Science.gov

Sample records for gigantic bivalve alatoconchidae

  1. Guadalupian (Middle Permian) giant bivalve Alatoconchidae from a mid-Panthalassan paleo-atoll complex in Kyushu, Japan: A unique community associated with Tethyan fusulines and corals.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Unique new fossil assemblages containing the large bivalve family Alatoconchidae are recorded from the Guadalupian (Middle Permian) shallow marine limestone in Kamura, Kyushu. The large bivalves occur in the Neoschwagerina Zone and Lepidolina Zone. This discovery establishes that the biostratigraphic range of the family Alatoconchidae extends up to the top of the Lepidolina Zone (upper Capitanian of upper Guadalupian) i.e., to the end-Guadalupian extinction level. The largest Alatoconchidae in Kamura occurs in the Neoschwagerina Zone, the size of which is up to 50 cm long and 5 cm thick. Although details are still unknown, their morphology with a wing-like side projection of their valves appears very similar to that of Alatoconchidae that includes the well-known genus Shikamaia Ozaki. The bivalve-bearing Iwato Formation was derived from a mid-oceanic shallow marine carbonate build-up formed on a mid-oceanic paleo-seamount. The close association among the Alatoconchidae, typical Tethyan fusulines (Verbeekinidae) and rugose corals (Waagenophyllidae), plus their common extinction pattern suggests that the Alatoconchidae flourished in warm, shallow (photic) marine environments in low latitude areas in Panthalassa as well as Tethys. The extra-large size and double-layered shell with a translucent outer layer composed of prismatic calcite suggests that these bivalves may have hosted abundant photosynthetic algal symbionts to support their large-body metabolism.

  2. Pulsars:. Gigantic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renxin

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the gigantic nucleus speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction.

  3. Genetics of gigantism and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    Gigantism and acromegaly are rare disorders that are caused by excessive GH secretion and/or high levels of its mediator, IGF-1. Gigantism occurs when excess GH or IGF-1 lead to increased linear growth, before the end of puberty and epiphyseal closure. The majority of cases arise from a benign GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, with an incidence of pituitary gigantism and acromegaly of approximately 8 and 11 per million person-years, respectively. Over the past two decades, our increasing understanding of the molecular and genetic etiologies of pituitary gigantism and acromegaly yielded several genetic causes, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and 4, McCune-Albright syndrome, Carney complex, familial isolated pituitary adenoma, pituitary adenoma association due to defects in familial succinate dehydrogenase genes, and the recently identified X-linked acrogigantism. The early diagnosis of these conditions helps guide early intervention, screening, and genetic counseling of patients and their family members. In this review, we provide a concise and up-to-date discussion on the genetics of gigantism and acromegaly.

  4. Cerebral gigantism with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ray, Munni; Malhi, P; Bhalla, A K; Singhi, P D

    2003-07-01

    A case of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome) with West syndrome in a one-year-old male child is reported. The case had a large stature, typical facies and neurodevelopmental delay along with infantile spasms, which were refractory to treatment with valproate and clonazepam.

  5. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome.

  6. Gigantism

    MedlinePlus

    ... giant; Overproduction of growth hormone; Growth hormone - excess production ... surgery is usually successful in limiting growth hormone production. Early treatment can reverse many of the changes ...

  7. Dwarfism and gigantism in historical picture postcards.

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, A

    1998-01-01

    A collection of 893 historical picture postcards from 1900 to 1935, depicting dwarfs and giants, was analysed from medical and psychosocial viewpoints. In conditions such as 'bird headed dwarfism', achondroplasia, cretinism, so-called Aztecs or pinheads, Grebe chondrodysplasia, and acromegalic gigantism, the disorder could be diagnosed easily. In hypopituitary dwarfism, exact diagnosis was more difficult because of heterogeneity. The most common conditions depicted were pituitary dwarfism and achondroplasia. Most of those with gigantism had pituitary gigantism and acromegaly. Brothers and sisters or parents and their children provided evidence of mendelian inheritance of some of these disorders. The cards suggest that being put on show provided, at least in some cases, social benefits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9764085

  8. Neurofibromatosis with unilateral lower limb gigantism.

    PubMed

    Sabbioni, Giacomo; Rani, Nicola; Devescovi, Valentina

    2010-05-01

    The case of a 3-year-old child diagnosed with Type 1 neurofibromatosis is presented, showing pigmented birthmarks and gigantism of the left lower limb associated with the presence of multiple neurofibromas. Increased bone growth appears to be the direct or indirect consequence of a still undefined paracrine effect of nerve tumor cells.

  9. Butterflied bivalves as paleoenvironmental indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Allmon, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Fossil bivalves are seldom preserved in a flat-open, yet still articulated position, or butterflied. A study of butterflied bivalves in the Delphi Station of the Hamilton Fm. suggests that this preservation mode is limited to one or possibly two sedimentary environments: deltaic and fluvial. Three parameters control the mode of preservation of fossil bivalves: 1) rate of sedimentation, 2) depth of bioturbation, and 3) time of ligament failure. Using these three parameters a model for the occurrence of butterflied bivalves can be constructed: bioturbation depth divided by sedimentation rate gives the disturbance time (DST), during which shells on one bedding plane would be subject to reworking. This can be seen as a time window into which ligament failure times - or disarticulation time (DAT) - can be fitted. If DATbivalves may be used as partial indicators of conditions prevailing in environments of deposition.

  10. Mechanisms of viral persistence within bivalves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal bacteria and waterborne enteric viruses bioconcentrate within bivalve shellfish. However while bacteria are readily purged, viruses tend to be retained within shellfish when bivalves are depurated. The US. Department of Agriculture Seafood Safety Laboratory has recently demonstrated that pha...

  11. Bacterial diseases in marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Boettcher Miller, Katherine; Roque, Ana; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2015-10-01

    Bivalve aquaculture is seriously affected by many bacterial pathogens that cause high losses in hatcheries as well as in natural beds. A number of Vibrio species, but also members of the genera Nocardia and Roseovarius, are considered important pathogens in aquaculture. The present work provides an updated overview of main diseases and implicated bacterial species affecting bivalves. This review focuses on aetiological agents, their diversity and virulence factors, the diagnostic methods available as well as information on the dynamics of the host-parasite relationship.

  12. Evolution of Gigantism in Amphiumid Salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Bonett, Ronald M.; Chippindale, Paul T.; Moler, Paul E.; Van Devender, R. Wayne; Wake, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The Amphiumidae contains three species of elongate, permanently aquatic salamanders with four diminutive limbs that append one, two, or three toes. Two of the species, Amphiuma means and A. tridactylum, are among the largest salamanders in the world, reaching lengths of more than one meter, whereas the third species (A. pholeter), extinct amphiumids, and closely related salamander families are relatively small. Amphiuma means and A. tridactylum are widespread species and live in a wide range of lowland aquatic habitats on the Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States, whereas A. pholeter is restricted to very specialized organic muck habitats and is syntopic with A. means. Here we present analyses of sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear loci from across the distribution of the three taxa to assess lineage diversity, relationships, and relative timing of divergence in amphiumid salamanders. In addition we analyze the evolution of gigantism in the clade. Our analyses indicate three lineages that have diverged since the late Miocene, that correspond to the three currently recognized species, but the two gigantic species are not each other's closest relatives. Given that the most closely related salamander families and fossil amphiumids from the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene are relatively small, our results suggest at least two extreme changes in body size within the Amphuimidae. Gigantic body size either evolved once as the ancestral condition of modern amphiumas, with a subsequent strong size reduction in A. pholeter, or gigantism independently evolved twice in the modern species, A. means and A. tridactylum. These patterns are concordant with differences in habitat breadth and range size among lineages, and have implications for reproductive isolation and diversification of amphiumid salamanders. PMID:19461997

  13. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  14. Evolution of gigantism in amphiumid salamanders.

    PubMed

    Bonett, Ronald M; Chippindale, Paul T; Moler, Paul E; Van Devender, R Wayne; Wake, David B

    2009-05-20

    The Amphiumidae contains three species of elongate, permanently aquatic salamanders with four diminutive limbs that append one, two, or three toes. Two of the species, Amphiuma means and A. tridactylum, are among the largest salamanders in the world, reaching lengths of more than one meter, whereas the third species (A. pholeter), extinct amphiumids, and closely related salamander families are relatively small. Amphiuma means and A. tridactylum are widespread species and live in a wide range of lowland aquatic habitats on the Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States, whereas A. pholeter is restricted to very specialized organic muck habitats and is syntopic with A. means. Here we present analyses of sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear loci from across the distribution of the three taxa to assess lineage diversity, relationships, and relative timing of divergence in amphiumid salamanders. In addition we analyze the evolution of gigantism in the clade. Our analyses indicate three lineages that have diverged since the late Miocene, that correspond to the three currently recognized species, but the two gigantic species are not each other's closest relatives. Given that the most closely related salamander families and fossil amphiumids from the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene are relatively small, our results suggest at least two extreme changes in body size within the Amphuimidae. Gigantic body size either evolved once as the ancestral condition of modern amphiumas, with a subsequent strong size reduction in A. pholeter, or gigantism independently evolved twice in the modern species, A. means and A. tridactylum. These patterns are concordant with differences in habitat breadth and range size among lineages, and have implications for reproductive isolation and diversification of amphiumid salamanders.

  15. Gigantism and Its Implications for the History of Life.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Geerat J

    2016-01-01

    Gigantism-very large body size-is an ecologically important trait associated with competitive superiority. Although it has been studied in particular cases, the general conditions for the evolution and maintenance of gigantism remain obscure. I compiled sizes and dates for the largest species in 3 terrestrial and 7 marine trophic and habitat categories of animals from throughout the Phanerozoic. The largest species (global giants) in all categories are of post-Paleozoic age. Gigantism at this level appeared tens to hundreds of millions of years after mass extinctions and long after the origins of clades in which it evolved. Marine gigantism correlates with high planktic or seafloor productivity, but on land the correspondence between productivity and gigantism is weak at best. All global giants are aerobically active animals, not gentle giants with low metabolic demands. Oxygen concentration in the atmosphere correlates with gigantism in the Paleozoic but not thereafter, likely because of the elaboration of efficient gas-exchange systems in clades containing giants. Although temperature and habitat size are important in the evolution of very large size in some cases, the most important (and rare) enabling circumstance is a highly developed ecological infrastructure in which essential resources are abundant and effectively recycled and reused, permitting activity levels to increase and setting the stage for gigantic animals to evolve. Gigantism as a hallmark of competitive superiority appears to have lost its luster on land after the Mesozoic in favor of alternative means of achieving dominance, especially including social organization and coordinated food-gathering.

  16. Toxic responses of bivalves to metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, P.; Menon, N.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Although there is a growing body of information on the toxicity of individual heavy metals to economically important on the toxicity of individual heavy metals to economically important species of bivalves, literature on the lethal toxicity of metal mixtures to bivalves under controlled conditions is rather limited. In the present investigation the toxic effects of combinations of copper - mercury and copper - mercury and copper - cadmium at lethal levels of two marine bivalve species, Perna indica and Donax incarnatus, have been delineated.

  17. Fungal Cell Gigantism during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 µm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with γ-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20–50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens. PMID:20585557

  18. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-06-17

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  19. [Comparison of mitochondrial genomes of bivalves].

    PubMed

    SONG, Wen-Tao; GAO, Xiang-Gang; LI, Yun-Feng; LIU, Wei-Dong; LIU, Ying; HE, Chong-Bo

    2009-11-01

    The structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes of 14 marine bivalves and two freshwater bivalves were analyzed using comparative genomics and bioinformatics methods. The results showed that the organization and gene order of the mitochondrial genomes of these bivalve species studied were different from each other. The size, organization, gene numbers, and gene order of mitochondrial genomes in bivalves at different taxa were different. Phylogenetic analysis using the whole mitochondrial genomes and all the coding genes showed different results-- phylogenetic analysis conducted using the whole mitochondrial genomes was consistent with the existing classification and phylogenetic analysis conducted using all coding genes not consistent with the existing classification.

  20. Neoplastic diseases of marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Carballal, María J; Barber, Bruce J; Iglesias, David; Villalba, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Two types of prevalent neoplastic diseases have been described in marine bivalves of commercial interest: disseminated neoplasia (DN) and gonadal neoplasia. The first involves the excessive proliferation of abnormal cells with unknown origin (probably of hemic source in some cases/species), disseminating through the circulatory system and infiltrating the connective tissue of various organs; the second consists of an abnormal proliferation of undifferentiated germinal cells of the gonad. These two types of bivalve neoplasia fit the criteria of malignant tumors: pleomorphic and undifferentiated cells, rapid and invasive growth, abundance of mitotic figures, metastasis and progressive development often resulting in the death of the affected individual. Different causes have been suggested regarding etiology: genetic alterations, virus, retrotranspons, and contaminants, although it could depend on the mollusk species; evidence of horizontal transmission of clonal cancer cells as the cause of DN spreading in clam Mya arenaria populations has been recently reported. In some species and populations, the neoplastic disorders affect only a few individuals, but in others reach high prevalence. Among the diagnostic methods, DN has been detected by histology and cytologic examination of hemolymph, and with developed specific antibodies. Recently, flow cytometry has also been applied, allowing detecting DNA quantity alteration. Several studies reported many genes and pathways critically involved in neoplastic transformation in Mya arenaria, Mytilus spp. and Ostrea edulis. These genetic studies will allow the development of diagnosis by PCR which can be used in biomonitoring studies.

  1. Hereditary Pituitary Hyperplasia with Infantile Gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Gläsker, Sven; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Lafferty, Antony R. A.; Hofman, Paul L.; Li, Jie; Weil, Robert J.; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2011-01-01

    Context: We report hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the results of the clinical and laboratory analysis of this rare instance of hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. Design: The study is a retrospective analysis of three cases from one family. Setting: The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health, a tertiary referral center. Patients: A mother and both her sons had very early-onset gigantism associated with high levels of serum GH and prolactin. Interventions: The condition was treated by total hypophysectomy. Main Outcome Measure(s): We performed clinical, pathological, and molecular evaluations, including evaluation basal and provocative endocrine testing, neuroradiological assessment, and assessment of the pituitary tissue by microscopic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Results: All three family members had very early onset of gigantism associated with abnormally high serum levels of GH and prolactin. Serum GHRH levels were not elevated in either of the boys. The clinical, radiographic, surgical, and histological findings indicated mammosomatotroph hyperplasia. The pituitary gland of both boys revealed diffuse mammosomatotroph hyperplasia of the entire pituitary gland without evidence of adenoma. Prolactin and GH were secreted by the same cells within the same secretory granules. Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of GHRH in clusters of cells distributed throughout the hyperplastic pituitary of both boys. Conclusions: This hereditary condition seems to be a result of embryonic pituitary maldevelopment with retention and expansion of the mammosomatotrophs. The findings suggest that it is caused by paracrine or autocrine pituitary GHRH secretion during pituitary development. PMID:21976722

  2. Health hazards of bivalve-mollusk ingestion.

    PubMed

    Earampamoorthy, S; Koff, R S

    1975-07-01

    Bivalve mollusks (oysters, clans, and mussels) filter large quantities of water unselectively and thereby may concentrate a variety of aquatic contaminants pathogenic for man within edible shellfish viscera. The recognized bacterial disease associated with ingestion of contaminated bivalves include typhoid fever (not presently a public health problem), Vibrio parahemolyticus gastroenteritis, and Vibrio chloerae infection. The major known shellfish-associated viral diseases are viral hepatitis and possibly viral gastroenteritis. The ingestion of bivalves that have fed on the toxic species of dinoflagellates that produce red tides may be responsible for an uncommon and very rarely fatal illness, paralytic shellfish poisoning. Outbreaks of airborne respiratory irritation in populations exposed to red tides may be the most common public health problem associated with red tides. The health hazards resulting from industrial, agricultural, and oil pollution of bivalves in coastal waters and the hazard from improper handling of bacterially contaminated mollusks remain to be defined.

  3. A Study in Bivalve Aging and Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Karl R.; Schlenker, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes how high school biology students use the clam to study the bivalve body plan anatomy. Employs an open-ended investigation format that is rich with measurement opportunities including body mass, valve mass, and volume. (DDR)

  4. Rostroconchia: A new class of bivalved mollusks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pojeta, J.; Runnegar, B.; Morris, N.J.; Newell, N.D.

    1972-01-01

    Four Paleozoic bivalved genera are assigned to the new molluscan class Rostroconchia: Eopteria, Euchasma, Conocardium, and Pseudoconocardium. These mollusks have an uncoiled univalved larval shell; an untorted bivalved adult shell; no hinge teeth, ligament, or adductor muscles; and a fused, almost inflexible, hinge. Rostroconchians developed separately from the pelecypods through the ribeirioids, but are regarded as more closely related to the Pelecypoda and Scaphopoda than to other known classes of molllusks.

  5. Gigantism and Its Implications for the History of Life

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2016-01-01

    Gigantism—very large body size—is an ecologically important trait associated with competitive superiority. Although it has been studied in particular cases, the general conditions for the evolution and maintenance of gigantism remain obscure. I compiled sizes and dates for the largest species in 3 terrestrial and 7 marine trophic and habitat categories of animals from throughout the Phanerozoic. The largest species (global giants) in all categories are of post-Paleozoic age. Gigantism at this level appeared tens to hundreds of millions of years after mass extinctions and long after the origins of clades in which it evolved. Marine gigantism correlates with high planktic or seafloor productivity, but on land the correspondence between productivity and gigantism is weak at best. All global giants are aerobically active animals, not gentle giants with low metabolic demands. Oxygen concentration in the atmosphere correlates with gigantism in the Paleozoic but not thereafter, likely because of the elaboration of efficient gas-exchange systems in clades containing giants. Although temperature and habitat size are important in the evolution of very large size in some cases, the most important (and rare) enabling circumstance is a highly developed ecological infrastructure in which essential resources are abundant and effectively recycled and reused, permitting activity levels to increase and setting the stage for gigantic animals to evolve. Gigantism as a hallmark of competitive superiority appears to have lost its luster on land after the Mesozoic in favor of alternative means of achieving dominance, especially including social organization and coordinated food-gathering. PMID:26771527

  6. Late paleozoic fusulinoidean gigantism driven by atmospheric hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jonathan L; Groves, John R; Jost, Adam B; Nguyen, Thienan; Moffitt, Sarah E; Hill, Tessa M; Skotheim, Jan M

    2012-09-01

    Atmospheric hyperoxia, with pO(2) in excess of 30%, has long been hypothesized to account for late Paleozoic (360-250 million years ago) gigantism in numerous higher taxa. However, this hypothesis has not been evaluated statistically because comprehensive size data have not been compiled previously at sufficient temporal resolution to permit quantitative analysis. In this study, we test the hyperoxia-gigantism hypothesis by examining the fossil record of fusulinoidean foraminifers, a dramatic example of protistan gigantism with some individuals exceeding 10 cm in length and exceeding their relatives by six orders of magnitude in biovolume. We assembled and examined comprehensive regional and global, species-level datasets containing 270 and 1823 species, respectively. A statistical model of size evolution forced by atmospheric pO(2) is conclusively favored over alternative models based on random walks or a constant tendency toward size increase. Moreover, the ratios of volume to surface area in the largest fusulinoideans are consistent in magnitude and trend with a mathematical model based on oxygen transport limitation. We further validate the hyperoxia-gigantism model through an examination of modern foraminiferal species living along a measured gradient in oxygen concentration. These findings provide the first quantitative confirmation of a direct connection between Paleozoic gigantism and atmospheric hyperoxia.

  7. Immune responses to infectious diseases in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Allam, Bassem; Raftos, David

    2015-10-01

    Many species of bivalve mollusks (phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia) are important in fisheries and aquaculture, whilst others are critical to ecosystem structure and function. These crucial roles mean that considerable attention has been paid to the immune responses of bivalves such as oysters, clams and mussels against infectious diseases that can threaten the viability of entire populations. As with many invertebrates, bivalves have a comprehensive repertoire of immune cells, genes and proteins. Hemocytes represent the backbone of the bivalve immune system. However, it is clear that mucosal tissues at the interface with the environment also play a critical role in host defense. Bivalve immune cells express a range of pattern recognition receptors and are highly responsive to the recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns. Their responses to infection include chemotaxis, phagolysosomal activity, encapsulation, complex intracellular signaling and transcriptional activity, apoptosis, and the induction of anti-viral states. Bivalves also express a range of inducible extracellular recognition and effector proteins, such as lectins, peptidoglycan-recognition proteins, thioester bearing proteins, lipopolysaccharide and β1,3-glucan-binding proteins, fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) and antimicrobial proteins. The identification of FREPs and other highly diversified gene families in bivalves leaves open the possibility that some of their responses to infection may involve a high degree of pathogen specificity and immune priming. The current review article provides a comprehensive, but not exhaustive, description of these factors and how they are regulated by infectious agents. It concludes that one of the remaining challenges is to use new "omics" technologies to understand how this diverse array of factors is integrated and controlled during infection.

  8. Ependimoma myxopapilar sacro gigante con osteolisis

    PubMed Central

    Ajler, Pablo; Landriel, Federico; Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Campero, Álvaro; Yampolsky, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: la presentación de un caso de una paciente con un ependimoma sacro con extensa infiltración y destrucción ósea local. Descripción del caso: una mujer de 53 años acudió a la consulta por dolor lumbosacro y alteraciones sensitivas perineales y esfinterianas. La imágenes por Resonancia Magnética (IRM) y la Tomografía Axial Computada (TAC) mostraron una lesión expansiva gigante a nivel S2-S4 con extensa osteólisis e invasión de tejidos adyacentes. Se realizó una exéresis tumoral completa con mejoría del estatus funcional. La anatomía patológica informó ependimoma mixopapilar. Discusión: la extensión de la resección quirúrgica es el mejor predictor de buen pronóstico. El tratamiento radiante se reserva como opción adyuvante para las resecciones incompletas y recidiva tumoral. La quimioterapia sólo debería utilizarse en casos en que la cirugía y la radioterapia estén contraindicadas. Conclusión: Los ependimomas mixopapilares sacros con destrucción ósea y presentación intra y extradural son muy infrecuentes y deben ser tenidos en cuenta entre los diagnósticos diferenciales preoperatorios. Su resección total, siempre que sea posible, es la mejor alternativa terapéutica. PMID:25165615

  9. Macrodystrophia Lipomatosa: An Unusual Cause of Localized Gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Maheswari, S Uma; Sampath, V; Ramesh, A; Manoharan, K

    2016-01-01

    Macrodystrophia lipomatosa (MDL) is a rare congenital form of localized gigantism characterized by progressive overgrowth of all mesenchymal elements with a disproportionate increase in fibro adipose tissue. Here we report a case of 20 years old male who presented with history of painless gradual enlargement of entire left upper limb since childhood. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of macrodystrophia lipomatosa. This condition has to be differentiated from other causes of localized gigantism, since these conditions differ in their course, prognosis, complications and treatment. PMID:27293271

  10. Macrodystrophia Lipomatosa: An Unusual Cause of Localized Gigantism.

    PubMed

    Maheswari, S Uma; Sampath, V; Ramesh, A; Manoharan, K

    2016-01-01

    Macrodystrophia lipomatosa (MDL) is a rare congenital form of localized gigantism characterized by progressive overgrowth of all mesenchymal elements with a disproportionate increase in fibro adipose tissue. Here we report a case of 20 years old male who presented with history of painless gradual enlargement of entire left upper limb since childhood. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of macrodystrophia lipomatosa. This condition has to be differentiated from other causes of localized gigantism, since these conditions differ in their course, prognosis, complications and treatment.

  11. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-12-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33-84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood.

  12. A study of model bivalve siphonal currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Janet K.; O'Riordan, Catherine A.; Nepf, Heidi M.

    1990-01-01

    We carried out experiments studying the hydrodynamics of bivalve siphonal currents in a laboratory flume. Rather than use living animals, we devised a simple, model siphon pair connected to a pump. Fluorescence-based flow visualization was used to characterize siphon-jet flows for several geometric configurations and flow speeds. These measurements show that the boundary-layer velocity profile, siphon height, siphon pair orientation, and size of siphon structure all affect the vertical distribution of the excurrent flow downstream of the siphon pair and the fraction of excurrent that is refiltered. The observed flows may effect both the clearance rate of an entire population of siphonate bivalves as well as the efficiency of feeding of any individual. Our results imply that field conditions are properly represented in laboratory flume studies of phytoplankton biomass losses to benthic bivalves when the shear velocity and bottom roughness are matched to values found in the field. Numerical models of feeding by a bivalve population should include an effective sink distribution which is created by the combined incurrent-excurrent flow field. Near-bed flows need to be accounted for to properly represent these benthic-pelagic exchanges. We also present velocity measurements made with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) for a single configuration (siphons flush with bed, inlet downstream) that show that the siphonal currents have a significant local effect on the properties of a turbulent boundary layer.

  13. Twin Explosions In Gigantic Dusty Potato Crisp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-05-01

    ESO's Very Large Telescope, equipped with the multi-mode FORS instrument, took an image of NGC 3190, a galaxy so distorted that astronomers gave it two names. And as if to prove them right, in 2002 it fired off, almost simultaneously, two stellar explosions, a very rare event. This beautiful edge-on spiral galaxy with tightly wound arms and a warped shape that makes it resemble a gigantic potato crisp lies in the constellation Leo ('the Lion') [1] and is approximately 70 million light years away. It is the dominant member of a small group of galaxies known as Hickson 44, named after the Canadian astronomer, Paul Hickson. In addition to NGC 3190 [2], Hickson 44 consists of one elliptical and two spiral galaxies. These are, however, slightly out of the field of view and therefore not visible here. ESO PR Photo 17/06 ESO PR Photo 17/06 The Spiral Galaxy NGC 3190 In 1982, Hickson published a catalogue of over 400 galaxies found in compact, physically-related groups of typically 4 to 5 galaxies per group (see the image of Robert's Quartet in ESO PR Photo 34/05 as another example). Such compact groups allow astronomers to study how galaxies dynamically affect each other, and help them test current ideas on how galaxies form. One idea is that compact groups of galaxies, such as Hickson 44, merge to form a giant elliptical galaxy, such as NGC 1316 (see ESO PR 17/00). Indeed, signs of tidal interactions are visible in the twisted dust lane of NGC 3190. This distortion initially misled astronomers into assigning a separate name for the southwestern side, NGC 3189, although NGC 3190 is the favoured designation. NGC 3190 has an 'Active Galactic Nucleus', and as such, the bright, compact nucleus is thought to host a supermassive black hole. In March 2002, a new supernova (SN 2002bo) was found in between the 'V' of the dust lanes in the southeastern part of NGC 3190. It was discovered independently by the Brazilian and Japanese amateur astronomers, Paulo Cacella and Yoji Hirose

  14. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  15. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omar; Banerjee, Swati; Kelly, Daniel F; Lee, Phillip D K

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary gigantism, a condition of endogenous growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion prior to epiphyseal closure, is a rare condition. In the adult condition of GH excess, acromegaly, the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported, with resolution following normalization of GH levels. We report the case of a 16-year-old male with pituitary gigantism due to a large invasive suprasellar adenoma who presented with T2DM and DKA. Despite surgical de-bulking, radiotherapy and medical treatment with cabergoline and pegvisomant, GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels remained elevated. However, the T2DM and recurrent DKA were successfully managed with metformin and low-dose glargine insulin, respectively. We review the pathophysiology of T2DM and DKA in growth hormone excess and available treatment options.

  16. Multiple origins of gigantism in stem baleen whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Kohno, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    Living baleen whales (Mysticeti) include the world's largest animals to have ever lived—blue whales ( Balaenoptera musculus) can reach more than 30 m. However, the gigantism in baleen whales remains little explored. Here, we compiled all published stem mysticetes from the Eocene and Oligocene and then mapped the estimated body size onto different phylogenies that suggest distinct evolutionary histories of baleen whales. By assembling all known stem baleen whales, we present three novel findings in early mysticete evolution. Results show that, regardless of different phylogenetic scenarios, large body size (more than 5-m long) evolved multiple times independently in their early evolutionary history. For example, the earliest known aetiocetid ( Fucaia buelli, 33-31 Ma) was small in size, about 2 m, and a later aetiocetid ( Morawanocetus-like animal, 26-23 Ma) can reach 8-m long—almost four times the size of Fucaia buelli—suggesting an independent gigantism in the aetiocetid lineage. In addition, our reconstruction of ancestral state demonstrates that the baleen whales originated from small body size (less than 5 m) rather than large body size as previously acknowledged. Moreover, reconstructing the evolution of body size in stem baleen whales suggests that the initial pulse of mysticete gigantism started at least back to the Paleogene and in turn should help to understand the origin, pattern, and process of the extreme gigantism in the crown baleen whales. This study illustrates that Cope's rule is insufficient to explain the evolution of body size in a group that comprises the largest animals in the history of life, although currently the lack of exact ancestor-descendant relationships remains to fully reveal the evolutionary history of body size.

  17. Multiple origins of gigantism in stem baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Kohno, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    Living baleen whales (Mysticeti) include the world's largest animals to have ever lived-blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) can reach more than 30 m. However, the gigantism in baleen whales remains little explored. Here, we compiled all published stem mysticetes from the Eocene and Oligocene and then mapped the estimated body size onto different phylogenies that suggest distinct evolutionary histories of baleen whales. By assembling all known stem baleen whales, we present three novel findings in early mysticete evolution. Results show that, regardless of different phylogenetic scenarios, large body size (more than 5-m long) evolved multiple times independently in their early evolutionary history. For example, the earliest known aetiocetid (Fucaia buelli, 33-31 Ma) was small in size, about 2 m, and a later aetiocetid (Morawanocetus-like animal, 26-23 Ma) can reach 8-m long-almost four times the size of Fucaia buelli-suggesting an independent gigantism in the aetiocetid lineage. In addition, our reconstruction of ancestral state demonstrates that the baleen whales originated from small body size (less than 5 m) rather than large body size as previously acknowledged. Moreover, reconstructing the evolution of body size in stem baleen whales suggests that the initial pulse of mysticete gigantism started at least back to the Paleogene and in turn should help to understand the origin, pattern, and process of the extreme gigantism in the crown baleen whales. This study illustrates that Cope's rule is insufficient to explain the evolution of body size in a group that comprises the largest animals in the history of life, although currently the lack of exact ancestor-descendant relationships remains to fully reveal the evolutionary history of body size.

  18. Metals bioaccumulation in two edible bivalves and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    El-Shenawy, Nahla S; Loutfy, Naglaa; Soliman, Maha F M; Tadros, Menerva M; Abd El-Azeez, Ahmed A

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to quantify the bioaccumulation of 13 metals in two edible bivalves (Ruditapes decussatus and Paphia undulata) in Lake Timsah, Egypt. A potential human health risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the hazards from bivalve consumption. Fe, Al, Zn, and Sr had the highest concentrations in the bivalve samples. The levels of Cd were much lower than the maximum permissible level, while Pb concentrations in the two bivalves were nearly two times the permissible level. The extent of bioaccumulation factor was site- and species-specific. For low and high bivalve-consuming groups, the estimated daily intake of Pb and Cd ranged from 0.01 to 0.76 μg/kg/day. For low and high bivalve-consuming groups, hazard quotients (HQs) for metals were found to be less than 1 for both bivalve species, except for Co in the high-consuming group. In conclusion, even though there was no apparent risk to bivalve consumers from being exposed to single metals, there is a risk from being exposed to the 13 studied metals together, especially for high bivalve-consuming groups such as fishermen.

  19. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  20. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members’ battles with David and his relatives. PMID:25075136

  1. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa: a reconstructive approach to gigantism of the foot.

    PubMed

    Watt, Andrew J; Chung, Kevin C

    2004-01-01

    Localized gigantism poses a challenging surgical dilemma, and it may be treated with amputation. This case report documents the application of a reconstructive approach to a severe case of pedal macrodystrophia lipomatosa in a 1-year-old girl. A series of 3 surgeries were designed to reduce the length, width, height, and overall bulk of the congenitally enlarged foot. The 3 procedures debulked the foot for normal ambulation and same-size shoe wear for both feet. The resulting functional and aesthetic improvements achieved through reconstructive treatment provided a desirable alternative to amputation.

  2. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives.

  3. The Oldest Recorded Case of Acromegaly and Gigantism in Iran.

    PubMed

    Najjari, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    Here we commemorate the character and academic authority of Prof. Zabiholah Gorban (1903-2006), the founder of Shiraz medical school. No doubt, in the scope of history of contemporary medicine, he has been efficient and effective. With respect to this fact, his article on a rare case described in Acta anatomica published in Iran in 1966, entitled (Observations on a giant skeleton) is browsed and reviewed. A case named Siah Khan with combined acromegaly and gigantism that appears to have letters to say still after nearly half a century.

  4. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome. PMID:24860761

  5. Phylogeny and diversification patterns among vesicomyid bivalves.

    PubMed

    Decker, Carole; Olu, Karine; Cunha, Regina L; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are among the most abundant and diverse symbiotic taxa in chemosynthetic-based ecosystems: more than 100 different vesicomyid species have been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic positioning of recently described vesicomyid species from the Gulf of Guinea and their western Atlantic and Pacific counterparts using mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The maximum-likelihood (ML) tree provided limited support for the recent taxonomic revision of vesicomyids based on morphological criteria; nevertheless, most of the newly sequenced specimens did not cluster with their morphological conspecifics. Moreover, the observed lack of geographic clustering suggests the occurrence of independent radiations followed by worldwide dispersal. Ancestral character state reconstruction showed a significant correlation between the characters "depth" and "habitat" and the reconstructed ML phylogeny suggesting possible recurrent events of 'stepwise speciation' from shallow to deep waters in different ocean basins. This is consistent with genus or species bathymetric segregation observed from recent taxonomic studies. Altogether, our results highlight the need for ongoing re-evaluation of the morphological characters used to identify vesicomyid bivalves.

  6. Phylogeny and Diversification Patterns among Vesicomyid Bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Carole; Olu, Karine; Cunha, Regina L.; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are among the most abundant and diverse symbiotic taxa in chemosynthetic-based ecosystems: more than 100 different vesicomyid species have been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic positioning of recently described vesicomyid species from the Gulf of Guinea and their western Atlantic and Pacific counterparts using mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The maximum-likelihood (ML) tree provided limited support for the recent taxonomic revision of vesicomyids based on morphological criteria; nevertheless, most of the newly sequenced specimens did not cluster with their morphological conspecifics. Moreover, the observed lack of geographic clustering suggests the occurrence of independent radiations followed by worldwide dispersal. Ancestral character state reconstruction showed a significant correlation between the characters “depth” and “habitat” and the reconstructed ML phylogeny suggesting possible recurrent events of ‘stepwise speciation’ from shallow to deep waters in different ocean basins. This is consistent with genus or species bathymetric segregation observed from recent taxonomic studies. Altogether, our results highlight the need for ongoing re-evaluation of the morphological characters used to identify vesicomyid bivalves. PMID:22511920

  7. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization.

    PubMed

    Legg, David A; Sutton, Mark D; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-12-07

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans ('great-appendage' arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids).

  8. Gigantic jets between a thundercloud and the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Su, H T; Hsu, R R; Chen, A B; Wang, Y C; Hsiao, W S; Lai, W C; Lee, L C; Sato, M; Fukunishi, H

    2003-06-26

    Transient luminous events in the atmosphere, such as lighting-induced sprites and upwardly discharging blue jets, were discovered recently in the region between thunderclouds and the ionosphere. In the conventional picture, the main components of Earth's global electric circuit include thunderstorms, the conducting ionosphere, the downward fair-weather currents and the conducting Earth. Thunderstorms serve as one of the generators that drive current upward from cloud tops to the ionosphere, where the electric potential is hundreds of kilovolts higher than Earth's surface. It has not been clear, however, whether all the important components of the global circuit have even been identified. Here we report observations of five gigantic jets that establish a direct link between a thundercloud (altitude approximately 16 km) and the ionosphere at 90 km elevation. Extremely-low-frequency radio waves in four events were detected, while no cloud-to-ground lightning was observed to trigger these events. Our result indicates that the extremely-low-frequency waves were generated by negative cloud-to-ionosphere discharges, which would reduce the electrical potential between ionosphere and ground. Therefore, the conventional picture of the global electric circuit needs to be modified to include the contributions of gigantic jets and possibly sprites.

  9. Evolution of gigantism in nine-spined sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Gábor; Gonda, Abigél; Merilä, Juha

    2009-12-01

    The relaxation of predation and interspecific competition are hypothesized to allow evolution toward "optimal" body size in island environments, resulting in the gigantism of small organisms. We tested this hypothesis by studying a small teleost (nine-spined stickleback, Pungitius pungitius) from four marine and five lake (diverse fish community) and nine pond (impoverished fish community) populations. In line with theory, pond fish tended to be larger than their marine or lake conspecifics, sometimes reaching giant sizes. In two geographically independent cases when predatory fish had been introduced into ponds, fish were smaller than those in nearby ponds lacking predators. Pond fish were also smaller when found in sympatry with three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) than those in ponds lacking competitors. Size-at-age analyses demonstrated that larger size in ponds was achieved by both increased growth rates and extended longevity of pond fish. Results from a common garden experiment indicate that the growth differences had a genetic basis: pond fish developed two to three times higher body mass than marine fish during 36 weeks of growth under similar conditions. Hence, reduced risk of predation and interspecific competition appear to be chief forces driving insular body size evolution toward gigantism.

  10. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    Bivalve shells are used as important palaeoclimate proxy archives and monitor regional climate variations. The shells mostly exist of two crystalline polymorphic phases of calcium carbonate calcite (rombohedric) and aragonite (orthorhombic). Calcite is the most stable polymorph at standard conditions, whereas vaterite (hexagonal) is the least stable and only rarely found in these structures. Shells are characterized by organized structures and several micro architectures of mollusc shell structures have been identified: Nacre shows different types: columnar and bricked forms and consists of composite inorganic- organic at the nano-scale. They are well known to display a "brick and mortar" structure. By AFM and FIB/TEM methods it could be shown, that its nanostructure consists of the structures in the range of 50 - 100 nm [1, 2]. These structures are vesicles, consisting of CaCO3 and are individually coated by a membrane. Most probably, the mantle epithelian cells of the bivalve extrude CaCO3 vesicles. By Raman spectroscopic investigations the crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, as well as ACC were determined. For some species (Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, Hyriopsis cumingii) pure ACC (i.e. not intermingled with a crystalline phase) could be identified. The presence of an amorphous phase is generally deduced from the lack of definite lattice modes, whereas a broad Raman band in this region is to observe. In most of the cultured pearls (Pinctada maxima and genus Hyriopsis) the ν1-Raman band of ACC clearly displays an asymmetric shape and splits into two different bands according to a nanocrystalline and an amorphous fraction. The FWHMs of most of the crystalline fractions are too high for well crystallized materials and support the assumption of nanocrystalline calcium carbonate polymorph clusters in ACC. They are primarily composed of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) which is later transformed into a crystalline modification [3

  11. Phylogenetic conservatism of extinctions in marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kaustuv; Hunt, Gene; Jablonski, David

    2009-08-07

    Evolutionary histories of species and lineages can influence their vulnerabilities to extinction, but the importance of this effect remains poorly explored for extinctions in the geologic past. When analyzed using a standardized taxonomy within a phylogenetic framework, extinction rates of marine bivalves estimated from the fossil record for the last approximately 200 million years show conservatism at multiple levels of evolutionary divergence, both within individual families and among related families. The strength of such phylogenetic clustering varies over time and is influenced by earlier extinction history, especially by the demise of volatile taxa in the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Analyses of the evolutionary roles of ancient extinctions and predictive models of vulnerability of taxa to future natural and anthropogenic stressors should take phylogenetic relationships and extinction history into account.

  12. Hemocyanin respiratory pigment in bivalve mollusks

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, M.P.; Meyhoefer, E.; Otto, J.J.; Kuzirian, A.M.

    1986-03-14

    Hemocyanins, high molecular weight oxygen-binding proteins, were identified in two species of protobranch bivalve mollusks, Acila castrensis and Yoldia limatula. Although hemocyanins have been reported in chitons, gastropods, and cephalopods, they have not been observed in the Class Bivalvia. In A. castrensis the dissociation products of hemocyanin, characterized by gel electrophoresis, had a subunit molecular weight of approximately 250K. Negatively stained preparations of extracted hemocyanin formed protein aggregates in the shape of cylinders measuring 35 by 38 nanometers. X-ray microanalysis of hemocyanin aggregates in thin sections of Y. limatula demonstrated the presence of copper in the molecules. The discovery of hemocyanin in the protobranchs reinforces the primitive nature of the taxon and is further evidence that the major molluscan classes have a common ancestry. 14 references, 3 figures.

  13. Gigantic enhancement of spin Seebeck effect by phonon drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroto; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Saitoh, Eiji; Ohe, Jun-Ichiro; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate both theoretically and experimentally a gigantic enhancement of the spin Seebeck effect [K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008); C. M. Jaworski et al., Nature Mater. 9, 898 (2010); K. Uchida et al., Nature Mater. 9, 894 (2010)] in a prototypical magnet La Y2 Fe 5 O12 at low temperatures. Our theoretical analysis sheds light on the important role of phonons; the spin Seebeck effect is enormously enhanced by nonequilibrium phonons that drag the low-lying spin excitations. We further argue that this scenario gives a clue to understand the observation of the spin Seebeck effect that is unaccompanied by a global spin current, and predict that the substrate condition affects the observed signal.

  14. Immunotoxicological effects of environmental contaminants on marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Renault, T

    2015-09-01

    Coastal areas are complex environments frequently contaminated by numerous pollutants that represent a potential threat to marine organisms, especially bivalves. These pollutants may have major ecological consequences. Although effects of different environmental contaminants on the immune system in marine bivalves have been already reported, a few of reviews summarizes these effects. The main purpose of this chapter relies on summarizing recent body of data on immunotoxicity in bivalves subjected to contaminants. Immune effects of heavy metals, pesticides, HAP, PCB and pharmaceuticals are presented and discussed and a particular section is devoted to nanoparticle effects. A large body of literature is now available on this topic. Finally, the urgent need of a better understanding of complex interactions between contaminants, marine bivalves and infectious diseases is noticed.

  15. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  16. Geography of end-Cretaceous marine bivalve extinctions.

    PubMed

    Raup, D M; Jablonski, D

    1993-05-14

    Analysis of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, based on 3514 occurrences of 340 genera of marine bivalves (Mollusca), suggests that extinction intensities were uniformly global; no latitudinal gradients or other geographic patterns are detected. Elevated extinction intensities in some tropical areas are entirely a result of the distribution of one extinct group of highly specialized bivalves, the rudists. When rudists are omitted, intensities at those localities are statistically indistinguishable from those of both the rudist-free tropics and extratropical localities.

  17. Geography of end-Cretaceous marine bivalve extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, David M.; Jablonski, David

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, based on 3514 occurrences of 340 genera of marine bivalves (Mollusca), suggests that extinction intensities were uniformly global; no latitudinal gradients or other geographic patterns are detected. Elevated extinction intensities in some tropical areas are entirely a result of the distribution of one extinct group of highly specialized bivalves, the rudists. When rudists are omitted, intensities at those localities are statistically indistinguishable from those of both the rudist-free tropics and extratropical localities.

  18. Isotopic fingerprints of bacterial chemosymbiosis in the bivalve Loripes lacteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreier, A.; Stannek, L.; Blumenberg, M.; Taviani, M.; Sigovini, M.; Wrede, C.; Thiel, V.; Hoppert, M.

    2012-04-01

    Metazoans with chemosynthetic bacterial endosymbionts are widespread in marine habitats and respective endosymbioses are known from seven recent animal phyla. However, little is known about endosymbioses in fossil settings and, hence, ecological significance in earth history. In the presented project, we investigate the ancient and recent bivalve fauna living at marine sedimentary oxic/anoxic interfaces. Two bivalve species collected from the same benthic environment - a Mediterranean lagoon - were studied in detail. The diet of Loripes lacteus is based on thiotrophic gill symbionts whereas Venerupis aureus is a filter feeding bivalve without symbionts. The presence of three key enzymes from sulfur oxidation (APS-reductase), carbon fixation (RubisCO) and assimilation of nitrogen (glutamine synthetase [GS]) were detected by immunofluorescence in symbionts of Loripes and/or by activity tests in living specimens. In search of biosignatures associated with thiotrophic chemosymbionts that might be suitable for detection of chemosymbiotic diets in recent and fossil bivalve shells, we analyzed the isotopic composition of shell lipids (δ13C) and the bulk organic matrix of the shell (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S). We could show that the combined δ15N and δ13C values from shell extracts are stable in subfossil (Pleistocene) bivalve specimens, as long as the isotopic data is "calibrated" with respective signatures from a filter feeding bivalve sampled from the same site or lithostratigraphic bed.

  19. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote–microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. PMID:28100665

  20. Numerical modeling of lightning, blue jets, and gigantic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riousset, Jeremy A.

    Blue jets and gigantic jets are transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere that form when conventional lightning leaders escape upward from thundercloud tops and propagate toward the lower ionosphere. These events are believed to be initiated by `classic' parent lightning discharges, when they escape upward from cloud tops. The present study builds upon a previously introduced lightning model that combines the hypotheses of equipotentiality and overall charge neutrality of the lightning channel with the fractal approach allowing to describe the stochasticity and branching of the discharge. The modeling indicates that blue jets occur as a result of electrical breakdown between the upper storm charge and screening charge attracted to the cloud top; they are predicted to occur 5--10 s or less after a cloud-to-ground or intracloud discharge produces a sudden charge imbalance in the storm. A new observation is also presented of an upward discharge that supports this basic mechanism. Gigantic jets are indicated to begin as a normal intracloud discharge between dominant midlevel charge and a screening-depleted upper level charge that continues to propagate out the top of the storm. Observational support for this mechanism comes from similarity with `bolt-from-the-blue' discharges and from data on the polarity of gigantic jets. Upward discharges are analogous to cloud-to-ground lightning and their explanation provides a unifying view of how lightning escapes from a thundercloud. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model of charge relaxation in the conducting atmosphere is developed. It is used in conjunction with the lightning model to demonstrate how realistic cloud electrodynamics leads to the development of blue and gigantic jets. This model accounts for the time-dependent conduction currents and screening charges formed under the influence of the thundercloud charge sources. Particular attention is given to numerical modeling of the screening charges near the cloud

  1. Analysis of marine bivalves and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisler, R.; Stone, S.F.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, environmental monitoring has been complemented by programs for systematic and controlled long-term storage of environmental samples; i.e., environmental specimen banking (ESB). In the US a pilot ESB program is currently expanding to become past of several environmental and human health monitoring projects. The National Status and Trends (NS and T) program on the marine environment, administrated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is one of these projects and has initialized new investigations within the ESB research program. This research includes all steps of the ESB operation, with special emphasis on quality assurance in the selection, collection, preparation, storage, and analysis of marine samples according to validated procedures. A unique sequence of instrumental analytical methods involving x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis procedures has been employed for the determination of 44 elements in marine bivalves. The individual procedures are an x-ray fluorescence method based on backscatter with fundamental parameter corrections, prompt gamma activation analysis, and neutron activation analysis with instrumental and radiochemical procedures. This analytical approach has been expanded to include the analysis of sediments and fish tissues.

  2. Microplastics in bivalves cultured for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    Microplastics are present throughout the marine environment and ingestion of these plastic particles (<1 mm) has been demonstrated in a laboratory setting for a wide array of marine organisms. Here, we investigate the presence of microplastics in two species of commercially grown bivalves: Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Microplastics were recovered from the soft tissues of both species. At time of human consumption, M. edulis contains on average 0.36 ± 0.07 particles g(-1) (wet weight), while a plastic load of 0.47 ± 0.16 particles g(-1) ww was detected in C. gigas. As a result, the annual dietary exposure for European shellfish consumers can amount to 11,000 microplastics per year. The presence of marine microplastics in seafood could pose a threat to food safety, however, due to the complexity of estimating microplastic toxicity, estimations of the potential risks for human health posed by microplastics in food stuffs is not (yet) possible.

  3. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.; Ruardij, P.

    2014-11-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg mortality, background mortality, food competition, and predation (including cannibalism) were additional population processes. Model properties were studied through the analysis of theoretical scenarios and by simulation of different mortality parameter combinations in a realistic setup, imposing environmental measurements. Realistic criteria were applied to narrow down the possible combination of parameter values. Field observations obtained in the long-term and multi-station monitoring program were compared with the model scenarios. The realistically selected modeling scenarios were able to reproduce reasonably the timing of some peaks in the individual abundances in the mussel bed and its size distribution but the number of individuals was not well predicted. The results suggest that the mortality in the early life stages (egg and larvae) plays an important role in population dynamics, either by initial egg mortality, larvae dispersion, settlement failure or shrimp predation. Future steps include the coupling of the population model with a hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to improve the simulation of egg/larvae dispersion, settlement probability, food transport and also to simulate the feedback of the organisms' activity on the water column properties, which will result in an improvement of the food quantity and quality characterization.

  4. Burrowing behaviour of robotic bivalves with synthetic morphologies.

    PubMed

    Germann, D P; Carbajal, J P

    2013-12-01

    Several bivalve species burrow into sandy sediments to reach their living position. There are many hypotheses concerning the functional morphology of the bivalve shell for burrowing. Observational studies are limited and often qualitative and should be complemented by a synthetic approach mimicking the burrowing process using a robotic emulation. In this paper we present a simple mechatronic set-up to mimic the burrowing behaviour of bivalves. As environment we used water and quartz sand contained in a glass tank. Bivalve shells were mathematically modelled on the computer and then materialized using a 3D printer. The burrowing motion of the shells was induced by two external linear motors. Preliminary experiments did not expose any artefacts introduced to the burrowing process by the set-up. We tested effects of shell size, shape and surface sculpturing on the burrowing performance. Neither the typical bivalve shape nor surface sculpture did have a clear positive effect on burrowing depth in the performed experiments. We argue that the presented method is a valid and promising approach to investigate the functional morphology of bivalve shells and should be improved and extended in future studies. In contrast to the observation of living bivalves, our approach offers complete control over the parameters defining shell morphology and motion pattern. The technical set-up allows the systematic variation of all parameters to quantify their effects. The major drawback of the built set-up was that the reliability and significance of the results was limited by the lack of an optimal technique to standardize the sediment state before experiments.

  5. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  6. Review of probiotics for use in bivalve hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Prado, Susana; Romalde, Jesús L; Barja, Juan L

    2010-10-26

    The aquaculture of bivalve molluscs has attained a considerable level of production but it is not enough to cover the demand of worldwide consumers. In the development of this sector, hatcheries play an important role, as suppliers of competent spat of different bivalves, including species with an aquaculture based on natural extraction present. Besides, these installations may help in the recovery of exhausted natural beds and in the obtaining of populations under genetic selection. Unfortunately, the disease outbreaks caused by bacterial pathogens are frequent, with the loss of complete batches, compromising the regular production and the economic viability of the industry. There are many descriptive studies about these outbreaks, but only a few focused on the control of microbiota. The particularities of bivalve aquaculture in hatchery must be taken into account to design methods of control. A common environment is shared by larvae and bacteria, including both beneficial and potentially pathogenic. The filter-feeding behaviour of larvae increases the strong influence of these populations. The classical treatments are directed toward to the complete elimination of bacteria from culture seawater. That objective is unfeasible, because the cultures are not axenic, and undesirable, since some bacteria enhance larval development. Taking into account these considerations, the most promising alternative is the use of probiotic bacteria. In this review we summarize the scientific literature about this subject, considering the particularities of bivalve larval cultures and the need to adapt the concept of probiotic and the strategies to use in marine bivalve hatcheries.

  7. Bivalve mollusks in metal pollution studies: from bioaccumulation to biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Zuykov, Michael; Pelletier, Emilien; Harper, David A T

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary environmental challenges have emphasized the need to critically assess the use of bivalve mollusks in chemical monitoring (identification and quantification of pollutants) and biomonitoring (estimation of environmental quality). Many authors, however, have considered these approaches within a single context, i.e., as a means of chemical (e.g. metal) monitoring. Bivalves are able to accumulate substantial amounts of metals from ambient water, but evidence for the drastic effects of accumulated metals (e.g. as a TBT-induced shell deformation and imposex) on the health of bivalves has not been documented. Metal bioaccumulation is a key tool in biomonitoring; bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of various metals in relation to bivalves are described in some detail including the development of biodynamic metal bioaccumulation model. Measuring metal in the whole-body or the tissue of bivalves themselves does not accurately represent true contamination levels in the environment; these data are critical for our understanding of contaminant trends at sampling sites. Only rarely has metal bioaccumulation been considered in combination with data on metal concentrations in parts of the ecosystem, observation of biomarkers and environmental parameters. Sclerochemistry is in its infancy and cannot be reliably used to provide insights into the pollution history recorded in shells. Alteration processes and mineral crystallization on the inner shell surface are presented here as a perspective tool for environmental studies.

  8. Gigantism and comparative life-history parameters of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Gregory M; Makovicky, Peter J; Currie, Philip J; Norell, Mark A; Yerby, Scott A; Brochu, Christopher A

    2004-08-12

    How evolutionary changes in body size are brought about by variance in developmental timing and/or growth rates (also known as heterochrony) is a topic of considerable interest in evolutionary biology. In particular, extreme size change leading to gigantism occurred within the dinosaurs on multiple occasions. Whether this change was brought about by accelerated growth, delayed maturity or a combination of both processes is unknown. A better understanding of relationships between non-avian dinosaur groups and the newfound capacity to reconstruct their growth curves make it possible to address these questions quantitatively. Here we study growth patterns within the Tyrannosauridae, the best known group of large carnivorous dinosaurs, and determine the developmental means by which Tyrannosaurus rex, weighing 5,000 kg and more, grew to be one of the most enormous terrestrial carnivorous animals ever. T. rex had a maximal growth rate of 2.1 kg d(-1), reached skeletal maturity in two decades and lived for up to 28 years. T. rex's great stature was primarily attained by accelerating growth rates beyond that of its closest relatives.

  9. LTR retrotransposons contribute to genomic gigantism in plethodontid salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Shepard, Donald B; Chong, Rebecca A; López Arriaza, José; Hall, Kathryn; Castoe, Todd A; Feschotte, Cédric; Pollock, David D; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2012-01-01

    Among vertebrates, most of the largest genomes are found within the salamanders, a clade of amphibians that includes 613 species. Salamander genome sizes range from ~14 to ~120 Gb. Because genome size is correlated with nucleus and cell sizes, as well as other traits, morphological evolution in salamanders has been profoundly affected by genomic gigantism. However, the molecular mechanisms driving genomic expansion in this clade remain largely unknown. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of transposable element (TE) content in salamanders. Using high-throughput sequencing, we generated genomic shotgun data for six species from the Plethodontidae, the largest family of salamanders. We then developed a pipeline to mine TE sequences from shotgun data in taxa with limited genomic resources, such as salamanders. Our summaries of overall TE abundance and diversity for each species demonstrate that TEs make up a substantial portion of salamander genomes, and that all of the major known types of TEs are represented in salamanders. The most abundant TE superfamilies found in the genomes of our six focal species are similar, despite substantial variation in genome size. However, our results demonstrate a major difference between salamanders and other vertebrates: salamander genomes contain much larger amounts of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, primarily Ty3/gypsy elements. Thus, the extreme increase in genome size that occurred in salamanders was likely accompanied by a shift in TE landscape. These results suggest that increased proliferation of LTR retrotransposons was a major molecular mechanism contributing to genomic expansion in salamanders.

  10. Gigantic Surface Lifetime of an Intrinsic Topological Insulator

    DOE PAGES

    Neupane, Madhab; Xu, Su-Yang; Ishida, Yukiaki; ...

    2015-09-09

    We report that the interaction between light and novel two-dimensional electronic states holds promise to realize new fundamental physics and optical devices. Here, we use pump-probe photoemission spectroscopy to study the optically excited Dirac surface states in the bulk-insulating topological insulator Bi2Te2Se and reveal optical properties that are in sharp contrast to those of bulk-metallic topological insulators. We observe a gigantic optical lifetime exceeding 4 μs (1 μs=10more » $${-}$$6 s) for the surface states in Bi2Te2Se, whereas the lifetime in most topological insulators, such as Bi2Se3, has been limited to a few picoseconds (1 ps=10$${-}$$12 s). Moreover, we discover a surface photovoltage, a shift of the chemical potential of the Dirac surface states, as large as 100 mV. Lastly, our results demonstrate a rare platform to study charge excitation and relaxation in energy and momentum space in a two-dimensional system.« less

  11. Gigantic Surface Lifetime of an Intrinsic Topological Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Madhab; Xu, Su-Yang; Ishida, Yukiaki; Jia, Shuang; Fregoso, Benjamin M.; Liu, Chang; Belopolski, Ilya; Bian, Guang; Alidoust, Nasser; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Galitski, Victor; Shin, Shik; Cava, Robert J.; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2015-09-09

    We report that the interaction between light and novel two-dimensional electronic states holds promise to realize new fundamental physics and optical devices. Here, we use pump-probe photoemission spectroscopy to study the optically excited Dirac surface states in the bulk-insulating topological insulator Bi2Te2Se and reveal optical properties that are in sharp contrast to those of bulk-metallic topological insulators. We observe a gigantic optical lifetime exceeding 4 μs (1 μs=10${-}$6 s) for the surface states in Bi2Te2Se, whereas the lifetime in most topological insulators, such as Bi2Se3, has been limited to a few picoseconds (1 ps=10${-}$12 s). Moreover, we discover a surface photovoltage, a shift of the chemical potential of the Dirac surface states, as large as 100 mV. Lastly, our results demonstrate a rare platform to study charge excitation and relaxation in energy and momentum space in a two-dimensional system.

  12. Why might they be giants? Towards an understanding of polar gigantism.

    PubMed

    Moran, Amy L; Woods, H Arthur

    2012-06-15

    Beginning with the earliest expeditions to the poles, over 100 years ago, scientists have compiled an impressive list of polar taxa whose body sizes are unusually large. This phenomenon has become known as 'polar gigantism'. In the intervening years, biologists have proposed a multitude of hypotheses to explain polar gigantism. These hypotheses run the gamut from invoking release from physical and physiological constraints, to systematic changes in developmental trajectories, to community-level outcomes of broader ecological and evolutionary processes. Here we review polar gigantism and emphasize two main problems. The first is to determine the true strength and generality of this pattern: how prevalent is polar gigantism across taxonomic units? Despite many published descriptions of polar giants, we still have a poor grasp of whether these species are unusual outliers or represent more systematic shifts in distributions of body size. Indeed, current data indicate that some groups show gigantism at the poles whereas others show nanism. The second problem is to identify underlying mechanisms or processes that could drive taxa, or even just allow them, to evolve especially large body size. The contenders are diverse and no clear winner has yet emerged. Distinguishing among the contenders will require better sampling of taxa in both temperate and polar waters and sustained efforts by comparative physiologists and evolutionary ecologists in a strongly comparative framework.

  13. Biology of the sauropod dinosaurs: the evolution of gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Sander, P Martin; Christian, Andreas; Clauss, Marcus; Fechner, Regina; Gee, Carole T; Griebeler, Eva-Maria; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Hummel, Jürgen; Mallison, Heinrich; Perry, Steven F; Preuschoft, Holger; Rauhut, Oliver W M; Remes, Kristian; Tütken, Thomas; Wings, Oliver; Witzel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs of the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods were the largest terrestrial animals ever, surpassing the largest herbivorous mammals by an order of magnitude in body mass. Several evolutionary lineages among Sauropoda produced giants with body masses in excess of 50 metric tonnes by conservative estimates. With body mass increase driven by the selective advantages of large body size, animal lineages will increase in body size until they reach the limit determined by the interplay of bauplan, biology, and resource availability. There is no evidence, however, that resource availability and global physicochemical parameters were different enough in the Mesozoic to have led to sauropod gigantism. We review the biology of sauropod dinosaurs in detail and posit that sauropod gigantism was made possible by a specific combination of plesiomorphic characters (phylogenetic heritage) and evolutionary innovations at different levels which triggered a remarkable evolutionary cascade. Of these key innovations, the most important probably was the very long neck, the most conspicuous feature of the sauropod bauplan. Compared to other herbivores, the long neck allowed more efficient food uptake than in other large herbivores by covering a much larger feeding envelope and making food accessible that was out of the reach of other herbivores. Sauropods thus must have been able to take up more energy from their environment than other herbivores. The long neck, in turn, could only evolve because of the small head and the extensive pneumatization of the sauropod axial skeleton, lightening the neck. The small head was possible because food was ingested without mastication. Both mastication and a gastric mill would have limited food uptake rate. Scaling relationships between gastrointestinal tract size and basal metabolic rate (BMR) suggest that sauropods compensated for the lack of particle reduction with long retention times, even at high uptake rates. The

  14. Biology of the sauropod dinosaurs: the evolution of gigantism.

    PubMed

    Sander, P Martin; Christian, Andreas; Clauss, Marcus; Fechner, Regina; Gee, Carole T; Griebeler, Eva-Maria; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Hummel, Jürgen; Mallison, Heinrich; Perry, Steven F; Preuschoft, Holger; Rauhut, Oliver W M; Remes, Kristian; Tütken, Thomas; Wings, Oliver; Witzel, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    The herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs of the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods were the largest terrestrial animals ever, surpassing the largest herbivorous mammals by an order of magnitude in body mass. Several evolutionary lineages among Sauropoda produced giants with body masses in excess of 50 metric tonnes by conservative estimates. With body mass increase driven by the selective advantages of large body size, animal lineages will increase in body size until they reach the limit determined by the interplay of bauplan, biology, and resource availability. There is no evidence, however, that resource availability and global physicochemical parameters were different enough in the Mesozoic to have led to sauropod gigantism. We review the biology of sauropod dinosaurs in detail and posit that sauropod gigantism was made possible by a specific combination of plesiomorphic characters (phylogenetic heritage) and evolutionary innovations at different levels which triggered a remarkable evolutionary cascade. Of these key innovations, the most important probably was the very long neck, the most conspicuous feature of the sauropod bauplan. Compared to other herbivores, the long neck allowed more efficient food uptake than in other large herbivores by covering a much larger feeding envelope and making food accessible that was out of the reach of other herbivores. Sauropods thus must have been able to take up more energy from their environment than other herbivores. The long neck, in turn, could only evolve because of the small head and the extensive pneumatization of the sauropod axial skeleton, lightening the neck. The small head was possible because food was ingested without mastication. Both mastication and a gastric mill would have limited food uptake rate. Scaling relationships between gastrointestinal tract size and basal metabolic rate (BMR) suggest that sauropods compensated for the lack of particle reduction with long retention times, even at high uptake rates. The

  15. Slow DNA loss in the gigantic genomes of salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; López Arriaza, José R; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in genome size result from the combined effects of mutation, natural selection, and genetic drift. Insertion and deletion mutations (indels) directly impact genome size by adding or removing sequences. Most species lose more DNA through small indels (i.e., ~1-30 bp) than they gain, which can result in genome reduction over time. Because this rate of DNA loss varies across species, small indel dynamics have been suggested to contribute to genome size evolution. Species with extremely large genomes provide interesting test cases for exploring the link between small indels and genome size; however, most large genomes remain relatively unexplored. Here, we examine rates of DNA loss in the tetrapods with the largest genomes-the salamanders. We used low-coverage genomic shotgun sequence data from four salamander species to examine patterns of insertion, deletion, and substitution in neutrally evolving non-long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon sequences. For comparison, we estimated genome-wide DNA loss rates in non-LTR retrotransposon sequences from five other vertebrate genomes: Anolis carolinensis, Danio rerio, Gallus gallus, Homo sapiens, and Xenopus tropicalis. Our results show that salamanders have significantly lower rates of DNA loss than do other vertebrates. More specifically, salamanders experience lower numbers of deletions relative to insertions, and both deletions and insertions are skewed toward smaller sizes. On the basis of these patterns, we conclude that slow DNA loss contributes to genomic gigantism in salamanders. We also identify candidate molecular mechanisms underlying these differences and suggest that natural variation in indel dynamics provides a unique opportunity to study the basis of genome stability.

  16. [Gigantism with low serum level of growth hormone: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ran, X; Zhang, L; Xiong, P; Zhao, T; Tong, N; Li, X

    2001-12-01

    Gigantism with low or normal basal concentrations of growth hormone (GH) is a rare condition, possibly due to abnormal GH secretory patterns, enhanced tissue sensitivity to GH, or the existence of an unidentified growth promoting factor. Here we report an 11 year-old female case of gigantism with a normal pituitary gland. Her height was 181 cm, body weight 77 kg, and bone age 11.1 years. Her basal serum GH levels were lower than 1 ng/ml. The levels of T3, T4, FT3, FT4, TSH, E2, LH, FSH, PRL, PTC and ACTH were normal. Serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia or arginine stimulation tests was blunted. In this case, non-pulsatile GH secretion and enhanced tissue sensitivity to GH may induce hypersecretion of IGF-1 and the existence of an unidentified growth promoting factor or biologically active anti-GH receptor antibodies may cause clinical gigantism.

  17. An evolutionary cascade model for sauropod dinosaur gigantism--overview, update and tests.

    PubMed

    Sander, P Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM). This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades ("Reproduction", "Feeding", "Head and neck", "Avian-style lung", and "Metabolism"). Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait "Very high body mass". Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits) were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size.

