  5. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  6. Partition and water/oil adsorption of some surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, Rawad; Zedde, Chantal; Routaboul, Corinne; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2008-10-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been determined at the water/oil interface for five biphasic systems involving surfactants (non-ionic and ionic) present in both phases at partition equilibrium. The systems studied were polyoxyethylene(23)lauryl ether (Brij35) in water/hexane and four ionic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and a series of three tetraalkylammonium dodecylsulfate (TEADS, TPADS, and TBADS) in water/CH 2Cl 2. Interfacial tension measurements performed at the water/air and water/oil interfaces provided all the necessary information for the determination of the adsorption parameters by taking partition into account. These measurements also allowed the comparison of the adsorption properties at both interfaces which showed an increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant and a decrease of the maximum surface concentration at the water/oil interface compared to water/air. The values of the critical aggregation concentration showed, in all cases, that only the surfactant dissolved in the aqueous phase contribute to the decrease of the water/oil interfacial tension. In the case of the four ionic surfactants, the critical aggregation concentration obtained in biphasic conditions were lowered because of the formation of mixed surfactant-CH 2Cl 2 aggregates.

  7. Universal surfactant for water, oils, and CO2.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Azmi; Trickett, Kieran; Chin, Swee Yee; Cummings, Stephen; Sagisaka, Masanobu; Hudson, Laura; Nave, Sandrine; Dyer, Robert; Rogers, Sarah E; Heenan, Richard K; Eastoe, Julian

    2010-09-01

    A trichain anionic surfactant sodium 1,4-bis(neopentyloxy)-3-(neopentyloxycarbonyl)-1,4-dioxobutane-2-sulfonate (TC14) is shown to aggregate in three different types of solvent: water, heptane, and liquid CO(2). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to characterize the surfactant aggregates in water, heptane, and dense CO(2). Surface tension measurements, and analyses, show that the addition of a third branched chain to the surfactant structural template is critical for sufficiently lowering the surface energy, tipping the balance between a CO(2)-incompatible surfactant (AOT) and CO(2)-philic compounds that will aggregate to form micelles in dense CO(2) (TC14). These results highlight TC14 as one of the most adaptable and useful surfactants discovered to date, being compatible with a wide range of solvent types from high dielectric polar solvent water to alkanes with low dielectrics and even being active in the uncooperative and challenging solvent environment of liquid CO(2).

  8. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  10. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D. Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  11. Mechanisms of Particle Charging by Surfactants in Nonpolar Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Zhou, Zhang-Lin; Alas, Guillermo; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2015-11-10

    Electric charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar solvents plays a crucial role for many industrial applications and products, including rubbers, engine oils, toners, or electronic displays. Although disfavored by the low solvent permittivity, particle charging can be induced by added surfactants, even nonionic ones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood, and neither the magnitude nor the sign of charge can generally be predicted from the particle and surfactant properties. The conclusiveness of scientific studies has been limited partly by a traditional focus on few surfactant types with many differences in their chemical structure and often poorly defined composition. Here we investigate the surface charging of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles dispersed in hexane-based solutions of three purified polyisobutylene succinimide polyamine surfactants with "subtle" structural variations. We precisely vary the surfactant chemistry by replacing only a single electronegative atom located at a fixed position within the polar headgroup. Electrophoresis reveals that these small differences between the surfactants lead to qualitatively different particle charging. In the respective particle-free surfactant solutions we also find potentially telling differences in the size of the surfactant aggregates (inverse micelles), the residual water content, and the electric solution conductivity as well as indications for a significant size difference between oppositely charged inverse micelles of the most hygroscopic surfactant. An analysis that accounts for the acid/base properties of all constituents suggests that the observed particle charging is better described by asymmetric adsorption of charged inverse micelles from the liquid bulk than by charge creation at the particle surface. Intramicellar acid-base interaction and intermicellar surfactant exchange help rationalize the formation of micellar ions pairs with size asymmetry. PMID:26484617

  12. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  13. Magnetic surfactants as molecular based-magnets with spin glass-like properties.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul; Smith, Gregory N; Hernández, Eduardo Padrón; James, Craig; Eastoe, Julian; Nunes, Wallace C; Settens, Charles M; Hatton, T Alan; Baker, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the use of muon spin relaxation spectroscopy to study how the aggregation behavior of magnetic surfactants containing lanthanide counterions may be exploited to create spin glass-like materials. Surfactants provide a unique approach to building in randomness, frustration and competing interactions into magnetic materials without requiring a lattice of ordered magnetic species or intervening ligands and elements. We demonstrate that this magnetic behavior may also be manipulated via formation of micelles rather than simple dilution, as well as via design of surfactant molecular architecture. This somewhat unexpected result indicates the potential of using novel magnetic surfactants for the generation and tuning of molecular magnets. PMID:27028571

  14. Magnetic surfactants as molecular based-magnets with spin glass-like properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Paul; Smith, Gregory N.; Padrón Hernández, Eduardo; James, Craig; Eastoe, Julian; Nunes, Wallace C.; Settens, Charles M.; Hatton, T. Alan; Baker, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the use of muon spin relaxation spectroscopy to study how the aggregation behavior of magnetic surfactants containing lanthanide counterions may be exploited to create spin glass-like materials. Surfactants provide a unique approach to building in randomness, frustration and competing interactions into magnetic materials without requiring a lattice of ordered magnetic species or intervening ligands and elements. We demonstrate that this magnetic behavior may also be manipulated via formation of micelles rather than simple dilution, as well as via design of surfactant molecular architecture. This somewhat unexpected result indicates the potential of using novel magnetic surfactants for the generation and tuning of molecular magnets.

  15. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  16. Effects of Surfactants on Chlorobenzene Absorption on Pyrite Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, P. T.; Suto, K.; Inoue, C.; Hara, J.

    2007-03-01

    Recently, both surfactant extraction of chlorinated compounds from contaminated soils and chemical reduction of chlorinated compounds by pyrite have had received a lot of attention. The reaction of the natural mineral pyrite was found as a surface controlling process which strongly depends on absorption of contaminants on the surface. Surfactants were not only aggregated into micelle which increase solubility of hydrophobic compounds but also tend to absorb on the solid surface. This study investigated effects of different kinds of Surfactants on absorption of chlorobenzene on pyrite surface in order to identify coupling potential of surfactant application and remediation by pyrite. Surfactants used including non-ionic, anionic and cationic which were Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether (Brij35), Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Cetyl TrimethylAmmonium Bromide (CTAB) respectively were investigated with a wide range of surfactant concentration up to 4 times of each critical micelle concentration (CMC). Chlorobenzene was chosen as a representative compound. The enhancement or competition effects of Surfactants on absorption were discussed.

  17. Interaction between casein and the oppositely charged surfactant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Guo, Rong

    2007-09-01

    The interactions between the classical cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and 2.0 mg/mL casein were investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), turbidity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence spectra measurements. The results suggest that the cationic headgroup of the surfactant individually binds to the negatively charged amino acid sites on the casein chains because of the electrostatic attraction upon the addition of DTAB. When the surfactant concentration reaches a critical value c1, DTAB forms micelle-like aggregates on the casein chain, resulting in the formation of insoluble casein/DTAB complexes. Further addition of DTAB leads to the redissolution of casein/DTAB complexes because of the net positive charge on casein/DTAB complexes and the formation of DTAB free micelles. The addition of salt screens the repulsion between the surfactant headgroups and the attraction between casein and surfactant molecules, which weakens the binding of surfactant onto the casein chain, favoring the formation of free surfactant micelles.

  18. Magnetic Surfactants and Polymers with Gadolinium Counterions for Protein Separations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul; Bromberg, Lev; Rial-Hermida, M Isabel; Wasbrough, Matthew; Hatton, T Alan; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2016-01-26

    New magnetic surfactants, (cationic hexadecyltrimethlyammonium bromotrichlorogadolinate (CTAG), decyltrimethylammonium bromotrichlorogadolinate (DTAG), and a magnetic polymer (poly(3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium tetrachlorogadolinate (APTAG)) have been synthesized by the simple mixing of the corresponding surfactants and polymer with gadolinium metal ions. A magnetic anionic surfactant, gadolinium tri(1,4-bis(2-ethylhexoxy)-1,4-dioxobutane-2-sulfonate) (Gd(AOT)3), was synthesized via metathesis. Both routes enable facile preparation of magnetically responsive magnetic polymers and surfactants without the need to rely on nanocomposites or organic frameworks with polyradicals. Electrical conductivity, surface tensiometry, SQUID magnetometry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) demonstrate surface activity and self-aggregation behavior of the magnetic surfactants similar to their magnetically inert parent analogues but with added magnetic properties. The binding of the magnetic surfactants to proteins enables efficient separations under low-strength (0.33 T) magnetic fields in a new, nanoparticle-free approach to magnetophoretic protein separations and extractions. Importantly, the toxicity of the magnetic surfactants and polymers is, in some cases, lower than that of their halide analogues.

  19. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems.

  20. Biophysical inhibition of synthetic vs. naturally-derived pulmonary surfactant preparations by polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Reasonable suspicion has accumulated that inhaled nano-scale particulate matter influences the biophysical function of the pulmonary surfactant system. Hence, it is evident to provide novel insights into the extent and mechanisms of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in order to facilitate the fabrication of safe nanomedicines suitable for pulmonary applications. Negatively- and positively-charged poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameters of ~100nm) served as model carriers. Nanoparticles were incubated with several synthetic and naturally-derived pulmonary surfactants to characterize the sensitivity of each preparation to biophysical inactivation. Changes in surface properties (i.e. adsorption and dynamic surface tension behavior) were monitored in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Both nanoparticle formulations revealed a dose-dependent influence on the biophysical behavior of all investigated pulmonary surfactants. However, the surfactant sensitivity towards inhibition depended on both the carrier type, where negatively-charged nanoparticles showed increased inactivation potency compared to their positively-charged counterparts, and surfactant composition. Among the surfactants tested, synthetic mixtures (i.e. phospholipids, phospholipids supplemented with surfactant protein B, and Venticute®) were more susceptible to surface-activity inhibition as the more complex naturally-derived preparations (i.e. Alveofact® and large surfactant aggregates isolated from rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Overall, nanoparticle characteristics and surfactant constitution both influence the extent of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactants.

  1. Two types of surfactant phases and four coexisting liquid phases in a water/nonionic surfactant/triglyceride/hydrocarbon system

    SciTech Connect

    Kunieda, H.; Asaoka, H.; Shinoda, K.

    1988-01-14

    A three-phase region consisting of reversed micellar solution (Om), surfactant (D'), and excess water (W) phases was observed in a wide range of water/oil ratios in a water/R/sub 12/EO/sub 4//triglyceride (1,2,3-(tris(2-ethylhexanoyloxy)propane, TEH) system. The composition of middle phase (D') remains in the vicinity of a water-surfactant axis, and its phase behavior is different from that in a water/nonionic surfactant/saturated hydrocarbon system, in which the composition of surfactant phase (D) changes from water-rich to oil-rich with increasing lipophilicity of surfactant. The D' phase is identified with the surfactant phase known as the L/sub 3/ phase in which an oblate spheroid aggregate is present. In a four-component system of water/R/sub 12/EO//sub 4//TEH/hexadecane, a four phase region consisting of water, two surfactant (D and D'), and oil phases appears due to the overlapping of two three-phase regions. The mechanism for the formation of the four-phase region and the existence of four types of three-phase regions were concluded and actually discovered in a carefully selected system.

  2. Polymer gels with associating side chains and their interaction with surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordievskaya, Yulia D.; Rumyantsev, Artem M.; Kramarenko, Elena Yu.

    2016-05-01

    Conformational behaviour of hydrophobically modified (HM) polymer gels in solutions of nonionic surfactants is studied theoretically. A HM gel contains hydrophobic side chains (stickers) grafted to its subchains. Hydrophobic stickers are capable to aggregate into joint micelles with surfactant molecules. Micelles containing more than one sticker serve as additional physical cross-links of the network, and their formation causes gel shrinking. In the proposed theoretical model, the interior of the gel/surfactant complex is treated as an array of densely packed spherical polymer brushes consisting of gel subchains tethered to the surface of the spherical sticker/surfactant micelles. Effect of stickers length and grafting density, surfactant concentration and hydrophobicity on gel swelling as well as on hydrophobic association inside it is analyzed. It is shown that increasing surfactant concentration can result in a gel collapse, which is caused by surfactant-induced hydrophobic aggregation of stickers, and a successive gel reswelling. The latter should be attributed to a growing fraction of surfactants in joint aggregates and, hence, increasing number of micelles containing only one sticker and not participating in gel physical cross-linking. In polyelectrolyte (PE) gels hydrophobic aggregation is opposed by osmotic pressure of mobile counterions, so that at some critical ionization degree hydrophobic association is completely suppressed. Hydrophobic modification of polymers is shown to open new ways for controlling gel responsiveness. In particular, it is discussed that incorporation of photosensitive groups into gel subchains and/or surfactant tail could give a possibility to vary the gel volume by light. Since hydrophobic aggregation regularities in gels and solutions are common, we hope our findings will be useful for design of polymer based self-healing materials as well.

  3. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. PMID:26869216

  4. Adsorption of anionic and non-ionic surfactants on carbon nanotubes in water with dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vo, Minh D; Shiau, Benjamin; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2016-05-28

    The morphology of surfactants physically adsorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has a significant impact on the dispersion of CNTs in the solution. The adsorption of the surfactants alfoterra 123-8s (AF) and tergitol 15-s-40 (TG) on CNTs was investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, as well as the behavior of the binary surfactant system with CNTs. Properties of surfactants (i.e., critical micelle concentration, aggregation number, shape and size of micelle, and diffusivity) in water were determined to validate the simulation model. Results indicated that the assembly of surfactants (AF and TG) on CNTs depends on the interaction of the surfactant tail and the CNT surface, where surfactants formed mainly hemimicellar structures. For surfactants in solution, most micelles had spherical shape. The particles formed by the CNT and the adsorbed surfactant became hydrophilic, due to the outward orientation of the head groups of the surfactants that formed monolayer adsorption. In the binary surfactant system, the presence of TG on the CNT surface provided a considerable hydrophilic steric effect, due to the EO groups of TG molecules. It was also seen that the adsorption of AF was more favorable than TG on the CNT surface. Diffusion coefficients for the surfactants in the bulk and surface diffusion on the CNT were calculated. These results are applicable, in a qualitative sense, to the more general case of adsorption of surfactants on the hydrophobic surface of cylindrically shaped nanoscale objects. PMID:27250319

  5. Adsorption of anionic and non-ionic surfactants on carbon nanotubes in water with dissipative particle dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Minh D.; Shiau, Benjamin; Harwell, Jeffrey H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of surfactants physically adsorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has a significant impact on the dispersion of CNTs in the solution. The adsorption of the surfactants alfoterra 123-8s (AF) and tergitol 15-s-40 (TG) on CNTs was investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, as well as the behavior of the binary surfactant system with CNTs. Properties of surfactants (i.e., critical micelle concentration, aggregation number, shape and size of micelle, and diffusivity) in water were determined to validate the simulation model. Results indicated that the assembly of surfactants (AF and TG) on CNTs depends on the interaction of the surfactant tail and the CNT surface, where surfactants formed mainly hemimicellar structures. For surfactants in solution, most micelles had spherical shape. The particles formed by the CNT and the adsorbed surfactant became hydrophilic, due to the outward orientation of the head groups of the surfactants that formed monolayer adsorption. In the binary surfactant system, the presence of TG on the CNT surface provided a considerable hydrophilic steric effect, due to the EO groups of TG molecules. It was also seen that the adsorption of AF was more favorable than TG on the CNT surface. Diffusion coefficients for the surfactants in the bulk and surface diffusion on the CNT were calculated. These results are applicable, in a qualitative sense, to the more general case of adsorption of surfactants on the hydrophobic surface of cylindrically shaped nanoscale objects.

  6. Adsorption of anionic and non-ionic surfactants on carbon nanotubes in water with dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vo, Minh D; Shiau, Benjamin; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2016-05-28

    The morphology of surfactants physically adsorbed on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has a significant impact on the dispersion of CNTs in the solution. The adsorption of the surfactants alfoterra 123-8s (AF) and tergitol 15-s-40 (TG) on CNTs was investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, as well as the behavior of the binary surfactant system with CNTs. Properties of surfactants (i.e., critical micelle concentration, aggregation number, shape and size of micelle, and diffusivity) in water were determined to validate the simulation model. Results indicated that the assembly of surfactants (AF and TG) on CNTs depends on the interaction of the surfactant tail and the CNT surface, where surfactants formed mainly hemimicellar structures. For surfactants in solution, most micelles had spherical shape. The particles formed by the CNT and the adsorbed surfactant became hydrophilic, due to the outward orientation of the head groups of the surfactants that formed monolayer adsorption. In the binary surfactant system, the presence of TG on the CNT surface provided a considerable hydrophilic steric effect, due to the EO groups of TG molecules. It was also seen that the adsorption of AF was more favorable than TG on the CNT surface. Diffusion coefficients for the surfactants in the bulk and surface diffusion on the CNT were calculated. These results are applicable, in a qualitative sense, to the more general case of adsorption of surfactants on the hydrophobic surface of cylindrically shaped nanoscale objects.

  7. Micelle depletion-induced vs. micelle-mediated aggregation in nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D. Aswal, V. K.

    2015-06-24

    The phase behavior anionic silica nanoparticle (Ludox LS30) with non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) and cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticle–surfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-micelle system in both the cases lead to the aggregation of nanoparticles. The aggregation is found to be micelle depletion-induced for C12E10 whereas micelle-mediated aggregation for DTAB. Interestingly, it is also found that phase behavior of mixed surfactant (C12E10 + DTAB) system is similar to that of C12E10 (unlike DTAB) micelles with nanoparticles.

  8. Micelle depletion-induced vs. micelle-mediated aggregation in nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K.

    2015-06-01

    The phase behavior anionic silica nanoparticle (Ludox LS30) with non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) and cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticle-surfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-micelle system in both the cases lead to the aggregation of nanoparticles. The aggregation is found to be micelle depletion-induced for C12E10 whereas micelle-mediated aggregation for DTAB. Interestingly, it is also found that phase behavior of mixed surfactant (C12E10 + DTAB) system is similar to that of C12E10 (unlike DTAB) micelles with nanoparticles.

  9. Surfactant-Triggered Fluorescence Turn "on/off" Behavior of a Polythiophene-graft-Polyampholyte.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Radhakanta; Das, Sandip; Chatterjee, Dhruba P; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-08-23

    Polythiophene-graft-polyampholyte (PTP) is synthesized using N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and tert-butyl methacrylate monomers by grafting from polythiophene backbone, followed by hydrolysis. The resulting polymer exhibits aqueous solubility via formation of small-sized miceller aggregates with hydrophobic polythiophene at the center and radiating polyionic side chains (cationic or anionic depending on the pH of the medium) at the outer periphery. The critical micelle concentration of PTP in acidic solution (0.025 mg/mL, pH = 2.7) is determined from fluorescence spectroscopy. PTP exhibits reversible fluorescence on and off response in both acidic and basic medium with the sequential addition of differently charged ionic surfactants, repeatedly. The fluorescence intensity of PTP at pH 2.7 increases with the addition of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), due to the self-aggregation forming compound micelles. The fluorescence intensity of these solutions again decreases on addition of a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), because of assembling of SDBS with CTAB, thus deassembling the PTP-SDBS aggregates. At pH 9.2, these turn on and turn off responses are also shown by PTP with the sequential addition of cationic surfactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (SDBS), respectively. This result shows that PTP has potential for surfactant-induced reversible fluorescence turn on and off using ionic surfactant (SDBS and CTAB) through self-assembling and deassembling of the ionic aggregates. The reversible aggregation and disaggregation process of PTP with the surfactants at both acidic and basic pH is supported from dynamic light scattering and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the above systems studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy also supports the above aggregation and disaggregation process. PMID:27465928

  10. SANS and DLS Studies of Protein Unfolding in Presence of Urea and Surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Aswal, V. K.; Chodankar, S. N.; Wagh, A. G.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Vavrin, R.

    2008-03-17

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) during its unfolding in presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. On addition of urea, the BSA protein unfolds for urea concentrations greater than 4 M and acquires a random coil configuration with its radius of gyration increasing with urea concentration. The addition of surfactant unfolds the protein by the formation of micelle-like aggregates of surfactants along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The fractal dimension of such a protein-surfactant complex decreases and the overall size of the complex increases on increasing the surfactant concentration. The conformation of the unfolded protein in the complex has been determined directly using contrast variation SANS measurements by contrast matching the surfactant to the medium. Results of DLS measurements are found to be in good agreement with those obtained using SANS.

  11. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1992--September 30 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, J.

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this research project was to investigate mechanisms governing adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy have been determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the three years contract period, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures was studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride were the surfactants studied. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes in interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amounts of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactants in mixed aggregate leads to shielding of the charge of ionic surfactants which in turn promotes aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution on adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentration in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  12. Perfluorinated Alcohols Induce Complex Coacervation in Mixed Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samuel I; Collins, Christopher M; Khaledi, Morteza G

    2016-03-15

    (-)) whereas the two counterions (Br(-) and Na(+)) primarily reside in the aqueous-rich phase. The results suggest the formation of a catanionic complex in the coacervate phase through ion pairing with a concomitant release of the surfactant counterions (Na(+) and Br(-)) into the aqueous-rich phase. Finally, the fluorocarbon alcohol systems are contrasted with the effects of aliphatic alcohols in the mixed catanionic surfactant systems. Isopropanol does not have the same interactions as HFIP with respect to solubilization, aggregation, and phase separation of the oppositely charged surfactants.

  13. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  14. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  15. Comparison between the interactions of the cationic surfactant DODAB with xanthan and galactomannan.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gabriel A T; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Pontarolo, Roberto; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2015-01-22

    The interactions of the cationic surfactant DODAB with anionic xanthan (XAN) and nonionic galactomannan (GMC) polysaccharides in solution were investigated using tensiometry, differential scanning microcalorimetry (μ-DSC), zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques and by the calculated thermodynamic parameters of ΔG(ves)(0), ΔG(ads)(0), Γ(max) and a(min). The surfactant formed large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) that aggregated with both the polymers in solution. Increasing DODAB concentrations resulted in greater and greater DODAB-XAN aggregates, high turbidity and even precipitation, while DODAB-GMC aggregates remained equal sized, clear solution and no precipitation observed. Further addition of DODAB to XAN solution was able to resuspend the precipitates. The interactions with both polysaccharides resulted in a more spontaneous adsorption of the DODAB-polymer aggregates at the air/solution interface with lower surfactant population.

  16. Comparative insight into surfactants mediated amyloidogenesis of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Khan, Javed M; Siddiqi, Mohammad K; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan H

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions have an important role in the protein aggregation. In this study, we have investigated the effect of charge and hydrophobicity of oppositely charged surfactants i.e., anionic (AOT and SDS) and cationic (CTAB and DTAB) on hen egg white lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. We have employed various methods such as turbidity measurements, Rayleigh light scattering, ThT, Congo red and ANS dye binding assays, far-UV CD, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy. At lower molar ratio, both anionic and cationic surfactants promote amyloid fibril formation in lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. The aggregation was proportionally increased with respect to protein concentration and hydrophobicity of surfactant. The morphology of aggregates at both the pH was fibrillar in structure, as visualized by dye binding and microscopic imaging techniques. Initially, the interaction between surfactants and lysozyme was electrostatic and then hydrophobic as investigated by ITC. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge and hydrophobicity during amyloid fibril formation.

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  19. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  20. Structure of the SDS/1-dodecanol surfactant mixture on a graphite surface: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Hector

    2010-05-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 1-dodecanol molecules on a graphite surface were carried out at low and high concentration to investigate the formation of aggregates on the solid plate. The simulations showed that at low concentration the surfactants were well adsorbed on the surface by forming layers structures or a hemicylinder aggregate for a slightly higher surfactant concentration whereas at the highest concentration the surfactants formed monolayer-like structures localized away from the graphite surface with a water bin between the monolayer and the graphite plate. Therefore, we obtained different arrays of those observed in recent simulations of pure SDS adsorbed on graphite at the same concentration reported in the literature. The unexpected water layer between the 1-dodecanol and the graphite surface, at the highest concentration, was explained in terms of the Hamaker constants. The present results suggest that the formation of aggregates on solid surfaces is a combined effect not only of the surfactant-surfactant and the surfactant-wall interactions but also of the surfactant concentration.

  1. Antagonistic effects between magnetite nanoparticles and a hydrophobic surfactant in highly concentrated Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander; Esquena, Jordi

    2014-05-13

    Herein we present a systematic study of the antagonistic interaction between magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and nonionic hydrophobic surfactant in Pickering highly concentrated emulsions. Interfacial tension measurements, phase behavior, and emulsion stability studies, combined with electron microscopy observations in polymerized systems and magnetometry, are used to support the discussion. First, stable W/O highly concentrated emulsions were obtained using partially hydrophobized magnetite nanoparticles. These emulsions experienced phase separation when surfactant is added at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt %. Such phase separation arises from the preferential affinity of the surfactant for the nanoparticle surfaces, which remarkably enhances their hydrophobicity, leading to a gradual desorption of nanoparticles from the interface. W/O emulsions were obtained at higher surfactant concentrations, but in this case, these emulsions were mainly stabilized by surfactant molecules. Therefore, stable emulsions could be prepared in two separate ranges of surfactant concentrations. After polymerization, low-density macroporous polymers were obtained, and the adsorption and aggregation of nanoparticles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The progressive displacement of the nanoparticles was revealed: from the oil-water interface, in which aggregated nanoparticles were adsorbed, forming dense layers, to the continuous phase of the emulsions, where small nanoparticle aggregates were randomly dispersed. Interestingly, the results also show that the blocking temperature of the iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in the macroporous polymers could be modulated by appropriate control of the concentrations of both surfactant and nanoparticles. PMID:24738961

  2. Antagonistic effects between magnetite nanoparticles and a hydrophobic surfactant in highly concentrated Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander; Esquena, Jordi

    2014-05-13

    Herein we present a systematic study of the antagonistic interaction between magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and nonionic hydrophobic surfactant in Pickering highly concentrated emulsions. Interfacial tension measurements, phase behavior, and emulsion stability studies, combined with electron microscopy observations in polymerized systems and magnetometry, are used to support the discussion. First, stable W/O highly concentrated emulsions were obtained using partially hydrophobized magnetite nanoparticles. These emulsions experienced phase separation when surfactant is added at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt %. Such phase separation arises from the preferential affinity of the surfactant for the nanoparticle surfaces, which remarkably enhances their hydrophobicity, leading to a gradual desorption of nanoparticles from the interface. W/O emulsions were obtained at higher surfactant concentrations, but in this case, these emulsions were mainly stabilized by surfactant molecules. Therefore, stable emulsions could be prepared in two separate ranges of surfactant concentrations. After polymerization, low-density macroporous polymers were obtained, and the adsorption and aggregation of nanoparticles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The progressive displacement of the nanoparticles was revealed: from the oil-water interface, in which aggregated nanoparticles were adsorbed, forming dense layers, to the continuous phase of the emulsions, where small nanoparticle aggregates were randomly dispersed. Interestingly, the results also show that the blocking temperature of the iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in the macroporous polymers could be modulated by appropriate control of the concentrations of both surfactant and nanoparticles.

  3. Concentration Dependent Specific Rotations of Chiral Surfactants: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Covington, Cody L; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2016-07-21

    Recent experimental studies have shown unexpected chiroptical response from some chiral surfactant molecules, where the specific rotations changed significantly as a function of concentration. To establish a theoretical understanding of this experimentally observed phenomena, a novel methodology for studying chiral surfactants via combined molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations is presented. MD simulations on the +10 000 atom surfactant systems have been performed using MD and QM/molecular mechanics (MM) approaches. QM calculations performed on MD snapshots coupled with extensive analysis on lauryl ester of phenylalanine (LEP) surfactant system indicate that the experimentally observed variation of specific rotation with concentration may be due to the conformational differences of the surfactant monomers in the aggregates. Though traditional MM simulations did not show significant differences in the conformer populations, QM/MM simulations using the forces derived from the PM6 method did predict conformational differences between aggregated and nonaggregated LEP molecules, which is consistent with experimental data. Additionally the electrostatic environment of charged surfactants may also be important, since dramatic changes in the Boltzmann populations of surfactant monomers can be noted in the presence of an electric field generated by the chiral ionic aggregates. PMID:27355395

  4. The interaction of photo-responsive surfactants with biological macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazwi, Khiza L.

    The interaction of photo-responsive surfactants with proteins has been considered as a means to exert reversible control over a number of aspects of protein structure and function. The azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) family of cationic surfactants undergo a photo-reversible cis to trans isomerization upon exposure to light of the appropriate wavelength. The trans form of the molecule has a lower dipole moment across its azo linkage, and is more hydrophobic than the cis isomer. This results in a higher binding affinity with proteins for the trans isomer, inducing a greater degree of unfolding of tertiary and secondary structures. The surfactant has been applied to the study of the amyloid fibrillation pathway in insulin, in which the protein self-associates into long, insoluble, rod-like structures. The fibrillation rate in insulin is enhanced in the presence of the trans- isomer while the formation of fibrils is largely inhibited in the presence of the cis- isomer, where amorphous aggregates are observed instead. Additionally early fibrillar species formed in the trans-azoTAB assays exhibit a greater tendency to lateral aggregation than do structures in the pure protein, resulting in a more truncated, bundled final aggregate morphology. Use of the surfactants as a means to control protein quaternary solution structure has also been explored in the subunit dissociation of tetrameric catalase. In the presence of azoTAB surfactants, catalase dissociates first into a super-active dimer, then at higher concentrations into an aggregation prone monomer. Finally, the structural changes associated with azoTAB-induced unfolding of the two domain protein papain are tracked. The denaturation pathway involves a progressive loss in secondary structure with increasing azoTAB concentration, along with a relaxation of the compact tertiary structure, and a spatial separation of the two domains. A number of complementary experimental techniques are combined to determine

  5. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, other inorganic and polymeric species is being studied. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro and nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability is used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the second year of this three year contract, adsorption/desorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures on alumina and silica was studied. Surfactants studied include the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC), nonionic pentadecylethoxylated nonyl phenol (NP-15) and the nonionic octaethylene glycol n-dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}EO{sub 8}) of varying hydrocarbon chain length. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer in terms of micropolarity and aggregation numbers was probed using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes of microstructure upon dilution (desorption) were also studied. Presence of the nonionic surfactant in the mixed aggregate led to shielding of the charge of the ionic surfactant which in-turn promoted aggregation but reduced electrostatic attraction between the charged surfactant and the mineral surface. Strong consequences of surfactant interactions in solution upon adsorption as well as correlations between monomer concentrations in mixtures and adsorption were revealed.

  6. Surfactant-Amino Acid and Surfactant-Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Medium: a Review.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    An overview of surfactant-amino acid interactions mainly in aqueous medium has been discussed. Main emphasis has been on the solution thermodynamics and solute-solvent interactions. Almost all available data on the topic has been presented in a lucid and simple way. Conventional surfactants have been discussed as amphiphiles forming micelles and amino acids as additives and their effect on the various physicochemical properties of these conventional surfactants. Surfactant-surfactant interactions in aqueous medium, various mixed surfactant models, are also highlighted to assess their interactions in aqueous medium. Finally, their applied part has been taken into consideration to interpret their possible uses.