  18. An Evolutionary Cascade Model for Sauropod Dinosaur Gigantism - Overview, Update and Tests

    PubMed Central

    Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM). This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades (“Reproduction”, “Feeding”, “Head and neck”, “Avian-style lung”, and “Metabolism”). Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait “Very high body mass”. Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits) were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size. PMID:24205267

  19. Gigantism and Acromegaly Due to Xq26 Microduplications and GPR101 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Trivellin, G.; Daly, A.F.; Faucz, F.R.; Yuan, B.; Rostomyan, L.; Larco, D.O.; Schernthaner-Reiter, M.H.; Szarek, E.; Leal, L.F.; Caberg, J.-H.; Castermans, E.; Villa, C.; Dimopoulos, A.; Chittiboina, P.; Xekouki, P.; Shah, N.; Metzger, D.; Lysy, P.A.; Ferrante, E.; Strebkova, N.; Mazerkina, N.; Zatelli, M.C.; Lodish, M.; Horvath, A.; de Alexandre, R. Bertollo; Manning, A.D.; Levy, I.; Keil, M.F.; de la Luz Sierra, M.; Palmeira, L.; Coppieters, W.; Georges, M.; Naves, L.A.; Jamar, M.; Bours, V.; Wu, T.J.; Choong, C.S.; Bertherat, J.; Chanson, P.; Kamenický, P.; Farrell, W.E.; Barlier, A.; Quezado, M.; Bjelobaba, I.; Stojilkovic, S.S.; Wess, J.; Costanzi, S.; Liu, P.; Lupski, J.R.; Beckers, A.; Stratakis, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. METHODS We performed clinical and genetic studies of samples obtained from 43 patients with gigantism and then sequenced an implicated gene in samples from 248 patients with acromegaly. RESULTS We observed microduplication on chromosome Xq26.3 in samples from 13 patients with gigantism; of these samples, 4 were obtained from members of two unrelated kindreds, and 9 were from patients with sporadic cases. All the patients had disease onset during early childhood. Of the patients with gigantism who did not carry an Xq26.3 microduplication, none presented before the age of 5 years. Genomic characterization of the Xq26.3 region suggests that the microduplications are generated during chromosome replication and that they contain four protein-coding genes. Only one of these genes, GPR101, which encodes a G-protein–coupled receptor, was overexpressed in patients’ pituitary lesions. We identified a recurrent GPR101 mutation (p.E308D) in 11 of 248 patients with acromegaly, with the mutation found mostly in tumors. When the mutation was transfected into rat GH3 cells, it led to increased release of growth hormone and proliferation of growth hormone–producing cells. CONCLUSIONS We describe a pediatric disorder (which we have termed X-linked acrogigantism [X-LAG]) that is caused by an Xq26.3 genomic duplication and is characterized by early-onset gigantism resulting from an excess of growth hormone. Duplication of GPR101 probably causes X-LAG. We also found a recurrent mutation in GPR101 in some adults with acromegaly. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.) PMID:25470569

  20. Von recklinghausen neurofibromatosis-pachydermatocele causing lower limb gigantism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rekha, Arcot; Gopalan, T R

    2006-03-01

    Gigantism of the lower limb can occur because of plexiform neurofibromas. This condition is seen with café au lait patches and multiple neurofibromatosis in this case of von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis. We report our patient and review literature of this uncommon condition.

  1. Escherichia coli Reduction by Bivalves in an Impaired River Impacted by Agricultural Land Use.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Niveen S; Tommerdahl, Jake P; Boehm, Alexandria B; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-10-18

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are leading causes of impaired surface waters. Innovative and environmentally appropriate best management practices are needed to reduce FIB concentrations and associated risk. This study examines the ability of the native freshwater mussel Anodonta californiensis and an invasive freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea to reduce concentrations of the FIB Escherichia coli in natural waters. Laboratory batch experiments were used to show bivalve species-specific E. coli removal capabilities and to develop a relationship between bivalve size and clearance rates. A field survey within an impaired coastal river containing both species of bivalves in an agricultural- and grazing-dominated area of the central coast of California showed a significant inverse correlation between E. coli concentration and bivalve density. An in situ field spiking and sampling study showed filtration by freshwater bivalves resulting in 1-1.5 log10 reduction of E. coli over 24 h, and calculated clearance rates ranged from 1.2 to 7.4 L hr(-1) bivalve(-1). Results of this study show the importance of freshwater bivalves for improving water quality through the removal of E. coli. While both native and invasive bivalves can reduce E. coli levels, the use of native bivalves through integration into best management practices is recommended as a way to improve water quality and protect and encourage re-establishment of native bivalve species that are in decline.

  2. The early ELF signals of the gigantic jets captured by the Taiwan ground observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. B. C.; Huang, P. H.; Su, H. T.; Hsu, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The in-cloud ignition process of gigantic jets and blue jets receives attentions and discussions in the past years. The polarity and the position of their breakdown were proposed by Krehbiel et al. [2008] but no concrete observational evidence to support it directly. ELF spectrogram is a good tool to explore the electric activities, but traditional spectrograms are generated by a Fourier transform which obtain the frequency information through an integration operation. However the integration greatly limits the lowest frequency revealed by spectrogram and buries the important transient features. In this study, we applied a new but widely-used method, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), to explore the spectrogram. Instead of the integration, HHT obtains the frequency information by differentiating on the phase angle, and become a powerful tool to reveal the fast frequency variation associated with transient luminous events. More than 100 transient luminous events including 25 gigantic jets observed by Taiwan ground optical observation network were analyzed. The results indicate that approximately 70% of gigantic jets can identify a rapid frequency variation in the interval of 300-600 milliseconds before main surge discharge, and this early feature can not find a clear corresponding amplitude variation in its sferic. Since this early signal can not be identified from the traditional Fourier spectrogram, but clear in-cloud lightning was registered correspondingly by the ground optical observation. In contrast to gigantic jets, this feature of early frequency change can be seen only in less than 30% of sprites and elves. These observational evidences are able to provide new constraints on the early discharge process of gigantic jets in clouds.

  3. Comparative pathology in bivalves: Aetiological agents and disease processes.

    PubMed

    Carella, F; Feist, S W; Bignell, J P; De Vico, G

    2015-10-01

    Comparative pathology as a scientific discipline studies animal diseases in relation to their aetiology, pathogenesis and prognosis. Among the main aspects of this discipline, regressive changes, host defense responses with pathological implications and progressive changes, represent the majority of the possible responses of cells and tissues to pathogens and exposure to chemicals. One of the most persistent issues in the field of invertebrate pathology is the variability in terminology and definition, which has led to confusion in scientific communication. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the pathological basis of bivalve disease (defensive, regressive and progressive phenomena) and contribute to the standardised terminology for bivalve molluscan disease in the context of comparative pathology.

  4. Sequential determination of biological and pollutant elements in marine bivalves

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisler, R.; Stone, S.F.; Sanders, R.W.

    1988-12-15

    A unique sequence of instrumental methods has been employed to obtain concentrations for 44 elements in marine bivalve tissue. The techniques used were (1) X-ray fluorescence, (2) prompt gamma activation analysis, and (3) neutron activation analysis. It is possible to use a single subsample and follow it nondestructively through the three instrumental analysis techniques. A final radiochemical procedure for tin was also applied after completing the instrumental analyses. Comparison of results for elements determined by more than one technique in sequence showed good agreement, as did results from certified reference material samples analyzed along with the samples. The concentrations found in the bivalve samples ranged from carbon at more than 50% dry weight down to gold at several microgram per kilogram.

  5. A context dependent role for DNA methylation in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Gavery, Mackenzie R; Roberts, Steven B

    2014-05-01

    The function of DNA methylation in species such as bivalves where the limited amount of DNA methylation is predominantly found in gene bodies remains unclear. An emerging possible explanation is that the role of gene body DNA methylation is dependent on gene function, a potential phenomenon that has arisen from selective pressure on lineage-specific life history traits. In genes contributing to phenotypes that benefit from increased plasticity, the absence of DNA methylation could contribute to stochastic transcriptional opportunities and increased transposable element activity. In genes where regulated control of activity is essential, DNA methylation may also play a role in targeted, predictable genome regulation. Here, we review the current knowledge concerning DNA methylation in bivalves and explore the putative role of DNA methylation in both an evolutionary and ecological context.

  6. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Waldbusser, George G.; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J.; Haley, Brian A.; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L.; Gray, Matthew W.; Miller, Cale A.; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world’s oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  7. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    PubMed

    Waldbusser, George G; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J; Haley, Brian A; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L; Gray, Matthew W; Miller, Cale A; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  8. Transcriptome survey of phototransduction and clock genes in marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Sun, X J; Zhou, L Q; Tian, J T; Liu, Z H; Wu, B; Dong, Y H; Yang, A G; Ma, W M

    2016-10-24

    Marine animals exhibit a variety of biological rhythms, such as solar and lunar-related cycles; however, our current molecular understanding of biological rhythms in marine animals is quite limited. Identifying and understanding the expression patterns of clock genes from available transcriptomes will help elucidate biological rhythms in marine species. Here, we perform a comprehensive survey of phototransduction and circadian genes using the mantle transcriptome of the scallop Patinopecten yessoensis and compare the results with those from three other bivalves. The comparison reveals the presence of transcripts for most of the core members of the phototransduction and circadian networks seen in terrestrial model species in the four marine bivalves. Matches were found for all 37 queried genes, and the expressed transcripts from the deep sequencing data matched 8 key insect and mammalian circadian genes. This demonstrates the high level of conservation of the timekeeping mechanism from terrestrial species to marine bivalves. The results provide a valuable gene resource for studies of "marine rhythms" and also further our understanding of the diversification and evolution of rhythms in marine species.

  9. Predicting Effects of Coastal Acidification on Marine Bivalve ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is increasing in the oceans and causing changes in seawater pH commonly described as ocean or coastal acidification. It is now well-established that, when reproduced in laboratory experiments, these increases in pCO2 can reduce survival and growth of early life stage bivalves. However, the effects that these impairments would have on whole populations of bivalves are unknown. In this study, these laboratory responses were incorporated into field-parameterized population models to assess population-level sensitivities to acidification for two northeast bivalve species with different life histories: Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clam) and Argopecten irradians (bay scallop). The resulting models permitted translation of laboratory pCO2 response functions into population-level responses to examine population sensitivity to future pCO2 changes. Preliminary results from our models indicate that if the current M. mercenaria negative population growth rate was attributed to the effects of pCO2 on early life stages, the population would decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at 420 microatmospheres (µatm) pCO2. If the current population growth rate was attributed to other additive factors (e.g., harvest, harmful algal blooms), M. mercenaria populations were predicted to decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at the preliminary estimate of 1010 µatm pCO2. The estimated population growth rate was positive for A. irradians,

  10. Bivalve molluscs as a unique target group for nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura; Ciacci, Caterina; Fabbri, Rita; Marcomini, Antonio; Pojana, Giulio; Gallo, Gabriella

    2012-05-01

    Due to the continuous development and production of manufactured nanomaterials or nanoparticles (NPs), their uptake and effects in the aquatic biota represent a major concern. Estuarine and coastal environments are expected to represent the ultimate sink for NPs, where their chemical behavior (aggregation/agglomeration) and consequent fate may be critical in determining the biological impact. Bivalve mollusks are abundant from freshwater to marine ecosystems, where they are widely utilized in biomonitoring of environmental perturbations. As suspension-feeders, they have highly developed processes for cellular internalization of nano- and micro-scale particles (endo- and phagocytosis), integral to key physiological functions such as intra-cellular digestion and cellular immunity. Here we will summarise available information on the effects of different types of NPs in different bivalve species, in particular Mytilus spp. Data on the effects and modes of action of different NPs on mussel hemocytes in vitro demonstrate that cell-mediated immunity represents a significant target for NPs. Moreover, in vivo exposure to NPs indicates that, due to the physiological mechanisms involved in the feeding process, NP agglomerates/aggregates taken up by the gills are directed to the digestive gland, where intra-cellular uptake of nanosized materials induces lysosomal perturbations and oxidative stress. Overall, bivalves represent a particularly suitable model for investigating the effects and mechanisms of action underlying the potential toxicity of NPs in marine invertebrates.

  11. Observations of Seven Blue/Gigantic Jets above One Storm over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Spiva, N.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H.; Free, D. L.; Cummer, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Blue/gigantic jets are electrical discharges developing from thundercloud tops and propagating to the upper atmosphere [e.g., Pasko et al., Nature, 416, 152, 2002; Su et al., Nature, 423, 973, 2003]. Not just producing an impressive display, gigantic jets establish a direct path of electrical contact between the upper troposphere and the lower ionosphere, capable of transferring a large amount of charge between them [Cummer et al., Nat. Geosci., 2, 617, 2009]. It has been suggested that they may play an important role in the earth's electrical environment [e. g., Pasko, Nature, 423, 927, 2003]. Upward discharges from thunderstorms like blue/gigantic jets are believed to originate from lightning leaders escaping from thunderclouds when the cloud's charges of different polarities are not balanced [Krehbiel et al., Nat. Geosci., 1, 233, 2008; Riousset et al., JGR, 115, A00E10, 2010]. On the evening of August 2, 2013, 4 gigantic jets, 2 blue jets and 1 blue starter were recorded within 26 min above a storm over the Atlantic Ocean by a low light level camera from the campus of Florida Institute of Technology. The events were also captured by two all-sky cameras: one again from the Florida Tech campus and the other from a nearby location. According to the NLDN data, positive intra-cloud flashes preceded all events except one gigantic jet. The distance between the observation site to the locations of the NLDN lightning discharges varies from 77 to 82 km. Optical signatures of intra-cloud discharge activities accompanied the events are clearly visible in the videos. The duration of each jet varies from about 300 ms to 1.2 s, and the 1.2 s duration is probably the longest that has been reported to date for jets. Rebrightening of gigantic jet structures occurs for at least two of the events. The upper terminal altitude of the 4 gigantic jets is greater than 76-81 km, the 2 blue jets reach about 48 and 51 km altitude, respectively, and the blue starter reaches 24 km altitude

  12. A gigantic nothosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia) from the Middle Triassic of SW China and its implication for the Triassic biotic recovery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Hu, Shi-xue; Rieppel, Olivier; Jiang, Da-yong; Benton, Michael J.; Kelley, Neil P.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Zhou, Chang-yong; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-yuan; Xie, Tao; Lv, Tao

    2014-01-01

    The presence of gigantic apex predators in the eastern Panthalassic and western Tethyan oceans suggests that complex ecosystems in the sea had become re-established in these regions at least by the early Middle Triassic, after the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). However, it is not clear whether oceanic ecosystem recovery from the PTME was globally synchronous because of the apparent lack of such predators in the eastern Tethyan/western Panthalassic region prior to the Late Triassic. Here we report a gigantic nothosaur from the lower Middle Triassic of Luoping in southwest China (eastern Tethyan ocean), which possesses the largest known lower jaw among Triassic sauropterygians. Phylogenetic analysis suggests parallel evolution of gigantism in Triassic sauropterygians. Discovery of this gigantic apex predator, together with associated diverse marine reptiles and the complex food web, indicates global recovery of shallow marine ecosystems from PTME by the early Middle Triassic. PMID:25429609

  13. A gigantic nothosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia) from the Middle Triassic of SW China and its implication for the Triassic biotic recovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Hu, Shi-Xue; Rieppel, Olivier; Jiang, Da-Yong; Benton, Michael J; Kelley, Neil P; Aitchison, Jonathan C; Zhou, Chang-Yong; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-Yuan; Xie, Tao; Lv, Tao

    2014-11-27

    The presence of gigantic apex predators in the eastern Panthalassic and western Tethyan oceans suggests that complex ecosystems in the sea had become re-established in these regions at least by the early Middle Triassic, after the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). However, it is not clear whether oceanic ecosystem recovery from the PTME was globally synchronous because of the apparent lack of such predators in the eastern Tethyan/western Panthalassic region prior to the Late Triassic. Here we report a gigantic nothosaur from the lower Middle Triassic of Luoping in southwest China (eastern Tethyan ocean), which possesses the largest known lower jaw among Triassic sauropterygians. Phylogenetic analysis suggests parallel evolution of gigantism in Triassic sauropterygians. Discovery of this gigantic apex predator, together with associated diverse marine reptiles and the complex food web, indicates global recovery of shallow marine ecosystems from PTME by the early Middle Triassic.

  14. A gigantic nothosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia) from the Middle Triassic of SW China and its implication for the Triassic biotic recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Hu, Shi-Xue; Rieppel, Olivier; Jiang, Da-Yong; Benton, Michael J.; Kelley, Neil P.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Zhou, Chang-Yong; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-Yuan; Xie, Tao; Lv, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The presence of gigantic apex predators in the eastern Panthalassic and western Tethyan oceans suggests that complex ecosystems in the sea had become re-established in these regions at least by the early Middle Triassic, after the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). However, it is not clear whether oceanic ecosystem recovery from the PTME was globally synchronous because of the apparent lack of such predators in the eastern Tethyan/western Panthalassic region prior to the Late Triassic. Here we report a gigantic nothosaur from the lower Middle Triassic of Luoping in southwest China (eastern Tethyan ocean), which possesses the largest known lower jaw among Triassic sauropterygians. Phylogenetic analysis suggests parallel evolution of gigantism in Triassic sauropterygians. Discovery of this gigantic apex predator, together with associated diverse marine reptiles and the complex food web, indicates global recovery of shallow marine ecosystems from PTME by the early Middle Triassic.

  15. Records of River Variation in the Shells of Freshwater Bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M.; Romanek, C.

    2005-12-01

    The skeletons of hard-shelled invertebrates such as corals and bivalves are commonly used in marine settings as archives of environmental information. They are less commonly used in freshwater settings where variability in water chemistry makes it more difficult to calibrate chemical proxies such as the Sr:Ca in a shell. Our objective is to evaluate whether trace element concentrations in freshwater bivalve shells contain information on environmental conditions. Multiple elements (Ba, Cu, Mn and Sr) were analyzed within the shells of modern bivalves from four streams on DOE's Savannah River Site in S.C. Laser Ablation ICP-MS was used to measure elemental concentrations across five aragonitic shells from each site. These elements were chosen because they are present in detectable concentrations (ppm) in the shell and they have been suggested as useful proxies for temperature, rainfall, productivity and pollution. Results were compared to historical monthly site records of water chemistry and chemical analyses of water samples collected from the streams where the clams were found. The average shell concentrations of Sr and Mn were significantly different between sites and increased proportionally to water concentration. This was not observed for Ba and Cu. For example, the Ba concentrations of shells collected at a site downstream of a lake were higher than those for shells from stream sites with significantly higher dissolved Ba concentrations. Copper was only detected at dark growth lines with the number of lines and shell material between them varying between shells within the same stream. Intrashell profiles of Ba, Sr and Mn concentrations exhibited cyclical variation. The magnitude of cyclical variation for Mn and Sr within a shell corresponds with the annual variation in monthly water sample concentrations. Again, this pattern was not observed for Ba, especially in shells from the site downstream of a lake. This supports suggestions that particulate organic

  16. Gigantic Cosmic Corkscrew Reveals New Details About Mysterious Microquasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    Making an extra effort to image a faint, gigantic corkscrew traced by fast protons and electrons shot out from a mysterious microquasar paid off for a pair of astrophysicists who gained new insights into the beast's inner workings and also resolved a longstanding dispute over the object's distance. Microquasar SS 433 VLA Image of Microquasar SS 433 CREDIT: Blundell & Bowler, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Larger Version) The astrophysicists used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to capture the faintest details yet seen in the plasma jets emerging from the microquasar SS 433, an object once dubbed the "enigma of the century." As a result, they have changed scientists' understanding of the jets and settled the controversy over its distance "beyond all reasonable doubt," they said. SS 433 is a neutron star or black hole orbited by a "normal" companion star. The powerful gravity of the neutron star or black hole draws material from the stellar wind of its companion into an accretion disk of material tightly circling the dense central object prior to being pulled onto it. This disk propels jets of fast protons and electrons outward from its poles at about a quarter of the speed of light. The disk in SS 433 wobbles like a child's top, causing its jets to trace a corkscrew in the sky every 162 days. The new VLA study indicates that the speed of the ejected particles varies over time, contrary to the traditional model for SS 433. "We found that the actual speed varies between 24 percent to 28 percent of light speed, as opposed to staying constant," said Katherine Blundell, of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. "Amazingly, the jets going in both directions change their speeds simultaneously, producing identical speeds in both directions at any given time," Blundell added. Blundell worked with Michael Bowler, also of Oxford. The scientists' findings have been accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters. SS 433 New VLA

  17. The evolution of island gigantism and body size variation in tortoises and turtles.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Alexander L; Slater, Graham J; Alfaro, Michael E

    2011-08-23

    Extant chelonians (turtles and tortoises) span almost four orders of magnitude of body size, including the startling examples of gigantism seen in the tortoises of the Galapagos and Seychelles islands. However, the evolutionary determinants of size diversity in chelonians are poorly understood. We present a comparative analysis of body size evolution in turtles and tortoises within a phylogenetic framework. Our results reveal a pronounced relationship between habitat and optimal body size in chelonians. We found strong evidence for separate, larger optimal body sizes for sea turtles and island tortoises, the latter showing support for the rule of island gigantism in non-mammalian amniotes. Optimal sizes for freshwater and mainland terrestrial turtles are similar and smaller, although the range of body size variation in these forms is qualitatively greater. The greater number of potential niches in freshwater and terrestrial environments may mean that body size relationships are more complicated in these habitats.

  18. A zeolite CAN-type aluminoborate with gigantic 24-ring channels.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gao-Juan; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Jian-Wen; Cheng, Lin; Yang, Guo-Yu

    2016-01-28

    A cancrinite type aluminoborate with gigantic 24-ring channels has been made under solvothermal conditions using Al(i-PrO)3 as the Al source and amines as the structure directing agents. Its framework is alternately constructed from B5O10 clusters and AlO4 units, no Al-O-Al linkages exist in the structure. Notably, the wall of the 24-ring channels has odd 11-ring windows, resulting in an unprecedented 3D intersecting channel system.

  19. Increased Population Risk of AIP‐Related Acromegaly and Gigantism in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Radian, Serban; Diekmann, Yoan; Gabrovska, Plamena; Holland, Brendan; Bradley, Lisa; Wallace, Helen; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anna‐Marie; McGurren, Karen; Cuesta, Martin; Ryan, Anthony W.; Herincs, Maria; Hernández‐Ramírez, Laura C.; Holland, Aidan; Samuels, Jade; Aflorei, Elena Daniela; Barry, Sayka; Dénes, Judit; Pernicova, Ida; Stiles, Craig E.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; McCloskey, Ronan; Ajzensztejn, Michal; Abid, Noina; Akker, Scott A.; Mercado, Moises; Cohen, Mark; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Baldeweg, Stephanie; Barkan, Ariel; Musat, Madalina; Levy, Miles; Orme, Stephen M.; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Kumar, Ajith V.; Ellard, Sian; McPartlin, Joseph; McManus, Ross; Linden, Gerard J.; Atkinson, Brew; Balding, David J.; Agha, Amar; Thompson, Chris J.; Hunter, Steven J.; Thomas, Mark G.; Morrison, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) founder mutation R304* (or p.R304*; NM_003977.3:c.910C>T, p.Arg304Ter) identified in Northern Ireland (NI) predisposes to acromegaly/gigantism; its population health impact remains unexplored. We measured R304* carrier frequency in 936 Mid Ulster, 1,000 Greater Belfast (both in NI) and 2,094 Republic of Ireland (ROI) volunteers and in 116 NI or ROI acromegaly/gigantism patients. Carrier frequencies were 0.0064 in Mid Ulster (95%CI = 0.0027–0.013; P = 0.0005 vs. ROI), 0.001 in Greater Belfast (0.00011–0.0047) and zero in ROI (0–0.0014). R304* prevalence was elevated in acromegaly/gigantism patients in NI (11/87, 12.6%, P < 0.05), but not in ROI (2/29, 6.8%) versus non‐Irish patients (0–2.41%). Haploblock conservation supported a common ancestor for all the 18 identified Irish pedigrees (81 carriers, 30 affected). Time to most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) was 2550 (1,275–5,000) years. tMRCA‐based simulations predicted 432 (90–5,175) current carriers, including 86 affected (18–1,035) for 20% penetrance. In conclusion, R304* is frequent in Mid Ulster, resulting in numerous acromegaly/gigantism cases. tMRCA is consistent with historical/folklore accounts of Irish giants. Forward simulations predict many undetected carriers; geographically targeted population screening improves asymptomatic carrier identification, complementing clinical testing of patients/relatives. We generated disease awareness locally, necessary for early diagnosis and improved outcomes of AIP‐related disease. PMID:27650164

  20. Increased Population Risk of AIP-Related Acromegaly and Gigantism in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Radian, Serban; Diekmann, Yoan; Gabrovska, Plamena; Holland, Brendan; Bradley, Lisa; Wallace, Helen; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anna-Marie; McGurren, Karen; Cuesta, Martin; Ryan, Anthony W; Herincs, Maria; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Holland, Aidan; Samuels, Jade; Aflorei, Elena Daniela; Barry, Sayka; Dénes, Judit; Pernicova, Ida; Stiles, Craig E; Trivellin, Giampaolo; McCloskey, Ronan; Ajzensztejn, Michal; Abid, Noina; Akker, Scott A; Mercado, Moises; Cohen, Mark; Thakker, Rajesh V; Baldeweg, Stephanie; Barkan, Ariel; Musat, Madalina; Levy, Miles; Orme, Stephen M; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; McPartlin, Joseph; McManus, Ross; Linden, Gerard J; Atkinson, Brew; Balding, David J; Agha, Amar; Thompson, Chris J; Hunter, Steven J; Thomas, Mark G; Morrison, Patrick J; Korbonits, Márta

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) founder mutation R304(*) (or p.R304(*) ; NM_003977.3:c.910C>T, p.Arg304Ter) identified in Northern Ireland (NI) predisposes to acromegaly/gigantism; its population health impact remains unexplored. We measured R304(*) carrier frequency in 936 Mid Ulster, 1,000 Greater Belfast (both in NI) and 2,094 Republic of Ireland (ROI) volunteers and in 116 NI or ROI acromegaly/gigantism patients. Carrier frequencies were 0.0064 in Mid Ulster (95%CI = 0.0027-0.013; P = 0.0005 vs. ROI), 0.001 in Greater Belfast (0.00011-0.0047) and zero in ROI (0-0.0014). R304(*) prevalence was elevated in acromegaly/gigantism patients in NI (11/87, 12.6%, P < 0.05), but not in ROI (2/29, 6.8%) versus non-Irish patients (0-2.41%). Haploblock conservation supported a common ancestor for all the 18 identified Irish pedigrees (81 carriers, 30 affected). Time to most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) was 2550 (1,275-5,000) years. tMRCA-based simulations predicted 432 (90-5,175) current carriers, including 86 affected (18-1,035) for 20% penetrance. In conclusion, R304(*) is frequent in Mid Ulster, resulting in numerous acromegaly/gigantism cases. tMRCA is consistent with historical/folklore accounts of Irish giants. Forward simulations predict many undetected carriers; geographically targeted population screening improves asymptomatic carrier identification, complementing clinical testing of patients/relatives. We generated disease awareness locally, necessary for early diagnosis and improved outcomes of AIP-related disease.

  1. [Gigantic keloïds after chicken-pox. A case report].

    PubMed

    Gathse, A; Ibara, J R; Obengui; Moyen, G

    2003-01-01

    Keloïds are tumors which appear after a lesion or spontaneously. They are frequent on black skin. We report a gigantic keloïd case appeared after chicken-pox on a 29 year-old black girl who had viral infection when she was 6 years old. The tumors increased after chirurgical treatment and became very unaesthetic. This observation specific by its clinical presentation relates the treatment difficulties of these tumors in our area.

  2. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (P<.05) in patients with gigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocity<1) was detected in 2 of 6 patients with gigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (P<.05) higher in patients with gigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in

  3. Starvation reveals the cause of infection-induced castration and gigantism.

    PubMed

    Cressler, Clayton E; Nelson, William A; Day, Troy; McCauley, Edward

    2014-10-07

    Parasites often induce life-history changes in their hosts. In many cases, these infection-induced life-history changes are driven by changes in the pattern of energy allocation and utilization within the host. Because these processes will affect both host and parasite fitness, it can be challenging to determine who benefits from them. Determining the causes and consequences of infection-induced life-history changes requires the ability to experimentally manipulate life history and a framework for connecting life history to host and parasite fitness. Here, we combine a novel starvation manipulation with energy budget models to provide new insights into castration and gigantism in the Daphnia magna-Pasteuria ramosa host-parasite system. Our results show that starvation primarily affects investment in reproduction, and increasing starvation stress reduces gigantism and parasite fitness without affecting castration. These results are consistent with an energetic structure where the parasite uses growth energy as a resource. This finding gives us new understanding of the role of castration and gigantism in this system, and how life-history variation will affect infection outcome and epidemiological dynamics. The approach of combining targeted life-history manipulations with energy budget models can be adapted to understand life-history changes in other disease systems.

  4. Ecological explanations to island gigantism: dietary niche divergence, predation, and size in an endemic lizard.

    PubMed

    Runemark, Anna; Sagonas, Kostas; Svensson, Erik I

    2015-08-01

    Although rapid evolution of body size on islands has long been known, the ecological mechanisms behind this island phenomenon remain poorly understood. Diet is an important selective pressure for morphological divergence. Here we investigate if selection for novel diets has contributed to the multiple independent cases of island gigantism in the Skyros wall lizard (Podarcis gaigeae) and if diet, predation, or both factors best explain island gigantism. We combined data on body size, shape, bite force, and realized and available diets to address this. Several lines of evidence suggest that diet has contributed to the island gigantism. The larger islet lizards have relatively wider heads and higher bite performance in relation to mainland lizards than would be expected from size differences alone. The proportions of consumed and available hard prey are higher on islets than mainland localities, and lizard body size is significantly correlated with the proportion of hard prey. Furthermore, the main axis of divergence in head shape is significantly correlated with dietary divergence. Finally, a model with only diet and one including diet and predation regime explain body size divergence equally well. Our results suggest that diet is an important ecological factor behind insular body size divergence, but could be consistent with an additional role for predation.

  5. IMPORTANCE OF MATERNAL TRANSFER OF THE PHOTOREACTIVE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FLUORANTHENE FROM BENTHIC ADULT BIVALVES TO THEIR PELAGIC LARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if maternal transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from benthic adult bivalves could result in phototoxicity to their pelagic larvae when exposed to ultraviolet light (UV). In these experiments, adult bivalves were e...

  6. Spikey bivalves: intra-periostracal crystal growth in anomalodesmatans.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio G; Harper, Elizabeth M

    2010-12-01

    The external shell surfaces of most anomalodesmatan bivalves are studded with small spikes, particularly at the posterior end. We have studied the morphology, mode of growth, and distribution among taxa of these spikes. In this study we found that spikes vary widely in morphology, from acute spikes to flat plaques. Optical and electron microscopy has revealed that the periostraca of Laternula, Myadora, and Thraciopsis consist of an outer dense layer and an inner translucent layer. The dense layer grows at the expense of the inner layer as it progresses toward the shell edge. The spikes begin to grow in the free periostracum, within the translucent periostracal layer, immediately below the dense layer. With growth, they push the dense periostracal layer upward but without penetrating it. Those parts of the spike in contact with this layer cease to grow, which explains the typical conical shape of spikes. When fully grown, spikes reach the base of the translucent layer, becoming incorporated into the outer shell layer. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis reveal that the spikes of Lyonsia norwegica and Lyonsiella abyssicola are prisms of aragonite composed of twinned crystals, with the c-axis vertical. A survey of the occurrence of spikes within the anomalodesmatans shows that they are present in all but a few families. Elsewhere within the closely related palaeoheterodonts, intra-periostracal calcification is also known in Neotrigonia and unionids, which indicates that this character may be plesiomorphic for these bivalves. The present data do not support the homology of spikes in other bivalve groups (e.g., veneroids) or in the aplacophorans or polyplacophorans.

  7. A novel filtering mutualism between a sponge host and its endosymbiotic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Remi; Kato, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Sponges, porous filter-feeding organisms consisting of vast canal systems, provide unique substrates for diverse symbiotic organisms. The Spongia (Spongia) sp. massive sponge is obligately inhabited by the host-specific endosymbiotic bivalve Vulsella vulsella, which benefits from this symbiosis by receiving protection from predators. However, whether the host sponge gains any benefit from this association is unclear. Considering that the bivalves exhale filtered water into the sponge body rather than the ambient environment, the sponge is hypothesized to utilize water exhaled by the bivalves to circulate water around its body more efficiently. We tested this hypothesis by observing the sponge aquiferous structure and comparing the pumping rates of sponges and bivalves. Observations of water currents and the sponge aquiferous structure revealed that the sponge had a unique canal system enabling it to inhale water exhaled from bivalves, indicating that the host sponge adapted morphologically to receive water from the bivalves. In addition, the volume of water circulating in the sponge body was dramatically increased by the water exhaled from bivalves. Therefore, this sponge-bivalve association can be regarded as a novel mutualism in which two filter-feeding symbionts promote mutual filtering rates. This symbiotic association should be called a "filtering mutualism".

  8. A Novel Filtering Mutualism between a Sponge Host and Its Endosymbiotic Bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Tsubaki, Remi; Kato, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Sponges, porous filter-feeding organisms consisting of vast canal systems, provide unique substrates for diverse symbiotic organisms. The Spongia (Spongia) sp. massive sponge is obligately inhabited by the host-specific endosymbiotic bivalve Vulsella vulsella, which benefits from this symbiosis by receiving protection from predators. However, whether the host sponge gains any benefit from this association is unclear. Considering that the bivalves exhale filtered water into the sponge body rather than the ambient environment, the sponge is hypothesized to utilize water exhaled by the bivalves to circulate water around its body more efficiently. We tested this hypothesis by observing the sponge aquiferous structure and comparing the pumping rates of sponges and bivalves. Observations of water currents and the sponge aquiferous structure revealed that the sponge had a unique canal system enabling it to inhale water exhaled from bivalves, indicating that the host sponge adapted morphologically to receive water from the bivalves. In addition, the volume of water circulating in the sponge body was dramatically increased by the water exhaled from bivalves. Therefore, this sponge-bivalve association can be regarded as a novel mutualism in which two filter-feeding symbionts promote mutual filtering rates. This symbiotic association should be called a “filtering mutualism”. PMID:25330073

  9. MAPPING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ESTUARINE BIVALVES WITH NATURAL HISTORY-BASED HABITAT SUITABILITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maps of harvested bivalve populations are invaluable for the management of fisheries species, yet the cost to produce them typically limits their availability. Here, we demonstrate a relatively low-cost approach to generate habitat maps for five species of bivalves found in many ...

  10. GREEN CRAB (CARCINUS MAENAS LINNAEUS) CONSUMPTION RATES ON AND PREY PREFERENCES AMONG FOUR BIVALVE PREY SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The European green crab, Carcinus maenas, is a recent invader to Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries with a voracious appetite, especially for bivalves. To assess their potential impact, we estimated green crab consumption rates on four PNW bivalve species, Yaquina oyster (Ostrea ...

  11. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E

  12. Detection of ostreid herpesvirus 1 DNA by PCR in bivalve molluscs: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Batista, Frederico M; Arzul, Isabelle; Pepin, Jean-François; Ruano, Francisco; Friedman, Carolyn S; Boudry, Pierre; Renault, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Herpes-like viral infections have been reported in different bivalve mollusc species throughout the world. High mortalities among hatchery-reared larvae and juveniles of different bivalve species have been associated often with such infections. The diagnosis of herpes-like viruses in bivalve molluscs has been performed traditionally by light and transmission electron microscopy. The genome sequencing of one of these viruses, oyster herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1), allowed the development of DNA-based diagnostic techniques. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used for the detection of OsHV-1 DNA in bivalve molluscs at different development stages. In addition, the PCR used for detection of OsHV-1 has also allowed the amplification of DNA from an OsHV-1 variant. The literature on DNA extraction methods, primers, PCR strategies, and confirmatory procedures used for the detection and identification of herpesviruses that infect bivalve molluscs are reviewed.

  13. Deployed bivalves (oysters and clams) as indicators of estuarine condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ringwood, A.H.; Holland, A.F.; Keppler, C.; Wert, M.; Hyland, J.

    1995-12-31

    Hatchery-reared bivalves, oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and clams (Mercenaria mercenaria), were deployed simultaneously at reference and degraded sites in SC estuaries for approximately 1 month. Juvenile bivalves with endogenously high growth rates were used because effects on growth can be detected in a short time frame. The effects on growth and bioaccumulation of metal contaminants, as well as two biochemical indices (expression of metallothioneins, MT, and multi-xenobiotic transporting proteins, {at}R) were evaluated. Metal concentrations of sediments were also measured. Adverse effects on growth of both species were observed at degraded sites. However, oysters tended to grow more rapidly than clams, and adverse effects on oysters were more pronounced than in clams. Many of the sediments were characterized by elevated concentrations of multiple metals (Cu, Pb, Cr, etc.). However, increases in metal concentrations of oyster tissues were observed primarily with Cu, suggesting that many of the other metals had low bioavailability. There was little evidence of bioconcentration of any metals in clams. There was a significant correlation between sediment Cu and Cu in oyster tissues, but not in clams. Alterations in MT and MXR expression were also observed in oysters deployed at degraded sites. These studies suggest that oysters may be better in-situ indicators of habitat condition because they have more rapid growth rates and greater bioaccumulation potentials.

  14. Magnetosome-containing bacteria living as symbionts of bivalves.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Suzanne C; Laurich, Jason R; Batstone, Rebecca T; McCuaig, Bonita; Elliott, Alexander; Poduska, Kristin M

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria containing magnetosomes (protein-bound nanoparticles of magnetite or greigite) are common to many sedimentary habitats, but have never been found before to live within another organism. Here, we show that octahedral inclusions in the extracellular symbionts of the marine bivalve Thyasira cf. gouldi contain iron, can exhibit magnetic contrast and are most likely magnetosomes. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, T. cf. gouldi symbionts group with symbiotic and free-living sulfur-oxidizing, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacteria, including the symbionts of other thyasirids. T. cf. gouldi symbionts occur both among the microvilli of gill epithelial cells and in sediments surrounding the bivalves, and are therefore facultative. We propose that free-living T. cf. gouldi symbionts use magnetotaxis as a means of locating the oxic-anoxic interface, an optimal microhabitat for chemolithoautotrophy. T. cf. gouldi could acquire their symbionts from near-burrow sediments (where oxic-anoxic interfaces likely develop due to the host's bioirrigating behavior) using their superextensile feet, which could transfer symbionts to gill surfaces upon retraction into the mantle cavity. Once associated with their host, however, symbionts need not maintain structures for magnetotaxis as the host makes oxygen and reduced sulfur available via bioirrigation and sulfur-mining behaviors. Indeed, we show that within the host, symbionts lose the integrity of their magnetosome chain (and possibly their flagellum). Symbionts are eventually endocytosed and digested in host epithelial cells, and magnetosomes accumulate in host cytoplasm. Both host and symbiont behaviors appear important to symbiosis establishment in thyasirids.

  15. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  16. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  17. Marine Bivalve Cellular Responses to Beta Blocker Exposures ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    β blockers are prescription drugs used for medical treatment of hypertension and arrhythmias. They prevent binding of agonists such as catecholamines to β adrenoceptors. In the absence of agonist induced activation of the receptor, adenylate cyclase is not activated which in turn limits cAMP production and protein kinase A activation, preventing increases in blood pressure and arrhythmias. After being taken therapeutically, commonly prescribed β blockers may make their way to coastal habitats via discharge from waste water treatment plants (WWTP) posing a potential risk to aquatic organisms. The aim of our research is to evaluate cellular responses of three commercially important marine bivalves - Eastern oysters, blue mussels and hard clams - upon exposure to two β blocker drugs, propranolol and metoprolol, and to find molecular initiating events (MIEs) indicative of the exposure. Bivalves were obtained from Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA) and acclimated in the laboratory. Following acclimation, gills and hepatopancreas (HP) tissues were harvested and separately exposed to 0, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/l of each drug. Tissues were bathed in 30 parts per thousand (ppt) filtered seawater, antibiotic mix, Leibovitz nutrient media, and the test drug. Exposures were conducted for 24 hours and samples were saved for cellular biomarker assays. A lysosomal destabilization assay, which is a marker of membrane damage, was also performed at the end of each exposure.

  18. Vanadium contamination monitored by an arctic bivalve, Cyrtodaria kurriana

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgoin, B.P.; Risk, M.J.

    1987-12-01

    The trace element Vanadium enters the ocean principally through natural weathering processes, atmospheric fallout and man's activity. Although recent studies failed to detect any significant input of atmospheric Vanadium in the Arctic environment, local contamination is always possible. Tuktoyaktuk is a small Inuvialuit community situated on the eastern edge of the Mackenzie River Delta along the shore of Kugmallit Bay. It has one of the few good natural harbors in the Western Arctic, and serves as the principle support base for oil and gas industry operations. Residual oil, high in Vanadium content, powers the electric generators and is periodically sprayed over the dirt road surfaces to keep dust levels down. This, along with heavy ship traffic, may contribute to local Vanadium contamination in the marine system. The Arctic Propeller clam, Cyrtodaria kurriana (Dunker), is the most common filter feeding bivalve in Tuktoyaktuk Harbor and is a major component in the trophic chain. This study investigates the utility of this bivalve as a monitor for Vanadium contamination in the Arctic environment. The total Vanadium content of sediments was determined bu x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and of claim tissues by short-decay instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  19. Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Obesity “Pituitary gigantism: Update on Molecular Biology and Management”

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an update on the mechanisms leading to pituitary gigantism, as well as to familiarize the practitioner with the implication of these genetic findings on treatment decisions. Recent findings Prior studies have identified gigantism as a feature of a number of monogenic disorders, including mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene, multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 4, McCune Albright Syndrome, Carney Complex, and the paraganglioma, pheochromocytoma and pituitary adenoma association (3PA) due to succinate dehydrogenase defects. We recently described a previously uncharacterized form of early-onset pediatric gigantism caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 and we termed it X-LAG (X-linked acrogigantism). The age of onset of increased growth in X-LAG is significantly younger than other pituitary gigantism cases, and control of growth hormone excess is particularly challenging. Summary Knowledge of the molecular defects that underlie pituitary tumorigenesis is crucial for patient care as they guide early intervention, screening for associated conditions, genetic counseling, surgical approach (partial or total hypophysectomy), and choice of medical management. Recently described microduplications of Xq26.3 account for more than 80% of the cases of early-onset pediatric gigantism. Early recognition of X-LAG may improve outcomes, as successful control of growth hormone excess requires extensive anterior pituitary resection and are difficult to manage with medical therapy alone. PMID:26574647

  20. Metabolic dominance of bivalves predates brachiopod diversity decline by more than 150 million years.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jonathan L; Heim, Noel A; Knope, Matthew L; McClain, Craig R

    2014-05-22

    Brachiopods and bivalves feed in similar ways and have occupied the same environments through geological time, but brachiopods were far more diverse and abundant in the Palaeozoic whereas bivalves dominate the post-Palaeozoic, suggesting a transition in ecological dominance 250 Ma. However, diversity and abundance data alone may not adequately describe key changes in ecosystem function, such as metabolic activity. Here, we use newly compiled body size data for 6066 genera of bivalves and brachiopods to calculate metabolic rates and revisit this question from the perspective of energy use, finding that bivalves already accounted for a larger share of metabolic activity in Palaeozoic oceans. We also find that the metabolic activity of bivalves has increased by more than two orders of magnitude over this interval, whereas brachiopod metabolic activity has declined by more than 50%. Consequently, the increase in bivalve energy metabolism must have occurred via the acquisition of new food resources rather than through the displacement of brachiopods. The canonical view of a mid-Phanerozoic transition from brachiopod to bivalve dominance results from a focus on taxonomic diversity and numerical abundance as measures of ecological importance. From a metabolic perspective, the oceans have always belonged to the clams.

  1. Two-Compartment Kinetic Modeling of Radiocesium Accumulation in Marine Bivalves under Hypothetical Exposure Regimes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Tan, Qiao-Guo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Interpreting the variable concentrations of (137)Cs in the field biological samples requires mechanistic understanding of both environmental and biological behavior of (137)Cs. In this study, we used a two-compartment model to estimate and compare the (137)Cs biokinetics in three species of subtropical marine bivalves. Significant interspecific difference of (137)Cs biokinetics was observed among oysters, mussels, and scallops. There was considerable (137)Cs assimilation from phytoplankton in the bivalves, but the calculated trophic transfer factors were generally between 0.04 and 0.4. We demonstrated a major efflux of radiocesium in the scallops (with a rate constant of 0.207 d(-1)), whereas the efflux was comparable between oysters and mussels (0.035-0.038 d(-1)). A two-compartment kinetic model was developed to simulate the (137)Cs accumulation in the three bivalves under four hypothetical exposure regimes. We showed that the bivalves respond differently to the exposure regimes in terms of time to reach equilibrium, equilibrium concentration, and maximum concentration. Bivalves suffering more frequent intermittent exposure may have higher maximum concentrations than those receiving less frequent exposure. The interspecific difference of (137)Cs accumulation in bivalves has important implications for biomonitoring and implementing management techniques. This study represents one of the first attempts to combine both dissolved and dietary pathways to give a realistic simulation of (137)Cs accumulation in marine bivalves under dynamic exposure regimes.

  2. Metabolic dominance of bivalves predates brachiopod diversity decline by more than 150 million years

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jonathan L.; Heim, Noel A.; Knope, Matthew L.; McClain, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Brachiopods and bivalves feed in similar ways and have occupied the same environments through geological time, but brachiopods were far more diverse and abundant in the Palaeozoic whereas bivalves dominate the post-Palaeozoic, suggesting a transition in ecological dominance 250 Ma. However, diversity and abundance data alone may not adequately describe key changes in ecosystem function, such as metabolic activity. Here, we use newly compiled body size data for 6066 genera of bivalves and brachiopods to calculate metabolic rates and revisit this question from the perspective of energy use, finding that bivalves already accounted for a larger share of metabolic activity in Palaeozoic oceans. We also find that the metabolic activity of bivalves has increased by more than two orders of magnitude over this interval, whereas brachiopod metabolic activity has declined by more than 50%. Consequently, the increase in bivalve energy metabolism must have occurred via the acquisition of new food resources rather than through the displacement of brachiopods. The canonical view of a mid-Phanerozoic transition from brachiopod to bivalve dominance results from a focus on taxonomic diversity and numerical abundance as measures of ecological importance. From a metabolic perspective, the oceans have always belonged to the clams. PMID:24671970

  3. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases.

  4. Velocidades radiales de estrellas gigantes rojas y blue stragglers en cúmulos abiertos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. F.; Lapasset, E.

    Se presentan mediciones de las estrellas más brillantes en los campos de los cúmulos abiertos NGC 6530, NGC 2516, NGC 3114, Cr 223 y NGC 2437. Mediante correlaciones cruzadas se obtiene la velocidad de unas 25 gigantes rojas con el objeto de derivar la velocidad media de cada asociación. En base a los espectros obtenidos de los blue stragglers se discuten sus principales características y su probabilidad de pertenencia. Finalmente, se presentan las observaciones para cinco nuevas binarias espectroscópicas detectadas.

  5. Formación y evolución de planetas gigantes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; Brunini, A.

    Presentamos el estado actual del trabajo que estamos realizando en el estudio de la formación de planetas gigantes. Detallamos los algoritmos numéricos necesarios para realizar este tipo de cálculo. Presentamos algunos resultados de la formación de objetos con masas de hasta una docena de veces la del planeta Júpiter, resaltando las principales caracteríticas. Finalmente detallamos los problemas que pensamos abordar en un futuro cercano en este tema de investigación.

  6. Vínculos observacionais para o processo-S em estrelas gigantes de Bário

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljanic, R. H. S.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; da Silva, L.

    2003-08-01

    Estrelas de bário são gigantes vermelhas de tipo GK que apresentam excessos atmosféricos dos elementos do processo-s. Tais excessos são esperados em estrelas na fase de pulsos térmicos do AGB (TP-AGB). As estrelas de bário são, no entanto, menos massivas e menos luminosas que as estrelas do AGB, assim, não poderiam ter se auto-enriquecido. Seu enriquecimento teria origem em uma estrela companheira, inicialmente mais massiva, que evolui pelo TP-AGB, se auto-enriquece com os elementos do processo-s e transfere material contaminado para a atmosfera da atual estrela de bário. A companheira evolui então para anã branca deixando de ser observada diretamente. As estrelas de bário são, portanto, úteis como testes observacionais para teorias de nucleossíntese pelo processo-s, convecção e perda de massa. Análises detalhadas de abundância com dados de alta qualidade para estes objetos são ainda escassas na literatura. Neste trabalho construímos modelos de atmosferas e, procedendo a uma análise diferencial, determinamos parâmetros atmosféricos e evolutivos de uma amostra de dez gigantes de bário e quatro normais. Determinamos seus padrões de abundância para Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu e Gd, concluindo que algumas estrelas classificadas na literatura como gigantes de bário são na verdade gigantes normais. Comparamos dois padrões médios de abundância, para estrelas com grandes excessos e estrelas com excessos moderados, com modelos teóricos de enriquecimento pelo processo-s. Os dois grupos de estrelas são ajustados pelos mesmos parâmetros de exposição de nêutrons. Tal resultado sugere que a ocorrência do fenômeno de bário com diferentes intensidades não se deve a diferentes exposições de nêutrons. Discutimos ainda efeitos nucleossintéticos, ligados ao processo-s, sugeridos na literatura para os elementos Cu, Mn, V e Sc.

  7. Selectivity of end-Cretaceous marine bivalve extinctions.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, D; Raup, D M

    1995-04-21

    Analyses of the end-Cretaceous or Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction show no selectivity of marine bivalve genera by life position (burrowing versus exposed), body size, bathymetric position on the continental shelf, or relative breadth of bathymetric range. Deposit-feeders as a group have significantly lower extinction intensities than suspension-feeders, but this pattern is due entirely to low extinction in two groups (Nuculoida and Lucinoidea), which suggests that survivorship was not simply linked to feeding mode. Geographically widespread genera have significantly lower extinction intensities than narrowly distributed genera. These results corroborate earlier work suggesting that some biotic factors that enhance survivorship during times of lesser extinction intensities are ineffectual during mass extinctions.

  8. Selectivity of end-Cretaceous marine bivalve extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jablonski, D.; Raup, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analyses of the end-Cretaceous or Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction show no selectivity of marine bivalve genera by life position (burrowing versus exposed), body size, bathymetric position on the continental shelf, or relative breadth of bathymetric range. Deposit-feeders as a group have significantly lower extinction intensities than suspension-feeders, but this pattern is due entirely to low extinction in two groups (Nuculoida and Lucinoidea), which suggests that survivorship was not simply linked to feeding mode. Geographically widespread genera have significantly lower extinction intensities than narrowly distributed genera. These results corroborate earlier work suggesting that some biotic factors that enhance survivorship during times of lesser extinction intensities are ineffectual during mass extinctions.

  9. Optimal designs of mollusk shells from bivalves to snails

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takuya; Yoshimura, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bivalve, ammonite and snail shells are described by a small number of geometrical parameters. Raup noted that the vast majority of theoretically possible shell forms do not occur in nature. The constraint factors that regulate the biased distribution of natural form have long since been an open problem in evolution. The problem of whether natural shell form is a result of optimization remains unsolved despite previous attempts. Here we solve this problem by considering the scaling exponent of shell thickness as a morphological parameter. The scaling exponent has a drastic effect on the optimal design of shell shapes. The observed characteristic shapes of natural shells are explained in a unified manner as a result of optimal utilization of shell material resources, while isometric growth in thickness leads to impossibly tight coiling. PMID:28186171

  10. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

    PubMed

    Fernández Robledo, José A; Vasta, Gerardo R; Record, Nicholas R

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature). Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in prioritizing research

  11. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sarà, G.

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity ( F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species ( Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  12. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Montalto, V; Rinaldi, A; Sarà, G

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity (F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  13. Evolutionary implications of endosymbiont diversity within lucinid bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A. M.; Thiessen, M.; Aronowsky, A.; Anderson, L.; Bao, H.; Engel, A.

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial endosymbiosis is widespread among Bivalvia. Symbiosis between lucinid bivalves and sulfur-oxidizing (thiotrophic) bacteria has received recent attention, as lucinids are one of the geologically oldest extant bivalve clades to possess endosymbionts. However, the ecological and evolutionary relationships between host and symbiont are poorly understood, and reconstructing the evolutionary history and geological significance of lucinid endosymbiosis requires additional knowledge and characterization of endosymbiont ecology and taxonomic diversity. Our goal was to characterize the bacterial diversity of a modern lucinid habitat in order to evaluate possible lucinid endosymbiont diversity. Host organisms ( Lucinisca nassula and Phacoides pectinatus) and sediment cores were collected from geochemically reducing and sulfide-rich sea grass beds. PCR amplification and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the sediment cores retrieved 13 major taxonomic groups, including equally dominant Chloroflexi, Delta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, and rare Bacteroides, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes. Less than 2% of the sequences were affiliated with uncultured gammaproteobacterial symbiont groups, but were not closely related to the sequences retrieved from the lucinid gills. Moreover, our analyses uncovered multiple gene sequence populations within an individual, as well as across individuals within the same sampling site. Additional habitat-host-symbiont diversity from three other lucinid taxa and from six geographically distinct habitat sites is also expanding the previously understood diversity of thiotrophic endosymbionts, and specifically that the lucinid symbionts are probably not a monophyletic species. These data suggest that thiotrophic bacteria are recruitable for endosymbiosis and are widely distributed in reducing marine environments. But, because of the diversity of bacteria in any one habitat, symbionts may be metabolically and physiologically

  14. Magnetosome-containing bacteria living as symbionts of bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Suzanne C; Laurich, Jason R; Batstone, Rebecca T; McCuaig, Bonita; Elliott, Alexander; Poduska, Kristin M

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria containing magnetosomes (protein-bound nanoparticles of magnetite or greigite) are common to many sedimentary habitats, but have never been found before to live within another organism. Here, we show that octahedral inclusions in the extracellular symbionts of the marine bivalve Thyasira cf. gouldi contain iron, can exhibit magnetic contrast and are most likely magnetosomes. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, T. cf. gouldi symbionts group with symbiotic and free-living sulfur-oxidizing, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacteria, including the symbionts of other thyasirids. T. cf. gouldi symbionts occur both among the microvilli of gill epithelial cells and in sediments surrounding the bivalves, and are therefore facultative. We propose that free-living T. cf. gouldi symbionts use magnetotaxis as a means of locating the oxic–anoxic interface, an optimal microhabitat for chemolithoautotrophy. T. cf. gouldi could acquire their symbionts from near-burrow sediments (where oxic–anoxic interfaces likely develop due to the host's bioirrigating behavior) using their superextensile feet, which could transfer symbionts to gill surfaces upon retraction into the mantle cavity. Once associated with their host, however, symbionts need not maintain structures for magnetotaxis as the host makes oxygen and reduced sulfur available via bioirrigation and sulfur-mining behaviors. Indeed, we show that within the host, symbionts lose the integrity of their magnetosome chain (and possibly their flagellum). Symbionts are eventually endocytosed and digested in host epithelial cells, and magnetosomes accumulate in host cytoplasm. Both host and symbiont behaviors appear important to symbiosis establishment in thyasirids. PMID:24914799

  15. Protozoan Parasites of Bivalve Molluscs: Literature Follows Culture

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Robledo, José A.; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Record, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter –feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi–intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer– reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20– to 30– year lifetime in the literature). Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in prioritizing

  16. Reproductive investment in the intertidal bivalve Macoma balthica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkoop, P. J. C.; Van der Meer, J.; Beukema, J. J.; Kwast, D.

    1999-05-01

    Bivalve eggs generally contain large amounts of lipids which, in comparison with proteins and carbohydrates, have high energy contents and are thus costly in energetic terms. As lipid contents vary between species, comparisons of reproductive investments should not only include numbers and sizes of eggs, but also their energy content. We estimated the investment in egg material of mature females of the Baltic tellin Macoma balthica (L.) in terms of both mass and energy content. All mass below a minimum body mass (below which no eggs are produced) was defined as structural mass. This threshold amounts to a body mass index (BMI) of 5.6 (ash-free dry mass per cubic shell length in mg cm -3). More than half (55%) of the mass above the structural mass was invested in egg material and 45% in extra somatic tissue and tissue for production and storage of gametes. This means that the amount of eggs spawned ranged from 0 (at BMI = 5.6 mg cm -3) to 33% of the total ash-free dry mass (at a high BMI value of 14 mg cm -3). Eggs contained a relatively large amount of lipids, about 30% of their ash-free dry mass, whereas non-egg material contained only about 7% lipids. Eggs of two other bivalves in the Wadden Sea, the cockle Cerastoderma edule and the mussel Mytilus edulis, were smaller and contained only about 11% and 20% lipids, respectively. Energy content of M. balthica eggs amounted to ˜0.006 J, in the other two species to ˜0.002 J. The function of the more expensive eggs in M. balthica may be related to its early spawning in spring, causing slower larval development until first feeding.

  17. Molecular and isotopic composition of lipids in modern and fossil bivalve shells: Records of paleoenvironmental change?

    SciTech Connect

    CoBabe, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    Suites of lipids residing in situ in modern and fossil bivalve shells offer new possibilities for the study of paleoecology and paleoclimatology. Distributions of carbon isotopic compositions of modem shell lipids suggests that many of these compounds, including alkanes, sterols, fatty acids, ketones and phytadienes, are derived from the bivalves and not directly from the surrounding environment. The occurrence of fatty acids in modem and fossil shell material opens up the possibility that saturation levels of these compounds may be used as paleothermometers. To date, the utility of fatty acids in paleoclimate studies has been limited because of the swift breakdown of these compounds in sediment. However, initial results indicate that fatty acids in bivalve shells retain their original structure for at least several million years. Comparison of modem bivalve shell fatty acids from tropical, temperate and polar nearshore marine systems will be presented, along with analogous fossil data.

  18. Bioaccumulation of 210Po in common gastropod and bivalve species from the northern Gulf.

    PubMed

    Uddin, S; Bebhehani, M

    2014-06-01

    This study sets the baseline for the concentration of the natural-series radionuclide polonium-210 in two species of gastropods and four species of bivalves that are common to the Northern Arabian/Persian Gulf. (210)Po is primarily absorbed from water and via ingestion of detrital material by gastropoda and bivalves. This concentrated (210)Po can then be passed along to the next trophic level of the marine food web. The lowest (210)Po concentration was measured in the gastropod Stomatella auricular (10.36-12.39Bq kg(-1)dry) and the highest in the bivalve Marica marmorata (193.51-215.60Bq kg(-1)dry). The measured concentration factor for these molluscs in the northern Gulf varied between 4.8 and 115×10(3), values very similar to the IAEA recommended value for bivalves and gastropods of 2×10(4).

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the New Pathogen for Bivalve Larvae Vibrio bivalvicida

    PubMed Central

    Dubert, Javier; Spinard, Edward J.; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio bivalvicida is a novel pathogen of bivalve larvae responsible for recent vibriosis outbreaks affecting shellfish hatcheries. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of V. bivalvicida 605T and describe potential virulence factors. PMID:27056224

  20. High pressure processing of bivalve shellfish and HPP's potential use as a virus intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bivalve shellfish readily bioconcentrate pathogenic microbes and substance, such as algal and dinoflagulate toxins, fecal viruses and bacteria, and naturally present vibrio bacteria. High pressure processing (HPP) is currently used as an intervention for Vibrio vulnificus bacteria within molluscan ...

  1. Effects of CO2-driven sediment acidification on infaunal marine bivalves: A synthesis.

    PubMed

    Clements, Jeff C; Hunt, Heather L

    2017-04-15

    While ocean acidification (OA) effects on marine organisms are well documented, impacts of sediment acidification on infaunal organisms are relatively understudied. Here we synthesize CO2-driven sediment acidification effects on infaunal marine bivalves. While sediment carbonate system conditions can already exceed near-future OA projections, sediments can become even more acidic as overlying seawater pH decreases. Evidence suggests that infaunal bivalves experience shell dissolution, more lesions, and increased mortality in more acidic sediments; effects on heavy metal accumulation appear complex and uncertain. Infaunal bivalves can avoid negative functional consequences of sediment acidification by reducing burrowing and increasing dispersal in more acidic sediments, irrespective of species or life stage; elevated temperature may compromise this avoidance behaviour. The combined effects of sediment acidification and other environmental stressors are virtually unknown. While it is evident that sediment acidification can impact infaunal marine bivalves, more research is needed to confidently predict effects under future ocean conditions.

  2. Bioconcentration and biotransformation of [¹⁴C]methoxychlor in the brackish water bivalve Corbicula japonica.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Minoru; Ohyama, Kazutoshi; Hayashi, Osamu; Satsuma, Koji; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2011-09-01

    To obtain basic information on the metabolic fate of xenobiotics in the brackish water, bivalve Corbicula japonica, bioconcentration and biotransformation experiments were performed using methoxychlor (MXC) as a model compound. Bivalves were exposed to [ring-U-¹⁴C]MXC (10 µg L⁻¹) for 28 days under semi-static conditions followed by a 14-day depuration phase. The ¹⁴C concentration in the bivalves rapidly increased and reached a steady state after exposure for 7 days (BCFss = 2010); however, it rapidly decreased with a half-life of 2.2 days in the depuration phase. Mono- and bis-demethylated MXC, and their corresponding sulphate conjugates, were identified as minor metabolites. No glycoside conjugates (including glucuronide and glucoside) were detected. Despite this biotransformation system, bivalves were found to excrete retained MXC mostly unchanged although its relatively hydrophobic nature.

  3. The small but clear gravity signal above the natural cave 'Grotta Gigante' (Trieste, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitenberg, Carla; Sampietro, Daniele; Zuliani, David; Barbagallo, Alfio; Fabris, Paolo; Fabbri, Julius; Rossi, Lorenzo; Handi Mansi, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Gravity observations are a powerful means for detecting underground mass changes. The Italian and Slovenian Karst has a number of explored caves, several are also touristic due to their size (e.g. Grotta Gigante in Italy; Skocjianske Jame and Postojnska Jama in Slovenia). Just a few years ago another big cave was discovered by chance close to Trieste when drilling a tunnel for a motor-highway, which shows that more caves are expected to be discovered in coming years. We have acquired the gravity field above the Grotta Gigante cave, a cave roughly 100 m high and 200 m long with a traditional spring-gravity meter (Lacoste&Romberg) and height measurements made with GPS and total station. The GPS was made with two different teams and processing algorithms, to cross-check accuracy and error estimate. Some stations had to be surveyed with a classical instrument due to the vegetation which concealed the satellite positioning signal. Here we present the results of the positioning acquisitions and the gravity field. The cave produces a signal of 1.5 mGal, with a clear elongated concentric symmetry. The survey shows that a systematic coverage of the Karst would have the benefit to recover the position of all of the greater existing caves. This will have a large impact on civil and environmental purposes, since it will for example allow to plan the urban development at a safety distance from subsurface caves.

  4. Implications of an avian-style respiratory system for gigantism in sauropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Perry, Steven F; Christian, Andreas; Breuer, Thomas; Pajor, Nadine; Codd, Jonathan R

    2009-10-01

    In light of evidence for avian-like lungs in saurischian dinosaurs, the physiological implications of cross-current gas exchange and voluminous, highly heterogeneous lungs for sauropod gigantism are critically examined. At 12 ton the predicted body temperature and metabolic rate of a growing sauropod would be similar to that of a bird scaled to the same body weight, but would increase exponentially as body mass increases. Although avian-like lung structure would be consistent with either a tachymetabolic-endothermic or a bradymetabolic-gigantothermic model, increasing body temperature requires adjustments to avoid overheating. We suggest that a unique sauropod structure/function unit facilitated the evolution of gigantism. This unit consisted of (1) a reduction in metabolic rate below that predicted by the body temperature, akin to thermal adaptation as seen in extant squamates, (2) presence of air-filled diverticula in the long neck and in the visceral cavity, and (3) low activity of respiratory muscles coupled with the high efficiency of cross-current gas exchange.

  5. GaAs-oxide interface states - Gigantic photoionization via Auger-like process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Kazior, T. E.; Gatos, H. C.; Walukiewicz, W.; Siejka, J.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral and transient responses of photostimulated current in MOS structures were employed for the study of GaAs-anodic oxide interface states. Discrete deep traps at 0.7 and 0.85 eV below the conduction band were found with concentrations of 5 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm and 7 x 10 to the 11th/sq cm, respectively. These traps coincide with interface states induced on clean GaAs surfaces by oxygen and/or metal adatoms (submonolayer coverage). In contrast to surfaces with low oxygen coverage, the GaAs-thick oxide interfaces exhibited a high density (about 10 to the 14th/sq cm) of shallow donors and acceptors. Photoexcitation of these donor-acceptor pairs led to a gigantic photoionization of deep interface states with rates 1000 times greater than direct transitions into the conduction band. The gigantic photoionization is explained on the basis of energy transfer from excited donor-acceptor pairs to deep states.

  6. Are Sick Individuals Weak Competitors? Competitive Ability of Snails Parasitized by a Gigantism-Inducing Trematode

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Otto; Karvonen, Anssi; Kuosa, Marja; Haataja, Maarit; Jokela, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Parasitized individuals are often expected to be poor competitors because they are weakened by infections. Many trematode species, however, although extensively exploiting their mollusc hosts, also induce gigantism (increased host size) by diverting host resources towards growth instead of reproduction. In such systems, alternatively to reduced competitive ability due to negative effects of parasitism on host performance, larger size could allow more efficient resource acquisition and thus increase the relative competitive ability of host individuals. We addressed this hypothesis by testing the effect of a trematode parasite Diplostomum pseudospathaceum on the competitive ability of its snail host Lymnaea stagnalis. We experimentally examined the growth of snails kept in pairs in relation to their infection status and intensity of resource competition (i.e. food availability). We found that parasitized snails grew faster and their reproduction was reduced compared to unparasitized individuals indicating parasite-induced gigantism. However, growth of the snails was faster when competing with parasitized individuals compared to unparasitized snails indicating reduced competitive ability due to parasitism. The latter effect, however, was relatively weak suggesting that the effects of the parasite on snail physiology may partly override each other in determining competitive ability. PMID:24205383

  7. Long-term effects of octreotide on pituitary gigantism: its analgesic action on cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fumio; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Ogura, Toshio; Sato, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masataka; Makino, Hirofumi

    2004-10-01

    We report the case of 19-year-old man with pituitary gigantism due to growth hormone-producing pituitary macroadenoma. The patient complained of recurrent headache and excessive growth spurt since age 15. Octreotide administration was initiated following transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy. Octreotide injection for 4 years efficaciously reduced the size of remnant adenoma as well as serum growth hormone levels. Notably, octreotide exhibited a potent analgesic effect on his intractable cluster headache that has continued even after reduction of the adenoma volume. The analgesic effect lasted 2 to 6 hours after each injection and no tachyphylaxis to octreotide appeared during 4-year treatment. To characterize the headache and the pain intensity, analgesic drugs including octreotide, lidocaine, morphine and thiopental were tested using a visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluation, with the result that octreotide exhibited a prompt and complete disappearance of the headache. Headache relief was in part reproduced by morphine injection (56% reduction) but not by lidocaine or thiopental. The present case suggests that the intractable headache associated with pituitary gigantism is possibly related to the endogenous opioid system. Thus, the headache control by octreotide is clinically helpful for continuation of the self-injection regimen.