  7. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    PubMed

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  8. Cooling enhancement of aerosol particles due to surfactant precipitation.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Melinda R; Freedman, Miriam A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-07-01

    Light extinction by particles in Earth's atmosphere is strongly dependent on the particle size, chemical composition, and ability to take up water. In this work, we have measured the optical growth factors, fRH(ext)(RH, dry), for complex particles composed of an inorganic salt, sodium nitrate, and an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate. In contrast with previous studies using soluble and slightly soluble organic compounds, optical growth in excess to that expected based on the volume weighted water uptake of the individual components is observed. We explored the relationship between optical growth and concentration of surfactant by investigating the role of particle density, the effect of a surfactant monolayer, and increased light extinction by surfactant aggregates and precipitates. For our experimental conditions, it is likely that surfactant precipitates are responsible for the observed increase in light scattering. The contribution of surfactant precipitates to light scattering of aerosol particles has not been previously explored and has significant implications for characterizing the aerosol direct effect.

  9. Solubilization of herbicides by single and mixed commercial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, M C; Gómez-Pantoja, E; Morillo, E; Undabeytia, T

    2015-12-15

    The solubilization capabilities of micellar solutions of three single surfactants, two alcohol alkoxylates B048 and B266, and the tallow alkyl ethoxylated amine ET15, and their equimolar mixed solutions toward the herbicides flurtamone (FL), metribuzin (MTZ) and mesotrione (MST) were investigated. The solubilization capacity was quantified in terms of the molar solubilization ratio (MSR), critical micellar concentration (CMC), micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmc), binding constant (K1), number of aggregation (Nagg) and Stern-Volmer constant (Ksv). The herbicides were greatly solubilized into different loci of the micelles: FL within the inner hydrophobic core, MST at the micelle/water interface and MTZ in the palisade region. Equimolar binary surfactant mixtures did not improve the solubilization of herbicides over those of single components, with the exception of MTZ by the B266/ET15 system which enhanced solubilization by 10-20%. This enhanced solubilization of MTZ was due to an increased number of micelles that arise from both the intermediate Nagg relative to that of the single surfactants and the lower CMC. The use of Ksv values was a better predictor of the solubilization of polar molecules within binary mixtures of these surfactants than the interaction parameter β(M) from regular solution theory (RST). The results herein suggest that the use of mixed surfactant systems for the solubilization of polar molecules in environmental remediation technologies may be very limited in scope, without clear advantages over the use of single surfactant systems.

  10. Large scale molecular dynamics study of polymer-surfactant complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we study the self-assembly of cationic polyelectrolytes mediated by anionic surfactants in dilute or semi-dilute and gel states. The understanding of the dilute system is a requirement for the understanding of gel states. The importance of polyelectrolyte with oppositely charged colloidal particles can be found in biological systems, such as immobilization of enzymes in polyelectrolyte complexes or nonspecific association of DNA with protein. With the same understanding, interaction of surfactants with polyelectrolytes shows intriguing phenomena that are important for both in academic research as well as industrial applications. Many useful properties of PE surfactant complexes come from the highly ordered structures of surfactant self-assembly inside the PE aggregate. We do large scale molecular dynamics simulation using LAMMPS to understand the structure and dynamics of PE-surfactant systems. Our investigation shows highly ordered ring-string structures that have been observed experimentally in biological systems. We will investigate many different properties of PE-surfactant complexation which will be helpful for pharmaceutical, engineering and biological applications.

  11. Implicit solvent model simulations of surfactant self-assembly in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Morisada, Shintaro; Shinto, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-20

    The behaviors of the cationic surfactants of n-decyltrimethylammonium chloride (C(10)TAC) in water have been studied by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the implicit solvent model proposed in our previous report (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2007, 3, 1163). The MD simulations of 343 C(10)TAC surfactants in water at the surfactant concentrations of 5-100 mM have been performed for 25 ns, where the surfactant monomers at the initial configurations are uniformly dispersed. As a result, it was found that the C(10)TAC surfactants exist as monomers or oligomers at 5-15 mM, whereas they self-assemble to form surfactant aggregates at 30-100 mM. The growth and the breakup of these surfactant aggregates were repeatedly observed during the 25 ns simulations. The size distributions and the free monomer concentrations indicate that the critical micelle concentration of C(10)TAC surfactant in water represented by the ISM-3 lies between 15 and 30 mM, which fairly agrees with the experimental values of 50-65 mM.

  12. Theoretical model to investigate the alkyl chain and anion dependent interactions of gemini surfactant with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Vishvakarma, Vijay K; Kumari, Kamlesh; Patel, Rajan; Dixit, V S; Singh, Prashant; Mehrotra, Gopal K; Chandra, Ramesh; Chakrawarty, Anand Kumar

    2015-05-15

    Surfactants are used to prevent the irreversible aggregation of partially refolded proteins and they also assist in protein refolding. We have reported the design and screening of gemini surfactant to stabilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of computational tool (iGEMDOCK). A series of gemini surfactant has been designed based on bis-N-alkyl nicotinate dianion via varying the alkyl group and anion. On changing the alkyl group and anion of the surfactant, the value of Log P changes means polarity of surfactant can be tuned. Further, the virtual screening of the gemini surfactant has been carried out based on generic evolutionary method. Herein, thermodynamic data was studied to determine the potential of gemini surfactant as BSA stabilizer. Computational tools help to find out the efficient gemini surfactant to stabilize the BSA rather than to use the surfactant randomly and directionless for the stabilization. It can be confirmed through the experimental techniques. Previously, researcher synthesized one of the designed and used gemini surfactant to stabilize the BSA and their interactions were confirmed through various techniques and computational docking. But herein, the authors find the most competent gemini surfactant to stabilize BSA using computational tools on the basis of energy score. Different from the single chain surfactant, the gemini surfactants exhibit much stronger electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with the protein and are thus effective at much lower concentrations. Based on the present study, it is expected that gemini surfactants may prove useful in the protein stabilization operations and may thus be effectively employed to circumvent the problem of misfolding and aggregation.

  13. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  14. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like ‘top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and ‘bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated. PMID:27193558

  15. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-05-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like `top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and `bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated.

  16. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... pigmented nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... baby grows in the womb. In some families bathing trunk nevi may be inherited. The condition may ...

  17. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  19. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  20. Relaxation times and modes of disturbed aggregate distribution in micellar solutions with fusion and fission of micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Anatoly I.; Adzhemyan, Loran Ts.; Shchekin, Alexander K.

    2015-09-28

    We have performed direct numerical calculations of the kinetics of relaxation in the system of surfactant spherical micelles under joint action of the molecular mechanism with capture and emission of individual surfactant molecules by molecular aggregates and the mechanism of fusion and fission of the aggregates. As a basis, we have taken the difference equations of aggregation and fragmentation in the form of the generalized kinetic Smoluchowski equations for aggregate concentrations. The calculations have been made with using the droplet model of molecular surfactant aggregates and two modified Smoluchowski models for the coefficients of aggregate-monomer and aggregate-aggregate fusions which take into account the effects of the aggregate size and presence of hydrophobic spots on the aggregate surface. A full set of relaxation times and corresponding relaxation modes for nonequilibrium aggregate distribution in the aggregation number has been found. The dependencies of these relaxation times and modes on the total concentration of surfactant in the solution and the special parameter controlling the probability of fusion in collisions of micelles with other micelles have been studied.

  1. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  2. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  3. Sizing up surfactant synthesis.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling involving a lysophospholipid. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, research from the Shimizu lab (Harayama et al., 2014) demonstrates the highly selective enzymatic behavior of lysophospholipid acyltransferases. The authors present an enzymatic model for phosphatidylcholine molecular species diversification that impacts surfactant formation.

  4. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  5. Characterization of micellar solutions using surfactant ion electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, K.M.; Cussler, E.L.; Evans, D.F.

    1980-03-20

    Surfactant ion electrodes were used to investigate the dimerization, aggregation, and micelle formation occurring at 25 C in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate, decyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB), and orange II (4-((2-hydroxy-1-naphthalenyl) acid monosodium salt) as a function of added electrolyte. The surfactant electrodes, which contained a liquid membrane ion exchanger, permitted a direct determination of the surfactant monomer activity. Analysis of these data gave an association constant of 1000 for orange II, an estimated fractional charge on the DTAB micelle of 0.78, a dimerization constant of 400 (l/m) for TTAB, and a second break above the commonly accepted critical micelle concentration for sodium dodecyl sulfate, a break which may result from an ordering of the micelles. 20 references.

  6. Aggregation in charged nanoparticles solutions induced by different interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, S.; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles as induced through different interactions. The nanoparticle aggregation is induced by addition of salt (NaCl), cationic protein (lysozyme) and non-ionic surfactant (C12E10) employing different kind of interactions. The results show that the interaction in presence of salt can be explained using DLVO theory whereas non-DLVO forces play important role for interaction of nanoparticles with protein and surfactant. The presence of salt screens the repulsion between charged nanoparticles giving rise to a net attraction in the DLVO potential. On the other hand, strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticle and oppositely charged protein leads to protein-mediated nanoparticle aggregation. In case of non-ionic surfactant, the relatively long-range attractive depletion interaction is found to be responsible for the particle aggregation. Interestingly, the completely different interactions lead to similar kind of aggregate morphology. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are found to have mass fractal nature having a fractal dimension (~2.5) consistent with diffusion limited type of fractal morphology in all three cases.

  7. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  8. Chain architecture and micellization: A mean-field coarse-grained model for poly(ethylene oxide) alkyl ether surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Colville, Alexander J.; Mackie, Allan D.

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic modeling of surfactant systems is expected to be an important tool to describe, understand, and take full advantage of the micellization process for different molecular architectures. Here, we implement a single chain mean field theory to study the relevant equilibrium properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and aggregation number for three sets of surfactants with different geometries maintaining constant the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers. The results demonstrate the direct effect of the block organization for the surfactants under study by means of an analysis of the excess energy and entropy which can be accurately determined from the mean-field scheme. Our analysis reveals that the CMC values are sensitive to branching in the hydrophilic head part of the surfactant and can be observed in the entropy-enthalpy balance, while aggregation numbers are also affected by splitting the hydrophobic tail of the surfactant and are manifested by slight changes in the packing entropy.

  9. Chain architecture and micellization: A mean-field coarse-grained model for poly(ethylene oxide) alkyl ether surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Mackie, Allan D.; Colville, Alexander J.

    2015-03-21

    Microscopic modeling of surfactant systems is expected to be an important tool to describe, understand, and take full advantage of the micellization process for different molecular architectures. Here, we implement a single chain mean field theory to study the relevant equilibrium properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and aggregation number for three sets of surfactants with different geometries maintaining constant the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers. The results demonstrate the direct effect of the block organization for the surfactants under study by means of an analysis of the excess energy and entropy which can be accurately determined from the mean-field scheme. Our analysis reveals that the CMC values are sensitive to branching in the hydrophilic head part of the surfactant and can be observed in the entropy-enthalpy balance, while aggregation numbers are also affected by splitting the hydrophobic tail of the surfactant and are manifested by slight changes in the packing entropy.

  10. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  11. Effect of alkyl chain asymmetry on catanionic mixtures of hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elena; Rodriguez-Abreu, Carlos; Schulz, Pablo; Ruso, Juan M

    2010-01-15

    In this work we studied and compared the physicochemical properties of the catanionic mixtures cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide-sodium dodecanoate, cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide-sodium perfluorodacanoate, octyltrimethylammonium bromide-sodium perfluorodacanoate and cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide-sodium octanoate by a combination of rheological, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and polarized optical microscopy measurements. The binary mixtures of the surfactants have been analyzed at different mixed ratios and total concentration of the mixture. Mixtures containing a perfluorinated surfactant are able to form lamellar liquid crystals and stable spontaneous vesicles. Meanwhile, system containing just hydrogenated surfactants form hexagonal phases or they are arranged in elongated aggregates.

  12. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2004-11-20

    The aim of the project is to develop a knowledge base to help the design of enhanced processes for mobilizing and extracting untrapped oil. We emphasize evaluation of novel surfactant mixtures and obtaining optimum combinations of the surfactants for efficient chemical flooding EOR processes. In this regard, an understanding of the aggregate shape, size and structure is crucial since these properties govern the crude oil removal efficiency. During the three-year period, the adsorption and aggregation behavior of sugar-based surfactants and their mixtures with other types of surfactants have been studied. Sugar-based surfactants are made from renewable resources, nontoxic and biodegradable. They are miscible with water and oil. These environmentally benign surfactants feature high surface activity, good salinity, calcium and temperature tolerance, and unique adsorption behavior. They possess the characteristics required for oil flooding surfactants and have the potential for replacing currently used surfactants in oil recovery. A novel analytical ultracentrifugation technique has been successfully employed for the first time, to characterize the aggregate species present in mixed micellar solution due to its powerful ability to separate particles based on their size and shape and monitor them simultaneously. Analytical ultracentrifugation offers an unprecedented opportunity to obtain important information on mixed micelles, structure-performance relationship for different surfactant aggregates in solution and their role in interfacial processes. Initial sedimentation velocity investigations were conducted using nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) to choose the best analytical protocol, calculate the partial specific volume and obtain information on sedimentation coefficient, aggregation mass of micelles. Four softwares: OptimaTM XL-A/XL-I data analysis software, DCDT+, Svedberg and SEDFIT, were compared for the analysis of sedimentation velocity

  13. Impact of cationic surfactant on the self-assembly of sodium caseinate.

    PubMed

    Vinceković, Marko; Curlin, Marija; Jurašin, Darija

    2014-08-27

    The impact of a cationic surfactant, dodecylammonium chloride (DDACl), on the self-assembly of sodium caseinate (SC) has been investigated by light scattering, zeta potential, and rheological measurements as well as by microscopy (transmission electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy). In SC dilute solutions concentration-dependent self-assembly proceeds through the formation of spherical associates and their aggregation into elongated structures composed of connected spheres. DDACl interacts with SC via its hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, inducing changes in SC self-assembled structures. These changes strongly depend on the surfactant aggregation states (monomeric or micellar) as well as concentration ratio of both components, leading to the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes of nano- to microdimensions. DDACl monomers interact with SC self-assembled entities in a different way compared to their micelles. Surfactant monomers form soluble complexes (similar to surfactant mixed micelles) at lower SC concentration but insoluble gelatinous complexes at higher SC concentration. At surfactant micellar concentration soluble complexes with casein chains wrapped around surfactant micelles are formed. This study suggests that the use of proper cationic surfactant concentration will allow modification and control of structural changes of SC self-assembled entities.

  14. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Evidence of overcharging in the complexation between oppositely charged polymers and surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, Jean-François

    2005-10-01

    We report on the complexation between charged-neutral block copolymers and oppositely charged surfactants studied by small-angle neutron scattering. Two block copolymers/surfactant systems are investigated, poly(acrylicacid)-b-poly(acrylamide) with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and poly(trimethylammonium ethylacrylate methylsulfate)-b-poly(acrylamide) with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Two two systems are similar in terms of structure and molecular weight but have different electrostatic charges. The neutron-scattering data have been interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the formation of mixed polymer-surfactant aggregates, also called colloidal complexes. These complexes exhibit a core-shell microstructure, where the core is a dense coacervate microphase of micelles surrounded by neutral blocks. Here, we are taking advantage of the fact that the complexation results in finite-size aggregates to shed some light on the complexation mechanisms. In order to analyze quantitatively the neutron data, we develop two different approaches to derive the number of surfactant micelles per polymer in the mixed aggregates and the distributions of aggregation numbers. With these results, we show that the formation of the colloidal complex is in agreement with overcharging predictions. In both systems, the amount of polyelectrolytes needed to build the core-shell colloids always exceeds the number that would be necessary to compensate the charge of the micelles. For the two polymer-surfactant systems investigated, the overcharging ratios are 0.66±0.06 and 0.38±0.02.

  16. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2002-09-30

    The aim of the project is to develop and evaluate efficient novel surfactant mixtures for enhanced oil recovery. Surfactant loss by adsorption or precipitation depends to a great extent on the type of surfactant complexes and aggregates formed. Such information as well as techniques to generate the information is lacking currently particularly for surfactant mixtures and surfactant/polymer systems. A novel analytical centrifuge application is explored during the last period to generate information on structures-performance relationship for different surfactant aggregates in solution and, in turn, at interfaces. To use analytical untracentrifuge for surfactant mixtures, information on partial specific volumes of single surfactants and their mixtures is required. Towards this purpose, surface tension and density measurements were performed to determine critical micellar concentrations (cmc), partial specific volumes of n-dodecyl-{beta}-Dmaltoside (DM), nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) and their 1:1 mixtures at 25 C. Durchschlag's theoretical calculation method was adopted to calculate the partial specific volumes. Effects of temperature and mixing, as well as methods used for estimation on micellization and partial specific volumes were studied during the current period. Surface tension results revealed no interaction between the two surfactants in mixed micelles. Partial specific volume measurements also indicated no interaction in mixed micelles. Maximum adsorption density, area per molecule and free energy of micellization were also calculated. Partial specific volumes were estimated by two experimental methods: d{sub {rho}}/dc and V{sub {sigma}}. The difference between the results of using the two methods is within 0.5% deviation. It was found that the partial specific volume is concentration dependent and sensitive to changes in temperature. The information generated in this study will be used for the study of surfactant aggregate mass distribution

  17. Biophysicochemical Interaction of a Clinical Pulmonary Surfactant with Nanoalumina.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, F; Le Borgne, R; Seyrek, E; Berret, J-F

    2015-07-01

    We report on the interaction of pulmonary surfactant composed of phospholipids and proteins with nanometric alumina (Al2O3) in the context of lung exposure and nanotoxicity. We study the bulk properties of phospholipid/nanoparticle dispersions and determine the nature of their interactions. The clinical surfactant Curosurf, both native and extruded, and a protein-free surfactant are investigated. The phase behavior of mixed surfactant/particle dispersions was determined by optical and electron microscopy, light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. It exhibits broad similarities with that of strongly interacting nanosystems such as polymers, proteins or particles, and supports the hypothesis of electrostatic complexation. At a critical stoichiometry, micron-sized aggregates arising from the association between oppositely charged vesicles and nanoparticles are formed. Contrary to the models of lipoprotein corona or of particle wrapping, our work shows that vesicles maintain their structural integrity and trap the particles at their surfaces. The agglomeration of particles in surfactant phase is a phenomenon of importance that could change the interactions of the particles with lung cells.

  18. Flavonoid-surfactant interactions: A detailed physicochemical study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Onkar; Kaur, Rajwinder; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the interactions between flavonoids and surfactants with attention of finding the probable location of flavonoids in micellar media that can be used for controlling their antioxidant behavior. In present study, the micellar and interfacial behavior of twin tailed anionic surfactants viz. sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (NaDEHP) in the presence of two flavonoids, namely quercetin (QUE) and kaempferol (KFL) have been studied by surface tension measurements. UV-visible, fluorescence and differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) measurements have been employed to predict the probable location of flavonoids (QUE/KFL) within surfactant (AOT/NaDEHP) aggregates. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements further confirmed the solubilization of QUE/KFL in AOT/NaDEHP aggregates deduced from increased hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of aggregates in the presence of flavonoids. Both radical scavenging activity (RSA) and degradation rate constant (k) of flavonoids are found to be higher in NaDEHP micelles as compared to AOT micelles. PMID:27419641

  19. Interaction between cationic surfactant of 1-methyl-3-tetradecylimidazolium bromide and anionic polymer of sodium polystyrene sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Kang, Wenpei; Sun, Dezhi; Liu, Jie; Wei, Xilian

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between long-chain imidazolium ionic liquid (C14mimBr) and anionic polyelectrolyte of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS) has been studied using surface tension, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scatting (DLS) and conductance methods. The result shows that the surface tension plots have a pronounced hump in the surface tension at surfactant concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the surfactant. The cooperative adsorption of surfactant and polymer on the surface (PSS) and the formation of polymer/surfactant aggregate in bulk solution (PSM) provide a rational explanation about it. The formation of surfactant/polymer complexes is affected by the concentration of the surfactant or NaPSS, which is also ascertained by ITC and DLS measurements. Further, the thermodynamic parameters are derived from calorimetric titration and conductance curves, and the effects of polymer concentration and temperature on the parameters are evaluated in detail.

  20. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources.

  1. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  2. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  3. Tetrabutylammonium alkyl carboxylate surfactants in aqueous solution: self-association behavior, solution nanostructure, and comparison with tetrabutylammonium alkyl sulfate surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zana, Raoul; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2005-12-01

    A series of long and ultralong chain tetrabutylammonium alkyl carboxylate (TBACm, TBA = tetrabutylammonium ion; Cm = carboxylate ion C(m-1)H(2)(m-1)CO(2)(-) of total carbon number m) surfactants have been obtained by direct neutralization of the fatty acids with m = 12, 14, 18, 22, and 24 by tetrabutylammonium hydroxide. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching has been used to determine the micelle aggregation number (N) of the surfactants with m = 12, 14, and 18 in the temperature range 10-50 degrees C and of the surfactants with m = 22 and 24 in the temperature range 25-60 degrees C. In all instances the values of N were well below those that can be calculated for the maximum spherical micelle formed by surfactants with the same alkyl chain as the investigated surfactants on the basis of the oil drop model for the micelle core. The microstructure of selected solutions of TBAC22 was examined using transmission electron microscopy at cryogenic temperature and compared to the microstructure of solutions of TBA dodecyl and tetradecyl sulfates. These observations generally confirmed the findings of TRFQ. The self-association behavior of these anionic surfactants with TBA counterions is explained on the basis of the large size and the hydrophobicity of the tetrabutylammonium ions. The important differences in behavior that have been evidenced between tetrabutylammonium alkyl carboxylates and alkyl sulfates are discussed in terms of differences in distribution of the surfactant electrical charge on the headgroup and alkyl chain predicted by quantum chemical calculations (Langmuir 1999, 15, 7546).

  4. Solution rheology of polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte-surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucktaveesak, Nopparat

    The fundamental understanding of polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions is an important branch of polymer research. In this work, the rheological properties of polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte/surfactant systems are studied. Various synthetic poly electrolytes are chosen with varied hydrophobicity. We discuss the effects of adding various surfactants to aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)- b-polyethylene oxide)-g-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO-PPO-PAA) in the first chapter. Thermogelation in aqueous solutions of PEO-PPO-PAA is due to micellization caused by aggregation of poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) blocks resulting from temperature-induced dehydration of PPO. When nonionic surfactants with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) parameter exceeding 11 or Cn alkylsulfates; n-octyl (C8), n-decyl (C 10) and n-dodecyl (C12) sulfates are added, the gelation threshold temperature (Tgel) of 1.0wt% PEO-PPO-PAA in aqueous solutions increases. In contrast, when nonionic surfactants with HLB below 11 are added, the gelation temperature decreases. On the other hand, alkylsulfates with n = 16 or 18 and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) do not affect the Tgel. The results imply that both hydrophobicity and tail length of the added surfactant play important roles in the interaction of PEO-PPO-PAA micelles and the surfactant. In the second chapter, the solution behavior of alternating copolymers of maleic acid and hydrophobic monomer is studied. The alternating structure of monomers with two-carboxylic groups and hydrophobic monomers make these copolymers unique. Under appropriate conditions, these carboxylic groups dissociate leaving charges on the chain. The potentiometric titrations of copolymer solutions with added CaCl2 reveal two distinct dissociation processes corresponding to the dissociation of the two adjacent carboxylic acids. The viscosity data as a function of polymer concentration of poly(isobutylene-alt-sodium maleate), poly

  5. Surfactant Assemblies and their Various Possible Roles for the Origin(S) of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walde, Peter

    2006-04-01

    A large number of surfactants (surface active molecules) are chemically simple compounds that can be obtained by simple chemical reactions, in some cases even under presumably prebiotic conditions. Surfactant assemblies are self-organized polymolecular aggregates of surfactants, in the simplest case micelles, vesicles, hexagonal and cubic phases. It may be that these different types of surfactant assemblies have played various, so-far underestimated important roles in the processes that led to the formation of the first living systems. Although nucleic acids are key players in the formation of cells as we know them today (RNA world hypothesis), it is still unclear how RNA could have been formed under prebiotic conditions. Surfactants with their self-organizing properties may have assisted, controlled and compartimentalized some of the chemical reactions that eventually led to the formation of molecules like RNA. Therefore, surfactants were possibly very important in prebiotic times in the sense that they may have been involved in different physical and chemical processes that finally led to a transformation of non-living matter to the first cellular form(s) of life. This hypothesis is based on four main experimental observations: (i) Surfactant aggregation can lead to cell-like compartimentation (vesicles). (ii) Surfactant assemblies can provide local reaction conditions that are very different from the bulk medium, which may lead to a dramatic change in the rate of chemical reactions and to a change in reaction product distributions. (iii) The surface properties of surfactant assemblies that may be liquid- or solid-like, charged or neutral, and the elasticity and packing density of surfactant assemblies depend on the chemical structure of the surfactants, on the presence of other molecules, and on the overall environmental conditions (e. g. temperature). This wide range of surface characteristics of surfactant assemblies may allow a control of surface

  6. Surfactant waterflooding oil recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Schievelbein, V.H.

    1981-12-29

    Oil is recovered from an underground petroleum reservoir which contains a brine having a salinity of from 50 to 220 kg/m3 total dissolved solids by injecting an alkylarylpolyalkoxy sulfate or alkylpolyalkoxy sulfate surfactant that exhibits phase stability in the brine or diluted brine. The surfactant is injected in an aqueous solution which is prepared with diluted brine which has a salinity slightly less than that required to cause partitioning of the surfactant out of the aqueous phase into the oil-water interface or oil phase. The injection of surfactant is followed by the injecting of a driving slug comprised of either diluted brine or thickened diluted brine.

  7. Supramolecular aggregates in vacuum: positively monocharged sodium alkanesulfonate clusters.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Giorgi, Gianluca; Indelicato, Serena; Ruggirello, Angela; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The formation and structural features of positively monocharged aggregates of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and sodium methane--(MetS), butane--(ButS) and octane--(OctS) sulfonate molecules in gas phase have been investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, energy resolved mass spectrometry and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that the center-of-mass collision energy required to dissociate 50% of these monocharged aggregates scantly depends on the length of the alkyl chain as well as on the aggregation number. This, together with the large predominance of monocharged species in the mass spectra, was rationalized in terms of an aggregation pattern mainly driven by the counter ions and head groups electrostatic interactions while minor effects were attributed to the steric hindrance caused by the size of the surfactant head group and alkyl chain. DFT calculations show that the most favoured structural arrangement of these aggregates is always characterized by an internal polar core constituted by the sodium counter ions and surfactant head groups surrounded by an external layer composed by the surfactant alkyl chains. PMID:20065519

  8. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  9. Marangoni Effects of a Drop in an Extensional Flow: The Role of Surfactant Physical Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebe, Kathleen J.; Balasubramaniam, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While the changes in stresses caused by surfactant adsorption on non-deforming interfaces have been fairly well established, prior to this work, there were few studies addressing how surfactants alter stresses on strongly deforming interfaces. We chose the model problem of a drop in a uniaxial extensional flow to study these stress conditions To model surfactant effects at fluid interfaces, a proper description of the dependence of the surface tension on surface concentration, the surface equation of state, is required. We have adopted a surface equation of state that accounts for the maximum coverage limit; that is, because surfactants have a finite cross sectional area, there is an upper bound to the amount of surfactant that can adsorb in a monolayer. The surface tension reduces strongly only when this maximum coverage is approached. Since the Marangoni stresses go as the derivative of the surface equation of state times the surface concentration gradient, the non-linear equation of state determines both the effect of surfactants in the normal stress jump, (which is balanced by the product of the mean curvature of the interface times the surface tension), and the tangential stress jump, which is balanced by Marangoni stresses. First, the effects of surface coverage and intermolecular interactions among surfactants which drive aggregation of surfactants in the interface were studied. (see Pawar and Stebe, Physics of Fluids).

  10. Enhancement of DNA compaction by negatively charged nanoparticles: effect of nanoparticle size and surfactant chain length.

    PubMed

    Rudiuk, Sergii; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Baigl, Damien

    2012-02-15

    We study the compaction of genomic DNA by a series of alkyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants having different hydrocarbon chain lengths n: dodecyl-(DTAB, n=12), tetradecyl-(TTAB, n=14) and hexadecyl-(CTAB, n=16), in the absence and in the presence of negatively charged silica nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter in the range 15-100 nm. We show that NPs greatly enhance the ability of all cationic surfactants to induce DNA compaction and that this enhancement increases with an increase in NP diameter. In the absence of NP, the ability of cationic surfactants to induce DNA compaction increases with an increase in n. Conversely, in the presence of NPs, the enhancement of DNA compaction increases with a decrease in n. Therefore, although CTAB is the most efficient surfactant to compact DNA, maximal enhancement by NPs is obtained for the largest NP diameter (here, 100 nm) and the smallest surfactant chain length (here, DTAB). We suggest a mechanism where the preaggregation of surfactants on NP surface mediated by electrostatic interactions promotes cooperative binding to DNA and thus enhances the ability of surfactants to compact DNA. We show that the amplitude of enhancement is correlated with the difference between the surfactant concentration corresponding to aggregation on DNA alone and that corresponding to the onset of adsorption on nanoparticles.

  11. The Critical Role of Surfactants in the Growth of Cobalt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Yuping; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2010-01-05

    We report a combined experimental and computational study on the critical role of surfactants in the nucleation and growth of Co nanoparticles synthesized by chemical routes. By varying the surfactant species, Co nanoparticles of different morphologies under similar reaction conditions (e.g., temperature and Co-precursor concentration) were produced. Depending on the surfactant species, the growth of Co nanoparticles followed three different growth pathways. For example, with surfactants oleic acid (OA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) used in combination, Co nanoparticles followed a diffusional growth pathway, leading to single crystalline nanoparticles. Multiple-grained nanoparticles, through an aggregation process, were formed with the combination of surfactants OA and dioctylamine (DOA). Further, an Ostwald ripening process was observed in the case of TOPO alone. Complementary electronic structure calculations were used to predict the optimized Co-surfactant complex structures and to quantify the binding energy between the surfactants (ligands) and the Co atoms. These calculations were further applied to predict the Co nanoparticle nucleation and growth processes based on the stability of Co-surfactant complexes.

  12. Facile Directed Assembly of Hollow Polymer Nanocapsules within Spontaneously Formed Catanionic Surfactant Vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mariya D.; Dergunov, Sergey; Richter, Andrew; Durbin, Jeffrey; Shmakov, Sergey; Jia, Ying; Kenbeilova, Saltanat; Orazbekuly, Yerbolat; Kengpeiil, Aigerim; Lindner, Erno; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Weigand, Steven; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant vesicles containing monomers in the interior of the bilayer were used to template hollow polymer nanocapsules. This study investigated the formation of surfactant/monomer assemblies by two loading methods, concurrent loading and diffusion loading. The assembly process and the resulting aggregates were investigated with dynamic light scattering, small angle neutron scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Acrylic monomers formed vesicles with a mixture of cationic and anionic surfactants in a broad range of surfactant ratios. Regions with predominant formation of vesicles were broader for compositions containing acrylic monomers compared with blank surfactants. This observation supports the stabilization of the vesicular structure by acrylic monomers. Diffusion loading produced monomer-loaded vesicles unless vesicles were composed from surfactants at the ratios close to the boundary of a vesicular phase region on a phase diagram. Both concurrent-loaded and diffusion-loaded surfactant/monomer vesicles produced hollow polymer nanocapsules upon the polymerization of monomers in the bilayer followed by removal of surfactant scaffolds.

  13. Cationic surfactants/copoly(styrene oxide ethylene oxide) systems: A physico-chemical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, Pablo; Castro, Emilio; Barbosa, Silvia; Mosquera, Víctor

    2005-07-01

    The interactions between the diblock copolymer S 15E 63 and the surfactants dodecyltrimethylammonium (DoTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammoniun (CTAB) bromides have been investigated by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. The surfactants with the same headgroup differentiate in their chain length. At 20 °C, the block copolymer is associated into micelles with a hydrodynamic radius of 11.3 nm, which is composed of a hydrophobic styrene oxide (S) core and a water-swollen oxypolyethylene (PEO) corona. The different copolymer/surfactant systems have been studied at a constant copolymer concentration of 2.5 g dm -3 and in a vast range of surfactant concentration, from 5.0 × 10 -6 up to 0.1 M. When DoTAB is added to the block copolymer solution, no important variations are observed in the apparent hydrodynamic radius up to a surfactant concentration of ˜10 -2 M, for which this magnitude starts decreasing abruptly as a consequence of disruption of the copolymer micelles due to surfactant binding. This phenomenon is also observed for CTAB but at much lower concentrations (˜10 -5 M). This decrease is associated to repulsive electrostatic interactions between surfactant headgroups in the micelle. Complete disruption of the mixed aggregates occurs neither for DoTAB nor CTAB in the measured concentration range. Transmission electron microscopy has confirmed this behaviour. Titration calorimetric data of micellised DoTAB present a plateau region indicating no interaction between the copolymer and the surfactant at low surfactant concentrations, followed by an exothermic decrease as a consequence of starting copolymer micelle disruption. For CTAB, an endothermic maximum points out the existence of interactions between copolymer micelles and this surfactant. This maximum is followed by a steep decrease which reflects the disruption of the mixed surfactant/copolymer micelles up to a very shallow exothermic minimum from

  14. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  15. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2005-04-30

    The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in

  16. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  17. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  18. Novel Approaches to Surfactant Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome for more than twenty years. For the most part, surfactant is administered intratracheally, followed by mechanical ventilation. In recent years, the growing interest in noninvasive ventilation has led to novel approaches of administration. This paper will review these techniques and the associated clinical evidence. PMID:23243504

  19. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  20. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  1. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  2. Innovation in surfactant therapy II: surfactant administration by aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Pillow, J Jane; Minocchieri, S

    2012-01-01

    Instilled bolus surfactant is the only approved surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, recent trends towards increased utilization of noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with surfactant deficiency have created a demand for a similarly noninvasive means of administering exogenous surfactant. Past approaches to surfactant nebulization met with varying success due to inefficient aerosol devices resulting in low intrapulmonary delivery doses of surfactant with variable clinical effectiveness. The recent development of vibrating membrane nebulizers, coupled with appropriate positioning of the interface device, indicates that efficient delivery of aerosolized surfactant is now a realistic goal in infants. Evidence of clinical effect despite low total administered dose in pilot studies, together with suggestions of enhanced homogeneity of pulmonary distribution indicate that this therapy may be applied in a cost-effective manner, with minimal patient handling and disruption. These studies need to be subjected to appropriately designed randomized controlled trials. Further work is also required to determine the optimum delivery route (mask, intranasal prong, nasopharyngeal or laryngeal), dosing amount and redosing interval.

  3. Unique liquid crystal behavior in water of anionic fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon hybrid surfactants containing oxyethylene units.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, Masanobu; Fujita, Yoshie; Shimizu, Yusuke; Osanai, Chie; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2011-05-15

    This study reports the unique aqueous lyotropic liquid crystal behavior of an anionic hybrid surfactant, 8F-B2ES, which has 2-[2-(butyloxy)ethyloxy]ethyl and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl tails. An 8F-B2ES-analog hybrid surfactant with no oxyethylene units (8F-DeS) and a symmetric fluorinated double-tail surfactant with two 2-(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorohexyloxy)ethyl tails (4FEOS) were used as control surfactants in examining the effects of the oxyethylene units and of the hybrid structure on the liquid crystal behavior. Polarized microscopic observations showed the formation of a lamellar liquid crystal phase for each surfactant/water mixture at surfactant concentrations higher than 10 wt.%. In the case of the 30 wt.% 8F-B2ES/water mixture, two types of spherical aggregates were observed at temperatures higher than 40 °C: one was a typical lamella liquid crystal with a maltese cross-texture, and the other was optically isotropic. Interestingly, when the 8F-B2ES lamellar phase was cooled to below 40 °C, the lamellar aggregates were distorted and the isotropic droplets became anisotropic. As this unique liquid crystal behavior was not observed for aqueous mixtures of the control surfactants, the oxyethylene units in the hybridized hydrocarbon tail play an important role in the behavior. This study also examined the effect of the oxyethylene units on microenvironmental polarity in the hybrid surfactant bilayer via fluorescence spectral measurements of pyrene solubilized in each lamellar phase. The polarity of the 8F-B2ES bilayer at 70 °C was found to be that of a hydrocarbon surfactant lamellar phase, and increased gradually with decreasing temperature. The polarity became the same as that of hydrophilic spherical micelles below 40 °C, despite the presence of the lamellar aggregates. Since the polarity in the 8F-DeS bilayer was independent of temperature, and as low as that of a typical hydrocarbon surfactant bilayer, hydration of the 8F-B2ES oxyethylene units would

  4. Genotoxicity induced by saponified coconut oil surfactant in prokaryote systems.

    PubMed

    Petta, Tirzah Braz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo; do Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates Tabosa; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2004-11-01

    Surfactants are amphiphilic substances with special properties and chemical structures that allow a reduction in interfacial tension, which permits an increase in molecule solubilization. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) is an important characteristic of surfactants that determines their aggregate state, which is generally related to its functional mechanism. In this work the genotoxic potential of saponified coconut oil (SCO), a surfactant obtained from Cocos nucifera, was analyzed using prokaryote systems. DNA strand breaks were not observed after treatment of a plasmid with SCO. Negative results were also obtained in the SOS Chromotest using Escherichia coli strains PQ35 and PQ37. A moderate toxicity of SCO was observed after treatment of strain CC104 with a concentration above its CMC, in which micelles were found. Nevertheless, this treatment was not cytotoxic to a CC104mutMmutY strain. Furthermore, in this DNA repair-deficient strain treatment with a SCO dose below its CMC, in which only monomers were found, demonstrated the possibility of an antioxidant effect, since a reduction in spontaneous mutagenesis frequency was observed. Finally, in an Ames test without metabolic activation mutagenicity induction was observed in strains TA100 and TA104 with treatment doses below the CMC. The cytotoxic, antioxidant and mutagenic effects of SCO can be influenced by the aggregational state.

  5. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  6. Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C12mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine.

    PubMed

    He, Yunfei; Shang, Yazhuo; Liu, Zhenhai; Shao, Shuang; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C(12)mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine were investigated in terms of various experimental methods and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was shown that the aggregation of [C(12)mim]Br on DNA chains is motivated not only by electrostatic attractions between DNA phosphate groups and [C(12)mim]Br headgroups but also by hydrophobic interactions among [C(12)mim]Br alkyl chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis indicated that the [C(12)mim]Br aggregation in the presence and absence of DNA are both thermodynamically favored driven by enthalpy and entropy. DNA undergoes size transition and conformational change induced by [C(12)mim]Br, and the charges of DNA are neutralized by the added [C(12)mim]Br. Various microstructures were observed such as DNA with loose coil conformation in nature state, necklace-like structures, and compact spherical aggregates. MD simulation showed that the polyelectrolyte collapses upon the addition of oppositely charged surfactants and the aggregation of surfactants around the polyelectrolyte was reaffirmed. The simulation predicted the gradual neutralization of the negatively charged polyelectrolyte by the surfactant, consistent with the experimental results.

  7. Size-dependent interaction of silica nanoparticles with different surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2012-06-26

    The size-dependent interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles with ionic (anionic and cationic) and nonionic surfactants has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surfactants used are anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), and nonionic decaoxyethylene n-dodecylether (C(12)E(10)). The measurements have been carried out for three different sizes of silica nanoparticles (8, 16, and 26 nm) at fixed concentrations (1 wt % each) of nanoparticles and surfactants. It is found that irrespective of the size of the nanoparticles there is no significant interaction evolved between like-charged nanoparticles and the SDS micelles leading to any structural changes. However, the strong attraction of oppositely charged DTAB micelles with silica nanoparticles results in the aggregation of nanoparticles. The number of micelles mediating the nanoparticle aggregation increases with the size of the nanoparticle. The aggregates are characterized by fractal structure where the fractal dimension is found to be constant (D ≈ 2.3) independent of the size of the nanoparticles and consistent with diffusion-limited-aggregation-type fractal morphology in these systems. In the case of nonionic surfactant C(12)E(10), micelles interact with the individual silica nanoparticles. The number of adsorbed micelles per nanoparticle increases drastically whereas the percentage of adsorbed micelles on nanoparticles decreases with the increase in the size of the nanoparticles. PMID:22655980

  8. NMR spectroscopy of proteins encapsulated in a positively charged surfactant.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Brian G; Liu, Weixia; Peterson, Ronald W; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, large proteins, aggregation-prone proteins, and membrane proteins have been difficult to examine by modern multinuclear and multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy. A major limitation presented by these protein systems is that their slow molecular reorientation compromises many aspects of the more powerful solution NMR methods. Several approaches have emerged to deal with the various spectroscopic difficulties arising from slow molecular reorientation. One of these takes the approach of actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation by encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid. Since the encapsulation is largely driven by electrostatic interactions, the preparation of samples of acidic proteins suitable for NMR spectroscopy has been problematic owing to the paucity of suitable cationic surfactants. Here, it is shown that the cationic surfactant CTAB may be used to prepare samples of encapsulated anionic proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents. In a more subtle application, it is further shown that this surfactant can be employed to encapsulate a highly basic protein, which is completely denatured upon encapsulation using an anionic surfactant. PMID:15949753

  9. ABC copolymer silicone surfactant templating for biomimetic silicification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Guo, Caiyun; Yao, Yuan; Che, Shunai

    2012-07-15

    Using the ABC copolymer silicone surfactant polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-graft-(polyethylene oxide (PEO)-block-propylene oxide (PPO)) (PSEP, Scheme 1a) as a template and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as a silica source, silica particles with various structures and morphologies (i.e., disordered spherical micellar aggregation, two-dimensional p6mm mesostructure, asymmetric multi-layer non-equilibrium vesicles and symmetric monolayer vesicles) were synthesized by changing the synthesis temperature from 30 to 80 °C. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the surfactant by increasing the temperature resulted in an increase in the surfactant packing parameter g, which led to the mesophase transformation from micellar to cylinder and later to a lamellar structure. The good compatibility between the PDMS and the TEOS, the different natures of the hydrophobic PDMS and PPO segments, and the hydrolysis and condensation rates of TEOS enabled the variation of silicification structures. This novel silicone surfactant templating route and a new type of materials with highly ordered mesostructures and asymmetric morphologies provide a new insight into the molecular factors governing inorganic-organic mesophase and biosilicification for fabricating functionalized materials.

  10. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  11. Inhibition of pulmonary surfactant adsorption by serum and the mechanisms of reversal by hydrophilic polymers: theory.

    PubMed

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Alig, T F; Alonso, Coralie; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Taeusch, H William

    2005-09-01

    A theory based on the Smolukowski analysis of colloid stability shows that the presence of charged, surface-active serum proteins at the alveolar air-liquid interface can severely reduce or eliminate the adsorption of lung surfactant from the subphase to the interface, consistent with the observations reported in the companion article (pages 1769-1779). Adding nonadsorbing, hydrophilic polymers to the subphase provides a depletion attraction between the surfactant aggregates and the interface, which can overcome the steric and electrostatic resistance to adsorption induced by serum. The depletion force increases with polymer concentration as well as with polymer molecular weight. Increasing the surfactant concentration has a much smaller effect than adding polymer, as is observed. Natural hydrophilic polymers, like the SP-A present in native surfactant, or hyaluronan, normally present in the alveolar fluids, can enhance adsorption in the presence of serum to eliminate inactivation.

  12. Inhibition of Pulmonary Surfactant Adsorption by Serum and the Mechanisms of Reversal by Hydrophilic Polymers: Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Alig, T. F.; Alonso, Coralie; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Taeusch, H. William

    2005-01-01

    A theory based on the Smolukowski analysis of colloid stability shows that the presence of charged, surface-active serum proteins at the alveolar air-liquid interface can severely reduce or eliminate the adsorption of lung surfactant from the subphase to the interface, consistent with the observations reported in the companion article (pages 1769–1779). Adding nonadsorbing, hydrophilic polymers to the subphase provides a depletion attraction between the surfactant aggregates and the interface, which can overcome the steric and electrostatic resistance to adsorption induced by serum. The depletion force increases with polymer concentration as well as with polymer molecular weight. Increasing the surfactant concentration has a much smaller effect than adding polymer, as is observed. Natural hydrophilic polymers, like the SP-A present in native surfactant, or hyaluronan, normally present in the alveolar fluids, can enhance adsorption in the presence of serum to eliminate inactivation. PMID:16006630

  13. Synthesis and bio-physicochemical properties of amide-functionalized N-methylpiperazinium surfactants.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vinay; Singh, Sukhprit; Mishra, Rachana; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2014-12-15

    Four new amide functionalized N-methylpiperazinium amphiphiles having tetradecyl, hexadecyl alkyl chain lengths and counterions; chloride or bromide have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. These new surfactants have been investigated in detail for their self-assembling behavior by surface tension, conductivity and fluorescence measurements. The thermodynamic parameters of these surfactants indicate that micellization is exothermic and entropy-driven. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments have been performed to insight the aggregate size of these cationics. Thermal degradation of these new surfactants has also been evaluated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). These new surfactants form stable complexes with DNA as acknowledged by agarose gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide exclusion and zeta potential measurements. They have also been found to have low cytotoxicity by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay on the C6 glioma cell line.

  14. Surfactant waterflooding enhanced oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Schievelbein, V.H.

    1984-07-17

    Disclosed is a surfactant waterflooding enhanced oil recovery process and surfactant fluid suitable for use in an enhanced oil recovery process which accomplishes an increase in the amount of oil recovered over prior art methods. The surfactant fluid contains an alkylpolyalkoxy sulfate or alkylarylpolyalkoxy sulfate, or an alkylpolyalkoxyalkylene sulfonate or alkylarylpolyalkoxyalkylene sulfonate, either alone or in combination with an organic sulfonate anionic surfactant, such as petroleum sulfonate. The optimum average degree of ethoxylation of the alkoxy sulfate or alkoxy sulfonate surfactant is identified, and the surfactant fluid is formulated with a mixture of ethoxylated and sulfated or ethoxylated and sulfonated surfactants, having a broad even range of degree of ethoxylation.

  15. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  16. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  17. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  18. Effect of additives on protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2009-06-01

    This paper overviews solution additives that affect protein stability and aggregation during refolding, heating, and freezing processes. Solution additives are mainly grouped into two classes, i.e., protein denaturants and stabilizers. The former includes guanidine, urea, strong ionic detergents, and certain chaotropic salts; the latter includes certain amino acids, sugars, polyhydric alcohols, osmolytes, and kosmotropic salts. However, there are solution additives that are not unambiguously placed into these two classes, including arginine, certain divalent cation salts (e.g., MgCl(2)) and certain polyhydric alcohols (e.g., ethylene glycol). Certain non-ionic or non-detergent surfactants, ionic liquids, amino acid derivatives, polyamines, and certain amphiphilic polymers may belong to this class. They have marginal effects on protein structure and stability, but are able to disrupt protein interactions. Information on additives that do not catalyze chemical reactions nor affect protein functions helps us to design protein solutions for increased stability or reduced aggregation. PMID:19519415

  19. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropies in mixed surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McCarroll, M.E.; Joly, A.G.; Wang, Z.; Friedrich, D.M.; Wandruszka, R. von

    1999-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decays of solutions of Triton X-114 (TX-114) with various amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were measured using the emission both from the surfactant itself and from added perylene. In the former case, the monomer and aggregate species of the surfactant were spectroscopically isolated and were shown to have significantly different rotational correlation times. The rotational diffusion of perylene in micellar TX-114 with small amounts of added SDS appeared to have a component with a very short correlation time. The anisotropy decay curves showed the existence of limiting anisotropies (r{sub {infinity}}), indicating hindered probe rotation in the micellar environment. At higher SDS concentrations, the fast-decaying component slowed down and the limiting anisotropy decreased substantially, suggesting some migration of the probe to the interior of the micelle.

  20. Aqueous behaviour of cationic surfactants containing a cleavable group.

    PubMed

    Samakande, Austin; Chaghi, Radhouane; Derrien, Gaelle; Charnay, Clarence; Hartmann, Patrice C

    2008-04-01

    The aggregation behaviour of two novel cationic RAFT agents (transfer surfactants); N,N-dimethyl-N-(4-(((phenylcarbonothioyl)thio)methyl)benzyl)ethanammonium bromide (PCDBAB) and N-(4-((((dodecylthio)-carbonothioyl)thio)methyl)benzyl)-N,N-dimethylethanammonium bromide (DCTBAB) in diluted solutions have been investigated by surface tension, conductimetry and microcalorimetry measurements. The thermodynamic parameters i.e. the critical micelle concentration (cmc), the degree of micelle ionization (alpha), the head group surface area (a 0), Delta H mic, Delta G mic and T Delta S mic are reported at 303 K. The thermodynamic parameters have been compared to those of the conventional surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in order to specify structural relationships. The obtained results have been discussed considering the hydrophobic behaviour of the S-C=S- linkage and the specific interactions that arise from the introduction of the benzene ring into the hydrophobic part.

  1. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  2. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  3. Demulsification of emulsions produced from surfactant recovery operations and recovery of surfactants therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.B.; Kudchadker, M.V.; Whittington, L.E.

    1981-07-07

    Treatment of emulsions of oil and water produced from surfactant recovery operations whereby the produced emulsions containing surfactants are demulsified and the surfactants are recovered in the water phase.

  4. Interactions between polymers and surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    de Gennes, P.G. )

    1990-11-01

    A surfactant film (at the water/air interface, or in a bilayer) is exposed to a solution of a neutral, flexible, polymer. Depending on the interactions, and on the Langmuir pressure II of the pure surfactant film, the authors expected to find three types of behavior: (I) the polymer does not absorb; (II) the polymer absorbs and mixes with the surfactant; (III) the polymer absorbs but segregates from the surfactant. Their interest here is in case II. They predict that (a) bilayers become rigid; (b) bilayers, exposed to polymer on one side only, tend to bend strongly; (c) the surface viscosity of monolayers or bilayers is considerably increased; soap films or foams, which usually drain by turbulent (two-dimensional) flows, may be stabilized in case II.

  5. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  6. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  7. Oil-in-water microemulsions based on cationic surfactants with a hydroxyalkyl fragment in the head group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirgorodskaya, Alla B.; Yackevich, Ekaterina I.; Zakharova, Lucia Ya.; Konovalov, Alexander I.

    2013-04-01

    The stable oil-in-water microemulsions with a high water content were formed on the basis of cationic surfactants, including those that contain a hydroxyalkyl fragment in the head group. These systems can bind the water- and oil-soluble reagents into a single aggregate formed by self-assembling components. The size, surface and electrokinetic potentials of aggregates in the surfactant/n-hexane/n-butanol/water microemulsions were determined. Besides, their catalytic effect on the cleavage of carboxylic acid esters was evaluated. The behavior of the system was shown to be determined not only by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions but also by specific interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonds.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and controlled aggregation of biotemplated polystyrene nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Tekobo, Samuel; Richter, Andrew; Dergunov, Sergey; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Yan, Bing; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polystyrene nanodisks were prepared by controlled polymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the interior of bicelles, discoidal lipid aggregates. Aggregation behavior of polymer nanodisks was studied in water, organic solvents, and solid phase. Nanodisks form stable dispersions in aqueous solutions of surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Varying SDS/nanodisk ratio allowed us to control the size of nanodisk aggregates. Nanodisks are readily solubilized in nonpolar organic solvents, such as toluene and carbon tetrachloride, to yield stable monodisperse suspensions. These findings open opportunities for creating nanodisk-based nanocomposite materials. Stable nanodisk suspension in toluene enabled small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data confirmed the nanodisk diameter and allowed accurate measurement of nanodisk thickness (19.5 1.0 ). In solid phase, nanodisks aggregate in sub-micron platelets.

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and controlled aggregation of biotemplated polystyrene nanodisks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tekobo, S.; Richter, A.G.; Dergunov, S.A.; Pingali, S.V.; Urban, V.; Yan, B.; Pinkhassik, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polystyrene nanodisks were prepared by controlled polymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the interior of bicelles, discoidal lipid aggregates. Aggregation behavior of polymer nanodisks was studied in water, organic solvents, and solid phase. Nanodisks form stable dispersions in aqueous solutions of surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Varying SDS/nanodisk ratio allowed us to control the size of nanodisk aggregates. Nanodisks are readily solubilized in nonpolar organic solvents, such as toluene and carbon tetrachloride, to yield stable monodisperse suspensions. These findings open opportunities for creating nanodisk-based nanocomposite materials. Stable nanodisk suspension in toluene enabled small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data confirmed the nanodisk diameter and allowed accurate measurement of nanodisk thickness (19.5 {+-} 1.0 {angstrom}). In solid phase, nanodisks aggregate in sub-micron platelets.

  10. Adsorption of a cationic surfactant by a magsorbent based on magnetic alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; El Kolli, Nadia; Dali, Noëlle; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Welschbillig, Mathias; Cabuil, Valérie; Bée, Agnès

    2014-10-15

    Adsorption of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant, by magnetic alginate beads (MagAlgbeads) was investigated. The magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was prepared by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in an alginate gel. The influence on CPC adsorption of several parameters such as contact time, pH and initial surfactant concentration was studied. The equilibrium isotherm shows that adsorption occurs through both electrostatic interactions with charge neutralization of the carboxylate groups of the beads and hydrophobic interactions inducing the formation of surfactant aggregates in the beads. The dosage of calcium ions released in the solution turns out to be a useful tool for understanding the adsorption mechanisms. Adsorption is accompanied by a shrinking of the beads that corresponds to a 45% reduction of the volume. Adsorption kinetic experiments show that equilibrium time is strongly dependent on the surfactant concentration, which monitors the nature of the interactions. On the other hand, since the pH affects the ionization state of adsorption sites, adsorption depends on the pH solution, maximum adsorption being obtained in a large pH range (3.2-12) in agreement with the pKa value of alginate (pKa=3.4-4.2). Finally, due to the formation of micelle-like surfactants aggregates in the magnetic alginate beads, they could be used as a new efficient magsorbent for hydrophobic pollutants. PMID:25086393

  11. Principles for microscale separations based on redox-active surfactants and electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Rosslee, C A; Abbott, N L

    2001-10-15

    We report principles for microscale separations based on selective solubilization and deposition of sparingly water-soluble compounds by an aqueous solution of a redox-active surfactant. The surfactant, (11-ferrocenylundecyl)trimethylammonium bromide, undergoes a reversible change in micellization upon oxidation or reduction. This change in aggregation is exploited in a general scheme in which micelles of reduced surfactant are formed and then put in contact with a mixture of hydrophobic compounds leading to selective solubilization of the compounds. The micelles are then electrochemically disrupted, leading to the selective deposition of their contents. We measured the selectivity of the solubilization and deposition processes using mixtures of two model drug-like compounds, o-tolueneazo-beta-naphthol (I) and 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (II). By repeatedly solubilizing and depositing a mixture that initially contained equal mole fractions of each compound, we demonstrate formation of a product that contains 98.4% of I after six cycles. Because the aggregation states of redox-active surfactants are easily controlled within simple microfabricated structures, including structures that define small stationary volumes (e.g., wells of a microtiter plate) or flowing volumes of liquids (e.g., microfabricated channels), we believe these principles may be useful for the purification or analysis of compounds in microscale chemical process systems. When used for purification, these principles provide separation of surfactant and product.

  12. Adsorption Behavior of Low-Concentration Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Surfactant on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Qiao, Longjiao; Xiang, Yinping; Guo, Rong

    2016-03-22

    The adsorption behavior of imidazolium-based ionic liquid surfactant ([C12mim]Br) on silica nanoparticles (NPs) has been studied with turbidity, isothermal titration microcalorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Both the electrostatic attraction and the hydrogen bonding interaction between silica NP and [C12mim]Br play crucial roles during [C12mim]Br monomers binding to silica NPs at low surfactant concentration, and the hydrophobic effect leads to formation of micelle-like aggregates on silica NP surfaces with the further increase of surfactant concentration. Furthermore, it is found that sodium halide salts favor the adsorption of [C12mim]Br on silica NP surfaces by decreasing the electrostatic repulsions. Anions with more hydrophobicity and the ability to form hydrogen bonding have more pronounced effect. Compared with DTAB, [C12mim]Br has much stronger binding ability with silica NPs at pH 7.0. More interestingly, [C12mim]Br can still form micelle-like aggregates on silica NP surfaces, but DTAB cannot at pH 2.0. The hydrogen bonding between the imidazolium ring and silica NPs is the principal contributor to these observations. Our results will contribute to the elucidation of silica NP/cationic surfactant interaction from molecular scale and the widely applications of silica NP/surfactant systems in practice.

  13. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  14. Effect of surfactants on Ra-sHSPI - A small heat shock protein from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus annulatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Shahein, Yasser E.; Hussein, Nahla; Khan, Rizwan H.

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic interaction plays an important role in protein aggregation phenomenon. In this study, we have checked the effect of anionic - Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and cationic-Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) surfactant on aggregation behavior of Ra-sHSPI, a small heat shock protein purified from Rhipicephalus annulatus tick. To monitor the effect of these surfactants, we have employed several spectroscopic methods such as Rayleigh light scattering measurements, ANS (8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) fluorescence measurements, ThT (Thioflavin T) binding assays, Far-UV CD (Circular Dichroism) and dynamic light scattering measurements. In the presence of anionic surfactant-SDS, Ra-sHSPI forms amyloid fibrils, in contrast, no amyloid formation was observed in presence of cationic surfactant at low pH. Enhancement of ANS fluorescence intensity confirms the exposition of more hydrophobic patches during aggregation. ThT binding assay confirms the amyloid fibrillar nature of the SDS induced Ra-sHSPI aggregates and supported by PASTA 2.0 (prediction of amyloid structural aggregation) software. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge during amyloid fibril formation at low pH in Ra-sHSPI.

  15. Transport of fluorescently labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated granular media at environmentally relevant concentrations of surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dengjun; Su, Chuming; Liu, Chongxuan; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHAP) is being used to remediate soils and aquifers contaminated with metals and radionuclides; however, the mobility of nHAP is still poorly understood in subsurface granular environments. In this study, transport and retention kinetics of alizarin red S (ARS)-labeled nHAP were investigated in water-saturated quartz sand at low concentrations of surfactants: sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, an anionic surfactant, 0–50 mg L–1) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, a cationic surfactant, 0–5 mg L–1). Both surfactants were found to have a marked effect on the electrokinetic properties of ARS-nHAP and, consequently, on their transport and retention behaviors. Transport of nanoparticles (NPs) increased significantly with increasing SDBS concentration, largely because of enhanced colloidal stability and reduced aggregate size arising from enhanced electrostatic, osmotic, and elastic-steric repulsions between ARS-nHAP and sand grains. Conversely, transport decreased significantly in the presence of increasing CTAB concentrations due to reduced surface charge and consequential enhanced aggregation of the NPs. Osmotic and elastic-steric repulsions played only a minor role in enhancing the colloidal stability of ARS-nHAP in the presence of CTAB. Retention profiles of ARS-nHAP exhibited hyperexponential-shapes (decreasing rates of retention with increasing distance) for all conditions tested, and became more pronounced as CTAB concentration increased. The phenomenon was attributed to the aggregation and ripening of ARS-nHAP in the presence of surfactants, particularly CTAB. Overall, the present study suggests that surfactants at environmentally relevant concentrations may be an important consideration in employing nHAP for engineered in-situ remediation of certain metals and radionuclides in contaminated soils and aquifers.

  16. Interactions and hybrid complex formation of anionic algal polysaccharides with a cationic glycine betaine-derived surfactant.

    PubMed

    Covis, Rudy; Vives, Thomas; Gaillard, Cédric; Benoit, Maud; Benvegnu, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between anionic algal polysaccharides ((κ)-, (ι)-, (λ)-carrageenans, alginate and ulvan) and a cationic glycine betaine (GB) amide surfactant possessing a C18:1 alkyl chain has been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), zeta-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and surface tension measurements. It was observed that this cationic surfactant derived from renewable raw materials induced cooperative binding with the anionic polymers at critical aggregation concentration (CAC) and the CAC values are significantly lower than the corresponding critical micelle concentration (CMC) for the surfactant. The CMC of cationic GB surfactant was obtained at higher surfactant concentration in polysaccharide solution than in pure water. More interestingly, the presence of original polysaccharide/surfactant hybrid complexes formed above the CMC value was evidenced from (κ)-carrageenan by microscopy (TEM and AFM). Preliminary investigations of the structure of these complexes revealed the existence of surfactant nanoparticles surrounded with polysaccharide matrix, probably resulting from electrostatic attraction. In addition, ITC measurements clearly showed that the interactions of the κ-carrageenan was stronger than for other polysaccharides ((ι)-, (λ)-carrageenans, alginate and ulvan). These results may have important impact on the use of the GB amide surfactant in formulations based on algal polysaccharides for several applications such as in food, cosmetics, and detergency fields.