  8. Pituitary gigantism presenting with depressive mood disorder and diabetic ketoacidosis in an Asian adolescent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Ng, Sohching; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chen-Nen; Chou, Chi-Hsiang; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Lin, Jen-Der

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is seldom described in young patients with pituitary gigantism. Here, we describe the case of a 17-year-old Taiwanese boy who developed depressive mood disorder and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at the presentation of pituitary gigantism. The boy complained of lethargy and dysphoric mood in June 2008. He presented at the emergency department with epigastralgia and dyspnea in January 2009. Results of laboratory tests suggested type 1 diabetes mellitus with DKA. However, serum C-peptide level was normal on follow-up. Although he had no obvious features of acral enlargement, a high level of insulin-like growth factor 1 was detected, and a 75 g oral glucose suppression test showed no suppression of serum growth hormone levels. A pituitary macroadenoma was found on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging. The pituitary adenoma was surgically removed, followed by gamma-knife radiosurgery, and Sandostatin long-acting release treatment. He was then administered metformin, 500 mg twice daily, and to date, his serum glycohemoglobin has been <7%.

  9. The isotopic biosignatures of photo- vs. thiotrophic bivalves: are they preserved in fossil shells?

    PubMed

    Dreier, A; Loh, W; Blumenberg, M; Thiel, V; Hause-Reitner, D; Hoppert, M

    2014-09-01

    Symbiont-bearing and non-symbiotic marine bivalves were used as model organisms to establish biosignatures for the detection of distinctive symbioses in ancient bivalves. For this purpose, the isotopic composition of lipids (δ13C) and bulk organic shell matrix (δ13C, δ34S, δ15N) from shells of several thiotrophic, phototrophic, or non-symbiotic bivalves were compared (phototrophic: Fragum fragum, Fragum unedo, Tridacna maxima; thiotrophic: Codakia tigerina, Fimbria fimbriata, Anodontia sp.; non-symbiotic: Tapes dorsatus, Vasticardium vertebratum, Scutarcopagia sp.). ∆13C values of bulk organic shell matrices, most likely representing mainly original shell protein/chitin biomass, were depleted in thio- and phototrophic bivalves compared to non-symbiotic bivalves. As the bulk organic shell matrix also showed a major depletion of δ15N (down to -2.2 ‰) for thiotrophic bivalves, combined δ13C and δ15N values are useful to differentiate between thio-, phototrophic, and non-symbiotic lifestyles. However, the use of these isotopic signatures for the study of ancient bivalves is limited by the preservation of the bulk organic shell matrix in fossils. Substantial alteration was clearly shown by detailed microscopic analyses of fossil (late Pleistocene) T. maxima and Trachycardium lacunosum shell, demonstrating a severe loss of quantity and quality of bulk organic shell matrix with time. Likewise, the composition and δ13C-values of lipids from empty shells indicated that a large part of these compounds derived from prokaryotic decomposers. The use of lipids from ancient shells for the reconstruction of the bivalve's life style therefore appears to be restricted.

  10. Influence of intertidal recreational fisheries and 'bouchot' mussel culture on bivalve recruitment.

    PubMed

    Toupoint, Nicolas; Barbier, Pierrick; Tremblay, Réjean; Archambault, Philippe; McKindsey, Christopher W; Winkler, Gesche; Meziane, Tarik; Olivier, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In coastal environments, fishing and aquaculture may be important sources of disturbance to ecosystem functioning, the quantification of which must be assessed to make them more sustainable. In the Chausey Archipelago, France, recreational fishing and commercial shellfish farming are the only two evident anthropogenic activities, dominated by bivalve hand-raking and 'bouchot' mussel culture, respectively. This study evaluates the impact of both activities on bivalve recruitment dynamics by comparing primary recruitment intensity (short-term effect) and recruitment efficiency (medium-term effect) by sampling bivalves in reference (undisturbed) and disturbed (i.e. subjected to hand-raking or in 'bouchot' mussel culture areas) parcels throughout and at the end of the recruitment season, respectively. Specific hypotheses evaluated were that (H1) bivalve hand-raking negatively affects bivalve recruitment and that (H2) 'bouchot' mussel culture promotes bivalve recruitment. Patterns in bivalve community structure in reference parcels (i.e. natural pattern) differed between initial and final recruitment, underlining the great importance of early post-settlement processes, particularly secondary dispersal. Primary recruitment intensity was inhibited in hand-raking parcels whereas it was promoted in 'bouchot' mussel culture parcels, but the effect on recruitment efficiency was muted for both activities due to post-settlement processes. Nevertheless, the importance of effects that occur during the first step of recruitment should not be ignored as they may affect bivalve communities and induce immediate consequences on the trophic web through a cascade effect. Finally, it is highlighted that hand-raking damages all life stages of the common cockle Cerastoderma edule, one of the major target species, suggesting that this activity should be managed with greater caution than is currently done.

  11. [Energy metabolism and body mass ratio in bivalves mollusca (Mollusca: Bivalvia)].

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, I G; Kleĭmenov, S Iu; Radzinskaia, L I

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of experimental and published data, the interspecific and intraspecific (ontogenetic) dependence of energy metabolism on body weight in bivalves was calculated. Changes in the parameters of intraspecific allometric dependence under the effect of environmental factors were analyzed. The rate of comparable standard metabolism (coefficient a at k = 0.76) was shown to vary in different taxonomic and zoogeographic groups of bivalves.

  12. Nursery function of coastal temperate benthic habitats: New insight from the bivalve recruitment perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Pierrick; Meziane, Tarik; Forêt, Martin; Tremblay, Réjean; Robert, René; Olivier, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    Marine habitat function has been typically investigated in terms of biogeochemical regulation but rarely in terms of population renewal, which is mainly controlled by recruitment dynamics. The recruitment phase is crucial for organisms with a bentho-pelagic life cycle, such as bivalves, and it regulates the population renewal success. This study provides new insight on the role of temperate benthic habitats on bivalve recruitment, as a function of nursery areas. Six dominant benthic habitats of the Chausey archipelago (Normandy, France) were studied. In each habitat, bivalve recruit assemblages were described at the end of two reproductive seasons. Furthermore, Ostrea edulis juveniles were immerged on each habitat during two months to compare growth performances and feeding status, estimated by fatty acid composition. Recruit assemblages differ from each habitat according to sediment grain-size composition and bathymetrical levels. Subtidal habitats, and especially Crepidula fornicata banks and Glycymeris glycymeris coarse sands, supported the highest species abundance and richness of recruits. All O. edulis juveniles fed on the same trophic resources but digestive glands of juveniles from C. fornicata banks were more concentrated in total fatty acids than those from subtidal G. glycymeris coarse sands and maerl banks. Our results depict the key role of subtidal and structured habitats, composed of ecosystem engineers, in enhancing bivalve recruitment and extending the bivalve population renewal. This study suggests that the crucial role of these habitats as bivalve nurseries must be integrated in management perspectives.

  13. In vitro acylation of okadaic acid in the presence of various bivalves' extracts.

    PubMed

    Konoki, Keiichi; Onoda, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Cho, Yuko; Kaga, Shinnosuke; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2013-01-29

    The dinoflagellate Dinophysis spp. is responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). In the bivalves exposed to the toxic bloom of the dinoflagellate, dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3), the 7-OH acylated form of either okadaic acid (OA) or DTX1, is produced. We demonstrated in vitro acylation of OA with palmitoyl CoA in the presence of protein extract from the digestive gland, but not other tissues of the bivalve Mizuhopecten yessoensis. The yield of 7-O-palmitoyl OA reached its maximum within 2 h, was the highest at 37 °C followed by 28 °C, 16 °C and 4 °C and was the highest at pH 8 in comparison with the yields at pH 6 and pH 4. The transformation also proceeded when the protein extract was prepared from the bivalves Corbicula japonica and Crassostrea gigas. The OA binding protein OABP2 identified in the sponge Halichondria okadai was not detected in the bivalve M. yessoensis, the bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis and the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi, though they are known to accumulate diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins. Since DTX3 does not bind to protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, the physiological target for OA and DTXs in mammalian cells, the acylation of DSP toxins would be related to a detoxification mechanism for the bivalve species.

  14. A randomised controlled trial comparing a dilating vaginal speculum with a conventional bivalve speculum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A; Weisberg, E; Lieberman, D; Fraser, I S

    2001-11-01

    Cervical smears are traditionally taken with the aid of a metal or disposable plastic bivalve speculum. Many women complain of discomfort with these specula. This study compares the efficacy and women's experiences of a new 'dilating speculum' called the Veda-scope, with a conventional metal bivalve speculum (Pederson). The aims of this study were: to determine whether the Veda-scope provides adequate visualisation of the cervix and vaginal walls and an adequate cervical cytology specimen; and to compare user acceptability and women's levels of comfort between the Veda-scope and the bivalve speculum. Sixty-four women were randomised to be examined with the Veda-scope and 60 with the bivalve speculum, by one of two operators. Each woman completed a questionnaire that included subjective views of their previous cervical smear experiences, and acceptability of the examination at the study consultation. Cytologists were blinded as to which speculum was used for cervical sampling. Of women examined, 7-83% of women found Veda-scope examinations comfortable, compared to 38-62% of women who found examinations with the bivalve comfortable; 94% of the women preferred the 'comfort' of the Veda-scope. The Veda-scope was as good as the bivalve speculum in providing samples for cytological analysis following the initial learning curve, and also provided markedly superior magnified views of the cervix and vaginal fornices.

  15. Genetic diversity of Arcobacter isolated from bivalves of Adriatic and their interactions with Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Donatella; Mosca, Francesco; Chierichetti, Serena; Tiscar, Pietro Giorgio; Leoni, Francesca

    2017-02-01

    The human food-borne pathogens Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus have been frequently isolated from the intestinal tracts and fecal samples of different farm animals and, after excretion, these microorganisms can contaminate the environment, including the aquatic one. In this regard, A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus have been detected in seawater and bivalves of coastal areas which are affected by fecal contamination. The capability of bivalve hemocytes to interact with bacteria has been proposed as the main factor inversely conditioning their persistence in the bivalve. In this study, 12 strains of Arcobacter spp. were isolated between January and May 2013 from bivalves of Central Adriatic Sea of Italy in order to examine their genetic diversity as well as in vitro interactions with bivalve components of the immune response, such as hemocytes. Of these, seven isolates were A. butzleri and five A. cryaerophilus, and were genetically different. All strains showed ability to induce spreading and respiratory burst of Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes. Overall, our data demonstrate the high genetic diversity of these microorganisms circulating in the marine study area. Moreover, the Arcobacter-bivalve interaction suggests that they do not have a potential to persist in the tissues of M. galloprovincialis.

  16. Bivalve fouling of nuclear power plant service-water systems. Volume 1. Correlation of bivalve biological characteristics and raw-water system design

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Johnson, K.I.; Page, T.L.; Young, J.S.; Daling, P.M.

    1984-12-01

    Fouling of raw-water systems in nuclear power plants in the US can affect the safe operation of a power plant. This report describes correlations between the biology of bivalve organisms and the design and operation of power plants that allow bivalves to enter and reside in nuclear power plants. Discussions are focused on safety-related raw-water systems subject to fouling by the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea), the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Score sheets to rate fouling potential of power plant systems and components are provided.

  17. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  18. An aquaculture-based method for calibrated bivalve isotope paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanamaker, Alan D.; Kreutz, Karl J.; Borns, Harold W.; Introne, Douglas S.; Feindel, Scott; Barber, Bruce J.

    2006-09-01

    To quantify species-specific relationships between bivalve carbonate isotope geochemistry (δ18Oc) and water conditions (temperature and salinity, related to water isotopic composition [δ18Ow]), an aquaculture-based methodology was developed and applied to Mytilus edulis (blue mussel). The four-by-three factorial design consisted of four circulating temperature baths (7, 11, 15, and 19°C) and three salinity ranges (23, 28, and 32 parts per thousand (ppt); monitored for δ18Ow weekly). In mid-July of 2003, 4800 juvenile mussels were collected in Salt Bay, Damariscotta, Maine, and were placed in each configuration. The size distribution of harvested mussels, based on 105 specimens, ranged from 10.9 mm to 29.5 mm with a mean size of 19.8 mm. The mussels were grown in controlled conditions for up to 8.5 months, and a paleotemperature relationship based on juvenile M. edulis from Maine was developed from animals harvested at months 4, 5, and 8.5. This relationship [T°C = 16.19 (±0.14) - 4.69 (±0.21) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW} + 0.17 (±0.13) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW}2; r2 = 0.99; N = 105; P < 0.0001] is nearly identical to the Kim and O'Neil (1997) abiogenic calcite equation over the entire temperature range (7-19°C), and it closely resembles the commonly used paleotemperature equations of Epstein et al. (1953) and Horibe and Oba (1972). Further, the comparison of the M. edulis paleotemperature equation with the Kim and O'Neil (1997) equilibrium-based equation indicates that M. edulis specimens used in this study precipitated their shell in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water within the experimental uncertainties of both studies. The aquaculture-based methodology described here allows similar species-specific isotope paleothermometer calibrations to be performed with other bivalve species and thus provides improved quantitative paleoenvironmental reconstructions.

  19. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    PubMed

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  20. Evaluation of bivalves as bioindicators of metal pollution in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Waykar, Bhalchandra; Deshmukh, Gajanan

    2012-01-01

    The fresh water bivalves, Lamellidens corrianus, Lamellidens marginalis, and Indonaia caeruleus were exposed to chronic concentration of arsenic (0.1719 ppm), cadmium (0.1284 ppm), copper (0.033 ppm), lead (1.50 ppm), mercury (0.0443 ppm) and zinc (1.858 ppm) separately up to 30 days in laboratory. Dry weight of each animal was used to calculate metal concentrations (μg/g) and the metal body burden (μg/individual). It was observed that lead (1235.4 μg/g) and arsenic (37.9 μg/g) concentration were highest in Lamellidens corrianus, zinc (3,032.3 μg/g) was highest in Lamellidens marginalis, while mercury (5.87 μg/g), cadmium (142 μg/g) and copper (826.7 μg/g) was highest in Indonaia caeruleus.

  1. Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Laitano, M V; Silva Barni, M F; Costa, P G; Cledón, M; Fillmann, G; Miglioranza, K S B; Panarello, H O

    2016-02-01

    Pampean creeks were evaluated in the present study as potential land-based sources of PCB marine contamination. Different carbon and nitrogen sources from such creeks were analysed as boosters of PCB bioaccumulation by the filter feeder bivalve Brachidontes rodriguezii and grazer limpet Siphonaria lessoni. Carbon of different source than marine and anthropogenic nitrogen assimilated by organisms were estimated through their C and N isotopic composition. PCB concentration in surface sediments and mollusc samples ranged from 2.68 to 6.46 ng g(-1) (wet weight) and from 1074 to 4583 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, reflecting a punctual source of PCB contamination related to a landfill area. Thus, despite the low flow of creeks, they should not be underestimated as contamination vectors to the marine environment. On the other hand, mussels PCB bioaccumulation was related with the carbon source uptake which highlights the importance to consider this factor when studying PCB distribution in organisms of coastal systems.

  2. Amnesic shellfish poisoning toxins in bivalve molluscs in Ireland.

    PubMed

    James, Kevin J; Gillman, Marion; Amandi, Mónica Fernández; López-Rivera, Américo; Puente, Patricia Fernández; Lehane, Mary; Mitrovic, Simon; Furey, Ambrose

    2005-12-15

    In December 1999, domoic acid (DA) a potent neurotoxin, responsible for the syndrome Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP) was detected for the first time in shellfish harvested in Ireland. Two liquid chromatography (LC) methods were applied to quantify DA in shellfish after sample clean-up using solid-phase extraction (SPE) with strong anion exchange (SAX) cartridges. Toxin detection was achieved using photodiode array ultraviolet (LC-UV) and multiple tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)). DA was identified in four species of bivalve shellfish collected along the west and south coastal regions of the Republic of Ireland. The amount of DA that was present in three species was within EU guideline limits for sale of shellfish (20 microg DA/g); mussels (Mytilus edulis), <1.0 microg DA/g; oysters (Crassostrea edulis), <5.0 microg DA/g and razor clams (Ensis siliqua), <0.3 microg DA/g. However, king scallops (Pecten maximus) posed a significant human health hazard with levels up to 240 microg DA/g total tissues. Most scallop samples (55%) contained DA at levels greater than the regulatory limit. The DA levels in the digestive glands of some samples of scallops were among the highest that have ever been recorded (2,820 microg DA/g).

  3. The bivalve Neithea from the Cretaceous of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus Andrade, Edilma; Seeling, Jens; Bengtson, Peter; Souza-Lima, Wagner

    2004-09-01

    On the basis of new collections from the Sergipe and Camamu (Bahia) basins, revision of previously described material from the Pernambuco-Paraı´ba Basin and a reassessment of previous descriptions, five species of the pectinid bivalve Neithea are described from the Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil: N. ( N.) alpina (d'Orbigny, 1847) from the Albian of the Camamu Basin; N. ( N.) coquandi (Peron, 1877) from the Aptian-Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin, the Albian of the Camamu Basin, broadly mid-Cretaceous beds of the Tucano Sul Basin (Bahia), and the Cenomanian of the São Luı´s Basin (Maranhão); N. ( N.) hispanica (d'Orbigny, 1850) from the Albian-lower Turonian of the Sergipe Basin; N. ( N.) bexarensis (Stephenson, 1941) from the Campanian of the Pernambuco-Paraı´ba Basin; N. ( Neithella) notabilis (Münster in Goldfuss, 1833) from the Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin. All species show a wide geographical distribution, in sharp contrast to previous studies that have indicated a highly endemic mollusc fauna in the Cretaceous of Brazil.

  4. First evidence of immunomodulation in bivalves under seawater acidification and increased temperature.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; Chinellato, Andrea; Munari, Marco; Finos, Livio; Bressan, Monica; Marin, Maria Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Water acidification, temperature increases and changes in seawater salinity are predicted to occur in the near future. In such a global climate change (GCC) scenario, there is growing concern for the health status of both wild and farmed organisms. Bivalve molluscs, an important component of coastal marine ecosystems, are at risk. At the immunological level, the ability of an organism to maintain its immunosurveillance unaltered under adverse environmental conditions may enhance its survival capability. To our knowledge, only a few studies have investigated the effects of changing environmental parameters (as predicted in a GCC scenario) on the immune responses of bivalves. In the present study, the effects of both decreased pH values and increased temperature on the important immune parameters of two bivalve species were evaluated for the first time. The clam Chamelea gallina and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, widespread along the coast of the Northwestern Adriatic Sea, were chosen as model organisms. Bivalves were exposed for 7 days to three pH values (8.1, 7.7 and 7.4) at two temperatures (22 and 28°C). Three independent experiments were carried out at salinities of 28, 34 and 40 PSU. The total haemocyte count, Neutral Red uptake, haemolymph lysozyme activity and total protein levels were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that tested experimental conditions affected significantly most of the immune parameters measured in bivalves, even if the variation pattern of haemocyte responses was not always linear. Between the two species, C. gallina appeared more vulnerable to changing pH and temperature than M. galloprovincialis. Overall, this study demonstrated that climate changes can strongly affect haemocyte functionality in bivalves. However, further studies are needed to clarify better the mechanisms of action of changing environmental parameters, both individually and in combination, on bivalve haemocytes.

  5. Determining provenance of marine metal pollution in French bivalves using Cd, Zn and Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiel, Alyssa E.; Weis, Dominique; Cossa, Daniel; Orians, Kristin J.

    2013-11-01

    Cadmium, Zn and Pb isotopic compositions (MC-ICP-MS) and elemental concentrations (HR-ICP-MS) have been used to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources of these metals in bivalves collected from the coastlines of France (English Channel, Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts). The Cd isotopic signatures (δ114Cd = -1.08‰ to -0.52‰) exhibited by bivalves from the coastlines of France, excluding those from NE France, are within the range of those exhibited by bivalves from the USA East coast (δ114Cd = -1.20‰ to -0.54‰). This indicates the high prevalence of industry, as well as the low natural contributions of Cd from North Atlantic waters in both regions. Thus, the significance of anthropogenic Cd sources is similar. These significant anthropogenic contributions are identified for bivalves with a large range in tissue Cd concentrations. Importantly, French bivalves from the Gironde estuary and Marennes-Oléron basin (regions of historic and modern importance for oyster farming, respectively) exhibited the highest Cd levels of the study. Their Cd isotopic signatures indicate historical smelting emissions remain the primary Cd source despite the cessation of local smelting activities in 1986 and subsequent remedial efforts. No significant variability is observed in the δ66Zn values of the French bivalves (∼0.53‰), with the exception of the much heavier compositions exhibited by oysters from the polluted Gironde estuary (1.19-1.27‰). Lead isotopes do not fractionate during processing like Cd and Zn. They can, therefore, be used to identify emissions from industrial processes and the consumption of unleaded gasoline and diesel fuel as metal sources to French bivalves. Cadmium and Zn isotopes are successfully used here as tracers of anthropogenic processing emissions and are combined with Pb isotope "fingerprinting" techniques to identify metal sources.

  6. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  7. First Evidence of Immunomodulation in Bivalves under Seawater Acidification and Increased Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Matozzo, Valerio; Chinellato, Andrea; Munari, Marco; Finos, Livio; Bressan, Monica; Marin, Maria Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Water acidification, temperature increases and changes in seawater salinity are predicted to occur in the near future. In such a global climate change (GCC) scenario, there is growing concern for the health status of both wild and farmed organisms. Bivalve molluscs, an important component of coastal marine ecosystems, are at risk. At the immunological level, the ability of an organism to maintain its immunosurveillance unaltered under adverse environmental conditions may enhance its survival capability. To our knowledge, only a few studies have investigated the effects of changing environmental parameters (as predicted in a GCC scenario) on the immune responses of bivalves. In the present study, the effects of both decreased pH values and increased temperature on the important immune parameters of two bivalve species were evaluated for the first time. The clam Chamelea gallina and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, widespread along the coast of the Northwestern Adriatic Sea, were chosen as model organisms. Bivalves were exposed for 7 days to three pH values (8.1, 7.7 and 7.4) at two temperatures (22 and 28°C). Three independent experiments were carried out at salinities of 28, 34 and 40 PSU. The total haemocyte count, Neutral Red uptake, haemolymph lysozyme activity and total protein levels were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that tested experimental conditions affected significantly most of the immune parameters measured in bivalves, even if the variation pattern of haemocyte responses was not always linear. Between the two species, C. gallina appeared more vulnerable to changing pH and temperature than M. galloprovincialis. Overall, this study demonstrated that climate changes can strongly affect haemocyte functionality in bivalves. However, further studies are needed to clarify better the mechanisms of action of changing environmental parameters, both individually and in combination, on bivalve haemocytes. PMID:22479452

  8. Determination of the recovery efficiency of cryptosporidium oocysts and giardia cysts from seeded bivalve mollusks.

    PubMed

    Schets, Franciska M; van den Berg, Harold H J L; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal parasites Cryptosporidium and Giardia are transmitted by water and food and cause human gastroenteritis. Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks, such as oysters and mussels, filter large volumes of water and thus concentrate such pathogens, which makes these bivalves potential vectors of disease. To assess the risk of infection from consumption of contaminated bivalves, parasite numbers and parasite recovery data are required. A modified immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedure was used to determine Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst numbers in individually homogenized oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis). About 12% of the commercial bivalves were positive, with low (oo)cyst numbers per specimen. The recovery efficiency of the IMS procedure was systematically evaluated. Experiments included seeding of homogenized bivalves and whole animals with 100 to 1,000 (oo)cysts. Both seeding procedures yielded highly variable recovery rates. Median Cryptosporidium recoveries were 7.9 to 21% in oysters and 62% in mussels. Median Giardia recoveries were 10 to 25% in oysters and 110% in mussels. Giardia recovery was significantly higher than Cryptosporidium recovery. (Oo)cysts were less efficiently recovered from seeded whole animals than from seeded homogenates, with median Cryptosporidium recoveries of 5.3% in oysters and 45% in mussels and median Giardia recoveries of 4.0% in oysters and 82% in mussels. Both bivalve homogenate seeding and whole animal seeding yielded higher (oo)cyst recovery in mussels than in oysters, likely because of the presence of less shellfish tissue in IMS when analyzing the smaller mussels compared with the larger oysters, resulting in more efficient (oo)cyst extraction. The data generated in this study may be used in the quantitative assessment of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium or Giardia associated with the consumption of raw bivalve mollusks. This information may be used for making risk management

  9. Gate-tunable gigantic lattice deformation in VO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Okuyama, D. E-mail: nakano@imr.tohoku.ac.jp Hatano, T.; Nakano, M. E-mail: nakano@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Takeshita, S.; Ohsumi, H.; Tardif, S.; Shibuya, K.; Yumoto, H.; Koyama, T.; Ohashi, H.; Takata, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Iwasa, Y. E-mail: nakano@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Arima, T.

    2014-01-13

    We examined the impact of electric field on crystal lattice of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) in a field-effect transistor geometry by in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements. Whereas the c-axis lattice parameter of VO{sub 2} decreases through the thermally induced insulator-to-metal phase transition, the gate-induced metallization was found to result in a significant increase of the c-axis length by almost 1% from that of the thermally stabilized insulating state. We also found that this gate-induced gigantic lattice deformation occurs even at the thermally stabilized metallic state, enabling dynamic control of c-axis lattice parameter by more than 1% at room temperature.

  10. A gigantic, exceptionally complete titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur from southern Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lacovara, Kenneth J; Lamanna, Matthew C; Ibiricu, Lucio M; Poole, Jason C; Schroeter, Elena R; Ullmann, Paul V; Voegele, Kristyn K; Boles, Zachary M; Carter, Aja M; Fowler, Emma K; Egerton, Victoria M; Moyer, Alison E; Coughenour, Christopher L; Schein, Jason P; Harris, Jerald D; Martínez, Rubén D; Novas, Fernando E

    2014-09-04

    Titanosaurian sauropod dinosaurs were the most diverse and abundant large-bodied herbivores in the southern continents during the final 30 million years of the Mesozoic Era. Several titanosaur species are regarded as the most massive land-living animals yet discovered; nevertheless, nearly all of these giant titanosaurs are known only from very incomplete fossils, hindering a detailed understanding of their anatomy. Here we describe a new and gigantic titanosaur, Dreadnoughtus schrani, from Upper Cretaceous sediments in southern Patagonia, Argentina. Represented by approximately 70% of the postcranial skeleton, plus craniodental remains, Dreadnoughtus is the most complete giant titanosaur yet discovered, and provides new insight into the morphology and evolutionary history of these colossal animals. Furthermore, despite its estimated mass of about 59.3 metric tons, the bone histology of the Dreadnoughtus type specimen reveals that this individual was still growing at the time of death.

  11. Giants among larges: how gigantism impacts giant virus entry into amoebae.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2016-06-01

    The proposed order Megavirales comprises the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV), infecting a wide range of hosts. Over time, they co-evolved with different host cells, developing various strategies to penetrate them. Mimiviruses and other giant viruses enter cells through phagocytosis, while Marseillevirus and other large viruses explore endocytosis and macropinocytosis. These differing strategies might reflect the evolution of those viruses. Various scenarios have been proposed for the origin and evolution of these viruses, presenting one of the most enigmatic issues to surround these microorganisms. In this context, we believe that giant viruses evolved independently by massive gene/size gain, exploring the phagocytic pathway of entry into amoebas. In response to gigantism, hosts developed mechanisms to evade these parasites.

  12. Intraspecific competition and high food availability are associated with insular gigantism in a lizard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafilis, Panayiotis; Meiri, Shai; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Valakos, Efstratios

    2009-09-01

    Resource availability, competition, and predation commonly drive body size evolution. We assess the impact of high food availability and the consequent increased intraspecific competition, as expressed by tail injuries and cannibalism, on body size in Skyros wall lizards ( Podarcis gaigeae). Lizard populations on islets surrounding Skyros (Aegean Sea) all have fewer predators and competitors than on Skyros but differ in the numbers of nesting seabirds. We predicted the following: (1) the presence of breeding seabirds (providing nutrients) will increase lizard population densities; (2) dense lizard populations will experience stronger intraspecific competition; and (3) such aggression, will be associated with larger average body size. We found a positive correlation between seabird and lizard densities. Cannibalism and tail injuries were considerably higher in dense populations. Increases in cannibalism and tail loss were associated with large body sizes. Adult cannibalism on juveniles may select for rapid growth, fuelled by high food abundance, setting thus the stage for the evolution of gigantism.

  13. Pituitary tumor with gigantism, acromegaly and preclinical Cushing's disease diagnosed from the 10th row.

    PubMed

    Tourtelot, John B; Vesely, David L

    2013-08-01

    A 7'3" basketball player was noted to have 2 to 3 times thicker tissue in his hands than 6'10" players by an endocrinologist sitting 10 rows above the player in a basketball arena. This led to the diagnosis of pituitary gigantism where the history revealed that he was 7'3" at 15 years of age. At age 19 when the acryl enlargement was noted, a diagnostic workup revealed elevated growth hormones and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) with a 2 × 1.3 cm pituitary tumor. His history suggested that his epiphyseal plates had closed at age 15, and because he continued to produce IGF-1, he now has acromegaly. His elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) before surgery suggests that he also had preclinical Cushing's disease. After pituitary transsphenoidal surgery, all acryl enlargement in hands and ligaments disappeared. His growth hormone, IGF-1 and ACTH returned to normal 2 weeks after surgery.

  14. Intraspecific competition and high food availability are associated with insular gigantism in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Pafilis, Panayiotis; Meiri, Shai; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Valakos, Efstratios

    2009-09-01

    Resource availability, competition, and predation commonly drive body size evolution. We assess the impact of high food availability and the consequent increased intraspecific competition, as expressed by tail injuries and cannibalism, on body size in Skyros wall lizards (Podarcis gaigeae). Lizard populations on islets surrounding Skyros (Aegean Sea) all have fewer predators and competitors than on Skyros but differ in the numbers of nesting seabirds. We predicted the following: (1) the presence of breeding seabirds (providing nutrients) will increase lizard population densities; (2) dense lizard populations will experience stronger intraspecific competition; and (3) such aggression, will be associated with larger average body size. We found a positive correlation between seabird and lizard densities. Cannibalism and tail injuries were considerably higher in dense populations. Increases in cannibalism and tail loss were associated with large body sizes. Adult cannibalism on juveniles may select for rapid growth, fuelled by high food abundance, setting thus the stage for the evolution of gigantism.

  15. Early descriptions of acromegaly and gigantism and their historical evolution as clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Mammis, Antonios; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Liu, James K

    2010-10-01

    Giants have been a subject of fascination throughout history. Whereas descriptions of giants have existed in the lay literature for millennia, the first attempt at a medical description was published by Johannes Wier in 1567. However, it was Pierre Marie, in 1886, who established the term "acromegaly" for the first time and established a distinct clinical diagnosis with clear clinical descriptions in 2 patients with the characteristic presentation. Multiple autopsy findings revealed a consistent correlation between acromegaly and pituitary enlargement. In 1909, Harvey Cushing postulated a “hormone of growth" as the underlying pathophysiological trigger involved in pituitary hypersecretion in patients with acromegaly. This theory was supported by his observations of clinical remission in patients with acromegaly in whom he had performed hypophysectomy. In this paper, the authors present some of the early accounts of acromegaly and gigantism, and describe its historical evolution as a medical and surgical entity.

  16. Molecular design of TiO2 for gigantic red shift via sublattice substitution.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guosheng; Deng, Quanrong; Wan, Lin; Guo, Meilan; Xia, Xiaohong; Gao, Yun

    2010-11-01

    The effects of 3d transition metal doping in TiO2 phases have been simulated in detail. The results of modelling indicate that Mn has the biggest potential among 3d transition metals, for the reduction of energy gap and the introduction of effective intermediate bands to allow multi-band optical absorption. On the basis of theoretical formulation, we have incorporated considerable amount of Mn in nano-crystalline TiO2 materials. Mn doped samples demonstrate significant red shift in the optical absorption edge, with a secondary absorption edge corresponding to theoretically predicted intermediate bands/states. The gigantic red shift achievable in Mn-doped TiO2 is expected to extend the useful TiO2 functionalities well beyond the UV threshold via the optical absorption of both visible and infrared photon irradiance.

  17. The Early ULF Signal of the Gigantic Jets Revealed By Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Hsun; Bing-Chih Chen, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    The conventional Fourier analysis on the sferics in ULF and VLF bandpasses has been done for years. Several phenomena e.g. whistler and Schumann resonance have been well studied by the Fourier spectrum comprehensively. But the Fourier analysis is computed by an integration over time, therefore, the temporal resolution is smoothed, and limited not only by the sampling rate but also the size of the integration window. The instantaneous frequency can't be obtained through this conventional approach. We introduce the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) instead of Fourier transform to analyze the sferics of TLEs recorded at Lulin observatory. The Hilbert-Huang transform decomposes a signal into so-called intrinsic mode functions (IMF), and derive instantaneous frequency data by differentiating the phase angle yielded by Hilbert transform. Our analysis of HHT on several gigantic jets recorded by ground observation surprisingly revealed an early signal of frequency-change during the phase of the leading jet, and this early signal can not be identified by Fourier analysis. In the phase of leading jet, the amplitude of the sferics remains a constant and no significant features are recognized in the recorded waveform, but an obvious frequency change about 100-200 millisecond prior to the main discharge of the full development jets (FDJs), which can be clearly recognized in the HHT spectra of all observed gigantic jets. From a further simulation, this frequency change is confirmed to come from the nature of the discharge, not an alias or a false signal generated by the analysis method. This early signal may implies an in-cloud discharge process which is suggested by Krehbiel et al. [2008

  18. Dioxins/furans and PCBs in bivalves and sediments from NOAA national status and trends program

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, T.; Gardinali, P.; Jackson, T.; Sericano, J.; Chambers, L.

    1995-12-31

    As part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Status and Trends (NS and T) Mussel Watch Program 55 bivalves and 7 sediment samples were analyzed for 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD and PCDF) and planar PCBs. Bivalve samples were collected from selected US East Gulf and West coast sites, while the sediment samples were all from the Gulf coast. Sediment concentrations for 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (TCDD and TCDF) ranged from 0.35 to 25 pg/g and 0.42 to 140 pg/g, respectively. The 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 2,3,7,8-TCDF represent only a small percentage of the total PCDD and PCDF in the sediments which is the case for most sediment. The concentration of TCDD and TCDF in bivalves ranged from not detected (ND) to 25 pg/g and ND to 140 pg/g, respectively. Most bivalve samples, in contrast to the sediment contained low proportions of the higher molecular weight PCDDs and PCDFs. The relative toxicological importance of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-TCDF and dioxin-like PCB to the bivalves from different locations will be compared based on toxicity equivalency factors.

  19. Mercury accumulation in marine bivalves: influences of biodynamics and feeding niche.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-10-01

    Differences in the accumulation of mercury (Hg) in five species of marine bivalves, including scallops Chlamys nobilis, clams Ruditapes philippinarum, oysters Saccostrea cucullata, green mussels Perna viridis, and black mussels Septifer virgatus, were investigated. The bivalves displayed different patterns of Hg accumulation in terms of the body concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total Hg (THg), as well as the ratio of MeHg to THg. Parameters of the biodynamics of the accumulation of Hg(II) and MeHg could reflect the species-dependent Hg concentrations in the bivalves. With the exception of black mussels, we found a significant relationship between the efflux rates of Hg(II) and the THg concentrations in the bivalves. The interspecific variations in the MeHg to THg ratio were largely controlled by the relative difference between the elimination rates of Hg(II) and MeHg. Stable isotope (δ(13)C) analysis indicated that the five bivalve species had contrasting feeding niches, which may also affect the Hg accumulation.

  20. Antimicrobial activities of two edible bivalves M. meretrix and M. casta.

    PubMed

    Sugesh, S; Mayavu, P

    2013-01-01

    The marine invertebrates become one of hot spot for the lead of antimicrobial compounds. Two species of commercially available and edible bivalves (M. meretrix and M. casta) were assayed for antimicrobial activity against 10 bacterial pathogens and 6 fungal pathogens and its biochemical composition. The bivalves were extracted with three different solvent systems respectively methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. All the three extracts of both the species M. meretrix and M. casta showed highest antibacterial activities against S. aureus, E. coli, B. substillus, K. pneumonia, P. fleuroscence and V. cholera. In present investigation the methanolic extract of the two bivalve species of M. meretrix and M. casta was showed inhibition activities against all pathogenic fungal forms. The two bivalve extracts showed high amounts of protein content, which made the variation up to 160-180 microg mg(-1) (wet weight). Both samples had low amount of carbohydrates 4.77-5.77 microg mg(-1) and lipids 0.11-0.17 microg mg(-1), respectively. The results of thin layer chromatography were revealed that presence of pink color spots it clearly indicates the presence of amino acid or peptides in bivalve's samples. Presuming that the antimicrobial compounds were proteins or peptides. In SDS-PAGE on 12% gel, the crude proteins M. meretrix and M. casta showed 5-6 bands ranging from 45-223 kDa. They represent potential pharmacological leads perhaps possessing novel and uncharacterized mechanisms of action that might ultimately benefit the ongoing global search for clinically useful antimicrobial agents.

  1. Modification in digestive processing strategies to reduce toxic trace metal uptake in a marine bivalve

    SciTech Connect

    Decho, A.W.; Luoma, S.N.

    1994-12-31

    Bivalves possess two major digestion pathways for processing food particles: a rapid ``intestinal`` pathway where digestion is largely extracellular; and a slower ``glandular`` pathway where digestion is largely intracellular. The slower glandular pathway often results in more efficient absorption of carbon but also more efficient uptake of certain metals (e.g. Cr associated with bacteria). In the bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis, large portions (> 90%) of bacteria are selectively routed to the glandular pathway. This results in efficient C uptake but also efficient uptake of associated Cr. The authors further determined if prolonged exposure to Cr-contaminated bacteria would result in high Cr uptake by animals or whether mechanisms exist to reduce Cr exposure and uptake. Bivalves were exposed to natural food + added bacteria (with or without added Cr) for a 6-day period, then pulse-chase experiments were conducted to quantify digestive processing and % absorption efficiencies (%AE) of bacterial Cr. Bivalves compensate at low (2--5 ug/g sed) Cr by reducing overall food ingestion, while digestive processing of food remains statistically similar to controls. At high Cr (200--500 ug/g sed) there are marked decreases in % bacteria processed by glandular digestion. This results in lower overall %AE of Cr. The results suggest that bivalves under natural conditions might balance efficient carbon sequestration against avoiding uptake of potentially toxic metals associated the food.

  2. Organohalogenated contaminants in sediments and bivalves from the Northern Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Lulwa Naseer; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Ismail, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim; Malarvannan, Govindan; Kadi, Mohammad W; Al-Badry Basahi, Jalal Mohammed; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of Organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs) were determined in sediments and bivalves collected from Kuwait coast. The levels and profile of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were compared in both sediments and bivalves. PCB-153 and -138 were the major contributors towards total OHCs followed by DDT and its metabolites (DDTs). The higher contribution of DDTs (~40%) and BDE-47 (~15%) in bivalves as compared to that in associated sediments indicated high biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF). Higher BSAF (values for heavier PCBs, DDTs and PBDEs) also indicated their high accumulation potential from sediment into associated biota at most of the studied locations. Overall, OHCs in sediments and bivalves measured in current study were lower than those reported in the literature worldwide. Most of the sediment concentrations of OHCs (ng/g, dry weight) were in the range of permissible guideline values proposed by Canadian Sediment Quality Guidelines (CSQGs), with few exceptions for DDTs (5 ng/g) and PCBs (22.7 ng/g). Similarly, 10% of bivalve samples contained high levels (ng/g, lipid weight) of PCBs (300) and DDTs (150) and were above the set safety benchmarks. This study establishes baseline for future monitoring programs.

  3. Trace Fossil Evidence of Trematode-Bivalve Parasite-Host Interactions in Deep Time.

    PubMed

    Huntley, John Warren; De Baets, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism is one of the most pervasive phenomena amongst modern eukaryotic life and yet, relative to other biotic interactions, almost nothing is known about its history in deep time. Digenean trematodes (Platyhelminthes) are complex life cycle parasites, which have practically no body fossil record, but induce the growth of characteristic malformations in the shells of their bivalve hosts. These malformations are readily preserved in the fossil record, but, until recently, have largely been overlooked by students of the fossil record. In this review, we present the various malformations induced by trematodes in bivalves, evaluate their distribution through deep time in the phylogenetic and ecological contexts of their bivalve hosts and explore how various taphonomic processes have likely biased our understanding of trematodes in deep time. Trematodes are known to negatively affect their bivalve hosts in a number of ways including castration, modifying growth rates, causing immobilization and, in some cases, altering host behaviour making the host more susceptible to their own predators. Digeneans are expected to be significant agents of natural selection. To that end, we discuss how bivalves may have adapted to their parasites via heterochrony and suggest a practical methodology for testing such hypotheses in deep time.

  4. Distribution, abundance, and habitat associations of a large bivalve (Panopea generosa) in a eutrophic, fjord estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mcdonald, P. Sean; Essington, Timothy E.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Galloway, Aaron W.E.; Stevick, Bethany C.; Jensen, Gregory C.; Vanblaricom, Glenn R.; Armstrong, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bivalves are important ecosystem constituents and frequently support valuable fisheries. In many nearshore areas, human disturbance—including declining habitat and water quality—can affect the distribution and abundance of bivalve populations, and complicate ecosystem and fishery management assessments. Infaunal bivalves, in particular, are frequently cryptic and difficult to detect; thus, assessing potential impacts on their populations requires suitable, scalable methods for estimating abundance and distribution. In this study, population size of a common benthic bivalve (the geoduck Panopea generosa) is estimated with a Bayesian habitat-based model fit to scuba and tethered camera data in Hood Canal, a fjord basin in Washington state. Densities declined more than two orders of magnitude along a north—south gradient, concomitant with patterns of deepwater dissolved oxygen, and intensity and duration of seasonal hypoxia. Across the basin, geoducks were most abundant in loose, unconsolidated, sand substrate. The current study demonstrates the utility of using scuba, tethered video, and habitat models to estimate the abundance and distribution of a large infaunal bivalve at a regional (385-km2) scale.

  5. What's in a Shell? - Interactions of Chemistry and Structure at Submicron Levels in Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Piazolo, S.; Trimby, P.

    2014-12-01

    The wide geographical distribution of bivalve shells makes them much favoured paleoclimate proxy archives. However, they are amongst the materials most affected by physiological effects, making the correct deciphering of these archives a challenging task. Shell building plans are usually hierarchic, thus optimizing mechanical properties. However, different structures common to certain bivalve families, such as the prism-nacre or the crossed-lamellar structures, are assembled from very different building blocks. These structural differences coincide with chemical and crystallographic differences suggesting critically different formation mechanisms within the bivalve class. Most importantly some bivalves form their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate that crystallizes in situ once assembled into the shell. We present new correlated multi-scale structural and compositional data for different shell bivalve shell structures such as nacre-prism, cross-lamellar intermediate structures. Data are obtained using EBSD, FIB-assisted TEM and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction combined with Nano-SIMS and Raman Microspectrometry and suggest that formation from amorphous phases is widespread and results in different calcium carbonate polymorphs to be present in the shell with distinct chemical compositions. The results highlight the complex nature of the biomaterials, which has consequences for the precision and accuracy of paleotemperature calculations.

  6. Modeling bivalve diversification: the effect of interaction on a macroevolutionary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. I.; Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    The global diversification of the class Bivalvia has historically received two conflicting interpretations. One is that a major upturn in diversification was associated with, and a consequence of, the Lake Permian mass extinction. The other is that mass extinctions have had little influence and that bivalves have experienced slow but nearly steady exponential diversification through most of their history, unaffected by interactions with other clades. We find that the most likely explanation lies between these two interpretations. Through most of the Phanerozoic, the diversity of bivalves did indeed exhibit slow growth, which was not substantially altered by mass extinctions. However, the presence of "hyperexponential bursts" in diversification during the initial Ordovician radiation and following the Late Permian and Late Cretaceous mass extinctions suggests a more complex history in which a higher characteristic diversification rate was dampened through most of the Phanerozoic. The observed pattern can be accounted for with a two-phase coupled (i.e., interactive) logistic model, where one phase is treated as the "bivalves" and the other phase is treated as a hypothetical group of clades with which the "bivalves" might have interacted. Results of this analysis suggest that interactions with other taxa have substantially affected bivalve global diversity through the Phanerozoic.

  7. Biomonitoring of trace metal pollution using the bivalve molluscs, Villorita cyprinoides, from the Cochin backwaters.

    PubMed

    George, Rejomon; Martin, G D; Nair, S M; Chandramohanakumar, N

    2013-12-01

    Trace metal concentrations in the muscle of the bivalve Villorita cyprinoides from the Cochin backwaters (southwest coast of India) were investigated during the monsoon, post-monsoon and pre-monsoon periods. The seasonal average ranges of metals (μg g(-1), dry weight) in the bivalve were as follows: Fe (18,532.44-28,267.05), Co (23.25-37.58), Ni (10.56-19.28), Cu (3.58-11.35), Zn (48.45-139.15), Cd (1.06-1.50) and Pb (3.05-4.35). The marginally elevated metal concentrations in bivalve muscles are probably related to high influx of metals as a result of pollution from the industries and agricultural fields with consequent increased bioavailability of metals to the bivalve. Evaluation of the risks to human health associated with consumption of the bivalves suggested that there is no health risk for moderate shellfish consumers. A regular and continuous biomonitoring program is recommended to establish V. cyprinoides as a bioindicator for assessing the effects of trace metal pollution and to identify future changes to conserve the "health" of this fragile ecosystem.

  8. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J.; Mendez, A.T.; Higashi, R.; Fan, T.

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  9. Environmental influence on population dynamics of the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte, Guilherme Nascimento; Coleman, Ross A.; Amaral, A. Cecília Z.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how species respond to the environment in terms of population attributes (e.g. abundance, growth, mortality, fecundity, and productivity) is essential to protect ecologically and economically important species. Nevertheless, responses of macrobenthic populations to environmental features are overlooked due to the need of consecutive samplings and time-consuming measurements. We examined the population dynamics of the filter-feeding bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana on a tidal flat over the course of one year to investigate the hypothesis that, as accepted for macrobenthic communities, populations inhabiting environments with low hydrodynamic conditions such as tidal flat should have higher attributes than populations inhabiting more energetic habitats (i.e. areas more influenced by wave energy such as reflective and intermediate beaches). This would be expected because the harsh conditions of more energetic habitats force organisms to divert more energy towards maintenance, resulting in lower population attributes. We found that A. brasiliana showed moderate growth and secondary production at the study area. Moreover the recruitment period was restricted to a few months. A comparison with previous studies showed that, contrary to expected, A. brasiliana populations from areas with low hydrodynamic conditions have lower abundance, growth, recruitment and turnover rate. It is likely that morphodynamic characteristics recorded in these environments, such as larger periods of air exposure and lower water circulation, may affect food conditions for filter-feeding species and increase competition. In addition, these characteristics may negatively affect macrobenthic species by enhancing eutrophication processes and anoxia. Overall, our results suggest that models accepted and applied at the macrobenthic community level might not be directly extended to A. brasiliana populations.

  10. A novel class of herpesvirus with bivalve hosts.

    PubMed

    Davison, Andrew J; Trus, Benes L; Cheng, Naiqian; Steven, Alasdair C; Watson, Moira S; Cunningham, Charles; Le Deuff, Rose-Marie; Renault, Tristan

    2005-01-01

    Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is the only member of the Herpesviridae that has an invertebrate host and is associated with sporadic mortality in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and other bivalve species. Cryo-electron microscopy of purified capsids revealed the distinctive T=16 icosahedral structure characteristic of herpesviruses, although the preparations examined lacked pentons. The gross genome organization of OsHV-1 was similar to that of certain mammalian herpesviruses (including herpes simplex virus and human cytomegalovirus), consisting of two invertible unique regions (U(L), 167.8 kbp; U(S), 3.4 kbp) each flanked by inverted repeats (TR(L)/IR(L), 7.6 kbp; TR(S)/IR(S), 9.8 kbp), with an additional unique sequence (X, 1.5 kbp) between IR(L) and IR(S). Of the 124 unique genes predicted from the 207 439 bp genome sequence, 38 were members of 12 families of related genes and encoded products related to helicases, inhibitors of apoptosis, deoxyuridine triphosphatase and RING-finger proteins, in addition to membrane-associated proteins. Eight genes in three of the families appeared to be fragmented. Other genes that did not belong to the families were predicted to encode DNA polymerase, the two subunits of ribonucleotide reductase, a helicase, a primase, the ATPase subunit of terminase, a RecB-like protein, additional RING-like proteins, an ion channel and several other membrane-associated proteins. Sequence comparisons showed that OsHV-1 is at best tenuously related to the two classes of vertebrate herpesviruses (those associated with mammals, birds and reptiles, and those associated with bony fish and amphibians). OsHV-1 thus represents a third major class of the herpesviruses.

  11. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    SciTech Connect

    Mat, I. )

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Spatial and temporal distribution of mercury and methylmercury in bivalves from the French coastline.

    PubMed

    Briant, N; Chouvelon, T; Martinez, L; Brach-Papa, C; Chiffoleau, J F; Savoye, N; Sonke, J; Knoery, J

    2017-01-30

    Marine mercury (Hg) concentrations have been monitored in the French coastline for the last half a century using bivalves. The analyses presented in this study concerned 192 samples of bivalves (mussels: Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis and oysters: Crassostrea gigas and Isognomon alatus) from 77 sampling stations along the French coast and in the French Antilles sea. The goals of this study were to assess MeHg levels in various common bivalves from French coastline, and to identify possible geographic, taxonomic or temporal variations of concentrations. We show that the evolution of methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations covary with total mercury (HgT) concentrations. Moreover, in most of the study sites, HgT concentrations have not decreased since 1987, despite regulations to decrease or ban mercury used for anthropic activities.

  13. A comparative study on the effects of barite, ilmenite and bentonite on four suspension feeding bivalves.

    PubMed

    Strachan, Maia F; Kingston, Paul F

    2012-10-01

    The impact of drilling mud components on the filtration activity and survival of bivalve molluscs was investigated by exposing them to suspensions of 'standard' barite, finely milled barite, ilmenite and bentonite in sea water. Introduction of the components stimulated filtration activity in all four bivalves. In addition, the introduction of standard barite and ilmenite both had lethal effects, with none of the bivalves surviving the full duration of the experiments. In-vivo observations of the gill surfaces provided direct evidence of physical damage caused by the administration of barite and ilmenite. A marked difference between filtration activity and survival of animals dosed with 'standard' barite and 'fine' barite suggests that the observed effects were primarily caused by physical interference with gill function. The results also suggest that the use of fine barite in offshore drilling may provide a more favourable environmental impact profile than the use of ilmenite.

  14. Approaches for evaluating the effects of bivalve filter feeding on nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Marine bivalves such as clams, mussels, and oysters are an important component of the food web, which influence nutrient dynamics and water quality in many estuaries. The role of bivalves in nutrient dynamics and, particularly, the contribution of commercial shellfish activities, are not well understood in Puget Sound, Washington. Numerous approaches have been used in other estuaries to quantify the effects of bivalves on nutrient dynamics, ranging from simple nutrient budgeting to sophisticated numerical models that account for tidal circulation, bioenergetic fluxes through food webs, and biochemical transformations in the water column and sediment. For nutrient management in Puget Sound, it might be possible to integrate basic biophysical indicators (residence time, phytoplankton growth rates, and clearance rates of filter feeders) as a screening tool to identify places where nutrient dynamics and water quality are likely to be sensitive to shellfish density and, then, apply more sophisticated methods involving in-situ measurements and simulation models to quantify those dynamics.

  15. Bivalves from the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous hydrocarbon seep carbonates from central Spitsbergen, Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Hryniewicz, Krzysztof; Little, Crispin T S; Nakrem, Hans Arne

    2014-09-02

    The bivalve fauna from the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous hydrocarbon seep deposits from central Spitsbergen, Svalbard comprises at least 17 species, four of which belong to chemosymbiotic taxa often found at seeps. These are the solemyid Solemya (Petrasma) cf. woodwardiana; Nucinella svalbardensis sp. nov., which belongs to a group of large Nucinella species known from seeps and deep water environments; the lucinid bivalve, Tehamatea rasmusseni sp. nov., included in a genus widely distributed in other Jurassic-Cretaceous seeps; and Cretaxinus hurumi gen. et sp. nov., which is the oldest known thyasirid and is discussed in relation to other large seep-restricted genera in this family. The remaining species in the fauna belong to 'background' genera known from coeval normal marine sediments, mostly from the Boreal area. These include the nuculid Dacromya chetaensis, two new malletiids (Mesosaccella rogovi sp. nov. and M. toddi sp. nov.), the oxytomiid Oxytoma octavia, at least three Buchia species, at least two pectinids, including Camptonectes (Costicamptonectes) aff. milnelandensis and Camptonectes (Camptochlamys) clatrathus, the limid Pseudolimea arctica, the arcticid Pseudotrapezium aff. groenlandicum, and the pholadomyid Goniomya literata. The large number of 'background' species in the bivalve fauna is probably a reflection of the shallow-water setting of the Svalbard seeps. This might also explain the lack of the seep-restricted modiomorphid bivalve Caspiconcha from the fauna. With solemyids, Nucinella, lucinids and thyasirids, the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous bivalve seep fauna of Svalbard contains typical representatives of the Mesozoic bivalve seep faunas, both long established and young evolutionary colonists.

  16. Bivalve aquaculture-environment interactions in the context of climate change.

    PubMed

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A; Tremblay, Réjean

    2016-12-01

    Coastal embayments are at risk of impacts by climate change drivers such as ocean warming, sea level rise and alteration in precipitation regimes. The response of the ecosystem to these drivers is highly dependent on their magnitude of change, but also on physical characteristics such as bay morphology and river discharge, which play key roles in water residence time and hence estuarine functioning. These considerations are especially relevant for bivalve aquaculture sites, where the cultured biomass can alter ecosystem dynamics. The combination of climate change, physical and aquaculture drivers can result in synergistic/antagonistic and nonlinear processes. A spatially explicit model was constructed to explore effects of the physical environment (bay geomorphic type, freshwater inputs), climate change drivers (sea level, temperature, precipitation) and aquaculture (bivalve species, stock) on ecosystem functioning. A factorial design led to 336 scenarios (48 hydrodynamic × 7 management). Model outcomes suggest that the physical environment controls estuarine functioning given its influence on primary productivity (bottom-up control dominated by riverine nutrients) and horizontal advection with the open ocean (dominated by bay geomorphic type). The intensity of bivalve aquaculture ultimately determines the bivalve-phytoplankton trophic interaction, which can range from a bottom-up control triggered by ammonia excretion to a top-down control via feeding. Results also suggest that temperature is the strongest climate change driver due to its influence on the metabolism of poikilothermic organisms (e.g. zooplankton and bivalves), which ultimately causes a concomitant increase of top-down pressure on phytoplankton. Given the different thermal tolerance of cultured species, temperature is also critical to sort winners from losers, benefiting Crassostrea virginica over Mytilus edulis under the specific conditions tested in this numerical exercise. In general, it is

  17. GaAs-oxide interface states - A gigantic photoionization effect and its implications to the origin of these states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Kazior, T. E.; Gatos, H. C.; Siejka, J.

    1981-01-01

    Gigantic photoionization was discovered on GaAs-oxide interfaces leading to the discharge of deep surface states with rates exceeding 1000 times those of photoionization transitions to the conduction band. It exhibits a peak similar to acceptor-donor transitions and is explained as due to energy transfer from photo-excited donor-acceptor pairs to deep surface states. This new process indicates the presence of significant concentrations of shallow donor and acceptor levels not recognized in previous interface models.

  18. Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sustained-release lanreotide (lanreotide Autogel) in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Akira; Teramoto, Akira; Hizuka, Naomi; Kitai, Kazuo; Ramis, Joaquim; Chihara, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The somatostatin analog lanreotide Autogel has proven to be efficacious for treating acromegaly in international studies and in clinical practices around the world. However, its efficacy in Japanese patients has not been extensively evaluated. We examined the dose-response relationship and long-term efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism. In an open-label, parallel-group, dose-response study, 32 patients (29 with acromegaly, 3 with pituitary gigantism) received 5 injections of 60, 90, or 120 mg of lanreotide Autogel over 24 weeks. Four weeks after the first injection, 41% of patients achieved serum GH level of <2.5 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) level was normalized in 31%. Values at Week 24 were 53% for GH and 44% for IGF-I. Dose-dependent decreases in serum GH and IGF-I levels were observed with dose-related changes in pharmacokinetic parameters. In an open-label, long-term study, 32 patients (30 with acromegaly, 2 with pituitary gigantism) received lanreotide Autogel once every 4 weeks for a total of 13 injections. Dosing was initiated with 90 mg and adjusted according to clinical responses at Weeks 16 and/or 32. At Week 52, 47% of patients had serum GH levels of <2.5 ng/mL and 53% had normalized IGF-I level. In both studies, acromegaly symptoms improved and treatment was generally well tolerated although gastrointestinal symptoms and injection site induration were reported. In conclusion, lanreotide Autogel provided early and sustained control of elevated GH and IGF-I levels, improved acromegaly symptoms, and was well tolerated in Japanese patients with acromegaly or pituitary gigantism.

  19. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with gigantism and huge pelvic tumor: a rare case of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sakayama, Kenshi; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kidani, Teruki; Fujibuchi, Taketsugu; Kito, Katsumi; Tanji, Nozomu; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2011-06-01

    We report a rare case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia on endocrine hyperfunction with elevated human growth hormone and normal serum level of prolactin. There were some differential points of gender, gigantism, endocrine function, and GNAS gene from McCune-Albright syndrome. Malignant transformation was suspected in the pelvic tumor from imaging because rapid growth of the tumor by imaging was observed; however, no malignant change occurred in this case.

  20. Mussel watch - measurements of chemical pollutants in bivalves as one indicator of coastal environmental quality

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, J.W.; Davis, A.C.; Tripp, B.W.; Phelps, D.K.; Galloway, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    The utility of the bivalve sentinel organism approach to monitoring for some chemicals of environmental concern in coastal and estuarine areas has been evaluated by regional and national programs and by smaller-scale research efforts during the past 15 years. The extent and severity of coastal contamination by chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, trace metals, and plutonium was assessed in several bivalve sentinel organism programs. Advantages and limitations of this approach are presented and discussed briefly within the context of both national and international efforts.

  1. First report of intramolluscan stages of a gorgoderid digenean from a marine bivalve.

    PubMed

    Bott, Nathan J; Cribb, Thomas H

    2005-08-01

    A survey of bivalves from Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, revealed a novel digenean infection in Lioconcha castrensis (Bivalvia: Veneridae). The cercaria has oral and ventral suckers, a dorsoventrally orientated stylet embedded in the oral sucker, penetration glands, and a large tail that is inflated at its base. This morphology is broadly consistent with that of previously described gorgoderid cercariae. Partial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (D1-D3 domains) was sequenced and aligned with sequences from other gorgoderids and related families. Phylogenetic analysis also suggests that the species belongs to the Gorgoderinae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gorgoderid from a marine bivalve.

  2. Convergent evolution of gigantism in damselflies of Africa and South America? Evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Linn F; Clausnitzer, Viola; Hadrys, Heike

    2007-02-01

    Extreme large body size is rare in modern Zygoptera (damselflies). Only the South and Central American damselfly family Pseudostigmatidae and one African species, Coryphagrion grandis, share the morphological trait of gigantism. By means of phylogenetic analyses using two mitochondrial markers (16S rDNA and ND1) and one nuclear marker (EF1) in combination with an existing morphological data set, we trace the evolution of gigantism in damselflies. Individual and combined data sets were analyzed using the maximum parsimony, minimum evolution and maximum likelihood algorithms. Regardless of the algorithm used and the data set analyzed all principal tree topologies support a monophyly of the damselfly taxa displaying giant body size. This supports the view that the evolution of gigantism in damselflies from Africa and South America is not the result of convergent evolution due to strikingly similar habitat preferences, but rather the result of close genealogical relationship. Because modern odonates evolved before the split of Africa from Gondwanaland, the proposed phylogeny suggests that C. grandis represents a Gondwana relict.

  3. Gravity combined with laser-scan in Grotta Gigante: a benchmark cave for gravity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetta, Tommaso; Braitenberg, Carla

    2014-05-01

    Laser scanning has become one of the most important topographic techniques in the last decades, due to its ability to reconstruct complex surfaces with high resolution and precision and due to its fast acquisition time. Recently a laser-scan survey has been acquired (Fingolo et al., 2011) in the "Grotta Gigante" cave near Trieste, Italy, the biggest cave worldwide according to the Guinness Awards. In this paper this survey is used to obtain a 3D discretization of the cave with prisms. Then through this new model, with the densities derived from campaign measurements, the exact gravimetric effect of the structure was computed (Nagy et al., 2000) and compared with the gravity observation at the surface. The transition from the cloud of laser-scan points to the prism model was carried out by different computer elaborations; first of all the reduction of the data density through an averaging process that allows to pass from over 10000 points/m2 to less than 10points/m2. Then the whole dataset was filtered from the outliers by the means of a simple quadratic surface that fit the data (Turner, 1999). The reduced data points should be divided into the 2 surfaces of top and bottom, that are used to define the prisms. This step was performed using the local regression method (Loess) to calculate a surface located halfway between top and bottom points. Once the top and bottom interfaces were obtained it was possible to get the final prism representation and calculate the gravity signal. The observed Bouguer field is explained very well by our model and the residuals are used to evaluate possible secondary caves. The final prism model together with the gravity database on surface and inside the cave form a perfect benchmark to test forward and inverse potential field algorithms. References Fingolo M., Facco L., Ceccato A., Breganze C., Paganini P., Cezza M., Grotta Gigante di Trieste. Tra realtà virtuale e rilievi 3D ad alta risoluzione, Veneto Geologi, 75, pp.21-25, 2011

  4. Bivalve effects on the food web supporting delta smelt—A long-term study of bivalve recruitment, biomass, and grazing rate patterns with varying freshwater outflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crauder, Jeff S.; Thompson, Janet K.; Parchaso, Francis; Anduaga, Rosa I.; Pearson, Sarah A.; Gehrts, Karen; Fuller, Heather; Wells, Elizabeth

    2016-01-21

    At the few stations where Potamocorbula and Corbicula co-occur, it appears that they did not hinder each other’s growth. Both bivalves had large animals at D4, where Corbicula size increased coincident with the presence of Potamocorbula in 1987. Corbicula were observed in wet years prior to Potamocorbula’sinvasion at D7 (Grizzly Bay) and were capable of growing to significant size in wet years (> 20 mm in 1986). 

  5. A gigantic new dinosaur from Argentina and the evolution of the sauropod hind foot.

    PubMed

    González Riga, Bernardo J; Lamanna, Matthew C; Ortiz David, Leonardo D; Calvo, Jorge O; Coria, Juan P

    2016-01-18

    Titanosauria is an exceptionally diverse, globally-distributed clade of sauropod dinosaurs that includes the largest known land animals. Knowledge of titanosaurian pedal structure is critical to understanding the stance and locomotion of these enormous herbivores and, by extension, gigantic terrestrial vertebrates as a whole. However, completely preserved pedes are extremely rare among Titanosauria, especially as regards the truly giant members of the group. Here we describe Notocolossus gonzalezparejasi gen. et sp. nov. from the Upper Cretaceous of Mendoza Province, Argentina. With a powerfully-constructed humerus 1.76 m in length, Notocolossus is one of the largest known dinosaurs. Furthermore, the complete pes of the new taxon exhibits a strikingly compact, homogeneous metatarsus--seemingly adapted for bearing extraordinary weight--and truncated unguals, morphologies that are otherwise unknown in Sauropoda. The pes underwent a near-progressive reduction in the number of phalanges along the line to derived titanosaurs, eventually resulting in the reduced hind foot of these sauropods.

  6. A gigantic new dinosaur from Argentina and the evolution of the sauropod hind foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Riga, Bernardo J.; Lamanna, Matthew C.; Ortiz David, Leonardo D.; Calvo, Jorge O.; Coria, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Titanosauria is an exceptionally diverse, globally-distributed clade of sauropod dinosaurs that includes the largest known land animals. Knowledge of titanosaurian pedal structure is critical to understanding the stance and locomotion of these enormous herbivores and, by extension, gigantic terrestrial vertebrates as a whole. However, completely preserved pedes are extremely rare among Titanosauria, especially as regards the truly giant members of the group. Here we describe Notocolossus gonzalezparejasi gen. et sp. nov. from the Upper Cretaceous of Mendoza Province, Argentina. With a powerfully-constructed humerus 1.76 m in length, Notocolossus is one of the largest known dinosaurs. Furthermore, the complete pes of the new taxon exhibits a strikingly compact, homogeneous metatarsus—seemingly adapted for bearing extraordinary weight—and truncated unguals, morphologies that are otherwise unknown in Sauropoda. The pes underwent a near-progressive reduction in the number of phalanges along the line to derived titanosaurs, eventually resulting in the reduced hind foot of these sauropods.