  17. Micelle-monomer equilibria in solutions of ionic surfactants and in ionic-nonionic mixtures: a generalized phase separation model.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Ananthapadmanabhan, Kavssery P

    2014-04-01

    On the basis of a detailed physicochemical model, a complete system of equations is formulated that describes the equilibrium between micelles and monomers in solutions of ionic surfactants and their mixtures with nonionic surfactants. The equations of the system express mass balances, chemical and mechanical equilibria. Each nonionic surfactant is characterized by a single thermodynamic parameter--its micellization constant. Each ionic surfactant is characterized by three parameters, including the Stern constant that quantifies the counterion binding. In the case of mixed micelles, each pair of surfactants is characterized with an interaction parameter, β, in terms of the regular solution theory. The comparison of the model with experimental data for surfactant binary mixtures shows that β is constant--independent of the micelle composition and electrolyte concentration. The solution of the system of equations gives the concentrations of all monomeric species, the micelle composition, ionization degree, surface potential and mean area per head group. Upon additional assumptions for the micelle shape, the mean aggregation number can be also estimated. The model gives quantitative theoretical interpretation of the dependence of the critical micellization concentration (CMC) of ionic surfactants on the ionic strength; of the CMC of mixed surfactant solutions, and of the electrolytic conductivity of micellar solutions. It turns out, that in the absence of added salt the conductivity is completely dominated by the contribution of the small ions: monomers and counterions. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  19. Dispersion behavior and aqueous foams in mixtures of a vesicle-forming surfactant and edible nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Campbell, Shawn; Mashinchi, Saeed; Piatko, Michael P

    2015-03-17

    In an attempt to prepare ultrastable aqueous foams composed entirely of food-grade ingredients, we describe the foamability and foam stability of aqueous phases containing either calcium carbonate particles (CaCO3), sodium stearoyl lactylate surfactant (SSL), or their mixtures. Techniques including zeta potential measurements, adsorption isotherm determination, contact angles and optical and cryo-scanning electron microscopy are used to probe the interaction between particles and surfactant molecules. Aqueous dispersions of inherently hydrophilic cationic CaCO3 nanoparticles do not foam to any great extent. By contrast, aqueous dispersions of anionic SSL, which forms a lamellar phase/vesicles, foam progressively on increasing the concentration. Despite their foamability being low compared to that of micelle-forming surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, they are much more stable to collapse with half-lives (of up to 40 days) of around 2 orders of magnitude higher above the respective aggregation concentrations. We believe that, in addition to surfactant lamellae around bubbles, the bilayers within vesicles contain surfactant chains in a solidlike state yielding indestructible aggregates that jam the aqueous films between bubbles, reducing the drainage rate and both bubble coalescence and gas-transfer between bubbles. In mixtures of particles and surfactant, the adsorption of SSL monomers occurs on particle surfaces, leading to an increase in their hydrophobicity, promoting particle adsorption to bubble surfaces. Ultrastable foams result with half-lives of around an order of magnitude higher again at low concentrations and foams which lose only around 30% of their volume within a year at high concentrations. In the latter case, we evidence a high surface density of discrete surfactant-coated particles at bubble surfaces, rendering them stable to coalescence and disproportionation.

  20. Direct Observation Of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Interactions Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-12-01

    Interactions of anionic silica nanoparticles with anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants have directly been studied by contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements are performed on 1 wt% of both silica nanoparticles and surfactants of anionic sodium dodecyle sulphate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene 10 lauryl ether (C12E10) in aqueous solution. We show that there is no direct interaction in the case of SDS with silica particles, whereas strong interaction for DTAB leads to the aggregation of silica particles. The interaction of C12E10 is found through the micelles adsorbed on the silica particles.

  1. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Fluorescence Studies of Mixed Surfactants with Dodecyl Tails.

    PubMed

    Griffiths; Whatton; Abbott; Kwan; Pitt; Howe; King; Heenan

    1999-07-01

    The mixed micelles formed in solutions of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and the nonionic surfactant dodecylmalono-bis-N-methylglucamide (DBNMG) were studied by surface tension, fluorescence, and small-angle neutron scattering. Measurements of the critical micelle concentration (CMC) by surface tension and fluorescence show that these two surfactants mix nonideally. The experimental values of the CMCs for surfactant mixtures for all compositions are less than the ideal prediction proposed by Clint (J. Chem. Soc. 71, 1327 (1975)). Regular solution theory (for example, Penfold et al., Langmuir 11, 2498 (1995)) can be used to calculate the composition of the micelle at the CMC. The micellar composition thus calculated differs significantly from that at higher total surfactant concentrations, the latter being much closer to the stoichiometric composition. The polarity of the micellar environment, as perceived by a solubilized fluorescence probe, is identical for both the single-component and the mixed micelles. The scattering data show that the mixed micelles are comparable in size to the pure nonionic micelle and slightly larger than the anionic micelle. Parallel studies with deuterated SDS showed no evidence of segregation or local ordering within the mixed micelle. The effective charge on the mixed micelle is determined by the amount of ionic surfactant within the micelle. Addition of 0.1 M NaCl to these systems has no effect on the CMC, micelle ellipticity, and aggregation number-a behavior very different from that observed for simple SDS solutions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Impact of model perfumes on surfactant and mixed surfactant self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Penfold, J; Tucker, I; Green, A; Grainger, D; Jones, C; Ford, G; Roberts, C; Hubbard, J; Petkov, J; Thomas, R K; Grillo, I

    2008-11-01

    The impact of some model perfumes on surfactant self-assembly has been investigated, using small-angle neutron scattering. A range of different model perfumes, with differing degrees of hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, have been explored, and in order of increasing hydrophobicity include phenyl ethanol (PE), rose oxide (RO), limonene (LM), linalool (LL), and dihydrogen mercenol (DHM). The effect of their solubilization on the nonionic surfactant micelles of dodecaethylene monododecyl ether (C12EO12) and on the mixed surfactant aggregates of C12EO12 and the cationic dialkyl chain surfactant dihexadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (DHDAB) has been quantified. For PE and LL the effect of their solubilization on the micelle, mixed micelle/lamellar and lamellar regimes of the C12EO12/DHDAB mixtures, has also been determined. For the C12EO12 and mixed DHDAB/C12EO12 micelles PE is solubilized predominantly at the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface, whereas the more hydrophobic perfumes, from RO to DHM, are solubilized predominantly in the hydrophobic core of the micelles. For the C12EO12 micelles, with increasing perfume concentration, the more hydrophobic perfumes (RO to DHM) promote micellar growth. Relatively modest growth is observed for RO and LM, whereas substantial growth is observed for LL and DHM. In contrast, for the addition of PE the C12EO12 micelles remain as relatively small globular micelles, with no significant growth. For the C12EO12/DHDAB mixed micelles, the pattern of behavior with the addition of perfume is broadly similar, except that the micellar growth with increasing perfume concentration for the more hydrophobic perfumes is less pronounced. In the Lbeta (Lv) region of the DHDAB-rich C12EO12/DHDAB phase diagram, the addition of PE results in a less structured (less rigid) lamellar phase, and ultimately a shift toward a structure more consistent with a sponge or bicontinuous phase. In the mixed L1/Lbeta region of the phase diagram PE induces a slight

  3. Waterflooding employing mixtures of sulfonate surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Savins, J.G.; Waite, J.M.; Burdyn, R.F.

    1980-11-04

    A new waterflooding process is described in which at least a portion of the injected fluid comprises a viscous aqueous liquid having a monovalent salt salinity within the range of 1.5 to 4.0% by wt and containing first and second sulfonate surfactants. The first surfactant is a petroleum sulfonate having a relatively broad molecular weight distribution and the second surfactant is a synthetic alkyl or alkylaryl sulfonate having a molecular weight distribution narrower than that of the first surfactant. The first and second surfactants are present in the aqueous liquid in relative amounts such that the ratio of the concentration of the first surfactant to the concentration of the second surfactant is within the range of 1:3 to 1:1. The thickened aqueous liquid containing the above described multicomponent surfactant system also contains a water-soluble C3-C6 aliphatic alcohol. 11 claims.

  4. Giant colon diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Chater, C; Saudemont, A; Zerbib, P

    2015-11-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum is defined by a diverticulum whose diameter is greater than 4 cm. This is a rare entity, arising mainly in the sigmoid colon. The diagnosis is based on abdominal computed tomography that shows a gas-filled structure communicating with the adjacent colon, with a smooth, thin diverticular wall that does not enhance after injection of contrast. Surgical treatment is recommended even in asymptomatic diverticula, due to the high prevalence and severity of complications. The gold standard treatment is segmental colectomy. Some authors propose a diverticulectomy when the giant diverticulum is unique.

  5. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  6. Surfactant-induced assembly of enzymatically-stable peptide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brad H.; Martinez, Alina M.; Wheeler, Jill S.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-04-07

    The secondary structure of peptides in the presence of interacting additives is an important topic of study, having implications in the application of peptide science to a broad range of modern technologies. Surfactants constitute a class of biologically relevant compounds that are known to influence both peptide conformation and aggregation or assembly. In addition, we have characterized the secondary structure of a linear nonapeptide composed of a hydrophobic alanine/phenylalanine core flanked by hydrophilic acid/amine units. We show that the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) induces the formation of β-sheets and macroscopic gelation in this otherwise unstructured peptide. Through comparison to related additives, we propose that SDS-induced secondary structure formation is the result of amphiphilicity created by electrostatic binding of SDS to the peptide. In addition, we demonstrate a novel utility of surfactants in manipulating and stabilizing peptide nanostructures. SDS is used to simultaneously induce secondary structure in a peptide and to inhibit the activity of a model enzyme, resulting in a peptide hydrogel that is impervious to enzymatic degradation. These results complement our understanding of the behavior of peptides in the presence of interacting secondary molecules and provide new potential pathways for programmable organization of peptides by the addition of such components.

  7. Surfactant-induced assembly of enzymatically-stable peptide hydrogels

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Brad H.; Martinez, Alina M.; Wheeler, Jill S.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-04-07

    The secondary structure of peptides in the presence of interacting additives is an important topic of study, having implications in the application of peptide science to a broad range of modern technologies. Surfactants constitute a class of biologically relevant compounds that are known to influence both peptide conformation and aggregation or assembly. In addition, we have characterized the secondary structure of a linear nonapeptide composed of a hydrophobic alanine/phenylalanine core flanked by hydrophilic acid/amine units. We show that the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) induces the formation of β-sheets and macroscopic gelation in this otherwise unstructured peptide. Through comparisonmore » to related additives, we propose that SDS-induced secondary structure formation is the result of amphiphilicity created by electrostatic binding of SDS to the peptide. In addition, we demonstrate a novel utility of surfactants in manipulating and stabilizing peptide nanostructures. SDS is used to simultaneously induce secondary structure in a peptide and to inhibit the activity of a model enzyme, resulting in a peptide hydrogel that is impervious to enzymatic degradation. These results complement our understanding of the behavior of peptides in the presence of interacting secondary molecules and provide new potential pathways for programmable organization of peptides by the addition of such components.« less

  8. Toward surfactant-free and water-free microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Veronika; Marcus, Julien; Touraud, Didier; Diat, Olivier; Kunz, Werner

    2015-09-01

    It was recently demonstrated that a nano-clustering was present in the monophasic "pre-Ouzo" region of ternary liquid mixtures without surfactants. The goal of this work is to check if this nano-clustering is also present in the surfactant-free and water-free "green" microemulsions glycerol/ethanol/1-octanol and deep eutectic solvent/tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol/diethyl adipate. The deep eutectic solvents used instead of water were ethylene glycol-choline chloride (molar ratio 4-1) and urea-choline chloride (molar ratio 2-1). To our knowledge this is the first time that deep eutectic solvents were used to formulate microemulsions. The surfactant-free and water-free microemulsions were studied using phase diagrams, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering. The presence of aggregate fluctuations was demonstrated and they were found to be independent of molecular critical fluctuations, except when approaching the critical point where the critical phenomenon is superimposed to the signal. These structures have similarities to classical microemulsions but, in contrast to them, without having a sharp interface between the non-miscible phases, much as it was the case for systems previously investigated like water/ethanol/oil, where the oil was 1-octanol, fragrance molecules, or mosquito repellents. PMID:25985422

  9. Ordered DNA-Surfactant Hybrid Nanospheres Triggered by Magnetic Cationic Surfactants for Photon- and Magneto-Manipulated Drug Delivery and Release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Wang, Yitong; Wei, Guangcheng; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-12-14

    Here we construct for the first time ordered surfactant-DNA hybrid nanospheres of double-strand (ds) DNA and cationic surfactants with magnetic counterion, [FeCl3Br](-). The specificity of the magnetic cationic surfactants that can compact DNA at high concentrations makes it possible for building ordered nanospheres through aggregation, fusion, and coagulation. Cationic surfactants with conventional Br(-) cannot produce spheres under the same condition because they lose the DNA compaction ability. When a light-responsive magnetic cationic surfactant is used to produce nanospheres, a dual-controllable drug-delivery platform can be built simply by the applications of external magnetic force and alternative UV and visible light. These nanospheres obtain high drug absorption efficiency, slow release property, and good biocompatibility. There is potential for effective magnetic-field-based targeted drug delivery, followed by photocontrollable drug release. We deduce that our results might be of great interest for making new functional nucleic-acid-based nanomachines and be envisioned to find applications in nanotechnology and biochemistry.

  10. Ordered DNA-Surfactant Hybrid Nanospheres Triggered by Magnetic Cationic Surfactants for Photon- and Magneto-Manipulated Drug Delivery and Release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Wang, Yitong; Wei, Guangcheng; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-12-14

    Here we construct for the first time ordered surfactant-DNA hybrid nanospheres of double-strand (ds) DNA and cationic surfactants with magnetic counterion, [FeCl3Br](-). The specificity of the magnetic cationic surfactants that can compact DNA at high concentrations makes it possible for building ordered nanospheres through aggregation, fusion, and coagulation. Cationic surfactants with conventional Br(-) cannot produce spheres under the same condition because they lose the DNA compaction ability. When a light-responsive magnetic cationic surfactant is used to produce nanospheres, a dual-controllable drug-delivery platform can be built simply by the applications of external magnetic force and alternative UV and visible light. These nanospheres obtain high drug absorption efficiency, slow release property, and good biocompatibility. There is potential for effective magnetic-field-based targeted drug delivery, followed by photocontrollable drug release. We deduce that our results might be of great interest for making new functional nucleic-acid-based nanomachines and be envisioned to find applications in nanotechnology and biochemistry. PMID:26571346

  11. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  12. Model study of enhanced oil recovery by flooding with aqueous surfactant solution and comparison with theory.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Paul D I; Savory, Luke D; Woods, Freya; Clarke, Andrew; Howe, Andrew M

    2015-03-17

    With the aim of elucidating the details of enhanced oil recovery by surfactant solution flooding, we have determined the detailed behavior of model systems consisting of a packed column of calcium carbonate particles as the porous rock, n-decane as the trapped oil, and aqueous solutions of the anionic surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT). The AOT concentration was varied from zero to above the critical aggregation concentration (cac). The salt content of the aqueous solutions was varied to give systems of widely different, post-cac oil-water interfacial tensions. The systems were characterized in detail by measuring the permeability behavior of the packed columns, the adsorption isotherms of AOT from the water to the oil-water interface and to the water-calcium carbonate interface, and oil-water-calcium carbonate contact angles. Measurements of the percent oil recovery by pumping surfactant solutions into calcium carbonate-packed columns initially filled with oil were analyzed in terms of the characterization results. We show that the measured contact angles as a function of AOT concentration are in reasonable agreement with those calculated from values of the surface energy of the calcium carbonate-air surface plus the measured adsorption isotherms. Surfactant adsorption onto the calcium carbonate-water interface causes depletion of its aqueous-phase concentration, and we derive equations which enable the concentration of nonadsorbed surfactant within the packed column to be estimated from measured parameters. The percent oil recovery as a function of the surfactant concentration is determined solely by the oil-water-calcium carbonate contact angle for nonadsorbed surfactant concentrations less than the cac. For surfactant concentrations greater than the cac, additional oil removal occurs by a combination of solubilization and emulsification plus oil mobilization due to the low oil-water interfacial tension and a pumping pressure increase. PMID

  13. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  14. Remarkable viscoelasticity in mixtures of cyclodextrins and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Ángela; da Silva, Marcelo A; Eriksson, Jonny; González-Gaitano, Gustavo; Valero, Margarita; Dreiss, Cécile A

    2014-10-01

    We report the effect of native cyclodextrins (α, β, and γ) and selected derivatives in modulating the self-assembly of the nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene cholesteryl ether (ChEO10) and its mixtures with triethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12EO3), which form wormlike micelles. Cyclodextrins (CDs) generally induce micellar breakup through a host-guest interaction with surfactants; instead, we show that a constructive effect, leading to gel formation, is obtained with specific CDs and that the widely invoked host-guest interaction may not be the only key to the association. When added to wormlike micelles of ChEO10 and C12EO3, native β-CD, 2-hydroxyethyl-β-CD (HEBCD), and a sulfated sodium salt of β-CD (SULFBCD) induce a substantial increase of the viscoelasticity, while methylated CDs rupture the micelles, leading to a loss of the viscosity, and the other CDs studied (native α- and γ- and hydroxypropylated CDs) show a weak interaction. Most remarkably, the addition of HEBCD or SULFBCD to pure ChEO10 solutions (which are low-viscosity, Newtonian fluids of small, ellipsoidal micelles) induces the formation of transparent gels. The combination of small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering, and cryo-TEM reveals that both CDs drive the elongation of ChEO10 aggregates into an entangled network of wormlike micelles. (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrate the formation of inclusion complexes between ChEO10 and methylated CDs, consistent with the demicellization observed. Instead, HEBCD forms a weak complex with ChEO10, while no complex is detected with SULFBCD. This shows that inclusion complex formation is not the determinant event leading to micellar growth. HEBCD:ChEO10 complex, which coexists with the aggregated surfactant, could act as a cosurfactant with a different headgroup area. For SULFBCD, intermolecular interactions via the external surface of the CD may be more relevant.

  15. Aerosol delivery of synthetic lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome due to lack of lung surfactant. If this approach fails, the next step is often intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV) and intratracheal instillation of clinical lung surfactant. Objective. To investigate whether aerosol delivery of advanced synthetic lung surfactant, consisting of peptide mimics of surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and synthetic lipids, during nCPAP improves lung function in surfactant-deficient rabbits. Methods. Experimental synthetic lung surfactants were produced by formulating 3% Super Mini-B peptide (SMB surfactant), a highly surface active SP-B mimic, and a combination of 1.5% SMB and 1.5% of the SP-C mimic SP-Css ion-lock 1 (BC surfactant), with a synthetic lipid mixture. After testing aerosol generation using a vibrating membrane nebulizer and aerosol conditioning (particle size, surfactant composition and surface activity), we investigated the effects of aerosol delivery of synthetic SMB and BC surfactant preparations on oxygenation and lung compliance in saline-lavaged, surfactant-deficient rabbits, supported with either nCPAP or MV. Results. Particle size distribution of the surfactant aerosols was within the 1–3 µm distribution range and surfactant activity was not affected by aerosolization. At a dose equivalent to clinical surfactant therapy in premature infants (100 mg/kg), aerosol delivery of both synthetic surfactant preparations led to a quick and clinically relevant improvement in oxygenation and lung compliance in the rabbits. Lung function recovered to a greater extent in rabbits supported with MV than with nCPAP. BC surfactant outperformed SMB surfactant in improving lung function and was associated with higher phospholipid values in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; these findings were irrespective of the type of ventilatory support

  16. Surfactant flooding oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, J.; Mills, M.; Tyler, T.; Ware, J.

    1980-07-29

    A method of recovering petroleum from a subterranean petroleum-containing formation penrated by at least one injection well and by at least one spaced apart production well is described. The wells being in fluid communication with the formation, comprising: (A) injecting into the formation via the injection well an aqueous, saline fluid having a salinity greater than 20,000 ppM total dissolved solids and containing a surfactant comprising petroleum sulfonates whose average equivalent weight is from 350 to 400, from 15 to 35 percent of said pertroleum sulfonates having equilvent weights of 350 or less, from 30 to 50 percent of said petroleum sulfonates having equivalent weights greater than 350 and less than 500, and from 10 to 40 percent of said petroleum sulfonates having equivalent weights of 500 and above and a solubilizing co-surfactant selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkanols, ethoxylated alkylphenols, alkyl or alkylaryl polyethoxy sulfates, alkyl or alkylaryl polyalkoxyalkyl sulfonates, and mixtures thereof, said surfactant fluid displacing petroleum toward the production well; and (B) recovering petroleum displaced by the surfactant fluids from the formation and via the production well.

  17. Cationic surfactants based on ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, V.A.; Kucherova, N.L.; Abramzon, A.A.

    1988-07-20

    Quaternary ammonium salts based on ferrocene were synthesized and their surface active properties were studied as potential cationic surfactants and for uses including antiknock compounds. The salts were halide and nitrate derivatives of dimethylferrocenylmethylammonium and were prepared by aminomethylation of ferrocene. Chemical reaction yields, melting points, surface tension isotherms, and other characteristics were assessed.

  18. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2003-03-31

    The aim of the project is to develop a knowledge base to help with the design of enhanced process for mobilizing and extracting untrapped oil. We emphasize on evaluating novel surfactant mixtures and on obtaining optimum combinations of the surfactants in chemical flooding EOR process. An understanding of the micellar shape and size is crucial since these physical properties directly determine the crude oil removal efficiency. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments were used to test the multi-micelle model proposed earlier and formulate the relationships between mixed micelle formation and the surfactant structure. Information on partial specific volume of surfactants and their mixtures is required to treat analytical ultracentrifuge data. In the last report, it was noted that the partial specific volumes of the sugar-based surfactants obtained experimentally did not agree with those from theoretical calculations. A scrutiny of partial specific volumes of the four sugar-based surfactants revealed that conformational changes upon micelle formation are responsible for the large deviation. From sedimentation equilibrium experiments, two types of micelles were identified for the nonionic polyethylene surfactant and its mixtures with the sugar-based surfactant, dodecyl maltoside. The average aggregation numbers of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside and nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether agreed with those reported in literature using other techniques. Our study displayed, for the first time, that small micelles might coexist with large micelles at high concentrations due to unique structures of the surfactant although classical thermodynamic theory supports only one type of micelle. Initial dynamic light scattering results support the results for the same mixed surfactant system from analytical ultracentrifuge equilibrium technique. The implication of this finding lies in the fact that efficiency of oil recovery will be improved due to the large micellar size, its

  19. Amino acid-bile acid based molecules: extremely narrow surfactant nanotubes formed by a phenylalanine-substituted cholic acid.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2012-12-21

    An amino acid-substituted bile acid forms tubular aggregates with inner and outer diameters of about 3 and 6 nm. The diameters are unusually small for surfactant self-assembled tubes. The results enhance the spectrum of applications of supramolecular tubules and open up possibilities for investigating a novel class of biological amphiphiles.

  20. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  1. Structural diversity, physicochemical properties and application of imidazolium surfactants: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Bhadani, Avinash; Misono, Takeshi; Singh, Sukhprit; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    The current review covers recent advances on development and investigation of cationic surfactants containing imidazolium headgroup, which are being extensively investigated for their self-aggregation properties and are currently being utilized in various conventional and non-conventional application areas. These surfactants are being used as: soft template for synthesis of mesoporous/microporous materials, drug and gene delivery agent, stabilizing agent for nanoparticles, dispersants for single/multi walled carbon nanotubes, antimicrobial and antifungal agent, viscosity modifiers, preparing nanocomposite materials, stabilizing microemulsions, corrosion inhibitors and catalyst for organic reactions. Recently several structural derivatives of these surfactants have been developed having many interesting physicochemical properties and they have demonstrated enormous potential in the area of nanotechnology, material science and biomedical science. PMID:27063924

  2. [Influence of Different Type of Surfactant on Bacteriolytic Activity of Lysozyme].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, R A; Soboleva, O A; Smirnov, S A; Levashov, P A

    2015-01-01

    The influence ofvarious surfactants (anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, cationic dodecyltrimethylarnmonium bromide, DTAB, and zwitterionic cocoamidopropylbetaine, CAPB) on the activity of the chicken egg lysozyme is investigated. Lysis of Gram-positive bacteria by the enzyme was carried out at pH 7.2 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. It was found that at low SDS and DTAB concentrations (less than 1 x 10(-5) M) the bacteriolytic activity increases by 30-140%. At higher concentrations (1 x 10(-5) - 1 x 10(4) M) the activity returns to the level observed in the absence of the surfactants. The elevated activity correlated with the formation of hydrophobic lysozyme-surfactant complexes. Introduction of CAPB at concentrations above 1 x 10(-5) M sig, nificantly diminished the bacteriolytic activity due to CAPB induced aggregation of lysozyme.

  3. The effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 deficiency on pulmonary surfactant in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Cory M; Cybulskie, Candice; Milos, Scott; Zuo, Yi Y; McCaig, Lynda A; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2016-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by arterial hypoxemia accompanied by severe inflammation and alterations to the pulmonary surfactant system. Published data has demonstrated a protective effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (Mmp3) deficiency against the inflammatory response associated with ARDS; however, the effect of Mmp3 on physiologic parameters and alterations to surfactant have not been previously studied. It was hypothesized that Mmp3 deficient (Mmp3(-/-)) mice would be protected against lung dysfunction associated with ARDS and maintain a functional pulmonary surfactant system. Wild type (WT) and Mmp3(-/-) mice were subjected to acid-aspiration followed by mechanical ventilation. Mmp3(-/-) mice maintained higher arterial oxygenation compared with WT mice at the completion of ventilation. Significant increase in functional large aggregate surfactant forms were observed in Mmp3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These findings further support a role of Mmp3 as an attractive therapeutic target for drug development in the setting of ARDS.

  4. New Lyotropic Liquid Crystals Based on Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honciuc, Maria; Borlescu, C.; Popa, Carmen

    We presented here the phase diagrams and the influence of the external electric field on the lyotropic liquid crystal phase (LLC) for some binary and pseudoternary systems based on surfactants. Binary systems are of the type surfactant/water (S/W) and the pseudoternary systems are of the type surfactant/oil/water (S/O/W). Two surfactants have been used: the lauryl alcohol ethoxilated with 11 molecules of ethylene oxide (LA11EO), which is a nonionic compound, and a mixture of LA11EO with the cationic surfactant named alkyl C12-C14-dimethyl-benzyl ammonium chloride. Based on these two types of surfactants, pseudoternary systems were prepared. Pine oil has been used as the oil. The region where the LLC phase appears depends on the concentration of the surfactant and that of the pine oil, respectively. It is strongly influenced by the nature of the surfactant and by the presence of the pine oil for the same type of surfactant. The influence of the external electric field, investigated by measuring the electric current appearing in the samples for different concentrations of surfactant and pine oil was found to be more important in the case of the systems based on the nonionic-cationic mixture of surfactants. The results are discussed in terms of a theoretical model based on the local thermal equilibrium approach for systems running nonstatic processes.

  5. Double tapered surfactant waterflood oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, J.T.; Tyler, T.N.

    1980-11-11

    Disclosed is an oil recovery process for recovering oil from subterranean formations containing relatively high salinity water , said process employing an aqueous surfactant fluid containing at least two surfactants, one primary anionic surfactant such as petroleum sulfonate and a solubilizing cosurfactant such as an alkyl or alkylaryl, polyethoxy sulfate or sulfonate. The process comprises injecting a plurality of slugs of surfactant fluids followed by a low salinity fluid containing a viscosifying amount of a hydrophilic polymer. The salinity and concentration of solubilizing cosurfactant of each surfactant slug are both decreased from the maximum level in the first slug of the surfactant fluid and in successive slugs to a minimum level at the last slug of the surfactant fluid.

  6. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane.

  7. Adsorption of Anionic, Cationic and Nonionic Surfactants on Carbonate Rock in Presence of ZrO 2 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouriya; Bahramian, Alireza; Fakhroueian, Zahra

    The adsorption of surfactants at the solid-water interface is important for the control of wetting, lubrication, detergency and in mineral flotation.We have studied the adsorptions of different types of surfactants, cationic (Dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide, DTAB), anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) and non-anionic (lauryl alcohol-7 mole ethoxylate, LA7) on carbonate rock in presence of zirconium oxide spherical nanoparticles (17-19 nm). ZrO2 nanoparticles with tetrahedral structure have significant effect on adsorption of surfactants on the carbonate rock. We have used the measured conductivities to determine the rate of adsorption of surfactants at rock-water interfaces. The conductivity of DTAB in aqueous solutions containing calcite powder decreases more than the other surfactants in contact with ZrO2 nanoparticles. We have also investigated the adsorption of surfactants at the air-water interface. The presence of nanoparticles, as demonstrated by our experiments, enhances the surface activity and surface adsorption of the surfactants through electrostatic forces or formation of nanostructures. Dynamic light structuring data shows similar aggregation number of nanoparticles in presence of nanoparticles.

  8. Structure of colloidal complexes obtained from neutral/poly- electrolyte copolymers and oppositely charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.; Cristobal, G.; Hervé, P.; Oberdisse, J.; Grillo, I.

    2002-11-01

    We report on the phase behavior and scattering properties of colloidal complexes made from block copolymers and surfactants. The copolymer is poly(sodium acrylate)-b-poly(acrylamide), hereafter abbreviated as PANa-PAM, with molecular weight 5000 g/mol for the first block and 30000 g/mol for the second. In aqueous solutions and neutral pH, poly(sodium acrylate) is a weak polyelectrolyte, whereas poly(acrylamide) is neutral and in good-solvent conditions. The surfactant is dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and is of opposite charge with respect to the polyelectrolyte block. Combining dynamical light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering, we show that in aqueous solutions PANa-PAM diblocks and DTAB associate into colloidal complexes. For surfactant-to-polymer charge ratios Z lower than a threshold (Z_C sim 0.3), the complexes are single surfactant micelles decorated by few copolymers. Above the threshold, the colloidal complexes reveal an original core-shell microstructure. We have found that the core of typical radius 100 200 Å is constituted from densely packed surfactant micelles connected by the polyelectrolyte blocks. The outer part of the colloidal complex is a corona and is made from the neutral poly(acrylamide) chains. Typical hydrodynamic sizes for the whole aggregate are around 1000 Å. The aggregation numbers expressed in terms of numbers of micelles and copolymers per complex are determined and found to be comprised between 100 400, depending on the charge ratio Z and on the total concentration. We have also shown that the sizes of the complexes depend on the exact procedure of the sample preparation. We propose that the driving mechanism for the complex formation is similar to that involved in the phase separation of homopolyelectrolyte/surfactant systems. With copolymers, the presence of the neutral blocks prevents the macroscopic phase separation from occurring.

  9. Explicit- and implicit-solvent simulations of micellization in surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Jusufi, Arben; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2015-03-24

    In this article, we focus on simulation methodologies to obtain the critical micelle concentration (cmc) and equilibrium distribution of aggregate sizes in dilute surfactant solutions. Even though it is now relatively easy to obtain micellar aggregates in simulations starting from a fully dispersed state, several major challenges remain. In particular, the characteristic times of micelle reorganization and transfer of monomers from micelles to free solution for most systems of practical interest exceed currently accessible molecular dynamics time scales for atomistic surfactant models in explicit solvent. In addition, it is impractical to simulate highly dilute systems near the cmc. We have demonstrated a strong dependence of the free surfactant concentration (frequently, but incorrectly, taken to represent the cmc in simulations) on the overall concentration for ionic surfactants. We have presented a theoretical framework for making the necessary extrapolations to the cmc. We find that currently available atomistic force fields systematically underpredict experimental cmc's, pointing to the need for the development of improved models. For strongly micellizing systems that exhibit strong hysteresis, implicit-solvent grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations represent an appealing alternative to atomistic or coarse-grained, explicit-solvent simulations. We summarize an approach that can be used to obtain quantitative, transferrable effective interactions and illustrate how this grand canonical approach can be used to interpret experimental scattering results.

  10. Elongational flow of solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) and sulfonated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Smitter, L M; Ruiz, J C; Torres, M E; Müller, A J; Sáez, A E

    2002-07-15

    In this work, the elongational flow behavior of aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in the presence of sulfonated surfactants. The technique of opposed-jets flow was used to generate an elongational flow field in which pressure drops were measured as a function of strain rates. The surfactants used were sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and an alpha-olefin sulfonate (AOS). Solutions of PEO and other flexible polymers exhibit extension thickening in opposed-jets flow due to the formation of transient networks of entangled molecules. This effect is present at concentrations below the static coil overlap concentration, due to the changes in molecular conformation induced by the flow. When SDBS or AOS are added to PEO solutions at low concentrations, the extension thickening weakens due to an increase in PEO intramolecular interactions that lead to coil contraction. This occurs until the surfactant concentration is close to the critical aggregation concentration reported in the literature. Further addition of surfactant induces the formation of intermolecular interactions as the PEO molecules are expanded by the electrostatic repulsion between attached micellar aggregates, with an associated strengthening of extension thickening. Intramolecular effects were not seen beyond a specific PEO concentration.

  11. Vesicles formed by mixed catanionic surfactants as novel pseudostationary phase in electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Ni, Xinjiong; Cao, Yuhua; Ma, Xinyu; Cao, Guangqun

    2014-09-12

    In this paper, a novel pseudostationary phase (PSP), the vesicle formed from octyltriethylammonium bromide (C8NE3Br) and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), has been developed in electrokinetic chromatography (EKC). Physicochemical parameters of the mixture of catanionic surfactants such as ζ potential and size of the aggregates were characterized as the molar ratio of C8NE3Br to SDBS varied from 2:8 to 8:2 and total concentration of surfactants fixed at 20mM. At any ratio mentioned above, ζ potential of mixture of catanionic surfactants remained negative. The absolute values of ζ potential were even larger than in only SDBS system as the molar ratio of C8NE3Br to SDBS less than 4:6, and they decreased as increasing the ratio of cationic surfactants. The size of the aggregates became smaller as the ratio was close to 1. Unexpectedly, the size was smallest at ratio of 3:7 and 6:4, instead of at 5:5. Notably, coagulation did not occur in the catanionic system at any proportion of each other. TEM testified the formation of vesicles. The performance of the vesicle as PSP was evaluated by separating eight kinds of corticosteroids with EKC, these analytes were separated completely without any additives. Compared with SDS microemulsion modified with ionic liquid (IL) and polymeric micelle, the novel vesicle PSP had better separation performances. PMID:25064530

  12. Mode changes associated with oil droplet movement in solutions of gemini cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Banno, Taisuke; Miura, Shingo; Kuroha, Rie; Toyota, Taro

    2013-06-25

    Micrometer-sized self-propelled oil droplets in nonequilibrium systems have attracted much attention, since they form stable emulsions composed of oil, water, and surfactant which represent a primitive type of inanimate chemical machinery. In this work, we examined means of controlling the movement of oil droplets by studying the dynamics of n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde droplets in phosphate buffers containing alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium bromide) (nG12) with either tetramethylene (4G12), octaethylene (8G12), or dodecamethylene (12G12) chains in the linker moiety. Significant differences in droplet dynamics were observed to be induced by changes in the linker structure of these gemini cationic surfactants. In a phosphate buffer containing 30 mM 4G12, self-propelled motion of droplets concurrent with the formation of molecular aggregates on their surfaces was observed, whereas the fusion of oil droplets was evident in both 8G12 and 12G12 solutions. We also determined that the surface activities and the extent of molecular self-assembly of the surfactants in phosphate buffer were strongly influenced by the alkyl chain length in the linker moiety. We therefore conclude that the surface activities of the gemini cationic surfactant have important effects on the oil-water interfacial tension of oil droplets and the formation of molecular aggregates and that both of these factors induce the unique movement of the droplets.

  13. Giant intrathyroidal parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Zafón, Carlos; Migone, Raul; Baena, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is not an uncommon endocrine disorder. However, acute primary hyperparathyroidism, or parathyroid crisis (PC), is a rare clinical entity characterized by life-threatening hypercalcemia of a sudden onset in patients with PHPT. We describe a patient with PC who presented with acute worsening of depressive symptoms, nausea and vomiting, and required emergency surgery. Serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone were elevated and serum phosphorus was low. An emergency hemithyroidectomy was performed because of none medical control of hypercalcemia. A giant intrathyroidal parathyroid adenoma was diagnosed. PHTP can be a life-threatening situation for patients, requiring immediate surgical treatment. A giant intrathyroidal parathyroid adenoma is an uncommon cause of PC. PMID:22787355

  14. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  15. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis.

  16. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  17. Lipoplexes of dicationic gemini surfactants with DNA: Structural features of DNA compaction and transfection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Faizullin, D A; Zuev, Yu F; Zakharova, L Ya; Pokrovsky, A G; Korobeinikov, V A; Mukhametzyanov, T A; Konovalov, A I

    2015-01-01

    The internal structure of DNA lipoplexes with hydroxyethylated alkylammonium gemini surfactants (GS) with high transfection activity was studied by circular dichroism. It was shown that the efficiency of transfection of HEK293T cells with the pEGFP-N1 circular plasmid was different from zero only in the region of existence of chiral supramolecular DNA-GS complexes and reaches a maximum at concentrations at which the spontaneous aggregation of components is observed.

  18. Superamphiphilic nanocontainers based on the resorcinarene - Cationic surfactant system: Synergetic self-assembling behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynanova, Gulnara A.; Bekmukhametova, Alina M.; Kashapov, Ruslan R.; Ziganshina, Albina Yu.; Zakharova, Lucia Ya.

    2016-05-01

    Self-organization in the mixed system based on water-soluble aminomethylated calix[4]arene with sulfonatoethyl groups at the lower rim and classical cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide has been studied by the methods of tensiometry, conductometry, spectrophotometry, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering. The values of the critical association concentration, the size and zeta potential values, and the solubilization capacity of mixed aggregates toward the hydrophobic probe (Sudan I) were determined.

  19. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  20. Surfactants in the management of rhinopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Philip L.; Palmer, James N.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surfactants are a class of amphiphilic surface active compounds that show several unique physical properties at liquid–liquid or liquid–solid surface interfaces including the ability to increase the solubility of substances, lower the surface tension of a liquid, and decrease friction between two mediums. Because of these unique physical properties several in vitro, ex vivo, and human trials have examined the role of surfactants as stand-alone or adjunct therapy in recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Methods: A review of the literature was performed. Results: The data from three different surfactants have been examined in this review: citric acid zwitterionic surfactant (CAZS; Medtronic ENT, Jacksonville FL), Johnson's Baby Shampoo (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick NJ), and SinuSurf (NeilMed Pharmaceuticals, Santa Rosa, CA). Dilute surfactant therapy shows in vitro antimicrobial effects with modest inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation. In patients with CRS, surfactants may improve symptoms, most likely through its mucolytic effects. In addition, surfactants have several distinct potential benefits including their ability to improve an irrigant's penetration of the nonoperated sinus and their synergistic effects with antibiotics. However, surfactants potential for nasal irritation and possible transient ciliotoxicity may limit their use. Conclusion: Recent data suggest a possible therapeutic role of surfactants in treating rhinopathologies associated with mucostasis. Further investigation, including a standardization of surfactant formulations, is warranted to further elucidate the potential benefits and drawbacks of this therapy. PMID:23710951

  1. Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration and air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Lipe, K.M.; Sabatini, D.A.; Hasegawa, M.A.; Harwell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF) and air stripping were evaluated for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant recovery. Two linear alkyl diphenyloxide disulfonate (DPDS) surfactants were evaluated with the contaminants naphthalene and trichloroethylene. A separation model developed from micellar partitioning principles showed a good correlation to batch MEUF studies, whereas flux analysis highlighted concentration polarization effects in relation to hydrophobe length. MEUF effectively concentrated the surfactant-contaminant system (93 to 99% retention); however, this did not result in surfactant-contaminant separation. Batch and continuous flow air stripping models were developed based upon air/water ratio, surfactant concentration, and micellar partitioning; model predictions were validated by experimental data. Sensitivity analyses illustrated the decline in contaminant-surfactant separation with increasing surfactant concentration (e.g., TCE removal efficiency declines from 83% to 37% as C-16 DPDS concentration increases from 0 to 55 mM). This effect is greater for more hydrophobic contaminants (naphthalene vs. TCE) and surfactants with greater solubilization potential (C16-DPDS vs. C-12 DPDS). The resulting design equations can account for this effect and thus properly size air strippers to achieve the desired removal efficiency in the presence of surfactant micelles. Proper selection and design of surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant recovery systems are integral to optimizing surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  2. Nanostructured fluids from degradable nonionic surfactants for the cleaning of works of art from polymer contaminants.

    PubMed

    Baglioni, M; Raudino, M; Berti, D; Keiderling, U; Bordes, R; Holmberg, K; Baglioni, P

    2014-09-21

    Nanostructured fluids containing anionic surfactants are among the best performing systems for the cleaning of works of art. Though efficient, their application may result in the formation of a precipitate, due to the combination with divalent cations that might leach out from the artifact. We propose here two new aqueous formulations based on nonionic surfactants, which are non-toxic, readily biodegradable and insensitive to the presence of divalent ions. The cleaning properties of water-nonionic surfactant-2-butanone (MEK) were assessed both on model surfaces and on a XIII century fresco that could not be cleaned using conventional methods. Structural information on nanofluids has been gathered by means of small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance with diffusion monitoring. Beside the above-mentioned advantages, these formulations turned out to be considerably more efficient in the removal of polymer coatings than those based on anionic surfactants. Our results indicate that the cleaning process most likely consists of two steps: initially, the polymer film is swollen by the MEK dissolved in the continuous domain of the nanofluid; in the second stage, surfactant aggregates come into play by promoting the removal of the polymer film with a detergency-like mechanism. The efficiency can be tuned by the composition and nature of amphiphiles and is promoted by working as close as possible to the cloud point of the formulation, where the second step proceeds at maximum rate.

  3. Nanostructured fluids from degradable nonionic surfactants for the cleaning of works of art from polymer contaminants.

    PubMed

    Baglioni, M; Raudino, M; Berti, D; Keiderling, U; Bordes, R; Holmberg, K; Baglioni, P

    2014-09-21

    Nanostructured fluids containing anionic surfactants are among the best performing systems for the cleaning of works of art. Though efficient, their application may result in the formation of a precipitate, due to the combination with divalent cations that might leach out from the artifact. We propose here two new aqueous formulations based on nonionic surfactants, which are non-toxic, readily biodegradable and insensitive to the presence of divalent ions. The cleaning properties of water-nonionic surfactant-2-butanone (MEK) were assessed both on model surfaces and on a XIII century fresco that could not be cleaned using conventional methods. Structural information on nanofluids has been gathered by means of small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance with diffusion monitoring. Beside the above-mentioned advantages, these formulations turned out to be considerably more efficient in the removal of polymer coatings than those based on anionic surfactants. Our results indicate that the cleaning process most likely consists of two steps: initially, the polymer film is swollen by the MEK dissolved in the continuous domain of the nanofluid; in the second stage, surfactant aggregates come into play by promoting the removal of the polymer film with a detergency-like mechanism. The efficiency can be tuned by the composition and nature of amphiphiles and is promoted by working as close as possible to the cloud point of the formulation, where the second step proceeds at maximum rate. PMID:25079380

  4. Adsorption isotherms and structure of cationic surfactants adsorbed on mineral oxide surfaces prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wangchareansak, Thipvaree; Craig, Vincent S J; Notley, Shannon M

    2013-12-01

    The adsorption isotherms and aggregate structures of adsorbed surfactants on smooth thin-film surfaces of mineral oxides have been studied by optical reflectometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films of the mineral oxides of titania, alumina, hafnia, and zirconia were produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with low roughness. We find that the surface strongly influences the admicelle organization on the surface. At high concentrations (2 × cmc) of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the surfactant aggregates on a titania surface exhibit a flattened admicelle structure with an average repeat distance of 8.0 ± 1.0 nm whereas aggregates on alumina substrates exhibit a larger admicelle with an average separation distance of 10.5 ± 1.0 nm. A wormlike admicelle structure with an average separation distance of 7.0 ± 1.0 nm can be observed on zirconia substrates whereas a bilayered aggregate structure on hafnia substrates was observed. The change in the surface aggregate structure can be related to an increase in the critical packing parameter through a reduction in the effective headgroup area of the surfactant. The templating strength of the surfaces are found to be hafnia > alumina > zirconia > titania. Weakly templating surfaces are expected to have superior biocompatibility.

  5. Interactions between dyes and surfactants in inkjet ink used for textiles.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Young; Hirata, Yuichi; Hamada, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Optimal preparation of inkjet ink should be possible through the elucidation of the relationship between dye/additive interactions and ink performance. In the present study, the interactions between the dyes and surfactant additives were investigated. To investigate the physical properties of the surfactants used, the critical micelle concentration (cmc) and the aggregation number (N) were determined using electron spin resonance, static light-scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy. On the basis of the cmc and N values, the visible absorption spectra of aqueous acid dye solutions (C. I. Acid Red 88, 13, and 27) containing surfactants (i.e., Surfynol 465 (S465), octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (OGDE), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) were measured. From the dependence of the spectra on the surfactant concentration, the binding constants, K(bind), of the acid dyes with the surfactant micelles were calculated: the K(bind) values decreased in the order of C. I. Acid Red 88 > C. I. Acid Red 13 > C. I. Acid Red 27, which correlates with the number of sulfonate groups. For all the dyes, the K(bind) values with the nonionic surfactants, S465 and OGDE, were much larger than those with the anionic surfactant, SDS. The thermodynamic parameters of the binding, i.e., the enthalpy change, ΔH(bind), and entropy change, ΔS(bind), were determined via the temperature dependence of the binding constants. The positive ΔH(bind) value for S465 indicates an endothermic binding process, while the negative ΔH(bind) values for SDS and OGDE indicate exothermic binding processes. PMID:22123244

  6. Solution properties and emulsification properties of amino acid-based gemini surfactants derived from cysteine.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Sakato, Ayako; Esumi, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid-based anionic gemini surfactants (2C(n)diCys, where n represents an alkyl chain with a length of 10, 12, or 14 carbons and "di" and "Cys" indicate adipoyl and cysteine, respectively) were synthesized using the amino acid cysteine. Biodegradability, equilibrium surface tension, and dynamic light scattering were used to characterize the properties of gemini surfactants. Additionally, the effects of alkyl chain length, number of chains, and structure on these properties were evaluated by comparing previously reported gemini surfactants derived from cystine (2C(n)Cys) and monomeric surfactants (C(n)Cys). 2C(n)diCys shows relatively higher biodegradability than does C(n)Cys and previously reported sugar-based gemini surfactants. Both critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension decrease when alkyl chain length is increased from 10 to 12, while a further increase in chain length to 14 results in increased CMC and surface tension. This indicates that long-chain gemini surfactants have a decreased aggregation tendency due to the steric hindrance of the bulky spacer as well as premicelle formation at concentrations below the CMC and are poorly packed at the air/water interface. Formation of micelles (measuring 2 to 5 nm in solution) from 2C(n)diCys shows no dependence on alkyl chain length. Further, shaking the mixtures of aqueous 2C(n)diCys surfactant solutions and squalane results in the formation of oil-in-water type emulsions. The highly stable emulsions are formed using 2C₁₂diCys or 2C₁₄diCys solution and squalane in a 1:1 or 2:1 volume ratio.

  7. Miscibility of Quillaja Saponins with other Co-surfactants under Different pH Values.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Corina L; Salminen, Hanna; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    The miscibility behavior of mixed surfactant systems and the influence of extrinsic parameters are crucial for their application as emulsifiers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the miscibility behavior of mixed systems composed of commercial Quillaja saponin and a co-surfactant, namely sodium caseinate, pea protein, rapeseed lecithin, or egg lecithin. These mixtures were evaluated macro- and microscopically at different concentration ratios (maximum concentration 5% w/v) at pH 3, 5, and 7 at 25 °C. The individual ingredients were also assessed for their charge properties and surface hydrophobicity. The results showed that Quillaja saponin-caseinate mixtures were miscible only at pH 7, and showed aggregation and precipitation at lower pH due to increasing electrostatic attraction forces. Rheological measurements showed that Quillaja saponin-pea protein mixtures formed gelled structures at all tested pH values mainly via association of hydrophobic patches. Quillaja saponins mixed with rapeseed lecithin were miscible at all tested pH values due to electrostatic repulsion. Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin mixtures aggregated independent of pH and concentration ratio. The microscopic analysis revealed that the lower the pH and the higher the Quillaja saponin ratio, the denser were the formed Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin aggregates. The results are summarized in ternary phase diagrams that provide a useful tool in selecting a surfactant system for food applications. PMID:26458074

  8. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  9. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  10. Hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex as a function of surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Devínsky, Ferdinand; Pisárcik, Martin; Lacko, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    The present study deals with the determination of hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex in sodium bromide solution using the dynamic light scattering method. Cationic gemini surfactants with polymethylene spacer of variable length were used for the interaction with DNA. The scattering experiments were performed at constant DNA and sodium bromide concentrations and variable surfactant concentration in the premicellar and micellar regions as a function of surfactant spacer length. It was found that the DNA conformation strongly depends on the polymethylene spacer length as well as on the surfactant concentration relative to the surfactant critical micelle concentration. Gemini surfactant molecules with 4 methylene groups in the spacer were found to be the least efficient DNA compacting agent in the region above the surfactant cmc. Gemini molecules with the shortest spacer length (2 methylene groups) and the longest spacer length (8 methylene groups) investigated showed the most efficient DNA compaction ability. PMID:19592712

  11. Enhancing Dopant Solubility via Epitaxial Surfactant Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Yan, Y.; Wei, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    A general concept for enhancing dopant solubility via epitaxial surfactant growth is proposed. The key of the concept is to find the appropriate surfactants that generate high (low) levels that can transfer electrons (holes) to dopant acceptor (donor) levels in p-type (n-type) doping, thus significantly lowering the formation energy of dopants. Using first-principles density-functional calculations, our concept explains excellently the recently discovered dual-surfactant effect of Sb and H on enhancing Zn doping in epitaxially grown GaP(100) thin film and suggests that sole surfactant Te can also induce enhancement of N solubility in ZnSe(100) film. We also proposed the surfactants for enhancing p-type doing of ZnO with epitaxial growth with (000{bar 1}) surface. General rules for selecting surfactants for enhancing both p-type and n-type dopings are provided.

  12. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  13. Thermodynamics of mixed micelles: Determination of the aggregate composition.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Pierre; Mayaffre, Alain; Turmine, Mireille

    2008-11-01

    In most studies concerning surfactant mixtures, the determination of the composition of mixed micelles is often tricky. This composition can be obtained by different ways. One of them, undoubtedly the most used, supposes, a priori, that the surfactant in the micelle follows the regular solution model. This poses a problem on the thermodynamic point of view because in these studies, a model of behavior is first admitted for deducing a composition. In a correct thermodynamic approach, a composition should first be determined and then, a model of behavior which accounts for the observed physicochemical properties can be found. This approach is all the more questionable since the application of the Gibbs-Duhem relationship to the pseudo-phase allows aggregate composition to be determined simply, without using a solution model, because the composition of the bulk at the threshold of aggregation is known. In this article, we describe and validate a simple procedure, which supplements that proposed by Rodenas et al. [E. Rodenas, M. Valiente, M.D. Villafruela, J. Phys. Chem. B 103 (1999) 4549], and which allows determination of the activities of the components of the micellar aggregate and its composition. The results are compared to those obtained with other approaches such as molecular-thermodynamic model. PMID:18723182

  14. Dependence of buffer acidity and surfactant chain-length on electro-osmotic mobility in thermoplastic microchannels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Lee, Chia-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-Ping

    2005-04-15

    In this paper, we report the dependence of buffer pH and coating surfactant chain-length on electro-osmotic (EO) mobility in co-polyester microchannels. Thermoplastics co-polyester hydrolyzes to anionic functionality to create electrical double layer on the micro-channel walls. These negatively charged sites are partially or completely screened when long-chain surfactants are added into the buffer. This ancillary technique to modify surface charge polarity to avoid analyte adsorption is known as dynamic coating. We develop a theory to predict the EO mobility tendency on buffer acidity considering the combination of pH-dependent surfactant aggregation and surface dissociation. Our findings of pH-dependent EO mobility in coated channels, using three types of quaternary ammonium surfactants, lauryltrimethyammonium bromide (LTAB), trimethyl (tetradecyl) ammonium bromide (TTAB), and cetyltrimethyammonium bromide (CTAB), agree with our theoretical prediction. We also explain the chain-length dependence of mobility with a collaborative adsorption mechanism of surfactant aggregates.

  15. Self-Assembly and Rheological Properties of a Pseudogemini Surfactant Formed in a Salt-Free Catanionic Surfactant Mixture in Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Hongguang; Chai, Jinling; Chen, Mengjun; Yang, Qiao; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-10-20

    The surface and bulk properties of bola-type dicarboxylic acid (sebacic acid, SA) and zwitterionic surfactant tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C14DMAO) mixtures in aqueous solutions were studied. Surface tension measurements indicate a pronounced synergistic effect between SA and C14DMAO. In bulk aqueous solutions, rich phase behavior was observed with a varied SA-to-C14DMAO ratio (ρ) and a total surfactant concentration. Typically at ρ = 0.5, a novel pseudogemini surfactant (C14-S-C14) forms, driven by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. The C14-S-C14/H2O system exhibits rich phase behavior induced by the transition of aggregates. With increasing concentration of C14-S-C14, one can observe a viscous L1 phase, an L1/Lα two-phase region where a birefringent Lα phase is on the top of an L1 phase, a single Lα phase, and finally a mixture of an Lα phase and a precipitate. Microstructures formed in the Lα phases were determined by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observations. Polymorphic aggregation behavior was observed with the formation of a variety of bilayer structures including unilamellar vesicles, onions, and open and hyperbranched bilayers. Rheological measurements showed that the Lα phases are viscoelastic and sensitive to temperature where a quick loss of viscoelasticity was observed at elevated temperature. PMID:26406939

  16. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  17. Crystalline surfactant dispersions by radio frequency absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tedder, S.H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently interest has increased in the use of liquid crystalline surfactant dispersions for enhanced oil recovery. The object of the work described in the report was to develop a method of measuring the electrical properties of colloidal surfactant particles, which control the structure and stability of the surfactant dispersion. A further object was to find how these electrical properties are affected by the method used to mix the components of the dispersion. The results may be useful in solving several practical problems, including the identification of optimally performing liquid crystalline surfactant formulations for oil recovery use. Another possible use is to identify and categorize effects of the method of mixing surfactants on the final product. This information would provide guidelines for field handling of chemical recovery agents. The absorption of radio frequency energy, a process which is mediated by the surface electrical properties of the surfactant particles, was used to measure several electrical parameters of the surfactant mixtures. Two commercial petroleum sulfonate surfactants were tested by the radio frequency absorption method, and a model of their electrical properties was developed and used to fit the data. The strength of the layer of electric charges surrounding the surfactant particles was found to be related to the stability of the solution. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Immiscible displacement of oil with surfactant system

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J. E.

    1985-12-03

    In accordance with the present invention it has been found that improved recovery of oil from a subsurface earth formation can be attained by injecting into the formation a surfactant system comprising a carboxylate surfactant, a cosurfactant and an electrolyte in concentrations and proportions to form an immiscible three-phase system with the reservoir oil comprising a predominantly oil phase, a microemulsion phase and an aqueous phase. The carboxylate surfactant is preferably selected from the group consisting of branched aliphatic carboxylates and mononuclear aromatic carboxylates. Where aliphatic carboxylates are utilized as a surfactant, it is preferred that the polar organic material utilized as a cosurfactant have a solubility in water less than about ten grams per hundred grams of water ost about 20/sup 0/ C. and, when an aromatic carboxylate is utilized as a surfactant, it is preferred that the polar organic material utilized as a cosurfactant have a water solubility greater than about ten grams per hundred grams of water at about 20/sup 0/ C. In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, it has been found that surfactant systems containing carboxylate surfactants will recover optimum amounts of oil when a base is added to the surfactant system to adjust the pH to a value at which the surfactant system results nin optimum oil recovery.

  19. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  20. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-01

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π*) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data.

  1. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-15

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π(*)) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data.

  2. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a specific tool for the interaction study of two surfactants with natural and synthetic organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Aude-Valérie; Frochot, Céline; Bersillon, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    Four different techniques were used to study the binding of cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and non-ionic nonylphenylethoxyl (NPE) surfactants to three synthetic organic components that mimic humic-like aggregates and to two natural aggregated humic substances (HS) extracted from aquatic suspended matter. The composition of synthetic organic components were chosen to be similar to high molecular weight highly processed terrigenous HS and low and high molecular weight less processed terrigenous (or aquatic terrigenous) HS. The natural HS were extracted under two different meteorological conditions (rainy and dry periods). No significant interaction between the non-ionic surfactant and any of the studied compounds was found. Concerning CTAB; pH, conductivity and turbidity measurements, along with fluorescence spectroscopy were combined to provide a better understanding of interactions between organic aggregates and the surfactant. The spectroscopic data show that a "highly processed terrigenous HS" fluorophore interacts in a different way with the cationic surfactant than an "aquatic terrigenous (or less processed terrigenous) HS" fluorophore does. Under similar conditions, some spectral changes in the fluorescence signal are correlated to changes in non-specific physical-chemical parameters (pH, turbidity, conductivity) for the organic compounds tested. The complexation mechanism is essentially governed by charge neutralization, which can be monitored specifically by the fluorescence of the organic moieties.

  4. GIANT INTRACANALICULAR FIBROADENOMA

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyn; Parsons, Robert J.; Bogart, William M.

    1951-01-01

    Five cases of giant intracanalicular fibroadenoma (“cystosarcoma phylloides”) were observed at one hospital in a period of three years. In a search of the literature, additional reports of breast tumors of this kind, not included in previous reviews, were noted. As there is record of 229 cases, it would appear that this rapidly growing benign tumor should be kept in mind in the diagnosis of masses in the breast. If removal is incomplete, there may be recurrence. Simple mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Radical mastectomy should be avoided. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2.Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:14848732

  5. Transmission X-ray microscopy reveals the clay aggregate discrete structure in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L; Song, Yen-Fang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chen, Jian-Hua

    2008-03-15

    The utilization of new transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) using the synchrotron photon source enable for the first time the study in three dimensions microsize clay particles in aggregates in their natural aqueous environment. This technique makes possible remarkable accurate images of nanosize mineral interparticle structure which forms a new nanocomposite. The Birdwood kaolinite/LDH aggregates observed in the TXM are much more compact than observed before in pure Birdwood kaolinite suspension and similar to aggregates formed after treatment by positively charged surfactant. Kaolinite/LDH aggregates in water reveal complex structure of larger kaolinite platelets connected together by gelled nanoparticles which are most probably LDH colloidal plates. Comparisons of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) and TXM techniques show similarities in particle morphology. The ability to study particles and aggregates in their natural aqueous environment and in 3-dimensions make this technique superior to the TEM technique. PMID:18187142

  6. Micelles and aggregates of oxyethylated isononylphenols and their extraction properties near cloud point.

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, Victor P; Idiyatullin, Zhamil Sh; Potapova, Elisaveta F; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Filippov, Andrey V

    2014-05-22

    We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques to study the structural and dynamic properties of micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants of a homologous series of oxyethylated isononylphenols--C9H19C6H4O(C2H4O)(n)H, where n = 6, 8, 9, 10, or 12--in a wide range of temperatures, including cloud points. The radii of the micelles and aggregates, as well as their compositions at different concentrations of surfactant, were determined. Using aqueous phenol solutions as a model, we studied the process of cloud point extraction with oxyethylated isononylphenols.

  7. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    PubMed

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency.

  8. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  9. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    PubMed Central

    Teli, Bhavuray; Thrishuli, P. B.; Santhosh, R.; Amar, D. N.; Rajpurohit, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals. PMID:25839021

  10. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  11. Rheology of giant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Giant micelles are elongated, polymer-like objects created by the self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules (such as detergents) in solution. Giant micelles are typically flexible, and can become highly entangled even at modest concentrations. The resulting viscoelastic solutions show fascinating flow behaviour (rheology) which we address theoretically in this article at two levels. First, we summarize advances in understanding linear viscoelastic spectra and steady-state nonlinear flows, based on microscopic constitutive models that combine the physics of polymer entanglement with the reversible kinetics of self-assembly. Such models were first introduced two decades ago, and since then have been shown to explain robustly several distinctive features of the rheology in the strongly entangled regime, including extreme shear thinning. We then turn to more complex rheological phenomena, particularly involving spatial heterogeneity, spontaneous oscillation, instability and chaos. Recent understanding of these complex flows is based largely on grossly simplified models which capture in outline just a few pertinent microscopic features, such as coupling between stresses and other order parameters such as concentration. The role of ‘structural memory’ (the dependence of structural parameters such as the micellar length distribution on the flow history) in explaining these highly nonlinear phenomena is addressed. Structural memory also plays an intriguing role in the little-understood shear thickening regime, which occurs in a concentration regime close to but below the onset of strong entanglement, and which is marked by a shear-induced transformation from an inviscid to a gelatinous state.

  12. Effects of spacer chain length of amino acid-based gemini surfactants on wormlike micelle formation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Nomura, Kazuyuki; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Endo, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kazutami; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of the spacer chain length of amino acid-based gemini surfactants on the formation of wormlike micelles in aqueous solutions. The surfactants used were synthesized by reacting dodecanoylglutamic acid anhydride with diamine compounds (ethylenediamine, pentanediamine, and octanediamine), and were abbreviated as 12-GsG-12 (s: the spacer chain length of 2, 5, and 8 methylene units). These surfactants yielded viscoelastic wormlike micellar solutions at pH 9 upon mixing with a cationic monomeric surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB). We found that the rheological behavior was strongly dependent on the spacer chain length and HTAB concentration. When the shortest spacer chain analogue (12-G2G-12) was used, an increased HTAB concentration resulted in the following structural transformations of the micelles: (i) spherical or rodlike micelles; (ii) anionic wormlike micelles exhibiting a transient network structure; (iii) anionic wormlike micelles with a micellar branching or interconnected structure; and (iv) cationic wormlike micelles. Similarly, when the middle spacer chain analogue (12-G5G-12) was used, a structural transformation from anionic to cationic wormlike micelles occurs; however, molecular aggregates with a lower positive curvature were also formed in this transition region. When the longest spacer analogue (12-G8G-12) was used, the formation of cation-rich molecular aggregates was not observed. These transition behaviors were attributed to the packing geometry of the gemini surfactants with HTAB. Additionally, as the spacer chain length increased, the zero-shear viscosity in the anionic wormlike micellar region decreased, suggesting limited one-dimensional micellar growth of spherical, rodlike, or anionic wormlike micelles.

  13. Adsorption of surfactants on mineral oxide surfaces from aqueous solutions. Part 1. Isomerically pure anionic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J.F.; Schechter, R.S.; Wade, W.H.