  7. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de La Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N.; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T.; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical ‘real-space’ search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo2O2S2]2+-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo10(C5)}; 2, {Mo14(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo60(C4)10}; 4, {Mo48(C4)6}; 5, {Mo34(C4)4}; 6, {Mo18(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations.

  8. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine.

    PubMed

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de la Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-04-28

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical 'real-space' search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo(2)O(2)S(2)](2+)-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo(10)(C5)}; 2, {Mo(14)(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo(60)(C4)10}; 4, {Mo(48)(C4)6}; 5, {Mo(34)(C4)4}; 6, {Mo(18)(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations.

  9. A gigantic new dinosaur from Argentina and the evolution of the sauropod hind foot

    PubMed Central

    González Riga, Bernardo J.; Lamanna, Matthew C.; Ortiz David, Leonardo D.; Calvo, Jorge O.; Coria, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Titanosauria is an exceptionally diverse, globally-distributed clade of sauropod dinosaurs that includes the largest known land animals. Knowledge of titanosaurian pedal structure is critical to understanding the stance and locomotion of these enormous herbivores and, by extension, gigantic terrestrial vertebrates as a whole. However, completely preserved pedes are extremely rare among Titanosauria, especially as regards the truly giant members of the group. Here we describe Notocolossus gonzalezparejasi gen. et sp. nov. from the Upper Cretaceous of Mendoza Province, Argentina. With a powerfully-constructed humerus 1.76 m in length, Notocolossus is one of the largest known dinosaurs. Furthermore, the complete pes of the new taxon exhibits a strikingly compact, homogeneous metatarsus—seemingly adapted for bearing extraordinary weight—and truncated unguals, morphologies that are otherwise unknown in Sauropoda. The pes underwent a near-progressive reduction in the number of phalanges along the line to derived titanosaurs, eventually resulting in the reduced hind foot of these sauropods. PMID:26777391

  10. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de la Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N.; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T.; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical ‘real-space’ search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo2O2S2]2+-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo10(C5)}; 2, {Mo14(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo60(C4)10}; 4, {Mo48(C4)6}; 5, {Mo34(C4)4}; 6, {Mo18(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations. PMID:24770632

  11. Evolución de planetas gigantes y posibilidades de su detección directa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, A.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Desde la reciente detección de planetas gigantes orbitando estrellas cercanas de tipo solar por medio de efecto Doppler, uno de los principales problemas, en cuanto al estudio de los sistemas planetarios extrasolares, se refiere a la posibilidad de obtener evidencia directa de su existencia. Esto parece ser factible gracias a que en un futuro cercano entrarán en operación algunos telescopios especialmente adecuados a estos propósitos. Por tal motivo, hemos comenzado desde hace un tiempo un esfuerzo en cuanto al estudio de la evolución planetaria. A tales efectos hemos adaptado el código de evolución estelar de nuestro Observatorio al caso planetario. Las principales diferencias entre el caso estelar y el planetario se encuentran en la ecuación de estado. A tales fines hemos incluído la reciente ecuación de estado de Saumon, Chabrier y Van Horn, las opacidades radiativas de Guillot et al., procesos de quema de Deuterio, etc. También se ha considerado la posible existencia de fases de hielo y roca en el interior planetario. Por el momento hemos despreciado los efectos de la rotación planetaria. Con este código hemos computado la evolución de planetas con masas desde 10 hasta 0.3 masas de Júpiter. Utilizando nuestros resultados numéricos discutimos la detectabilidad de estos objetos en condiciones realistas.

  12. Respiratory evolution facilitated the origin of pterosaur flight and aerial gigantism.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Leon P A M; O'Connor, Patrick M; Unwin, David M

    2009-01-01

    Pterosaurs, enigmatic extinct Mesozoic reptiles, were the first vertebrates to achieve true flapping flight. Various lines of evidence provide strong support for highly efficient wing design, control, and flight capabilities. However, little is known of the pulmonary system that powered flight in pterosaurs. We investigated the structure and function of the pterosaurian breathing apparatus through a broad scale comparative study of respiratory structure and function in living and extinct archosaurs, using computer-assisted tomographic (CT) scanning of pterosaur and bird skeletal remains, cineradiographic (X-ray film) studies of the skeletal breathing pump in extant birds and alligators, and study of skeletal structure in historic fossil specimens. In this report we present various lines of skeletal evidence that indicate that pterosaurs had a highly effective flow-through respiratory system, capable of sustaining powered flight, predating the appearance of an analogous breathing system in birds by approximately seventy million years. Convergent evolution of gigantism in several Cretaceous pterosaur lineages was made possible through body density reduction by expansion of the pulmonary air sac system throughout the trunk and the distal limb girdle skeleton, highlighting the importance of respiratory adaptations in pterosaur evolution, and the dramatic effect of the release of physical constraints on morphological diversification and evolutionary radiation.

  13. Earth’s oldest ‘Bobbit worm’ – gigantism in a Devonian eunicidan polychaete

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mats E.; Parry, Luke A.; Rudkin, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Whilst the fossil record of polychaete worms extends to the early Cambrian, much data on this group derive from microfossils known as scolecodonts. These are sclerotized jaw elements, which generally range from 0.1–2 mm in size, and which, in contrast to the soft-body anatomy, have good preservation potential and a continuous fossil record. Here we describe a new eunicidan polychaete, Websteroprion armstrongi gen. et sp. nov., based primarily on monospecific bedding plane assemblages from the Lower-Middle Devonian Kwataboahegan Formation of Ontario, Canada. The specimens are preserved mainly as three-dimensional moulds in the calcareous host rock, with only parts of the original sclerotized jaw walls occasionally present. This new taxon has a unique morphology and is characterized by an unexpected combination of features seen in several different Palaeozoic polychaete families. Websteroprion armstrongi was a raptorial feeder and possessed the largest jaws recorded in polychaetes from the fossil record, with maxillae reaching over one centimetre in length. Total body length of the species is estimated to have reached over one metre, which is comparable to that of extant ‘giant eunicid’ species colloquially referred to as ‘Bobbit worms’. This demonstrates that polychaete gigantism was already a phenomenon in the Palaeozoic, some 400 million years ago. PMID:28220886

  14. Lower limb gigantism, lymphedema, and painful varicosities following a thigh vascular access graft.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Mathuram Thiyagarajan, Umasankar; Akoh, Jacob A

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are associated with greater morbidity than autogenous arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), but their use is indicated when AVF formation is not possible. This report adds to the literature a case of lower limb gigantism, painful varicosities, and lymphedema following long-term use of AVG in the upper thigh. The patient's past medical history included renal transplantation on the same side well before the AVG was inserted and right leg deep vein thrombosis. Suspicion of AVG thrombosis was excluded by Doppler ultrasound, which demonstrated an access flow of 1700 mL/min. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis did not identify the cause of her symptoms. Whereas functional incompetence of the iliac vein valve might be responsible for the varicosities, the extent of hypertrophy in this case raises the suspicion of lymphatic blockage possibly secondary to groin dissection undertaken at the time of graft insertion, in addition to the previous dissection at the time of transplantation. This case highlights the need for minimal groin dissection during AVG insertion, particularly in patients with a history of previous abdominopelvic surgery.

  15. Endochondral gigantism: a newly recognized skeletal dysplasia with pre- and postnatal overgrowth and endocrine abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Heinrich; Kammer, Birgit; Grasser, Monika; Enders, Angelika; Rost, Imma; Kiess, Wieland

    2007-08-15

    We report on a 3-year-old male, born at 34 weeks of gestation, with marked pre- and postnatal overgrowth, birth weight of 6,600 g, length of 61 cm, and head circumference of 38.5 cm. A striking phenotype was recorded at birth, which became more evident during the follow-up period. He had macrobrachycephaly, facial abnormalities, small thoracic cage, long trunk, deformed spine, rhizomelia, large hands and feets, absent subcutaneous fat, small umbilical hernia, inguinal hernias, and large joints with mild contractures. Hypoglycemic episodes and obstructive apnea complicated the neonatal period. During follow-up, overgrowth continued with a height of 146 cm (+11.65 SDS) and a weight of 39 kg (BMI 18.3 kg/m(2)) at 3.5 years. Endocrinological work-up disclosed extremely low levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors, and insulin. What makes our patient unique is the association of marked prenatal overgrowth; unusual phenotype; skeletal dysplasia caused by accelerated endochondral ossification resulting in cartilage hyperplasia of the skull base and spine, and postnatal gigantism; and complete absence of subcutaneous fat. Other well-known overgrowth syndromes were excluded. We hypothesize that autocrine/paracrine growth factors could be the cause of excessive endochondral ossification. Alternately, activating mutations in transcription factors involved in both growth and endocrine/metabolic homeostasis could be responsible for this unusual phenotype.

  16. A Thermodynamic, kinematic and microphysical analysis of a jet and gigantic jet-producing Florida thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, S. M.; Splitt, M. E.; Brownlee, James; Spiva, Nicholas; Liu, Ningyu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a meteorological analysis of a storm that produced two jets, four gigantic jets (GJ), and a starter, which were observed by two radars as well as the Kennedy Space Center 4-Dimensional Lightning Surveillance System on 3 August 2013 in Central Florida. The work is the first application of dual polarization data to a jet-producing storm and is the fifth case related to a tropical disturbance. The storm environment is consistent with the moist tropical paradigm that characterizes about three quarters of the surface and aircraft observed jet and GJ events. The most unstable (MU) convective available potential energy is not unusual for Florida summer convection and is below the climatological mean for these events. An unusual speed shear layer is located near the storm equilibrium level (EL) and the storm exhibits a tilted structure with CGs displaced upshear. The turbulence, as measured by the eddy dissipation rate, is extreme near the storm top during the event window, consistent with the GJ mixing hypothesis. The individual events are collocated with, and track along, the center axis of the divergent outflow at the EL and occur within the region of the coldest GOES IR temperatures—placing the events within the overshoot. The dual polarization data indicate a deep graupel column, extending above the mixed phase layer, to a 13 km altitude.

  17. DETERMINATION OF LETHAL DISSOLVED OXYGEN LEVELS FOR SELECTED MARINE AND ESTUARINE FISHES, CRUSTACEANS AND A BIVALVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to provide a database of the incipient lethal concentrations for reduced dissolved oxygen (DO) for selected marine and estuarine species including 12 species of fish, 9 crustaceans, and 1 bivalve. All species occur in the Virginian Province, USA, w...

  18. Consumption of freshwater bivalves by muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hersey, Kimberly Asmus; Clark, Joseph D.; Layzer, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) are known to prey on freshwater bivalves (mussels and clams) and can negatively impact imperiled mussel species. However, factors that influence muskrat predation on bivalves are poorly understood. We evaluated the feeding ecology of muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky, by using stable isotope analysis of muskrat hair samples and by monitoring bivalve shell deposition at muskrat middens. Bayesian mixing-model analysis of stable isotope δ15N and δ13C ratios revealed that the median muskrat biomass derived from bivalves was 51.4% (5th and 95th percentiles were 39.1 to 63.4%, respectively), a much higher dietary proportion than previously reported. Shell depositions by muskrats at middens decreased with the availability of seasonal emergent vegetation, suggesting that the consumption of animal matter is in response to a scarcity of plant foods, perhaps exacerbated by the altered flow regimes on the Green River. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that muskrats have the potential to impact mussel population growth and recovery in some environments.

  19. Cadmium-induced changes in trace element bioaccumulation and proteomics perspective in four marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengjie; Wang, Da-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-06-01

    Bivalves are employed widely as biomonitors of metal pollution and proteomics has increasingly been applied to solve ecotoxicological issues. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Cd exposure on the bioaccumulation of other trace elements and reveal the molecular mechanisms using proteomics technologies. The results showed that Cd exposure resulted in remarkable changes in body concentrations of Zn, Cu, Ag, Co, Ni, Pb, and Se in four marine bivalves (scallop Chlamys nobilis, clam Ruditapes philippinarum, mussel Perna viridis, and oyster Saccostrea cucullata). Generally, the bivalves exposed to higher Cd concentration accumulated higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Se, but a lower concentration of Co. The accumulation of Ag, Ni, and Pb was specific for different species. The data strongly suggest that the influences of one metal exposure on the bioaccumulation of other metals/metalloids need to be considered in interpreting body concentrations of the elements in the biomonitors. Cd exposure had little effect on bivalve proteomes, and the identified proteins were insufficient to explain the observed disruption of trace element metabolism. However, protein expression signatures composed of the altered proteins could distinguish the clams and the mussels with different body Cd levels. The strong up-regulation of galectin in Cd-exposed oysters indicated the protein as a novel biomarker in environmental monitoring.

  20. EMBATTLED BIVALVES: BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND ABUNDANCES FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change, we have synthesized in a web-based tool, the Coastal Biogeographic Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT), the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves, found in dept...

  1. Pattern and process of diversification in an ecologically diverse epifaunal bivalve group Pterioidea (Pteriomorphia, Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Remi; Kameda, Yuichi; Kato, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The pterioid bivalves (superfamily Pterioidea) are epifaunal filter feeders that attach to various substrata, including rocks, corals, gorgonians, and sponges. An intriguing question is how different substratum types have affected the diversification of pterioid bivalves. To elucidate the evolutionary pathway of Pterioidea, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of 49 individuals belonging to 18 pterioid and 5 outgroup species using 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes. The results supported the monophyly of superfamily Pterioidea and recovered three major clades within Pterioidea: Malleus, Pteria and Electroma (Pterelectroma) zebra and the rest. This result contradicts the current circumscription of the pterioid families, Pteriidae, Malleidae, and Isognomonidae, and suggests that hinge morphology, which has long been used as a diagnostic character, does not reflect phylogenetic relationships. The monophyly of most genera, however, was confirmed. Mapping substrata types on the phylogenetic tree indicated that the ancestors of pterioid bivalves were epifaunal on rocks, and that epizoic life on sessile cnidarians had a single origin. Although we could not ascertain whether endozoic life in sponges evolved once or twice, our results suggest that colonization of biotic substrata resulted in diversification and morphological and ecological adaptation to epi-/endozoic life. We estimated that the genus Pteria has diversified since the late Cretaceous in response to gorgonian diversification. These results emphasize the importance of substratum shifts in speciation and diversification of pterioid bivalves.

  2. Shell growth and environmental control of methanophyllic Thyasirid bivalves from Svalbard cold seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Åström, Emmelie; Ambrose, William; Locke, William; Oliver, Graham; Hong, Wei-Li; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of molluscan shell material (sclerochronology) can provide information about an organism's age, growth history, and environmental conditions during its lifetime. Bivalve molluscs are common members of hydrothermal vents and methane cold seeps communities where, supported by chemosynthetic symbionts, they can reach high density and biomass. But little is known about methane-associated bivalve populations inhabiting high-Arctic cold seeps, and sclerochronological analysis of methane-influenced bivalves is rare. We measured growth rates and elemental and isotopic shell signatures in a newly discovered species of bivalve (Thyasiridae) from cold seeps at 350-390m depth southwest of Svalbard. First discovered in 2014, recently described shells of Thyasira capitanea sp.nov. were found at 2 independent seep systems in Storfjordrenna. Mean shell carbon isotopic ratios from inorganic δ13C (mean = -4.8‰) and organic δ13C (mean = -26.9‰) fractions clearly indicate a methane influenced habitat and food source for these organisms. Shell mineral ratios (Li/Ca, Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Pb/Ca) sampled along the axis of growth with laser-ablated ICP-MS exhibit variability through time and between sites, suggesting that concentrations of these elements that may be affected by methane emissions. The mineralogical data also elucidates the internal pattern of shell deposition and growth checks, and combined with the isotopic and growth rate data, enables us to interpret the temporal history of methane release from these locations.

  3. Forever competent: deep-sea bivalves are colonized by their chemosynthetic symbionts throughout their lifetime.

    PubMed

    Wentrup, Cecilia; Wendeberg, Annelie; Schimak, Mario; Borowski, Christian; Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    Symbiotic bivalves at hydrothermal vents and cold seeps host chemosynthetic bacteria intracellularly in gill cells. In bivalves, the gills grow continuously throughout their lifetime by forming new filaments. We examined how newly developed gill tissues are colonized in bivalves with horizontal and vertical symbiont transmission (Bathymodiolus mussels versus a vesicoymid clam) using fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy. Symbiont colonization was similar in mussels and clams and was independent of the transmission modes. Symbionts were absent in the growth zones of the gills, indicating that symbionts colonize newly formed gill filaments de novo after they are formed and that gill colonization is a continuous process throughout the host's lifetime. Symbiont abundance and distribution suggested that colonization is shaped by the developmental stage of host cells. Self-infection, in which new gill cells are colonized by symbionts from ontogenetically older gill tissues, may also play a role. In mussels, symbiont infection led to changes in gill cell structure similar to those described from other epithelial cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as the loss of microvilli. A better understanding of the factors that affect symbiont colonization of bivalve gills could provide new insights into interactions between intracellular bacteria and epithelial tissues.

  4. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect fecal-oral route involving fecal-contaminated water. In this study, the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water was examined. A single cla...

  5. Estimation of density-dependent mortality of juvenile bivalves in the Wadden Sea.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Henrike; Strasser, Matthias; van der Meer, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    We investigated density-dependent mortality within the early months of life of the bivalves Macoma balthica (Baltic tellin) and Cerastoderma edule (common cockle) in the Wadden Sea. Mortality is thought to be density-dependent in juvenile bivalves, because there is no proportional relationship between the size of the reproductive adult stocks and the numbers of recruits for both species. It is not known however, when exactly density dependence in the pre-recruitment phase occurs and how prevalent it is. The magnitude of recruitment determines year class strength in bivalves. Thus, understanding pre-recruit mortality will improve the understanding of population dynamics. We analyzed count data from three years of temporal sampling during the first months after bivalve settlement at ten transects in the Sylt-Rømø-Bay in the northern German Wadden Sea. Analyses of density dependence are sensitive to bias through measurement error. Measurement error was estimated by bootstrapping, and residual deviances were adjusted by adding process error. With simulations the effect of these two types of error on the estimate of the density-dependent mortality coefficient was investigated. In three out of eight time intervals density dependence was detected for M. balthica, and in zero out of six time intervals for C. edule. Biological or environmental stochastic processes dominated over density dependence at the investigated scale.

  6. A predatory bivalved euarthropod from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte, South China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Lan, Tian; Hou, Jin-bo; Zhang, Xi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Bivalved euarthropods represent a conspicuous component of exceptionally-preserved fossil biotas throughout the Lower Palaeozoic. However, most of these taxa are known from isolated valves, and thus there is a limited understanding of their morphological organization and palaeoecology in the context of early animal-dominated communities. The bivalved euarthropod Clypecaris serrata sp. nov., recovered from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Hongjingshao Formation in Kunming, southern China, is characterized by having a robust first pair of raptorial appendages that bear well-developed ventral-facing spines, paired dorsal spines on the trunk, and posteriorly oriented serrations on the anteroventral margins of both valves. The raptorial limbs of C. serrata were adapted for grasping prey employing a descending stroke for transporting it close the mouth, whereas the backwards-facing marginal serrations of the bivalved carapace may have helped to secure the food items during feeding. The new taxon offers novel insights on the morphology of the enigmatic genus Clypecaris, and indicates that the possession of paired dorsal spines is a diagnostic trait of the Family Clypecarididae within upper stem-group Euarthropoda. C. serrata evinces functional adaptations for an active predatory lifestyle within the context of Cambrian bivalved euarthropods, and contributes towards the better understanding of feeding diversity in early ecosystems. PMID:27283406

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Emerging Bivalve Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus

    PubMed Central

    Spinard, Edward J.; Dubert, Javier; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Barja, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus is a bivalve pathogen isolated during episodes of mortality affecting larval cultures in different shellfish hatcheries. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of the type strain PP-638 and describe potential virulence factors, which may provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity. PMID:27469949

  8. A predatory bivalved euarthropod from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Lan, Tian; Hou, Jin-Bo; Zhang, Xi-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Bivalved euarthropods represent a conspicuous component of exceptionally-preserved fossil biotas throughout the Lower Palaeozoic. However, most of these taxa are known from isolated valves, and thus there is a limited understanding of their morphological organization and palaeoecology in the context of early animal-dominated communities. The bivalved euarthropod Clypecaris serrata sp. nov., recovered from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Hongjingshao Formation in Kunming, southern China, is characterized by having a robust first pair of raptorial appendages that bear well-developed ventral-facing spines, paired dorsal spines on the trunk, and posteriorly oriented serrations on the anteroventral margins of both valves. The raptorial limbs of C. serrata were adapted for grasping prey employing a descending stroke for transporting it close the mouth, whereas the backwards-facing marginal serrations of the bivalved carapace may have helped to secure the food items during feeding. The new taxon offers novel insights on the morphology of the enigmatic genus Clypecaris, and indicates that the possession of paired dorsal spines is a diagnostic trait of the Family Clypecarididae within upper stem-group Euarthropoda. C. serrata evinces functional adaptations for an active predatory lifestyle within the context of Cambrian bivalved euarthropods, and contributes towards the better understanding of feeding diversity in early ecosystems.

  9. Freshwater bivalve mollusca (unionidae, sphaeriidae, corbiculidae) of the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J.C.; Fuller, S.L.H.

    1980-11-01

    A guide to freshwater bivalve molluscs found at the Savannah River Plant is presented. A dichotomous taxonomic key is provided to common forms and to unreported species whose geographic distributions include nearby localities. Discussions of ecology, life history, larval hosts, and other pertinent information is provided. (ACR)

  10. BIVALVE BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS, ABUNDANCES, AND CLIMATE VULNERABILITY FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an U.S. EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change along the Pacific Coast, we have synthesized the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves found in depths <200 m. We have included the twelve &ldqu...

  11. Dynamic Energy Budget model parameter estimation for the bivalve Mytilus californianus: Application of the covariation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzelle, A.; Montalto, V.; Sarà, G.; Zippay, M.; Helmuth, B.

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models serve as a powerful tool for describing the flow of energy through organisms from assimilation of food to utilization for maintenance, growth and reproduction. The DEB theory has been successfully applied to several bivalve species to compare bioenergetic and physiological strategies for the utilization of energy. In particular, mussels within the Mytilus edulis complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus) have been the focus of many studies due to their economic and ecological importance, and their worldwide distribution. However, DEB parameter values have never been estimated for Mytilus californianus, a species that is an ecological dominant on rocky intertidal shores on the west coast of North America and which likely varies considerably from mussels in the M. edulis complex in its physiology. We estimated a set of DEB parameters for M. californianus using the covariation method estimation procedure and compared these to parameter values from other bivalve species. Model parameters were used to compare sensitivity to environmental variability among species, as a first examination of how strategies for physiologically contending with environmental change by M. californianus may differ from those of other bivalves. Results suggest that based on the parameter set obtained, M. californianus has favorable energetic strategies enabling it to contend with a range of environmental conditions. For instance, the allocation fraction of reserve to soma (κ) is among the highest of any bivalves, which is consistent with the observation that this species can survive over a wide range of environmental conditions, including prolonged periods of starvation.

  12. Estimating the distribution of harvested estuarine bivalves with natural-history-based habitat suitability models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of concern. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to natural or human-...

  13. Onshore-offshore decrease in genus origination rate in Recent tropical bivalves (Red Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasovych, Adam; Zuschin, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Broad-scale macroevolutionary and macroecological studies show significant effects of latitude on diversification rates and the clustering of range limits, with temperature being one of the most important correlates of macroecological attributes in marine environments. Temperature, however, also varies predictably with depth, but variation in diversification along bathymetric gradients remains much less explored. Here we assess bathymetric gradients in range configuration (and thus in the clustering of range limits), in taxonomic structure and in age structure of bivalve communities in the Red Sea. We find that depth minima of bivalve species and genera do not cluster along bathymetric gradients while depth maxima significantly cluster at ~50 and 700 m. Therefore, bivalve species and genera show a marked nestedness of their bathymetric ranges: taxa restricted to shallow environments are nested within generalistic taxa that have broad bathymetric distribution. Nested ranges imply that extinction, origination and dispersal processes that structure bivalve metacommunities in the Red Sea change significantly with depth. In accord with this, bivalve genera show (1) a significant increase in median age towards deeper environments, implying that genus origination rate decreases with depth, and (2) a significant decrease in the proportion of monotypic genera and increase in the per-genus species richness towards deeper environments, implying that per-species genus origination and in species extinction rates decrease with depth. These patterns suggest that genera preferentially originated onshore and then expanded offshore in the Red Sea, but still kept their presence in onshore (i.e., offshore specialists are rare). The unique configuration of bathymetric ranges in the Red Sea with rarity of taxa restricted to deeper waters can be related to the lack of temperature stratification. Our analyses, however, indicate that bivalve metacommunities in tropical and warm

  14. Burrowing criteria and burrowing mode adjustment in bivalves to varying geoenvironmental conditions in intertidal flats and beaches.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Shinji; Watabe, Yoichi; Yang, Soonbo; Kuwae, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    The response of bivalves to their abiotic environment has been widely studied in relation to hydroenvironmental conditions, sediment types and sediment grain sizes. However, the possible role of varying geoenvironmental conditions in their habitats remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the hardness of the surficial intertidal sediments varies by a factor of 20-50 due to suction development and suction-induced void state changes in the essentially saturated states of intertidal flats and beaches. We investigated the response of two species of bivalves, Ruditapes philippinarum and Donax semigranosus, in the laboratory by simulating such prevailing geoenvironmental conditions in the field. The experimental results demonstrate that the bivalve responses depended strongly on the varying geoenvironmental conditions. Notably, both bivalves consistently shifted their burrowing modes, reducing the burrowing angle and burial depth, in response to increasing hardness, to compensate for the excessive energy required for burrowing, as explained by a proposed conceptual model. This burrowing mode adjustment was accompanied by two burrowing criteria below or above which the bivalves accomplished vertical burrowing or failed to burrow, respectively. The suitable and fatal conditions differed markedly with species and shell lengths. The acute sensitivities of the observed bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes revealed two distinctive mechanisms accounting for the adult-juvenile spatial distributions of Ruditapes philippinarum and the behavioral adaptation to a rapidly changing geoenvironment of Donax semigranosus. The present results may provide a rational basis by which to understand the ensuing, and to predict future, bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes in intertidal zones.

  15. Cellular physiological assessment of bivalves after chronic exposure to spilled Exxon Valdez crude oil using a novel molecular diagnostic biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Downs, Craig A; Shigenaka, Gary; Fauth, John E; Robinson, Charles E; Huang, Arnold

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cellular physiological status of the bivalves Mya arenaria and Mytilus trossulus in an area experiencing a 10-yr chronic exposure of spilled Exxon Valdez crude oil in Prince William Sound. Bivalves were collected from well-characterized oiled and unoiled sites. We used a novel biotechnology (Environmental Cellular Diagnostic System) to determine (i) if bivalves were physiologically stressed, (ii) the nature of the altered physiological state, and (iii) whether the bivalves were responding to an exposure of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Molecular diagnostic analysis indicated that bivalves at the oiled site were experiencing both oxidative and xenobiotic stress, resulting in increased protein turnover and chaperone activity. Bivalves from the impacted area were responding specifically to a PAH-xenobiotic exposure and accumulating protein-PAH adducts. Finally, species-specific responses were observed that could be related to the habitat preferences of each species. We conclude that bivalves inhabiting a site impacted by crude oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill showed clear indications of cellular physiological stress.

  16. Depth-related gradients in community structure and relatedness of bivalves and isopods in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Angelika; Linse, Katrin; Ellingsen, Kari E.; Somerfield, Paul J.

    2016-05-01

    Despite increased research over the last decade, diversity patterns in Antarctic deep-sea benthic taxa and their driving forces are only marginally known. Depth-related patterns of diversity and distribution of isopods and bivalves collected in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean are analysed. The data, sampled by epibenthic sledge at 40 deep-sea stations from the upper continental slope to the hadal zone (774-6348 m) over a wide area of the Southern Ocean, comprises 619 species of isopods and 81 species of bivalves. There were more species of isopods than bivalves in all samples, and species per station varied from 2 to 85 for isopods and from 0 to 18 for bivalves. Most species were rare, with 72% of isopod species restricted to one or two stations, and 45% of bivalves. Among less-rare species bivalves tended to have wider distributions than isopods. The species richness of isopods varied with depth, showing a weak unimodal curve with a peak at 2000-4000 m, while the richness of bivalves did not. Multivariate analyses indicate that there are two main assemblages in the Southern Ocean, one shallow and one deep. These overlap over a large depth-range (2000-4000 m). Comparing analyses based on the Sørensen resemblance measure and Γ+ (incorporating relatedness among species) indicates that rare species tend to have other closely related species within the same depth band. Analysis of relatedness among species indicates that the taxonomic variety of bivalves tends to decline at depth, whereas that of isopods is maintained. This, it is speculated, may indicate that the available energy at depth is insufficient to maintain a range of bivalve life-history strategies.

  17. The use of bivalves as rapid, real-time indicators of aquatic pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Markich, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The ability of bivalves to filter large volumes of water on a daily basis, combined with the relatively high permeability of their cell membranes, make them valuable organisms to use in the contemporary detection of pollution. Bivalves are well known to respond to chemical contaminants by isolating their soft tissues from the aquatic medium by valve closure. The sensory acuity (via specialized sensory regions including the osphradium) and associated repertoire of this behavioral response can be employed to assess subtle effects exerted by chemical contaminants, such as complex effluents, that may ultimately influence the survival of these organisms. As hazard assessment tools, behavioral studies reflect sublethal toxicity and often yield a highly sensitive estimate of the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC). Moreover, valve movement behavior has been identified as one of the more sensitive biological early warning measures to a variety of aquatic contaminants, in comparison with those used in other aquatic animal phyla. Therefore, the valve movement behavior of both freshwater (Hyridella depressa, Velesunio angasi and V. ambiguus) and marine (Mytilus edulis) bivalves was continuously monitored, using an on-line computer based data acquisition system, during exposure to either trace metals (e.g. Cu, Cd, Mn and U) or complex effluents (ie treated sewage effluent and acid leachate derived from contaminated Sydney Harbour sediments), in the context of using the valve movement behavior of the bivalve species to indicate the biological significance of exposure to the above-mentioned pollutants. The results indicate that several components of the valve movement behavior of each bivalve provide quantifiable and ecologically interpretable sub-lethal endpoints for the rapid and sensitive evaluation of waters containing either complex effluents or elevated levels of trace metals.

  18. First respiration estimates of cold-seep vesicomyid bivalves from in situ total oxygen uptake measurements.

    PubMed

    Decker, Carole; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Khripounoff, Alexis; Olu, Karine

    2012-04-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves are one of the most abundant symbiont-bearing species inhabiting deep-sea reducing ecosystems. Nevertheless, except for the hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica, their metabolic rates have not been documented, and only assessed with ex situ experiments. In this study, gathering benthic chamber measurements and biomass estimation, we give the first in situ assessment of the respiration rate of these bivalves. The giant pockmark Regab, located at 3160m depth along the Congo-Angola margin, is a cold-seep site characterised by dense assemblages of two species of vesicomyids: Christineconcha regab and Laubiericoncha chuni with high dominance of C. regab. Two sites with dense aggregates of vesicomyids were selected to measure total oxygen uptake (TOU), and methane fluxes using IFREMER's benthic chamber CALMAR deployed by the ROV Quest 4000 (MARUM). Photographs were taken and bivalves were sampled using blade corers to estimate density and biomass. Total oxygen uptake was higher at Site 2 compared to Site 1 (respectively 492 mmol.m(-2).d(-1) and 332 mmol.m(-2).d(-1)). However, given vesicomyid densities and biomass, mean oxygen consumption rates were similar at both sites (1.9 to 2.5 μmol.g total dry mass(-1).h(-1) at the Site 1 and 1.8 to 2.3 μmol.g total dry mass(-1).h(-1) at Site 2). These respiration rates are higher than published ex situ estimates for cold-seep or hydrothermal vent bivalves. Although methane fluxes at the base of sulphide production were clearly higher at Site 2 (14.6 mmol.m(-2).d(-1)) than at Site 1 (0.3 mmol.m(-2).d(-1)), they do not seem to influence the respiration rates of these bivalves associated to sulphide-oxidizing symbionts.

  19. How predictable is high bivalve recruitment in the Wadden Sea after a severe winter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, Matthias; Dekker, Rob; Essink, Karel; Günther, Carmen-Pia; Jaklin, Sandra; Kröncke, Ingrid; Madsen, Poul Brinch; Michaelis, Hermann; Vedel, Grace

    2003-02-01

    Higher than average recruitment among bivalves on the intertidal flats of the Wadden Sea was often observed after severe winters in the period 1940-1995. The occurrence of another severe winter in 1995/96 prompted us to test the hypothesis of severe winters leading to universally high bivalve recruitment on a large geographic scale (500 km coastline) in temperate shallow waters. We analysed data sets on bivalve abundance from seven areas in the Dutch, German and Danish Wadden Sea. The longer data sets showed generally higher bivalve recruitment in the 1970s and 1980s than in the 1990s which may be related to the near absence of severe winters since 1987. Considering the period 1988 onwards (the longest possible period in which 1995/96 was the only severe winter), recruitment of Cerastoderma edule was in 1996 - in agreement with our hypothesis - above average in all seven areas investigated. In contrast, recruitment of Macoma balthica and Mya arenaria was for the same period above average only in the southern Wadden Sea (south-west of Jade Bay) but not in the northern Wadden Sea (north of Eiderstedt peninsula). These regional differences may be related to (i) the different topography of the northern Wadden Sea (with barrier islands west of the mainland) compared to the southern Wadden Sea (with barrier islands north of the mainland) and subsequent differential effects of wind-induced currents on bivalve recruitment, (ii) differences in biotic factors such as standing stocks, larval supply or epibenthic predation or (iii) changes in environmental conditions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale comparisons along coasts are an indispensable addition to insights derived from local studies alone.

  20. Generally detected genes in comparative transcriptomics in bivalves: toward the identification of molecular markers of cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingjing; Chi, Luping; Pan, Luqing; Song, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The specificity and representativeness of protein-coding genes identified by transcriptomics as biomarkers for environmental toxicological stress is crucial. We extracted the differential gene expression profile data from 49 published comparative transcriptomic studies of bivalves from January 2004 till November 2014 performed in 15 different bivalve species. Among the studies, 77 protein-coding genes were frequently detected when we use threefold of the average detection frequency as cut-off. Cellular organization and communication, protein and energy metabolism, stress response are the main functional classes of these proteins. We consider if these protein-coding genes represent common cellular stress responses of bivalves.

  1. Gastropods and bivalves of commercial interest from the continental shelf of Jalisco and Colima, México.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Jara, E; Pérez-Peña, M; Beas-Luna, R; López-Uriarte, E; Juárez-Carrillo, E

    2001-01-01

    The distribution and abundance with respect to depth and type of substratum of 20 species of gastropods and four species of bivalves of economic importance were examined in the continental shelf of Jalisco and Colima, México. These species were taken with net trawls at depths from 24 to 83 m in August, 1988. Most individuals and species of gastropods were collected in stations with sandy silt substratum. Bivalves were collected in sandy silt and medium sand substrata. The six most abundant species represented 81.2% of all gastropods and bivalves collected. These species are: Cantharus pallidus, Fusinus dupetittouarsi, Ficus ventricosa, Hexaplex brassica, Harpa conoidalis and Arca pacifica.

  2. Increase in tracheal investment with beetle size supports hypothesis of oxygen limitation on insect gigantism.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Klok, C Jaco; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Quinlan, Michael C; Harrison, Jon F

    2007-08-07

    Recent studies have suggested that Paleozoic hyperoxia enabled animal gigantism, and the subsequent hypoxia drove a reduction in animal size. This evolutionary hypothesis depends on the argument that gas exchange in many invertebrates and skin-breathing vertebrates becomes compromised at large sizes because of distance effects on diffusion. In contrast to vertebrates, which use respiratory and circulatory systems in series, gas exchange in insects is almost exclusively determined by the tracheal system, providing a particularly suitable model to investigate possible limitations of oxygen delivery on size. In this study, we used synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging to visualize the tracheal system and quantify its dimensions in four species of darkling beetles varying in mass by 3 orders of magnitude. We document that, in striking contrast to the pattern observed in vertebrates, larger insects devote a greater fraction of their body to the respiratory system, as tracheal volume scaled with mass1.29. The trend is greatest in the legs; the cross-sectional area of the trachea penetrating the leg orifice scaled with mass1.02, whereas the cross-sectional area of the leg orifice scaled with mass0.77. These trends suggest the space available for tracheae within the leg may ultimately limit the maximum size of extant beetles. Because the size of the tracheal system can be reduced when oxygen supply is increased, hyperoxia, as occurred during late Carboniferous and early Permian, may have facilitated the evolution of giant insects by allowing limbs to reach larger sizes before the tracheal system became limited by spatial constraints.

  3. Increase in tracheal investment with beetle size supports hypothesis of oxygen limitation on insect gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Klok, C. Jaco; Socha, John J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Quinlan, Michael C.; Harrison, Jon F.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Paleozoic hyperoxia enabled animal gigantism, and the subsequent hypoxia drove a reduction in animal size. This evolutionary hypothesis depends on the argument that gas exchange in many invertebrates and skin-breathing vertebrates becomes compromised at large sizes because of distance effects on diffusion. In contrast to vertebrates, which use respiratory and circulatory systems in series, gas exchange in insects is almost exclusively determined by the tracheal system, providing a particularly suitable model to investigate possible limitations of oxygen delivery on size. In this study, we used synchrotron x-ray phase–contrast imaging to visualize the tracheal system and quantify its dimensions in four species of darkling beetles varying in mass by 3 orders of magnitude. We document that, in striking contrast to the pattern observed in vertebrates, larger insects devote a greater fraction of their body to the respiratory system, as tracheal volume scaled with mass1.29. The trend is greatest in the legs; the cross-sectional area of the trachea penetrating the leg orifice scaled with mass1.02, whereas the cross-sectional area of the leg orifice scaled with mass0.77. These trends suggest the space available for tracheae within the leg may ultimately limit the maximum size of extant beetles. Because the size of the tracheal system can be reduced when oxygen supply is increased, hyperoxia, as occurred during late Carboniferous and early Permian, may have facilitated the evolution of giant insects by allowing limbs to reach larger sizes before the tracheal system became limited by spatial constraints. PMID:17666530

  4. New color images of sprites, halos and gigantic jets from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Y.; Rubanenko, L.; Mezuman, K.; Elhalel, G.; Pariente, M.; Glickman-Pariente, M.; Ziv, B.; Takahashi, Y.; Inoue, T.

    2012-12-01

    During July-August 2011, Expedition 28/29 JAXA astronaut Satoshi Furukawa conducted TLE observations from the International Space Station in conjunction with the "Cosmic Shore" program produced by NHK. An EMCCD normal video-rate color TV camera was used to conduct directed observations from the Earth-pointing Copula module. The target selection was based on the methodology developed for the MEIDEX sprite campaign on board the space shuttle Columbia in January 2003 (Ziv et al., 2004). We used the Aviation Weather Center (http://aviationweather.gov) daily significant weather forecast maps (SIGWX) to select regions with high probability for convective activity and thunderstorm such that they were within the camera FOV as deduced from the ISS trajectory and distance to the limb (2240 km). For increasing the chance for successful observations, only storms with predicted "Frequent Cb" and cloud tops above 45 Kft (~14 km) were selected. Additionally, we targeted tropical storms and hurricanes over the oceans. The observation geometry was pre-determined and uploaded daily to the ISS with pointing options to limb, oblique or nadir, based on the predicted location of the storm with regards to the ISS. The pointing angle was rotated in real-time according to visual eyesight by the astronaut. We present results of 10 confirmed TLEs: 8 sprites, 1 sprite halo and 1 gigantic jet, out of <2 hours of video. Sprites tend to appear in a single frame simultaneously with maximum lightning brightness. Unique images (a) from nadir of a sprite horizontally displaced form the lightning light and (b) from oblique view of a sprite halo, enable the calculation of dimensions and volumes occupied by these TLEs. Since time stamping on the ISS images was accurate within 1 s, matching with ELF and WWLLN data for the parent lightning location is limited. Nevertheless, the results prove that the ISS is an ideal platform for lightning and TLE observations, and careful operational procedures greatly

  5. Parâmetros astrofísicos de estrelas gigantes do aglomerado globular 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Barbuy, B.

    2003-08-01

    Os aglomerados globulares são considerados laboratórios astrofísicos para a verificação da teoria de evolução estelar, bem como a trajetória químio-dinâmica das galáxias hospedeiras. Em particular, 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) configura-se como um dos mais extensivamente estudados aglomerados globulares da Galáxia devido a relativa proximidade ao Sol (R¤ = 4.5 kpc) e alta latitute galáctica (b = -44°,89). Neste trabalho, apresentamos a velocidade radial heliocêntrica e os parâmetros atmosféricos (Teff, logg, [Fe/H]) de 5 estrelas gigantes do aglomerado globular 47 Tucanae. Os espectros foram obtidos pelo espectrógrafo UVES (Ultaviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph) de alta resolução (R = 60000) e alta razão sinal-ruído (S/N > 200), acoplado ao telescópio de 8,2m Kueyen do VLT (Very Large Telescope). Nós encontramos = -22,43 +/- 3,97 km/s, [Fe/H] ~ -0.7, 1,2 < logg < 2,2 e 4100 < Teff < 4570 para a nossa amostra. As estrelas cobrem um intervalo de magnitude 12,2 < V < 14,2. Os parâmetros atmosféricos são fundamentais para a construção de espectros sintéticos de outros aglomerados globulares ricos em metais. Trabalho financiado pela FAPESP e pelo CNPq.

  6. A new technique for reconstruction of the current moment waveform related to a gigantic jet from the magnetic field component recorded by an ELF station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KułAk, Andrzej; MłYnarczyk, Janusz

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents a reconstruction of the current moment waveform of the gigantic jet observed optically last winter in Europe, based on the magnetic field component of the ELF electromagnetic field, recorded by the Hylaty station in Poland. Gigantic jets have only been observed so far on a few occasions, and there is still relatively little known about them. In order to analyze the recorded signal we have developed a new technique, which makes it possible to obtain the actual current moment waveform of the lightning discharges associated with the gigantic jet by eliminating from the waveform the effects of both the impulse response of the receiver and the Earth-ionosphere propagation channel. The proposed method can be also used to analyze other waveform observations, especially in the ELF and VLF frequency bands.

  7. Acromegaly and gigantism in the medical literature. Case descriptions in the era before and the early years after the initial publication of Pierre Marie (1886).

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2009-01-01

    In 1886 Pierre Marie used the term "acromegaly" for the first time and gave a full description of the characteristic clinical picture. However several others had already given clear clinical descriptions before him and sometimes had given the disease other names. After 1886, it gradually became clear that pituitary enlargement (caused by a pituitary adenoma) was the cause and not the consequence of acromegaly, as initially thought. Pituitary adenomas could be found in the great majority of cases. It also became clear that acromegaly and gigantism were the same disease but occurring at different stages of life and not different diseases as initially thought. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century most information was derived from case descriptions and post-mortem examinations of patients with acromegaly or (famous) patients with gigantism. The stage was set for further research into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of acromegaly and gigantism.

  8. Microbiological monitoring of bivalves from the Ria Formosa Lagoon (south coast of Portugal): a 20 years of sanitary survey.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina; Soares, Florbela

    2012-02-01

    The microbiological pollution of coastal waters is a major problem, especially in shellfish areas. This article shows the faecal contamination in bivalves from the Ria Formosa Lagoon (south coast of Portugal) along 20 years (1990-2009). The highest values of Escherichia coli in bivalves were obtained during the 90s, related with the discharge of untreated wastewaters and agricultural runoff. In the 2000s contamination levels decreased, with 83% of the population already served by new or remodelled sewage treatment plants. The highest levels were found in bivalves close to the largest city, where punctual and diffuse contamination sources still exist. Bivalves from the less impacted site showed the lowest contamination, an area with more water renewal. Seasonally, the highest levels were in autumn and winter, due to the runoff of waters from rainfall. These were opposite to those in spring and summer, when the highest temperatures and salinity showed a bactericidal effect.

  9. New records and a new species of bivalve (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from Miocene hydrocarbon seep deposits, North Island, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Saether, Kristian P; Jingeng, Sha; Little, Crispin T S; Campbell, Kathleen A

    2016-08-18

    Fourteen bivalve taxa belonging to 11 families are present in at least 13 early to middle Miocene hydrocarbon seep deposits in the East Coast Basin, North Island, New Zealand. Among these are at least three new species, one of which, Semeloidea (s. l.) bexhavenensis sp. nov. (Lasaeidae), is described here. New distribution data are recorded for bivalve species in the families Limidae, Propeamussiidae, Malleidae and Solemyidae. Additional morphological details of Gigantidas coseli (Mytilidae) and Pratulum quinarium (Cardiidae) are provided based upon previously unrecorded internal shell features. Palaeoecological analysis indicates that bivalves utilized a broad range of modes of life and niches within the New Zealand Miocene seep environment, and no more than ca. 30% of these bivalve species were likely to have been obligate to seeps.

  10. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  11. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems. PMID:26261984

  12. Spatial and Temporal Examination of Bivalve Communities in Several Estuaries of Southern California and Northern Baja California, MX.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Anai; Talley, Theresa S; Talley, Drew M; Crooks, Jeffrey A; Reyns, Nathalie B

    2016-01-01

    A combination of historical bivalve surveys spanning 30-50 years and contemporary sampling were used to document the changes in bivalve community structure over time at four southern California and one northern Baja California estuaries. While there are limitations to the interpretation of historic data, we observed generally similar trends of reduced total bivalve species richness, losses of relatively large and/or deeper-dwelling natives, and gains of relatively small, surface dwelling introduced species across the southern California estuaries, despite fairly distinct bivalve communities. A nearly 50-year absence of bivalves from two wetlands surveyed in a Baja California estuary continued. A combination of site history and current characteristics (e.g., location, depth) likely contributes to maintenance of distinct communities, and both episodic and gradual environmental changes likely contribute to within-estuary temporal shifts (or absences). We highlight future research needed to determine mechanisms underlying patterns so that we can better predict responses of bivalve communities to future scenarios, including climate change and restoration.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Examination of Bivalve Communities in Several Estuaries of Southern California and Northern Baja California, MX

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Jeffrey A.; Reyns, Nathalie B.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of historical bivalve surveys spanning 30–50 years and contemporary sampling were used to document the changes in bivalve community structure over time at four southern California and one northern Baja California estuaries. While there are limitations to the interpretation of historic data, we observed generally similar trends of reduced total bivalve species richness, losses of relatively large and/or deeper-dwelling natives, and gains of relatively small, surface dwelling introduced species across the southern California estuaries, despite fairly distinct bivalve communities. A nearly 50-year absence of bivalves from two wetlands surveyed in a Baja California estuary continued. A combination of site history and current characteristics (e.g., location, depth) likely contributes to maintenance of distinct communities, and both episodic and gradual environmental changes likely contribute to within-estuary temporal shifts (or absences). We highlight future research needed to determine mechanisms underlying patterns so that we can better predict responses of bivalve communities to future scenarios, including climate change and restoration. PMID:26840744

  14. Morphological diversity of microstructures occurring in selected recent bivalve shells and their ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brom, Krzysztof Roman; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Environmental adaptation of molluscs during evolution has led to form biomineral exoskeleton - shell. The main compound of their shells is calcium carbonate, which is represented by calcite and/or aragonite. The mineral part, together with the biopolymer matrix, forms many types of microstructures, which are differ in texture. Different types of internal shell microstructures are characteristic for some bivalve groups. Studied bivalve species (freshwater species - duck mussel (Anodonta anatina Linnaeus, 1758) and marine species - common cockle (Cerastoderma edule Linnaeus, 1758), lyrate Asiatic hard clam (Meretrix lyrata Sowerby II, 1851) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758)) from different locations and environmental conditions, show that the internal shell microstructure with the shell morphology and thickness have critical impact to the ability to survive in changing environment and also to the probability of surviving predator attack. Moreover, more detailed studies on molluscan structures might be responsible for create mechanically resistant nanomaterials.

  15. Paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic significance of freshwater bivalves in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Steven C.

    2004-05-01

    Freshwater unionid bivalves are spatially and temporally distributed throughout the Morrison depositional basin, and locally dominate the biomass of many aquatic depositional environments. Two bivalve assemblages are identified. Within-channel assemblages are death assemblages that have been transported and may represent mixed assemblages from multiple communities. These assemblages are predominately disarticulated, in current stable orientations, and composed of higher stream velocity ecophenotypes (medium size, lanceolate form, and very thick shells). The floodplain-pond assemblages are disturbed neighborhood assemblages in the mudstones inhabited during life. The bivalves are predominately articulated, variable in size, and composed of low stream velocity ecophenotypes (large maximum sizes, ovate shell shapes, and thinner shells). The glochidial parasitic larval stage of unionid bivalves provides an effective means of dispersing species throughout drainage basins. These larvae attach to fish and are carried through the fluvial drainage where the larvae detach and establish new bivalve communities. Preliminary paleobiogeographic analyses are drawn at the genus level because of the need to reevaluate bivalve species of the Morrison. Unio spp. and Vetulonaia spp. are widespread throughout the Morrison depositional basin, but Hadrodon spp. are restricted to the eastern portion of the Colorado Plateau during Salt Wash Member deposition, suggesting that Salt Wash drainage was isolated from other contemporaneous regions of the basin. Bivalves from five localities in the Morrison Formation were thin-sectioned for growth band analysis. Growth bands of modern unionid bivalves are produced when the valves are forced to close. Closure can produce annual growth bands in response to seasonal variation, such as temperature-induced hibernation, or precipitation-induced aestivation or turbidity. Pseudoannual growth bands form from non-cyclical events such as predation attacks or

  16. Trace metals in water, sediment and bivalves of a tropical estuary, west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Parvez Al-Usmani, S M; Jagtap, T G; Patil, D N

    2015-10-15

    Trace metal pollution was studied in water, sediment and three selected bivalves in Mandovi and Chapora estuaries of Goa. The trace metal in water and sediment of Mandovi was higher than in Chapora. The concentration in the tissues was in the range of 1205.2-2506.7 ppm for Paphia malabarica, 1906.2-2802.6 ppm for Perna viridis and 778.7-1607.5 ppm for Saccostrea cucullata in Mandovi estuary. Tha values for Chapora were 199.4-625.8 ppm for P. malabarica, 812.6-1220.2 for P. viridis and 392.5-418.6 ppm for S. cucullata. The anthropogenic input of metal in Mandovi estuary appears to be mainly responsible for the high accumulation of trace metals. These bivalves have potential to serve as indicator for metal contamination in seafood of Goa.

  17. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Simon, Olivier; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 μg.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (× 5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (× 2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure.

  18. p53 Superfamily proteins in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Charles W; Van Beneden, Rebecca J; Muttray, Annette F; Böttger, S Anne; Kelley, Melissa L; Tucker, Abraham E; Thomas, W Kelley

    2011-01-01

    The human p53 tumour suppressor protein is inactivated in many cancers and is also a major player in apoptotic responses to cellular stress. The p53 protein and the two other members of this protein family (p63, p73) are encoded by distinct genes and their functions have been extensively documented for humans and some other vertebrates. The structure and relative expression levels for members of the p53 superfamily have also been reported for most major invertebrate taxa. The functions of homologous proteins have been investigated for only a few invertebrates (specifically, p53 in flies, nematodes and recently a sea anemone). These studies of classical model organisms all suggest that the gene family originally evolved to mediate apoptosis of damaged germ cells or to protect germ cells from genotoxic stress. Here, we have correlated data from a number of molluscan and other invertebrate sequencing projects to provide a framework for understanding p53 signalling pathways in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology. These data suggest that (a) the two identified p53 and p63/73-like proteins in soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Northern European squid (Loligo forbesi) have identical core sequences and may be splice variants of a single gene, while some molluscs and most other invertebrates have two or more distinct genes expressing different p53 family members; (b) transcriptional activation domains (TADs) in bivalve p53 and p63/73-like protein sequences are 67-69% conserved with human p53, while those in ecdysozoan, cnidarian, placozoan and choanozoan eukaryotes are ≤33% conserved; (c) the Mdm2 binding site in the transcriptional activation domain is 100% conserved in all sequenced bivalve p53 proteins (e.g. Mya, Mytilus, Crassostrea and Spisula) but is not present in other non-deuterostome invertebrates; (d) an Mdm2 homologue has been cloned for Mytilus trossulus; (e) homologues for both human p53 upstream regulatory and

  19. Immunosuppression in the infaunal bivalve Scrobicularia plana environmentally exposed to mercury and association with its accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Coelho, João P; Mohmood, Iram; Pacheco, Mário; Santos, Maria A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis whether mercury (Hg) activates or suppresses inappropriately the immunity of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana inhabiting a Hg contaminated area (Laranjo basin, Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Immunity endpoints, as well as lipid peroxidation (LPO) as a sign of damage, were evaluated in parallel with total Hg burden. Bivalves from both moderately (MO) and highly (HI) contaminated sites displayed higher haemolymph Hg load and reduced plasma agglutination. Increased haemocytes density and decreased phagocytosis were observed at HI, whereas increased oxidative burst activity (OBA) was observed at MO, pointing out that the immunotoxicity is a result of Hg direct contact involving no ROS intervention. OBA observed at MO was concomitantly associated to peroxidative damage as depicted by LPO increase in haemocytes and haemolymph plasma. Thus, S. plana can be suggested as a suitable bioindicator of metal pollution in coastal areas on the basis of Hg bioaccumulation and immunotoxicity responses.

  20. Measurement of filtration rates by infaunal bivalves in a recirculating flume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, B.E.; Thompson, J.K.; Cloern, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A flume system and protocol for measuring the filtration rate of infaunal bivalves is described. Assemblages of multi-sized clams, at natural densities and in normal filter-feeding positions, removed phytoplankton suspended in a unidirectional flow of water. The free-stream velocity and friction velocity of the flow, and bottom roughness height were similar to those in natural estuarine waters. Continuous variations in phytoplankton (Chroomonas salinay) cell density were used to measure the filtration rate of the suspension-feeding clam Potamocorbula amurensis for periods of 2 to 28 h. Filtration rates of P. amurensis varied from 100 to 580 liters (gd)-1 over a free-stream velocity range of 9 to 25 cm s-1. Phytoplankton loss rates were usually constant throughout the experiments. Our results suggest that suspension-feeding by infaunal bivalves is sensitive to flow velocity. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Aragonite shells are more ancient than calcite ones in bivalves: new evidence based on omics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Li; Zhu, Yabing; Song, Xiaorui; Fang, Xiaodong; Huang, Ronglian; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    Two calcium carbonate crystal polymorphs, aragonite and calcite, are the main inorganic components of mollusk shells. Some fossil evidences suggest that aragonite shell is more ancient than calcite shell for the Bivalvia. But, the molecular biology evidence for the above deduction is absent. In this study, we searched for homologs of bivalve aragonite-related and calcite-related shell proteins in the oyster genome, and found that no homologs of calcite-related shell protein but some homologs of aragonite-related shell proteins in the oyster genome. We explained the results as the new evidence to support that aragonite shells are more ancient than calcite shells in bivalves combined the published biogeological and seawater chemistry data.

  2. [Isolation of enteropathogenic Vibrio in bivalves and mud from the Nicoya Gulf, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    García Cortés, V; Antillón, F

    1990-11-01

    The presence of enteropathogenic Vibrio was evaluated in 36 sediment samples and 41 bivalve samples obtained from 3 collecting sites in the Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica. Isolation methods for halophilic and non halophilic Vibrio were used. The biochemical profiles of the strains obtained revealed the presence of the following isolates: 224 Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 3 V. furnissii, 1 V. damsela and 3 V. fluvialis. V. cholerae was not isolated, due principally to the use of TCBS agar.

  3. Alkylphenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in eastern Mediterranean Spanish coastal marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Alberto; Aguado, Daniel; Martí, Nuria; Pastor, José Manuel; Herráez, Rosa; Campins, Pilar; Seco, Aurora

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the first results on alkylphenol pollution in edible bivalves from the Spanish coast. Two sampling campaigns (July 2006 and July 2007) were carried out to determine the concentration of nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), and eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wild mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialys) and clams (Donax trunculus) at 14 sampling sites along the eastern Mediterranean Spanish coast. The results show that NP is the predominant alkylphenol, being the port of Valencia the most polluted area (up to 147 μg/kg wet weight in clams). Moving away from the ports the concentration of NP in bivalves decreased. OP concentration was below its detection limit in most of the studied areas and its maximum concentration (6 μg/kg w/w) was measured in clams from the port of Sagunto. The presence of low levels of PAHs was observed in most of the studied areas. The total PAHs concentration (i.e., sum of the eight measured PAHs) achieved a maximum value of 10.09 μg/kg w/w in the north coast of Valencia city. The distribution pattern of the individual PAHs showed that both pollution sources petrogenic and pyrolytic were present in the sampled areas. Fluoranthene was the most abundant PAH in mussels while benzo(b)fluoranthene in clams. The maximum concentration of 10 μg/kg w/w for benzo(a)pyrene established by the European Commission was never reached, indeed sampled bivalves showed concentrations 10 times lower than this reference value. Thus, they can be considered safe for human consumption. Despite the low contamination levels, the results show an overall pollution of bivalves by alkylphenol and PAHs as well as an increment in the number of polluted areas from 2006 to 2007. Thus, periodical sampling campaigns should be carried out to monitor the long-term tendency of these toxic and persistent pollutants.

  4. Bioaccumulation of selected metals in bivalves (Unionidae) and Phragmites australis inhabiting a municipal water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rzymski, Piotr; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Klimaszyk, Piotr; Poniedziałek, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Urbanization can considerably affect water reservoirs by, inter alia, input, and accumulation of contaminants including metals. Located in the course of River Cybina, Maltański Reservoir (Western Poland) is an artificial shallow water body built for recreation and sport purposes which undergoes restoration treatment (drainage) every 4 years. In the present study, we demonstrate an accumulation of nine metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in water, sediment, three bivalve species (Anodonta anatina, Anodonta cygnea, Unio tumidus), and macrophyte Phragmites australis collected before complete drainage in November 2012. The mean concentrations of metals in the sediment, bivalves, and P. australis (roots and leaves) decreased in the following order: Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. A considerably higher bioconcentration of metals was observed in samples collected from the western and southern sites which undergo a higher degree of human impact. Sediments were found to be a better indicator of metal contamination than water samples. Interspecific differences in levels of metal accumulation were found between investigated unionids. U. tumidus accumulated higher levels of Cr, positively correlated with ambient concentrations, predisposing this species as a potential bioindicator of this metal in aquatic environments. On the other hand, species of Anodonta genus demonstrated higher accumulation of Cu and Cd. Positive correlations were found between Pb content in the sediments and tissues of all three bivalve species. In P. australis, metals were largely retained in roots except for Cd and Pb for which higher concentrations were found in leaves suggesting additional absorption of these metals from aerial sources. P. australis and bivalve from the Maltański Reservoir may be a potential source of toxic metals for animals feeding upon them and contribute to further contamination in the food chain.

  5. Triassic bivalves and the initial marine Mesozoic revolution: A role for predators?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRoberts, Christopher A.

    2001-04-01

    Marine bivalves document the long-term increase in generic richness through the early Mesozoic. Following the end-Permian crisis, the Early Triassic was marked by a gradual recovery in generic richness (57 Induan and 66 Olenekian genera). Diversity slowly increased in the Middle Triassic (98 Anisian and 121 Ladinian genera) and peaked in the Late Triassic (171 Carnian, 165 Norian, and 143 Rhaetian genera). These data support earlier hypotheses that the recovery following the end-Permian extinction was very gradual and was not completed (in terms of both richness and ecologic complexity) until the Ladinian. Although a Carnian-Norian extinction is not evident in the data and may be a regional event limited to the Tethyan realm, the end-Triassic extinction is profound—fewer than 30 genera (<35%) survived into the Jurassic. Diversity metrics are not equally distributed among bivalve living habits. The generally epifaunal Pteriomorphia and Isofilibranchia exhibit higher extinction rates compared to the ordinarily infaunal Heteroconchia (especially the Veneroida and Trigonoida). This pattern of selective extinction led to a gradual increase in generic richness of infaunal suspension feeders through most of the Triassic. Contrary to previous hypotheses, this increase in infaunalization may not have been related to the evolutionary expansion of major predatory groups (e.g., shell-crushing cephalopods, crustaceans, sharks, fish, and reptiles), which had typically low abundances and limited distribution during the Triassic. Drilling predators, although present during the Triassic, are not considered to be prominent causes of mortality among bivalves. Instead, the infaunalization of bivalves during the Triassic may have been due to several interconnected abiotic and biotic causes associated with the recovery after the end-Permian mass extinction.

  6. Bivalves and gastropods from the middle Campanian Anacacho limestone, South Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Anacacho Limestone was deposited during the Campanian and represents two depositional intervals, one of early Campanian and one of middle Campanian age. These two intervals correspond to periods of major eustatic sea level rise. This study focuses on the molluscan paleontology of the middle Campanian interval in the eastern part of the Anacacho exposure belt in Medina County, Texas. Molluscan assemblages in this area are indicative of inner to mid-shelf environments. No significant reef components are present. These eastern Anacacho deposits are interpreted to represent more offshore, deeper water environments than those to the southwest, where reef and lagoonal deposits have been reported. Analysis of the macrofossil components from these eastern localities has expanded the number of invertebrate species known from the Anacacho Limestone by nearly three-fold. This increase in diversity, based on a small amount of new work, suggests that many more taxa are yet to be identified, particularly in the western part of the exposure belt in Uvalde and Kinney Counties. This paper documents the bivalve and gastropod fauna, discussing and illustrating 24 bivalve taxa and 11 gastropod species. Two new bivalve species are named, Panopea anacachoensis new species and Spondylus siccus new species, and two potentially new gastropod species are identified but not named herein due to inadequate material. This paper expands the distribution of many eastern Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast taxa westward into Texas and shows strong ties between the Anacacho fauna and that of the Campanian Tar Heel and Bladen Formations of the Black Creek Group in North Carolina. The taxonomic ties between these two areas probably reflect the thorough documentation of the North Carolina fauna, which is the best documented Campanian bivalve fauna in the Gulf or Atlantic Coast regions.

  7. Species composition and distribution of bivalves in bathyal and abyssal depths of the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Gennady M.

    2013-02-01

    Twenty-six bivalve species collected by four Russian (1972, 1976, 1985, 2005) and Russian-German (2010) expeditions in the bathyal and abyssal depths of the Sea of Japan (465-3435 m) are listed with the material examined and illustrated. Taxonomic decisions herein: Robaia habei Scarlato, 1981 is synonymized with Nuculana (Robaia) robai (Kuroda, 1929); following Scarlato (1981) and Coan et al. (2000)Dacrydium nipponicum Okutani, 1975 and Dacrydium minimum Okutani and Izumidate, 1992 are synonymized with Dacrydium vitreum (Möller, 1842); Maorithyas yamatotaensis Okutani and Izumidate, 1992 is synonymized with Adontorhina cyclia Berry, 1947; Axinopsida rubiginosa Okutani and Izumidate, 1992 is synonymized with Mendicula ferruginosa (Forbes, 1844); Cardiomya lindbergi batialis Scarlato, 1972 is synonymized with Cardiomya tosaensis (Kuroda, 1948); Cuspidaria sadoensis Okutani and Ito, 1983 is synonymized with Cuspidaria ascoldica Scarlato, 1972; Cyclocardia rjabininae (Scarlato, 1955) recognized as valid and distinct from Cyclocardia ovata (Rjabinina, 1952). The deep-water bivalve fauna of the Sea of Japan is characterized by an impoverished shelf fauna and consists of eurybathic species that extend from the shelf to the bathyal and abyssal zones. Most of them have a wide geographic distribution and inhabit cold water regions of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and Arctic Ocean. Only five species are endemic to the Sea of Japan. With increase in depth, the species richness of bivalves decreases. In the depth range from 200 to 1600 m, all species (26) found in the deep Sea of Japan were recorded, while only 10 species were recorded in the lower bathyal slope (1700-3000 m). At depths below 3000 m, only D. vitreum, Delectopecten vancouverensis (Whiteaves, 1893), and Thyasira (Parathyasira) sp. were found. The lack of typical abyssal species of bivalves in the deep Sea of Japan is probably connected with the isolation of this body of water from the Pacific abyssal

  8. Shell disturbances and butyltins burden in commercial bivalves collected from the Bizerta lagoon (northern Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Kefi, Ferdaous Jaafar; Lahbib, Youssef; Abdallah, Lamia Gargouri Ben; El Menif, Najoua Trigui

    2012-11-01

    Shell disturbances and soft tissues butyltin burden were investigated in commercial bivalves Lithophaga lithophaga, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Solen marginatus and Crassostrea gigas from the Bizerta lagoon. Shell disturbances were found in all bivalves, being scarce in S. marginatus. In the internal valve of L. lithophaga, burrowing annelids and sipunculids living inside galleries were observed, while in the external valve, brown-blackish or white stains were found. In M. galloprovincialis, a yellowish mass located at the shell anterior side was found fixed firmly to the pearly layer by a hard brownish structure covering some annelid elliptic eggs. In the internal shell layer of some specimens collected in April, embryos belonging to tubiculous annelids at various developmental stages were observed. In C. gigas, shell thickening was revealed in some specimens corresponding to white doughy deposits at the internal valve and between shell layers. In S. marginatus, only one specimen showing a cavity at the posterior site was found. Total butyltin concentrations in the studied bivalves varied between 30 and 245 ng/g dry weight with tributyltin (TBT) being the predominant compound. The highest concentration was recorded in L. lithophaga collected from the Bizerta Bay and the lowest concentration in S. marginatus from Maghraoua. This study provided baseline data that could serve for long-term monitoring of TBT pollution in Tunisia, since legislation to reduce the use of TBT-based antifouling paints has not been introduced yet.