    1982-02-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on minerals is detrimental to surfactant-enhanced oil recovery. To minimize adsorption, the forces tending to cause it must be understood. This requires the study of relatively simple, well-defined systems. The majority of surfactant adsorption studies on mineral oxides has been made with surfactant mixtures and not with monoisomerically pure species. Some of the observed results may be due to complex surfactant intercomponent interactions. In this study, the adsorption of 3 isomerically pure alkylbenzene sulfonates was measured on alumina and kaolinite from very low concentrations to well above the critical micelle concentration and a thermodynamic model was developed, which describes the observed isotherms. 59 references.

  14. Salt-induced transition from a micellar to a lamellar liquid crystalline phase in dilute mixtures of anionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sein, A.; Engberts, J.B.F.N. ); Linden, E. van der; Pas, J.C. van de )

    1993-07-01

    In dilute mixtures of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDoBS), and nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) alkylmonoether (C[sub 13-15]E[sub <7>]) a transition from a micellar to a lamellar phase is found at high salting-out electrolyte (NaCit) concentrations. With an increase of the salt concentration, different types of lamellar aggregates are formed. The existence of different types of aggregates is reflected by changes of the turbidity of the solutions. Light and fluorescence microscopy, freeze-fractured electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and fluorescence depolarization were employed to characterize the aggregates and to induce a mechanism for the transition from a micellar to a lamellar phase. Surfactant aggregation is important in view of possible applications in enhanced oil recovery. 39 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Colloidal Recycling: Reconfiguration of Random Aggregates into Patchy Particles.

    PubMed

    Meester, Vera; Verweij, Ruben W; van der Wel, Casper; Kraft, Daniela J

    2016-04-26

    The key ingredients to the successful bottom-up construction of complex materials are believed to be colloids with anisotropic shapes and directional, or patchy, interactions. We present an approach for creating such anisotropic patchy particles based on reconfiguring randomly shaped aggregates of colloidal spheres. While colloidal aggregates are often undesirable in colloidal dispersions due to their random shapes, we exploit them as a starting point to synthesize patchy particles. By a deliberate destabilization of the colloidal particles, diffusion-limited aggregation is induced which partitions the particles into randomly shaped aggregates with controlled size distribution. We achieve a reconfiguration of the aggregates into uniform structures by swelling the polymer spheres with an apolar solvent. The swelling lowers the attractive van der Waals forces, lubricates the contact area between the spheres, and drives the reorganization through minimization of the interfacial energy of the swollen polymer network. This reorganization process yields patchy particles whose patch arrangement is uniform for up to five patches. For particles with more patches, we find that the patch orientation depends on the degree of phase separation between the spheres and the monomer. This enables the synthesis of patchy particles with unprecedented patch arrangements. We demonstrate the broad applicability of this recycling strategy for making patchy particles as well as clusters of spheres by varying the swelling ratio, swelling solvent, surfactant concentration, and swelling time. PMID:27014995

  16. Colloidal Recycling: Reconfiguration of Random Aggregates into Patchy Particles.

    PubMed

    Meester, Vera; Verweij, Ruben W; van der Wel, Casper; Kraft, Daniela J

    2016-04-26

    The key ingredients to the successful bottom-up construction of complex materials are believed to be colloids with anisotropic shapes and directional, or patchy, interactions. We present an approach for creating such anisotropic patchy particles based on reconfiguring randomly shaped aggregates of colloidal spheres. While colloidal aggregates are often undesirable in colloidal dispersions due to their random shapes, we exploit them as a starting point to synthesize patchy particles. By a deliberate destabilization of the colloidal particles, diffusion-limited aggregation is induced which partitions the particles into randomly shaped aggregates with controlled size distribution. We achieve a reconfiguration of the aggregates into uniform structures by swelling the polymer spheres with an apolar solvent. The swelling lowers the attractive van der Waals forces, lubricates the contact area between the spheres, and drives the reorganization through minimization of the interfacial energy of the swollen polymer network. This reorganization process yields patchy particles whose patch arrangement is uniform for up to five patches. For particles with more patches, we find that the patch orientation depends on the degree of phase separation between the spheres and the monomer. This enables the synthesis of patchy particles with unprecedented patch arrangements. We demonstrate the broad applicability of this recycling strategy for making patchy particles as well as clusters of spheres by varying the swelling ratio, swelling solvent, surfactant concentration, and swelling time.

  17. Surfactants decrease the toxicity of ZnO, TiO2 and Ni nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Patryk; Jośko, Izabela; Skwarek, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was the estimation of the effect of surfactants on the toxicity of ZnO, TiO2 and Ni nanoparticles (ENPs) towards Daphnia magna. The effect of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), triton X-100 (TX100) and 4-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (SDBS) was tested. The Daphtoxkit F test (conforming to OECD Guideline 202 and ISO 6341) was applied for the toxicity testing. Both the surfactants and the ENPs were toxic to D. magna. The addition of ENPs to a solution of the surfactants caused a significant reduction of toxicity of ENPs. The range of reduction of the toxicity of the ENPs depended on the kind of the ENPs and their concentration in the solution, and also on the kind of surfactant. For nano-ZnO the greatest reduction of toxicity was caused by CTAB, while for nano-TiO2 the largest drop of toxicity was observed after the addition of TX100. In the case of nano-Ni, the effect of the surfactants depended on its concentration. Most probably the reduction of toxicity of ENPs in the presence of the surfactants was related with the formation of ENPs aggregates that inhibited the availability of ENPs for D. magna.

  18. Impact of model perfume molecules on the self-assembly of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig; Grillo, Isabelle

    2013-03-12

    The impact of two model perfumes with differing degrees of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, linalool (LL) and phenylethanol (PE), on the solution structure of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate, LAS-6, has been studied by small angle neutron scattering, SANS. For both types of perfume molecules, complex phase behavior is observed. The phase behavior depends upon the concentration, surfactant/perfume composition, and type of perfume. The more hydrophilic perfume PE promotes the formation of more highly curved structures. At relatively low surfactant concentrations, small globular micelles, L1, are formed. These become perfume droplets, L(sm), stabilized by the surfactant at much higher perfume solution compositions. At higher surfactant concentrations, the tendency of LAS-6 to form more planar structures is evident. The more hydrophobic linalool promotes the formation of more planar structures. Combined with the greater tendency of LAS-6 to form planar structures, this results in the planar structures dominating the phase behavior for the LAS-6/linalool mixtures. For the LAS-6/linalool mixture, the self-assembly is in the form of micelles only at the lowest surfactant and perfume concentrations. Over most of the concentration-composition space explored, the structures are predominantly lamellar, L(α), or vesicle, L(v), or in the form of a lamellar/micellar coexistence. At low and intermediate amounts of LL, a significantly different structure is observed, and the aggregates are in the form of small, relatively monodisperse vesicles (i.e., nanovesicles), L(sv).

  19. Surfactants decrease the toxicity of ZnO, TiO2 and Ni nanoparticles to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Patryk; Jośko, Izabela; Skwarek, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was the estimation of the effect of surfactants on the toxicity of ZnO, TiO2 and Ni nanoparticles (ENPs) towards Daphnia magna. The effect of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), triton X-100 (TX100) and 4-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (SDBS) was tested. The Daphtoxkit F test (conforming to OECD Guideline 202 and ISO 6341) was applied for the toxicity testing. Both the surfactants and the ENPs were toxic to D. magna. The addition of ENPs to a solution of the surfactants caused a significant reduction of toxicity of ENPs. The range of reduction of the toxicity of the ENPs depended on the kind of the ENPs and their concentration in the solution, and also on the kind of surfactant. For nano-ZnO the greatest reduction of toxicity was caused by CTAB, while for nano-TiO2 the largest drop of toxicity was observed after the addition of TX100. In the case of nano-Ni, the effect of the surfactants depended on its concentration. Most probably the reduction of toxicity of ENPs in the presence of the surfactants was related with the formation of ENPs aggregates that inhibited the availability of ENPs for D. magna. PMID:26410374

  20. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  1. Surfactant and pulmonary blood flow distributions following treatment of premature lambs with natural surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, A; Ikegami, M; Jacobs, H; Jones, S

    1984-01-01

    Prematurely delivered lambs were treated with radiolabeled natural surfactant by either tracheal instillation at birth and before the onset of mechanical ventilation, or after 23 +/- 1 (+/- SE) min of mechanical ventilation. Right ventricular blood flow distributions, left ventricular outputs, and left-to-right ductal shunts were measured with radiolabeled microspheres. After sacrifice, the lungs of lambs receiving surfactant at birth inflated uniformly with constant distending pressure while the lungs of lambs treated after a period of ventilation had aerated, partially aerated, and atelectatic areas. All lungs were divided into pieces which were weighed and catalogued as to location. The amount of radiolabeled surfactant and microsphere-associated radioactivity in each piece of lung was quantified. Surfactant was relatively homogenously distributed to pieces of lung from lambs that were treated with surfactant at birth; 48% of lung pieces received amounts of surfactant within +/- 25% of the mean value. Surfactant was preferentially recovered from the aerated pieces of lungs of lambs treated after a period of mechanical ventilation, and the distribution of surfactant to these lungs was very nonhomogeneous. Right ventricular blood flow distributions to the lungs were quite homogeneous in both groups of lambs. However, in 8 of 12 lambs, pulmonary blood flow was preferentially directed away from those pieces of lung that received relatively large amounts of surfactant and toward pieces of lung that received less surfactant. This acute redirection of pulmonary blood flow distribution may result from the local changes in compliances within the lung following surfactant instillation. PMID:6546766

  2. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  3. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  4. Stabilizing nanocellulose-nonionic surfactant composite foams by delayed Ca-induced gelation.

    PubMed

    Gordeyeva, Korneliya S; Fall, Andreas B; Hall, Stephen; Wicklein, Bernd; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-06-15

    Aggregation of dispersed rod-like particles like nanocellulose can improve the strength and rigidity of percolated networks but may also have a detrimental effect on the foamability. However, it should be possible to improve the strength of nanocellulose foams by multivalent ion-induced aggregation if the aggregation occurs after the foam has been formed. Lightweight and highly porous foams based on TEMPO-mediated oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were formulated with the addition of a non-ionic surfactant, pluronic P123, and CaCO3 nanoparticles. Foam volume measurements show that addition of the non-ionic surfactant generates wet CNF/P123 foams with a high foamability. Foam bubble size studies show that delayed Ca-induced aggregation of CNF by gluconic acid-triggered dissolution of the CaCO3 nanoparticles significantly improves the long-term stability of the wet composite foams. Drying the Ca-reinforced foam at 60 °C results in a moderate shrinkage and electron microscopy and X-ray tomography studies show that the pores became slightly oblate after drying but the overall microstructure and pore/foam bubble size distribution is preserved after drying. The elastic modulus (0.9-1.4 MPa) of Ca-reinforced composite foams with a density of 9-15 kg/m(3) is significantly higher than commercially available polyurethane foams used for thermal insulation. PMID:27003498

  5. Competitive interactions between components in surfactant-cosurfactant-additive systems.

    PubMed

    Chaghi, Radhouane; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Charnay, Clarence; Zajac, Jerzy

    2010-04-15

    Complex interactions of phenol (PhOH), heptanol (HeOH) and heptanoic acid (HeOIC) with micellar aggregates of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) in aqueous solutions at surfactant concentrations close to the CMC, HeOH or HeOIC content of 0.5 mmol kg(-1), and phenol molality of 1, 5, or 10 mmol kg(-1) have been investigated at 303 K by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, titration calorimetry and solution conductimetry. The analysis of the composition-dependence of the (1)H chemical shifts assigned to selected protons in the surfactant and additive units revealed the location of PhOH both within the hydrophobic micelle core and in the vicinity of the quaternary ammonium groups, the phenol penetration being somewhat deeper in the presence of HeOIC. The phenomenon was globally more exothermic with increasing extent of PhOH solubilization and it was accompanied by a gradual decrease in the positive entropy of micellization. The solubilization was competitive for high phenol contents in the aqueous phase, with some HeOH and HeOIC units being displaced progressively towards the aqueous phase.

  6. Novel surfactant-based adsorbent material for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Venditti, F; Angelico, R; Ceglie, A; Ambrosone, L

    2007-10-01

    Many surfactants aggregate spontaneously in aqueous media to form small spherical structures called micelles. Among the numerous technical applications it is known that micelles have the ability to dissolve in their hydrophobic part significant amounts of water-insoluble organic compounds. In this study we investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy the micellar solubilization of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (Tcp), an intermediate product of the microbial degradation of the broad-leaf herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic (2,4,5-T). Our results show that in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate SDS the water solubility of Tcp increases six-fold whereas with cationic CTAB and nonionic Triton-X 100 the partition of chlorinated compound is not efficient. After the excess amount of the pollutant solubilized in SDS-micelles has been precipitated with CaCl2 the remaining fraction of Tcp has been successfully reduced within the toxicological limit for drinkable water through a cocurrent multistage operation. Finally, potential use in the decontamination of wastewater or soils of the new adsorbent material has been compared with the most commonly used activated carbon and silica gel.

  7. Organic aggregate formation in aerosols and its impact on the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    Fatty acid salts and "humic" materials, found in abundance in atmospheric particles, are both anionic surfactants. Such materials are known to form organic aggregates or colloids in solution at very low aqueous concentrations. In a marine aerosol, micelle aggregates can form at a low fatty acid salt molality of ˜10 -3 m. In other types of atmospheric particles, such as biomass burning, biogenic, soil dust, and urban aerosols, "humic-like" materials exist in sufficient quantities to form micelle-like aggregates in solution. I show micelle formation limits the ability of surface-active organics in aerosols to reduce the surface tension of an atmospheric particle beyond about 10 dyne cm -1. A general phase diagram is presented for anionic surfactants to explain how surface-active organics can change the water uptake properties of atmospheric aerosols. Briefly such molecules can enhance and reduce water uptake by atmospheric aerosols at dry and humid conditions, respectively. This finding is consistent with a number of unexplained field and laboratory observations. Dry electron microscope images of atmospheric particles often indicate that organics may coat the surface of particles in the atmosphere. The surfactant phase diagram is used to trace the particle path back to ambient conditions in order to determine whether such coatings can exist on wet ambient aerosols. Finally, I qualitatively highlight how organic aggregate formation in aerosols may change the optical properties and chemical reactivity of atmospheric particles.

  8. Cosurfactant in preflush for surfactant flood system

    SciTech Connect

    Glinsmann, G.R.; Hedges, J.H.

    1981-06-23

    In a post-primary oil recovery process involving the sequential addition of a saline preflush, a surfactant system comprising of a surfactant, a cosurfactant and brine when added to the preflush improves recovery. If desired, cosurfactant can also be added to a subsequent injected mobility buffer. The resulting system gives extraordinarily high recovery of oil.

  9. Hyaluronan decreases surfactant inactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Goerke, Jon; Clements, John A; Taeusch, H William

    2005-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an anionic polymer and a constituent of alveolar fluid that can bind proteins, phospholipids, and water. Previous studies have established that nonionic polymers improve the surface activity of pulmonary surfactants by decreasing inactivation of surfactant. In this work, we investigate whether HA can also have beneficial effects when added to surfactants. We used a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer to measure mixtures of several commercially available pulmonary surfactants or native calf surfactant with and without serum inactivation. Surface properties such as equilibrium surface tension, minimum and maximum surface tensions on compression and expansion of a surface film, and degree of surface area reduction required to reach a surface tension of 10 mN/m were measured. In the presence of serum, addition of HA dramatically improved the surface activities of all four surfactants and in some cases in the absence of serum as well. These results indicate that HA reduces inactivation of surfactants caused by serum and add evidence that endogenous HAs may interact with alveolar surfactant under normal and abnormal conditions.

  10. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  11. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    DOEpatents

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  12. Kinetics of spreading of surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starov, Victor; Kovalchuk, Nina; Trybala, Anna; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Wetting properties of surfactant solutions are determined by adsorption of surfactant at all interfaces involved. Adsorption on liquid/air and liquid/solid interface depends on surfactant chemistry. That is why the lower surface tension does not result automatically in better wetting properties. Spreading of surfactant solutions causes redistribution of surfactant at the interface and in the bulk. As a result surface concentration gradients appear and spreading kinetics is influenced by solutal Marangoni effect. Disjoining pressure, being the driving force of spreading also depends on the local surfactant concentration. Therefore spreading kinetics of surfactant solutions differ considerably from those of pure liquids. The results of experimental study on spreading kinetics of synergetic surfactant mixtures on hydrophobic substrates such as polyethylene and sylanised glass are presented for the two different regimes: complete and partial wetting and compared with the spreading kinetics of a pure liquid in those regimes. EPSRC Grant Numbers EP/J010502/1, EP/D077869/1, EU Marie Curie CoWet Grant, by ESA under Grants FASES and PASTA, and COST MP1106 Project.

  13. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  14. Oil recovery by fluorochemical surfactant waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, T.W.

    1984-07-17

    The instant invention relates to the recovery of oil from subterranean oil reservoirs involving the injection of an aqueous based liquid containing a fluorochemical surfactant possessing an oleophobic-hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group, a hydrophilic group and an oleophilic group, optionally in conjugation with a conventional enhanced oil recovery surfactant.

  15. Interaction of Surfactants with Block Polyelectrolyte Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, Mark; Bhatia, Surita

    2002-03-01

    We present SANS and rheology for poly(styrene)-poly(acrylic acid) polymers in aqueous solutions. These polymers self-assemble to form spherical micelles in aqueous solutions, and the micelles associate to create elastic, transparent gels at moderate polymer concentrations. The addition of cationic and anionic surfactants (DTAB and SDS) can be used to modify the associative interactions and solution rheology. Addition of an anionic surfactant acts to screen attractive interactions and causes a monotonic decrease in the elastic modulus. However, the addition of a cationic surfactant appears to initially induce a stronger intermicellar attraction, leading to gels with a higher elastic modulus. At higher surfactant concentrations, the cationic surfactant begins to screen intermicellar association, leading to a decrease in the strength of the gel.

  16. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. ); Lewis, B.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Giant magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenas, Terrisa Ann

    The limitation of magnetostrictive composites has been in their low magnetostrictive response when compared to their monolithic counterparts. In this dissertation research is presented describing the methods and analysis used to create a giant magnetostrictive composite (GMC) producing giant strains at low fields, exhibiting magnetization ``jumping'' and the ΔE effect. This composite combines the giant magnetostrictive material, Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2) in particle form, with a nonmetallic binder and is capable of producing strains (at room temperature) exceeding 1000 ppm at a nominal field of 1.5 kOe mechanically unloaded and 1200 ppm at 8 MPa preload (2.5 kOe). Several studies leading to the high response of this composite are presented. A connectivity study shows that a [1-3] connected composite produces 50% more strain than a [0-3] composite. A resin study indicates that the lower the viscosity of the resin, the greater the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the removal of voids during degassing. A void study correlates the increase in voids to the decrease in strain response. A model is used to correlate analysis with experimental results within 10% accuracy and shows that an optimal volume fraction exists based on the properties of the binder. Using a Polyscience Spurr low- viscosity (60 cps) binder this volume fraction is nominally 20%; this optimum is attributed to the balance of epoxy contracting on the particle (built-in preload) and the actuation delivered by the magnetostrictive material. In addition to the connectivity, resin, void, and volume-fraction study, particle size and gradation studies are presented. Widely dispersed (<106, <212, <300 μm), narrowly dispersed (<45, (90-106), (275-300) μm), and an optimized bimodal (18.7% of (45-90) μm with 81.3% of (250-300) μm) particle distributions are studied. Results show that the larger the particle size, the higher the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the reduction of

  18. Giant vesicles: preparations and applications.

    PubMed

    Walde, Peter; Cosentino, Katia; Engel, Helen; Stano, Pasquale

    2010-05-01

    There is considerable interest in preparing cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles from natural or nonnatural amphiphiles because a giant vesicle membrane resembles the self-closed lipid matrix of the plasma membrane of all biological cells. Currently, giant vesicles are applied to investigate certain aspects of biomembranes. Examples include lateral lipid heterogeneities, membrane budding and fission, activities of reconstituted membrane proteins, or membrane permeabilization caused by added chemical compounds. One of the challenging applications of giant vesicles include gene expressions inside the vesicles with the ultimate goal of constructing a dynamic artificial cell-like system that is endowed with all those essential features of living cells that distinguish them from the nonliving form of matter. Although this goal still seems to be far away and currently difficult to reach, it is expected that progress in this and other fields of giant vesicle research strongly depend on whether reliable methods for the reproducible preparation of giant vesicles are available. The key concepts of currently known methods for preparing giant unilamellar vesicles are summarized, and advantages and disadvantages of the main methods are compared and critically discussed. PMID:20336703

  19. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta®, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload. PMID:23781287

  20. The interactions between cationic cellulose and Gemini surfactant in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaojing; Cheng, Fa; Chen, Yu; Wei, Yuping

    2016-05-01

    Due to the extensive application of cationic cellulose in cosmetic, drug delivery and gene therapy, combining the improvement effect of surfactant-cellulose complexes, to investigate the properties of cellulose in aqueous solution is an important topic from both scientific and technical views. In this study, the phase behavior, solution properties and microstructure of Gemini surfactant sodium 5-nonyl-2-(4-(4-nonyl-2-sulfonatophenoxy)butoxy)phenyl sulfite (9-4-9)/cationic cellulose (JR400, the ammonium groups are directly bonded to the hydroxyethyl substituent with a degree substitution of 0.37) mixture was investigated using turbidity, fluorescence spectrophotometer and shear rheology techniques. As a control, the interaction of corresponding monovalent surfactant, sodium 2-ethoxy-5-nonylbenzenesulfonate (9-2) with JR400 in aqueous solution was also studied. Experimental results showed that 9-4-9/JR400 mixture has lower critical aggregation concentration (CAC) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) (about one order of magnitude) than 9-2/JR400 mixture. A low concentration of Gemini surfactant 9-4-9 appeared to induce an obvious micropolarity and viscosity value variation of the mixture, while these effects required a high concentration of corresponding monovalent one. Furthermore, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements illuminated the formation and collapse procedure of network structure of the 9-4-9/JR400 mixture, which resulted in the increase and decrease of viscosity. These results suggest that the molecular structure of the surfactant has a great effect on its interaction with cationic cellulose. Moreover, the Gemini surfactant/cationic cellulose mixture may be used as a potencial stimuli-responsive drug delivery vector which not only load hydrophilic drugs, but also deliver hydrophobic substances. PMID:26876997

  1. Growth Behavior, Geometrical Shape, and Second CMC of Micelles Formed by Cationic Gemini Esterquat Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L Magnus; Tehrani-Bagha, Alireza; Nagy, Gergely

    2015-04-28

    Micelles formed by novel gemini esterquat surfactants have been investigated with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The growth behavior of the micelles is found to differ conspicuously depending on the length of the gemini surfactant spacer group. The gemini surfactant with a long spacer form rather small triaxial ellipsoidal tablet-shaped micelles that grow weakly with surfactant concentration in the entire range of measured concentrations. Geminis with a short spacer, on the other hand, form weakly growing oblates or tablets at low concentrations that start to grow much more strongly into polydisperse rodlike or wormlike micelles at higher concentrations. The latter behavior is consistent with the presence of a second CMC that marks the transition from the weakly to the strongly growing regime. It is found that the growth behavior in terms of aggregation number as a function of surfactant concentration always appear concave in weakly growing regimes, while switching to convex behavior in strongly growing regimes. As a result, we are able to determine the second CMC of the geminis with short spacer by means of suggesting a rather precise definition of it, located at the point of inflection of the growth curve that corresponds to the transition from concave to convex growth behavior. Our SANS results are rationalized by comparison with the recently developed general micelle model. In particular, this theory is able to explain and reproduce the characteristic appearances of the experimental growth curves, including the presence of a second CMC and the convex strongly growing regime beyond. By means of optimizing the agreement between predictions from the general micelle model and results from SANS experiments, we are able to determine the three bending elasticity constants spontaneous curvature, bending rigidity, and saddle-splay constant for each surfactant. PMID:25835031

  2. Competitive solubilization of phenol by cationic surfactant micelles in the range of low additive and surfactant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chaghi, Radhouane; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Charnay, Clarence; Derrien, Gaëlle; Zajac, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Competitive interactions of phenol (PhOH) with micellar aggregates of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) against 1-butanol (BuOH) in aqueous solutions at surfactant concentrations close to the critical micelle concentration (CMC), BuOH concentration of 0.5 mmol kg(-1), and phenol contents of 1, 5, or 10 mmol kg(-1) have been investigated at 303 K by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, titration calorimetry, and solution conductimetry. The solubilization loci for phenol were deduced from the composition-dependence of the (1)H chemical shifts assigned to various protons in the surfactant and additive units. Since in pure HTAB solutions phenol is already in competition with Br(-), addition of 1 mmol kg(-1) NaBr to the system weakens the phenol competitiveness. The presence of butanol in the HTAB micelles causes phenol to penetrate deeper toward the hydrophobic micelle core. For higher phenol contents, the butanol molecules are constrained to remain in the bulk solution and are progressively replaced within the HTAB micelles by the aromatic units. The competitive character of phenol solubilization against butanol is well supported by changes in the thermodynamic parameters of HTAB micellization in the presence of both of the additives.

  3. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  4. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction.

  5. [Giant adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Dakir, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail; Manni, Ahmed; Meziane, Fethi

    2004-02-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-secreting tumour composed of adipose and haematopoietic tissue. The authors report a rare case of giant adrenal myelolipoma in a 53-year-old patient presenting with low back pain and a palpable flank mass on examination. CT scan suggested the diagnosis and surgical resection was indicated in view of the size and symptomatic nature of this mass. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favourable without recurrence after a follow-up of one year. The diagnosis of adrenal myelolipoma is based on radiology. Conservative management is generally sufficient for small asymptomatic tumours, but resection is required for large (> 5 cm) and/or symptomatic tumours.

  6. Two giant stellar complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Efremov, E. Yu.

    Common star complexes are huge (0.3-1 kpc in diameter) groups of relatively young stars, associations and clusters. The complexes usually form regular chains along spiral arms of grand design galaxies, being evidently formed and supported by magneto- gravitational instability developing along an arm. Special attention is given to a few large complexes which have signatures of gravitational boundness, such as round shape and high central density. Concentrations of stars and clusters in such a complex in M51 galaxy were found in this paper; we concluded it is possible to suggest that the complex is gravitationally bound. It is also stressed that some properties of the giant complex in NGC 6946 (such as its semicircular and sharp Western edge) are still enigmatic.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Thrombosis in Giant Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopard, B.; Ouared, R.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.

    We propose a numerical model of blood flow and blood clotting whose purpose is to describe thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysms. We identify possible mechanisms that can cause occurence of spontaneous thrombosis in unruptured giant intracranial aneurysms. Our main claim is that, under normal conditions, there is a low shear rate threshold below which thrombosis starts and growths. This assumption is supported by several evidences from literature. The proposed mechanisms are incorporated into a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for blood flow and platelets adhesion and aggregation. Numerical simulations show that the low shear rate threshold assumption together with aneurysm geometry account well for the observations.

  8. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    PubMed

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  9. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  10. Determination of aromatic hydrotropic drugs in pharmaceutical preparations by the surfactant-binding degree method.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Ana; Sicilia, María Dolores; Rubio, Soledad; Pérez-Bendito, Dolores

    2005-07-01

    An aggregation parameter-based analytical approach, the surfactant-dye binding degree (SDBD) method, was used, for the first time, to determine aromatic hydrotropic compounds. The anionic dye Coomassie Brilliant Blue G (CBBG) was used as inductor of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDABr) aggregates, whose formation was monitored from changes in the spectral features of the dye. Interactions between hydrotrope and DDABr molecules resulted in a decrease of the degree of binding of the cationic surfactant to CBBG, which was proportional to the concentration of hydrotrope in the aqueous solution. The CBBG-DDABr-hydrotrope chemical system was found to fit to the mathematical expression previously derived for the determination of amphiphilic compounds. The hydrotrope-surfactant bond strength determined the sensitivity achieved for the determination of hydrotropic compounds, which was highly dependent on the molecular structure of the analyte. The high precision (the relative standard deviation for 7 mg l(-1) of salicylic acid was 0.8%), rapidity (measurements were performed in a few minutes) and low cost (in both instrumentation and reactants) of the proposed method, made it especially suitable for quality control. The practical analytical applicability of the SDBD method for the control of hydrotropic drugs in pharmaceutical preparations was demonstrated by quantifying salicylic acid and acetyl salicylic acid in liquid (solutions) and solid (tablets, granulates, unguents, gels and creams) samples, which were directly analyzed after dissolution of the samples.

  11. Aqueous stability and mobility of C₆₀ complexed by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate surfactant.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianjia; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Hongyu; Liang, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Surfactant complexation may have significant effects on the environmental behavior of nano-particles. In order to understand the ecological exposure of nano-materials, it is important to determine the stability and mobility of surfactant-complexed nano-materials in aqueous systems. In this study, the aggregation and transport of C60 complexed by the surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) were investigated. It was found that SDBS-complexed C60 had a ζ-potential of -49.5 mV under near-neutral pH conditions and remained stable during an aging period of 15 days. It had a critical coagulation concentration of 550 mmol/L for NaCl, which was higher than common natural colloids and many kinds of raw nano-materials, and was comparable to those of many kinds of surface-modified nano-materials. SDBS enhanced the stability of C60 colloid; however, at the same time, it also enhanced the colloidal particle aggregation rate. Much higher mobility was found for SDBS-complexed C60 than C60 colloid. Increase in ionic strength, Ca(2+) concentration or Al(3+) concentration decreased the mobility. In general, SDBS-complexed C60 had high stability and mobility. PMID:27090698

  12. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  13. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  14. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  15. Hydrogenated/fluorinated catanionic surfactants as potential templates for nanostructure design.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Ruso, Juan M; Piñeiro, Ángel

    2011-08-16

    The structure and physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles spontaneously formed within aqueous mixtures of the hydrogenated/fluorinated catanionic surfactant cetyltrimetylammonium perfluorooctanoate in the absence of counterions as a function of its concentration are investigated by a combined experimental/computational study at room temperature. Apparent molar volumes, isentropic apparent molar compressibilities, and dynamic light scattering measurements together with transmission and cryo-scanning electron as well as confocal laser microscopy images, and computational molecular dynamics simulations indicate that a variety of structures of different sizes coexist in solution with vesicles of ∼160 nm diameter. Interestingly, the obtained nanostructures were observed to self-assemble from a random distribution of monomers in a time scale easily accessible by atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations, allowing to provide a comprehensive structural and dynamic characterization of the surfactant molecules at atomic level within the different aggregates. Overall, it is demonstrated that the use of mixed fluorinated hydrogenated surfactant systems represents an easy strategy for the design of specific nanoscale structures. The detailed structural analysis provided in the present work is expected to be useful as a reference to guide the design of new nanoparticles based on different hydrogenated/fluorinated catanionic surfactants.