  9. Impact of particulate pollutant metals on larval and adult bivalve molluscs

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, T.R.; Robinson, W.E. ); Morse, M.P. . Marine Science Lab.)

    1982-10-25

    Our investigations of the effects of pollutants on bivalve molluscs have continued with studies with in the following areas: bioaccumulation of trace metals in adult sea scallops exposed to dissolved and particulate forms of the metals, SEM/EDXA studies of phosphoritic concretions in the kidneys of adult sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus), documentation of the normal embryonic and larval development, including shell formation, in surf clams (Spisula solidissima), evaluation of the toxicity of dissolved silver to the gametes and larvae of surf clams at several stages of development, and examination of the effects of turbid suspensions on the feeding efficiency of larval Mercenaria mercenaria. The overall goal of our work is twofold. First, we are striving to gain an understanding of the pathways by which metals are transported within bivalve molluscs. The production of metallothioneins and metal-rich inorganic concretions have been documented for a number of bivalves. The ways in which of metal-rich matrices in membrane-limited vesicles as an intermediate step, is one area of investigation. Second, we are examining the relative sensitivities of the gamete and of early life stages of these organisms to stresses induced by exposure to energy-related pollutants. 46 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Bivalve larvae testing of ocean and in-bay sediments using porewater and elutriates

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.; Targgart, L.

    1995-12-31

    Toxicity of marine sediments is commonly tested using bivalve larval tests. The tests are performed on elutriates, which are prepared by mixing the sediment sample with seawater, and allowing the mixture to settle. The supernatant is separated and tested. Test results appeared to vary depending on the grain-size of the sediments. A study was performed to compare the effects of sediment grain-size on elutriate and porewater toxicity using the bivalve larvae test. Sediments were sampled from two sites: one in San Francisco Bay and one off the coast of San Francisco in the open ocean. From each site, two areas were sampled, one that was potentially impacted by a point-source discharge and another that was free from any discharge impacts. The bay sediments were fine-grained, and the ocean sediments were coarse grained. Porewater from each sample was extracted by centrifugation, and elutriates were prepared using a 4:1 sediment: seawater ratio. Each of the porewater and elutriate samples were tested using the ASTM Standard Guide for Conducting Static Acute Toxicity Tests with Saltwater Bivalves. The results show differences in toxicity that appear to be related to sediment grain-size. The results of this study further imply that dredge material test results should be interpreted with caution when fine-grained sediments are tested. Normalization of the results to grain-size may be appropriate.

  11. Lincoln Park shoreline erosion control project: Monitoring for surface substrate, infaunal bivalves and eelgrass, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Thom, R.M.; Gardiner, W.W.

    1993-09-01

    In 1988, the US Army Corps of Engineers and the City of Seattle placed material on the upper beach at Lincoln Park, in West Seattle, Washington. The fill served to mitigate shoreline erosion that had caused undercutting and collapse of the seawall in several places. A series of pre- and post-construction studies have been conducted to assess the impacts to marine biota of fill placement and movement of surface substrate. This study was designed to monitor infaunal bivalves and eelgrass from intertidal areas in and adjacent to the area of original fill placement. Findings from this survey were compared to previous survey results to determine (1) if recruitment of infaunal bivalves to the fill area has occurred, (2) if infaunal bivalve densities outside the fill area are stable, and (3) if eelgrass distribution and abundance have remained stable along the adjacent shoreline. To maximize comparability of findings from this survey with previous studies, sampling techniques, transects, and tidal elevations were consistent with previous studies at this site.

  12. Pathogenic marine microbes influence the effects of climate change on a commercially important tropical bivalve

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lucy M.; Alsterberg, Christian; Turner, Andrew D.; Girisha, S. K.; Rai, Ashwin; Havenhand, Jonathan N.; Venugopal, M. N.; Karunasagar, Indrani; Godhe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that climate change will increase the prevalence of toxic algae and harmful bacteria, which can accumulate in marine bivalves. However, we know little about any possible interactions between exposure to these microorganisms and the effects of climate change on bivalve health, or about how this may affect the bivalve toxin-pathogen load. In mesocosm experiments, mussels, Perna viridis, were subjected to simulated climate change (warming and/or hyposalinity) and exposed to harmful bacteria and/or toxin-producing dinoflagellates. We found significant interactions between climate change and these microbes on metabolic and/or immunobiological function and toxin-pathogen load in mussels. Surprisingly, however, these effects were virtually eliminated when mussels were exposed to both harmful microorganisms simultaneously. This study is the first to examine the effects of climate change on determining mussel toxin-pathogen load in an ecologically relevant, multi-trophic context. The results may have considerable implications for seafood safety. PMID:27576351

  13. Explosive demographic expansion by dreissenid bivalves as a possible result of astronomical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, M.; Mandic, O.; Kern, A. K.; Piller, W. E.; Neubauer, T. A.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2013-07-01

    Human induced range expansions of invasive dreissenid bivalves are of great concern. However, the underlying biological processes are only poorly understood, partly due to the lack of information on natural expansion events. Here we use the extinct bivalve species Sinucongeria primiformis as a model organism for testing natural (i.e. non-Anthropocene) blooms of dreissenid species in a lacustrine system of Lake Pannon during the Tortonian (~10.5 Myr; Late Miocene). 600 samples from a consecutive core were evaluated for the relative abundance of this pavement-forming mollusc, which cover about 8 millennia of Late Miocene time with a decadal resolution. Our data indicate that the settlement by bivalves in the offshore environment was limited mainly by bottom water oxygenation, which follows predictable and repetitive patterns through time. These population fluctuations might be related to solar cycles: successful dreissenid settlement is re-occurring in a frequency known as the lower and upper Gleissberg cycles with a 50-80 and 90-120 yr period. These cycles appear to control regional wind patterns, which are directly linked to water mixing of the lake. This is modulated by the even more prominent 500 yr cycle, which seems to be the most important pacemaker for Lake Pannon hydrology.

  14. Explosive demographic expansion by dreissenid bivalves as a possible result of astronomical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, M.; Mandic, O.; Kern, A. K.; Piller, W. E.; Neubauer, T. A.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2013-12-01

    Human induced range expansions of invasive dreissenid bivalves are of great concern. However, the underlying biological processes are only poorly understood, partly due to the lack of information on natural expansion events. Here we use the extinct bivalve species Sinucongeria primiformis as a model organism for testing natural (i.e. pre-Anthropocene) blooms of dreissenid species in a lacustrine system of Lake Pannon during the Tortonian (~ 10.5 Myr; late Miocene). A total of 600 samples from a consecutive core were evaluated for the relative abundance of this pavement-forming mollusc, which cover about eight millennia of late Miocene time with a decadal resolution. Our data indicate that the settlement by bivalves in the offshore environment was limited mainly by bottom water oxygenation, which follows predictable and repetitive patterns through time. These population fluctuations might be related to solar cycles: successful dreissenid settlement is recurring in a frequency known as the lower and upper Gleissberg cycles with 50-80 and 90-120 yr periods. These cycles appear to control regional wind patterns, which are directly linked to water mixing of the lake. This is modulated by the even more prominent 500 yr cycle, which seems to be the most important pacemaker for Lake Pannon hydrology.

  15. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S.; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D.; Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  16. Environmental regulation of bivalve growth in the southern Barents Sea: A combined ecological and geochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M. L.; Johnson, B. J.; Henkes, G. A.; McMahon, K. W.; Voronkov, A.; Ambrose, W. G., Jr.; Denisenko, S. G.

    2009-04-01

    Ecological and geochemical analyses of bivalve shells provide potentially complimentary information on patterns and drivers of natural variability in Arctic marine populations, yet are rarely considered together. We analyzed growth rates and shell geochemistry of the Greenland Smooth Cockle (Serripes groenlandicus) from the southern Barents Sea between 1882 and 1968. Growth, stable isotope (oxygen and carbon), and trace elemental (Mg, Sr, Ba, Mn) patterns were linked to environmental variations on weekly to decadal scales. Standardized growth rates exhibited multi-year periodicity inversely related to the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAO) and positively related to river discharge. Up to 60% of the interannual variability in Ba/Ca could be explained by variations in river discharge at stations closest to the rivers, but the relationship disappeared at a more distant location. Stable isotope data (18O, 13C), and Sr/Ca patterns suggest that bivalve growth ceases at elevated temperatures during the fall and recommences at the coldest temperatures in the early spring, implying that food, rather than temperature, is the primary driver of the annual growth cycle. Combining annually-integrated growth results and higher resolution geochemical results thus elucidated the annual growth cycle of an Arctic bivalve and mechanisms of biophysical coupling over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

  17. Trace element ratios in bivalve shells as records of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, S.; Opdyke, B.; Welch, S.; Beavis, S.

    2007-12-01

    Stable isotope and trace element data from the carbonate of both marine and freshwater bivalves are proving to be useful tools in studies of palaeoclimate and environmental change. However, much of the work already done has shown that the trace element ratios in bivalve shells exhibit a complex relationship with the ambient environment and caution must be exercised when attempting to use them as environmental proxies. This work examines the feasibility of using the trace element ratios Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca of the shells of a number of different species of bivalves as records of the temperature and salinity of their ambient aquatic environment. The species analysed were the estuarine oysters Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, and Crassostrea gigas, an estuarine mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and the freshwater mussel Velesunio ambiguus. The estuarine shells were taken from monitoring experiments conducted over a period of 12 months at two different field sites. Freshwater shells were collected wild, from locations close to water monitoring stations. Preliminary results show distinct variations in the Mg/Ca of O. angasi shells with an apparent seasonal pattern. V. ambiguus shells show clear patterns in Mn/Ca, linked to environmental variations.

  18. Chemosynthetic bacteria found in bivalve species from mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Clara F; Webster, Gordon; Cunha, Marina R; Duperron, Sébastien; Weightman, Andrew J

    2010-09-01

    As in other cold seeps, the dominant bivalves in mud volcanoes (MV) from the Gulf of Cadiz are macrofauna belonging to the families Solemyidae (Acharax sp., Petrasma sp.), Lucinidae (Lucinoma sp.), Thyasiridae (Thyasira vulcolutre) and Mytilidae (Bathymodiolus mauritanicus). The delta(13)C values measured in solemyid, lucinid and thyasirid specimens support the hypothesis of thiotrophic nutrition, whereas isotopic signatures of B. mauritanicus suggest methanotrophic nutrition. The indication by stable isotope analysis that chemosynthetic bacteria make a substantial contribution to the nutrition of the bivalves led us to investigate their associated bacteria and their phylogenetic relationships based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and cloning of bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding genes confirmed the presence of sulfide-oxidizing symbionts within gill tissues of many of the studied specimens. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that most bacteria were related to known sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts found in other deep-sea chemosynthetic environments, with the co-occurrence of methane-oxidizing symbionts in Bathymodiolus specimens. This study confirms the presence of several chemosynthetic bivalves in the Gulf of Cadiz and further highlights the importance of sulfide- and methane-oxidizing symbionts in the trophic ecology of macrobenthic communities in MV.

  19. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in sixty-four different bivalve species

    PubMed Central

    De Moro, Gianluca; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias (CUB) is a defined as the non-random usage of codons encoding the same amino acid across different genomes. This phenomenon is common to all organisms and the real weight of the many factors involved in its shaping still remains to be fully determined. So far, relatively little attention has been put in the analysis of CUB in bivalve mollusks due to the limited genomic data available. Taking advantage of the massive sequence data generated from next generation sequencing projects, we explored codon preferences in 64 different species pertaining to the six major evolutionary lineages in Bivalvia. We detected remarkable differences across species, which are only partially dependent on phylogeny. While the intensity of CUB is mild in most organisms, a heterogeneous group of species (including Arcida and Mytilida, among the others) display higher bias and a strong preference for AT-ending codons. We show that the relative strength and direction of mutational bias, selection for translational efficiency and for translational accuracy contribute to the establishment of synonymous codon usage in bivalves. Although many aspects underlying bivalve CUB still remain obscure, we provide for the first time an overview of this phenomenon in this large, commercially and environmentally important, class of marine invertebrates. PMID:26713259

  20. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in sixty-four different bivalve species.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; De Moro, Gianluca; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias (CUB) is a defined as the non-random usage of codons encoding the same amino acid across different genomes. This phenomenon is common to all organisms and the real weight of the many factors involved in its shaping still remains to be fully determined. So far, relatively little attention has been put in the analysis of CUB in bivalve mollusks due to the limited genomic data available. Taking advantage of the massive sequence data generated from next generation sequencing projects, we explored codon preferences in 64 different species pertaining to the six major evolutionary lineages in Bivalvia. We detected remarkable differences across species, which are only partially dependent on phylogeny. While the intensity of CUB is mild in most organisms, a heterogeneous group of species (including Arcida and Mytilida, among the others) display higher bias and a strong preference for AT-ending codons. We show that the relative strength and direction of mutational bias, selection for translational efficiency and for translational accuracy contribute to the establishment of synonymous codon usage in bivalves. Although many aspects underlying bivalve CUB still remain obscure, we provide for the first time an overview of this phenomenon in this large, commercially and environmentally important, class of marine invertebrates.

  1. Climatic control on the growth of gigantic gypsum crystals within hypogenic caves (Naica mine, Mexico)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, Paolo S.; Fricker, Mattias B.; Günther, Detlef; Forti, Paolo; Mercuri, Anna-Maria; Loreti, Mara; Capaccioni, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Three hypogenic caves within the Naica mine of Mexico ( Cueva de los Cristales — CLC, Ojo de la Reina — OR, and Cueva de las Velas — CLV) host spectacular gypsum crystals up to 11 m in length. These caves are close to another shallow cave of the area ( Cueva de las Espadas — CLE), with which they cover a 160 m-deep vertical section of the local drainage basin. Similar to other hypogenic caves, all these caves lack a direct connection with the land surface and should be unrelated with climate. A record of multi-technique fluid inclusion data and pollen spectra from cave and mine gypsum indicates surprisingly that climatic changes occurring at Naica could have controlled fluid composition in these caves, and hence crystal growth. Microthermometry and LA-ICP-Mass Spectrometry of fluid inclusions indicate that the shallow, chemically peculiar, saline fluid (up to 7.7 eq. wt.%NaCl) of CLE could have formed from evaporation, during a dry and hot climatic period. The fluid of the deep caves was instead of low salinity (˜ 3.5 eq. wt.% NaCl) and chemically homogeneous, and was poorly affected by evaporation. We propose that mixing of these two fluids, generated at different depths of the Naica drainage basin, determined the stable supersaturation conditions for the gigantic gypsum crystals to grow. Fluid mixing was controlled by the hydraulic communication between CLE and the other deep caves, and must have taken place during cycles of warm-dry and fresh-wet climatic periods, which are known to have occurred in the region. Pollen grains from a 35 ka-old gypsum crystal of CLC corresponds to a fairly homogenous catchment basin made of a mixed broadleaf wet forest, which suggests precipitation during a fresh-wet climatic period and confirms our interpretation of the fluid inclusion data. The unusual combination of geological and geochemical factors of Naica suggests that other hypogenic caves found elsewhere may not host similar crystals. However, this work shows that

  2. Rapid and repeated origin of insular gigantism and dwarfism in Australian tiger snakes.

    PubMed

    Keogh, J Scott; Scott, Ian A W; Hayes, Christine

    2005-01-01

    It is a well-known phenomenon that islands can support populations of gigantic or dwarf forms of mainland conspecifics, but the variety of explanatory hypotheses for this phenomenon have been difficult to disentangle. The highly venomous Australian tiger snakes (genus Notechis) represent a well-known and extreme example of insular body size variation. They are of special interest because there are multiple populations of dwarfs and giants and the age of the islands and thus the age of the tiger snake populations are known from detailed sea level studies. Most are 5000-7000 years old and all are less than 10,000 years old. Here we discriminate between two competing hypotheses with a molecular phylogeography dataset comprising approximately 4800 bp of mtDNA and demonstrate that populations of island dwarfs and giants have evolved five times independently. In each case the closest relatives of the giant or dwarf populations are mainland tiger snakes, and in four of the five cases, the closest relatives are also the most geographically proximate mainland tiger snakes. Moreover, these body size shifts have evolved extremely rapidly and this is reflected in the genetic divergence between island body size variants and mainland snakes. Within south eastern Australia, where populations of island giants, populations of island dwarfs, and mainland tiger snakes all occur, the maximum genetic divergence is only 0.38%. Dwarf tiger snakes are restricted to prey items that are much smaller than the prey items of mainland tiger snakes and giant tiger snakes are restricted to seasonally available prey items that are up three times larger than the prey items of mainland tiger snakes. We support the hypotheses that these body size shifts are due to strong selection imposed by the size of available prey items, rather than shared evolutionary history, and our results are consistent with the notion that adaptive plasticity also has played an important role in body size shifts. We suggest

  3. Gigantic landslides versus glacial deposits: on origin of large hummock deposits in Alai Valley, Northern Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznichenko, Natalya

    2015-04-01

    As glaciers are sensitive to local climate, their moraines position and ages are used to infer past climates and glacier dynamics. These chronologies are only valid if all dated moraines are formed as the result of climatically driven advance and subsequent retreat. Hence, any accurate palaeoenvironmental reconstruction requires thorough identification of the landform genesis by complex approach including geomorphological, sedimentological and structural landform investigation. Here are presented the implication of such approach for the reconstruction of the mega-hummocky deposits formation both of glacial and landslide origin in the glaciated Alai Valley of the Northern Pamir with further discussion on these and similar deposits validity for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. The Tibetan Plateau valleys are the largest glaciated regions beyond the ice sheets with high potential to provide the best geological record of glacial chronologies and, however, with higher probabilities of the numerous rock avalanche deposits including those that were initially considered of glacial origin (Hewitt, 1999). The Alai Valley is the largest intermountain depression in the upper reaches of the Amudarja River basin that has captured numerous unidentified extensive hummocky deposits descending from the Zaalai Range of Northern Pamir, covering area in more than 800 km2. Such vast hummocky deposits are usually could be formed either: 1) glacially by rapid glacial retreat due to the climate signal or triggered a-climatically glacial changes, such as glacial surge or landslide impact, or 2) during the landslide emplacement. Combination of sediment tests on agglomerates forming only in rock avalanche material (Reznichenko et al., 2012) and detailed geomorphological and sedimentological descriptions of these deposits allowed reconstructing the glacial deposition in the Koman and Lenin glacial catchments with identification of two gigantic rock avalanches and their relation to this glacial

  4. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay.

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, M K; Shyama, S K; Sonaye, B S; Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S B; Bipin, P D; D'costa, A; Chaubey, R C

    2014-05-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of 'Comet assay' for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in both bivalve species. This showed a dose-dependent increase of genetic damage induced in bivalves by EMS as well as gamma radiation. Further, the highest DNA damage was observed at 24h. The damage gradually decreased with time, i.e. was smaller at 48 and 72 h than at 24h post irradiation in both species of bivalves. This may indicate repair of the damaged DNA and/or loss of heavily damaged cells as the post irradiation time advanced. The present study

  5. Museum Preserved Bivalves as Indicators of Long-term Trends in Methylmercury Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengen, A. C.; Foslund, H. M.; Greenfield, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many efforts to reduce mercury concentrations in the environment, there are relatively few datasets on long-term trends in mercury in biota, especially for the bioavailable form, methylmercury (MeHg). This study used museum preserved bivalves (stored in ethanol) to look at MeHg trends in the Asian date mussel Musculista senhousia and the Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis, collected from San Francisco Bay, California between 1975 and 2012. For each sampling date, 4 to 15 individuals were obtained from museum collections (N = 156 total specimens), freeze-dried, weighed, homogenized, digested, and individually analyzed for MeHg using trace metal clean techniques. The bivalves were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to look for changes in food web structure. P. amurensis specimens were only available from 1988 to 2012, and an increase in MeHg was observed during that time. In contrast, M. senhousia specimens were available for the entire 37 year period and exhibited a significant decline in MeHg in the southern reach of the estuary (South Bay). The median MeHg concentration in M. senhousia was highest at 239 ng/g dw in October 1975. That year was the last year of operations for the New Almaden Mercury Mining District, which drained into South Bay. By the 1990s, MeHg concentrations in M. senhousia dropped significantly to a median of 37 ng/g dw. Isotopic δ15N values did not support a hypothesis of reduced trophic position causing the MeHg decline. Over the study duration, δ15N increased in M. senhousia, which we attributed to a baseline shift. We also observed a decline in δ13C since 2000, which may represent a shift in bivalve carbon towards greater utilization of planktonic sources. To validate the use of museum specimens, we ran a preservation study, where we collected fresh bivalves, fixed them in ethanol or formalin, and then transferred them to ethanol for long-term storage. Although MeHg concentrations increased after 1 week, they stabilized over

  6. Uncharted waters: Bivalves of midway atoll and integrating mathematics into biology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCully, Kristin M.

    To protect and conserve the Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem services, it is important not only to understand and conserve species and ecosystems, but also to instill an understanding and appreciation for biodiversity and ecosystem services in the next generations of both scientists and citizens. Thus, this dissertation combines research into the ecology and identity of large bivalves at Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) with research on pedagogical strategies for integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology education. The NWHI is one of the few remaining large, mainly intact, predator-dominated coral reef ecosystems and one of the world's largest marine protected areas. Previous bivalve studies focused on the black-lipped pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, which was heavily harvested in the late 1920s, has not recovered, and is now a candidate species for restoration. First, I combined remote sensing, geographic information systems, SCUBA, and mathematical modeling to quantify the abundance, spatial distributions, and filtration capacity of large epifaunal bivalves at Midway Atoll. These bivalves are most abundant on the forereef outside the atoll, but densities are much lower than reported on other reefs, and Midway's bivalves are unlikely to affect plankton abundance and productivity inside the lagoon. Second, I used molecular techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions to identify pearl oysters (Pinctada) from Midway Atoll as P. maculata , a species not previously reported in Hawaii. As a small morphologically cryptic species, P. maculata may be a native species that has not been collected previously, a native species that has been identified incorrectly as the morphologically similar P. radiata, or it may be a recent introduction or natural range extension from the western Pacific. Finally, I review science education literature integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology curricula, and then present and evaluate a

  7. Divalent metal accumulation in freshwater bivalves: an inverse relationship with metal phosphate solubility.

    PubMed

    Markich, S J; Brown, P L; Jeffree, R A

    2001-07-25

    Whole soft tissue concentrations of Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and U were measured in two species of freshwater (unionid) bivalves (Hyridella depressa and Velesunio ambiguus) from a minimally polluted site in the Hawkesbury-Nepean River, south-eastern Australia. Although the mean concentrations of metals in the tissue were similar for each bivalve species, their patterns of accumulation were dissimilar. For each metal, positive linear relationships between tissue concentration and shell length (r2 = 0.37-0.77; P < or = 0.001) and tissue dry weight (r2 = 0.29-0.51; P < or = 0.01) were found in H. depressa, but not in V. ambiguus. However, for both species, positive linear relationships were found between the tissue concentration of each divalent metal and Ca tissue concentration (r2 = 0.59-0.97; P < or = 0.001). For both bivalve species, the normalised rates of accumulation of the metals relative to increasing Ca concentration and/or size, were U approximately = Cd > or = Pb > or = Mn > Co > or = Zn > Cu > Ni. The differential rates of accumulation of divalent metals are interpreted as being predominantly governed by their varying loss rates, which are controlled by the differing solubilities (log Ksp values) of the metals in the phosphatic extracellular granules, the demonstrated major sites of metal deposition in the tissue of H. depressa and V. ambiguus. The rates of accumulation of Mn, Co, Zn, Cu and Ni were linearly and inversely related (r2 = 0.91-0.97; P < or = 0.001) to their solubilities as hydrogen phosphates, a finding consistent with the bioaccumulation model previously developed for the alkaline-earth metals. However, for U, Cd and Pb, this linear inverse relationship did not continue to hold, i.e. their rates of accumulation did not increase with decreasing solubility. However, these results are still consistent with the model if U, Cd and Pb are so insoluble in the granules of H. depressa and V. ambiguus over their lifetime (up to approx. 50 years

  8. Size, distribution and sediment biodeposition of prolific bivalves in small estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaway, Ruth; Grenfell, Suzanne; Bertelli, Chiara; Mendzil, Anouska; Moore, Jon

    2014-10-01

    The growth and distribution of bivalves in estuaries is generally driven by access to food, hydrodynamic forces and sedimentary conditions that facilitate recruitment and allow persistent settlement. Factors such as site elevation or sediment properties have a significant impact, but there are few studies quantifying the relative importance of different factors in an entire estuary. We carried out an estuary-wide survey of the cockle Cerastoderma edule L. by sampling 343 sites in a small estuary, the Burry Inlet in South Wales, UK. We determined the extent to which site elevation, as an indicator for the duration of feeding, sediment properties and position inside the estuary, explained variation in the size and density of the bivalve. We also analysed the production of faeces and pseudo-faeces per cockle. The population consisted almost entirely of 1-year old cockles, the average size was 14.7 ± 2.7 mm and the average density was 56 ± 189 cockles 0.1 m-2 (mean ± SD). Altogether 37% of the variation in size was explained by two factors: elevation of site (15%) and amount of clay & silt in sediments (22%). Variation in density appeared to play no significant role in determining size. Density was significantly linked to sediment properties (32%) and position inside the estuary (4%). Sediment biodeposition, the amount of material discharged per cockle, was 0.032 ± 0.017 g dry weight, the whole population thereby producing an estimated 387 tonnes of faeces and pseudo-faeces in the entire estuary per day. The study confirmed that access to food is a principal driver of growth, but the relatively small proportion of the variation in size explained by site elevation highlights that other factors play an important role. Sediment characteristics in particular were of importance to variation in size as well as density. It seems plausible that sediment properties were a proxy for factors such as bedload movement and exposure, which are more likely causal factors for

  9. Assessment of ametryn contamination in river water, river sediment, and mollusk bivalves in São Paulo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jacomini, Analu Egydio; de Camargo, Plínio Barbosa; Avelar, Wagner Eustáquio Paiva; Bonato, Pierina Sueli

    2011-04-01

    São Paulo state, Brazil, is one of the main areas of sugar cane agriculture in the world. Herbicides, in particular, ametryn, are extensively used in this extensive area, which implies that this herbicide is present in the environment and can contaminate the surface water by running off. Thereby, residues of ametryn were analyzed in samples of river water an river sediment and in freshwater bivalves obtained from the rivers Sapucaí, Pardo and Mogi-Guaçu in São Paulo State, Brazil. Samples were taken in the winter of 2003 and 2004 in two locations in each river. The specimens of freshwater bivalves collected and analyzed were Corbicula fluminea, an exotic species, and Diplodon fontaineanus, a native species. Additionally, the evaluation of the ability of bioconcentration and depuration of ametryn by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was also performed. Ametryn concentrations in the samples were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Residues of ametryn in water (50 ng/L) and in freshwater bivalves (2-7 ng/g) were found in the Mogi-Guaçu River in 2004, and residues in river sediments were found in all rivers in 2003 and 2004 (0.5-2 ng/g). The observation of the aquatic environment through the analysis of these matrixes, water, sediment, and bivalves, revealed the importance of the river sediment in the accumulation of the herbicide ametryn, which can contaminate the biota.

  10. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve

    PubMed Central

    van Gils, Jan A.; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from ‘normal’ bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  11. A gigantic Bezymianny-type event at the beginning of modern volcan Popocatepetl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Claude; Boudal, Christian

    1987-03-01

    The history of volcan Popocatepetl can be divided into two main periods: the formation of a large primitive volcano — approximatively 30 km wide — on which is superimposed a modern cone (6-8 km in diameter and 1700m high). A major event of Bezymianny type marks the transition between these two dissimilar periods. The activity of the primitive volcano was essentially effusive and lasted several hundred thousands of years. The total volume of products ejected by the volcano is of the order of 500-600 km 3. Its last differentiated magmas are dacitic. A gigantic debris flow (D.F.) spread on the southern side is related to the Bezymianny-type event which destroyed the summit area of the ancient edifice. An elliptical caldera ( ⋍ 6.5 × 11 km wide) was formed by the landslide. Its deposits, with a typical hummocky surface, cover 300 km 2 for a volume of 28-30 km 3. Numerous outcrops belonging to this debris flow show "slabs" of more or less fractured and dislocated rocks that come from the primitive volcano. These deposits are compared to two studied debris flows of similar extent and volume: the Mount Shasta and Colima's D.F. This eruption takes a major place in the volcanologic and magmatic history of Popocatepetl: pyroclastic products of surge-type with "laminites" and crude layers, ashflows, and pumiceous airfall layers are directly related to this event and begin the history of the modern volcano probably less than 50,000 years ago. In addition, a second andesitic and dacitic phase rose both from the central vent — forming the basis of modern Popo — and from lateral vents. The terminal cone is characterized by long periods of construction by lava flows alternating with phases of destruction, the duration of these episodes being 1000 to 2000 years. The cone is composed of two edifices: the first, volcan El Fraile, began with effusive activity and was partly destroyed by three periods of intense explosive activity. The first period occurred prior to 10

  12. System of gigantic valleys northwest of Tharsis, Mars: Latent catastrophic flooding, northwest watershed, and implications for northern plains ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Baker, V.R.; Ferris, J.C.; Hare, T.M.; Strom, R.G.; Rudd, L.P.; Rice, J. W.; Casavant, R.R.; Scott, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) reveals a system of gigantic valleys to the northwest of the huge martian shield volcano, Arsia Mons, in the western hemisphere of Mars. These newly identified northwestern slope valleys (NSVs) potentially signify previously undocumented martian catastrophic floods and may corroborate the northern ocean hypotheses. These features, which generally correspond spatially to gravity lows, were previously obscurred in Mariner and Viking Orbiter imagery by veneers of materials, including volcanic lava flows and air fall deposits. Geologic investigations of the Tharsis region suggest that the NSVs were mainly carved prior to the construction of Arsia Mons and its associated Late Hesperian and Amazonian age lava flows, concurrent with the early development of the outflow channels that debouch into Chryse Planitia.

  13. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  14. On the shoulders of giants: Harvey Cushing's experience with acromegaly and gigantism at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896-1912.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Adams, Hadie; Salvatori, Roberto; Wand, Gary; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    A review of Dr. Cushing's surgical cases at Johns Hopkins Hospital revealed new information about his early operative experience with acromegaly. Although in 1912 Cushing published selective case studies regarding this work, a review of all his operations for acromegaly during his early years has never been reported. We uncovered 37 patients who Cushing treated with surgical intervention directed at the pituitary gland. Of these, nine patients who presented with symptoms of acromegaly, and one with symptoms of gigantism were selected for further review. Two patients underwent transfrontal 'omega incision' approaches, and the remaining eight underwent transsphenoidal approaches. Of the 10 patients, 6 were male. The mean age was 38.0 years. The mean hospital stay was 39.4 days. There was one inpatient death during primary interventions (10%) and three patients were deceased at the time of last follow-up (33%). The mean time to death, calculated from the date of the primary surgical intervention, and including inpatient and outpatient deaths, was 11.3 months. The mean time to last follow-up, calculated from the day of discharge, was 59.3 months. At the time of last follow-up, two patients reported resolution of headache; four patients reported continued visual deficits, and two patients reported ongoing changes in mental status. This review analyzes the outcomes for 10 patients who underwent surgical intervention for acromegaly or gigantism, and offers an explanation for Cushing's transition from the transfrontal "omega incision" to the transsphenoidal approach while practicing at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  15. PBDEs, hydroxylated PBDEs and methoxylated PBDEs in bivalves from Beijing markets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Jiao, Ying; Lin, Chunye; Sun, Ke; Zhao, Ye

    2014-09-01

    The structural analogues of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs) and methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs) have been attracting increasing concern in recent years. Five bivalve species (blue mussel, short-necked clam, surf clam, ark shell and razor clam) were collected from Beijing markets, and the concentrations of seven PBDEs, four OH-PBDEs and fourteen MeO-PBDEs in the bivalves were measured. The seasonal variations of these three types of polybrominated compound in blue mussels were also monitored. The results indicate that the levels of ΣPBDEs in this study were comparable to those in short-necked clams from Liaodong Bay, China, with BDE47 as the dominant congener. For the ortho-MeO-PBDEs, 6-MeO-BDE47 was found at higher concentrations than the others, while for the meta- and para-MeO-PBDEs, 4'-MeO-BDE17 was found at higher concentrations. 6-OH-BDE-47 was the most abundant congener among the 4 measured OH-PBDEs, followed by 6-OH-BDE-137 and 6-OH-BDE-85. The levels of OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs in bivalves from Beijing markets were much lower than the corresponding compounds in blue mussels from the Baltic Sea. In the blue mussels collected in April, June and September of 2012, apparent seasonal variations were observed for these three types of polybrominated compounds, but the acidic components displayed different trends from the neutral components, with PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs showing the highest concentrations in June, while OH-PBDEs had the lowest concentrations in June. This difference in seasonal variations between the neutral components and the acidic components may be explained by their different sources and transformation/elimination mechanisms.

  16. Bivalve shells as high resolution biomineral archives of early Pleistocene seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Gaia; Angiolini, Lucia; Leng, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Bivalves are among the best tools for palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions because they are known to precipitate their shells in isotopic equilibrium with the seawater in which they live. Also, the analysis of their shell microstructure shows that these organisms modify their shell fabric in response to environmental variations forming growth lines. However, diagenetic processes may alter fossil bivalve shell microstructure and shell isotopic composition; for this reason it is important to perform screening tests to check if the shell is pristine and thus confidently identify biogenic calcium carbonate as a reliable proxy of primary seawater chemistry. Here, we performed a detailed study of the microstructure of ten aragonite bivalves shells belonging to Glycymeris insubrica, Glycymeris inflata and Arctica islandica, collected from the lower Pleistocene Arda River marine succession (northern Italy), to check their preservation for subsequent sclerochemical stable isotope analyses (δ18O, δ13C). To assess shell preservation 4 different screening techniques were used: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Catholuminescence (CL), X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and Feigl's solution. Shells of species of Glycymeris, under SEM, show an outer crossed lamellar layer, an inner irregular and cone complex crossed lamellar layer and an irregular simple prismatic pallial myostracum; all the layers are penetrated by cylindrical tubules. Arctica islandica has an outer homogenous/crossed lamellar/crossed acicular layer, an inner fine complex crossed lamellar layer and an irregular simple prismatic pallial myostracum. The comparative analysis with recent fabrics shows a consistent pattern for species of both Glycymeris and Arctica genera, the recent and fossils shell microstructures being almost identical. Analyses at CL, XRD and Feigl's solution support that these fossil species have a non luminescent shells composed of pure aragonite. The excellent preservation

  17. Improving management support tools for reintroducing bivalve species (eastern oyster [Crassostrea virginica Gmelin]) in urban estuaries.

    PubMed

    Ravit, Beth; Cooper, Keith; Buckley, Brian; Comi, Meredith; McCandlish, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Successful reintroduction of "ecologically extinct" bivalve species into anthropogenically impaired urban estuaries is problematic when employing existing management tools used in estuaries where bivalves are present (GIS-based restoration models, expanding existing shellfish beds, placement of shell substrate, physical oceanographic parameters). A significant management challenge is appropriate site selection. We are proposing the inclusion of a biological parameter (evaluation of tissue histopathology) in an inexpensive and rapid site selection model to inform management decision making and identify sites with the greatest potential for reintroduction success. Use of biological biomarkers is not a new concept, but it is important that they be included in a multitiered management approach to bivalve reintroduction. This Case Study tested adult Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) from locations that supported comparable short-term survival rates by evaluating growth and tissue health and/or disease. Biomarkers indicated oyster tissues at one site were normal, the female:male sex ratio was 50:50, and female oysters were in spawning condition. Conversely, oyster tissues at the second site exhibited multiple abnormalities, samples were 100% male, and the incidence of disease was high. Using the biomarker tool, we evaluated 4 additional sites where oysters exhibited short-term (1 year) survival. At 2 locations, we observed chronic health impacts that would preclude reintroduction, including samples from one site where a wild population was surviving. We also analyzed tissue and shell heavy metal contents. Soft tissue metal concentrations in Meadowlands samples were at the high range of scientific literature values, averaging 1.1% of total body weight, whereas tissue metal concentrations at the Keyport site were within acceptable ranges. Although initial survival and growth rates at both locations were comparable, site-specific urban stressors reduced oyster

  18. Detection of the oyster herpesvirus in commercial bivalve in northern California, USA: conventional and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Burge, Colleen A; Strenge, Robyn E; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2011-04-06

    The ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV-1) and related oyster herpesviruses (OsHV) are associated with world-wide mortalities of larval and juvenile bivalves. To quantify OsHV viral loads in mollusc tissues, we developed a SYBR Green quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on the A-region of the OsHV-1 genome. Reaction efficiency and precision were demonstrated using a plasmid standard curve. The analytical sensitivity is 1 copy per reaction. We collected Crassostrea gigas, C. sikamea, C. virginica, Ostrea edulis, O. lurida, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Venerupis phillipinarum from Tomales Bay (TB), and C. gigas from Drakes Estero (DE), California, U.S.A., and initially used conventional PCR (cPCR) to test for presence of OsHV DNA. Subsequently, viral loads were quantified in selected samples of all tested bivalves except O. lurida. Copy numbers were low in each species tested but were significantly greater in C. gigas (p < 0.0001) compared to all other species, suggesting a higher level of infection. OsHV DNA was detected with cPCR and/or qPCR and confirmed by sequencing in C. gigas, C. sikamea, C. virginica, O. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and V phillipinarum from TB and C. gigas from DE. These data indicate that multiple bivalve species may act as reservoirs for OsHV in TB. A lack of histological abnormalities in potential reservoirs requires alternative methods for their identification. Further investigation is needed to determine the host-parasite relationship for each potential reservoir, including characterization of viral loads and their relationship with infection (via in situ hybridization), assessments of mortality, and host responses.

  19. Sodium provides unique insights into transgenerational effects of ocean acidification on bivalve shell formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R; Mertz-Kraus, Regina; Yang, Feng

    2017-01-15

    Ocean acidification is likely to have profound impacts on marine bivalves, especially on their early life stages. Therefore, it is imperative to know whether and to what extent bivalves will be able to acclimate or adapt to an acidifying ocean over multiple generations. Here, we show that reduced seawater pH projected for the end of this century (i.e., pH7.7) led to a significant decrease of shell production of newly settled juvenile Manila clams, Ruditapes philippinarum. However, juveniles from parents exposed to low pH grew significantly faster than those from parents grown at ambient pH, exhibiting a rapid transgenerational acclimation to an acidic environment. The sodium composition of the shells may shed new light on the mechanisms responsible for beneficial transgenerational acclimation. Irrespective of parental exposure, the amount of Na incorporated into shells increased with decreasing pH, implying active removal of excessive protons through the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger which is known to depend on the Na(+) gradient actively built up by the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase as a driving force. However, the shells with a prior history of transgenerational exposure to low pH recorded significantly lower amounts of Na than those with no history of acidic exposure. It therefore seems very likely that the clams may implement less costly and more ATP-efficient ion regulatory mechanisms to maintain pH homeostasis in the calcifying fluid following transgenerational acclimation. Our results suggest that marine bivalves may have a greater capacity to acclimate or adapt to ocean acidification by the end of this century than currently understood.

  20. Effects of green algal mats on bivalves in a New England mud flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, M.; Stearns, L. M.; Watling, L.

    1998-03-01

    Concurrent with the spread of green algal mats on tidal flats, reports of macrofauna dieoffs under dense algal mats have increased in numbers. Bivalves seem to be particularly affected by persistent dense algal mats. Bivalve species with a long extendible siphon seem to be less affected underneath algal mats, but no distinction has been made in the past between species with short and those with long siphons, Mya arenaria and Macoma balthica, on an intertidal mudflat in New England. Abundances of M. arenaria declined substantially during the study period when a thick green algal mat covered the mudflat for several months. Numbers of the small bivalve Gemma gemma also decreased substantially, whereas abundances of M. balthica showed minimal variation during the time of algal coverage. In algae removal/addition experiments numbers of M. arenaria decreased, but effects were only significant in an algal addition to previously algal-free mudflat areas. Abundance of M. balthica did not change significantly in the algal removal/additition experiments. Over the time period of the experiment (9 weeks), M. arenaria showed measurable size increase in uncovered mudflat areas, but not underneath algal mats. Similarly, M. balthica only increased in size in the uncovered mudflat area. From these results it is concluded that M. balthica can survive time periods of dense algal coverage because it is able to penetrate through the algal mat with its long extendible siphon, and thus can reach well-oxygenated water layers above the mat. M. arenaria with its thick, less extendible, siphon cannot push through dense algal mats and therefore is more likely to die underneath persistent algal mats.

  1. Distribution of persistent toxic substances in benthic bivalves from the inshore areas of the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen X; Hu, Jing; Chen, Jiang L; Fan, Yong S; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2008-01-01

    A baseline survey of trace metals and organic pollutants in bivalves from the coastal areas of the Yellow Sea (China) showed the the concentrations of Cd and Pb in the bivalves from more than 85 and 73%, respectively, of the total sites (30 sites in all) exceeded the low limits of the national quality standards for marine organisms. At three sites, the contents of Cd in three species were even higher than the median limit, and a similar case with Pb occurred at another site. The tissue concentrations of As at four sites and of Hg at one site were above the low and the median limits, respectively, of the quality standards. At 43% of all sites, the levels of petroleum hydrocarbons were higher than the low limit of the quality standards, and the tissue concentrations at two sites even went beyond the median limit at one site and the high limit at the other. The concentrations of phthalate esters and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the collected bivalves were not high, as shown by peak values of 305 and 302 ng/g, respectively. The contents of polychlorinated biphenyls for all the species were much lower than the low limit of the quality standards. The compositional properties and isomeric ratios of PAHs indicated various pyrolytic procedures as the dominant origins. The sites with higher tissue contents of DDT and its metabolites (DDTs) over the low or the median quality limit were located mainly in the South Yellow Sea. The fractions and specific ratios of DDTs suggested that new inputs of DDT existed at two sites in the North Yellow Sea, and the potential sources involved technical DDT, technical dicofol, and their mixture.

  2. How does the metallothionein induction in bivalves meet the criteria for biomarkers of metal exposure?

    PubMed

    Le, T T Yen; Zimmermann, Sonja; Sures, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Metallothionein (MT) concentrations in the whole soft tissue or in a particular tissue of bivalves have widely been used in ecotoxicological studies and biomonitoring programmes. This approach is based on the reported results on the enhancement of MT induction in bivalves in response to metal exposure. The validity of using MT induction as a biomarker is briefly assessed in the present study. The sensitivity of MT induction in these organisms is questionable due to the high basal MT level as well as the high natural variability related to the effects of a number of biotic and abiotic factors, which are not well described yet. Moreover, the relationship between exposure to metals, the toxic effects of that exposure, and the appearance of MT in soft tissue, is not well characterized. A variety of factors may influence the appearance and distribution of MT: 1) the uneven distribution of metals in particular portions of the soft tissue and in particular subcellular compartments; 2) pre-exposure to metals, perhaps at non-toxic levels; 3) metal-metal competition and metal-protein interactions; and 4) tissue-specific induction, functions, and isoforms of MT. Therefore, attention is required when using MT induction in bivalves for assessment of metal exposure or consequent toxic effects. The MT concentration can be a reliable indicator only when it is considered in relation with metal uptake kinetics and subcellular partitioning while specifying the isoform of MT synthesised and considering various confounding factors. The kinetic turnover of MT may provide useful information on metal exposure and biological effects since it covers both the synthesis and breakdown of MT as well as the chemical species of metals accumulated and MT.

  3. Dispersal, environmental niches and oceanic-scale turnover in deep-sea bivalves.

    PubMed

    McClain, Craig R; Stegen, James C; Hurlbert, Allen H

    2012-05-22

    Patterns of beta-diversity or distance decay at oceanic scales are completely unknown for deep-sea communities. Even when appropriate data exist, methodological problems have made it difficult to discern the relative roles of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation for generating faunal turnover patterns. Here, we combine a spatially extensive dataset on deep-sea bivalves with a model incorporating ecological dynamics and shared evolutionary history to quantify the effects of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation. Both the model and empirical data are used to relate functional, taxonomic and phylogenetic similarity between communities to environmental and spatial distances separating them for 270 sites across the Atlantic Ocean. This study represents the first ocean-wide analysis examining distance decay as a function of a broad suite of explanatory variables. We find that both strong environmental filtering and dispersal limitation drive turnover in taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic composition in deep-sea bivalves, explaining 26 per cent, 34 per cent and 9 per cent of the variation, respectively. This contrasts with previous suggestions that dispersal is not limiting in broad-scale biogeographic and biodiversity patterning in marine systems. However, rates of decay in similarity with environmental distance were eightfold to 44-fold steeper than with spatial distance. Energy availability is the most influential environmental variable evaluated, accounting for 3.9 per cent, 9.4 per cent and 22.3 per cent of the variation in functional, phylogenetic and taxonomic similarity, respectively. Comparing empirical patterns with process-based theoretical predictions provided quantitative estimates of dispersal limitation and niche breadth, indicating that 95 per cent of deep-sea bivalve propagules will be able to persist in environments that deviate from their optimum by up to 2.1 g m(-2) yr(-1) and typically disperse 749 km from their natal site.

  4. Appearance and spread of diseases among bivalve molluscs in the northern hemisphere in relation to international trade.

    PubMed

    Renault, T

    1996-06-01

    Bivalve mollusc culture is a well-developed marine aquaculture activity in many countries around the world, notably in the northern hemisphere. During the development of this activity, numerous countries have been confronted with infectious diseases of varying severity and duration. Research has been conducted to determine the aetiology, epidemiology and control measures for these epizootics. Major epizootics in bivalve molluscs have been caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoan parasites. Moreover important commercial relations exist in marine mollusc culture between different geographical areas. This must be taken into account in explaining the appearance and the spread of some infectious diseases in several countries around the world. The author concentrates on some viral and protozoan diseases of bivalve molluscs reported in the northern hemisphere, in view of their economic impact and their spread related to movement of molluscs through trade.

  5. The ecological role of bivalve shellfish aquaculture in the estuarine environment: A review with application to oyster and clam culture in West Coast (USA) estuaries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture is viewed as a potential mechanism to meet the growing demand for seafood around the world. The future of bivalve shellfish aquaculture in the U.S. hinges on sustainable practices on the part of industry and a more consistent regulatory regime. Bivalve shellfish aquaculture is a recent...

  6. Detection and identification of tdh- and trh-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from four species of cultured bivalve molluscs on the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Lacuesta, Beatriz; Elandaloussi, Laurence; Wagley, Sariqa; Furones, M Dolores; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; de Blas, Ignacio; Rangdale, Rachel; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2009-12-01

    Presented here is the first report describing the detection of potentially diarrheal Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from cultured bivalves on the Mediterranean coast, providing data on the presence of both tdh- and trh-positive isolates. Potentially diarrheal V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from four species of bivalves collected from both bays of the Ebro delta, Spain.

  7. Detection and Identification of tdh- and trh-Positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains from Four Species of Cultured Bivalve Molluscs on the Spanish Mediterranean Coast▿

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Ana; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Lacuesta, Beatriz; Elandaloussi, Laurence; Wagley, Sariqa; Furones, M. Dolores; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; de Blas, Ignacio; Rangdale, Rachel; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Presented here is the first report describing the detection of potentially diarrheal Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from cultured bivalves on the Mediterranean coast, providing data on the presence of both tdh- and trh-positive isolates. Potentially diarrheal V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from four species of bivalves collected from both bays of the Ebro delta, Spain. PMID:19801467

  8. Soundscapes and Larval Settlement: Larval Bivalve Responses to Habitat-Associated Underwater Sounds.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, David B; Lillis, Ashlee; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R

    2016-01-01

    We quantified the effects of habitat-associated sounds on the settlement response of two species of bivalves with contrasting habitat preferences: (1) Crassostrea virginicia (oyster), which prefers to settle on other oysters, and (2) Mercenaria mercenaria (clam), which settles on unstructured habitats. Oyster larval settlement in the laboratory was significantly higher when exposed to oyster reef sound compared with either off-reef or no-sound treatments. Clam larval settlement did not vary according to sound treatments. Similar to laboratory results, field experiments showed that oyster larval settlement in "larval housings" suspended above oyster reefs was significantly higher compared with off-reef sites.

  9. [Nutrition and biological value of food parts of a trade bivalve mollusk Anadara broughtoni].

    PubMed

    Tabakaeva, O V; Tabakaev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the human diet includes different new products of seafishing, including non-fish--bivalves and gastropods, holothurias, echinoderms, jellyfishes that demands careful studying of their chemical composition. The purpose of the study was to determine the nutritional and biological value of all soft parts of the burrowing bivalve MOLLUSK Anadara broughtoni from the Far East region. It was established thatfood parts of a bivalve were significantly flooded (water content--73.5-84.2%), with the minimum water content in the adductor and maximum in the mantle. Dry solids are presented by organic (89-93%) and mineral (7-11%) components. Organic components consist of protein (14.6-20.7%), lipids (1.8-2.3%), carbohydrates (2.1-2.6%). The analysis of amino-acid composition of proteins of food parts of the mollusk of Anadara broughtonishowed the presence of all essential amino acids with slight differences in their content depending on the localization of the protein. All edible parts have tryptophan as the limiting amino acid. Muscle proteins have maximum level of lysine, methionine, cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine; mantle proteins--leucine, isoleucine and threonine; adductor proteins--valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine and cysteine. Predominant nonessential amino acids forproteins of all food pieces are glycine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine. The coefficient of amino-acid score differences of adductor protein (31.7%) is less than the same of cloak by 3.7%. The indicator "biological value" is maximal for adductor (68.3%), but the differenceformuscle is only 0.83%. Mantle proteins are characterized by minimum biological value (64.6%). The coefficient of utility of amino acid composition of protein is maximalfor muscle (57.83%), and values for a cloak and an adductor differ slightly (55.81 and 55.96%). Taurine content in food parts of a mollusk Anadara broughtoni is rather high compared to with other bivalve mollusks of the Far East region

  10. Bivalve growth rate and isotopic variability across the Barents Sea Polar Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael L.; Ambrose, William G.; Locke V, William L.; Ryan, Stuart K.; Johnson, Beverly J.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of bivalve shell increments provides a means to reconstruct long-term patterns in growth histories and assess factors that regulate marine ecosystems, while tissue stable isotopes are indicators of food sources and trophic dynamics. We examined shell growth patterns and tissue stable isotopic composition (δ13C and δ15N) of the hairy cockle (Ciliatocardium ciliatum) in the northwest Barents Sea to evaluate the influence of different water masses and the Polar Front on growth rates and food sources and to assess the influence of climatic variability on ecological processes over seasonal to decadal scales. Shell growth rates were highest in Atlantic water, intermediate in Arctic water, and lowest at the Polar Front. Temporal patterns of ontogenetically-adjusted growth (SGI) were negatively correlated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), local precipitation and ice-free days. The highest growth occurred during colder periods with more sea ice, while lower growth was associated with warmer periods and less sea ice. Stable isotope values of lipid-extracted tissues from Atlantic water cockles were enriched in δ13C by up to 2.1‰ and δ15N by 1.5‰ compared to animals from Arctic waters. Distinct seasonal and water mass variations in stable isotopic values reflect spatial and temporal variability in food supplies to the bivalves in this region on small spatial scales. Overall, Atlantic waters supported the highest growth rates, the most complex trophic webs, and the greatest sensitivity to interannual variability in environmental conditions. Bivalves from Arctic waters were the most distinct of the three groups in their response to regional climate forcing and local environmental manifestations of those conditions. The Polar Front exhibits growth and isotopic characteristics predominantly of the Atlantic domain. These results demonstrate that integrating results of sclerochronological and stable isotopic analyses of benthic bivalves provide

  11. Host-parasite interactions: Marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, Perkinsus species.

    PubMed

    Soudant, Philippe; E Chu, Fu-Lin; Volety, Aswani

    2013-10-01

    This review assesses and examines the work conducted to date concerning host and parasite interactions between marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, belonging to Perkinsus species. The review focuses on two well-studied host-parasite interaction models: the two clam species, Ruditapes philippinarum and R. decussatus, and the parasite Perkinsus olseni, and the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the parasite Perkinsus marinus. Cellular and humoral defense responses of the host in combating parasitic infection, the mechanisms (e.g., antioxidant enzymes, extracellular products) employed by the parasite in evading host defenses as well as the role of environmental factors in modulating the host-parasite interactions are described.

  12. Comparative sensitivity of European native (Anodonta anatina) and exotic (Corbicula fluminea) bivalves to mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Machado, Jorge; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-12-01

    Pollution is believed to be an important factor modulating the competition between exotic invasive bivalves and their native competitors. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of the European native Anodonta anatina and the exotic invasive species Corbicula fluminea to mercury, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant of high concern. In laboratory acute bioassays, adult organisms of both species were exposed independently to mercury for 96 h (31-500 μg/L). The criteria indicative of toxicity were mortality and biomarkers of oxidative stress and damage, neurotoxicity, and energy production changes. Mercury induced mortality in A. anatina (72 h-LC10 and 72 h-LC50 of 14.0 μg/L and 49.6 μg/L, respectively) but not in C. fluminea. The ability of C. fluminea to maintaining the shell closed for considerable periods of time when exposed to high concentrations of mercury and the effective activation (up to 63 μg/L) of mechanisms against the oxidative stress caused by mercury may have contributed to its relatively low sensitivity. In the range of concentrations tested, mercury had no significant effects on the other parameters analysed in C. fluminea. Overall, the findings of the present study, suggest that in real scenarios of competition between C. fluminea and A. anatina populations, the presence of mercury may modulate the process, acting in favour of the exotic species because it is less sensitive to this environmental contaminant than the native bivalve. The results of the present study highlight the need of further investigation on the effects of mercury on the competition between exotic invasive species and their native competitors, especially the effects potentially induced by long-term exposure to low concentrations of this metal, the mechanisms involved in the tolerance to mercury-induced stress, and the potential post-exposure recovery of both exotic invasive and native bivalves. This knowledge is most important for

  13. Abundance not linked to survival across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction: patterns in North American bivalves.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Rowan

    2003-03-04

    Ecological studies suggest that rare taxa are more likely to go extinct than abundant ones, but the influence of abundance on survivorship in the fossil record has received little attention. An analysis of Late Maastrichtian bivalve subgenera from the North American Coastal Plain found no evidence that survivorship is tied to abundance across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (65 million years ago), regardless of abundance metric or spatial scale examined. The fact that abundance does not promote survivorship in end-Cretaceous bivalves suggests that the factors influencing survivorship during mass extinctions in the fossil record may differ from those operating during intervals of background extinction.

  14. Morphological and molecular analyses of larval trematodes in the intertidal bivalve Perumytilus purpuratus from central Chile.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; López, Z; Cárdenas, L

    2013-09-01

    The bivalve Perumytilus purpuratus is a common species that is widely distributed throughout rocky intertidal zones in Chile. This bivalve is the first intermediate host for three trematode species: one bucephalid (an undetermined species) and two fellodistomids (Proctoeces lintoni and one undetermined species). A few studies based on morphological comparisons, experimental infection and molecular analyses have been performed to ascertain the taxon (at least at the family level) to which these trematodes belong; yet, there remains no clarification about the specific identity of these trematodes. Therefore, in this study, we compared the V4 region nucleotide sequences of the 18S rRNA of these three sporocyst species, classified as morphotypes, found in P. purpuratus and nine adult trematode species from intertidal fishes that are likely definitive hosts for these parasites. The sequences from two of the sporocyst morphotypes matched with adult trematodes from the intertidal fish: type 1 sporocyst was similar to Prosorhynchoides carvajali (Bucephalidae), with a mean genetic divergence of 0.78%, and type 2 sporocyst was similar to Proctoeces sp. (but not P. lintoni), with 0% genetic divergence. The third species (type 3 sporocyst) was classified to the family Fellodistomidae; however, the sequence from this species differed greatly from the three other fellodistomid species documented in the marine fish of Chile and from other fellodistomids in public databases. Moreover, this morphotype has a particular cercarial morphology that greatly differs from other fellodistomid species described thus far. Therefore, this intriguing trematode remains a mystery.

  15. Genotoxicity in two bivalve species from a coastal lagoon in the south of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina; Pereira, Catarina G; Gomes, Tânia; Cardoso, Cátia; Bebianno, Maria João; Cravo, Alexandra

    2013-08-01

    DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay in the haemolymph of two bivalve species Ruditapes decussatus and Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Ria Formosa lagoon (south Coast of Portugal). Clams and mussels were sampled from sites close to each other to determine interspecific responses to similar environmental conditions, considering also seasonal and gender differences. Coupled with genotoxic effect, another damage biomarker (lipid peroxidation) was analysed to verify if the conditions that instigate DNA damage can be related with injury to cell membranes. For both species, DNA damage was low, reflecting the low levels of genotoxic contaminants in the lagoon, and no interspecific differences were found. However, seasonal differences were established for both bivalve species, reflecting higher environmental stress in summer. Regarding gender susceptibility, only clams showed differences in percentage of Tail DNA, with females more sensitive to DNA damage than males. Additionally, results for clams point out that factors responsible for LPO may not be the same as those causing genotoxicity. This study demonstrated that DNA damage is a sensitive biomarker to discriminate spatial, temporal and gender differences, being an appropriate biomarker for genotoxicity evaluation even in places of low contamination, such as the Ria Formosa lagoon.

  16. Proteomic research in bivalves: towards the identification of molecular markers of aquatic pollution.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alexandre; Tedesco, Sara; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cristobal, Susana

    2012-07-19

    Biomonitoring of aquatic environment and assessment of ecosystem health play essential roles in the development of effective strategies for the protection of the environment, human health and sustainable development. Biomarkers of pollution exposure have been extensively utilized in the last few decades to monitor the health of organisms and hence assess environmental status. However, the use of single biomarkers against biotic or abiotic stressors may be limited by the lack of sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, more recently, the search for novel biomarkers has been focused on the application of OMICS methodologies. Environmental proteomics focuses on the analysis of an organism's proteome and the detection of changes in the level of individual proteins/peptides in response to environmental stressors. Proteomics can provide a more robust approach for the assessment of environmental stress and therefore exposure to pollutants. This review aims to summarize the proteomic research in bivalves, a group of sessile and filter feeding organisms that play an important function as "sentinels" of the aquatic environment. A description of the main proteomic methodologies is provided. The current knowledge in bivalves' toxicology, achieved with proteomics, is reported describing the main biochemical markers identified. A brief discussion regarding future challenges in this area of research emphasizing the development of more descriptive gene/protein databases that could support the OMICs approaches is presented.

  17. Assessing phototoxicity of petroleum using the bivalve Mulinia lateralis and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, M.; Champlin, D.; Burgess, R.; Ho, K.; Kuhn-Hines, A.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major inputs of PAHs in the marine environment is petroleum products. A large and often catastrophic source of petroleum is an oil spill, which releases concentrated quantities of PAHs into the water column. Intermediate molecular weight compounds remain in the water column for a relatively extended length of time. These compounds include phototoxic PAHs such as anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and their substituted derivatives. Assessments of the environmental impact of marine oil spills have not included phototoxicity tests using pelagic larvae of benthic invertebrates. In this study, the photoreactive toxicity of individual PAHs, including anthracene, pyrene, and fluoranthene, were determined using the bivalve, Mulinia lateralis and the mysid, Mysidopsis bahia. Ultraviolet light exposures increased toxicity relative to fluorescent light for both species but a particularly dramatic response was seen using M. lateralis embryos. This species was relatively insensitive when exposed under fluorescent lights, but exhibited up to a 4,000 fold increase in toxicity under ultraviolet lights. Exposures with different types of petroleum (e.g., fuel oil {number_sign}2 and crude oil) under fluorescent and ultraviolet light will demonstrate the utility of this bivalve and mysid for assessing oil spill-related acute and sublethal toxicity in the marine environment.

  18. Steady-state model of biota sediment accumulation factor for metals in two marine bivalves

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, R.V.; Mahony, J.D.; Mueller, R.

    1995-11-01

    A model of the biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) is developed to relate the ratio of metal concentrations in two marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica and Mytilus edulis) to sediment metal concentration. A generalized metal BSAF can be approximated by a simple relationship that is a function of sediment to water column partitioning, the bioconcentration factor (BCF), the depuration rate, the metal assimilation efficiency from food, the bivalve feeding rate, and the growth rate. Analyses of Mussel Watch data indicate that the medium BSAF across stations varies by about three orders of magnitude from Zn, Cd, and Cu at the highest levels of BSAF = 1 to 10, while Cr has the lowest BSAF at 0.01. Total Hg is about 1.0 and Ni and Pb are approximately 0.1. Calibration of the model indicates that the food route of metal accumulation is significant for all metals but specially for Zn, Cd, Cu, and Hg where virtually all of the observed BSAF is calculated to be due to ingestion of metal from food in the overlying water. These results indicate a potential significance of the metal-binding protein metallothionein, which results in relatively high binding of metal and resulting low depuration rates.

  19. Origins, bottlenecks, and present-day diversity: patterns of morphospace occupation in marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Roy, Kaustuv; Jablonski, David

    2015-03-01

    It has long been known that species should not be distributed randomly in morphospace (a multidimensional trait space), even under simple models of evolution. However, recent studies suggest that position in morphospace can affect aspects of evolution such as the durations of clades and the species richness of their constituent taxa. Here we investigate the dynamics of morphospace occupancy in living and fossil marine bivalves using shell size and aspect ratio, two functionally important traits. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the center of a family's morphospace today represents a location where taxonomic diversity is maximized, apparently owing to lower extinction rates. Within individual bivalve families, species with narrow geographic ranges are distributed throughout the morphospace but widespread species, which are generally expected to be extinction resistant, tend to be concentrated near the center. The morphospace centers of most species-rich families today (defined as the median value for all species in the family) tend to be close to the positions of the family founders, further suggesting an association between position in morphospace and net diversification rates. However, trajectories of individual subclades (genera) are inconsistent with the center of morphospace being an evolutionary attractor.

  20. Delineating copper accumulation pathways for the freshwater bivalve Corbicula using stable copper isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Delineation of metal uptake routes in aquatic invertebrates is critical for characterizing bioaccumulation dynamics and assessing risks associated with metal exposure. Here we demonstrate that Cu stable isotopic ratios can be manipulated in both exposure media and algae to determine the efflux rate constant (ke) and to estimate Cu assimilation efficiency (AE) from ingested food in a freshwater bivalve (Corbicula fluminea). The Cu AE in Corhicula fed 65Cu-spiked Cryptomonas ozolini was 38%. Copper uptake routes had no significant influence on efflux; ke, of 0.004 per day characterized the slowest component of efflux following short-term exposures to 65Cu in water or in both food and water. Incorporation of the physiological parameters for dietary and dissolved uptake as well as rate constants of loss into a bioaccumulation model allowed for assessing the relative contribution of water and food as Cu sources. At [65Cu 2+] of 6.7 ??g/L, Corbicula accumulated twice as much Cu from diet as from water. In most freshwater systems, the dietary pathway is likely to act as the major Cu uptake route for Corbicula. Extrapolation of our laboratory results to the San Francisco Bay-Delta (California, USA) indicated that our biodynamic model and the laboratory-derived parameters for dietary 65Cu uptake provided a realistic representation of the processes involved in Cu accumulation by the bivalve Corbicula. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  1. Bioavailability of Cd, Cr, and Zn to bivalves in south San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.G.; Luoma, S.N.; Geen, A. van

    1995-12-31

    The bioavailability of Cd, Cr, and Zn to benthic bivalves (Potamocorbular amurensis and Macoma balthica) is affected by the type of natural particles the animals ingest, and the concentration and speciation of dissolved metals. During a spring phytoplankton bloom in south San Francisco Bay dissolved Cd and Zn concentrations decreased to about half of pre-bloom concentrations. The concentrations of particulate Cd and Zn concentrations increased due to preferential uptake of these metals by phytoplankton. Assimilation of Cd was more efficient when clams ate pure phytoplankton (80% for M. balthica and 29% for P. amurensis) than when they were exposed to inorganic-dominated particles. M. balthica and P. amurensis assimilated 72% and 42% of Zn associated with the particles during the bloom. Assimilation of Cr was low (<6%) and particle type had little effect on its availability. Accumulation of Cd via the dissolved route was low in high salinity waters (15 ppt). Metal bioaccumulation in the bivalves was modeled using the experimentally determined physiological parameters. The results were compared to metal concentrations in clams from the Bay. The model suggested that the clams accumulated Cd and Zn at higher rates during the phytoplankton bloom, although dissolved metal concentrations in the water column were reduced.

  2. Contrasting metal detoxification in polychaetes, bivalves and fish from a contaminated bay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhong; Xu, Zhizhen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-02-01

    Jinzhou Bay in Bohai, Northern China, is historically contaminated with metals, but the organisms living in such contaminated environments are much less well studied. In this study, we contrasted the different subcellular and detoxification responses of polychaetes, bivalves and fish collected from different contaminated sites in Jinzhou Bay. In polychaete Neanthes japonica, metal-rich granule (MRG) was the main biologically detoxified metal compartment, and metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) detoxified a relatively smaller fraction of accumulated metals. The importance of MRG increased whereas that of MTLP decreased with increasing metal bioaccumulation. Detoxification in the two bivalves was similar to that in the polychaetes. However, the MRG appeared to play only a minor role in metal binding and detoxification in the gills and livers of fish, whereas MTLP was the dominating detoxification pool. Cellular debris was an important pool binding with metals in the three marine animals. Our study highlighted the contrasting cellular binding and detoxification among different marine organisms living in contaminated environments.

  3. Multi-residue method for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and some of their metabolites in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Muñoz, D; Huerta, B; Fernandez-Tejedor, M; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Barceló, D

    2015-05-01

    A fast, simple and robust method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 pharmaceuticals (including some major metabolites) in bivalve mollusks. The analytes belong to eight different therapeutic groups: antibiotics, psychiatric drugs, analgesics/anti-inflammatories, tranquilizer, calcium channel blockers, diuretic, and prostatic hyperplasia. The method is based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by solid phase extraction clean-up (SPE), and ultra performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPL-MS/MS) for the identification and quantification of the target analytes. It has been developed and validated in three different species of bivalves: Crassostrea gigas (Pacific oyster), Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean mussel), and Chamelea gallina (striped venus clam). The majority of the compounds were extracted with a recovery between 40 and 115%. The developed analytical method allowed the determination of the compounds in the lower ng/g concentration levels. The relative standard deviation was under 12% for the intra-day and 20% inter-day analyses, respectively. Finally, the method was applied to oyster, clam and mussel samples collected from the Ebro delta, Spain. The most ubiquitous compounds detected were the psychiatric drug venlanfaxine and the antibiotic azithromycin, with the highest concentrations found in mussel (2.7ng/g dw) and oyster (3.0ng/g dw), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that azithromycin has been reported in environmental samples of marine biota.

  4. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-01

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p < 0.05) in the CO2 acidified seawater during the 30 days experiment and the health risk of Cd (based on the estimated target hazard quotients, THQ) via consumption of M. meretrix at pH 7.8 and 7.4 significantly increased 1.21 and 1.32 times respectively, suggesting a potential threat to seafood safety. The ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd2+/Ca2+ in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  5. SAR Indicators for Morphological Changes and Bivalve Beds on Intertidal Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina; Kemme, Linnea

    2016-08-01

    We analysed a large amount of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of four test areas acquired from 2008 to 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Multi-temporal analyses of series of SAR images allow detecting bivalve beds, since the radar backscattering from those beds is generally high, whereas that from sediments may vary with imaging geometry and environmental conditions. Our results further show evidence that also single-acquisition, dual- polarization SAR imagery can be used in this respect. The polarization coefficient (i.e., the ratio of the difference and the sum of both co-polarizations) can be used to infer indicators for oyster and blue-mussel beds.

  6. Bivalve omics: state of the art and potential applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Manfrin, Chiara; Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola; Eirín-López, José M

    2013-11-01

    The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

  7. Pathways of food uptake in native (Unionidae) and introduced (Corbiculidae and Dreissenidae) freshwater bivalves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Silverman, Harold; Dietz, Thomas H.; Lynn, John W.; Garling, Donald L.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen species of adult freshwater bivalves were able to use water currents generated from within the mantle cavity to move non-suspended algae into the shell through non-siphon areas such as the anterior shell valve edge and the mid-ventral point of the shell. This was in addition to, and not in replacement of, uptake of planktonic algae through the inhalant siphon. Algae obtained from both the non-inhalant siphon areas and the inhalant siphon were equally captured and transferred to the stomach. Pseudofecal release was also more complex than typically stated. Pseudofeces were released from the inhalant siphon (as expected), plus from the anterior shell margin, and at the mid-point along the ventral shell edge (non-dreissenids). Pseudofeces that settled near the ventral shell margin was accessible for future uptake back into the mantle cavity. There were no species or body size differences in ability to capture food from non-planktonic sources. The extent to which natural populations utilize benthic food resources remains to be determined. However, our study demonstrates that bivalve communities are very adaptable in accessing a variety of food resources from both suspended material in the water column, as well as organic material from the sediments.

  8. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-21

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p < 0.05) in the CO2 acidified seawater during the 30 days experiment and the health risk of Cd (based on the estimated target hazard quotients, THQ) via consumption of M. meretrix at pH 7.8 and 7.4 significantly increased 1.21 and 1.32 times respectively, suggesting a potential threat to seafood safety. The ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd(2+)/Ca(2+) in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  9. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles as carrier facilitate bioaccumulation of phenanthrene in marine bivalve, ark shell (Scapharca subcrenata).

    PubMed

    Tian, Shengyan; Zhang, Yaodan; Song, Chunzheng; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) on the uptake of hydrophobic organic chemicals by marine bivalves, we conducted a comparative bioaccumulation study by exposing clam, Scapharca subcrenata, to phenanthrene (Phe) in the presence and absence of nTiO2. The large surface area of nTiO2 resulted in adsorption of co-existing Phe in aqueous solution to form nTiO2-Phe complexes. Accumulation of nTiO2 was not observed in clams at exposed concentration (500 μg/L) in this study. However, enhanced uptake of Phe by clams was observed in the presence of nTiO2, with ku and BAFs values being 2 and 1.7 times higher than that of Phe alone, respectively. The enhanced uptake can be explained by ingestion of nTiO2-Phe complexes into the gut and subsequent desorption of Phe there. Therefore, nTiO2 as a carrier facilitated the uptake of Phe by marine bivalves.

  10. Bivalve Omics: State of the Art and Potential Applications for the Biomonitoring of Harmful Marine Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Manfrin, Chiara; Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola; Eirín-López, José M.

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds. PMID:24189277

  11. Fouling deterrence on the bivalve shell Mytilus galloprovincialis: a physical phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Scardino, Andrew J; de Nys, Rocky

    2004-01-01

    The physical nature of fouling deterrence by the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis was investigated using high-resolution biomimics of the bivalve surface. The homogeneous microtextured surface of M. galloprovincialis (1.94 +/- 0.03 microm), the smooth surface of the bivalve Amusium balloti (0 microm), and moulds of these surfaces (biomimics) were compared with controls of smooth (0 microm) and sanded moulds, (55.4 +/- 2.7 microm) and PVC strips (0 microm) in a 12-week field trial. The shell and mould of M. galloprovincialis were fouled by significantly fewer species and had significantly less total fouling cover than the shell and mould of A. balloti over a 12-week period. However, the major effects were between surfaces with and without microtopography. Surface microtopography, be it structured as in the case of M. galloprovincialis shell and mould, or random as in the case of the sanded mould, had a lower cover of fouling organisms than treatments without microtopography after 6 weeks. There was also no difference between the effect of the M. galloprovincialis mould and the sanded mould. The strong fouling deterrent effects of both these surfaces diminished rapidly after 6 to 8 weeks while that of M. galloprovincialis shell remained intact for the duration of the experiment suggesting factors in addition to surface microtopography contribute to fouling deterrence.

  12. Evolution of the tyrosinase gene family in bivalve molluscs: independent expansion of the mantle gene repertoire.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Felipe; McDougall, Carmel; Degnan, Bernard M

    2014-09-01

    Tyrosinase is a copper-containing enzyme that mediates the hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. This enzyme is involved in a variety of biological processes, including pigment production, innate immunity, wound healing, and exoskeleton fabrication and hardening (e.g. arthropod skeleton and mollusc shell). Here we show that the tyrosinase gene family has undergone large expansions in pearl oysters (Pinctada spp.) and the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that pearl oysters possess at least four tyrosinase genes that are not present in the Pacific oyster. Likewise, C. gigas has multiple tyrosinase genes that are not orthologous to the Pinctada genes, indicating that this gene family has expanded independently in these bivalve lineages. Many of the tyrosinase genes in these bivalves are expressed at relatively high levels in the mantle, the organ responsible for shell fabrication. Detailed comparisons of tyrosinase gene expression in different regions of the mantle in two closely related pearl oysters, P. maxima and P. margaritifera, reveals that recently evolved orthologous tyrosinase genes can have markedly different expression profiles. The expansion of tyrosinase genes in these oysters and their co-option into the mantle's gene regulatory network is consistent with mollusc shell formation being underpinned by a rapidly evolving transcriptome.

  13. Ultrastructure of the Interlamellar Membranes of the Nacre of the Bivalve Pteria hirundo, Determined by Immunolabelling

    PubMed Central

    Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio J.; Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; Marin, Frédéric; Checa, Antonio G.

    2015-01-01

    The current model for the ultrastructure of the interlamellar membranes of molluscan nacre imply that they consist of a core of aligned chitin fibers surrounded on both sides by acidic proteins. This model was based on observations taken on previously demineralized shells, where the original structure had disappeared. Despite other earlier claims, no direct observations exist in which the different components can be unequivocally discriminated. We have applied different labeling protocols on non-demineralized nacreous shells of the bivalve Pteria. With this method, we have revealed the disposition and nature of the different fibers of the interlamellar membranes that can be observed on the surface of the nacreous shell of the bivalve Pteria hirundo by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The minor chitin component consists of very thin fibers with a high aspect ratio and which are seemingly disoriented. Each fiber has a protein coat, which probably forms a complex with the chitin. The chitin-protein-complex fibers are embedded in an additional proteinaceous matrix. This is the first time in which the sizes, positions and distribution of the chitin fibers have been observed in situ. PMID:25909912

  14. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-01

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p < 0.05) in the CO2 acidified seawater during the 30 days experiment and the health risk of Cd (based on the estimated target hazard quotients, THQ) via consumption of M. meretrix at pH 7.8 and 7.4 significantly increased 1.21 and 1.32 times respectively, suggesting a potential threat to seafood safety. The ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd2+/Ca2+ in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion. PMID:26795597

  15. Mass mortalities in bivalve populations: A review of the edible cockle Cerastoderma edule (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdon, Daryl; Callaway, Ruth; Elliott, Michael; Smith, Tim; Wither, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Mass mortalities in bivalve populations have long been of particular concern, especially when the species supports a commercial fishery or is of conservation interest. Here we consider the evidence of mass mortalities of the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule (L.). Through the construction of a conceptual model eight potential factors (or groups of factors) which may cause mass mortalities are identified and reviewed. These include: food limitation; density; oxygen depletion and organic loadings; temperature and salinity; parasites, pathogens and commensals; toxicants and other persistent pollutants; predation, and changes in sediment, suspended solids, topography and bathymetry. The interplay between factors in recognized and discussed based on evidence mainly from the published literature relating to temperate edible cockle beds. Anecdotal evidence is also reported from a structured survey of site-specific evidence provided by fisheries managers in England and Wales. Case studies from the UK and Europe indicate that there is often no single, clear generic cause of mass mortalities in cockle populations. The importance of linked site-specific scientific investigations and laboratory-based experiments to fill the gaps in our current understanding of mass mortalities in bivalve species is highlighted as necessary to take account of both local extrinsic and intrinsic factors.

  16. Ultrastructure of the Interlamellar Membranes of the Nacre of the Bivalve Pteria hirundo, Determined by Immunolabelling.

    PubMed

    Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio J; Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; Marin, Frédéric; Checa, Antonio G

    2015-01-01

    The current model for the ultrastructure of the interlamellar membranes of molluscan nacre imply that they consist of a core of aligned chitin fibers surrounded on both sides by acidic proteins. This model was based on observations taken on previously demineralized shells, where the original structure had disappeared. Despite other earlier claims, no direct observations exist in which the different components can be unequivocally discriminated. We have applied different labeling protocols on non-demineralized nacreous shells of the bivalve Pteria. With this method, we have revealed the disposition and nature of the different fibers of the interlamellar membranes that can be observed on the surface of the nacreous shell of the bivalve Pteria hirundo by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The minor chitin component consists of very thin fibers with a high aspect ratio and which are seemingly disoriented. Each fiber has a protein coat, which probably forms a complex with the chitin. The chitin-protein-complex fibers are embedded in an additional proteinaceous matrix. This is the first time in which the sizes, positions and distribution of the chitin fibers have been observed in situ.

  17. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Christina; Stallknecht, David; Swayne, David; Brown, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are believed to be transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect faecal–oral route involving contaminated water. This study examined the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water. Clams were placed into individual flasks with distilled water inoculated 1:100 with a low pathogenic (LP) AI virus (A/Mallard/MN/190/99 (H3N8)). Viral titres in water with clams were significantly lower at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation compared to LPAI-infected water without clams. To determine whether clams affected the infectivity of AI viruses, 18 wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were divided into test groups and inoculated with a variety of treatments of clam supernatants, whole clams and water exposed to a high pathogenic (HP) AI (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 (H5N1)). None of the wood ducks inoculated with HPAI-infected water that was filtered by clams or that was inoculated with or fed tissue from these clams exhibited morbidity or mortality. All wood ducks exposed to either HPAI-infected water without clams or the original viral inoculum died. These results indicate that filter-feeding bivalves can remove and reduce the infectivity of AI viruses in water and demonstrate the need to examine biotic environmental factors that can influence AI virus transmission. PMID:19656788

  18. Bivalve immunity and response to infections: Are we looking at the right place?

    PubMed

    Allam, Bassem; Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in the understanding of cellular and molecular mediators of immunity in invertebrates in general and bivalve mollusks in particular. Despite this information, there is a lack of understanding of factors affecting animal resistance and specific responses to infections. This in part results from limited consideration of the spatial (and to some extent temporal) heterogeneity of immune responses and very limited information on host-pathogen (and microbes in general) interactions at initial encounter/colonization sites. Of great concern is the fact that most studies on molluscan immunity focus on the circulating hemocytes and the humoral defense factors in the plasma while most relevant host-microbe interactions occur at mucosal interfaces. This paper summarizes information available on the contrasting value of information available on focal and systemic immune responses in infected bivalves, and highlights the role of mucosal immune factors in host-pathogen interactions. Available information underlines the diversity of immune effectors at molluscan mucosal interfaces and highlights the tailored immune response to pathogen stimuli. This context raises fascinating basic research questions around host-microbe crosstalk and feedback controls of these interactions and may lead to novel disease mitigation strategies and improve the assessment of resistant crops or the screening of probiotic candidates.

  19. Oxidative stress and histological alterations produced by dietary copper in the fresh water bivalve Diplodon chilensis.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Sebastián E; Rocchetta, Iara; Nahabedian, Daniel E; Luquet, Carlos M; Eppis, Maria Rosa; Bianchi, Laura; Ríos de Molina, María del Carmen

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the oxidative stress effects and histological alterations caused by dietary copper on the filter-feeding freshwater mussel Diplodon chilensis. Bivalves were fed during 6 weeks with the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus previously exposed to copper. Metal concentration in algae cultures and bivalve digestive gland was measured by TXRF. A maximum accumulation of 0.49 μg Cu/mg protein was detected at week 6. Also at this week, the hepatosomatic index (HSI) showed the highest decrease (50%) in response to Cu exposure. SOD and GST activities were significantly increased at weeks 4, 5 and 6, reaching an activity on average 50% higher than in controls for GST. CAT activity and GSH increased significantly at weeks 5 and 6. Despite this response, oxidative damage measured as TBARS and carbonyl groups contents increased significantly at weeks 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Digestive tubule and duct atrophy and cell-type replacement in treated mussels were observed by histological studies. The presence of intracellular rhodanine-positive granules, suggests copper accumulation in intracellular vacuoles of digestive cells.

  20. Temporal Patterns in Bivalve Excurrent Flow Under Varying Ambient Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavan, S. K.; Webster, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    The predator-prey relationship between blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and bivalve clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) is mediated by the transport of metabolites released by the prey (clams) and transported downstream as a passive scalar. This study focuses on how the prey behavior contributes to the information available within the odorant plume. Clams may modify factors such as excurrent flux, flow unsteadiness, and siphon height and diameter. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system has been used to quantify the temporal patterns in the excurrent jet of the bivalve siphon under varying ambient flow conditions. According to a spectral analysis of siphon excurrent velocity time records, there is a low frequency periodic component that could contribute to the mixing of clam metabolites through the generation of persistent jet vorticies. Also, fractal analysis of the velocity time records shows that as the ambient velocity increases the excurrent velocity becomes more correlated and less random. These results suggest that for high ambient flow a low frequency periodicity may be sufficient to promote the mixing and dilution of metabolites. In contrast, for low ambient flow more random siphon excurrent velocity may be required to reduce the amount of information available to predators in the downstream odorant plume.

  1. Occurrence of gigantic biogenic magnetite during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Kopp, R. E.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Wu, T. D.; Rouiller, I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Sears, S. K.; Lücken, U.; Tikoo, S. M.; Hesse, R.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Vali, H.

    2009-04-01

    et al. 2008] to other PETM locations of the Atlantic margin and to a possible modern analog environment. High surface productivity with low-organic carbon density sediments and meter-scale sedimentary suboxic zones are provided by tropical shelves fed by energetic river systems, such as the Amazon. We inverstigated several magnetic extracts of samples taken from the meter-scale suboxic zones of the Amazone delta system. Sluijs A, Brinkhuis H, Schouten S, Bohaty SM, John CM, Zachos JC, Reichart GJ, Damste JSS, Crouch EM, Dickens GR. 2007. Environmental precursors to rapid light carbon injection at the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary. Nature 450:1218-1221. Kopp RE, Raub TD, Schumann D, Vali H, Smirnov AV, Kirschvink JL 2007. Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock magnetic, and electron microscopy evidence from Ancora, New Jersey, United States. Paleoceanography, doi:10.1029/2007pa001473. Lipper PC, Zachos JC 2007. A biogenic origin for anomalous fine-grained magnetic material at the Paleocone-Eocene booundary at Wilson Lake, New Jesery. Paleoceanography, doi:10.1029/2007pa001471. Schumann D, Raub TD, Kopp RE, Guerquin-Kern JL, Wu TD, Rouiller I, Smirnov AV, Sears K, Lücken U, Tikoo SM, Hesse R, Kirschvink JL, Vali H 2008. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. PNAS, 105:17648-17653.

  2. Ultrafast gigantic photo-response in charge-ordered organic salt (EDO-TTF)2PF6 on 10-fs time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Itatani, J.; Rini, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Onda, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ogihara, S.; Koshihara, S.; Shao, X.; Nakano, Y.; Yamochi, H.; Saito, G.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2008-08-01

    The initial dynamics of photo-induced phase transition in charge-ordered organic salt (EDO-TTF){sub 2}PF{sub 6} was investigated using 10-fs near-infrared laser pulses. We observed sub-20-fs gigantic photo-responses (|{Delta}R/R|>100%) due to intra-molecular vibration and a clear signature of a structural bottleneck ({approx}50 fs) for the first time.

  3. Spatial intertidal distribution of bivalves and polychaetes in relation to environmental conditions in the Natori River estuary, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, Takeshi; Komizunai, Nobuhiro; Shirase, Tatsuya; Ito, Kinuko; Omori, Michio

    2008-11-01

    This paper aims to reveal spatial variation in the abundance of infaunal bivalves and polychaetes at different spatial scales (station: 200-800 m intervals; plot: 5-20 m), and to reveal environmental variables affecting the spatial distribution of animals in the Natori River estuary, Japan. We found six bivalve species and eight polychaete species from 52 plots at 12 stations. Nuttallia olivacea and Heteromastus sp. were found to be the most abundant species of bivalves and polychaetes, respectively. Assemblage patterns of bivalves and polychaetes were classified into five distinct groups. Substrata (silt-clay contents), salinity, and relative elevation were the variables found to affect the infaunal assemblage patterns. Chlorophyll a was not a significant variable, but benthic animals were absent at sites with extremely low chlorophyll a conditions. Macrobenthic assemblage patterns were different not only between stations but often differed between plots at the same station, reflecting the complex assemblage structure of benthic invertebrates. Detailing such animal-environment relationship is essential in understanding the potential food supply for estuarine fishes.

  4. Comparison of the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bivalves and sediments in San Francisco Bay, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, K.D.; Pendergast, J.; Means, J.C.; McMillin, D.J.; Gala, W.R.; Folwarkow, S.

    1994-12-31

    Accumulation of non-polar organic chemicals into the lipids of aquatic organisms and into the organic carbon of sediments are controlled by the same physical/chemical characteristic of a chemical, the octanol-water partition coefficient. Although theoretically the monitoring of non-polar organic chemicals in aquatic organisms and sediments could be redundant, environmental factors such as metabolism, biodegradation, historical sediment deposits, etc. can cause the chemical profiles of aquatic organisms and sediments to be quite different. A comparison of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) profile in sediments and in bivalves exposed to the overlying water for 90 days at several stations near refinery discharges in San Francisco Bay was performed. Concentrations of all classes of PAHs were enriched in the sediments relative to the bivalves even after normalizing for organic carbon and lipids. The PAH profile in the sediments contained a higher proportion of high MW PAHs and non-substituted PAHs than was observed in the bivalves. Given the low capacity of bivalves to metabolize PAHs, other factors, such as differential solubility and bioavailability, must be important to explain this variation in partitioning of PAH classes between sediments and tissues.

  5. ESTIMATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ESTUARINE BIVALVES WITH HABITAT SUITABILITY MODELS AND UNDERSTANDING THE IMPLICATIONS UNDER A CHANGING CLIMATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of interest. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to stressors. Usin...

  6. Biochemical and behavioural responses of the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana to silver nanoparticles in seawater and microalgal food.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Pan, Jin-Fen; Poirier, Laurence; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Gaudin, Pierre; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    Because of their bactericidal effects, Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have promising industrial development but could lead to potential ecological risks. The aim of this study was to examine the uptake and effect of silver (soluble or as lactate Ag NPs of 40 nm) at low concentrations (10 μg L(-1)) in the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana exposed, for 14 days, directly (water) or via the diet (microalgae). The stability of Ag NPs in seawater was examined using dynamic light scattering. Release of soluble Ag from Ag NPs in the experimental media was quantified by using diffusive gradient in thin film. Bioaccumulation of Ag in bivalves was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Behavioural and biochemical biomarkers were determined in bivalves. Aggregation of Ag NPs and the release of soluble Ag from Ag NPs were observed in the experimental media. For both forms of Ag, bioaccumulation was much more important for waterborne than for dietary exposure. The response of oxidative stress biomarkers (catalase, glutathion S-transferase, superoxide dismutase) was more important after dietary than waterborne exposure to Ag (soluble and NPs). These defences were relatively efficient since they led to a lack of response of damage biomarkers. Burrowing was not affected for bivalves exposed directly or through the diet to both Ag forms but feeding behaviour was impaired after 10 days of dietary exposure. Since no differences of responses to Ag either soluble or nanoparticulate were observed, it seems that labile Ag released from Ag NPs was mainly responsible for toxicity.

  7. The Ghost in the Shell : Local and Remote Forcing of a Coastal Bivalve Inhabiting the Humboldt Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The external skeleton of mollusc bivalves, the shell, can furnish a recording of the environmental changes to which the organisms and population are exposed during their lives. The bivalve's growth is subjected to the thermocline variability; which itself is affected by environmental and climatic events. A highly variable environment such as the Humboldt current system (HCS) requires tools capable of recording its variations over a wide range of periodicities. Upwelling, Coastal trapped waves (CTWs), El Niño Southern Oscillation, and Pacific decadal oscillation events contribute to this environmental and climatic variability. The thermocline depth is modified by these different events at their own time-scales (respectively, daily to weekly, intraseasonally, interseasonally to interannually, and on a decadal scale). The thermocline variation translates into changes in Sea surface temperature (SST) and in the qualitative and quantitative productivity of phytoplankton. These two environmental factors are critical to bivalve growth.The sclerochronological (increment width) and sclerochemical (δ18O and δ13C) study consisted on the analysis of the Chilean bivalve Eurhomalea rufa, collected in 2005, as a recorder of the environmental HCS variability. The calibration step identified daily, monthly, and annual marks in the growth patterns of E. rufa. The results confirmed that the thermocline variability mainly drives the bivalve's activity and led to the establishment of a paleotemperature equation. Moreover, periodogram and wavelet analyses exposed the respective impacts of each environmental event from daily to interannual periodicities. In particular, the growth pattern of E. rufa follows SST variability at an intraseasonal periodicity (~ 60 days) which is remotely induced by CTWs. CTWs are generated by Kelvin oceanic waves, which are formed primarily by eastward equatorial Pacific winds (e.g. Shaffer et al. 1997; Montecino and Lange 2009).Sclerochronological studies

  8. Contrasting behavioral and feeding strategies recorded by tidal-flat bivalve trace fossils from the Upper Carboniferous of eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.; West, R.R.; Maples, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous tidal-flat deposits near Waverly, eastern Kansas (Stull Shale Member, Kanwaka Shale Formation), host abundant and very well-preserved trace fossils attributed to the activity of burrowing bivalves. Thin shell lenses with an abundant bivalve fauna area associated with the ichnofossil-bearing beds and afford an unusual opportunity to relate trace fossils to their makers. Two distinctive life and feeding strategies can be reconstructed on the basis of trace fossil analysis and functional morphology. Lockeria siliquaria hyporeliefs commonly are connected with vertical to inclined, truncated endichnial shafts in the absence of horizontal locomotion traces. These structures record vertical and oblique displacement through the sediment, and suggest relatively stable domiciles rather than temporary resting traces as typically considered. Crowded bedding surfaces displaying cross-cutting relationships between specimens of L. siliquaria and differential preservation at the top (concave versus convex epireliefs) record a complex history of successive events of colonization, erosion, deposition, and recolonization (time-averaged assemblages). Irregujlar contours of some large hypichnia indicate the cast of the foot, while other outlines closely match the anterior area of Wilkingia, its suggested tracemaker. Relatively stable, vertical to inclined life positions and dominanit vertical mobility suggest a filter-feeding strategy. Moreover, the elongate shell and pallial sinus of Wilkingia providfe a strong independent line of evidence for an opisthosiphonate, moderately deep-tier inhabitant. Wilingia may represent a pioneer attempt at siphon-feeding in the late Paleozoic, preceding the outcome of the Mesozoic infaunal radiation. A second strategy is represented by Lockeia ornata and association locomotionm and locomotion/feding structures. Lockeia ornata is commonly connected with chevron locomotion traces that record the bifurcated foot of a protobranch

  9. Influences of organic matter and calcification rate on trace elements in aragonitic estuarine bivalve shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takesue, R.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Thompson, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of elements (B, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, V, Mn, Cr, Sr, and Ba) was measured in aragonitic shells of the estuarine bivalve Corbula amurensis, the Asian clam, using the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP RG). Our initial intent was to explore potential geochemical proxy relationships between shell chemistry and salinity (freshwater inflow) in northern San Francisco Bay (SFB). In the course of this study we observed variations in shell trace element to calcium ([M]/Ca) ratios that could only be attributed to internal biological processes. This paper discusses the nature and sources of internal trace element variability in C. amurensis shells related to the shell organic fraction and shell calcification rates. The average organic content of whole C. amurensis shells is 19%. After treating whole powdered shells with an oxidative cleaning procedure to remove organic matter, shells contained on average 33% less total Mg and 78% less total Mn. Within our analytical uncertainty, Sr and Ba contents were unchanged by the removal of organic matter. These results show that aragonitic C. amurensis shells have a large component of non-lattice-bound Mg and Mn that probably contribute to the dissimilarity of [M]/Ca profiles among five same-sized shells. Non-lattice-bound trace elements could complicate the development and application of geochemical proxy relationships in bivalve shells. Because B, Ba and Sr occur exclusively in shell aragonite, they are good candidates for external proxy relationships. [M]/Ca ratios were significantly different in prismatic and nacreous aragonite and in two valves of the same shell that had different crystal growth rates. Some part of these differences can be attributed to non-lattice-bound trace elements associated with the organic fraction. The differences in [M]/Ca ratios were also consistent with the calcification rate-dependent ion transport model developed by Carr?? et al. [Carr?? M., Bentaleb I

  10. Subcellular compartmentalization of Cd and Zn in two bivalves. II. Significance of trophically available metal (TAM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, W.G.; Luoma, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines how the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Zn in the bivalves Macoma balthica and Potamocorbula amurensis may affect the trophic transfer of metal to predators. Results show that the partitioning of metals to organelles, 'enzymes' and metallothioneins (MT) comprise a subcellular compartment containing trophically available metal (TAM; i.e. metal trophically available to predators), and that because this partitioning varies with species, animal size and metal, TAM is similarly influenced. Clams from San Francisco Bay, California, were exposed for 14 d to 3.5 ??g 1-1 Cd and 20.5 ??g 1-1 Zn, including 109Cd and 65Zn as radiotracers, and were used in feeding experiments with grass shrimp Palaemon macrodatylus, or used to investigate the subcellular partitioning of metal. Grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated P. amurensis absorbed ???60% of ingested Cd, which was in accordance with the partitioning of Cd to the bivalve's TAM compartment (i.e. Cd associated with organelles, 'enzymes' and MT); a similar relationship was found in previous studies with grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated oligochaetes. Thus, TAM may be used as a tool to predict the trophic transfer of at least Cd. Subcellular fractionation revealed that ???34% of both the Cd and Zn accumulated by M. balthica was associated with TAM, while partitioning to TAM in P. amurensis was metal-dependent (???60% for TAM-Cd%, ???73% for TAM-Zn%). The greater TAM-Cd% of P. amurensis than M. balthica is due to preferential binding of Cd to MT and 'enzymes', while enhanced TAM-Zn% of P. amurensis results from a greater binding of Zn to organelles. TAM for most species-metal combinations was size-dependent, decreasing with increased clam size. Based on field data, it is estimated that of the 2 bivalves, P. amurensis poses the greater threat of Cd exposure to predators because of higher tissue concentrations and greater partitioning as TAM; exposure of Zn to predators would be similar between these species.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of viral contamination in bivalve molluscs harvested in Italy.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Elisabetta; Lanni, Luigi; Arcangeli, Giuseppe; Pepe, Tiziana; Mazzette, Rina; Ciccaglioni, Gianni; Croci, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    Bivalve molluscs are a well documented source of viral infection. Further data on shellfish viral contamination are needed to implement European Regulations with sanitary measures more effective against viral pathogens. To this aim, 336 samples of bivalve molluscs (185 mussels, 66 clams, 23 oysters and 62 samples from other species) collected in harvesting areas of class A and B of four Italian Regions were analyzed for qualitative and quantitative determination of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Norovirus (NoV) GI and GII, using real time RT-PCR. The results showed a wide diffusion of viral contamination in the shellfish production areas considered. HAV prevalence was low (0.9%) with contamination levels that varied from 5 to 7 × 10(2)copies/g. On the contrary, NoV showed a high prevalence (51.5%), with a large variability according to the group considered (e.g. 47.8% for Crassostrea in Veneto, 79.7% for Mytilus in Campania, 84.6% for Tapes in Sardinia). NoV contamination affected class A and class B production areas to a different extent, with a statistically significant difference in both contamination prevalence (22.1% vs. 66.3%; p<0.0001) and quantity (average contamination level of 3.1 × 10(2) vs. 1.9 × 10(3) copies/g; p<0.05). The different species analyzed from class B harvesting areas (Mytilus, Tapes/Ruditapes and Crassostrea) showed a NoV prevalence respectively of 70.3%, 66.0% and 47.8% but comparable NoV contamination levels (between 8.4 × 10(2) and 4.9 × 10(3)copies/g). Other two bivalve species considered in the study (Donax spp. and Solen spp.) showed a relevant NoV presence (40.0% and 34.4% of samples). Finally, samples analyzed before and after commercial purification treatment showed a decrease of contamination prevalence after the treatment, but inconsistent results were recorded on NoV levels. The data obtained, together with other quantitative information to estimate consumer exposure, in association with studies on dose-response and on the

  12. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in macroalgaes, bivalves, and fish from coastal areas in Europe.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Muñoz, D; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Maulvault, A L; Tediosi, A; Fernández-Tejedor, M; Van den Heuvel, F; Kotterman, M; Marques, A; Barceló, D

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence and levels of PhACs, Endocrine Disrupting and related Compounds (EDCs) in seafood from potential contaminated areas in Europe has been studied. Macroalgae (Saccharina latissima and Laminaria digitata), bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus spp., Chamalea gallina and Crassostrea gigas) and fish (Liza aurata and Platichthys flesus) from Portugal, Spain, Italy, Netherlands, and Norway were analysed following 4 different analytical protocols depending on the organism and target group of contaminants. The results revealed the presence of 4 pharmaceutical compounds in macroalgae samples, 16 in bivalves and 10 in fish. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that PhACs have been detected in marine fish and in macroalgae. Besides, this is also the first time that dimetridazole, hydrochlorothiazide and tamsulosin have been detected in biota samples. The highest levels of PhACs corresponded to the psychiatric drug velanfaxine (up to 36.1 ng/g dry weight (dw)) and the antibiotic azithromycin (up to 13.3 ng/g dw) in bivalves from the Po delta (Italy). EDCs were not detected in macroalgae samples, however, the analysis revealed the presence of 10 EDCs in bivalves and 8 in fish. The highest levels corresponded to the organophosphorus flame retardant tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBEP) reaching up to 98.4 ng/g dw in mullet fish from the Tagus estuary. Bivalves, in particular mussels, have shown to be good bioindicator organisms for PhACs and fish for EDCs. Taking into consideration the concentrations and frequencies of detection of PhACs and EDCs in the seafood samples analysed, a list of candidates' compounds for priorization in future studies has been proposed.

  13. Biologically Induced Deposition of Fine Suspended Particles by Filter-Feeding Bivalves in Land-Based Industrial Marine Aquaculture Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67±0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43±0.98 cm) was 77.84±7.77 and 6.37±0.67 mg ind−1•d−1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73±0.27 and 2.76±0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P<0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P<0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products. PMID:25250730

  14. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm) was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1) • d(-1), respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  15. The effects of carbamazepine on macroinvertebrate species: Comparing bivalves and polychaetes biochemical responses.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Rosa; Almeida, Ângela; Pires, Adília; Velez, Cátia; Calisto, Vânia; Schneider, Rudolf J; Esteves, Valdemar I; Wrona, Frederick J; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2015-11-15

    In the present study, the bivalve Scrobicularia plana and the polychaete Diopatra neapolitana were exposed to an increasing carbamazepine (CBZ) concentration gradient. Both species are among the most widely used bioindicators, and CBZ is one of the most commonly found drugs in the aquatic environment. After a chronic exposure (28 days), the results obtained revealed that CBZ induced biochemical alterations in both species. Our findings demonstrated that S. plana and D. neapolitana reduced the CBZ accumulation rate at higher CBZ concentrations, probably due to their capacity to decrease their feeding rates at stressful conditions. Nevertheless, this defence mechanism was not enough to prevent both species from oxidative stress. In fact, S. plana and D. neapolitana were not able to efficiently activate their antioxidant defence mechanisms which resulted in the increase of lipid peroxidation, especially at the highest CBZ concentrations. Comparing both species, it seems that S. plana was the most sensitive species since stronger biochemical alterations were observed in this species.

  16. Assessment of metal contamination in coastal sediments, seawaters and bivalves of the Mediterranean Sea coast, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S; Attiah, Abdullah

    2015-12-30

    In order to assess metal contamination on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, 45 sediment samples, seawaters and bivalve specimens were collected from Rosetta coastal area for Mg, Al, K, Fe, Sr, Zn, Pb, Mn, As, Ce, Ni, Cr and Zr analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that the coastal sediments of Rosetta area were severely enriched, strongly polluted with As, Pb and very highly contaminated with As, Pb, Ni, Ce, mostly as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with other samples from the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of Fe, Pb, As, Zn and Ni. The natural sources of heavy metals in the study area are attributed to weathering and decomposition of mountain ranges of the Sudan and Ethiopia, while the anthropogenic ones are the metals produced from industrial, sewage, irrigation and urban runoff.

  17. Relating the bivalve shellfish harvesting area classification criteria in the United States and European Union programmes.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Reese, R A

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of the level of risk of faecal contamination of shellfish harvesting areas is undertaken by monitoring faecal indicator bacteria in seawater samples under the United States programme and shellfish flesh samples under the European Union (EU) programme. Determining the relationship between the two approaches is important for assessing the relative level of public health protection and regulating international trade. The relationship was investigated using both statistical modelling and simple compliance assessment on large international data sets of paired seawater and shellfish samples. The two approaches yielded the same conclusions: EU class A is more stringent than the US Approved category for all species; the US Restrictive standard is more restrictive than EU class B for some bivalve species. Therefore, the classifications under the two programmes are not exactly equivalent.

  18. Turnover of postlarval bivalves in sediments of tidal flats in Königshafen (German Wadden sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armonies, W.

    1994-06-01

    After larval settlement, juvenile bivalves may rapidly re-enter the water column and attain secondary dispersal by byssus-drifting. In order to estimate the quantitative importance of byssus-drifting, the abundance of drifters in the water column, their re-entry into the sediment, and their density in the ambient sediment were measured simultaneously over 3 months on a tidal flat in Königshafen near the Island of Sylt in the North Sea. Turnover of juvenile clams Macoma balthica and cockles Cerastoderma edule was more than once per week in summer, showing strong short-term variability because of semi-lunar rhythms of drifting activity. While there is currently no evidence for active habitat selection in settling M. balthica and C. edule larvae, it is suggested that habitat selection occurs following postlarval migrations.

  19. High Pressure Processing of Bivalve Shellfish and HPP’s Use as a Virus Intervention †

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve shellfish readily bioconcentrate pathogenic microbes and substance, such as algal and dinoflagulate toxins, fecal viruses and bacteria, and naturally present vibrio bacteria. High pressure processing (HPP) is currently used as an intervention for Vibrio vulnificus bacteria within molluscan shellfish and its potential to inactivate food-borne viruses and bacteria are discussed. Mechanisms of action of high pressure against bacteria and viruses, as well as how time of pressure application, pressure levels, and pre-pressurization temperature influence inactivation are described. Matrix influences such as ionic strength are noted as important additional considerations. The potential of HPP to influence spoilage and enhance shelf-life of shucked shellfish is also discussed. PMID:28234323

  20. Biodepuration of petroleum-derived polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from a bivalve mollusc

    SciTech Connect

    Tanacredi, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    Two species of bivalves, Mya arenaria and Mercenaria mercenaria were analyzed to identify and quantify nine polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons attributable to either natural environmental accumulation, or attributable to exposure in controlled laboratory aquarium system, respectively. Extracts from naturally occurring (e.g. Jamaica bay) and laboratory maintained organism samples were characterized using a 9-PAH reference exposure standard. The results clearly show that in-vitro exposed Mercenaria mercenaria sampled over a 45-day depuration period, do not depurate the 9-PAH's but rather bioaccumulate them at detectable levels. Due to the commercial importance of these clam species for human consumption, and the fact that these PAH's are toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic, the practice of clam depuration and clam relaying must be re-evaluated in light of potential public health implications.

  1. Response of the freshwater bivalve Anodonta grandis to Cd near the Canadian Water Quality Guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.R.; Malley, D.F. |

    1994-12-31

    The bivalve population inhabiting Lake 382 in the Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario, receiving experimental additions of cadmium (Cd) near the Canadian Water Quality Guideline (CWQG) was monitored for effects during 1987 to 1992. the purpose of the study was to determine if the CWQG of 0.2 {mu}g Cd/L would adequately protect the biota of the Precambrian Shield Lakes. Mussels accumulated Cd to whole body levels 30X background. Cd levels in the mussels did not plateau by the end of 1992 and continues to increase. Metal-binding proteins metallothioneins (MTs) were induced in all tissues to levels significantly higher than in tissues of mussels from a pristine lake. Although mussel growth rates differed from site to site within Lake 382, there was no change in growth rates with the addition of Cd.

  2. Direct observation of the crystallographic relationship between interlamellar membranes and aragonite tablets in bivalve nacre.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Gangsheng

    2016-12-23

    Nacre is one of the most attractive models for understanding the fundamental principles of biomineralization and for designing bio-inspired materials due to its simple structure but with unusual mechanical properties. It is made up of lamellae of aragonite tablets bonded together by the organic interlamellar membranes (ILMs), of which the latter occupy less than 5wt% of nacre. For a long time, previous authors failed to directly observe the crystallographic relationship between the ILM and aragonite tablet in bivalve shells. Here, using high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), we investigate the interfacial structure of the domed tablets that coexist with the flat ones in green mussels. We directly observed that the ILMs are oriented with the underlying tablets and connected with the latter via a superlattice region. The finding advances our current knowledge of nacre biomineralization and may help to design novel nacre-like materials.

  3. Scale-up of ecological experiments: Density variation in the mobile bivalve Macomona liliana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Davod C.; Walters, R.; Thrush, S.; Dayton, P.

    1997-01-01

    At present the problem of scaling up from controlled experiments (necessarily at a small spatial scale) to questions of regional or global importance is perhaps the most pressing issue in ecology. Most of the proposed techniques recommend iterative cycling between theory and experiment. We present a graphical technique that facilitates this cycling by allowing the scope of experiments, surveys, and natural history observations to be compared to the scope of models and theory. We apply the scope analysis to the problem of understanding the population dynamics of a bivalve exposed to environmental stress at the scale of a harbour. Previous lab and field experiments were found not to be 1:1 scale models of harbour-wide processes. Scope analysis allowed small scale experiments to be linked to larger scale surveys and to a spatially explicit model of population dynamics.

  4. Mucus-exopolymer utilization by two bivalves with different feeding strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Decho, A.W.; Luoma, S.N. )

    1990-01-09

    The utilization and absorption efficiencies of bacterial exopolymer secretaions were examined using two bivalves from San Francisco Bay, which exhibit different feeding strategies. Macoma balthica is primarily a deposit-feeder, exhibiting relatively slow gut-passage time (4-12 hrs). Theasian clam Potamocorbula amurensis is a suspension-feeder and exhibits a relatively fast gut-passage time (15-0- min). [sup 14]C-exopolymer was readily utilized both animals and with similar absorption efficiencies (40-70%). It appears that this bacterial exopolymer represents an easily utilized food resource for both animals. The adsorption of heavy metals to the exopolymer and their subsequent uptake by animals are currently under investigation. Their role as an agent in transferring heavy metals to deposit- and suspension-feeding animals will be discussed.

  5. Assessment of the metal bioaccumulation in three species of freshwater bivalves.

    PubMed

    Waykar, Bhalchandra; Shinde, Satish Madhukar

    2011-09-01

    The metal concentration and body burden of three species of fresh water bivalves, Parreysia cylindrica, Parreysia corrugata and Corbicula striatella were estimated in laboratory experiment after exposure to chronic concentration of arsenic (0.1719 ppm), cadmium (0.23 ppm), copper (0.13 ppm), mercury (0.06 ppm), lead (2.4 ppm) and zinc (5.1 ppm) separately up to 30 days. Dry weight of each animal was used to calculate metal concentrations (μg/g) and the metal body burden (μg/individual). It was observed that zinc, lead and copper concentration and metal body burden was highest in the Corbicula striatella, mercury and arsenic was highest in Parreysia corrugata and cadmium was highest in Parreysia cylindrica. Therefore, Corbicula striatella is being proposed as sentinel organism for monitoring of zinc, lead and copper, Parreysia corrugata for mercury and arsenic, and Parreysia cylindrica for cadmium in fresh water ecosystem.

  6. Herbivory and Body Size: Allometries of Diet Quality and Gastrointestinal Physiology, and Implications for Herbivore Ecology and Dinosaur Gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, Marcus; Steuer, Patrick; Müller, Dennis W. H.; Codron, Daryl; Hummel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology has played a prominent role in explanations for terrestrial herbivore body size evolution and size-driven diversification and niche differentiation. This is based on the association of increasing body mass (BM) with diets of lower quality, and with putative mechanisms by which a higher BM could translate into a higher digestive efficiency. Such concepts, however, often do not match empirical data. Here, we review concepts and data on terrestrial herbivore BM, diet quality, digestive physiology and metabolism, and in doing so give examples for problems in using allometric analyses and extrapolations. A digestive advantage of larger BM is not corroborated by conceptual or empirical approaches. We suggest that explanatory models should shift from physiological to ecological scenarios based on the association of forage quality and biomass availability, and the association between BM and feeding selectivity. These associations mostly (but not exclusively) allow large herbivores to use low quality forage only, whereas they allow small herbivores the use of any forage they can physically manage. Examples of small herbivores able to subsist on lower quality diets are rare but exist. We speculate that this could be explained by evolutionary adaptations to the ecological opportunity of selective feeding in smaller animals, rather than by a physiologic or metabolic necessity linked to BM. For gigantic herbivores such as sauropod dinosaurs, other factors than digestive physiology appear more promising candidates to explain evolutionary drives towards extreme BM. PMID:24204552

  7. Herbivory and body size: allometries of diet quality and gastrointestinal physiology, and implications for herbivore ecology and dinosaur gigantism.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Steuer, Patrick; Müller, Dennis W H; Codron, Daryl; Hummel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology has played a prominent role in explanations for terrestrial herbivore body size evolution and size-driven diversification and niche differentiation. This is based on the association of increasing body mass (BM) with diets of lower quality, and with putative mechanisms by which a higher BM could translate into a higher digestive efficiency. Such concepts, however, often do not match empirical data. Here, we review concepts and data on terrestrial herbivore BM, diet quality, digestive physiology and metabolism, and in doing so give examples for problems in using allometric analyses and extrapolations. A digestive advantage of larger BM is not corroborated by conceptual or empirical approaches. We suggest that explanatory models should shift from physiological to ecological scenarios based on the association of forage quality and biomass availability, and the association between BM and feeding selectivity. These associations mostly (but not exclusively) allow large herbivores to use low quality forage only, whereas they allow small herbivores the use of any forage they can physically manage. Examples of small herbivores able to subsist on lower quality diets are rare but exist. We speculate that this could be explained by evolutionary adaptations to the ecological opportunity of selective feeding in smaller animals, rather than by a physiologic or metabolic necessity linked to BM. For gigantic herbivores such as sauropod dinosaurs, other factors than digestive physiology appear more promising candidates to explain evolutionary drives towards extreme BM.

  8. Dorsal resection of a thoracic hemivertebra in a 4-year-old boy with endochondral gigantism. A case report.

    PubMed

    Zarghooni, Kourosh; Sobotrke, Rolf; Schmidt, Heinrich; Rollinghoff, Marc; Siewe, Jan; Eysel, Peer

    2010-10-01

    The authors present what appears to be the first case of congenital kyphosis due to a T12 hemivertebra in a four-year-old boy with endochondral gigantism syndrome of unknown origin. Because of his overgrowth, the patient had severe medical and orthopaedic problems and was almost immobile. Prior to surgery, he experienced a rapidly progressive thoracolumbar kyphosis to 600 (T10-L2). MRI of the brain and spine showed critical protraction of the spinal cord and myelopathy from compression at T12. Single-stage posterior resection of the hemivertebra with spinal shortening and dorsal transpedicular instrumentation of T10-L2 was performed. Although the bone tissue was cartilaginous and dysplastic, 420 (30%) correction was achieved along with decompression of the spinal canal. The patient experienced no neurological impairment post-operatively. At follow-up examination 1.5 year after surgery, the patient's movement disorder had improved markedly and he was able to stand and walk. This very rare case demonstrates that single-stage posterior hemivertebra resection and transpedicular instrumentation for correction of congenital kyphosis can be a safe and effective procedure even in a very challenging case.

  9. Hepatitis A and E Viruses in Wastewaters, in River Waters, and in Bivalve Molluscs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, M; Purpari, G; Della Libera, S; Petricca, S; Guercio, A; Ciccaglione, A R; Bruni, R; Taffon, S; Equestre, M; Fratini, M; Muscillo, M; La Rosa, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have reported the detection of hepatitis A (HAV) and E (HEV) virus in sewage waters, indicating a possibility of contamination of aquatic environments. The objective of the present study was to assess the occurrence of HAV and HEV in different water environments, following the route of contamination from raw sewage through treated effluent to the surface waters receiving wastewater discharges . Bivalve molluscan shellfish samples were also analyzed, as sentinel of marine pollution. Samples were tested by RT-PCR nested type in the VP1/2A junction for HAV, and in the ORF1 and ORF2 regions for HEV. Hepatitis A RNA was detected in 12 water samples: 7/21 (33.3%) raw sewage samples, 3/21 (14.3%) treated sewage samples, and 2/27 (7.4%) river water samples. Five sequences were classified as genotype IA, while the remaining 7 sequences belonged to genotype IB. In bivalves, HAV was detected in 13/56 samples (23.2%), 12 genotype IB and one genotype IA. Whether the presence of HAV in the matrices tested indicates the potential for waterborne and foodborne transmission is unknown, since infectivity of the virus was not demonstrated. HEV was detected in one raw sewage sample and in one river sample, both belonging to genotype 3. Sequences were similar to sequences detected previously in Italy in patients with autochthonous HEV (no travel history) and in animals (swine). To our knowledge, this is the first detection of HEV in river waters in Italy, suggesting that surface water can be a potential source for exposure .

  10. Longevity and GAPDH Stability in Bivalves and Mammals: A Convenient Marker for Comparative Gerontology and Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Treaster, Stephen B.; Chaudhuri, Asish R.; Austad, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Comparative aging studies, particularly those that include species of exceptional resistance to aging processes, can potentially illuminate novel senescence-retarding mechanisms. In recent years, protein homeostasis (proteostasis) has been implicated in fundamental aging processes. Here we further evaluate the relationship between proteostasis and longevity in a selection of bivalve mollusks and mammals with maximum longevities ranging from 3 to 507 years. Methods & Results We experimentally examined proteostasis using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a reporter, as it is ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved, and conveniently assayed. The ability to maintain this enzymatic function was tested with increasing concentrations of the chaotropic agent urea, revealing a robust relationship with longevity in bivalves and mice. While our shortest-lived mollusk and mouse lost all activity by 2.5 and 3.5 M urea respectively, the longest-lived mollusk species, Arctica islandica, still preserved 45% of its basal function even at 6 M urea. To confirm that GAPDH proteostasis has a broad association with longevity, we also investigated a selection of primate species ranging in maximum longevity from 22 to 122 years. They outperformed the mouse at all concentrations, but among the primates results were variable at low urea doses. Still, at 6 M urea baboon and human samples retained 10% of their activity while both mouse and marmoset samples had no activity. Mechanism of Exceptional Stress Resistance To explore possible mechanisms of the exceptional stress resistance of A. islandica GAPDH we enzymatically removed post-translational glycosylation, but observed no decrease in stability. We also removed molecules smaller than 30 kDa, which includes most small heat shock proteins, but again did not compromise the exceptional stress resistance of Arctica GAPDH. Conclusion While the mechanism underlying A. islandica’s exceptional stress resistance

  11. Using transplanted bivalves to assess oil exposure and effects in Delaware Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.; Salazar, S.; Mearns, A.; Venosa, A.; Eberhart, B.

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the effectiveness of bioremediation, the US EPA oiled intertidal plots in Delaware Bay and monitored oil degradation rates. This controlled release of oil was also used to test the utility of transplanted bivalves in assessing oil spills and to evaluate the extent and potential effects of the release. Measuring the accumulation of oil in bivalve tissues was used to estimate exposure and the extent of contamination. Growth was used to estimate potential bioeffects. Approximately 1,800 mussels and 1,200 oysters were transplanted to 11 intertidal sites. Five treatment sites were within 1 meter of the lower end of the oiled plots. A total of six sites were used as controls, three on either side of the oiled plots at 5, 10, and 100 m. Samples were taken on Day 0, 2, 15, and 28 to estimate the rate of bioaccumulation. All of the mussels died within the first week of exposure; oysters exhibited over 95% survival but growth was minimal. The authors found a statistically significant difference in tissue weights when comparing treatment sites with control sites. The total concentration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tissues of oysters nearest the oiled plots increased by a factor of four after an exposure period of two days. PAH concentrations in control oysters nearest the mouth of the bay increased slightly but the differences were not statistically significant. The control oysters nearest the head of the bay received an intermediate dose which was depurated by the end of the 28-day experiment. PAHs in the oysters nearest the oiled plots approached but did not return to background levels by the end of the test.

  12. Bivalves as indicators of environmental variation and potential anthropogenic impacts in the southern Barents Sea

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Michael L.; Johnson, Beverly J.; Henkes, Gregory A.; McMahon, Kelton W.; Voronkov, Andrey; Ambrose, William G.; Denisenko, Stanislav G.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying patterns and drivers of natural variability in populations is necessary to gauge potential effects of climatic change and the expected increases in commercial activities in the Arctic on communities and ecosystems. We analyzed growth rates and shell geochemistry of the circumpolar Greenland smooth cockle, Serripes groenlandicus, from the southern Barents Sea over almost 70 years between 1882 and 1968. The datasets were calibrated via annually-deposited growth lines, and growth, stable isotope (δ18O, δ13C), and trace elemental (Mg, Sr, Ba, Mn) patterns were linked to environmental variations on weekly to decadal scales. Standardized growth indices revealed an oscillatory growth pattern with a multi-year periodicity, which was inversely related to the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAO), and positively related to local river discharge. Up to 60% of the annual variability in the Ba/Ca could be explained by variations in river discharge at the site closest to the rivers, but the relationship disappeared at a more distant location. Patterns of δ18O, δ13C, and Sr/Ca together provide evidence that bivalve growth ceases at elevated temperatures during the fall and recommences at the coldest temperatures in the early spring, with the implication that food, rather than temperature, is the primary driver of bivalve growth. The multi-proxy approach of combining the annually integrated information from the growth results and higher resolution geochemical results yielded a robust interpretation of biophysical coupling in the region over temporal and spatial scales. We thus demonstrate that sclerochronological proxies can be useful retrospective analytical tools for establishing a baseline of ecosystem variability in assessing potential combined impacts of climatic change and increasing commercial activities on Arctic communities. PMID:19394657

  13. Emerging and endemic types of Ostreid herpesvirus 1 were detected in bivalves in China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Changming; Wang, Chongming; Xia, Junyang; Sun, Hailin; Zhang, Shuai; Huang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection caused by Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) is one of the proximate causes of mass mortalities of cultivated bivalves around the world. The emergence and spread of different variants of OsHV-1 accompanied by different epidemiological characteristics have been reported frequently in different countries around the world. In this paper, we present a study of the detection of OsHV-1 DNA and their variations from 1599 samples over 18 species collected in 27 aquaculture sites and two food markets during 2001-2013 in China. All of the samples were examined by a nested PCR assay targeting the C2/C6 fragment of OsHV-1 followed by sequencing. Our results showed 338 individuals (21.1%) of seven species sampled from 14 (14/27=51.9%) sites and the two food markets were positive for viral DNA. Sequencing of 289 PCR products revealed 24 virus types. No shared virus type was found among different countries with 47 types (23 in Japan, 16 in France, 2 in South Korea and 1 in each country of Australia, USA, Ireland, New Zealand, Mexico and China) identified in previous studies. As previously reported, two main phylogenetic groups were identified by phylogenetic analysis based on the 71 virus types; within which 6 separate clades were identified. Our results also demonstrated that two clades were associated with abnormal mortalities of the scallop, Chlamys farrier and the calm, Scapharca broughtonii in China. These findings indicated that cultivated bivalves may face potential threats from OsHV-1 types found in our study.

  14. Application of phage therapy during bivalve depuration improves Escherichia coli decontamination.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Teles, Luís; Rocha, Rui J M; Calado, Ricardo; Romalde, Jesús L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the potential application of the bacteriophage (or phage) phT4A, ECA2 and the phage cocktail phT4A/ECA2 to decrease the concentration of Escherichia coli during the depuration of natural and artificially contaminated cockles. Depuration in static seawater at multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1 with single phage suspensions of phT4A and ECA2 was the best condition, as it decreased by ∼2.0 log CFU/g the concentration of E. coli in artificially contaminated cockles after a 4 h of treatment. When naturally contaminated cockles were treated in static seawater with single phage suspensions and the phage cocktail, similar decreases in the concentration of E. coli (∼0.7 log CFU/g) were achieved. However, when employing the phage cocktail, a longer treatment time was required to obtain comparable results to those achieved when using single phage suspensions. When naturally contaminated cockles were depurated with phage phT4A in a recirculated seawater system (mimicking industrial depuration conditions), a 0.6 log CFU/g reduction of E. coli was achieved after a 2 h of treatment. When the depuration process was performed without phage addition, a 4 h treatment was necessary to obtain a similar decrease. By combining phage therapy and depuration procedures, a reduction in bivalves depuration period can be achieved for, thus decreasing the cost associated with this procedure and even enhance the quality and safety of depurated bivalves destined for human consumption.

  15. Clarifying phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of the bivalve order Arcida (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia).

    PubMed

    Combosch, David J; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The systematics of the bivalve order Arcida constitutes an unresolved conundrum in bivalve systematics. The current definition of Arcida encompasses two superfamilies: Limopsoidea, which includes the recent families Philobryidae and Limopsidae, and Arcoidea, which encompasses the families Arcidae, Cucullaeidae, Noetiidae, Glycymerididae and Parallelodontidae. This classification, however, is controversial particularly with respect to the position and taxonomic status of Glycymerididae. Previous molecular phylogenies were limited either by the use of only a single molecular marker or by including only a few limopsoid and glycymeridid taxa. The challenging nature of Arcida taxonomy and the controversial results of some of the previous studies, prompted us to use a broad range of taxa (55 species), three nuclear markers (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and histone H3) and a wide range of algorithmic approaches. This broad but stringent approach led to a number of results that differ significantly from previous studies. We provide the first molecular evidence that supports the separation of Arcoidea from Limopsoidea, although the exact position of Glycymerididae remains unresolved, and the monophyly of Limopsoidea is algorithm-dependent. In addition, we present the first time-calibrated evolutionary tree of Arcida relationships, indicating a significant increase in the diversification of arcidan lineages at the beginning of the Cretaceous, around 140Ma. The monophyly of Arcida, which has been supported previously, was confirmed in all our analyses. Although relationships among families remain somehow unresolved we found support for the monophyly of most arcidan families, at least under some analytical conditions (i.e., Glycymerididae, Noetiidae, Philobryidae, and Limopsidae). However, Arcidae, and particularly Arcinae, remain a major source of inconsistency in the current system of Arcida classification and are in dire need of taxonomic revision.

  16. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves.

  17. Pan-Svalbard growth rate variability and environmental regulation in the Arctic bivalve Serripes groenlandicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael L.; Ambrose, William G.; Levin, Benjamin S.; Locke V, William L.; Henkes, Gregory A.; Hop, Haakon; Renaud, Paul E.

    2011-11-01

    Growth histories contained in the shells of bivalves provide continuous records of environmental and biological information over lifetimes spanning decades to centuries, thereby linking ecosystem responses to both natural and anthropogenic climatic variations over a range of scales. We examined growth rates and temporal growth patterns of 260 individuals of the circumpolar Greenland Smooth Cockle ( Serripes groenlandicus) collected between 1997 and 2009 from 11 sites around the Svalbard Archipelago. These sites encompass a range of oceanographic and environmental conditions, from strongly Atlantic-influenced conditions on the west coast to high-Arctic conditions in northeast Svalbard. Absolute growth was up to three times greater at the most strongly Atlantic-influenced locations compared to the most Arctic-influenced areas, and growth performance was highest at sites closest to the West Spitsbergen Current. We also developed growth chronologies up to 34 years in length extending back to 1974. Standardized growth indices (SGI) exhibited substantial inter-site variability, but there were also common temporal features including steadily increasing growth from the late 1980's to the mid-1990's followed by a marked shift from relatively greater to poorer growth in the mid-1990's and from 2004 to 2008. This pattern was consistent with phase-shifts in large-scale climatic drivers. Interannual variability in SGI was also related to local manifestations of the large-scale drivers, including sea temperature and sea ice extent. The temporal growth pattern at Rijpfjorden, on northeast Svalbard, was broadly representative (R = 0.81) of the entire dataset. While there were site-related differences in the specific relationships between growth and environmental parameters, the aggregated dataset indicated an overriding regional driver of bivalve growth: the Arctic Climate Regime Index (ACRI). These results demonstrate that sclerochronological proxies can be useful retrospective

  18. Record of seasonal body fluid composition in Black Clam (Bivalve) using clumped isotope thermometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, H.; Naidu, P. K.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Application of clumped isotope thermometry (Ghosh et al., 2006) is highly debated while resolving the issue of kinetic effect during biogenic carbonate precipitation. Mollusks are particularly attractive target to study the kinetic effect (Eiler, 2011) in the biological system owing to its incremental growth ring patterns. This allows understanding the role of environmental parameters other than temperature driving the distribution of heavier isotopologues. Guo et al., (2010) indicated role of pH in driving the distribution of heavier isotopolgues in the carbonates. We investigated here clumped isotopic composition of Black Calm (bivalve shell) caught live from a location in Southern Indian Estuary. The region experiences large change in seasonal condition. The physical environmental parameters at that location were monitored for last 3 years at monthly interval. The salinity, temperature, pH information are available for all the months when mollusc growth bands are deposited. The bottom water of estuary, where bivalve thrives experience maximum temperature of 32°C during November and December, while temperature during Monsoon months (July, August) drops lows to 26°C. Initial results on clumped isotope thermometry on the growth bands precipitated suggests that during the time in a year when pH level is alkaline i.e. 8.0±0.2 there is large consistency between actual temperature and estimated temperature using clumped isotope based thermometry. While the pH drops towards acidic i.e. 6.8±0.1 lower temperature estimates compared to actual was recorded. The effect of metabolic rate and body temperature variability is not been investigated as suggested in case of land snails based clumped isotope thermometry (Zaarur et al., 2011). Mollusc shell can be used to trace the composition of environmental water while pH variation is minimal. In this presentation analyses of more shell specimen and explore the role of pH and osmo-regulation in mollusc determining the clumped

  19. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-07-01

    Bivalve calcification, particularly of the early larval stages, is highly sensitive to the change in ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no effects and [HCO3-] and pH had only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. An equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the mechanisms that limit or facilitate adaptation to future ocean acidification, it is necessary to better

  20. Influence of food on the assimilation of selected metals in tropical bivalves from the New Caledonia lagoon: qualitative and quantitative aspects.

    PubMed

    Hédouin, Laetitia; Metian, Marc; Lacoue-Labarthe, Thomas; Fichez, Renaud; Teyssié, Jean-Louis; Bustamante, Paco; Warnau, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the influence of food quality and quantity on the assimilation efficiency (AE) of metals in two abundant bivalves in the New Caledonia lagoon, the oyster Isognomon isognomon and the clam Gafrarium tumidum. Bivalves were exposed via their food to the radiotracers of three metals of concern in New Caledonia ((54)Mn, (57)Co and (65)Zn) under different feeding conditions (phytoplankton species, cell density, and cell-associated metal concentration). When bivalves were fed Heterocapsa triquetra, Emiliania huxleyi and Isochrysis galbana, AE of Mn, Co and Zn was strongly influenced by the phytoplankton species and by the metal considered. In contrast, when fed one given phytoplankton species previously exposed to different concentrations of Co, phytoplankton-associated Co load had no influence on the AE and on the retention time of the metal in both bivalves. Metals ingested with I. galbana displayed generally the highest AE in both bivalve species, except for Mn in clams for which the highest AE was observed for H. triquetra. Influence of food quantity was investigated by exposing bivalves to different cell densities of I. galbana (5 x 10(3), 10(4) or 5 x 10(4) cell ml(-1)). As for food quality, food quantity was found to influence AE of Mn, Co and Zn, the highest AE being observed when bivalves were fed the lowest cell density. Overall, results indicate that the two bivalve species are able to adjust their feeding strategies according to the food conditions prevailing in their environment.

  1. [Aeromonas spp. and Plesiomonas shigelloides in bivalves, mud, and water from the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, E; Antillón, F

    1989-06-01

    Bivalves, mud, and surface water were collected at three different sites of the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica, in search of Aeromonas spp. and Plesiomonas shigelloides. For their isolation, these bacteria were enriched in alkaline peptone water and streaked on MacConkey agar and on brilliant green bile inositol agar. This was followed by the biochemical tests necessary for their identification. Thirty-five strains of A. hydrophila, 58 of A. caviae, 43 of A. sobria, and 7 of P. shigelloides were isolated. None of these predominated nor was there any indication of a seasonal distribution along the 15 month's duration of the study. Seven strains of A. hydrophila and two of A. sobria showed the biochemical characteristics associated with toxin production (positive Voges-Proskauer and lysine decarboxylase tests). These species are widely distributed in the gulf and there is risk of contracting an infection while bathing or when eating raw bivalves from this area.

  2. The mismatch between bioaccumulation in field and laboratory environments: Interpreting the differences for metals in benthic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Belzunce-Segarra, Maria J; Simpson, Stuart L; Amato, Elvio D; Spadaro, David A; Hamilton, Ian L; Jarolimek, Chad V; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-09-01

    Laboratory-based bioaccumulation and toxicity bioassays are frequently used to predict the ecological risk of contaminated sediments in the field. This study investigates the bioassay conditions most relevant to achieving environmentally relevant field exposures. An identical series of metal-contaminated marine sediments were deployed in the field and laboratory over 31 days. Changes in metal concentrations and partitioning in both sediments and waters were used to interpret differences in metal exposure and bioaccumulation to the benthic bivalve Tellina deltoidalis. Loss of resuspended sediments and deposition of suspended particulate matter from the overlying water resulted in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn (major contaminants) becoming lower in the 1-cm surface layer of field-deployed sediments. Lower exchange rates of overlying waters in the laboratory resulted in higher dissolved metal exposures. The prediction of metal bioaccumulation by the bivalves in field and laboratory was improved by considering the metal partitioning within the surface sediments.

  3. Upper Triassic pyritized bivalve mollusks from the Sentachan orogenic gold-antimony deposit, eastern Yakutia: Mineralogy and sulfur isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal'yanova, G. A.; Sobolev, E. S.; Reutsky, V. N.; Bortnikov, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    Pyritized bivalve mollusks have been revealed for the first time in upper Norian sedimentary rocks at the large orogenic Sentachan gold-antimony deposit in eastern Yakutia. It has been established that they are related to species of the genus Monotis ( M. ex gr. jacutica (Teller) (specimen no. 2077/1, CSGM) and M. pachypleura (Teller) (specimen no. 2077/2, CSGM), which existed during the Monotis densistriata phase of the Norian Age of the Triassic Epoch presumably 211.5-214 Ma ago. The occurrence of two pyrite generations differing in morphology, sulfur impurity, and isotopic compositions corroborates the suggestion that pyritization of fauna was a discrete process. It has been shown that sulfur that formed owing to bacterial sulfate reduction and interaction with organic matter was involved in the pyritization of bivalve mollusks, whereas mixing of magmatic sulfur and sulfur derived from host sedimentary rocks participated in deposition of Au-Sb ore.