  16. Comparison of amphiphilic polyurethane nanoparticles to nonionic surfactants for flushing phenanthrene from soil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Young; Shim, Sun-Bo; Shim, Jin-Kie

    2004-12-31

    Amphiphilic polyurethane (APU) nanoparticles were synthesized through crosslinking polymerization of nano-aggregates of urethane acrylate nonionomer (UAN). The efficiency of in situ extraction of sorbed phenanthrene from aquifer material was tested using soil columns and compared with that of surfactants such as Triton X-100, Brij 30, and Tween 80. The extraction efficiency of those washing materials strongly depended on their concentration, flow rate, and the degree of sorption within soil column. That is, the extraction efficiency increased with the decrease of flow rate and the degree of sorption and the increase of the concentration. Even though the surfactants are superior to APU nanoparticles at solubilizing phenanthrene, at the same flow rate (0.02 mL/min) and concentration (4000 mg/L), the effectiveness of in situ soil washing of APU nanoparticles was about two times higher than those of surfactants. This is because, at the lower flow rates, the degree of sorption of APU nanoparticles was lower than that of surfactants, owing to the chemically crosslinked nature of APU nanoparticles.

  17. Controlling the morphology of membranes by excess surface charge in cat-anionic fluorinated surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuwen; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can; Zhang, Yufeng; Hao, Jingcheng; Liu, Zhaohui

    2014-03-18

    The segregation and phase sequence of semifluorinated cat-anionic surfactant membranes at different excess surface charges was investigated by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscope (FF-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The thermal behavior of the membranes was evaluated by conductivity, rheology, and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR). The experimental results show that the cat-anionic fluorinated surfactant mixtures can form faceted vesicles and punctured lamellar phase when there is excess surface charge. The cationic and anionic fluorinated surfactants are stiff in the membranes, like phospholipids in the frozen "crystalline" or "gel" phase. For the system with excess cationic surface charge, the gel-like faceted vesicles and punctured lamellae can transform into smooth-shaped vesicles at 65 °C. However, for the system with no excess charge or with excess anionic surface charge, no phase transformation occurs even at 90 °C. A model was established to demonstrate the mechanism of the formation and transition of the aggregates with different morphologies. The segregation-crystallization mechanism works well with other cosmotropic counterions from the Hofmeister series. The observations provide a better understanding of how to control the membrane morphology of the aqueous solutions of cat-anionic surfactant mixtures.

  18. Re-entrant phase behavior of a concentrated anionic surfactant system with strongly binding counterions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sajal Kumar; Rathee, Vikram; Krishnaswamy, Rema; Raghunathan, V A; Sood, A K

    2009-08-01

    The phase behavior of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence of the strongly binding counterion p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) has been examined using small-angle X-ray diffraction and polarizing microscopy. A hexagonal-to-lamellar transition on varying the PTHC to SDS molar ratio (alpha) occurs through a nematic phase of rodlike micelles (Nc) --> isotropic (I) --> nematic of disklike micelles (N(D)) at a fixed surfactant concentration (phi). The lamellar phase is found to coexist with an isotropic phase (I') over a large region of the phase diagram. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of the phase behavior at phi = 0.4 confirm the transition from N(C) to N(D) on varying alpha. The viscoelastic and flow behaviors of the different phases were examined. A decrease in the steady shear viscosity across the different phases with increasing alpha suggests a decrease in the aspect ratio of the micellar aggregates. From the transient shear stress response of the N() and N(D) nematic phases in step shear experiments, they were characterized to be tumbling and flow aligning, respectively. Our studies reveal that by tuning the morphology of the surfactant micelles strongly binding counterions modify the phase behavior and rheological properties of concentrated surfactant solutions.

  19. Re-entrant phase behavior of a concentrated anionic surfactant system with strongly binding counterions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sajal Kumar; Rathee, Vikram; Krishnaswamy, Rema; Raghunathan, V A; Sood, A K

    2009-08-01

    The phase behavior of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence of the strongly binding counterion p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) has been examined using small-angle X-ray diffraction and polarizing microscopy. A hexagonal-to-lamellar transition on varying the PTHC to SDS molar ratio (alpha) occurs through a nematic phase of rodlike micelles (Nc) --> isotropic (I) --> nematic of disklike micelles (N(D)) at a fixed surfactant concentration (phi). The lamellar phase is found to coexist with an isotropic phase (I') over a large region of the phase diagram. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of the phase behavior at phi = 0.4 confirm the transition from N(C) to N(D) on varying alpha. The viscoelastic and flow behaviors of the different phases were examined. A decrease in the steady shear viscosity across the different phases with increasing alpha suggests a decrease in the aspect ratio of the micellar aggregates. From the transient shear stress response of the N() and N(D) nematic phases in step shear experiments, they were characterized to be tumbling and flow aligning, respectively. Our studies reveal that by tuning the morphology of the surfactant micelles strongly binding counterions modify the phase behavior and rheological properties of concentrated surfactant solutions. PMID:19301881

  20. Discrimination of Proteins Using an Array of Surfactant-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Jacob L; Verma, Mohit S; Gu, Frank X

    2016-08-01

    Protein analysis is a fundamental aspect of biochemical research. Gold nanoparticles are an emerging platform for various biological applications given their high surface area, biocompatibility, and unique optical properties. The colorimetric properties of gold nanoparticles make them ideal for point-of-care diagnostics. Different aspects of gold nanoparticle-protein interactions have been investigated to predict the effect of protein adsorption on colloidal stability, but the role of surfactants is often overlooked, despite their potential to alter both protein and nanoparticle properties. Herein we present a method by which gold nanoparticles can be prepared in various surfactants and used for array-based quantification and identification of proteins. The exchange of surfactant not only changed the zeta potential of those gold nanoparticles but also drastically altered their aggregation response to five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, and hemoglobin) in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that varying surfactant concentration can be used to control assay sensitivity. PMID:27399345

  1. Modeling and simulations of carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in water/surfactant/polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Nasir Mohammad

    concentrations and structures on CNT interactions in water were investigated at room conditions. CNT interactions in polymer solution were also investigated with polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymer and water as a solvent. In all cases, the atomic arrangement of molecules was discussed in detailed. Simulations revealed that CNT orientation, length, diameter, and addition of surfactant and its structures can significantly affect CNT interactions (i.e., PMFs varied significantly) and in-turn the degree of CNT dispersion in aqueous solution. For all simulation cases, a uniform sampling was achieved by using the ABF method to calculate the governing PMF between CNTs indicating the effectiveness and convergence of the adaptive sampling scheme. The surfactant molecules were shown to adsorb at the CNT surface and contribute to weaker interactions between CNTs which resulted less CNT aggregate size at the mesoscale. Surfactant consisting with a benzene ring contributed much weaker interactions between CNTs as compared with that of without benzene ring. The increase in CNT length contributed the stronger CNT interactions where the increase in CNT diameter caused weaker CNT interactions in water. The interfacial characteristics between the CNT, surfactant and the polymer were also predicted and discussed. The model can be expanded for more solvents, surfactants, and polymers.

  2. Possible size control and emission characteristics of Eu3+-doped Y2O3 nanoparticles synthesized by surfactant-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Yukihiko; Harada, Takashi; Sasai, Ryo; Tomita, Koji; Nishiyama, Katsura

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium oxide nanoparticles doped with 2.0 wt% Eu (Eu@Y2O3) were synthesized via the surfactant-assembly method. The average diameter of Eu@Y2O3 (dav) depends on the alkyl chain number (N) of the sodium alkyl sulfates employed as surfactants. Using surfactants with N = 8, 10, and 12, Eu@Y2O3 with dav = 35, 200, and 500 nm, respectively were obtained. Such changes in dav are ascribed to the difference in the micelle aggregation numbers, supporting the use of rare-earth ions in the assembly. The Eu@Y2O3 particles synthesized presently emitted through Eu3+ transitions under UV excitation of Y2O3, making them applicable to nanoemitters.

  3. Effects of arginine and other solution additives on the self-association of different surfactants: an investigation at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2011-05-17

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is used to monitor the self-association of SDS and DTAB monomers at single-molecule resolution. Tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMR) has been chosen as a probe because rhodamine dyes have been shown to bind surfactant micelles. Correlation functions obtained by FCS experiments have been fit using conventional discrete diffusional component analysis as well as the more recent maximum entropy method (MEM). Hydrodynamic radii calculated from the diffusion time values increase with surfactant concentration as the monomers self-associate. Effects of several solution additives on the self-association property of the surfactants have been studied. Urea and glycerol inhibit self-association, and arginine shows a dual nature. With SDS, arginine favors self-association, and with DTAB, it inhibits micelle formation. We propose surfactant self-association to be a "supersimplified" model of protein aggregation.

  4. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  5. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  6. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  7. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  8. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  9. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  11. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-01

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  12. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  13. Liquid-liquid extraction for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, M.A.; Sabatini, D.A.; Harwell, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction was investigated for use with surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation. A surfactant liquid-liquid extraction model (SLLEM) was developed for batch equilibrium conditions based on contaminant partitioning between micellar, water, and solvent phases. The accuracy of this fundamental model was corroborated with experimental results (using naphthalene and phenanthrene as contaminants and squalane as the extracting solvent). The SLLEM model was then expanded to nonequilibrium conditions. The effectiveness of this nonequilibrium model was corroborated with experimental results from continuous flow hollow fiber membrane systems. The validated models were used to conduct a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects of surfactants on the removal of the contaminants in liquid-liquid extraction systems. In addition, liquid-liquid extraction is compared to air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the impact of surfactants on liquid-liquid extraction processes, and the significance of these impacts on the optimization of surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  14. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Hongmei; Lin, Qianglu; Baber, Stacy; Naalla, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    We demore » monstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta 2 O 5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses.« less

  15. pH-Sensitive self-propelled motion of oil droplets in the presence of cationic surfactants containing hydrolyzable ester linkages.

    PubMed

    Banno, Taisuke; Kuroha, Rie; Toyota, Taro

    2012-01-17

    Self-propelled oil droplets in a nonequilibrium system have drawn much attention as both a primitive type of inanimate chemical machinery and a dynamic model of the origin of life. Here, to create the pH-sensitive self-propelled motion of oil droplets, we synthesized cationic surfactants containing hydrolyzable ester linkages. We found that n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde oil droplets were self-propelled in the presence of ester-containing cationic surfactant. In basic solution prepared with sodium hydroxide, oil droplets moved as molecular aggregates formed on their surface. Moreover, the self-propelled motion in the presence of the hydrolyzable cationic surfactant lasted longer than that in the presence of nonhydrolyzable cationic surfactant. This is probably due to the production of a fatty acid by the hydrolysis of the ester-containing cationic surfactant and the subsequent neutralization of the fatty acid with sodium hydroxide. A complex surfactant was formed in the aqueous solution because of the cation and anion combination. Because such complex formation can induce both a decrease in the interfacial tension of the oil droplet and self-assembly with n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde and lauric acid in the aqueous dispersion, the prolonged movement of the oil droplet may be explained by the increase in heterogeneity of the interfacial tension of the oil droplet triggered by the hydrolysis of the ester-containing surfactant.

  16. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    monolayer expands outward from the aggregate apparently under tension. In this tense monolayer, holes nucleate, and lead to a symmetry breaking as the entire aggregate starts to move in a similar fashion as a giant fish keratocyte.

  17. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Experimental-Theoretical Approach to the Adsorption Mechanisms for Anionic, Cationic, and Zwitterionic Surfactants at the Calcite-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Durán-Álvarez, Agustín; Maldonado-Domínguez, Mauricio; González-Antonio, Oscar; Durán-Valencia, Cecilia; Romero-Ávila, Margarita; Barragán-Aroche, Fernando; López-Ramírez, Simón

    2016-03-22

    The adsorption of surfactants (DTAB, SDS, and CAPB) at the calcite-water interface was studied through surface zeta potential measurements and multiscale molecular dynamics. The ground-state polarization of surfactants proved to be a key factor for the observed behavior; correlation was found between adsorption and the hard or soft charge distribution of the amphiphile. SDS exhibits a steep aggregation profile, reaching saturation and showing classic ionic-surfactant behavior. In contrast, DTAB and CAPB featured diversified adsorption profiles, suggesting interplay between supramolecular aggregation and desorption from the solid surface and alleviating charge buildup at the carbonate surface when bulk concentration approaches CMC. This manifests as an adsorption profile with a fast initial step, followed by a metastable plateau and finalizing with a sharp decrease and stabilization of surface charge. Suggesting this competition of equilibria, elicited at the CaCO3 surface, this study provides atomistic insight into the adsorption mechanism for ionic surfactants on calcite, which is in accordance with experimental evidence and which is a relevant criterion for developing enhanced oil recovery processes.

  19. Influence of surfactant charge on antimicrobial efficacy of surfactant-stabilized thyme oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-06-01

    Thyme oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80, T80) were prepared as potential antimicrobial delivery systems (pH 4). The nanoemulsions were highly unstable to droplet growth and phase separation, which was attributed to Ostwald ripening due to the relatively high water solubility of thyme oil. Ostwald ripening could be inhibited by incorporating ≥75% of corn oil (a hydrophobic material with a low water solubility) into the nanoemulsion droplets. The electrical characteristics of the droplets in the nanoemulsions were varied by incorporating ionic surfactants with different charges after homogenization: a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The antifungal activity of nanoemulsions containing positive, negative, or neutral thymol droplets was then conducted against four strains of acid-resistant spoilage yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces bailli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis. The antifungal properties of the three surfactants (T80, LAE, SDS) were also tested in the absence of thymol droplets. Both ionic surfactants showed strong antifungal activity in the absence of thymol droplets, but no antimicrobial activity in their presence. This effect was attributed to partitioning of the antimicrobial surfactant molecules between the oil droplet and microbial surfaces, thereby reducing the effective concentration of active surfactants available to act as antimicrobials. This study shows oil droplets may decrease the efficacy of surfactant-based antimicrobials, which has important consequences for formulating effective antimicrobial agents for utilization in emulsion-based food and beverage products. PMID:21520914

  20. Amine terminated spherical aggregates of alumina through self-assembly using organosilanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Saini, Simarjeet Singh

    2011-01-01

    A simple and straightforward approach was devised to fabricate microspherical aggregates of alumina nanoparticles by self-assembly. Two different organosilanes were used as surfactant agents. Spherical aggregates were spin-coated on a silicon substrate. Spheres with diameters ranging from 100 nm to a few micrometers were thus assembled within an hour. The spatial distribution and the size distribution of the spheres are adjustable by changing the concentration of used organosilane. Effects of different organosilane agents, mixture molarity, and temperature on the size distribution of the spheres were also investigated.

  1. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells. PMID:26354264

  2. Synthesis and tuning of bimodal mesoporous silica by combined hydrocarbon/fluorocarbon surfactant templating.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rong; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Knutson, Barbara L; Rankin, Stephen E

    2009-06-01

    Hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants show highly nonideal mixing that under some conditions results in demixing of the two types of surfactants into distinct populations of fluorocarbon-rich and hydrocarbon-rich aggregates. This also occurs in materials prepared by cooperative assembly of hydrolyzed tetraethoxysilane with mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydro-perfluorodecylpyridinium chloride (HFDePC). Here, we report conditions under which demixed micelles lead to bimodal mesoporous materials (including specific concentrations of ammonia and salt in the synthesis solution) and show that the sizes of the hydrocarbon-templated and fluorocarbon-templated pores can be finely and independently controlled by adding lipophilic or fluorophilic oils, respectively. Nitrogen sorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy provide clear evidence for a single phase of demixed but disordered wormhole-like pores.

  3. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells.

  4. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1-2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50-60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion's pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  5. Aggregation of concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions studied by rheology and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai; Colby, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Protein solutions are studied using rheology and scattering techniques to investigate aggregation. Here we present a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that aggregates after incubation at 40 °C (below its unfolding temperature), with a decrease in monomer purity of 6% in 10 days. The mAb solution contains surfactant and behaves as a Newtonian fluid when reconstituted into solution from the lyophilized form (before incubation at 40 °C). In contrast, mAb solutions incubated at 40 °C for 1 month exhibit shear yielding in torsional bulk rheometers. Interfacial rheology reveals that interfacial properties are controlled by the surfactant, producing a negligible surface contribution to the bulk yield stress. These results provide evidence that protein aggregates formed in the bulk are responsible for the yield stress. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show an increase in intensity at low wavevectors (q < 4*10-2 nm-1) that we attribute to protein aggregation, and is not observed in solutions stored at 4 °C for 3 days before the measurement. This work suggests a correlation between the aggregated state of the protein (stability) and the yield stress from rheology. Research funded by MedImmune

  6. Influences of perfluorooctanoic acid on the aggregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengliang; Schäffer, Andreas; Vereecken, Harry; Heggen, Marc; Ji, Rong; Klumpp, Erwin

    2013-03-01

    The aggregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the aqueous phase not only inhibits their extensive utilization in various aspects but also dominates their environmental fate and transport. The role of surfactants at low concentration in the aggregation of MWCNTs has been studied, however the effect of perfluorinated surfactants at low concentration is uncertain. To understand this interfacial phenomenon, the influences of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a control, on MWCNT aggregation in the aqueous phase were examined by the UV absorbency method. Influences of pH and cationic species on the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) value were evaluated. The CCC values were dependent on the concentration of PFOA, however a pronounced effect of SDS concentration on the CCC values was not observed. The CCC values of the MWCNTs were 51.6 mmol/L in NaCl and 0.28 mmol/L in CaCl2 solutions, which suggested pronounced differences in the effects of Na+ and Ca2+ ions on the aggregation of the MWCNTs. The presence of both PFOA and SDS significantly decreased the CCC values of the MWCNTs in NaCl solution. The aggregation of the MWCNTs took place under acidic conditions and was not notably altered under neutral and alkaline conditions due to the electrostatic repulsion of deprotonated functional groups on the surface of the MWCNTs. PMID:23923418

  7. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  8. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURE AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACE IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2002-03-01

    The aim of the project is to develop and evaluate efficient novel surfactant mixtures for enhanced oil recovery. Preliminary ultra-filtration tests suggest that two kinds of micelles may exist in binary surfactant mixtures at different concentrations. Due to the important role played in interfacial processes by micelles as determined by their structures, focus of the current work is on the delineation of the relationship between such aggregate structures and chemical compositions of the surfactants. A novel analytical centrifuge application is explored to generate information on structures of different surfactants aggregates. In this report, optical systems, typical output of the analytical ultracentrifuge results and four basic experiments are discussed. Initial sedimentation velocity investigations were conducted using nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) to choose the best analytical protocol, calculate the partial specific volume and obtain information on sedimentation coefficient, aggregation mass of micelles. The partial specific volume was calculated to be 0.920. Four softwares: Optima{trademark} XL-A/XL-I data analysis software, DCDT+, Svedberg and SEDFIT, were compared for the analysis of sedimentation velocity experimental data. The sedimentation coefficient and aggregation number of NP-10 micelles obtained using the first three softwares at 25 C are 209, 127, and 111, respectively. The last one is closest to the result from Light Scattering. The reason for the differences in numbers obtained using the three softwares is discussed. Based on these tests, Svedberg and SEDFIT analysis are chosen for further studies. This approach using the analytical ultracentrifugation offers an unprecedented opportunity now to obtain important information on mixed micelles and their role in interfacial processes.

  9. The biophysical function of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Rugonyi, Sandra; Biswas, Samares C; Hall, Stephen B

    2008-11-30

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers surface tension in the lungs. Physiological studies indicate two key aspects of this function: that the surfactant film forms rapidly; and that when compressed by the shrinking alveolar area during exhalation, the film reduces surface tension to very low values. These observations suggest that surfactant vesicles adsorb quickly, and that during compression, the adsorbed film resists the tendency to collapse from the interface to form a 3D bulk phase. Available evidence suggests that adsorption occurs by way of a rate-limiting structure that bridges the gap between the vesicle and the interface, and that the adsorbed film avoids collapse by undergoing a process of solidification. Current models, although incomplete, suggest mechanisms that would partially explain both rapid adsorption and resistance to collapse as well as how different constituents of pulmonary surfactant might affect its behavior. PMID:18632313

  10. Surfactant Activated Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2005-03-01

    Direct nanoscale patterning of maleimide-linked biotin on mercaptosilane-functionalized glass substrates using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is facilitated by the addition of a small amount of the biocompatible nonionic surfactant Tween-20. A correlation was found between activated ink transfer from the AFM tip when surfactant was included in the ink and an increase in the wettability of the partially hydrophobic silanized substrate. Surfactant concentration represents a new control variable for DPN that complements relative humidity, tip-substrate contact force, scan speed, and temperature. Using surfactants systematically as ink additives expands the possible ink-substrate combinations that can be used for patterning biotin and other molecules. For example, we are currently exploring the possibility of developing nickel/nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-maleimide based inks that will bind to mercaptosilanized glass surfaces for the reversible immobilization of biomolecules containing polyhistidine tags.

  11. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  12. Silicone Oil- and Agitation-Induced Aggregation of a Monoclonal Antibody in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Thirumangalathu, Renuka; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Ricci, Margaret Speed; Brems, David N.; Randolph, Theodore W.; Carpenter, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Silicone oil, which is used as a lubricant or coating in devices such as syringes, needles and pharmaceutical containers, has been implicated in aggregation and particulation of proteins and antibodies. Aggregation of therapeutic protein products induced by silicone oil can pose a challenge to their development and commercialization. To systematically characterize the role of silicone oil on protein aggregation, the effects of agitation, temperature, pH and ionic strength on silicone oil-induced loss of monomeric anti-streptavidin IgG 1 antibody were examined. Additionally, the influences of excipients polysorbate20 and sucrose on protein aggregation were investigated. In the absence of agitation, protein absorbed to silicone oil with approximately monolayer coverage, however silicone oil did not stimulate aggregation during isothermal incubation unless samples were also agitated. A synergistic stimulation of aggregation by a combination of agitation and silicone oil was observed. Solution conditions which reduced colloidal stability of the antibody, as assessed by determination of osmotic second virial coefficients, accelerated aggregation during agitation with silicone oil. Polysorbate20 completely inhibited silicone oil-induced monomer loss during agitation. A formulation strategy optimizing colloidal stability of the antibody as well as incorporation of surfactants such as polysorbate20 is proposed to reduce silicone oil-induced aggregation of therapeutic protein products. PMID:19360857

  13. Spectral studies on the interaction of pinacyanol chloride with binary surfactants in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kausik; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Interaction of pinacyanol chloride (PIN) with pure and binary mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) was spectroscopically studied. Interaction of PIN with pure NaDC produced a blue shifted metachromatic band (at approximately 502 nm), which gradually shifted to higher wavelength region as the concentration of NaDC increased in the pre-micellar stage. For CTAB only intensity of both the bands increased without any shift. Mixed surfactant systems behaved differently than the pure components. Absorbance of monomeric band with a slight red-shift, and a simultaneous decrease in the absorbance of dimeric band of PIN, were observed for all the combinations in the post-micellar region. PIN-micelle binding constant (K(b)) for pure as well as mixed was determined from spectral data using Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Using the idea of Regular Solution Theory, micellar aggregates were assumed to be predominant than other aggregated state, like vesicles. Aggregation number was determined by fluorescence quenching method. Spectral analyses were also done to evaluate CMC values. Rubinigh's model for Regular Solution Theory was employed to evaluate the interaction parameters and micellar composition. Strong synergistic interaction between the oppositely charged surfactants was noted. Bulkier nature of NaDC lowered down its access in mixed micellar system.

  14. Synthesis and surface activities of a novel di-hydroxyl-sulfate-betaine-type zwitterionic gemini surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiang F.; Hu, Xing Q.; Xia, Ji J.; Jia, Xue C.

    2013-04-01

    A series of novel di-hydroxyl-sulfate-betaine-type zwitterionic gemini surfactants of 1,2-bis[N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyl-3-sulfopropyl)-alkylammonium] alkyl betaines (DBAs-n, where s and n represent the spacer length of 2, 4 and 6 and the hydrocarbon chain length of 8, 12, 14, 16 and 18, respectively) were synthesized by reacting alkylamine with sodium 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropanesulfonate (the alternative sulphonated agent), followed by the reactions with а,ω-dibromoalkyl and then ethyl bromide. Their adsorption and aggregation properties were investigated by means of equilibrium surface tension, dynamic light-scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DBAs-n gemini surfactants showed excellent surface activities and packed tightly at the interface. For example, the minimum CMC value for DBAs-n series was of the order of 10-5 M and the surface tension of water can be decreased as low as 22.2 mN/m. It was also found that the aggregates of DBAs-n solutions were significantly dependent on their hydrocarbon chain lengths. The aggregates changed from vesicles to entangled fiber-like micelles as the chain length increased from dodecyl to tetradecyl.

  15. A comprehensive study on micellization of dissymmetric pyrrolidinium headgroup-based gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Min; Dong, Jinfeng; Yang, Guangfu; Li, Xuefeng

    2015-04-21

    Three groups of pyrrolidinium headgroup-based gemini surfactants of 1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(1-alkyl pyrrolidinium) bromide, in categories of symmetric CmC3CmPB (m = 10, 12, 14), dissymmetric CmC3C14PB (m = 10, 12, 14) and CmC3CnPB (m = 8, 10, 12, m + n = 24) surfactants, are studied using equilibrium surface tension, conductivity, fluorescence, and NMR techniques. The importance of the dissymmetry on the micellization has been revealed in detail. The increase in the hydrophobic chain length m for CmC3CmPB and CmC3C14PB or in the dissymmetry (n/m) for CmC3CnPB can strengthen the aggregation ability and surface activity of the surfactants significantly, i.e., a lower critical micelle concentration (cmc) and a lower surface tension at cmc (γcmc). However, the aggregation number at cmc (N*) obeys the opposite variation tendency and it becomes smaller upon increasing m or n/m, due to the formation of premicelles. Thermodynamic results reveal that the contribution of enthalpy (ΔH) to the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) is strengthened by increasing m or n/m during the spontaneous micellization process. Moreover, (1)H NMR results confirm the microenvironment change of the surfactants from polar water to micelles during the micellization, and 2D Noesy NMR spectra suggest that the methylene groups in the ring should adopt a conformation toward the nonpolar micellar core rather than in the polar water.

  16. Aqueous Self-Assembly of Non-Ionic Bottlebrush Block Copolymer Surfactants with Tunable Molecular Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzayev, Javid

    2015-03-01

    Polymer amphiphiles provide a robust and versatile platform for the fabrication of nanostructured soft matter. In this research, we explore a new class of polymer surfactants based on comb-like bottlebrush architecture as highly tunable molecular building blocks for aqueous self-assembly. Excluded volume interactions between densely grafted polymer side chains in the bottlebrush architecture are alleviated by backbone stretching, which leads to the formation of shape-persistent cylindrical macromolecules whose molecular dimensions can be precisely tailored during chemical synthesis. Amphiphilic bottlebrush block copolymers containing hydrophobic polylactide (PLA) and hydrophilic poly(oligoethylene oxide methacrylate) (PEO) side chains of various lengths were synthesized by a combination of controlled radical and ring-opening polymerizations. In dilute aqueous solutions, bottlebrush surfactants rapidly assembled into spherical, cylindrical and bilayer aggregates, as visualized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Depending on the compositional side chain asymmetry, the formation of spherical micelles with different sizes and dispersities was observed. The molecular shape-dependent assembly was analyzed with help of a packing parameter (p) computed from the molecular composition data akin to small molecule surfactants, with most uniform spherical aggregates observed for bottlebrush amphiphiles with p close to 0.3. The formation of highly uniform micelles and the presence of a rich morphological diagram with relatively narrow compositional windows were attributed to the lack of conformational freedom in bottlebrush surfactants. Similarly, the unusual formation of cylindrical micelles with long aspect ratios for such high molecular weight amphiphiles was attributed to their inability to stabilize morphological defects, such as Y-junctions, with large deviations from mean curvature. Financial support for this work was provided by the National

  17. Process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Rockenberger, Joerg

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals of transition metal oxides. The process comprises reacting a metal cupferron complex of the formula M Cup, wherein M is a transition metal, and Cup is a cupferron, with a coordinating surfactant, the reaction being conducted at a temperature ranging from about 250 to about 300 C., for a period of time sufficient to complete the reaction.

  18. A novel, rapid and automated conductometric method to evaluate surfactant-cells interactions by means of critical micellar concentration analysis.

    PubMed

    Tiecco, Matteo; Corte, Laura; Roscini, Luca; Colabella, Claudia; Germani, Raimondo; Cardinali, Gianluigi

    2014-07-25

    Conductometry is widely used to determine critical micellar concentration and micellar aggregates surface properties of amphiphiles. Current conductivity experiments of surfactant solutions are typically carried out by manual pipetting, yielding some tens reading points within a couple of hours. In order to study the properties of surfactant-cells interactions, each amphiphile must be tested in different conditions against several types of cells. This calls for complex experimental designs making the application of current methods seriously time consuming, especially because long experiments risk to determine alterations of cells, independently of the surfactant action. In this paper we present a novel, accurate and rapid automated procedure to obtain conductometric curves with several hundreds reading points within tens of minutes. The method was validated with surfactant solutions alone and in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. An easy-to use R script, calculates conductometric parameters and their statistical significance with a graphic interface to visualize data and results. The validations showed that indeed the procedure works in the same manner with surfactant alone or in combination with cells, yielding around 1000 reading points within 20 min and with high accuracy, as determined by the regression analysis.

  19. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Lipid II Aggregation, Causing Membrane Instability and Vesicle Budding

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Katharina M.; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  20. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  1. Surface forces between titanium dioxide surfaces in the presence of cationic surfactant as a function of surfactant concentration, electrolyte concentration, and pH.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Rick B; Wu, Bo; Howard, Shaun C; Craig, Vincent S J

    2014-03-18

    Titanium dioxide (titania) surfaces produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are suitable for surfactant adsorption and surface force measurements. Adsorption isotherms for cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on ALD titanium dioxide surfaces were measured using optical reflectometry (OR), and surface force measurements between ALD titanium dioxide surfaces in aqueous CTAB solutions were measured using the colloid probe technique at different pH and electrolyte concentrations. Measurements were performed at a range of concentrations below and above the common intersection point (CIP) where adsorption is dominated by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, respectively. An examination of surfactant adsorption above and below the isoelectric point (IEP) was performed. Interestingly, significant levels of adsorption were observed below the IEP where the electrostatic interactions are unfavorable. The adsorption results are used to interpret the force data, which is dependent upon the amount of surfactant adsorbed and the electrolyte concentration and pH. The surface force data is compared to DLVO theory. Poor fits are obtained when Lifshitz theory is used to describe the dispersion forces. However, all of the data are fit well with a dispersion force of reduced magnitude. The kinetics of adsorption was measured and reveals very slow adsorption kinetics below the critical micelle concentration as a result of the monomer-by-monomer formation of aggregates on the surface.

  2. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  3. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  4. New synthetic surfactant - how and when?

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Animal-derived surfactant preparations are very effective in the treatment of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome but they are expensive to produce and supplies are limited. In order to widen the indications for surfactant treatment there is a need for synthetic preparations, which can be produced in large quantities and at a reasonable cost. However, development of clinically active synthetic surfactants has turned out to be more complicated than initially anticipated. The hydrophobic surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, which are involved in the adsorption of surface-active lipids to the air-liquid interface of the alveoli and increase alveolar stability, are either too big to synthesize, structurally complex or unstable in pure form. A new generation of synthetic surfactants containing simplified phospholipid mixtures and small amounts of peptides replacing the hydrophobic proteins is currently under development and will in the near future be introduced into the market. However, more trials need to be performed before any conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of these synthetic surfactants in relation to natural animal-derived preparations.

  5. Turbulent drag reduction in nonionic surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Shinji; Itoh, Motoyuki; Kato, Katsuo; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    There are only a few studies on the drag-reducing effect of nonionic surfactant solutions which are nontoxic and biodegradable, while many investigations of cationic surfactant solutions have been performed so far. First, the drag-reducing effects of a nonionic surfactant (AROMOX), which mainly consisted of oleyldimethylamineoxide, was investigated by measuring the pressure drop in the pipe flow at solvent Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 and 60 000. Second, we investigated the drag-reducing effect of a nonionic surfactant on the turbulent boundary layer at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers Reθ from 443 to 814 using two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry systems. At the temperature of nonionic surfactant solutions, T =25 °C, the maximum drag reduction ratio for AROMOX 500 ppm was about 50%, in the boundary layer flow, although the drag reduction ratio was larger than 60% in pipe flow. Turbulence statistics and structures for AROMOX 500 ppm showed the behavior of typical drag-reducing flow such as suppression of turbulence and modification of near-wall vortices, but they were different from those of drag-reducing cationic surfactant solutions, in which bilayered structures of the fluctuating velocity vectors were observed in high activity.

  6. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain andmore » surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.« less

  7. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1998-10-01

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer has been selected to study micellar-polymer chemical flooding. The physical properties and phase behavior of this system have been determined. A surfactant-polymer slug has been designed to achieve high efficiency recovery by improving phase behavior and mobility control. Recovery experiments have been performed on linear cores and a quarter 5-spot. The same recovery experiments have been simulated using a commercially available simulator (UTCHEM). Good agreement between experimental data and simulation results has been achieved.

  8. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain and surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.

  9. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Imbibition in an originally oil-wet 2D capillary is the fastest in the case of Alf-38 and slowest in the case of DTAB (among the surfactants studied). Force of adhesion studies and contact angle measurements show that greater wettability alteration is possible with these anionic surfactants than the cationic surfactant studied. The water imbibition rate does not increase monotonically with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  10. Surfactant toxicity identification with a municipal wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, J.R.; Wayment, D.D.

    1998-12-31

    An acute toxicity identification evaluation following US EPA guidelines was performed with a municipal wastewater to identify effluent components responsible for lethality of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Ammonia toxicity, also present in the effluent, was not the object of this study. The study was designed to characterize effluent toxicity not due to ammonia. To minimize ammonia toxicity interferences, all Phase 1 testing was performed at pH`s where ammonia toxicity would be negligible. Phase 1 toxicity characterization results indicated surfactants as the class of compounds causing acute non-ammonia toxicity for both test species. A distinct toxicant characteristic, specifically sublation at alkaline pH, was employed to track suspect surfactant loadings in the collection system. Concurrently, effluent surfactant residue testing determined nonionic surfactants were at adequate concentrations and were sufficiently toxic to cause the measured adverse effects. Influent surfactant toxicity was determined to be much less than in the final effluent indicating the treatment process was enhancing surfactant toxicity.

  11. Aggregation in concentrated protein solutions: Insights from rheology, neutron scattering and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica

    Aggregation of therapeutic proteins is currently one of the major challenges in the bio-pharmaceutical industry, because aggregates could induce immunogenic responses and compromise the quality of the product. Current scientific efforts, both in industry and academia, are focused on developing rational approaches to screen different drug candidates and predict their stability under different conditions. Moreover, aggregation is promoted in highly concentrated protein solutions, which are typically required for subcutaneous injection. In order to gain further understanding about the mechanisms that lead to aggregation, an approach that combined rheology, neutron scattering, and molecular simulations was undertaken. Two model systems were studied in this work: Bovine Serum Albumin in surfactant-free Phosphate Buffered Saline at pH = 7.4 at concentrations from 11 mg/mL up to ˜519 mg/mL, and a monoclonal antibody in 20 mM Histidine/Histidine Hydrochloride at pH = 6.0 with 60 mg/mL trehalose and 0.2 mg/mL polysorbate-80 at concentrations from 53 mg/mL up to ˜220 mg/mL. The antibody used here has three mutations in the CH2 domain, which result in lower stability upon incubation at 40 °C with respect to the wild-type protein, based on size-exclusion chromatography assays. This temperature is below 49 °C, where unfolding of the least stable, CH2 domain occurs, according to differential scanning calorimetry. This dissertation focuses on identifying the role of aggregation on the viscosity of protein solutions. The protein solutions of this work show an increase in the low shear viscosity in the absence of surfactants, because proteins adsorb at the air/water interface forming a viscoelastic film that affects the measured rheology. Stable surfactant-laden protein solutions behave as simple Newtonian fluids. However, the surfactant-laden antibody solution also shows an increase in the low shear viscosity from bulk aggregation, after prolonged incubation at 40 °C. Small

  12. Kinetics of protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation into linear nanostructures, notably amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, is a common form of behaviour exhibited by a range of peptides and proteins. This process was initially discovered in the context of the aetiology of a range of neurodegenerative diseases, but has recently been recognised to of general significance and has been found at the origin of a number of beneficial functional roles in nature, including as catalytic scaffolds and functional components in biofilms. This talk discusses our ongoing efforts to study the kinetics of linear protein self-assembly by using master equation approaches combined with global analysis of experimental data.

  13. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  14. Polymer-grafted lignin surfactants prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-08-12

    Kraft lignin grafted with hydrophilic polymers has been prepared using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and investigated for use as a surfactant. In this preliminary study, polyacrylamide and poly(acrylic acid) were grafted from a lignin RAFT macroinitiator at average initiator site densities estimated to be 2 per particle and 17 per particle. The target degrees of polymerization were 50 and 100, but analysis of cleaved polyacrylamide was consistent with a higher average molecular weight, suggesting not all sites were able to participate in the polymerization. All materials were readily soluble in water, and dynamic light scattering data indicate polymer-grafted lignin coexisted in isolated and aggregated forms in aqueous media. The characteristic size was 15-20 nm at low concentrations, and aggregation appeared to be a stronger function of degree of polymerization than graft density. These species were surface active, reducing the surface tension to as low as 60 dyn/cm at 1 mg/mL, and a greater decrease was observed than for polymer-grafted silica nanoparticles, suggesting that the lignin core was also surface active. While these lignin surfactants were soluble in water, they were not soluble in hexanes. Thus, it was unexpected that water-in-oil emulsions formed in all surfactant compositions and solvent ratios tested, with average droplet sizes of 10-20 μm. However, although polymer-grafted lignin has structural features similar to nanoparticles used in Pickering emulsions, its interfacial behavior was qualitatively different. While at air-water interfaces, the hydrophilic grafts promote effective reductions in surface tension, we hypothesize that the low grafting density in these lignin surfactants favors partitioning into the hexanes side of the oil-water interface because collapsed conformations of the polymer grafts improve interfacial coverage and reduce water-hexanes interactions. We propose that polymer-grafted lignin

  15. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  16. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  17. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}ȯ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  18. Physicochemical characterization and cytotoxic studies of nonionic surfactant vesicles using sucrose esters as oral delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Karina; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder; Chávez, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Several nanotechnological solutions for mucosal immunization have been proposed, such as nanoparticles, liposomes, solid lipidic particles, micelles, and surfactant vesicles. In recent years, surfactant vesicles have gained increasing scientific attention as an alternative potential drug delivery system to the conventional liposome. This type of vesicle known as niosomes or nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) has a structure and properties similar to those of liposomes. Both of them can transport hydrophilic drugs by encapsulation in the aqueous inner pool or hydrophobic drugs by intercalation into hydrophobic domains. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize vesicles formed by sucrose esters as protective systems of bioactive molecules for oral administration. Vesicles were prepared using two commercial products formed by mixtures of mono and diesters S-570 and S-770, respectively. Determined parameters were size and zeta potential; the stability of formulations was tested in presence of increasing concentrations of a surfactant, and at several pH values observed in the gastrointestinal tract. Solubilization experiences showed an initial decrease in size for vesicles of both ester mixtures, samples showed detergent resistance at higher Triton X-100 concentrations. Vesicles showed stability at pH 5-7.4 up to 90 min; however, both formulations showed colloidal instability at pH=2, which corresponds to the isoelectric point of these vesicles. To evaluate the cytotoxicity of both vesicle formulations and separately each pure ester, Caco-2 cells were used. Cytotoxic evaluation indicated that both types of vesicles and free sucrose distearate were safe for Caco-2 viability; however, free sucrose monostearate was toxic for the cells. As a conclusion of these preliminary studies, it can be stated that vesicles formed with mixtures of sucrose esters showed a size in the range of 200 nm maintaining their size when exposed to the action of a surfactant, but

  19. Loading capacity and interaction of DNA binding on catanionic vesicles with different cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Chen, Jingfei; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-12-01

    Cationic and anionic (catanionic) vesicles were constructed from the mixtures of sodium laurate (SL) and alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (CnTAB, n = 12, 14, and 16) and were used to control the loading capacity of DNA. The binding saturation point (BSP) of DNA to catanionic vesicles increases with the chain length of cationic surfactants, which is at 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 for CnTAB with n = 12, 14, and 16, respectively. Our measurements showed that the loading capacity and affinity of DNA can be controlled by catanionic vesicles. It increases with the chain length of cationic surfactants. Because of a large reduction in surface charge density, catanionic vesicles are prone to undergo re-aggregation or fusion with the addition of DNA. DNA molecules can still maintain original coil state during the interaction with catanionic CnTAL vesicles. (1)H NMR data reveals that the obvious dissociation of anionic ions, L(-), from catanionic C14TAL vesicles is due to the interaction with DNA; however, this phenomenon cannot be observed in C12TAB-SL vesicles. Agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) results demonstrate that the electrostatic interaction between the two oppositely charged cationic and anionic surfactants is stronger than that between DNA and cationic surfactant, CnTAB (n = 12, 14, and 16). Not only is the dissociation of L(-) simply determined by the charge competition, but it also depends largely on the variations in the surface charge density as well as the cationic and anionic surfactant competing ability in geometry configuration of catanionic vesicles. The complicated interaction between DNA and catanionic vesicles induces the deformation of cationic vesicles. Our results should provide clear guidance for choosing more proper vectors for DNA delivery and gene therapy in cell experiments.

  20. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    PubMed

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations <150 mM spherical micelles are present and the oscillation period is close to the micelle diameter, slightly decreasing with the rise of concentration. For elongated micelles (at concentration 200 mM), no harmonic oscillations are observed anymore; instead, the period increases with the decrease of film thickness. In the case of Tween 20, the force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants.

  1. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  2. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  3. Surfactant design for the 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane-water interface: ab initio calculations and in situ high-pressure tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Parthiban; Peguin, Robson P S; Chokshi, Udayan; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2006-10-10

    In situ high-pressure tensiometry and ab initio calculations were used to rationally design surfactants for the 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane-water (HFA134a|W) interface. Nonbonded pair interaction (binding) energies (E(b)) of the complexes between HFA134a and candidate surfactant tails were used to quantify the HFA-philicity of selected moieties. The interaction between HFA134a and an ether-based tail was shown to be predominantly electrostatic in nature and much more favorable than that between HFA134a and a methyl-based fragment. The interfacial activity of (i) amphiphiles typically found in FDA-approved pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) formulations, (ii) a series of nonionic surfactants with methylene-based tails, and (iii) a series of nonionic surfactants with ether-based tails was investigated at the HFA134a|W interface using in situ tensiometry. This is the first time that the tension of the surfactant-modified HFA134a|W interface has been reported in the literature. The ether-based surfactants were shown to be very interfacially active, with tension decreasing by as much as 27 mN.m(-)(1). However, the methyl-based surfactants, including those from FDA-approved formulations, did not exhibit high activity at the HFA134a|W interface. These results are in direct agreement with the E(b) calculations. Significant differences in interfacial activity are noted for surfactants at the 2H,3H-perfluoropentane (HPFP)|water and HFA134a|W interfaces. Care should be taken, therefore, when results from the mimicking solvent (HPFP) are extrapolated to HFA134a-based systems. The results shown here are of relevance in the selection of surfactants capable of forming and stabilizing reverse aqueous aggregates in HFA-based pMDIs, which are promising formulations for the systemic delivery of biomolecules to and through the lungs.

  4. Meibomian gland function and giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Mathers, W D; Billborough, M

    1992-08-15

    We examined 42 contact lens-wearing patients for clinical evidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis and for meibomian gland dysfunction with gland dropout. Fifteen patients were free of clinical signs and symptoms of giant papillary conjunctivitis, whereas 27 had clinical symptoms and evidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis had significantly more gland dropout with an average of 0.6 +/- 1.2 gland absent in both lower eyelids compared with 0.2 +/- 0.4 gland absent in patients without giant papillary conjunctivitis. Additionally, the viscosity of meibomian gland excreta was greater in the giant papillary conjunctivitis group. There was no difference in tear osmolarity or in the Schirmer test results between the two groups. These results indicated patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis were more likely to have meibomian gland dysfunction with gland dropout than patients without giant papillary conjunctivitis.

  5. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  6. Anionic surfactant - Biogenic amine interactions: The role of surfactant headgroup geometry.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-03-15

    Oligoamines and biogenic amines (naturally occurring oligoamines) are small flexible polycations. They interact strongly with anionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS. This results in enhanced adsorption and the formation of layered structures and the formation of layered structures at the air-water interface which depends on surfactant concentration and solution pH. The effect of changing the surfactant headgroup geometry on that interaction and subsequent adsorption is reported here. Neutron reflectivity, NR, results for the surface adsorption of the anionic surfactant sodium diethylene glycol monododecyl ether sulfate, SLES, with the biogenic amine, spermine, are presented, and contrasted with previous data for SDS/spermine mixtures. The enhancement in the adsorption of the surfactant at the air-water interface where monolayer adsorption occurs is similar for both surfactants. However the regions of surfactant concentration and solution pH where surface multilayer adsorption occurs is less extensive for the SLES/spermine mixtures, and occurs only at low pH. The results show how changing the headgroup geometry by the introduction of the ethylene oxide linker group between the alkyl chain and sulfate headgroup modifies the polyamine - surfactant interaction. The increased steric constraint from the polyethylene oxide group disrupts the conditions for surface multilayer formation at the higher pH values. This has important consequences for applications where the modification or manipulation of the surface properties are required. PMID:26724704

  7. Structure and dynamics of polyelectrolyte surfactant mixtures under conditions of surfactant excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ingo; Simon, Miriam; Farago, Bela; Schweins, Ralf; Falus, Peter; Holderer, Olaf; Gradzielski, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant mixtures can self-assemble into a large variety of mesoscopic structures, so-called polyelectrolyte surfactant complexes (PESCs). These structures directly affect the macroscopic behavior of such solutions. In this study, we investigated mixtures of the cationically charged PE JR 400 and the anionic surfactant SDS with the help of different neutron scattering and fluorescence methods. While an excess of PE charges in semi-dilute solutions causes an increase of viscosity, it has been observed that an excess of surfactant charges reduces the viscosity while precipitation is observed at charge equilibrium. The increase in viscosity had been investigated before and was attributed to the formation of cross links between PE chains. In this publication we focus our attention on the reduction of viscosity which is observed with an excess of surfactant charges. It is found that the PE chains form relatively large and densely packed clusters near the phase boundary on the surfactant rich side, thereby occupying less space and reducing the viscosity. For even higher surfactant concentrations, individual surfactant decorated PE chains are observed and their viscosity is found to be similar to that of the pure PE.

  8. Giant myoma and erythrocytosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozsaran, A A; Itil, I M; Terek, C; Kazandi, M; Dikmen, Y

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome in a patient with a giant subserous uterine myoma. She presented with plethora and an abdominal mass. After venesection of 4 units of blood, the preoperative haematocrit value of 53.3% and haemoglobin value of 17.5 g/dL had decreased to 48.6% and 16.8 g/dL levels, respectively. After the operative extraction of the giant subserous myoma with attached uterus weighing 14.2 kg, the haematocrit and the haemoglobin values had regressed to 40.3% and 14.3 g/dL levels, respectively. The findings indicated that the giant subserous myoma was the cause of the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome in this patient. PMID:10554963

  9. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  10. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  11. Surfactant-assisted synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible semiconductor quantum dot-micelles.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Bunge, Scott D.; Gabaldon, John; Fan, Hongyou; Scullin, Chessa; Leve, Erik W.; Wilson, Michael C.; Tallant, David Robert; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-04-01

    We report a simple, rapid approach to synthesize water-soluble and biocompatible fluorescent quantum dot (QD) micelles by encapsulation of monodisperse, hydrophobic QDs within surfactant/lipid micelles. Analyses of UV-vis and photo luminescence spectra, along with transmission electron microscopy, indicate that the water-soluble semiconductor QD micelles are monodisperse and retain the optical properties of the original hydrophobic QDs. The QD micelles were shown to be biocompatible and exhibited little or no aggregation when taken up by cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  12. Surfactant-assisted synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible semiconductor quantum dot-micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hongyou; Leve, Erik W.; Scullin, Chessa; Tallant, David; Wilson, Michael C.; Brinker, C. J.

    2005-04-01

    We report a simple and rapid method to synthesize water-soluble and biocompatible fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-micelles by encapsulation of monodisperse, hydrophobic QDs inside surfactant/lipid micelles. Analysis of UV-vis spectra, transmission electron microscopy, and photo luminescence spectra indicate that the water-soluble semiconductor QD-micelles are monodisperse and retain the optical properties of the original hydrophobic QDs. The QD-micelles were shown to be biocompatible and exhibited little or no aggregation when taken up by cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  13. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes.

  14. Reconstitution of surfactant activity by using the 6 kDa apoprotein associated with pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S H; Possmayer, F

    1986-01-01

    Lipid extracts of bovine pulmonary surfactant containing the 6 kDa apoprotein, but lacking the 35 kDa apoprotein, can mimic the essential characteristics of pulmonary surfactant on a pulsating-bubble surfactometer. Reconstituted surfactant can be produced by combining silicic acid fractions containing 6 kDa apoprotein and phosphatidylglycerol with phosphatidylcholine. Treatment of the protein-containing fraction with proteolytic enzymes abolishes its efficacy. These results indicate that the presence of the 6 kDa apoprotein can account for some of the essential physical and biological characteristics of pulmonary surfactant. Immunodiffusion studies indicate that, contrary to earlier suggestions, the 6 kDa apoprotein is not structurally related to the major surfactant apoprotein that has a molecular mass of 35 kDa. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3098235

  15. Selection of surfactant in remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by comparison of surfactant effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yueming; Chen, Tao; Li, Linhui; Wang, Guanzhu

    2014-01-01

    With an aim to select the most appropriate surfactant for remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, the performance of nonionic surfactants Tween80, TX-100, and Brij35 and one anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) in enhancement of DDT water solubility and desorption of DDT from contaminated soil and their adsorption onto soil and ecotoxicities were investigated in this study. Tween80 had the highest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT among the four experimental surfactants. The adsorption loss of surfactants onto soil followed the order of TX-100 > Tween80 > Brij35 > SDBS. The ecotoxicity of Tween80 to ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was lowest. The overall performance considering about the above four aspects suggested that Tween80 should be selected for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, because Tween80 had the greatest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT, less adsorption loss onto soil, and the lowest ecotoxicity in this experiment.

  16. Perfluoroalklylated phospholipids as surfactants and co-surfactants forinjectable fluorocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Santaella, C; Vierling, P; Riess, J G

    1992-01-01

    Highly fluorinated phospholipids were investigated as sole surfactant, and as co-surfactant with egg yolk phospholipids (EYP), in the formulation of 50% and 100% w/v perfluorodecalin emulsions. The surfactant's capability to stabilize such emulsions improves with the length of the perfluoroalklylated tail and with the increase of its relative weight in the hydrophobic chain. As sole surfactant, 2, which has the longest fluorinated tail has the highest efficacy. As co-surfactant with EYP, a strong stabilizing effect is found when the total hydrophobic chain length is adjusted to the EYP membrane's thickness, which is the case of 1. Dispersions of the F-phospholipids do not modify cell growth and viability and show no hemolytic activity on human red blood cells at concentrations in the 60-100g/L range. Acute toxicity tests in mice indicate - i.v. DL50 greater than 2.75 g/Kg body wt. PMID:1391518

  17. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiwei; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhengwu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension (γ) of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies on cloud point (for nonionic surfactants), biodegradation potential and some other properties of surfactants are evaluated. PMID:20479997

  18. Growing Characteristics of Fine Ice Particles in Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kosuke; Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Hiromoto; Okada, Kazuto; Fujisawa, Ryo

    Time variation characteristics of ice particles in a surfactant solution have been investigated. The effect of surfactants on corrosion characteristics was also studied. The results were compared with those treated with poly(vinyl alcohol). From the results, the present surfactant, cetyl dimethyl betaine was not found to be effective on preventing Ostward ripening of ice particles as poly(vinyl alcohol) showed. Then, it was concluded some effective technology has to be installed with surfactants when this surfactant treatment is realized. On the corrosion characteristics, it was found that the present surfactant shows the same level as tap water.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  20. Review of Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Joseph G.; Chacko, J. Anthony; Salter, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic autoimmune disease affecting primarily the elderly. Giant cell arteritis can cause sudden and potentially bilateral sequential vision loss in the elderly. Therefore, it is considered a medical emergency in ophthalmology and a significant cause of morbidity in an increasingly aging population. Ophthalmologists need to be able to recognize the classic symptoms and signs of this disease, and then be able to work-up and treat these patients in an efficient manner. An in-depth review of GCA from the literature as well as personal clinical experience follows. PMID:25859139

  1. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  2. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  3. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  4. Mineral-Surfactant Interaction for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2006-09-30

    In this project, fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms of the interactions between polymers/surfactants and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of structures of the surface active molecules on critical solid/liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and surface tension in mineral/surfactant systems were investigated. The final aim is to build a guideline to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interfaces. During this period, the wettability of alumina was tested using two-phase extraction at different pHs. The results were explained using the adsorption data obtain previously. It was found that the wettability is determined by both the nano-structure of the hemimicelles and the surface coverage. It was found that pH plays a critical role in controlling the total adsorption and the mineral wettability. At pH 4, the alumina surface remains hydrophilic in the surfactant concentration range tested because of the low surface coverage, even though hemimicelles are formed. Adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on alumina and silica, the component minerals reservoir rocks, was conducted at different pHs. The adsorption of SDS on silica is negligible, while the adsorption on alumina is high due to the different charge of the latter. Tests of adsorption of a modified polymer S-19703-35HT on alumina were also conducted at different pHs. Adsorption density decreases with pH. The results suggest that alkaline pH range is more cost-effective for a SDS/polymer system because of the low adsorption density. A new term, reagent loss index (RLI), was used to analyze the adsorption data for different surfactants and minerals. It was shown that the chemical loss is very high in the case of SDS on gypsum and limestone, while it is low in the case of silica. The mixed Dodecyl maltoside

  5. Modulation of the aggregation properties of sodium deoxycholate in presence of hydrophilic imidazolium based ionic liquid: water dynamics study to probe the structural alteration of the aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Roy, Arpita; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2015-10-14

    In this article, we have investigated the effect of a hydrophilic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim]-BF4), on the aggregation properties of a biological surfactant, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), in water. In solution, unlike conventional surfactants it shows stepwise aggregation and the effect of the conventional ionic liquid on the aggregation properties is rather interesting. We have observed concentration dependent dual role of the ionic liquid; at their low concentration, the aggregated structure of NaDC reorganizes itself into an elongated rod like structure. However, the aggregated network is disintegrated into small aggregates upon further addition of ionic liquid. TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) images also confirmed the structural alteration of NaDC upon varying the concentration of the ionic liquid. The proton NMR data indicate that hydrophobic as well as electrostatic interaction is solely responsible for such structural adaptation of NaDC in the presence of an ionic liquid. The host-guest interaction inside the aggregates is monitored using Coumarin-153 (C-153) and the location of C-153 is probed by varying the excitation wavelength from 375 nm to 440 nm and the two binding sites of the aggregates are affected in a different fashion in the presence of ionic liquid. Excitation in the blue region selects the fluorophores which preferably bind to the buried region of the aggregates, whereas 440 nm excitation corresponds to the guest molecules which are exposed to the solvent molecules. The average solvation time of C-153 is increased in the presence of 1.68 wt% [bmim]-BF4 at λexc = 440 nm i.e. the probe molecules relocate themselves to a more restricted region. However, the average solvation time became 2.6 times faster in the presence of 11.2 wt% [bmim]-BF4, which corresponds to a more polar and exposed region. The time resolved

  6. Oil recovery performances of surfactant solutions by capillary imbibition.

    PubMed

    Babadagli, Tayfun; Boluk, Yaman

    2005-02-01

    Critical parameters playing a role in oil recovery by capillary imbibition of surfactant solutions were studied. Experiments conducted on sandstone and carbonate samples using different oil and surfactant types were evaluated for surfactant selection. In this evaluation interfacial tension (IFT), surfactant type, solubility characteristics of surfactants, rock type, initial water (pre-wet rock), and surfactant concentration were considered. In addition to these, a new technique was adopted to facilitate the surfactant screening process. This technique is based on assigning inorganic and organic property values and plotting organic conception diagrams (OCD) for surfactants. OCD defines the property of a compound in terms of physical chemistry in such a way that the property that depends much on the van der Waals force is called "organic" and the one that depends much on electric affinity is called "inorganic." Correlations between the capillary imbibition recovery performance and the properties of surfactant and oil (organic value (OV), inorganic value (IV), and IFT of surfactant solutions, oil viscosity, and surfactant type) were obtained. These correlations are expected to be useful in selecting the proper surfactant for improved oil recovery as well as identifying the effects of surfactant properties on the capillary imbibition performance. PMID:15576095

  7. Electrical surface potential of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Zoya; Rodenstein, Mathias; Döhner, Jana; Eng, Lukas M; Amrein, Matthias

    2006-11-21

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixed lipid protein substance of defined composition that self-assembles at the air-lung interface into a molecular film and thus reduces the interfacial tension to close to zero. A very low surface tension is required for maintaining the alveolar structure. The pulmonary surfactant film is also the first barrier for airborne particles entering the lung upon breathing. We explored by frequency modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) the structure and local electrical surface potential of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) films. BLES is a clinically used surfactant replacement and here served as a realistic model surfactant system. The films were distinguished by a pattern of molecular monolayer areas, separated by patches of lipid bilayer stacks. The stacks were at positive electrical potential with respect to the surrounding monolayer areas. We propose a particular molecular arrangement of the lipids and proteins in the film to explain the topographic and surface potential maps. We also discuss how this locally variable surface potential may influence the retention of charged or polar airborne particles in the lung.

  8. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step. PMID:17577887

  9. Poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant polymers

    PubMed Central

    VACHEETHASANEE, KATANCHALEE; WANG, SHUWU; QIU, YONGXING; MARCHANT, ROGER E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a series of structurally well-defined surfactant polymers that undergo surface-induced self-assembly on hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with poly(ethylene oxide) and hexanal pendant groups. The poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) was synthesized by hydrolysis of poly(N-vinyl formamide) following free radical polymerization of N-vinyl formamide. Hexanal and aldehyde-terminated poly (ethyleneoxide) (PEO) were simultaneously attached to PVAm via reductive amination. Surfactant polymers with different PEO : hexanal ratios and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balances were prepared, and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR and XPS spectroscopies. Surface active properties at the air/water interface were determined by surface tension measurements. Surface activity at a solid surface/water interface was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, showing epitaxially molecular alignment for surfactant polymers adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The surfactant polymers described in this report can be adapted for simple non-covalent surface modification of biomaterials and hydrophobic surfaces to provide highly hydrated interfaces. PMID:15027845

  10. Self-Assembly of Gemini Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Mondal, Jagannath; Mahanthappa, Mahesh

    2013-03-01

    The self-assembly behavior of Gemini (dimeric or twin-tail) dicarboxylate disodium surfactants is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. This gemini architecture, in which two single tailed surfactants are joined through a flexible hydrophobic linker, has been shown to exhibit concentration-dependent aqueous self-assembly into lyotropic phases including hexagonal, gyroid, and lamellar morphologies. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed phases at similar amphiphile concentrations in water, including the unusual ability of these surfactants to form gyroid phases over unprecedentedly large amphiphile concentration windows. We demonstrate quanitative agreement between the predicted and experimentally observed domain spacings of these nanostructured materials. Through careful conformation analyses of the surfactant molecules, we show that the gyroid phase is electrostatically stabilized related to the lamellar phase. By starting with a lamellar phase, we show that decreasing the charge on the surfactant headgroups by carboxylate protonation or use of a bulkier tetramethyl ammonium counterion in place of sodium drives the formation of a gyroid phase.

  11. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-03-31

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover more than 40% of the oil in about 50 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 28% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Residual oil saturation showed little capillary number dependence between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -2}. Wettability alteration increases as the number of ethoxy groups increases in ethoxy sulfate surfactants. Plans for the next quarter include conducting mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  12. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Simulation studies indicate that both wettability alteration and gravity-driven flow play significant role in oil recovery from fractured carbonates. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover about 55% of the oil in about 150 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration and low tension in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 40% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Cationic surfactant, DTAB recovers about 35% of the oil. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  13. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N.; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effective when the PaO2/FiO2 improved by > 20%.
RESULTS—After initial surfactant administration the PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly in patients with systemic or pulmonary disease from 68 to 111, and the oxygenation index (OI) diminished significantly from 36.9 to 27.1. The PaO2/FiO2 and OI did not improve in children with cardiac disease. The improvement of the patients who survived was greater than that of those who died.
CONCLUSIONS—Surfactant moderately improves oxygenation in some children with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pulmonary or systemic disease.

 PMID:10325705

  14. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS.

  15. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v). PMID:24792543

  16. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  17. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step.

  18. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v).

  19. Molecular dynamics study of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4-[[4-[[4-[(E)-2-cyanoethenyl]-2,6-dimethylphenyl]amino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]benzonitrile (TMC278/rilpivirine) aggregates: correlation between amphiphilic properties of the drug and oral bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Yulia Volovik; Gallicchio, Emilio; Das, Kalyan; Levy, Ronald M.; Arnold, Eddy

    2009-01-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) TMC278/rilpivirine is an anti-AIDS therapeutic agent with high oral bioavailability despite its high hydrophobicity. Previous studies established a correlation between ability of the drug molecule to form stable, homogeneous populations of spherical nanoparticles (~100–120 nm in diameter) at low pH in surfactant-independent fashion, and good oral bioavailability. Here, we hypothesize that the drug is able to assume surfactant-like properties under physiologically relevant conditions, thus facilitating formation of nanostructuresin the absence of other surfactants. The results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations indeed show that protonated drug molecules behave as surfactants at the water/aggregate interface while neutral drug molecules assist aggregate packing via conformational variability. Our simulation results suggest that amphiphilic behavior at low pH and intrinsic flexibility influence drug aggregation and are believed to play critical roles in the favorable oral bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:19739675

  20. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.