  4. First data on three bivalve species exposed to an intra-harbour polymetallic contamination (La Rochelle, France).

    PubMed

    Breitwieser, Marine; Viricel, Amélia; Churlaud, Carine; Guillot, Benoit; Martin, Elie; Stenger, Pierre-Louis; Huet, Valérie; Fontanaud, Angélique; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2017-02-21

    Evaluating diffuse sediment contamination in the environment is a major concern with the aim of reaching a good chemical and ecological state of the littoral zone. In this study the risks of chronic chemical contamination and consequences in the bivalves Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus sp. and Mimachlamys varia were evaluated in coastal environments. The objective here was to understand the anthropological phenomena that affect the functioning of the marina of La Rochelle (semi-closed environment). Harbours seeking ecomanagement accreditations (such as the international reference ISO 14001) constitute zones of interest to implement biomonitoring studies. The biological effects of chemical pollution in the Marina of La Rochelle were studied to develop a multi-biomarker biomonitoring approach on specific marine species of this site. Moreover, a genetic (DNA barcoding) approach was applied to validate the species identity of collected bivalves. Of the three species tested the scallop, M. varia, was the most sensitive to metal exposure.

  5. Bivalve vulnerability is enhanced by parasites through the deficit of metallothionein synthesis: A field monitoring on cockles (Cerastoderma edule)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrimont, M.; de Montaudouin, X.; Palvadeau, A.

    2003-05-01

    The effect of the parasite Labratrema minimus (digenean trematode) on metallothioneins (MTs) biosynthesis by the cockle Cerastoderma edule (bivalve) was investigated. An in situ monitoring allowed to describe and compare monthly variations of MTs concentrations in cockles with and without L. minimus in a site free of metai pollution (Banc d'Arguin, Arcachon Bay, France). These concentrations are correlated with the reproductive cycle of the bivalve: (I) in spent cockles, MTs concentrations are higher in infected cockles. probably due to host tissue lysis: (2) during maturation, MTs biosynthesis increases in all cockles. However, concentrations are lower in parasitized individuals in relation with castration by parasites. Therefore, parasite infection in cockles, which can affect 100% of individuals, may contribute to a higher vulnerability of organisms to metal contamination.

  6. Genetic analysis of durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in the rice accession Gigante Vercelli identified two blast resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Urso, Simona; Desiderio, Francesca; Biselli, Chiara; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Crispino, Laura; Piffanelli, Pietro; Abbruscato, Pamela; Assenza, Federica; Guarnieri, Giada; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valè, Giampiero

    2016-02-01

    Rice cultivars exhibiting durable resistance to blast, the most important rice fungal disease provoking up to 30 % of rice losses, are very rare and searching for sources of such a resistance represents a priority for rice-breeding programs. To this aim we analyzed Gigante Vercelli (GV) and Vialone Nano (VN), two temperate japonica rice cultivars in Italy displaying contrasting response to blast, with GV showing a durable and broad-spectrum resistance, whereas VN being highly susceptible. An SSR-based genetic map developed using a GV × VN population segregating for blast resistance identified two blast resistance loci, localized to the long arm of chromosomes 1 and 4 explaining more than 78 % of the observed phenotypic variation for blast resistance. The pyramiding of two blast resistance QTLs was therefore involved in the observed durable resistance in GV. Mapping data were integrated with information obtained from RNA-seq expression profiling of all classes of resistance protein genes (resistance gene analogs, RGAs) and with the map position of known cloned or mapped blast resistance genes to search candidates for the GV resistant response. A co-localization of RGAs with the LOD peak or the marker interval of the chromosome 1 QTL was highlighted and a valuable tool for selecting the resistance gene during breeding programs was developed. Comparative analysis with known blast resistance genes revealed co-positional relationships between the chromosome 1 QTL with the Pi35/Pish blast resistance alleles and showed that the chromosome 4 QTL represents a newly identified blast resistance gene. The present genetic analysis has therefore allowed the identification of two blast resistance loci in the durable blast-resistant rice cultivar GV and tools for molecular selection of these resistance genes.

  7. [Bacteriological study of bivalves from the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. I. Condition of the mollusk recently collected].

    PubMed

    Fernández, B; Brunker, T

    1977-07-01

    During the first six months of 1970 we collected 16 lots of the bivalve Anadara tuberculosa from two areas within the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. These were examined bacteriologically and the coliform levels found in all of them were such that they had to be graded as not satisfactory for human consumption, according to generally accepted norms. The source of these coliforms is attributed to the sewage discharge of the city of Puntarenas into its estuary.

  8. Mutation and Selection on the Wobble Nucleotide in tRNA Anticodons in Marine Bivalve Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Li, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Background Animal mitochondrial genomes typically encode one tRNA for each synonymous codon family, so that each tRNA anticodon essentially has to wobble to recognize two or four synonymous codons. Several factors have been hypothesized to determine the nucleotide at the wobble site of a tRNA anticodon in mitochondrial genomes, such as the codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis, the wobble versatility hypothesis, the translation initiation and elongation conflict hypothesis, and the wobble cost hypothesis. Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed codon usage and tRNA anticodon wobble sites of 29 marine bivalve mitochondrial genomes to evaluate features of the wobble nucleotides in tRNA anticodons. The strand-specific mutation bias favors G and T on the H strand in all the 29 marine bivalve mitochondrial genomes. A bias favoring G and T is also visible in the third codon positions of protein-coding genes and the wobble sites of anticodons, rejecting that codon usage bias drives the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons or tRNA anticodon bias drives the evolution of codon usage. Almost all codon families (98.9%) from marine bivalve mitogenomes support the wobble versatility hypothesis. There are a few interesting exceptions involving tRNATrp with an anticodon CCA fixed in Pectinoida species, tRNASer with a GCU anticodon fixed in Mytiloida mitogenomes, and the uniform anticodon CAU of tRNAMet translating the AUR codon family. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that most of the nucleotides at the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in marine bivalve mitogenomes are determined by wobble versatility. Other factors such as the translation initiation and elongation conflict, and the cost of wobble translation may contribute to the determination of the wobble nucleotide in tRNA anticodons. The finding presented here provides valuable insights into the previous hypotheses of the wobble nucleotide in tRNA anticodons by adding some new evidence. PMID:21267462

  9. Upregulating Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defenses in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas: Investigating the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Naissa Maria; Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Fischer, Kelvis; Deconto, Vanessa Schadeck; da Silva Acosta, Daiane; Bianchini, Adalto; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2017-05-01

    Analysis of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas annotated genome revealed genes with conserved sequences belonging to typical cap 'n' collar Nrf2 domain, a major player in antioxidant protection, and domains belonging to Nrf2 cytoplasmic repressor (Keap1), but little is known about Nrf2/Keap1 induction in bivalves. C. gigas were exposed to waterborne 10 and 30μM curcumin, a known inducer of the mammalian Nrf2. Curcumin disappeared from the seawater after 10h, and accumulated in the gills (10h) and digestive gland (10-96h). A clear induction of glutathione (GSH)-related antioxidant defenses was observed at 96h in the gills of curcumin exposed animals (10 and 30μM), including GSH levels, and the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST). This response was completely absent in the digestive gland, in line with the idea that bivalve gills act as a major site for antioxidant protection under acute exposure. The relative mRNA levels coding glutamate-cysteine ligase, GR, GPx2 and GSTpi were clearly induced by curcumin treatment (30μM, 24h). Curcumin pre-treatment for 96h increased oyster resistance to cumene hydroperoxide, but neither Nrf2 nor Keap1 genes were modulated by curcumin. However, the conserved sequences belonging to typical Nrf2 and Keap1 domains, and the notorious induction of antioxidant defense-related genes known to be controlled by Nrf2 in mammals, indicates a functional Nrf2/Keap1 pathway in bivalves, and curcumin seems to be a new tool to investigate the antioxidant response in bivalves.

  10. Suspended material availability and filtration-biodeposition processes performed by a native and invasive bivalve species in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, C.L.; First, M.R.; Covich, A.P.; Opsahl, S.P.; Golladay, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are among the most threatened group of freshwater organisms globally. They are known for their ability to filter food particles from flowing and standing waters. However, invasive bivalve species, such as the Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) in North America, have the potential to overlap in feeding and potentially out-compete the native species. Yet, the feeding preferences of unionid mussels and C. fluminea are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that Elliptio crassidens (native) and C. fluminea (invasive) would select for specific organic components present within seston. We examined changes in seston (dry mass and ash-free dry mass) resulting from bivalve feeding activity for three size classes of material that were isolated using gravimetric filtration. The treatments were also sub-sampled for flow cytometry (FC) which separated the suspended materials in the stream water into five categories: detritus, heterotrophic bacteria, picoautotrophs, nanoautotrophs, and heterotrophic nanoeukaryotes. Our results indicated that both species of bivalve showed preferences for organic and living materials. E. crassidens preferentially filtered nanoeukaryotes, whose decreases were associated with an increase in bacteria. In contrast, C. fluminea preferred smaller materials through selective filtration of picoautotrophs. In addition, both species increased the concentration of large materials toward the end of the experiment because of the suspension of their pseudofeces biodeposits. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine grazing by bivalve species on natural stream particulate matter using FC. Our results suggest that native and non-native mussels have different functional roles, which has important implications for organic matter processing and food webs in streams. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. Stable isotopes in bivalves as indicators of nutrient source in coastal waters in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago, Panama

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Ethan L.; O’Dea, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To examine N-isotope ratios (15N/14N) in tissues and shell organic matrix of bivalves as a proxy for natural and anthropogenic nutrient fluxes in coastal environments, Pinctada imbricata, Isognomon alatus, and Brachidontes exustusbivalves were live-collected and analyzed from eight sites in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Sites represent a variety of coastal environments, including more urbanized, uninhabited, riverine, and oceanic sites. Growth under differing environmental conditions is confirmed by δ18O values, with open ocean Escudo de Veraguas shells yielding the highest average δ18O (−1.0‰) value and freshwater endmember Rio Guarumo the lowest (−1.7‰). At all sites there is no single dominant source of organic matter contributing to bivalve δ15N and δ13C values. Bivalve δ15N and δ13C values likely represent a mixture of mangrove and seagrass N and C, although terrestrial sources cannot be ruled out. Despite hydrographic differences between end-members, we see minimal δ15N and δ13C difference between bivalves from the river-influenced Rio Guarumo site and those from the oceanic Escudo de Veraguas site, with no evidence for N from open-ocean phytoplankton in the latter. Populated sites yield relative 15N enrichments suggestive of anthropogenic nutrient input, but low δ15N values overall make this interpretation equivocal. Lastly, δ15N values of tissue and shell organic matrix correlate significantly for pterioideans P. imbricata and I. alatus. Thus for these species, N isotope studies of historical and fossil shells should provide records of ecology of past environments. PMID:27547578

  12. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  13. What Lies Beneath: Sub-Articular Long Bone Shape Scaling in Eutherian Mammals and Saurischian Dinosaurs Suggests Different Locomotor Adaptations for Gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Bonnan, Matthew F.; Wilhite, D. Ray; Masters, Simon L.; Yates, Adam M.; Gardner, Christine K.; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load. PMID:24130690

  14. Indigenous Bacteria in Hemolymph and Tissues of Marine Bivalves at Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Jan A.; Mikkelsen, Helene V.; Giæver, Hanne M.; Høvik Hansen, Geir

    1993-01-01

    and human erythrocytes were found in hemolymph from both animals. We found no differences in agglutinin titers in oysters from different Norwegian locations, and long-term challenge with bacteria in seawater did not result in changes of agglutinin activity. These studies demonstrate that bacteria exist in hemolymph and soft tissues of marine bivalves at temperatures below 8°C. Increased bacterial numbers in seawater at 4°C result in augmented invasion of bacteria in hemolymph and soft tissues. V. salmonicida, a bacterium pathogenic for fish at low temperatures, invades bivalve hemolymph and soft tissues, and thus bivalves may serve as a reservoir for pathogens of fish at low seawater temperatures. PMID:16348962

  15. A comparative study on effects of heterotrophic microbial activity on the stability of bivalve and coral carbonate during early diagenesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Skadi M.; Krause, Stefan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Ritter, Ann-Christin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Kleinteich, Thomas; Treude, Tina

    2016-04-01

    Following deposition and shallow burial, marine biogenic carbonates are exposed to an environment that is geochemically affected by a manifold of bacterial metabolic redox processes. To allow for comparison of potential microbe-mediated alteration effects on carbonates, we used aragonitic bivalve shell samples and porous aragonitic coral fragments for incubation experiments in oxic- and anoxic seawater media. The media contained marine sediment slurries or bacterial cultures to mimic the natural processes in vitro. The results for anoxic experimental media containing bivalve shell samples or coral fragments displayed considerable changes in carbonate-system parameters (pH, AT, CA, DIC) and divalent-cation ratios (Mg/Ca, Mg/Sr, Sr/Ca) over time. Furthermore, incubated bivalve shell samples were altered in morphology, elemental composition and isotopic signature. Coral-fragment bearing oxic incubations were run at two temperature regimes and divalent-cation ratios of the high-temperature bacterial medium displayed withdrawal of Ca2+ and Sr2+ from the medium, thus indicating microbe-induced secondary aragonite precipitation. Analyses of coral fragments include electron-microprobe mapping and X-ray microtomography to resolve elemental sample composition and pore-space alteration features, respectively. Up to this point our results indicate that heterotrophic bacterial activity has the potential to affect surficial or open pore space in carbonate archives by increasing rates of alteration relative to sterile environments.

  16. [Community structure of bivalves and gastropods in roots of red mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) in isla Larga, Mochima Bay, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Acosta Balbas, Vanessa; Betancourt Tineo, Rafael; Prieto Arcas, Antulio

    2014-06-01

    The Rhizophora mangle roots form a complex ecosystem where a wide range of organisms are permanently established, reproduce, and find refuge. In this study, we assessed the diversity of bivalves and gastropods that inhabit red mangrove roots, in isla Larga, Mochima, Venezuela Sucre state. Bimonthly collections were made from January 2007 to May 2008, in four study areas denominated: South, North, East and West. In each area, five mangrove roots were sampled, and the specimens were obtained. We analyzed a total of 180 roots and a total of 35 bivalve species and 25 gastropod species were found. The most abundant bivalves were: Isognomon alatus, Isognomon bicolor, Ostrea equestris, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Brachidontes exustus; among gastropods, the most common where: Littorina angulifera, (Cymatium pileare and Diodora cayenensis. The months with the highest abundances and number of individuals for both groups were January and July 2007, and March 2008. The mangrove ecosystem in isla Larga, presented a number of individuals and species higher than those reported for other regions in Venezuela and the Caribbean.

  17. The fingerprint of chemosymbiosis: origin and preservation of isotopic biosignatures in the nonseep bivalve Loripes lacteus compared with Venerupis aurea.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Anne; Stannek, Lorena; Blumenberg, Martin; Taviani, Marco; Sigovini, Marco; Wrede, Christoph; Thiel, Volker; Hoppert, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Endosymbionts in marine bivalves leave characteristic biosignatures in their host organisms. Two nonseep bivalve species collected in Mediterranean lagoons, thiotrophic symbiotic Loripes lacteus and filter-feeding nonsymbiotic Venerupis aurea, were studied in detail with respect to generation and presence of such signatures in living animals, and the preservation of these signals in subfossil (late Pleistocene) sedimentary shells. Three key enzymes from sulfur oxidation (APS-reductase), CO(2) fixation (RubisCO) and assimilation of nitrogen [glutamine synthetase (GS)] were detected by immunofluorescence in the bacterial symbionts of Loripes. In Loripes, major activity was derived from GS of the symbionts whereas in Venerupis the host GS is active. In search of geologically stable biosignatures for thiotrophic chemosymbiosis that might be suitable to detect such associations in ancient bivalves, we analyzed the isotopic composition of shell lipids (δ(13)C) and the bulk organic matrix of the shell (δ(13)C , δ(15)N , δ(34)S). In the thiotrophic Loripes, δ(13)C values were depleted compared with the filter-feeding Venerupis by as much as 8.5‰ for individual fatty acids, and 4.4‰ for bulk organic carbon. Likewise, bulk δ(15)N and δ(34)S values were more depleted in recent thiotrophic Loripes. Whereas δ (34)S values were found to be unstable over time, the combined δ(15)N and δ(13)C values in organic shell extracts revealed a specific signature for chemosymbiosis in recent and subfossil specimens.

  18. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  19. Coexistence of Multiple Proteobacterial Endosymbionts in the Gills of the Wood-Boring Bivalve Lyrodus pedicellatus (Bivalvia: Teredinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Daniel L.; Beaudoin, David J.; Morrill, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Wood-boring bivalves of the family Teredinidae (commonly called shipworms) are known to harbor dense populations of gram-negative bacteria within specialized cells (bacteriocytes) in their gills. These symbionts are thought to provide enzymes, e.g., cellulase and dinitrogenase, which assist the host in utilizing wood as a primary food source. A cellulolytic, dinitrogen-fixing bacterium, Teredinibacter turnerae, has been isolated from the gill tissues of numerous teredinid bivalves and has been proposed to constitute the sole or predominant symbiont of this bivalve family. Here we demonstrate that one teredinid species, Lyrodus pedicellatus, contains at least four distinct bacterial 16S rRNA types within its gill bacteriocytes, one of which is identical to that of T. turnerae. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the three newly detected ribotypes are derived from gamma proteobacteria that are related to but distinct (>6.5% sequence divergence) from T. turnerae. In situ hybridizations with 16S rRNA-directed probes demonstrated that the pattern of occurrence of symbiont ribotypes within bacteriocytes was predictable and specific, with some bacteriocytes containing two symbiont ribotypes. However, only two of the six possible pairwise combinations of the four ribotypes were observed to cooccur within the same host cells. The results presented here are consistent with the existence of a complex multiple symbiosis in this shipworm species. PMID:12450854

  20. A Holistic Approach to the Conservation and Propagation of Freshwater, Brackish and Estuarine Bivalves for Ecosystem Services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreeger, D.

    2005-05-01

    Shellfish restoration is increasingly valued in estuaries such as Chesapeake Bay where oyster populations are known to function as living biofilters, performing critical ecosystem services. Less studied are the services rendered by other suspension-feeding bivalves that reside in fringing marshes around these estuaries, in brackish and freshwater tidal portions, and in freshwater tributaries. The potential benefits contributed by other native bivalves will be discussed with two case studies from the Delaware basin. These are the ribbed mussel (Geukensia demissa ), which is abundant in brackish and marine tidal marshes, and the unionid mussel (Elliptio complanata ), which is abundant in many rivers of the system. Ribbed mussels are abundant enough to filter a large portion of the tidal prism flushing marshes, facilitating the role that these systems play as a sink for suspended solids and nutrients. Similarly, data from the lower Brandywine River suggests that a vestigial community of freshwater unionids remains sufficiently abundant to have a measurable beneficial effect on water quality by removing more than 25 metric tons of suspended particulates per year. Hence, the conservation and propagation of freshwater unionids can yield benefits that extend beyond current interest that is focused on protecting their biodiversity. Future efforts to protect or reclaim water quality and ecosystem integrity may benefit by a basin-wide, holistic approach that promotes integrated "biofiltration services" by native bivalves living from the headwaters to the coastal shelf.

  1. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments and Bivalves on the Pacific Coast of Japan: Influence of Tsunami and Fire

    PubMed Central

    Onozato, Mayu; Nishigaki, Atsuko; Okoshi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Surface sediments and at least one edible bivalve species (Ruditapes philippinarum, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Crassostrea gigas) were collected from each of seven intertidal sites in Japan in 2013. The sites had experienced varying levels of tsunami and fire disturbance following the major earthquake of 2011. Eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were identified and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Total sediment PAH concentration (CT), the sum of the average concentrations of the eight PAHs, was 21–1447 μg kg-1-dry. Relative to the average level of one type of PAH in sediments collected around Japan in 2002 (benzo[a]pyrene = 21 μg kg-1-dry), five of the seven sites showed concentrations significantly lower than this average in 2013. The CTs for the three bivalves (134–450 μg kg-1-dry) were within the range of the previous reports (2.2–5335 μg kg-1-dry). The data suggest that the natural disaster did not increase PAH concentrations or affect the distribution within sediment or bivalves in Tohoku district. Although PAH concentrations at the sites pose no risk to human health, the findings highlight that the observed PAH levels derive from pre- rather than post-quake processes. PMID:27232189

  2. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans detected in bivalve samples from the NOAA National Status and Trends Program.

    PubMed

    Wade, Terry L; Sweet, Stephen T; Sericano, José L; Defreitas, Debra A; Lauenstein, Gunnar G

    2014-04-30

    Bivalve samples from 142 sites were analyzed to determine the concentration and toxicity equivalents (TEQ) of dioxins and furans (D/F) as part of the NOAA National Status and Trends Program. The total concentration of 17 D/F ranged from not detected to 203 pg/g wet weight of tissue. Octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, OCDD, had a concentration range from not detected to 189 pg/g and a mean concentration of 8.65 pg/g. OCDD was the dominant D/F compound detected and accounted for, on average, over 70% of the total D/F concentration. The TEQ (compared to 2,3,7,8-TCDD) ranged from 0.12 to 7.32 pg TEQ/g. The TEQ for 39% of the bivalves analyzed were below 0.238 pg TEQ/g. TEQ above human consumption advisory concentration of 1.2 pg TEQ/g were found in 9.3% of the samples analyzed. TEQ for D/F indicate very limited human health concerns from consumption of bivalves at most of the locations sampled.

  3. Ocean Acidification at High Latitudes: Potential Effects on Functioning of the Antarctic Bivalve Laternula elliptica

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Vonda; Hewitt, Judi; Van Rooyen, Anthony; Currie, Kim; Beard, Samuel; Thrush, Simon; Norkko, Joanna; Barr, Neill; Heath, Philip; Halliday, N. Jane; Sedcole, Richard; Gomez, Antony; McGraw, Christina; Metcalf, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification is a well recognised threat to marine ecosystems. High latitude regions are predicted to be particularly affected due to cold waters and naturally low carbonate saturation levels. This is of concern for organisms utilising calcium carbonate (CaCO3) to generate shells or skeletons. Studies of potential effects of future levels of pCO2 on high latitude calcifiers are at present limited, and there is little understanding of their potential to acclimate to these changes. We describe a laboratory experiment to compare physiological and metabolic responses of a key benthic bivalve, Laternula elliptica, at pCO2 levels of their natural environment (430 µatm, pH 7.99; based on field measurements) with those predicted for 2100 (735 µatm, pH 7.78) and glacial levels (187 µatm, pH 8.32). Adult L. elliptica basal metabolism (oxygen consumption rates) and heat shock protein HSP70 gene expression levels increased in response both to lowering and elevation of pH. Expression of chitin synthase (CHS), a key enzyme involved in synthesis of bivalve shells, was significantly up-regulated in individuals at pH 7.78, indicating L. elliptica were working harder to calcify in seawater undersaturated in aragonite (ΩAr = 0.71), the CaCO3 polymorph of which their shells are comprised. The different response variables were influenced by pH in differing ways, highlighting the importance of assessing a variety of factors to determine the likely impact of pH change. In combination, the results indicate a negative effect of ocean acidification on whole-organism functioning of L. elliptica over relatively short terms (weeks-months) that may be energetically difficult to maintain over longer time periods. Importantly, however, the observed changes in L. elliptica CHS gene expression provides evidence for biological control over the shell formation process, which may enable some degree of adaptation or acclimation to future ocean acidification scenarios. PMID:21245932

  4. Manganese in the shell of the bivalve Mytilus edulis: Seawater Mn or physiological control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Pedro S.; Clarke, Leon J.; Kennedy, Hilary; Richardson, Christopher A.

    2016-12-01

    Manganese in the shell calcite of marine bivalves has been suggested to reflect ambient seawater Mn concentrations, thus providing a high-resolution archive of past seawater Mn concentrations. However, a quantitative relationship between seawater Mn and shell Mn/Ca ratios, as well as clear understanding of which process(es) control(s) shell Mn/Ca, are still lacking. Blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were grown in a one-year duration field experiment in the Menai Strait, U.K., to study the relationship between seawater particulate and dissolved Mn2+ concentrations and shell calcite Mn/Ca ratios. Shell Mn/Ca showed a well-defined intra-annual double-peak, with maximum values during early spring and early summer and low values during autumn and winter. Seawater particulate Mn peaked during winter and autumn, with a series of smaller peaks during spring and summer, whereas dissolved Mn2+ exhibited a marked single maximum during late-spring to early-summer, being low during the remainder of the year. Consequently, neither seawater particulate Mn nor dissolved Mn2+ concentrations explain the intra-annual variation of shell Mn/Ca ratios. A physiological control on shell Mn/Ca ratios is evident from the strong similarity and timing of the double-peaked intra-annual variations of Mn/Ca and shell growth rate (SGR), the latter corresponding to periods of increased metabolic activity (as indicated by respiration rate). It is thus likely that in M. edulis SGR influences shell Mn/Ca by altering the concentration or activity of Mn2+ within the extra-pallial fluid (EPF), by changing the flux of Mn into or the proportion of protein bound Mn within the EPF. By linking shell Mn/Ca ratios to the endogenous and environmental factors that determine growth and metabolic activity, this study helps to explain the lack of a consistent relationship between shell Mn/Ca in marine bivalve shell calcite and seawater particulate and dissolved Mn2+ concentrations. The use of Mn content from M. edulis

  5. Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca in Aragonitic Bivalves: Do They Record Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Ulens, H.; Dehairs, F.; Baeyens, W.; Navez, J.; Andre, L.; Keppens, E.; Calmars Group,.

    2003-12-01

    The chemical or isotopic composition of calcareous skeletons have long been recognized as archives of past and present environmental conditions. Oxygen isotopes (d18O) of biogenic carbonates are a powerful proxy of SST, however, although usually dominated by SST, salinity (SSS) also significantly effects the oxygen isotopic signal recorded in the carbonate. This has led researchers to explore new proxies, which are independent of SSS. Generally, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca of seawater remains unchanged above salinities of 10 and marine animals will commonly live in habitats that do not fluctuate below this salinity. To solve the issue of SSS complicating paleotemperature records, these "new" proxies must be at least as reliable as d18O. If an environmental control is dominant, the proxies should be reproducible between specimens growing under the same field conditions. Both Sr and Mg have been used as paleotemperature proxies in corals and foraminifera, whereas a fewer attempts have been made to use these proxies in bivalves. Some report a clear seasonal periodicity in Sr/Ca profiles of bivalves, which covaries with d18O (i.e., temperature), whereas others have found no clear periodicity. We test the robustness of these proxies by analyzing the shell material from three species of aragonitic clams from around the world using a LA-ICP-MS. Three individuals of M. mercenaria from North Carolina, USA, three individuals of Saxidomus giganteus from Washington, USA and one Arctica islandica from Norway have been analyzed. As expected, there is excellent reproducibility of d18O between specimens (both M. mercenaria and S. giganteus) indicating external environmental conditions control this proxy (i.e. SST and SSS). Preliminary data analysis show that Sr and Mg are not reproducible between specimens from the same site nor do they exhibit a clear seasonal cyclicity, indicating individual metabolic effects (i.e., vital effects) dominate the incorporation of these elements. A. islandica

  6. Does seawater acidification affect survival, growth and shell integrity in bivalve juveniles?

    PubMed

    Bressan, M; Chinellato, A; Munari, M; Matozzo, V; Manci, A; Marčeta, T; Finos, L; Moro, I; Pastore, P; Badocco, D; Marin, M G

    2014-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide are leading to decreases in pH and changes in the carbonate chemistry of seawater. Ocean acidification may negatively affect the ability of marine organisms to produce calcareous structures while also influencing their physiological responses and growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of reduced pH on the survival, growth and shell integrity of juveniles of two marine bivalves from the Northern Adriatic sea: the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the striped venus clam Chamelea gallina. An outdoor flow-through plant was set up and two pH levels (natural seawater pH as a control, pH 7.4 as the treatment) were tested in long-term experiments. Mortality was low throughout the first experiment for both mussels and clams, but a significant increase, which was sensibly higher in clams, was observed at the end of the experiment (6 months). Significant decreases in the live weight (-26%) and, surprisingly, in the shell length (-5%) were observed in treated clams, but not in mussels. In the controls of both species, no shell damage was ever recorded; in the treated mussels and clams, damage proceeded via different modes and to different extents. The severity of shell injuries was maximal in the mussels after just 3 months of exposure to a reduced pH, whereas it progressively increased in clams until the end of the experiment. In shells of both species, the damaged area increased throughout the experiment, peaking at 35% in mussels and 11% in clams. The shell thickness of the treated and control animals significantly decreased after 3 months in clams and after 6 months in mussels. In the second experiment (3 months), only juvenile mussels were exposed to a reduced pH. After 3 months, the mussels at a natural pH level or pH 7.4 did not differ in their survival, shell length or live weight. Conversely, shell damage was clearly visible in the treated mussels from the 1st month onward. Monitoring the

  7. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve calcification, particular of the early larval stages is highly sensitive to the change of ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no and [HCO3-] and pH only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. Therefore, the availability of [HCO3-] combined with favorable environmental pH determines calcification rate and an equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the

  8. Marine Bivalve Mollusks As Possible Indicators of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli and Other Species of the Enterobacteriaceae Family.

    PubMed

    Grevskott, Didrik H; Svanevik, Cecilie S; Sunde, Marianne; Wester, Astrid L; Lunestad, Bjørn T

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development and spread of antibacterial resistance (ABR) in bacteria residing in environmental compartments, including the marine environment, are far from understood. The objective of this study was to examine the ABR rates in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from marine bivalve mollusks collected along the Norwegian coast during a period from October 2014 to November 2015. A total of 549 bivalve samples were examined by a five times three tube most probable number method for enumeration of E. coli in bivalves resulting in 199 isolates from the positive samples. These isolates were identified by biochemical reactions and matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, showing that 90% were E. coli, while the remaining were species within the genera Klebsiella, Citrobacter, and Enterobacter. All 199 isolates recovered were susceptibility tested following the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing disk diffusion method. In total, 75 of 199 (38%) isolates showed resistance to at least one antibacterial agent, while multidrug-resistance were seen in 9 (5%) isolates. One isolate conferred resistance toward 15 antibacterial agents. Among the 75 resistant isolates, resistance toward extended-spectrum penicillins (83%), aminoglycosides (16%), trimethoprim (13%), sulfonamides (11%), tetracyclines (8%), third-generation cephalosporins (7%), amphenicols (5%), nitrofurans (5%), and quinolones (5%), were observed. Whole-genome sequencing on a selection of 10 E. coli isolates identified the genes responsible for resistance, including blaCTX-M genes. To indicate the potential for horizontal gene transfer, conjugation experiments were performed on the same selected isolates. Conjugative transfer of resistance was observed for six of the 10 E. coli isolates. In order to compare E. coli isolates from bivalves with clinical strains, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeats

  9. Marine Bivalve Mollusks As Possible Indicators of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli and Other Species of the Enterobacteriaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Grevskott, Didrik H.; Svanevik, Cecilie S.; Sunde, Marianne; Wester, Astrid L.; Lunestad, Bjørn T.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development and spread of antibacterial resistance (ABR) in bacteria residing in environmental compartments, including the marine environment, are far from understood. The objective of this study was to examine the ABR rates in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from marine bivalve mollusks collected along the Norwegian coast during a period from October 2014 to November 2015. A total of 549 bivalve samples were examined by a five times three tube most probable number method for enumeration of E. coli in bivalves resulting in 199 isolates from the positive samples. These isolates were identified by biochemical reactions and matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, showing that 90% were E. coli, while the remaining were species within the genera Klebsiella, Citrobacter, and Enterobacter. All 199 isolates recovered were susceptibility tested following the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing disk diffusion method. In total, 75 of 199 (38%) isolates showed resistance to at least one antibacterial agent, while multidrug-resistance were seen in 9 (5%) isolates. One isolate conferred resistance toward 15 antibacterial agents. Among the 75 resistant isolates, resistance toward extended-spectrum penicillins (83%), aminoglycosides (16%), trimethoprim (13%), sulfonamides (11%), tetracyclines (8%), third-generation cephalosporins (7%), amphenicols (5%), nitrofurans (5%), and quinolones (5%), were observed. Whole-genome sequencing on a selection of 10 E. coli isolates identified the genes responsible for resistance, including blaCTX-M genes. To indicate the potential for horizontal gene transfer, conjugation experiments were performed on the same selected isolates. Conjugative transfer of resistance was observed for six of the 10 E. coli isolates. In order to compare E. coli isolates from bivalves with clinical strains, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeats

  10. Cross-habitat interactions among bivalve species control community structure on intertidal flats.

    PubMed

    Donadi, Serena; van der Heide, Tjisse; van der Zee, Els M; Eklöf, Johan S; van de Koppel, Johan; Weerman, Ellen J; Piersma, Theunis; Olff, Han; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that spatial interactions between sedentary organisms can structure communities and promote landscape complexity in many ecosystems. Here we tested the hypothesis that reef-forming mussels (Mytilus edulis L.), a dominant intertidal ecosystem engineer in the Wadden Sea, promote abundances of the burrowing bivalve Cerastoderma edule L. (cockle) in neighboring habitats at relatively long distances coastward from mussel beds. Field surveys within and around three mussel beds showed a peak in cockle densities at 50-100 m toward the coast from the mussel bed, while cockle abundances elsewhere in the study area were very low. Field transplantation of cockles showed higher survival of young cockles (2-3 years old) and increased spat fall coastward of the mussel bed compared to within the bed and to areas without mussels, whereas growth decreased within and coastward of the mussel bed. Our measurements suggest that the observed spatial patterns in cockle numbers resulted from (1) inhibition effects by the mussels close to the beds due to preemptive algal depletion and deteriorated sediment conditions and (2) facilitation effects by the mussels farther away from the beds due to reduction of wave energy. Our results imply that these spatial, scale-dependent interactions between reef-forming ecosystem engineers and surrounding communities of sedentary benthic organisms can be an important determinant of the large-scale community structure in intertidal ecosystems. Understanding this interplay between neighboring communities of sedentary species is therefore essential for effective conservation and restoration of soft-bottom intertidal communities.

  11. Polonium-210 in marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) inhabiting the southern coast of India.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Feroz; Wesley, S Godwin; Rajan, M P

    2014-12-01

    The present study focused on the determination of the alpha-emitter, (210)Po, in two species of marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) commonly available in the southern coastal region of India. The brown mussel, Perna indica was collected from the west coast and the green mussel, Perna viridis from the east coast. The concentration of (210)Po was related to the allometry (length of shell, wet/dry weight of shell/soft tissue) of the mussels and significant results were found. The study period focused on three seasons namely, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon for a 1-year period (2010-2011). The results revealed higher activity levels in smaller-sized mussels compared to larger ones. Marked variation in (210)Po activity concentration was noted in the whole-body soft tissues between seasons and sampling site (p < 0.05). The dose rate assessment for mussels was performed using the ERICA Assessment tool. The chronic exposure to mussels due to (210)Po was found to be lesser than the global benchmark dose rate of 10 μGy h(-1). The effective ingestion dose to adults who intake mussels was estimated to be in the range 5.1-34.9 μSv y(-1). The measurement contributes to the furthering of knowledge of (210)Po, since no data exist in this region.

  12. Stable metal isotopes reveal copper accumulation and loss dynamics in the freshwater bivalve Corbucula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Topping, B.R.; Lopez, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of uptake and loss dynamics is critical to understanding risks associated with contaminant exposure in aquatic animals. Dynamics are especially important in addressing questions such as why coexisting species in nature accumulate different levels of a contaminant. Here we manipulated copper (Cu) stable isotopic ratios (as an alternative to radioisotopes) to describe for the first time Cu dynamics in a freshwater invertebrate, the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. In the laboratory, Corbicula uptake and loss rate constants were determined from an environmentally realistic waterborne exposure to 65Cu (5.7 ??g L-1). That is, we spiked deionized water with Cu that was 99.4% 65Cu. Net tracer uptake was detectable after 1 day and strongly evident after 4 days. Thus, short-term exposures necessary to determine uptake dynamics are feasible with stable isotopes of Cu. In Corbicula, 65Cu depuration was biphasic. An unusually low rate constant of loss (0.0038 d-1) characterized the slow component of efflux, explaining why Corbicula strongly accumulates copper in nature. We incorporated our estimates of rate constants for dissolved 65Cu uptake and physiological efflux into a bioaccumulation model and showed that dietary exposure to Cu is likely an important bioaccumulation pathway for Corbicula.

  13. Bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves from Sugarland Run and the Potomac River

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.R.; Lauren, D.J.; Dimitry, J.A. |

    1995-12-31

    A bioaccumulation study was conducted following a release of Fuel Oil {number_sign}2 into Sugarland Run, a small northern Virginia stream. Caged clams (Corbicula sp.) were placed in 3 downstream locations and 2 upstream reference areas for an exposure period of approximately 28 days. In addition, resident clams from the Potomac River were sampled at the start of the study and at 4 and 8 weeks. Chemical fingerprinting techniques were employed to identify spill-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to differentiate these compounds from background sources of contamination. The greatest concentration of spill-related PAHs (2 and 3-ring compounds) were measured in clams placed immediately downstream of the spill site, and tissue concentrations systematically decreased with distance from the spill site. PAHs that were not related to Fuel Oil {number_sign}2 were found in all clams and accounted for up to 90% of the total body burden at downstream locations. Furthermore, the highest concentrations of 4-, 5-, and 6-ring PAH were found at the upstream reference location, and indicated an important source of PAHs into the environment. Body burdens measured in this study were compared to ambient concentrations reported for bivalves from a variety of environments. Tissue concentrations were also compared to concentrations that have been reported to cause adverse biological effects.

  14. The evolutionary origins of the southern ocean Philobryid bivalves: hidden biodiversity, ancient persistence.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer A; Linse, Katrin; Whittle, Rowan; Griffiths, Huw J

    2015-01-01

    Philobryids (Bivalvia: Arcoida) are one of the most speciose marine bivalve families in the Southern Ocean and are common throughout the Southern Hemisphere. Considering this diversity and their brooding reproductive mode (limiting long-distance dispersal), this family may have been present in the Southern Ocean since its inception. However Philobrya and Adacnarca appear only in the Quaternary fossil record of the Antarctic, suggesting a much more recent incursion. Molecular dating provides an independent means of measuring the time of origin and radiation of this poorly known group. Here we present the first combined molecular and morphological investigation of the Philobryidae in the Southern Ocean. Two nuclear loci (18S and 28S) were amplified from 35 Southern Ocean Adacnarca and Philobrya specimens, with a combined sequence length of 2,282 base pairs (bp). Adacnarca specimens (A. nitens and A. limopsoides) were resolved as a strongly supported monophyletic group. Genus Philobrya fell into two strongly supported groups ('sublaevis' and 'magellanica/wandelensis'), paraphyletic with Adacnarca. The A. nitens species complex is identified as at least seven morpho-species through morphological and genetic analysis of taxon clustering. Phylogenetic analyses resolve Philobryidae as a strongly supported monophyletic clade and sister taxon to the Limopsidae, as anticipated by their classification into the superfamily Limopsoidea. Bayesian relaxed clock analyses of divergence times suggest that genus Adacnarca radiated in the Southern Ocean from the Early Paleogene, while P. sublaevis and P. wandelensis clades radiated in the late Miocene, following the formation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  15. Purification and characterization of an N-acetylglucosamine specific lectin from marine bivalve Macoma birmanica.

    PubMed

    Adhya, Mausumi; Singha, Biswajit; Chatterjee, Bishnu P

    2009-07-01

    A calcium independent lectin of molecular mass 47kDa was isolated from the foot muscle of marine bivalve Macoma birmanica by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by affinity chromatography on immobilized GlcNAc column and designated as M. birmanica agglutinin (MBA). The lectin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes strongly compared to human erythrocytes over a wide pH range from 5 to 9 and up to 50 degrees C. MBA is a glycoprotein and consists of 7.63% sugar. Among the tested sugars for analysis of carbohydrate recognition properties, Me-betaGlcNAc was the most potent inhibitor followed by Me-alphaMan. Enzyme linked solid phase assay revealed that MBA interacted well with complex type N-linked glycans and moderately to high mannose type N-linked glycans. Fluorescence study of MBA indicated that tryptophan was present in a non-hydrophobic region and its binding to GlcNAc was neither quenched nor altered lambda(max) position. The denaturation of MBA induced by urea was a reversible process and urea could not significantly change the Trp environment. MBA interacted with both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by recognizing their surface exposed GlcNAc containing antigens.

  16. Determination of selenium bioavailability to a benthic bivalve from particulate and solute pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, S.N.; Johns, C.; Fisher, N.S.; Steinberg, N.A.; Oremland, R.S.; Reinfelder, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Particulate organo-Se was assimilated with 86% efficiency by the deposit feeding bivalve Macoma balthica, when the clam was fed 75Se-labeled diatoms. Absorption efficiencies of participate elemental Se were 22%, when the animals were fed 75Se-labeled sediments in which elemental Se was precipitated by microbial dissimilatory reduction. Precipitation of elemental Se did not eliminate biological availability of the element. Selenite was taken up from solution slowly by M. balthica (mean concentration factor was 712). Concentrations of selenite high enough to influence Se bioaccumulation by M. balthica did not occur in the oxidized water column of San Francisco Bay. However, 98-99% of the Se observed in M. balthica could be explained by ingestion of the concentrations of participate Se found in the bay. The potential for adverse biological effects occurred at much lower concentrations of environmental Se when food web transfer was considered than when predictions of effects were based upon bioassays with solute forms of the element. Selenium clearly requires a protective criterion based upon particulate concentrations or food web transfer. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  17. Use of a bivalved polypropylene orthosis in the postoperative management of idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R S; Price, C T; Riddick, M F

    1984-05-01

    Forty-four consecutive patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated by posterior spinal fusion and Harrington rod instrumentation were immobilized after surgery with bivalved polypropylene orthoses. Immediate ambulation was allowed, and the patients wore the orthoses for a mean of 5.9 months. Brace removal was permitted with the patient recumbent for sponge bathing. These patients were followed up for a mean of 2.1 years (range, 1.0-4.3 years). The average final correction for all curves was 45%. The average loss of correction was 2.4 degrees (5.3%). Combined distraction and compression instrumentation was found to improve final correction in all curves by 3 degrees (6.2%) as compared with distraction instrumentation alone. There were no pseudarthroses and no rod breakage. Patients enjoyed the benefits of improved personal hygiene, pleasing cosmetic appearance, and increased life-style flexibility, especially swimming, which was not possible with the conventional Risser plaster cast. Use of the polypropylene orthosis offers significant advantages as compared with previous methods of postoperative management: it not only provides consistently good results but is enthusiastically accepted by patients as well.

  18. Endpoints for sediment toxicity tests with the freshwater bivalve Sphaerium corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Looise, B.A.S.; Holwerda, D.A.; Foekema, E.M.

    1994-12-31

    Being a participant in the EU project `Sediment toxicity tests for poorly water soluble substances` the authors examined toxicological endpoints with the freshwater bivalve Sphaerium corneum. These included induction of two biotransformation enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and catalase, and survival time under anoxic stress. Animals were taken from the field and exposed to sediments spiked with contaminants or to contaminants in a water-only system. Also a field sediment from a contaminated area was included. Spiking substances were lindane, dieldrin, benzo[a]pyrene, and PCB. After 1--5 weeks of exposure to contaminated sediments or water, animals were examined for induction of the biotransformation enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase. GST activity in whole body soft tissue was measured spectrophotometrically by the amount of conjugate formed, using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate and glutathione as a co-substrate. Catalase activity was also measured spectrophotometrically by the transformation rate of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide. None of the treatments resulted in a significant increase of GST or catalase activities. After 2--5 weeks of exposure to contaminated sediment, the animals were transferred to individual 10-mL bottles. Results show significant decrease of survival times of animals exposed to contaminated sediments.

  19. Protandric hermaphroditism in the whale-fall bivalve mollusc Idas washingtonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Paul A.; Marsh, Leigh; Baco-Taylor, Amy; Smith, Craig R.

    2009-09-01

    Whale falls provide abundant but relatively ephemeral, sulphide-rich habitat islands on the deep-sea floor. To explore life-history adaptations to whale-fall habitats, we examined the reproductive biology of Idas washingtonia, a bathymodiolin mussel occurring in abundance on sunken whale skeletons in the deep northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the reproductive biology of I. washingtonia demonstrates strong evidence of protandric hermaphroditism. Developing males were recognised in individuals as small as 1.7 mm shell length and spermatogenesis continued until ˜7 mm length. At >6.5 mm, males were generally spent and the first previtellogenic oocytes were observed. Although developing females were found as small as 4.5 mm shell length, most well-developed females were >6 mm shell length. Overall, females only formed ˜12% of the population. As with other modiolid bivalves, fecundity was high and the egg size <50 μm, indicative of planktotrophic development. The occurrence of protandric hermaphroditism, high fecundity and planktotrophic dispersal may be an adaptation to the ephemeral nature of their habitat. The success of this adaptation is shown by the rapid colonisation of whale falls even though these may have been severely reduced in abundance since the peak of commercial whaling activity in the 20th century.

  20. Environmental versus biological controls on multi-proxy records from bivalve shell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, D.; Kluender, M. H.; Witbaard, R.; Buhl, D.; Richter, D.; Frei, D.; Immenhauser, A.

    2007-12-01

    Field experiments on different bivalve species have been conducted in the Dutch Wadden Sea near the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) to investigate the environmental and biological controls on the fractionation pattern of different stable isotope systems (18O/16O, 26Mg/24Mg, 44Ca/42Ca) and elemental/calcium ratios, and their reliability as geochemical proxies for high- resolution palaeoclimate reconstructions. Our study includes various individuals of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis and juveniles of the ocean quahog, Arctica islandica. Our study is completed using samples from growth experiments on young Arcitca's which were also performed at the NIOZ laboratory. These individuals were cultured in five temperature controlled basins, ranging from 1 to 12° Celcius. The third sample set analysed was collected at several sites in the Baltic Sea characterised by salinities lower than 15 permil. Our data shows that both species deposit their shells in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. Trace element ratios in Mytilus edulis further indicate that Mg/Ca may indeed provide a reliable palaeothermometer. In contrast, Calcium and magnesium isotope fractionation is obviously controlled by biological processes. However, environmental signals (e.g. temperature, salinity) are well recorded in the shells. Therefore, the combined approach could give new insights into biomineralization processes. This is a contribution to EuroCLIMATE project 04 ECLIM FP08 CASIOPEIA.

  1. Mass mortality in bivalves and the intricate case of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Solomieu, Valérie; Renault, Tristan; Travers, Marie-Agnès

    2015-10-01

    Massive mortality outbreaks in cultured bivalves have been reported worldwide and they have been associated with infection by a range of viral and bacterial pathogens. Due to their economic and social impact, these episodes constitute a particularly sensitive issue in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) production. Since 2008, mortality outbreaks affecting C. gigas have increased in terms of intensity and geographic distribution. Epidemiologic surveys have lead to the incrimination of pathogens, specifically OsHV-1 and bacteria of the Vibrio genus, in particular Vibrio aestuarianus. Pathogen diversity may partially account for the variability in the outcome of infections. Host factors (age, reproductive status...) including their genetic background that has an impact on host susceptibility toward infection, also play a role herein. Finally, environmental factors have significant effects on the pathogens themselves, on the host and on the host-pathogen interaction. Further knowledge on pathogen diversity, classification, and spread, may contribute toward a better understanding of this issue and potential ways to mitigate the impact of these outbreaks.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter species isolated from edible bivalve molluscs purchased from Bangkok markets, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Soonthornchaikul, Nantika; Garelick, Hemda

    2009-10-01

    Campylobacter species have been recognized as the most commonly reported cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The increase of resistance rates to drugs of choice used for treatment in campylobacteriosis is becoming a public health concern. In parallel, the increased use of antimicrobials in aquaculture may lead to the emergence of resistant microorganisms and is likely to cause additional health risk to humans through food consumption. The study assesses the presence of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter species isolated from three groups of bivalve molluscs (bloody cockles, green mussels, and oysters) purchased from markets in Bangkok. Thirty samples were collected from each group. Susceptibility to three antimicrobials was determined using the Epsilometer test. Rates of erythromycin, nalidixic acid, and ciprofloxacin resistance in Campylobacter isolates were 72-84%, 28-40%, and 21-25%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of each antimicrobial resistance between the three groups. This study demonstrates a significant level of antimicrobial resistance in the Campylobacter spp. isolated from molluscs with a particular high rate of resistance to erythromycin. Consumption of raw molluscs contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter spp. may therefore result in resistant infections in humans.

  3. Phylogeography of a pan-Atlantic abyssal protobranch bivalve: implications for evolution in the Deep Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Etter, Ron J; Boyle, Elizabeth E; Glazier, Amanda; Jennings, Robert M; Dutra, Ediane; Chase, Mike R

    2011-02-01

    The deep sea is a vast and essentially continuous environment with few obvious barriers to gene flow. How populations diverge and new species form in this remote ecosystem is poorly understood. Phylogeographical analyses have begun to provide some insight into evolutionary processes at bathyal depths (<3000 m), but much less is known about evolution in the more extensive abyssal regions (>3000 m). Here, we quantify geographical and bathymetric patterns of genetic variation (16S rRNA mitochondrial gene) in the protobranch bivalve Ledella ultima, which is one of the most abundant abyssal protobranchs in the Atlantic with a broad bathymetric and geographical distribution. We found virtually no genetic divergence within basins and only modest divergence among eight Atlantic basins. Levels of population divergence among basins were related to geographical distance and were greater in the South Atlantic than in the North Atlantic. Ocean-wide patterns of genetic variation indicate basin-wide divergence that exceeds what others have found for abyssal organisms, but considerably less than bathyal protobranchs across similar geographical scales. Populations on either side of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the North Atlantic differed, suggesting the Ridge might impede gene flow at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that abyssal populations might be quite large (cosmopolitan), exhibit only modest genetic structure and probably provide little potential for the formation of new species.

  4. Trace element accumulation in bivalve mussels Anodonta woodiana from Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Jian; Gan, Juli

    2010-11-01

    Data are presented for 13 trace metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, and Pb) in 38 bivalve mussels Anodonta woodiana from four separate sites (Huzhou, Dapu, Sansandao, and Manshan) around the Taihu Lake of China. All elemental concentrations generally ranked in decreasing order, Mn > Fe > Zn > As ≈ Cu ≈ Cd ≈ Se > Pb > Mo ≈ Ag, except that Cr, Co, and Ni were not detected. Anodonta woodiana was able to bioaccumulate essential Mn and toxic Cd to the extremely high level of 19,240 and 53 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. Geographical differences in the concentrations of trace elements were usually significant between sampling sites except for As and Pb, and the mussels from Sanshandao site had mostly accumulated or were contaminated with essential and toxic elements. The residue level of Cd in A. woodiana from the Sanshandao and Manshan sites appeared to be even higher than those of the essential elements Cu and Se, and exceeded the corresponding maximum residue limits of China. The present study provides the most recent information on trace element bioaccumulation or contamination in Taihu Lake and, further, suggests that A. woodiana can be used as a suitable bioindicator for inland water environmental monitoring.

  5. Intrinsic hierarchical structural imperfections in a natural ceramic of bivalve shell with distinctly graded properties

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Da; Liu, Zengqian; Zhang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Zhefeng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive investigation on the structure of natural biological materials, insufficient attention has been paid to the structural imperfections by which the mechanical properties of synthetic materials are dominated. In this study, the structure of bivalve Saxidomus purpuratus shell has been systematically characterized quantitatively on multiple length scales from millimeter to sub-nanometer. It is revealed that hierarchical imperfections are intrinsically involved in the crossed-lamellar structure of the shell despite its periodically packed platelets. In particular, various favorable characters which are always pursued in synthetic materials, e.g. nanotwins and low-angle misorientations, have been incorporated herein. The possible contributions of these imperfections to mechanical properties are further discussed. It is suggested that the imperfections may serve as structural adaptations, rather than detrimental defects in the real sense, to help improve the mechanical properties of natural biological materials. This study may aid in understanding the optimizing strategies of structure and properties designed by nature, and accordingly, provide inspiration for the design of synthetic materials. PMID:26198844

  6. Into the deep: a phylogenetic approach to the bivalve subclass Protobranchia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Zardus, John D; Boyle, Elizabeth E; González, Vanessa L; Jennings, Robert M; McIntyre, Erin; Wheeler, Ward C; Etter, Ron J; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2013-10-01

    A molecular phylogeny of Protobranchia, the subclass of bivalve mollusks sister to the remaining Bivalvia, has long proven elusive, because many constituent lineages are deep-sea endemics, which creates methodological challenges for collecting and preserving genetic material. We obtained 74 representatives of all 12 extant protobranch families and investigated the internal phylogeny of this group using sequence data from five molecular loci (16S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, and histone H3). Model-based and dynamic homology parsimony approaches to phylogenetic reconstruction unanimously supported four major clades of Protobranchia, irrespective of treatment of hypervariable regions in the nuclear ribosomal genes 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA. These four clades correspond to the superfamilies Nuculoidea (excluding Sareptidae), Nuculanoidea (including Sareptidae), Solemyoidea, and Manzanelloidea. Salient aspects of the phylogeny include (1) support for the placement of the family Sareptidae with Nuculanoidea; (2) the non-monophyly of the order Solemyida (Solemyidae+Nucinellidae); (3) and the non-monophyly of most nuculoid and nuculanoid genera and families. In light of this first family-level phylogeny of Protobranchia, we present a revised classification of the group. Estimation of divergence times in concert with analyses of diversification rates demonstrate the signature of the end-Permian mass extinction in the phylogeny of extant protobranchs.

  7. Draft Genome of the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata: A Platform for Understanding Bivalve Biology

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Takeshi; Kawashima, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Gyoja, Fuki; Tanaka, Makiko; Ikuta, Tetsuro; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Fujiwara, Mayuki; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Fujie, Manabu; Usami, Takeshi; Nagai, Kiyohito; Maeyama, Kaoru; Okamoto, Kikuhiko; Aoki, Hideo; Ishikawa, Takashi; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atushi; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Endo, Hirotoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo; Satoh, Nori

    2012-01-01

    The study of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata is key to increasing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in pearl biosynthesis and biology of bivalve molluscs. We sequenced ∼1150-Mb genome at ∼40-fold coverage using the Roche 454 GS-FLX and Illumina GAIIx sequencers. The sequences were assembled into contigs with N50 = 1.6 kb (total contig assembly reached to 1024 Mb) and scaffolds with N50 = 14.5 kb. The pearl oyster genome is AT-rich, with a GC content of 34%. DNA transposons, retrotransposons, and tandem repeat elements occupied 0.4, 1.5, and 7.9% of the genome, respectively (a total of 9.8%). Version 1.0 of the P. fucata draft genome contains 23 257 complete gene models, 70% of which are supported by the corresponding expressed sequence tags. The genes include those reported to have an association with bio-mineralization. Genes encoding transcription factors and signal transduction molecules are present in numbers comparable with genomes of other metazoans. Genome-wide molecular phylogeny suggests that the lophotrochozoan represents a distinct clade from ecdysozoans. Our draft genome of the pearl oyster thus provides a platform for the identification of selection markers and genes for calcification, knowledge of which will be important in the pearl industry. PMID:22315334

  8. The bivalve Anopaea (Inoceramidae) from the Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Crame, J. Alistair; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Seija

    2015-07-01

    In Mexico, the Upper Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous La Casita and coeval La Caja and La Pimienta formations are well-known for their abundant and well-preserved marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The latter include conspicuous inoceramid bivalves of the genus Anopaea not formally described previously from Mexico. Anopaea bassei (Lecolle de Cantú, 1967), Anopaea cf. stoliczkai (Holdhaus, 1913), Anopaea cf. callistoensis Crame and Kelly, 1995 and Anopaea sp. are rare constituents in distinctive Tithonian-lower Berriasian levels of the La Caja Formation and one Tithonian horizon of the La Pimienta Formation. Anopaea bassei was previously documented from the Tithonian of central Mexico and Cuba, while most other members of Anopaea described here are only known from southern high latitudes. The Mexican assemblage also includes taxa which closely resemble Anopaea stoliczkai from the Tithonian of India, Indonesia and the Antarctic Peninsula, and Anopaea callistoensis from the late Tithonian to ?early Berriasian of the Antarctic Peninsula. Our new data expand the palaeogeographical distribution of the high latitude Anopaea to the Gulf of Mexico region and substantiate faunal exchange, in the Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, between Mexico and the Antarctic Realm.

  9. An evaluation of the relative sensitivity of two marine bivalve mollusc species using the Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Victoria V; Depledge, Michael H; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to (a) evaluate the potential for the 'Comet assay' to be used as a method for detecting genetic damage in the common cockle Cerastoderma edule; and (b) to compare the relative sensitivity with Mytilus edulis as the bivalve widely used as a sentinel species in biomonitoring studies. In vitro validation studies were carried out on haemocytes from each species using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a known oxidant and the induced DNA damage was measured using the Comet assay. On exposure to 0, 100, 500 and 1000 microM H2O2, a significant concentration-dependent increase was observed in both species. Use of an additional concentration of 5000 microM H2O2 showed that while DNA damage could be assessed in M. edulis at this concentration, only a few cells from C. edule were amenable to measurements owing to extensive DNA damage ("hedgehog cells"). The evidence also suggested that the cells from C. edule are more sensitive to oxidative damage induced by H2O2 when compared with M. edulis. Bearing in mind that sediments are the ultimate sink for many contaminants, this study demonstrates the potential application of sediment-dwelling C. edule as a useful biomonitoring species.

  10. Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Cordeiro, Ana; Diniz, Mário S; Costa, Pedro M; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-11-01

    Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50≈400mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated.

  11. The Shell of the Invasive Bivalve Species Dreissena polymorpha: Biochemical, Elemental and Textural Investigations.

    PubMed

    Immel, Françoise; Broussard, Cédric; Catherinet, Bastien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bundeleva, Irina; Marin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a well-established invasive model organism. Although extensively used in environmental sciences, virtually nothing is known of the molecular process of its shell calcification. By describing the microstructure, geochemistry and biochemistry/proteomics of the shell, the present study aims at promoting this species as a model organism in biomineralization studies, in order to establish a bridge with ecotoxicology, while sketching evolutionary conclusions. The shell of D. polymorpha exhibits the classical crossed-lamellar/complex crossed lamellar combination found in several heterodont bivalves, in addition to an external thin layer, the characteristics of which differ from what was described in earlier publication. We show that the shell selectively concentrates some heavy metals, in particular uranium, which predisposes D. polymorpha to local bioremediation of this pollutant. We establish the biochemical signature of the shell matrix, demonstrating that it interacts with the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate and inhibits calcium carbonate crystal formation, but these two properties are not strongly expressed. This matrix, although overall weakly glycosylated, contains a set of putatively calcium-binding proteins and a set of acidic sulphated proteins. 2D-gels reveal more than fifty proteins, twenty of which we identify by MS-MS analysis. We tentatively link the shell protein profile of D. polymorpha and the peculiar recent evolution of this invasive species of Ponto-Caspian origin, which has spread all across Europe in the last three centuries.

  12. The Shell of the Invasive Bivalve Species Dreissena polymorpha: Biochemical, Elemental and Textural Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Cédric; Catherinet, Bastien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bundeleva, Irina; Marin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a well-established invasive model organism. Although extensively used in environmental sciences, virtually nothing is known of the molecular process of its shell calcification. By describing the microstructure, geochemistry and biochemistry/proteomics of the shell, the present study aims at promoting this species as a model organism in biomineralization studies, in order to establish a bridge with ecotoxicology, while sketching evolutionary conclusions. The shell of D. polymorpha exhibits the classical crossed-lamellar/complex crossed lamellar combination found in several heterodont bivalves, in addition to an external thin layer, the characteristics of which differ from what was described in earlier publication. We show that the shell selectively concentrates some heavy metals, in particular uranium, which predisposes D. polymorpha to local bioremediation of this pollutant. We establish the biochemical signature of the shell matrix, demonstrating that it interacts with the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate and inhibits calcium carbonate crystal formation, but these two properties are not strongly expressed. This matrix, although overall weakly glycosylated, contains a set of putatively calcium-binding proteins and a set of acidic sulphated proteins. 2D-gels reveal more than fifty proteins, twenty of which we identify by MS-MS analysis. We tentatively link the shell protein profile of D. polymorpha and the peculiar recent evolution of this invasive species of Ponto-Caspian origin, which has spread all across Europe in the last three centuries. PMID:27213644

  13. The unusual mineral vaterite in shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea from the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Nicole; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Aldridge, David C.

    2010-08-01

    Asian clams ( Corbicula fluminea) with abnormally thickened shell valves were found in four rivers in the UK (Rivers Yare, Waveney, Thames and New Bedford River). The material making up these malformations was the rare calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite. Vaterite is seldom found in the natural environment because it is less stable than the other calcium carbonate polymorphs (aragonite and calcite). In the few reported cases of vaterite formation in molluscs, it is usually related to unusual biomineralisation events such as shell regeneration, pearls and initial stages of shell formation. We compared two populations from the Rivers Yare and Waveney in the Norfolk Broads, UK, one (River Waveney) displaying dominantly the normal Corbicula shell form with aragonitic shells. In the River Yare population, all individuals sampled had shell deformations to different extents. These deformations were apparent as bulges on the inside of the ventral shell margin. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the shell material in the bulges of recently collected clams was vaterite. Other parts of the deformed shells were aragonitic. The shell deformations alter the shell morphology, leading to higher and wider shells. The shell microstructure is fibrous in the vateritic parts and crossed-lamellar in the aragonitic parts of deformed or non-deformed shells. The cause for the malformations is probably a disrupted biomineralisation process in the bivalves. Fossil Corbicula specimens from the late Pleistocene had similar deformations, suggesting that this is not a response to anthropogenic causes, such as pollution.

  14. Mobile Element Evolution Playing Jigsaw—SINEs in Gastropod and Bivalve Mollusks

    PubMed Central

    Matetovici, Irina; Sajgo, Szilard; Ianc, Bianca; Ochis, Cornelia; Bulzu, Paul; Popescu, Octavian; Damert, Annette

    2016-01-01

    SINEs (Short INterspersed Elements) are widely distributed among eukaryotes. Some SINE families are organized in superfamilies characterized by a shared central domain. These central domains are conserved across species, classes, and even phyla. Here we report the identification of two novel such superfamilies in the genomes of gastropod and bivalve mollusks. The central conserved domain of the first superfamily is present in SINEs in Caenogastropoda and Vetigastropoda as well as in all four subclasses of Bivalvia. We designated the domain MESC (Romanian for MElc—snail and SCoica—mussel) because it appears to be restricted to snails and mussels. The second superfamily is restricted to Caenogastropoda. Its central conserved domain—Snail—is related to the Nin-DC domain. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a 40-bp subdomain of the SINE V-domain is conserved in SINEs in mollusks and arthropods. It is predicted to form a stable stem-loop structure that is preserved in the context of the overall SINE RNA secondary structure in invertebrates. Our analysis also recovered short retrotransposons with a Long INterspersed Element (LINE)-derived 5′ end. These share the body and/or the tail with transfer RNA (tRNA)-derived SINEs within and across species. Finally, we identified CORE SINEs in gastropods and bivalves—extending the distribution range of this superfamily. PMID:26739168

  15. Differences in tolerance to anthropogenic stress between invasive and native bivalves.

    PubMed

    Bielen, Ana; Bošnjak, Ivana; Sepčić, Kristina; Jaklič, Martina; Cvitanić, Marija; Lušić, Jelena; Lajtner, Jasna; Simčič, Tatjana; Hudina, Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Tolerance towards environmental stress has been frequently considered as one of the key determinants of invasion success. However, empirical evidence supporting the assumption that invasive species can better endure unfavorable conditions compared with native species is limited and has yielded opposing results. In this study, we examined the tolerance to different stress conditions (thermal stress and trace metal zinc pollution stress) in two phylogenetically related and functionally similar freshwater bivalve species, the native Anodonta anatina and the invasive Sinanodonta woodiana. We assessed potential differences in response to stress conditions using several cellular response assays: efficiency of the multixenobiotic resistance mechanism, respiration estimate (INT reduction capacity), and enzymatic biomarkers. Our results demonstrated that the invasive species overall coped much better with unfavorable conditions. The higher tolerance of S. woodiana was evident from (i) significantly decreased Rhodamine B accumulation indicating more efficient multixenobiotic resistance mechanism; (ii) significantly higher INT reduction capacity and (iii) less pronounced alterations in the activity of stress-related enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase, catalase) and of a neurotoxicity biomarker (cholinesterase) in the majority of treatment conditions in both stress trials. Higher tolerance to thermal extremes may provide physiological benefit for further invasion success of S. woodiana in European freshwaters, especially in the context of climate change.

  16. Cytomorphology and PCNA expression pattern in bivalves Mytilus galloprovincialis and Cerastoderma edule with haemic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carella, Francesca; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; De Vico, Gionata

    2013-07-09

    Haemic neoplasia (HN) is a pathologic condition reported in several bivalve species in different geographic areas. In this study we describe the cytomorphological features and the proliferative behaviour, assessed by the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), of HN in common cockle Cerastoderma edule and Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovicialis. In mussels the presence of at least 5 types of atypical haemocytes was detected, including A- and B-type cells, previously described in M. edulis and Mytilus sp., with predominance of A-type cells in early phases of the disease and B-type cells in more advanced stages. PCNA immunostaining was positive for 97 to 100% of the neoplastic cells, with both cytoplasmic (A cells) and nuclear patterns (B cells). Conversely, in C. edule there was no distinctive morphological cell sub-population, and staining atypical haemocytes with PCNA (range 93 to 100%) showed nuclear expression in early phases of disease and cytoplasmic expression in more advanced stages. The above findings suggest distinct histo-pathogenetic pathways for HN in mussels and common cockles.

  17. Calcification rate influence on trace element concentrations in aragonitic bivalve shells: Evidences and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, Matthieu; Bentaleb, Ilhem; Bruguier, Olivier; Ordinola, Elmer; Barrett, Nicholas T.; Fontugne, Michel

    2006-10-01

    Trace elements in calcareous organisms have been widely used for paleoclimatic studies. However, the factors controlling their incorporation into mollusc shells are still unclear. We studied here the Sr, Mg, Ba and Mn serial records in the shells of two aragonitic marine bivalve species: Mesodesma donacium and Chione subrugosa from the Peruvian Coast. The elemental concentrations were compared to local temperature and salinity records. The relationships with crystal growth rate G were investigated thanks to well defined periodic growth structures providing a precise shell chronology. Our results show that for both species, environmental parameters only have minor influence, whereas crystal growth rate strongly influences trace elements concentrations, especially for Sr (explaining up to 74% of the variance). The relationship between G and Sr/Ca exhibits variability among the shells as well as inside the shells. For a same growth rate value, Sr/Ca values are higher in more curved shell sections, and the growth rate influence is stronger as well. We show that intercellular and Ca 2+-pump pathways cannot support the calcification Ca 2+ flux, leading us to propose an alternative mechanism for ionic transport through the calcifying mantle, implying a major role for calcium channels on mantle epithelial cell membranes. In this new calcification model, Sr/Ca shell ratios is determined by Ca 2+-channel selectivity against Sr 2+, which depends (i) on the electrochemical potential imposed by the crystallisation process and (ii) on the Ca 2+-channel density per surface unit on mantle epithelia.

  18. The packaging problem: bivalve prey selection and prey entry techniques of the octopus Enteroctopus dofleini.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Roland C; Mather, Jennifer A

    2007-08-01

    Many predators face a complex step of prey preparation before consumption. Octopuses faced with bivalve prey use several techniques to penetrate the shells to gain access to the meat inside. When given prey of mussels Mytilus trossulus, Manila clams Venerupis philippinarum, and littleneck clams Protothaca staminea, Enteroctopus dofleini solved the problem differently. They pulled apart V. philippinarum and M. trossulus, which had the thinnest shells and the least pulling resistance. P. staminea were eaten after the shells had been chipped or had been penetrated by drilling, presumably to inject a toxin. Likely because of these differences, octopuses consumed more V. philippinarum and M. trossulus than P. staminea when the mollusks were given to them either 1 species at a time or all together. However, when the shells were separated and the penetration problem removed, the octopuses predominantly chose P. staminea and nearly ignored M. trossulus. When V. philippinarum were wired shut, octopuses switched techniques. These results emphasize that octopuses can learn on the basis of nonvisual information and monitor their body position to carry out feeding actions.

  19. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Angelo; Chiaravalle, Eugenio; Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante; Mangiacotti, Michele; Marchesani, Giuliana; Plescia, Elena

    2011-12-01

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy.We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO2-, CO33-, SO2- and SO3- radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters.

  20. Marine bivalve geochemistry and shell ultrastructure from modern low pH environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, S.; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R.; Griesshaber, E.; Schmahl, W. W.; Buhl, D.; Hall-Spencer, J. M.; Baggini, C.; Fehr, K. T.; Immenhauser, A.

    2011-10-01

    Bivalve shells can provide excellent archives of past environmental change but have not been used to interpret ocean acidification events. We investigated carbon, oxygen and trace element records from different shell layers in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (from the Mediterranean) and M. edulis (from the Wadden Sea) combined with detailed investigations of the shell ultrastructure. Mussels from the harbour of Ischia (Mediterranean, Italy) were transplanted and grown in water with mean pHT 7.3 and mean pHT 8.1 near CO2 vents on the east coast of the island of Ischia. The shells of transplanted mussels were compared with M. edulis collected at pH ~8.2 from Sylt (German Wadden Sea). Most prominently, the shells recorded the shock of transplantation, both in their shell ultrastructure, textural and geochemical record. Shell calcite, precipitated subsequently under acidified seawater responded to the pH gradient by an in part disturbed ultrastructure. Geochemical data from all test sites show a strong metabolic effect that exceeds the influence of the low-pH environment. These field experiments showed that care is needed when interpreting potential ocean acidification signals because various parameters affect shell chemistry and ultrastructure. Besides metabolic processes, seawater pH, factors such as salinity, water temperature, food availability and population density all affect the biogenic carbonate shell archive.

  1. Influence of acid-soluble proteins from bivalve Siliqua radiata ligaments on calcium carbonate crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zeng-Qiong; Zhang, Gang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    In vitro biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of shell proteins is a heavily researched topic in biomineralization. However, little is known regarding the function of bivalve ligament proteins in the growth of CaCO3 crystals. In this study, using fibrous protein K58 from Siliqua radiata ligaments or coverslips as substrates, we report the results of our study of CaCO3 precipitation in the presence or absence of acid-soluble proteins (ASP) from inner ligament layers. ASP can disturb the controlling function of K58 or a coverslip on the crystalline phase, resulting in the formation of aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In addition, we identified the following four primary components from ASP by mass spectroscopy: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ABC transporter, keratin type II cytoskeletal 1 (KRT 1), and phosphate ABC transporter, phosphate-binding protein (PstS). Further analysis revealed that the first three proteins and especially ALP, which is important in bone mineralisation, could affect the polymorphism and morphology of CaCO3 crystals by trapping calcium ions in their domains. Our results indicate that ALP may play an important role in the formation of aragonite in S. radiata ligaments. This paper may facilitate our understanding of the biomineralization process.

  2. Structure and classification of haemocytes in the bivalve mollusc Meretrix meretrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Ren, Sulian; Wang, Dexiu; Song, Weibo

    2006-04-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out in order to characterize haemocytes in the bivalve molluse Meretrix meretrix. According to nucleus and cytoplasm characters, four types of haemocytes were recognized: agranular haemocytes, lymphoid haemocyte, large granular and small granular haemocytes. Agranular hamocyte is the main cell type, accounting for 75%. It is agranular with rich organelles in cytoplasm, including mitochondria, golgi body and endoplasmic reticulum. Glycogen deposits were usually found in this cell type. The number of lymphoid haemocyte accounts for 1% 2%. This cell type is agranular and shows a high ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm. A few organelles were found. High electrondense granules with diameters of 0.2 0.5 μm and rich organelles were found in small granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 15%. Rich granules of high electron-dense with diameters of 0.8 2.4 μm were found in large granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 10%, and the quantity of organelles is the least.

  3. Structure and classification of haemocytes in the bivalve mollusc Meretrix meretrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanyan, Zhang; Sulian, Ren; Dexiu, Wang; Weibo, Song

    2006-04-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out in order to characterize haemocytes in the bivalve molluse Meretrix meretrix. According to nucleus and cytoplasm characters, four types of haemocytes were recognized: agranular haemocytes, lymphoid haemocyte, large granular and small granular haemocytes. Agranular hamocyte is the main cell type, accounting for 75%. It is agranular with rich organelles in cytoplasm, including mitochondria, golgi body and endoplasmic reticulum. Glycogen deposits were usually found in this cell type. The number of lymphoid haemocyte accounts for 1%-2%. This cell type is agranular and shows a high ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm. A few organelles were found. High electrondense granules with diameters of 0.2-0.5 μm and rich organelles were found in small granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 15%. Rich granules of high electron-dense with diameters of 0.8-2.4 μm were found in large granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 10%, and the quantity of organelles is the least.

  4. Iceberg Scour and Shell Damage in the Antarctic Bivalve Laternula elliptica

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Elizabeth M.; Clark, Melody S.; Hoffman, Joseph I.; Philipp, Eva E. R.; Peck, Lloyd S.; Morley, Simon A.

    2012-01-01

    We document differences in shell damage and shell thickness in a bivalve mollusc (Laternula elliptica) from seven sites around Antarctica with differing exposures to ice movement. These range from 60% of the sea bed impacted by ice per year (Hangar Cove, Antarctic Peninsula) to those protected by virtually permanent sea ice cover (McMurdo Sound). Patterns of shell damage consistent with blunt force trauma were observed in populations where ice scour frequently occurs; damage repair frequencies and the thickness of shells correlated positively with the frequency of iceberg scour at the different sites with the highest repair rates and thicker shells at Hangar Cove (74.2% of animals damaged) compared to the other less impacted sites (less than 10% at McMurdo Sound). Genetic analysis of population structure using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs) revealed no genetic differences between the two sites showing the greatest difference in shell morphology and repair rates. Taken together, our results suggest that L. elliptica exhibits considerable phenotypic plasticity in response to geographic variation in physical disturbance. PMID:23029484

  5. Mercury in the bivalves Anadara (Senilia) senilis, Perna perna and Crassostrea tulipa from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Otchere, Fred A; Joiris, Claude R; Holsbeek, Ludo

    2003-03-20

    Three bivalves: Anadara (Senilia) senilis (n=220), Crassostrea tulipa (n=260) from two 'open' lagoons (Benya and Ningo) and a 'closed' lagoon (Sakumo), and Perna perna (n=170) from rocky shores adjacent to Benya and Sakumo, were analyzed for their total and organic Hg concentrations and total body burden. Median concentrations for cockles were 0.20 micro/gdw for the wet season and 0.36 microg/gdw for the dry season. Total mercury concentration for both mussels and oysters ranged from 0.04 to 0.84 microg/gdw. Seasonal variations and age effect were detected in all the species but no significant spatial variation was found along the coast. Organic (methyl) mercury concentration ranged from 0.03 to 0.55 microg/gdw was stable without age effect. The median relative organic mercury varied between 30 and 80% depending on the season, location, species and the type of lagoon. The lower concentrations in the wet season were due to primary production and dilution effect. Log-transformed regression relationships between body burden and size were used to compare the species.

  6. Aspartic acid racemization dating of Holocene brachiopods and bivalves from the southern Brazilian shelf, South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour Wood, Susan L.; Krause, Richard A.; Kowalewski, Michał; Wehmiller, John; Simões, Marcello G.

    2006-09-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid (Asp) has been used to estimate the ages of 9 shells of the epifaunal calcitic brachiopod Bouchardia rosea and 9 shells of the infaunal aragonitic bivalve Semele casali. Both taxa were collected concurrently from the same sites at depths of 10 m and 30 m off the coast of Brazil. Asp D/L values show an excellent correlation with radiocarbon age at both sites and for both taxa ( r2Site 9 B. rosea = 0.97, r2Site 1 B. rosea = 0.997, r2Site 9 S. casali = 0.9998, r2Site 1 S. casali = 0.93). The Asp ratios plotted against reservoir-corrected AMS radiocarbon ages over the time span of multiple millennia can thus be used to develop reliable and precise geochronologies not only for aragonitic mollusks (widely used for dating previously), but also for calcitic brachiopods. At each collection site, Bouchardia specimens display consistently higher D/L values than specimens of Semele. Thermal differences between sites are also notable and in agreement with theoretical expectations, as extents of racemization for both taxa are greater at the warmer, shallower site than at the cooler, deeper one. In late Holocene marine settings, concurrent time series of aragonitic and calcitic shells can be assembled using Asp racemization dating, and parallel multi-centennial to multi-millennial records can be developed simultaneously for multiple biomineral systems.

  7. Zachsia zenkewitschi (Teredinidae), a Rare and Unusual Seagrass Boring Bivalve Revisited and Redescribed

    PubMed Central

    Shipway, J. R.; O’Connor, R.; Stein, D.; Cragg, S. M.; Korshunova, T.; Martynov, A.; Haga, T.; Distel, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The sea-grass borer Zachsia zenkewitschi belongs to a group of economically and ecologically important bivalves, commonly referred to as shipworms. The sole recognized representative of the genus Zachsia, this species displays an unusual life history and reproductive strategy that is now understood to include: environmental sex determination of free swimming larvae, extreme sexual and size dimorphism between males and females, internal fertilization, maintenance of often large harems of male dwarfs within a specialized cavity of the female mantle, and complex maternal care of larvae in specialized brood pouches within the gill. It is also the only shipworm species known to burrow in sea grass rhizomes rather than terrestrial wood. Although Z. zenkewitschi is rare and little studied, understanding of its biology and anatomy has evolved substantially, rendering some aspects of its original description inaccurate. Moreover, no existing type specimens are known for this species. In light of these facts, we designate a neotype from among specimens recently collected at the type location, and undertake a re-description of this species, accounting for recent reinterpretation of its life history and functional anatomy. PMID:27171209

  8. Habitat creation and biodiversity maintenance in mangrove forests: teredinid bivalves as ecosystem engineers.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Ian W; Michie, Laura; Taylor, Ben W

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of dead wood in the intertidal zone of mature mangrove forests are tunnelled by teredinid bivalves. When the tunnels are exposed, animals are able to use tunnels as refuges. In this study, the effect of teredinid tunnelling upon mangrove forest faunal diversity was investigated. Mangrove forests exposed to long emersion times had fewer teredinid tunnels in wood and wood not containing teredinid tunnels had very few species and abundance of animals. However, with a greater cross-sectional percentage surface area of teredinid tunnels, the numbers of species and abundance of animals was significantly higher. Temperatures within teredinid-attacked wood were significantly cooler compared with air temperatures, and animal abundance was greater in wood with cooler temperatures. Animals inside the tunnels within the wood may avoid desiccation by escaping the higher temperatures. Animals co-existing in teredinid tunnelled wood ranged from animals found in terrestrial ecosystems including centipedes, crickets and spiders, and animals found in subtidal marine ecosystems such as fish, octopods and polychaetes. There was also evidence of breeding within teredinid-attacked wood, as many juvenile individuals were found, and they may also benefit from the cooler wood temperatures. Teredinid tunnelled wood is a key low-tide refuge for cryptic animals, which would otherwise be exposed to fishes and birds, and higher external temperatures. This study provides evidence that teredinids are ecosystem engineers and also provides an example of a mechanism whereby mangrove forests support intertidal biodiversity and nurseries through the wood-boring activity of teredinids.

  9. Vertical transmission of chemoautotrophic symbionts in the bivalve Solemya velum (Bivalvia: Protobranchia).

    PubMed

    Krueger, D M; Gustafson, R G; Cavanaugh, C M

    1996-04-01

    Adults of the bivalve species Solemya velum live in symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria in specialized gill bacteriocytes. The bacteria play an essential nutritional role in the mature association, fixing CO2 via the Calvin cycle with energy obtained through the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. To understand how the continuity of this partnership is maintained between host generations, we investigated the mode of symbiont transfer in S. velum. A diagnostic assay using the polymerase chain reaction and primers specific for the S. velum symbiont ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) gene consistently detected bacterial sequence in female gonad tissue, suggesting the presence of symbiont cells in host ovaries and a vertical mode of symbiont transmission from mother to offspring. Furthermore, intracellular bacteria were present in the developing gills of juveniles that had not yet hatched from the gelatinous capsule in which larval development occurs (11 days after fertilization). By 64 days postfertilization, the typical adult gill ultrastructure of alternating bacteriocytes and symbiont-free-intercalary cells was apparent. Knowledge about the mode of symbiont transfer in S. velum allows further study into the dynamics of host-symbiont interactions in chemoautotrophic associations.

  10. Effects of deposit-feeding tubificid worms and filter-feeding bivalves on benthic-pelagic coupling: implications for the restoration of eutrophic shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Liu, Zhengwen; Jeppesen, Erik; Taylor, William D

    2014-03-01

    Benthic-pelagic coupling is a key factor in the dynamics of shallow lakes. A 12-week mesocosm experiment tested the hypothesis that deposit-feeding tubificid worms stimulate the growth of pelagic algae while filter-feeding bivalves promote the growth of benthic algae, using the deposit-feeding tubificid Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and the filter-feeding bivalve Anodonta woodiana. A tube-microcosm experiment using a (32)P radiotracer tested for differential effects of tubificids and bivalves on the release of sediment phosphorus (P). In this experiment A. woodiana was replaced by Corbicula fluminea, a smaller bivalve from the same functional group whose size was more appropriate to the experimental tubes needed for the tracer study. The first experiment recorded greater nutrient concentrations in the overlying water, higher biomass of pelagic algae as measured by chlorophyll a (Chl a), lower light intensity at the sediment and lower biomass of benthic algae in the worm treatments than in the controls, while nutrients and Chl a of pelagic algae were lower and the light intensity and Chl a of benthic algae were higher in the bivalve treatments than in the controls. In the second experiment, (32)P activity in the overlying water was higher in both treatments than in the controls, but highest in the worm treatment indicating that both animals accelerated P release from the sediment, with the biggest effect associated with the presence of worms. Our study demonstrates that worms promote pelagic algal growth by enhancing the release of sediment nutrients, while bivalves, likely through their grazing on pelagic algae increasing available light levels, stimulate benthic algal growth despite enhanced P release from the sediment and thus aid the establishment of clear water states. The rehabilitation of native bivalve populations may therefore enhance the recovery of eutrophic shallow lakes.

  11. Congener-specific distribution and bioaccumulation of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in sediments and bivalves of the Bohai Sea, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xindong; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Haijun; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Ziwei; Chen, Jiping; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-02-15

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a new type of persistent organic pollutants that are of great environmental concern because of their wide distribution. In this study, surface sediments and bivalve samples were collected from the coastal area of the Bohai Sea in China. Total SCCP (ΣSCCP) concentrations in surface sediments and bivalves ranged from 97.4 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) to 1756.7 ng g(-1) dw and 476.4-3269.5 ng g(-1) dw, respectively. C10-CPs and C11-CPs were the predominant homologue groups in all sediments and bivalves. Specific congener composition analysis and correspondence analysis indicated that the local SCCP source mainly came from CP-42 and CP-52 products, and riverine input had an important function. The biota-sediment accumulation factors of ΣSCCPs for bivalves ranged from 1.08 to 1.61, and a significant correlation indicated that the SCCP congener with higher chlorination degree was more likely to be accumulated in bivalves.

  12. Accumulation profile and seasonal variations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in bivalves Crassostrea tulipa (oysters) and Anadara senilis (mussels) at three different aquatic habitats in two seasons in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dodoo, D K; Essumang, D K; Jonathan, J W A

    2013-02-01

    Research has shown that some polychlorinated biphenyl congeners degrade slowly in the environment and build up in the food chain, causing a wide range of possible adverse effects to humans. In order to ascertain the nature of the situation in Ghana, polychlorinated biphenyls congener residues in Crassostrea tulipa (oysters) and Anadara senilis (mussels) at Narkwa, Ada and Anyanui in the coastal region of Ghana were determined. At Narkwa, both bivalves' species were collected; at Ada only Anadara senilis were collected while at Anyanui, only Crassotrea tulipa were collected. The number of each bivalve species collected from each site was 80 (n=80), making up a total of 320 for the dry and the wet seasons. The PCBs were extracted with (1:1) hexane-acetone mixture and analyzed with a gas chromatogram equipped with (65)Ni electron capture detector, model CP 3800 using the mixed PCBs standard of the ICES 7. Total PCBs in the bivalves ranged from 5.55 to 6.37 μg/kg wet weight in mussels and 2.95-11.41 μg/kg wet weight in oysters, respectively. The composition of the PCB homologues in the bivalves was dominated by tri-, hepta- and hexa-PCBs in descending order. Risk assessments conducted on the samples indicated that edible bivalves from Narkwa, Ada and Anyanui in Ghana might pose some health risk to the consumers.

  13. Species composition, richness, and distribution of marine bivalve molluscs in Bahía de Mazatlán, México

    PubMed Central

    Esqueda-González, María del Carmen; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moises; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabian Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe the composition and distribution of bivalve molluscs from the sandy and rocky intertidal and the shallow subtidal environments of Bahía de Mazatlán, México. The bivalve fauna of the bay is represented by 89 living species in 28 families, including 37 new records and four range extensions: Lithophaga hastasia, Adula soleniformis, Mactrellona subalata, and Strigilla ervilia. The number of species increases from the upper (44) and lower intertidal (53) to the shallow subtidal (76), but only 11 (17%) have a wide distribution in the bay (i.e., found in all sampling sites and environments). The bivalve assemblages are composed of four main life forms: 27 epifaunal species, 26 infaunal, 16 semi-infaunal, and 20 endolithic. A taxonomic distinctness analysis identified the sampling sites and environments that contribute the most to the taxonomic diversity (species to suborder categories) of the bay. The present work increased significantly (31%) to 132 species previous inventories of bivalves of Bahía de Mazatlán. These species represent 34% of the bivalve diversity of the southern Golfo de California and approximately 15% of the Eastern Tropical Pacific region. PMID:24843252

  14. Bioavailability of particle-associated Se to the bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlekat, C.E.; Dowdle, P.R.; Lee, B.-G.; Luoma, S.N.; Oremland, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Elemental selenium, Se(0), is a prevalent chemical form in sediments, but little is known about its bioavailability. We evaluated the bioavailability of two forms of Se(0) by generating radioisotopic 75Se(0) through bacterial dissimilatory reduction of 75SeO32- by pure bacterial cultures (SES) and by an anaerobic sediment microbial consortium (SED). A third form was generated by reducing 75SeO32- with ascorbic acid (AA). Speciation determinations showed that AA and SES were >90% Se(0), but SED showed a mixture of Se(0), selenoanions, and a residual fraction. Pulse-chase techniques were used to measure assimilation efficiencies (AE) of these particulate Se forms by the bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis. Mean AE values were 3 ?? 2% for AA, 7 ?? 1% for SES, and 28 ?? 15% for SED, showing that the bioavailability of reduced, particle-associated Se is dependent upon its origin. To determine if oxidative microbial processes increased Se transfer, SES 75Se(0) was incubated with an aerobic sediment microbial consortium. After 113 d of incubation, 36% of SES Se(0) was oxidized to SeO32-. Assimilation of total particulate Se was unaffected however (mean AE = 5.5%). The mean AE from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was 58 ?? 8%, verifying the importance of Se associated with biogenic particles. Speciation and AE results from SED suggest that selenoanion reduction in wetlands and estuaries produces biologically available reduced selenium.Elemental selenium, Se(0), is a prevalent chemical form in sediments, but little is known about its bioavailability. We evaluated the bioavailability of two forms of Se(0) by generating radioisotopic 75Se(0) through bacterial dissimilatory reduction of 75SeO32- by pure bacterial cultures (SES) and by an anaerobic sediment microbial consortium (SED). A third form was generated by reducing 75SeO32 with ascorbic acid (AA). Speciation determinations showed that AA and SES were > 90% Se(0), but SED showed a mixture of Se(0), selenoanions, and a

  15. Mg isotopes in biocarbonates: new insight into vital effects associated to echinoderms and bivalves calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, F.; Hermans, J.; Borremans, C.; Dubois, P.; Poulain, C.; Paulet, Y.; Andre, L.

    2007-12-01

    Mg isotopes can be helpful tracers to reveal the fundamental pathways of Mg incorporation during biomineralisation. We report in this study a detailed characterisation of the Mg isotopic signatures of different biominerals: high magnesium calcitic skeletons of selected echinoderms (sea urchins and starfish) and low magnesium aragonitic shells of a bivalve species (clam). State of the art analytical procedures were applied including sample purification step followed by high precision measurements using MC-ICP-MS (Nu instrument) in dry plasma conditions. 26Mg/24Mg and 25Mg/24Mg are expressed as per mil deviations from the DSM3 (Dead Sea Metal 3) reference standard in delta notation (d26Mg and d25Mg). For echinoderms, we considered: (a) adult specimens of six starfish species (Asteria r., Marthasterias g., Anseropoda p., Asterina g., Echinaster s. and Henricia o.), sampled in Brittany (France); (b) a sea urchin species (Paracentrotus lividus) with field samples (Mediterranean Sea, Marseille, France) and culture specimen under T and S controlled conditions. In vivo endoskeletons display negative, but different d26Mg values of -3.06 for starfish (with uniform interspecies signatures) and -2.65 for sea urchin. Relative to seawater signature (-0.82), all echinoderms favour the incorporation of light isotopes during biocalcification. The d26Mg depletion is lower than theoretically expected from a inorganic calcite precipitation from seawater (at -3.5). These differences suggest that on its route from seawater to the shell, Mg isotopes are partly biologically fractionationated through "vital effects" leaving heavier Mg isotopic signatures. Taken into account that calcification in echinoderms is an intra- cellular process involving transient amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase, the observed bio-fractionation factors can be related to: (1) changes in the isotopic composition of the precipitating intracellular fluids due to active pumping in and out of the cell; (2) a

  16. The effect of immersion time on burying depth of the bivalve Macoma balthica (Tellinidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Goeij, Petra; Honkoop, Pieter J. C.

    2002-03-01

    As a characteristic buried tellinid bivalve, Macoma balthica has a long inhalent siphon that enables it to feed in two different ways: deposit and suspension feeding. To deposit feed efficiently on benthic microalgae, Macoma has to live close to the sediment surface, where it can graze an extensive surface area, but is within reach of many predators. Individuals that are more safely buried at a greater depth can only suspension feed, or deposit feed from a small surface area. We expected local differences in burying depth on intertidal mudflats to be caused by differences in immersion time (i.e. time available for feeding, particularly suspension feeding), since immersion time has been shown experimentally to affect body condition positively, and since body condition and burying depth in Macoma are postively related in the field. To test this we experimentally manipulated immersion time, and followed changes in burying depth and body condition. In the experiments, longer immersion time went consistently with greater burying depth of Macoma and higher body condition. On a transect in the western Wadden Sea, the deepest Macoma were indeed found at the intertidal level with the longest immersion time, but these were at that time not the animals with the highest body condition. Within each locality, however, body condition was positively correlated with burying depth. The experimental data and the within-locality data support the hypothesis that longer immersion time may influence burying depth through body condition. However, the fact that between-locality differences in burying depth seemed to be consistently related to immersion time, but not to body condition, indicates that body condition alone does not explain place-to-place variation in burying depth.

  17. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues. [Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Mendez, A.T. ); Higashi, R. . Bodega Marine Lab.); Fan, T. )

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  18. Development of histopathological indices in a commercial marine bivalve (Ruditapes decussatus) to determine environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M; Carreira, Sara; Costa, Maria H; Caeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-15

    Bivalve histopathology is an acknowledged tool in environmental toxicology studies, however geographically restricted, limited to a few species and still lacking the degree of detail needed to develop effective (semi)quantitative approaches. A first-time detailed histopathological screening was performed on grooved carpet shell clams collected from commercial shellfish beds in distinct coastal ecosystems of the Southern Portuguese coast: two parted sites within an impacted estuary (S(1) and S(2)), an inlet channel of a fish farm at a considered pristine estuary (site M) and a site allocated in a clean coastal lagoon (A). A total of thirty histopathological lesions and alterations were analysed in the gills and digestive glands following a weighted condition indices approach, including inflammation-related responses, necrosis, neoplastic diseases and parasites. Digestive glands were consistently more damaged than gills, except for animals collected from site M, where the most severe lesions were found in both organs, immediately followed by S(2). Clams from sites S(1) and A were overall the least damaged. Neoplastic diseases were infrequent in all cases. Inflammation-related traits were some of the most common alterations progressing in animals enduring severe lesions such as digestive tubule (diverticula) and intertubular tissue necrosis. Some alterations, such as lipofuscin aggregates within digestive tubule cells, did not relate to histological lesions. Granulocytomas only occurred in heavily infected tissues. Animals from M and A presented the highest infections in the digestive gland, especially by protozoa. Gill infections were more similar between sites. Still, the level of infection does not account for all histopathological lesions in either organ. Overall, the results are in accordance with environmental parameters, such as distance to pollution sources, sediment type and hydrodynamics, and show that the combination of multiple histopathological features

  19. Location is everything: evaluating the effects of terrestrial and marine resource subsidies on an estuarine bivalve.

    PubMed

    Harding, Joel M S; Segal, Michelle R; Reynolds, John D

    2015-01-01

    Estuaries are amongst the world's most productive ecosystems, lying at the intersection between terrestrial and marine environments. They receive substantial inputs from adjacent landscapes but the importance of resource subsidies is not well understood. Here, we test hypotheses for the effects of both terrestrial- and salmon-derived resource subsidies on the diet (inferred from stable isotopes of muscle tissue), size and percent nitrogen of the soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria), a sedentary estuarine consumer. We examine how these relationships shift across natural gradients among 14 estuaries that vary in upstream watershed size and salmon density on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. We also test how assimilation and response to subsidies vary at smaller spatial scales within estuaries. The depletion and enrichment of stable isotope ratios in soft-shell clam muscle tissue correlated with increasing upstream watershed size and salmon density, respectively. The effects of terrestrial- and salmon-derived subsidies were also strongest at locations near stream outlets. When we controlled for age of individual clams, there were larger individuals with higher percent nitrogen content in estuaries below larger watersheds, though this effect was limited to the depositional zones below river mouths. Pink salmon exhibited a stronger effect on isotope ratios of clams than chum salmon, which could reflect increased habitat overlap as spawning pink salmon concentrate in lower stream reaches, closer to intertidal clam beds. However, there were smaller clams in estuaries that had higher upstream pink salmon densities, possibly due to differences in habitat requirements. Our study highlights the importance of upstream resource subsidies to this bivalve species, but that individual responses to subsidies can vary at smaller scales within estuaries.

  20. Genetic connectivity between north and south Mid-Atlantic Ridge chemosynthetic bivalves and their symbionts.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Karina; Petersen, Jillian M; Dubilier, Nicole; Borowski, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Transform faults are geological structures that interrupt the continuity of mid-ocean ridges and can act as dispersal barriers for hydrothermal vent organisms. In the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, it has been hypothesized that long transform faults impede gene flow between the northern and the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and disconnect a northern from a southern biogeographic province. To test if there is a barrier effect in the equatorial Atlantic, we examined phylogenetic relationships of chemosynthetic bivalves and their bacterial symbionts from the recently discovered southern MAR hydrothermal vents at 5°S and 9°S. We examined Bathymodiolus spp. mussels and Abyssogena southwardae clams using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene as a phylogenetic marker for the hosts and the bacterial 16S rRNA gene as a marker for the symbionts. Bathymodiolus spp. from the two southern sites were genetically divergent from the northern MAR species B. azoricus and B. puteoserpentis but all four host lineages form a monophyletic group indicating that they radiated after divergence from their northern Atlantic sister group, the B. boomerang species complex. This suggests dispersal of Bathymodiolus species from north to south across the equatorial belt. 16S rRNA genealogies of chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic symbionts of Bathymodiolus spp. were inconsistent and did not match the host COI genealogy indicating disconnected biogeography patterns. The vesicomyid clam Abyssogena southwardae from 5°S shared an identical COI haplotype with A. southwardae from the Logatchev vent field on the northern MAR and their symbionts shared identical 16S phylotypes, suggesting gene flow across the Equator. Our results indicate genetic connectivity between the northern and southern MAR and suggest that a strict dispersal barrier does not exist.

  1. Oxidative stress in marine bivalves tissues in response to accumulation of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chelomin, V.P.; Belcheva, N.N.; Zakartsev, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Using model aquarium experiments the authors have shown that the accumulation of heavy metals (copper and cadmium) by the tissues of marine bivalves (Mytilus edulis, Mizuhopecten yessoensis) is followed by a complex of alterations in the lipid matrix of some membrane organelles. It is supposed that the disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes is the main mechanism in heavy metal-inducible damage, of membranes. This possibility is supported by results of levels of conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde and Shiff`s bases, determined as indicators of lipid peroxidation in different tissues of molluscs, markedly increased with metal accumulation. Unlike to cadmium, the copper possess prooxidative activity, stimulating the peroxidation of membrane lipids directly. In spite of some distinctions the intracellular antioxidative systems (glutathione system and tocopherol) showed extreme sensitivity to the accumulation of both metals. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of these metals was followed by die changes of glutathione and tocopherol contents and the inhibition of glutathione-reductase. activity,, but it was not correlated with changes of Se-depending glutathioneperoxidase activity. As it results from kinetic data the most damages of glutathione system are revealed on this earliest stages of metal accumulation when metallothionein synthesis is on the low level. The amount of glutathione in the tissues was restored almost to their original level when metallothionein synthesis increases markedly. But, total amount of peroxides is retained on the high level for a long period of time. On the basis of results it is reasonable to assume that the accumulation of these metals by mollusc tissues does not proceed without leaving a trace. This process is a potential menace for increasing of destructive events in consequence of disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes.

  2. Metal, mutagenicity, and biochemical studies on bivalve molluscs from Spanish coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Ariza, A.; Abril, N.; Navas, J.I.; Dorado, G.; Lopez-Barea, J.; Pueyo, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Three species of marine bivalve molluscs (Chamelea gallina, Ruditapes decussatus, and Crassostrea gigas) have been studied in order to evaluate the levels of pollution on the South Atlantic Spanish littoral. Several transition metals (Cu, As, Cd, Sn, Hg, Pb) were determined as a general index of total contamination. Animals from putative contaminated areas exhibited higher metal contents than those from cleaner waters. C. gigas showed 5-20-fold higher total metal content than the other two species. The mutagenicity of ethanolic extracts was assayed by using both the His reversion and the Ara forward mutation tests. Mollusc tissues from the three species did not contain genotoxins active on TA98 (frameshift mutations) or TA100 (mainly G:C base-pair substitutions), but did contain direct-acting genotoxins of a polar nature and oxidative type. This was based on the following observations: (1) mammalian metabolic activation was not required for mutagenicity, (2) mutagens were eluted with the polar fraction from XAD-2 columns, and (3) mutagenic responses were observed with Salmonella typhimurium TA102 (base-pair substitutions; sensitive to oxidative damages) and Escherichia coli catalase-deficient (AraR forward mutations) strains. No relevant differences were found in the mutagenicity of mollusc extracts from areas with different pollution levels. Otherwise, our data suggest that, in general, animals living in contaminated environments had fewer genotoxins of oxidative type than those from less polluted areas. Such a result might be explained by the observation of increased levels of a number of detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase.

  3. Gene expression profiling of genetically determined growth variation in bivalve larvae (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Meyer, E; Manahan, D T

    2010-03-01

    Growth rates in animals are governed by a wide range of biological factors, many of which remain poorly understood. To identify the genes that establish growth differences in bivalve larvae, we compared expression patterns in contrasting phenotypes (slow- and fast-growth) that were experimentally produced by genetic crosses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Based on transcriptomic profiling of 4.5 million cDNA sequence tags, we sequenced and annotated 181 cDNA clones identified by statistical analysis as candidates for differential growth. Significant matches were found in GenBank for 43% of clones (N=78), including 34 known genes. These sequences included genes involved in protein metabolism, energy metabolism and regulation of feeding activity. Ribosomal protein genes were predominant, comprising half of the 34 genes identified. Expression of ribosomal protein genes showed non-additive inheritance - i.e. expression in fast-growing hybrid larvae was different from average levels in inbred larvae from these parental families. The expression profiles of four ribosomal protein genes (RPL18, RPL31, RPL352 and RPS3) were validated by RNA blots using additional, independent crosses from the same families. Expression of RPL35 was monitored throughout early larval development, revealing that these expression patterns were established early in development (in 2-day-old larvae). Our findings (i) provide new insights into the mechanistic bases of growth and highlight genes not previously considered in growth regulation, (ii) support the general conclusion that genes involved in protein metabolism and feeding regulation are key regulators of growth, and (iii) provide a set of candidate biomarkers for predicting differential growth rates during animal development.

  4. Unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masteller, E.C.; Maleski, K.R.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine species composition and relative abundance of unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania 1990-1992. This information was compared with data from the only other extensive survey of unionids in the bay conducted in 1909-1911 (Ortmann 1919) to assess changes over the 80 years preceding the present study. A total of 1,540 individuals representing 18 species were collected in 1990-1992. Five relatively common species (between 7 and 42% of total individuals), six uncommon species (2 and 6%), and seven rare species (<1%) were found. The rare species were Anodontoides ferussacianus, Lasmigona costata, Ligumia recta, Ptychobranchus fasciolaris, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa, Strophitus undaulatus, and Truncilla donaciformis. Five of the species found in Presque Isle Bay (Leptodea fragilis, Ligumia nasuta, Potamilus alatus, Quadrula quadrula, and Truncilla donaciformis) are listed as critically imperiled and one species (Truncilla truncata) as extirpated in the State of Pennsylvania by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Comparisons between unionid populations in 1909-1911 and 1990-1992 indicate few substantial changes occurred during the past 80 years. A total of 22 species were found; 21 in 1909-1911 and 18 in 1990-1992. Seventeen species were found in both studies, an additional four in 1909-1911 and one in 1990-1992. The relative abundance of 11 of the 17 species found in both studies remained stable (i.e., common or uncommon) over the past 80 years. Only four species listed as uncommon in 1909-1911 were listed as rare in 1990-1992. However, the invasion of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) is considered a threat to the continued existence of the entire Unionidae fauna in Presque Isle Bay, a unique habitat of the Great Lakes.

  5. Haematopoiesis in molluscs: A review of haemocyte development and function in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

    PubMed

    Pila, E A; Sullivan, J T; Wu, X Z; Fang, J; Rudko, S P; Gordy, M A; Hanington, P C

    2016-05-01

    Haematopoiesis is a process that is responsible for generating sufficient numbers of blood cells in the circulation and in tissues. It is central to maintenance of homeostasis within an animal, and is critical for defense against infection. While haematopoiesis is common to all animals possessing a circulatory system, the specific mechanisms and ultimate products of haematopoietic events vary greatly. Our understanding of this process in non-vertebrate organisms is primarily derived from those species that serve as developmental and immunological models, with sparse investigations having been carried out in other organisms spanning the metazoa. As research into the regulation of immune and blood cell development advances, we have begun to gain insight into haematopoietic events in a wider array of animals, including the molluscs. What began in the early 1900's as observational studies on the morphological characteristics of circulating immune cells has now advanced to mechanistic investigations of the cytokines, growth factors, receptors, signalling pathways, and patterns of gene expression that regulate molluscan haemocyte development. Emerging is a picture of an incredible diversity of developmental processes and outcomes that parallels the biological diversity observed within the different classes of the phylum Mollusca. However, our understanding of haematopoiesis in molluscs stems primarily from the three most-studied classes, the Gastropoda, Cephalopoda and Bivalvia. While these represent perhaps the molluscs of greatest economic and medical importance, the fact that our information is limited to only 3 of the 9 extant classes in the phylum highlights the need for further investigation in this area. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that defines haematopoiesis and its products in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

  6. Spatial heterogeneity in parasite infections at different spatial scales in an intertidal bivalve.

    PubMed

    Thieltges, David W; Reise, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneities in the abundance of free-living organisms as well as in infection levels of their parasites are a common phenomenon, but knowledge on parasitism in invertebrate intermediate hosts in this respect is scarce. We investigated the spatial pattern of four dominant trematode species which utilize a common intertidal bivalve, the cockle Cerastoderma edule, as second intermediate host in their life cycles. Sampling of cockles from the same cohort at 15 sites in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea) over a distance of 50 km revealed a conspicuous spatial heterogeneity in infection levels in all four species over the total sample as well as among and within sampling sites. Whereas multiple regression analyses indicated the density of first intermediate upstream hosts to be the strongest determinant of infection levels in cockles, the situation within sites was more complex with no single strong predictor variable. However, host size was positively and host density negatively correlated with infection levels and there was an indication of differential susceptibility of cockle hosts. Small-scale differences in physical properties of the habitat in the form of residual water at low tide resulted in increased infection levels of cockles which we experimentally transferred into pools. A complex interplay of these factors may be responsible for within-site heterogeneities. At larger spatial scales, these factors may be overridden by the strong effect of upstream hosts. In contrast to first intermediate trematode hosts, there was no indication for inter-specific interactions. In other terms, the recruitment of trematodes in second intermediate hosts seems to be largely controlled by pre-settlement processes both among and within host populations.

  7. The estimation of DEB parameters for various Northeast Atlantic bivalve species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veer, Henk W.; Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; van der Meer, Jaap

    2006-08-01

    Dynamic energy budgets are used for the description of the energy flow through individual organisms from the assimilation of food to the utilisation for maintenance, growth, development and reproduction. In this paper, a procedure for estimation of the parameters of Kooijman's Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model is introduced and subsequently parameters are estimated for the following Northeast Atlantic bivalve species: the Baltic clam Macoma balthica (L.), the sandgaper Mya arenaria L., the cockle Cerastoderma edule (L.), the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. and the Pacifc oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793). For none of the species, a complete set of parameters could be compiled. A special protocol was developed to account for missing values and to achieve consistency between parameters. Species were similar in their optimal temperature range, as reflected in a common Arrhenius temperature of 5800 K, which corresponds with a Q 10 of 2. Differences between species were observed in width of the optimal temperature range. The taxonomic relatedness between species was reflected in similar volume-specific maintenance costs, costs for growth and almost similar maximum storage density of energy. Species differed in their maximum surface area-specific assimilation rate by a factor of 6 and in the fraction of energy allocated to reproduction (ranging from 0.15 to 0.50). These differences are reflected in the maximum theoretical total shell length of the species, which varied from about 3 cm in M. balthica, 6 cm in C. edule, 15 cm in M. arenaria and M. edulis and 45 cm in C. gigas.

  8. Location Is Everything: Evaluating the Effects of Terrestrial and Marine Resource Subsidies on an Estuarine Bivalve

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Joel M. S.; Segal, Michelle R.; Reynolds, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Estuaries are amongst the world’s most productive ecosystems, lying at the intersection between terrestrial and marine environments. They receive substantial inputs from adjacent landscapes but the importance of resource subsidies is not well understood. Here, we test hypotheses for the effects of both terrestrial- and salmon-derived resource subsidies on the diet (inferred from stable isotopes of muscle tissue), size and percent nitrogen of the soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria), a sedentary estuarine consumer. We examine how these relationships shift across natural gradients among 14 estuaries that vary in upstream watershed size and salmon density on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. We also test how assimilation and response to subsidies vary at smaller spatial scales within estuaries. The depletion and enrichment of stable isotope ratios in soft-shell clam muscle tissue correlated with increasing upstream watershed size and salmon density, respectively. The effects of terrestrial- and salmon-derived subsidies were also strongest at locations near stream outlets. When we controlled for age of individual clams, there were larger individuals with higher percent nitrogen content in estuaries below larger watersheds, though this effect was limited to the depositional zones below river mouths. Pink salmon exhibited a stronger effect on isotope ratios of clams than chum salmon, which could reflect increased habitat overlap as spawning pink salmon concentrate in lower stream reaches, closer to intertidal clam beds. However, there were smaller clams in estuaries that had higher upstream pink salmon densities, possibly due to differences in habitat requirements. Our study highlights the importance of upstream resource subsidies to this bivalve species, but that individual responses to subsidies can vary at smaller scales within estuaries. PMID:25993002

  9. Early Stage Biomineralization in the Periostracum of the ‘Living Fossil’ Bivalve Neotrigonia

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G.; Salas, Carmen; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Bueno-Pérez, Juan de Dios

    2014-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the shell formation of the palaeoheterodont ‘living fossil’ Neotrigonia concentrated on the timing and manufacture of the calcified ‘bosses’ which stud the outside of all trigonioid bivalves (extant and fossil) has been conducted. Electron microscopy and optical microscopy revealed that Neotrigonia spp. have a spiral-shaped periostracal groove. The periostracum itself is secreted by the basal cell, as a thin dark pellicle, becoming progressively transformed into a thin dark layer by additions of secretions from the internal outer mantle fold. Later, intense secretion of the internal surface of the outer mantle fold forms a translucent layer, which becomes transformed by tanning into a dark layer. The initiation of calcified bosses occurred at a very early stage of periostracum formation, deep within the periostracal groove immediately below the initialmost dark layer. At this stage, they consist of a series of polycyclically twinned crystals. The bosses grow as the periostracum traverse through the periostracal groove, in coordination with the thickening of the dark periostracal layer and until, upon reaching the mantle edge, they impinge upon each other and become transformed into large prisms separated by dark periostracal walls. In conclusion, the initial bosses and the external part of the prismatic layer are fully intraperiostracal. With later growth, the prisms transform into fibrous aggregates, although the details of the process are unknown. This reinforces the relationships with other groups that have the ability to form intraperiostracal calcifications, for example the unionoids with which the trigonioids form the clade Paleoheterodonta. The presence of similar structures in anomalodesmatans and other euheterodonts raises the question of whether this indicates a relationship or represents a convergence. The identification of very early calcification within an organic sheet has interesting implications for our

  10. Mixed function oxygenases and xenobiotic detoxication/toxication systems in bivalve molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. N.; Livingstone, D. R.; Donkin, P.; Bayne, B. L.; Widdows, J.; Lowe, D. M.

    1980-03-01

    Components of a xenobiotic detoxication/toxication system involving mixed function oxygenases are present in Mytilus edulis. Our paper critically reviews the recent literature on this topic which reported the apparent absence of such a system in bivalve molluscs and attempts to reconcile this viewpoint with our own findings on NADPH neotetrazolium reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldrin epoxidation and other reports of the presence of mixed function oxygenases. New experimental data are presented which indicate that some elements of the detoxication/toxication system in M. edulis can be induced by aromatic hydrocarbons derived from crude oil. This includes a brief review of the results of long-term experiments in which mussels were exposed to low concentrations of the water accommodated fraction of North Sea crude oil (7.7-68 µg 1-1) in which general stress responses such as reduced physiological scope for growth, cytotoxic damage to lysosomal integrity and cellular damage are considered as characteristics of the general stress syndrome induced by the toxic action of the xenobiotics. In addition, induction in the blood cells of microsomal NADPH neotetrazolium reductase (associated with mixed function oxygenases) and the NADPH generating enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are considered to be specific biological responses to the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The consequences of this detoxication/toxication system for Mytilus edulis are discussed in terms of the formation of toxic electrophilic intermediate metabolites which are highly reactive and can combine with DNA, RNA and proteins with subsequent damage to these cellular constituents. Implications for neoplasms associated with the blood cells are also discussed. Finally, in view of the increased use of mussel species in pollutant monitoring programmes, the induction phenomenon which is associated with microsomal enzymes in the blood cells is considered as a possible tool for the

  11. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity—59 species—of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future

  12. The Evolutionary Origins of the Southern Ocean Philobryid Bivalves: Hidden Biodiversity, Ancient Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jennifer A.; Linse, Katrin; Whittle, Rowan; Griffiths, Huw J.

    2015-01-01

    Philobryids (Bivalvia: Arcoida) are one of the most speciose marine bivalve families in the Southern Ocean and are common throughout the Southern Hemisphere. Considering this diversity and their brooding reproductive mode (limiting long-distance dispersal), this family may have been present in the Southern Ocean since its inception. However Philobrya and Adacnarca appear only in the Quaternary fossil record of the Antarctic, suggesting a much more recent incursion. Molecular dating provides an independent means of measuring the time of origin and radiation of this poorly known group. Here we present the first combined molecular and morphological investigation of the Philobryidae in the Southern Ocean. Two nuclear loci (18S and 28S) were amplified from 35 Southern Ocean Adacnarca and Philobrya specimens, with a combined sequence length of 2,282 base pairs (bp). Adacnarca specimens (A. nitens and A. limopsoides) were resolved as a strongly supported monophyletic group. Genus Philobrya fell into two strongly supported groups (‘sublaevis’ and ‘magellanica/wandelensis’), paraphyletic with Adacnarca. The A. nitens species complex is identified as at least seven morpho-species through morphological and genetic analysis of taxon clustering. Phylogenetic analyses resolve Philobryidae as a strongly supported monophyletic clade and sister taxon to the Limopsidae, as anticipated by their classification into the superfamily Limopsoidea. Bayesian relaxed clock analyses of divergence times suggest that genus Adacnarca radiated in the Southern Ocean from the Early Paleogene, while P. sublaevis and P. wandelensis clades radiated in the late Miocene, following the formation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. PMID:25853413

  13. CO2 uptake and fixation by endosymbiotic chemoautotrophs from the bivalve Solemya velum.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen M; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2007-02-01

    Chemoautotrophic symbioses, in which endosymbiotic bacteria are the major source of organic carbon for the host, are found in marine habitats where sulfide and oxygen coexist. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of pH, alternate sulfur sources, and electron acceptors on carbon fixation and to investigate which form(s) of inorganic carbon is taken up and fixed by the gamma-proteobacterial endosymbionts of the protobranch bivalve Solemya velum. Symbiont-enriched suspensions were generated by homogenization of S. velum gills, followed by velocity centrifugation to pellet the symbiont cells. Carbon fixation was measured by incubating the cells with (14)C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon. When oxygen was present, both sulfide and thiosulfate stimulated carbon fixation; however, elevated levels of either sulfide (>0.5 mM) or oxygen (1 mM) were inhibitory. In the absence of oxygen, nitrate did not enhance carbon fixation rates when sulfide was present. Symbionts fixed carbon most rapidly between pH 7.5 and 8.5. Under optimal pH, sulfide, and oxygen conditions, symbiont carbon fixation rates correlated with the concentrations of extracellular CO(2) and not with HCO(3)(-) concentrations. The half-saturation constant for carbon fixation with respect to extracellular dissolved CO(2) was 28 +/- 3 microM, and the average maximal velocity was 50.8 +/- 7.1 micromol min(-1) g of protein(-1). The reliance of S. velum symbionts on extracellular CO(2) is consistent with their intracellular lifestyle, since HCO(3)(-) utilization would require protein-mediated transport across the bacteriocyte membrane, perisymbiont vacuole membrane, and symbiont outer and inner membranes. The use of CO(2) may be a general trait shared with many symbioses with an intracellular chemoautotrophic partner.

  14. Effects of environmental hypercapnia and metal (Cd and Cu) exposure on acid-base and metal homeostasis of marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Hawkins, Chelsea; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 levels reduce seawater pH and may affect bioavailability of trace metals in estuaries. We studied the interactive effects of common metal pollutants (50 μg l(-1) Cd or Cu) and PCO2 (~395, 800 and 2000 μatm) on metal levels, intracellular pH, expression of metal binding proteins and stress biomarkers in estuarine bivalves Crassostrea virginica (oysters) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clams). Cd (but not Cu or hypercapnia) exposure affected the acid-base balance of hemocytes resulting in elevated intracellular pH. Cd and Cu exposure led to the increase in the tissue metal burdens, and metal accumulation was reduced by elevated PCO2 in the mantle but not hemocytes. No change was found in the intracellular free Cd(2+), Cu(2+) or Fe(2+) during Cu or Cd exposure indicating that these metals are bound to intracellular ligands. Free Zn(2+) content in oyster hemocytes was suppressed by Cd and Cu exposure and below the detection limits in clam hemocytes, which went hand-in-hand with the elevated mRNA expression of metallothioneins and ferritin in Cd- and Cu-exposed bivalves, enhanced by hypercapnia. The metal-binding and antioxidant mechanisms of oysters and clams were sufficient to effectively maintain intracellular redox status, even though metal exposure combined with moderate hypercapnia (~800 μatm PCO2) led to the elevated production of reactive oxygen species in hemocytes. Overall, while hypercapnia modulates metal accumulation, binding capacity and oxidative stress in estuarine bivalves, the physiological effects of elevated CO2 are mild compared to the effects of other common stressors.

  15. Interspecific comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organochlorines bioaccumulation in bivalves from a Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    León, Víctor M; Moreno-González, Rubén; González, Emilia; Martínez, Fulgencio; García, Víctor; Campillo, Juan A

    2013-10-01

    The bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was characterized in cockle, oyster and noble pen shell from nine areas in the Mar Menor lagoon with different hydrodynamic and pollutant sources. Biota, sediment and water samples were simultaneously collected in the spring and autumn of 2010. Considering all bivalve samples, PAH concentrations ranged from 8.98 to 370 μg·kg(-1) d.w., those of PCBs from 0.15 to 42.36 μg·kg(-1) d.w. and those of DDXs from below detection limit to 240.6 μg·kg(-1) d.w., where p,p'-DDE was the main fraction. The bioaccumulation of PAHs was similar for cockle, oyster and noble pen shell, being higher close to ports and wastewater effluents. However, DDX and PCB bioaccumulations in oyster and noble pen shell were significantly higher than in cockle in spring (p=0.02). The first organic pollutant bioaccumulation data for noble pen shell were obtained in this study, showing a preferential accumulation of pyrene. The increase of PAH bioaccumulation in autumn, as compared to spring, was low, due to high water temperatures during the summer, which favoured PAH dissipation processes. No significant seasonal variations were detected for OCPs and PCBs, except in some specific areas. The PAH, PCB and OCP levels detected in these bivalves were lower than OSPAR/MED POL environmental assessment criteria, except for p,p'-DDE in bivalves sited close to El Albujón watercourse mouth.

  16. A comparison of virus concentration methods for molecular detection and characterization of rotavirus in bivalve shellfish species.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Singhaboot, Yutatirat; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Pombubpa, Kannika; Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a method for concentrating rotavirus, to assess the detection rate, and to characterize the genotype of naturally occurring rotavirus in bivalve shellfish species; including oysters (Saccostrea forskali), cockles (Anadara nodifera), and mussels (Perna viridis). The results demonstrated that an adsorption-twice elution-extraction method was less-time consuming method of concentrating the spiked rotavirus, yielding high sensitivity of 1.14 genome copies/g of digestive tissues from all three shellfish species, as detected using an RT-nested PCR. In seeding experiments, rotavirus as low as 1.39 genome copies was able to be detected in 4 g of digestive tissues or per sample. In the period of August 2011 to July 2012, of the 300 bivalve shellfish samples collected and tested, 24 (8.0%) were found to be contaminated with rotavirus, the figures being: oysters, 13/100 samples; mussels, 10/100 samples; and cockles, 1/100 samples. By DNA sequencing of the RT-nested PCR products and phylogenetic analysis, the rotaviruses detected were classified into G1, lineage II (4 samples); G3 (10 samples): lineage I (3 samples), lineage IIIc (3 samples), lineage IIId (3 samples), lineage IV (1 sample); G9 (6 samples); and G12, lineage III (1 sample). These findings suggest that this virus concentration method provides high sensitivity for the detection of rotavirus from the three bivalve shellfish species. The prevalence of rotavirus and the identified genotypes contribute to the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in different shellfish species.

  17. The Evolutionary Ecology of Biotic Association in a Megadiverse Bivalve Superfamily: Sponsorship Required for Permanent Residency in Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingchun; Ó Foighil, Diarmaid; Middelfart, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Marine lineage diversification is shaped by the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors but our understanding of their relative roles is underdeveloped. The megadiverse bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea represents a promising study system to address this issue. It is composed of small-bodied clams that are either free-living or have commensal associations with invertebrate hosts. To test if the evolution of this lifestyle dichotomy is correlated with specific ecologies, we have performed a statistical analysis on the lifestyle and habitat preference of 121 species based on 90 source documents. Methodology/Principal Findings Galeommatoidea has significant diversity in the two primary benthic habitats: hard- and soft-bottoms. Hard-bottom dwellers are overwhelmingly free-living, typically hidden within crevices of rocks/coral heads/encrusting epifauna. In contrast, species in soft-bottom habitats are almost exclusively infaunal commensals. These infaunal biotic associations may involve direct attachment to a host, or clustering around its tube/burrow, but all commensals locate within the oxygenated sediment envelope produced by the host’s bioturbation. Conclusions/Significance The formation of commensal associations by galeommatoidean clams is robustly correlated with an abiotic environmental setting: living in sediments (). Sediment-dwelling bivalves are exposed to intense predation pressure that drops markedly with depth of burial. Commensal galeommatoideans routinely attain depth refuges many times their body lengths, independent of siphonal investment, by virtue of their host’s burrowing and bioturbation. In effect, they use their much larger hosts as giant auto-irrigating siphon substitutes. The evolution of biotic associations with infaunal bioturbating hosts may have been a prerequisite for the diversification of Galeommatoidea in sediments and has likely been a key factor in the success of this exceptionally diverse bivalve superfamily. PMID

  18. The influence of sedimentation on metal accumulation and cellular oxidative stress markers in the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husmann, G.; Abele, D.; Monien, D.; Monien, P.; Kriews, M.; Philipp, E. E. R.

    2012-10-01

    Recent rapid climate warming at the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) results in elevated glacial melting, enhanced sedimentary run-off, increased turbidity and impact of ice-scouring in shallow coastal areas. Discharge of mineral suspension from volcanic bedrock ablation and chronic physical disturbance is expected to influence sessile filter feeders such as the Antarctic soft shell clam Laternula elliptica (King and Broderip, 1832). We investigated effects of sedimentary run-off on the accumulation of trace metals, and together with physical disturbance, the cumulative effect on oxidative stress parameters in younger and older L. elliptica from two stations in Potter Cove (King George Island, Antarctica) which are distinctly impacted by turbidity and ice-scouring. Fe, Mn, Sr, V and Zn concentrations were slightly higher in sediments of the station receiving more sediment run-off, but not enriched in bivalves of this station. The only element that increased in bivalves experimentally exposed to sediment suspension for 28 days was Mn. Concentration of the waste accumulation biomarker lipofuscin in nervous tissue was higher in L. elliptica from the “exposed” compared to the “less exposed” site, whereas protein carbonyl levels in bivalve mantle tissue were higher at the less sediment impacted site. Tissue metal content and lipofuscin in nervous tissue were generally higher in older compared to younger individuals from both field stations. We conclude that elevated sediment ablation does not per se result in higher metal accumulation in L. elliptica. Instead of direct absorbance from sediment particles, metal accumulation in gills seems to indicate uptake of compounds dissolved in the water column, whereas metals in digestive gland appear to originate from enriched planktonic or detritic food. Accumulation of cellular waste products and potentially reactive metals over lifetime presumably alters L. elliptica physiological performance with age and may

  19. Deep conservation of bivalve nacre proteins highlighted by shell matrix proteomics of the Unionoida Elliptio complanata and Villosa lienosa.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Arivalagan, Jaison; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Bolbach, Gérard; Berland, Sophie; Marie, Arul; Marin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the molluscan shell nacre is regulated to a large extent by a matrix of extracellular macromolecules that are secreted by the shell-forming tissue, the mantle. This so-called 'calcifying matrix' is a complex mixture of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides that is assembled and occluded within the mineral phase during the calcification process. Better molecular-level characterization of the substances that regulate nacre formation is still required. Notable advances in expressed tag sequencing of freshwater mussels, such as Elliptio complanata and Villosa lienosa, provide a pre-requisite to further characterize bivalve nacre proteins by a proteomic approach. In this study, we have identified a total of 48 different proteins from the insoluble matrices of the nacre, 31 of which are common to both E. complanata and V. lienosa A few of these proteins, such as PIF, MSI60, CA, shematrin-like, Kunitz-like, LamG, chitin-binding-containing proteins, together with A-, D-, G-, M- and Q-rich proteins, appear to be analogues, if not true homologues, of proteins previously described from the pearl oyster or the edible mussel nacre matrices, thus forming a remarkable list of deeply conserved nacre proteins. This work constitutes a comprehensive nacre proteomic study of non-pteriomorphid bivalves that has enabled us to describe the molecular basis of a deeply conserved biomineralization toolkit among nacreous shell-bearing bivalves, with regard to proteins associated with other shell microstructures, with those of other mollusc classes (gastropods, cephalopods) and, finally, with other lophotrochozoans (brachiopods).

  20. Chemosymbiotic bivalves from the mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic, with descriptions of new species of Solemyidae, Lucinidae and Vesicomyidae

    PubMed Central

    Olive, Graham; Rodrigues, Clara F.; Cunha, Marina R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The chemosymbiotic bivalves collected from the mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz are reviewed. Of the thirteen species closely associated with chemosynthetic settings two Solemyidae, Solemya (Petrasma) elarraichensis sp. n. and Acharax gadirae sp. n., one Lucinidae, Lucinoma asapheus sp. n., and one Vesicomyidae, Isorropodon megadesmus sp. n. are described and compared to close relatives of their respective families. The biodiversity and distribution of the chemosymbiotic bivalves in the Gulf of Cadiz are discussed and compared to the available information from other cold seeps in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Although there is considerable similarity at the genus level between seep/mud volcano fields in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, there is little overlap at the species level. This indicates a high degree of endemism within chemosymbiotic bivalve assemblages. PMID:21976991

  1. Chemosymbiotic bivalves from the mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic, with descriptions of new species of Solemyidae, Lucinidae and Vesicomyidae.

    PubMed

    Olive, Graham; Rodrigues, Clara F; Cunha, Marina R

    2011-01-01

    The chemosymbiotic bivalves collected from the mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz are reviewed. Of the thirteen species closely associated with chemosynthetic settings two Solemyidae, Solemya (Petrasma) elarraichensissp. n. and Acharax gadiraesp. n., one Lucinidae, Lucinoma asapheussp. n., and one Vesicomyidae, Isorropodon megadesmussp. n. are described and compared to close relatives of their respective families. The biodiversity and distribution of the chemosymbiotic bivalves in the Gulf of Cadiz are discussed and compared to the available information from other cold seeps in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Although there is considerable similarity at the genus level between seep/mud volcano fields in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, there is little overlap at the species level. This indicates a high degree of endemism within chemosymbiotic bivalve assemblages.

  2. Assimilation efficiencies and turnover rates of trace elements in marine bivalves: A comparison of oysters, clams and mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinfelder, J.R.; Wang, W.-X.; Luoma, S. N.; Fisher, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation efficiencies (AEs) and physiological turnover-rate constants (k) of six trace elements (Ag, Am, Cd, Co, Se, Zn) in four marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin,Macoma balthica Linnaeus, Mercenaria mercenaria Linnaeus, and Mytilus edulis Linnaeus) were measured in radiotracer-depuration experiments. Egestion rates of unassimilated elements were highest during the first 24 h of depuration and declined thereafter. Significant egestion of unassimilated Co, however, continued for up to 5 d in Macoma balthica,Mercenaria mercenaria and Mytilus edulis. With the exception of the extremely low values for110 mAg, 109Cd, and 65Zn in C. virginica, physiological turnover-rate constants (k) showed no general pattern of variation among elements, bivalve species or food types, and were relatively invariant. Values from  ≤0.001 to 0.1 d−1 were observed, but excluding those for Co, most values were  ≤0.04 d−1. In all four species, the AEs of Ag, Am, and Co were generally lower than those of Cd, Se, and Zn. The AEs of Ag, Cd, Se, and Zn in these bivalves are directly related to the proportion of each element in the cytoplasmic fraction of ingested phytoplankton, indicating that >80% of elements in a prey alga's cytoplasm was assimilated. C. virginica, Macoma balthica, and Mercenaria mercenaria assimilated ∼36% of the Ag and Cd associated with the non-cytoplasmic (membrane/organelle) fraction of ingested cells in addition to the cytoplasmic fraction. The ratio of AE:k, which is proportional to the consumer–prey trace-element bioaccumulation factor (concentration in consumer:concentration in prey) was generally greater for Cd, Se, and Zn than for Ag, Am, and Co. This ratio was lowest in Mytilus edulis, suggesting that this bivalve, the most widely employed organism in global biomonitoring, is relatively inefficient at accumulating important elements such as Ag, Cd, and Zn from ingested phytoplankton.

  3. Biogeographic complexity in Triassic bivalves of the Wallowa terrane, northwestern US: oceanic islands, not continents, provide the best analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    High levels of endemism and complex, overlapping biogeographic patterns characterize modern molluscan faunas of the Hawaiian Islands and the Triassic bivalve fauna of the Wallowa volcanic-arc terrane in Hells Canyon, Oregon. Such biogeographic complexities and high levels of endemism in many modern and Mesozoic island settings constrain the use of faunal data as a primary basis for paleogeographic reconstruction of accreted terranes. Large, taxonomically diver samples are required to identify genuine biogeographic patterns in these insular settings. Selective use of individual species, genera, or families to reconstruct terrane paleogeography may give misleading results.

  4. Interactions between Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes and the bivalve pathogens Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 and Vibrio splendidus LGP32.

    PubMed

    Balbi, T; Fabbri, R; Cortese, K; Smerilli, A; Ciacci, C; Grande, C; Vezzulli, L; Pruzzo, C; Canesi, L

    2013-12-01

    Marine bivalves can accumulate large numbers of bacteria, in particular Vibrio species, whose persistence in bivalve tissues largely depends on their sensitivity to the bactericidal activity of circulating hemocytes and hemolymph soluble factors. The interactions between vibrios and hemolymph have been investigated, in particular in bivalve species susceptible to infection by certain Vibrio spp. and strains. In this work, the effects of two bivalve pathogens, Vibrio splendidus LGP32 (V.s.) and Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 (V.a.), isolated from oyster mortality outbreaks, on the hemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis were investigated. In vitro, V.s., but not V.a., induced a dramatic decrease in lysosomal membrane stability-LMS in the hemocytes; both vibrios induced a moderate lysozyme release, with V.s. > V.a.. The V.s.-induced decrease in LMS was mediated by activation of PI-3Kinase, as shown by use of different kinase inhibitors. TEM analysis showed rapid internalization of both vibrios; however, V.s. lead to cellular and lysosomal damage and was able to survive within the hemocytes, whereas significant killing of V.a. was observed. In vivo, in mussels challenged with either vibrio and sampled at 6, 24 and 96 h post-injection, transient decreases in hemocyte LMS and progressive increases in serum lysozyme activity were observed, with V.s. > V.a.. Moreover, whereas V.a. was efficiently cleared from hemolymph, V.s. showed significant growth, that was maximal at 24 h p.i. when lowest LMS values were recorded in the hemocytes. Both vibrios also induced significant decreases in LMS in the digestive gland, again with V.s. > V.a.. The results indicate distinct interactions between mussel hemocytes and the two vibrio strains tested. The effects of V.s. may be due to the capacity of this strain to interfere with the signaling pathways involved in hemocyte function, thus escaping the bactericidal activity of the host cell, as observed for certain mammalian pathogens

  5. Plio-Pleistocene extinctions and immigration credit reflected in the size-frequency distribution of Mediterranean marine bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrot, Rafal; Zuschin, Martin; Chattopadhyay, Devapriya

    2015-04-01

    Following the opening of the Suez Canal hundreds of Red Sea species have entered the Mediterranean Sea making it a global hot spot of marine bioinvasion. With the ongoing influx of the subtropical and tropical alien species and increasing sea surface temperatures, the Mediterranean biota is currently gaining a more tropical character and increasingly becoming a mixture of faunal stocks with different evolutionary histories. This susceptibility to invasion was suggested to reflect the presence